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					H O M E
Consolidated Annual
  Performance &
 Evaluation Report
 Longview-Kelso Consortium




C D B G
           2009
  Longview-Kelso HOME Consortium
  City of Longview CDBG Entitlement


Consolidated Annual Performance and
         Evaluation Report

              2009 Program Year
             August 1, 2009 - July 31, 2010



Comment Period: October 16, 2010 through October 30, 2010



       Julie Hourcle’, Program Coordination Specialist
                   Lisa Wolff, Accountant

                   City of Longview
           Community Development Department
              1525 Broadway / PO Box 128
               Longview, WA 98632-7080
                     360.442.5081
                      2009 HOME & CDBG
      Consolidated Annual Performance & Evaluation Report

                            Table of Contents

Part 1: Affordable Housing and Community Development
Goals and Accomplishments                                               Page
    Annual Performance Report & CDBG and HOME Narratives………………… 3
    2009 HOME Funding ……………………………………………………………. 28
    2009 CDBG Funding …………………………….………………………………. 29
    Affirmative Marketing List……………………………………………………… 30
    2009-2013 Summary of Housing & Community Development Objectives …... 31
    Match Form ……………………………………………………………………… 35
    Match Log ………………………………………………………………………... 36


Part 2: HOME Subrecipient Reports
          Campus Towers………………………………………………………….. 41
             Bathtub Conversion

          Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity …………………………………. 43
              Longview
              Kelso

          Kelso Housing Authority……………………………………….………… 48
               Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Domestic Violence &
               Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Drug Court

          Longview Housing Authority …………………………………………… 52
              SHARE (Self-Help and Rehab Equity) Program
              Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Domestic Violence &
              Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Drug Court

          Lower Columbia Community Action Council …………………………. 58
              Highlands Self-Help Housing
              46th Ave Self-Help Project, Longview
              Transitional Housing 3, Kelso
Part 3: CDBG Subrecipient Reports

       Main Entitlement Projects
         City of Longview …………………………………………………….…… 61
              Highlands Neighborhood Trail, Segment 1, Phase 1 & 2
              Highlands Infrastructure (ARRA)

         Cowlitz County Guidance Association/
         Lower Columbia Mental Health………………………………………… 69
             Supportive Housing for Homeless Individuals with Mental Illness and
             Substance Abuse Difficulties

         Lower Columbia Community Action…………………………………… 71
             CAPitol Investment

         Life Works (formally Residential Resources)
              Community Service Building ……………………………….…..… 74
               906 New York St.

         Progress Center …………………………………………………….……. 80
             New Addition

       Public Services
         Lower Columbia Community Action Council ……………….………... 82
             HELP Warehouse

         Family Finance Resource Center ……………………………….......….. 84
             Home Owner Foreclosure Avoidance Counseling

       Planning
         City of Longview………………………………. …………….…..……... 86
              Archie Anderson Park Master Plan

         Lower Columbia Head Start/ESCAP ………………………………….. 90
             Head Start Center Feasibility Plan

         Sherri Fittro Foundation ………………………………………….....….. 95
              Sherri Fittro Building Planning
Part 4: Citizen Participation
     Advertisements …………………………………….……………………......….. 99
           Request for 2009 HOME & CDBG Proposals Display Ad
           CDBG /ARRA Public Hearing for 2009 Project Selection Display Ad
           HOME Public Hearing for 2009 Project Selection Display Ad
           2009-2013 Consolidated Plan and 2009 Annual Plan Comment Period
           2008 CAPER Display Ad

     Fair Housing ……………………………………………………………………. 104
           Workshop Flyer – October 16, 2009

     Landlord Workshops …………………………………………………………. 106
           Find the Right Renter – August 27, 2009
           Landlord Training – March 2010 Series

     Healthy Homes ………………………………………………………………… 108
           Brown Bag Lunch Series – October 2009
           Indoor Air Pollution – March 4 & 5, 2010

     Longview and Kelso City Council Public Hearing & Meeting Minutes

           March 26, 2009 Longview City Council …………………………....... 111
        2009 CDBG/ARRA Allocations Public Hearing

           April 21, 2009 Kelso City Council ………………………………….... 116
        2008 HOME Allocations Public Hearing

           April 23, 2009 Longview City Council ………………………….....… 118
        2008 HOME Allocations Public Hearing

