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					   RUTGERS SYMPOSIUM ON LUNAR SETTLEMENTS 3-8 JUNE 2007
                   RUTGERS UNIVERSITY



 Surface Infrastructure
 Planning and Design
 Considerations for
 Future Lunar and
 Mars Habitation




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
                  Launch Systems

• Heavy Lift Vehicles (HLVs)
  with capabilities to launch
  payloads         approaching
  100MT and 7 meter diameter
• Approaches      that   utilize
  Medium Lift Vehicles (MLVs)
  with capacities ranging from
  about 15MT to somewhat
  less than 100MT




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
 Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
          Lander Considerations




      Typical Lander Concept             SICSA Lander Concept



Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
                  Module Options
       1.    Conventional module
       2.    Telescopic module
       3.    Vertical module with a
             spherical inflatable section




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
     Vertical Module Configurations
•    A triangular pattern scheme affords
     certain advantages and disadvantages:
Pros: A relatively compact configuration
     footprint at the entry airlock level can
     minimize the area for site surface
     preparation if required.
     Loop egress is achieved with three
     modules.
Con: May be more difficult to position/
     assemble.
•    A rectilinear scheme also offers
     advantages/ disadvantages:
Pros: Greater spacing between berthing
     locations affords more useful wall/
     equipment space.
Con: Larger footprint for good site selection
     and/ or surface preparation.
     4 modules are needed for loop egress.



Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
    Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
        Combination Configurations
•    The triangular scheme offers
     advantages and disadvantages:
Pros: A very compact footprint around the
     inflatable module support bases to
     minimize site surface preparation
     requirements.
     Loop egress is achieved with 3 inflatable
     modules.
Con: May be more difficult to assemble.
•    The cruciform scheme also offers
     advantages and disadvantages:
Pros: The deployment footprint around the
     horizontal module is quite small, limiting
     site preparation.
     The scheme can begin as a cruciform
     and evolve into a closed-loop plan.
Con: Dual egress is not achieved until 4
     modules are in place.



Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
    Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
  Configuration Comparisons
Space/Launch Efficiency




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
  Configuration Comparisons
Emergency Egress




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
  Configuration Comparisons
Module Commonality




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
  Configuration Comparisons
Evolutionary Growth




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
  Configuration Comparisons
    Surface Positioning




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
      Inflatable Upper Level Plan

•     Sleeping/Private
1.    Partitions
2.    Bed and storage
3.    Table
4.    Chair
5.    Shelves
6.    Privacy curtains



Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
                Sleeping/Private
                Accommodations




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
        Inflatable Second Level Plan

•      Labs and Crew
       Workstations
      – Glovebox
      – Sample Photography
      – Lab’s Workstation
      – Experiment Tanks
      – Sink/Refrigerator/
         Freezer
      – Fabric Storage

Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
    Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
      Inflatable Lower Level Plan




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
                   Common Areas




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
           Exercise/Medical Area




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
     Exercise and Common Area




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
                 Site Development
                  Considerations
1. Orbital satellite imaging and unmanned precursor surface surveys
   should be undertaken to determine safe landing locations with
   appropriate terrain characteristics for base development.
   • Robotic surface investigation and mapping rovers can determine
     optimized routings between landing and operational locations and
     deploy beacons.
   • Automated survey/mapping rovers can later work in conjunction with
     rovers used for power cable deployment and cargo/human transport.
2. Landing sites must be located at sufficient distances from habitats
   and other sensitive areas.
   • Use of tethered landers can greatly reduce or avoid projectile hazards.
   • RTGs or other power systems that produce radiation safety hazards
     must be located at a safe distance away from habitable facilities..




Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
 Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX
Larry Bell, Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA)
Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, University of Houston, Houston TX

				
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