           August 13, 2009 Longview City Council ……………………..…....... 124
        Substantial Amendment to the 2009 Annual Plan
        ARRA Funding for Highlands Infrastructure

           October 22, 2009 Longview City Council ………………….....…...… 128
        2008 Consolidated Annual Performance & Evaluation
        Report Public Hearing

          June 24, 2010 Longview City Council ………………………...…..…. 131
        Community House Bedbug Eradication – CDBG Program Income


     Cowlitz Housing First! Coalition Membership List ……….…………...…..... 134

     Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Housing Advisory Committee Membership List ... ... 136
            Part 1

Affordable Housing & Community
     Development Goals and
        Accomplishments




              1
2
                          2009 Annual Performance Report &
                             HOME and CDBG Narratives

Executive Summary

The Home and CDBG Programs are administered by the City of Longview Community
Development Department. The City of Longview is also lead agency for the Longview-Kelso
HOME Consortium. This is the 1st year of the 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan.

The 2009 Program year covers the period from August 1, 2009 through July 31, 2010. During
this period fourteen (14) subrecipients had thirty-two projects (32) underway. Of these
projects five (5) CDBG projects and six (6) HOME projects were completed. A 2009-2010
Executive Funding Allocation summary for CDBG and HOME follows the narrative. Project
Annual Reports submitted by each agency are located in Sections 2 and 3.

CDBG

The following CDBG projects were completed in the 2009 Program Year

   Cowlitz County Guidance Association
          Supportive Housing for Homeless Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness
          and Substance Abuse Difficulties (2008)
              Acquire two 3-bedroom homes (one for each gender) to provide permanent or
              transitional housing, as needed on a case-by-case basis, for persons with a serious and
              persistent mental illness. Supportive services and case management are provided
              separately. $240,000 Fully Funded (includes $9,852.40 Program Income). $240,000
              expended in 2008 PY.
              Two single family homes were purchased in PY 2008. The agency placed
              homeless tenants in the units in PY 2009. Cowlitz County Guidance
              Association is monitoring and adjusting their housing management practices
              to better suit the tenants housing stability. 8 residents were housed.

   Family Finance Resource Center
          Home Ownership Counseling (2005)
              Home Ownership Counseling for Low-Income Families – Improve family credit history
              and spending habits of renters to prepare for homeownership. $12,952 $0 spent in
              2009 PY. $4,215.86 transferred to Foreclosure Counseling.
              State and Federal funding was used in lieu of Longview CDBG funding due to
              more attractive reimbursement rates. The Agency consolidated this program
              together with Foreclosure Avoidance into one Homeowner Counseling
              program.




                                                  3
   Life Works
          Life Works Community Services Building (2007)
                Provide partial acquisition costs for an existing building for administration of community
                services to disabled youth & adults, and to permanently house AmeriCorps Network
                volunteers. Funded at $167,952 and expended in PY 2008.
                A vacant building was acquired at 906 New York St. and was extensively
                rehabilitated. It was completed November 2009 and the agency was
                relocated from Commerce Ave. in downtown Longview. The open house was
                held in February 2010. An average of 140 developmentally disabled residents
                are served monthly through Life Works.

   Lower Columbia Community Action
          CAPital Investment (2008)
                Provide a $2,000 down payment match for 3 participants enrolled in Individual
                Development Accounts to purchase their first home. $6,000 Fully Funded. $0 expended
                in 2009 PY. Reimbursement of $2,000 was made in early 2010 PY. $4,000 will be
                deobligated.
                One person purchased housing under this program in April 2010. Although
                the program had identified several Longview’s CDBG matches some have used
                other housing programs such as Section 8 Homeownership, SHARE or Habitat
                for Humanity. Others chose to purchase homes outside of Longview.

          HELP Warehouse (2008)
                Support food bank services to Longview residents. $54,495 Fully Funded. All funding
                was expended in 2009 PY. (Jan-Dec 2009 contract)
                More residents are accessing food assistance from the HELP warehouse in
                2009. 1482 Longview individual families were served. A total of 6,218
                families were provided services when considering repeat visits.

The following CDBG projects are underway:

   City of Longview
          Highlands Neighborhood Trail, Segment 1, Phase 1 & 2 (2009)
                Construct a 10’ wide 5,250 lineal foot paved recreational trail from Oregon Way to Beech
                St. along the Dike at the south edge (100-200 Blocks) of the neighborhood. A future
                phase (funded under 2010 & 2011 CDBG) will include lighting and landscaping. City of
                Longview Public Works Department $352,001 plus city funding for a total of $400,000.
                $0 expended in 2009 PY.
                The City supplemented this project with 2010 & 2011 (pre-award) CDBG
                funding for lighting, landscaping and pedestrian amenities. Additional funding
                was secured for a portion of Segment 2 through a transportation
                enhancement grant which will extend the trail 1/3 mile farther from Beech St.
                to Douglas St. for a total trail length of 1.3 miles. It is possible that this
                combined project will provide some cost savings rather than bid separately as
                was originally planned. The trail will be completed by September 2011.

          Highlands Infrastructure (ARRA-2009)
                CDBG Stimulus Project to Benefit Highlands Neighborhood – Street light replacement and
                installation to provide more efficient illumination for vehicular and pedestrian traffic. This
                will be accomplished by replacing twelve street light fixtures with energy efficient fixtures
                on existing street lights, install new street lights with energy efficient fixtures, replace
                approximately 220 Square Yards of sidewalk, upgrade ADA ramps on each corner of the



                                                      4
          block to provide better accessibility and install 5 trees. The existing street lights have
          limited capacity, limited pedestrian safety effectiveness, and limited efficiency. By
          installing addition illumination, replacing the sidewalks and ADA ramps, significant
          improvements in safety, visibility, and uniformity will be accomplished. Project location is
          in the 200 blocks of 25th and 26th Ave. City of Longview Public Works Department
          $98,660 Funded with $17,147 expended in PY 2009.
          Project completion is scheduled for early October 2010.

      Archie Anderson Park Master Plan (2009)
          Develop a master plan for a park located within Highlands neighborhood. A landscape
          architectural firm will be hired to bring together concepts for park improvements
          suggested by various community partners. City of Longview Parks & Recreation Dept.
          $20,000. Fully Funded (includes $1,835 Program Income) $7,207 was expended in 2009
          PY.
          An RFP process was initiated and a design firm was hired. A site analysis was
          made, stakeholders were interviewed and a neighborhood park visioning
          workshop was held. Five draft design concepts were prepared. A park design
          open house was held in early 2010 PY (August). The park plan should be
          completed by December 2010.

Lower Columbia Community Action
      HELP Warehouse (2009)
          Support food bank services to Longview residents. $54,495 Fully Funded. $13,623 was
          expended in 2009 PY. (Jan-Dec 2010 contract).
          An average of 315 households are being served monthly.

Lower Columbia Head Start/ESCAP
      Head Start Center Feasibility Plan (2008)
          Create a plan to relocate, expand, and/or build a new facility for the Head Start/Early
          Childhood Education and Assistance Program. The plan will consider co-locating with
          one or more compatible community based social service organizations.
          $25,000 Fully Funded (includes $12,669.60 Program Income) $0 drawn to date
          This plan was finalized in PY 2009 and submitted after the program year
          ended. A consultant and community advisory committee were involved in the
          planning process. A grant opportunity allowed Head Start to build new
          administrative offices on the LCC campus. Head Start classrooms in the
          Broadway School were modified for very young children, and a satellite
          facility in the Highlands is being prepared for occupancy. The plan will be
          presented to the City Council in Fall 2010.

Family Finance Resource Center
      Homeowner Foreclosure Avoidance & Default Counseling (2007)
          Provide one-on-one financial counseling to homeowners who are in danger of defaulting
          their mortgage loans. $16,015 including a transfer from the Home Ownership Counseling
          Program. $2,250 Expended in 2009 PY and $3,064 drawn to date.
          State and Federal funding is being used in lieu of Longview CDBG funding due
          to more attractive reimbursement rates. The Agency would like to consolidate
          this program into one homeowner counseling program. 10 persons were
          served this year.




                                               5
Progress Center
       Progress Center Addition (2005)
           Construct a building addition at 1600 3rd Avenue, Longview in order to expand services.
           The addition will contain three multi-purpose rooms to serve children for motor, sensory
           and speech therapy, and rest/changing rooms. The addition will be designed for future
           expansion of the building. (The original 2005 scope of service was for medically fragile
           newborns, infants and toddlers at-risk or experiencing abuse and neglect, and/or are in
           need of specialized infant mental health services.) $186,378.58 previously expended for
           land acquisition and construction plans.
           2010 CDBG funding of $100,000 was allocated to support this project. A line
           of credit has been established at a local bank to complete this project. Pacific
           Tech Construction won the bid and construction began in August 2010.
           Construction will be substantially complete by January 22, 2011.

Sherri Fittro Foundation
       Sherrie Fittro Building Feasibility Plan (2007)
           Feasibility Study for a housing facility for persons with recent spinal cord/brain injuries.
           $15,000 Fully Funded $11,400 previously expended with $0 drawn PY 2009
           This plan is being finalized and will be presented to Council in January 2011.


HOME

The following HOME projects were completed during the Program Year:

Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity
       Habitat Duplex - Longview (2008)
           Acquire one lot, and provide infrastructure and permits for construction of a duplex
           condominium for 2 new homeowners in the Highlands Neighborhood. $75,000 Fully
           Funded $35,122 spent for permits and infrastructure in 2009 PY. Total expenditure was
           $70,122. $4,878 was transferred to next Longview project.
           This project was constructed at 336 A and B 18th Ave.

       Habitat for Humanity – Kelso (2006 & 2008)
           Develop a lot at 800 N. Pacific for new construction of a single-family home. Funds
           would be used to pay for permits and install some infrastructure. Lot acquisition was
           paid for through HOME 2006 funding. Funding of $5,195 added in 2008 PY for permits
           and infrastructure. $5,590 spent in 2009 PY Total cost was $39,590.
           This project was completed at 800 N. Pacific Ave.

Longview Housing Authority
       SHARE Homeownership Program (LV & Kelso) (2002 & 2006)
           Longview Provide thirteen (13) new homeowners with partial acquisition costs and/or
           rehabilitation costs and lead-based paint abatement. Additional funding added in 2006.
           Total funding at $409,662.61 Total spent was $289,394. $0 spent in PY 2009 $70,000
           moved to SHARE 2007 PY project and $50,268 was deobligated.
           A total of 9 homes were rehabilitated over the course of the project. The last
           home was complete in 2009 PY located at 416 24th Ave.




                                                 6
       Domestic Violence TBRA (2006)
          Provide transitional rental assistance to at least 13 families referred through the
          Emergency Support Shelter over a 20 month period. Partially Funded at $98,614.06
          (plus $7,899.12 in Consortium Administration) plus $10,114.74 in Document Recording
          Fees. $2,495 spent in PY 2009.
          14 individuals/families were served through this program.
          8 transferred to Section 8 Rental Assistance; 4 terminated including 1 self-
          termination and 1 who exceeded income qualification.

       Drug Court TBRA (2005)
          Provide transitional rental assistance to 9 families enrolled in the Cowlitz Drug Court
          Rehabilitation Program over a 15-18 month period. Funded at $68,004 $332 spent in PY
          2009.
          11 individuals/families were served through this program.
          6 transferred to Section 8 Rental Assistance; 3 terminated; and 3 self-
          terminated.

Lower Columbia Community Action
       Transitional Housing 3 (Kelso) (2004)
          Construct 1 new 3-bedroom home for transitional housing. ($92,868 originally requested
          for 2 homes). Partially Funded in 2004. 2003 and 2008 CHDO was used to complete the
          project. $71,418.54 spent in 2009 PY
          This project located at 1301 Sunrise St., Kelso.

The following HOME projects are underway:

Campus Towers
       Campus Towers Bath Tub Conversion (2009)
          Modify bathtub sides to allow walk-in entry for showers to improve elderly safety and
          hygiene. Funded at $74,154 $33,294 drawn in 2009 PY.
          This project bid came in lower than estimated which now will require
          additional ADA work in the bathrooms to meet the required HOME $1000
          minimum per unit for 74 units. ADA faucets and higher ADA toilets are
          planned for installation. Campus Towers is providing funding for the 17
          remaining units.

Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity
       Habitat Building Hope – Longview (2009)
          Acquisition permits, and infrastructure of 2 parcels of property to construct 2 to 3 homes
          for low income families. Demolition costs may be included. $120,000 $65,000 spent in
          2009 PY
          Two parcels have been purchased in the Highlands neighborhood.

       Habitat Building Hope – Kelso (2009)
          Acquisition, infrastructure, utility and construction permit costs for a single-family or
          multi-family lot in Kelso. Demolition costs may be included. $40,000 $29,000 spent in
          2009 PY.
          This project is under construction at 1204 N 3rd Ave.




                                              7
Kelso Housing Authority
       Domestic Violence TBRA (2008)
          Provide transitional housing rental assistance for 4 families of domestic violence for 15-
          months. $29,760 (plus $1,488 in HOME Administration funding) $16,921 spent in PY
          2009
          2 individuals/families transitioned to Section 8 and 1 family remains on the
          program for a total of 3 families.

       Domestic Violence TBRA (2009)
          Provide rental assistance to 2 families/individuals for 15 months. $13,830 $3,269 spent
          in 2009 PY.
          1 individual/family transitioned to Section 8 and 2 families remains on the
          program for a total of 3 families.

       Drug Court/HOPE Court TBRA (2008)
          Provide transitional housing rental assistance for 4 families enrolled in Cowlitz Drug Court
          and/or HOPE Court for 15-months. $29,760 (plus $1,488 in HOME Administration
          funding) $18,930 spent in PY 2009
          2 individuals/families are currently on the program and 2 transitioned to
          Section 8 for a total of 4 families served.

       Drug Court/HOPE Court TBRA (2009)
          Provide rental assistance to 2 families/individuals for 15 months. $10,888 $1,141 spent
          in 2009 PY
          1 individual/family currently on the program.

Longview Housing Authority
       SHARE Homeownership Program (LV & Kelso) (2007)
          Longview – Provide two (2) new homeowners with partial acquisition costs and/or
          rehabilitation costs and lead-based abatement. Funded at $102,412 $0 spent in PY
          2009
          1 family has found a home to rehab shortly after the 2009 PY ended.

          Kelso – Provide one (1) new homeowner with partial acquisition costs and/or
          rehabilitation costs and lead-based abatement. Funded at $33,373.97 $0 spent in PY
          2009
          1 family has found a home to rehab shortly after the 2009 PY ended.

       Domestic Violence TBRA (2008)
          Provide transitional housing rental assistance for 6 (19 in original funding request)
          families of domestic violence for 18 months. Funded at $74,420 plus 5% ($3,720) in
          Consortium Administration. Additional funding of $6,177 from Longview Document
          Recording Fee $57,061 spent in PY 2009
          22 individuals/families served. 17 were transitioned to Section 8. 2 were
          terminated including 1 self-termination. 3 families remain on the program.

       Drug Court/HOPE Court TBRA (2008)
          Provide transitional housing rental assistance for 8 participants in Drug Court/HOPE Court
          for 15 months. Funded at $74,420 plus 5% ($3,720) in Consortium Administration
          $13,961 spent in PY 2009
          7 individuals/families were served and 6 transferred to Section 8 rental
          assistance. 1 family remains on the program.


                                               8
Lower Columbia Community Action
      46th St. at Windemere Self-Help Housing Phase 2
         Construct remaining six (6) homes within new self-help subdivision. $0 spent in 2009 PY
         for this phase.
         This supplements Phase 1 and will complete the project. Phase 1 was
         completed in 2008 PY. Phase 2 families are being income and mortgage
         qualified together with Highlands Self-Help families in order to complete a
         building team.

      Highlands/33rd Self-Help Housing
         Acquire one lot and construct 4 new self-help housing in scattered sites within the
         Highlands neighborhood. This project uses 3 lots previously owned by the agency.
         Additional lots were purchased on 33rd Ave to create a new self-help subdivision.
         $156,684 plus CHDO funding. $1,157 CHDO spent in 2009 PY
         The agency is seeking qualified households for the Highlands project and
         Phase 2 of the 46th St. project in order to assemble a self-help team.

         The 33rd Ave. project has escalated in development costs due to storm water
         requirements. This year the project was changed from a self-help housing
         subdivision to 2 units of transitional/supportive housing. The property will be
         replatted. One unit was partially funded with 2010 HOME and 2009 CHDO
         funding will be obligated to complete the unit. CAP will request additional
         HOME dollars for the second unit from 2011 PY. Future CHDO funding will be
         used to complete that unit as well.




                                             9
Geographic Distribution of 2009 Funding
The following projects are listed by Census Tract (CT) noting the amount of funding and the
percent of total funding invested (excluding Administration and Planning):

CDBG
Highlands Neighborhood Trail, Segment 1, Phase 1 & 2 – Highlands CT 5.02 $352,001 (87%)
HELP Warehouse – Citywide. $54,495 (13%)

HOME
Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion CT 4 $74,154 (29%)
Longview Habitat for Humanity – Highlands CT 5.02 $120,000 (46%)
Kelso Habitat for Humanity – CT 11 $40,000 (16%)
Kelso TBRA Domestic Violence – Citywide $13,830 (5%)
Kelso TBRA Drug Court – Citywide $10,888 (4%)


Fair Housing
Landlord Workshop
A Landlord Information Session on entitled “Finding the Right Renter” which reviewed code
compliance, the Ready-to-Rent program, crime prevention, evictions and lawful detainers, and
gangs in the community was held on August 27, 2009 from 9 AM-4 PM at the PUD Auditorium.

A second workshop was held on fair housing laws, HUD’s Fair Housing Enforcement Program,
reasonable accommodation, and service animals was held on October 16, 2009 from 9 AM to 4
PM at the PUD Auditorium. The workshop was sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Regional
Council of the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials.

A third informational session “Evictions and Civil Liability” was held on March 11, 2010 at the
Cowlitz County Administration Building from 6:30-8 PM. Speakers included Chelsea Baldwin,
Attorney with Walstead Mertsching. All flyer are included in Part 4 Citizen Participation.

Tenant Workshop
A Landlord-Tenant Information Session was held on October 29, 2009 at the Cowlitz County
Health District from Noon-1 PM as part of a Brown Bag lunch series. Vickie Rhodes with the
Longview Housing presented the program. A flyer is included in Part 4 Citizen Participation.

Review and Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing
The original Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing was conducted in 1999 by the Longview
Housing Authority, and identified five key impediments that have been periodically monitored
for improvement:

1. Low income tenants, who include a number of protected classes, are sometimes limited to
deteriorated and austere sites without the support of readily accessible basic services. In part, this is a
function of the historical pattern of development, wherein lower income groups ended up in lower-cost
housing that was segmented into tracts lacking many of these services and resources. A disproportionate
share of some protected classes, such as the disabled, may be living on Social Security Income (SSI) or
General Assistance Unemployable (GAU) at a very low income level. This may present a fair housing issue



                                                    10
if it results in concentrating protected classes, not on the basis of any direct discriminatory action, but on
the basis of economics.

Findings
The largest minority group within the Longview-Kelso HOME Consortium is Hispanic, who are found in
significant concentrations within most income-eligible target areas within the Consortium. These areas
are also characterized by concentrated poverty, deteriorated housing stock, and overcrowding.
Approximately one quarter of all housing vouchers issued by Longview Housing Authority are located
within the Highlands, indicating that management practices may have the unintended effect of further
concentrating poverty.

Hispanic renters and homeowners in all income ranges experience disproportionate share of housing
problems, that is, greater than ten percentage points above that experienced by these groups as a
whole. This is particularly concentrated in families and other household hold types (non-family household,
non-elderly small families, etc.) Large families experience a greater degree of housing problems, most
likely due to overcrowding.

Black families and other household types who rent also experience disparities in housing problems,
particularly those at 30-50% of MFI. There are no very low income Black homeowners, but those in the
50-80% MFI income bracket experience a significant degree of housing problems, though the number is
not large.

The Fair Housing Center conducted 25 rental and 5 sales tests in Cowlitz and Clark counties in 2004. The
30 audit tests were all designed as national origin tests utilizing Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian
testers assigned in a match-paired format. Of the 30 tests conducted, 10 were in Clark and 20 were in
Cowlitz County. Of tests conducted at rental sites, 50% indicated home seekers were provided equal
treatment while 50% revealed differences necessitating further testing. Of the five sales sites tested for
discrimination based on national origin, fully 805 of the tests indicated equal treatment of the Hispanic
and Caucasian testers. In the course of national origin testing conducted in Cowlitz County, one
apartment complex consistently exhibited discriminatory housing practices limiting housing choice for
families with children. As a result of testing, the Fair Housing Center filed a complaint through the HUD
enforcement process and successfully settled in November of 2005 for $3,398 for the Fair Housing
Center’s diversion of resources and frustration of mission. The Respondent agreed to send all parties
responsible for rental decisions to fair housing training, to refrain from retaliation and agreed to post fair
housing posters at its Longview apartment complex.

In 2009 PY the City approved a planning project to update the Analysis to Impediments for Fair Housing
with 2010 CDBG funding. The Fair Housing Center of Washington will be conducting the study
formulating new recommendations to improve Fair Housing in the Consortium.

Recommendations
• Promote awareness of fair housing laws and obligations to landlords, tenants, and members of the real
estate and financial sectors through mailings, website linkages and informational workshops.
• Promote attendance at Fair Housing trainings held throughout the region by publicly and privately
employed persons in the housing sector.
• Promote the distribution of Housing Choice Vouchers throughout the jurisdiction. Expand the pool of
landlords willing to rent to Section 8 HCV tenants.
• Continue participation/sponsorship of landlord/tenant information sessions to present fair housing,
landlord-tenant law and code compliance obligations.
• Expand availability of fair housing information in languages other than English.

2. Several subsidized housing projects are approaching the expiration of their public funding assistance
contracts .This is causing many to opt for increases in rental rates under conversion to open market



                                                      11
rents. Losing subsidized housing forces tenants into rents that exceed 30% of income, and my affect a
disproportionate number of folks in protected classes.

Findings
A review of Washington State Housing Finance Commission data finds that there are 76 units with
expiring mortgage affordability provisions over the next five years, but only 25 of these are at-risk. The
balance have additional affordability constraints from refinancing through other public financing
programs. During the 2004-2009 Consolidated Plan, the Longview Housing Authority purchased 16 units
of expiring USDA apartments in Kalama and 32 units in Castle Rock, preserving a total of 48 low
income/disabled housing units in the outlying areas. Between 1998 and 2004, a total of 172 units left the
affordable housing stock, though Longview Housing Authority was able to provide 103 tenant-based
vouchers to replace the project-based subsidy of Campus Towers, and also provided 12 mod-rehab
project-based vouchers to Olympia Court apartments.

Recommendations
Suggest to Longview and Kelso Housing Authorities that they consider purchase of properties with
expiring affordability and/or assign project-based vouchers to these units. Explore additional financing
mechanisms to retain affordable housing. No projects are nearing expiration at this time.

3. There is no central clearing house for inquiring potential homeowners and tenants. Lack of
accessibility to housing information exacerbates other limitations to fair housing choice for those with
special needs.

Findings
There was a plan to utilize two free/public computers at the Community Action Council to allow public
access to research information on housing programs and resources within the region. It was intended
that a Housing Resource Website would be established to link this information for users’ convenience.
Due to staffing and time constraints this project was reassigned to the Council of Governments, where it
also languished due to lack of staffing for website development. A mechanism to allow for updating was
not developed, limiting the utility of the planned website.

During 2009 a series of landlord/tenant informational sessions were conducted to raise awareness and
educate the public about fair housing, landlord-tenant law, and code compliance. These forums are
continued into the 2010 work program for the Council of Governments. The City of Longview and the
Regional Housing Advisory Committee publish information about Fair Housing laws from time to time and
mails this to local real estate and finance professionals and community agencies. The city has developed
a HOME and CDBG webpage with extensive links to Fair Housing resources for the community.

Also in 2009 PY (June 2010) City HOME staff researched and presented a written proposal to the Housing
Advisory Committee (HAC) on a housing finder website www.OneStopHousing.org used in Spokane WA.
The website would allow residents to search for available housing by location, rent amount, and
affordability. The HAC was asked to review the website. No action has been taken on the proposal prior
to the close of the program year.

Recommendations
Assist local jurisdictions, local housing authorities and non-profit agencies to provide links from their
webpage to fair housing and other resource information. Most of these agencies now have their own
websites, which are routinely updated.

4. Services within the jurisdiction specifically addressing housing barriers faced by those
with physical disabilities were not located. The local RSVP does some reasonable
accommodations issue mitigation, but there is not general access service with this focus.




                                                      12
Findings
A sample of area agencies serving disabled clients were contacted during the development of the
Consolidated Plan via telephone to inquire about any barriers to fair housing they may encounter on
behalf of their clients. Several confirmed various types of barriers and potential discrimination, such as
landlords unwilling to lease to persons with disabilities, utility companies requiring third-party financial
responsibility, and landlords concerned about tenants from agencies dealing with mental disabilities.
These agencies typically intervene on behalf of their clients, and were usually able to work out the
situation with potential landlords. ARC, Life Works, Lower Columbia Mental Health, Another Option and
other similar agencies reported such problems on an informal basis, but reported that they are typically
able to work out the situation in a satisfactory manner.

DisAbility Resources assists local residents with reasonable accommodation and access to services.
Several attempts have been made by city staff to encourage agencies to apply for funding to construct
home modifications, with no results prior to 2009. Northwest Justice Project has located an office in the
Longview area 2 years ago and has the ability to assist clients in addressing some housing concerns.
They represented a group of mobile home park residents in a class action lawsuit in 2008 with a decision
in the tenants’ favor for unfair park closure practices. This was an older mobile home park with a high
concentration of ethnic minorities.

Habitat for Humanity was interested in a CDBG proposal for 2011 to improve ADA accessibility for
disabled residents. However, with the departure of the former Executive Director in June it may or may
not move forward.

Recommendations
Continue efforts to identify area agencies who attempt to address housing barriers faced by those with
physical disabilities. Inventory their capacity and areas of expertise, making this information publicly
available in local fair housing materials oriented to the public.

5. We found a reported shortfall of available, affordable, and suitable housing for the developmentally
disabled, as well as others with various forms of dementia.

Findings
A housing shortfall for developmentally disabled persons cannot be documented. The Washington State
Department of Health & Human Services reported in 2007 that there were 87 persons in community
residential placements. An inventory of available beds confirmed that 125 were available in 2009. Some
are licensed group homes owned by the service provider. Many providers simply rent or lease homes or
apartments for their clients on the private market, and provide supportive services.

Telephone interviews with local providers to update the housing inventory did not reveal a housing
shortage for developmentally disabled persons. A shortfall in supportive housing for persons with
dementia cannot be confirmed. There are 470 seniors in the Longview-Kelso area who were receiving
services through DSHS for adult family homes, adult residential care, assisted living and nursing facilities.
An inventory of senior housing available from the Washington Center for Real Estate Research shows 621
intensive care beds within Cowlitz County and 936 adult family homes or assisted living units in the area.
While the number of persons with dementia is not known, nor the number of those that are low income,
it is evident that senior housing and care facilities exceed the number of persons receiving assistance
through the Washington State Department of Health & Human Services.

Recommendations
Continue to monitor conditions over time to determine if significant changes have occurred, particularly
as the population ages and a higher proportion of county residents may experience dementia as a
disease associated with aging. Developmentally disabled populations can be more easily monitored to
determine that there are enough available housing resources.



                                                      13
In 2009 PY, Life Works (formally Residential Resources) moved into their new community service center
at 906 New York St. They receive calls for housing assistance on a regional basis from families with
developmentally disabled members.

Planned Activities
   Expand opportunities for information, educational opportunities and technical assistance to the
community to assure that all citizens have housing choices regardless of race, color, religion, sex, familial
status, national origin, or handicap. Continue offering landlord/tenant workshops with fair housing
components at times convenient to the public.

  Continue to monitor the implementation of the city’s Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice.
Conduct reviews of progress towards eliminating impediments to fair housing on a regular basis through
the Regional Housing Advisory Committee.

   Update the Analysis of Impediments (AI) that affects the rights of fair housing choice, including public
and private policies, practices, and procedures affecting housing choice. Particular attention should be
given to identifying the extent of housing problems of low income black families who own their homes;
low income Hispanic families and elderly households who own their homes; and Hispanic families and
“other” households who rent their homes, in all income categories. Areas where minority populations are
living in disproportionate concentrations include: Longview Downtown Business District, the Tennant Way
area, the Highlands and Olympic neighborhoods, West Main (Kelso) and South Kelso. Develop an update
that includes:
     o An extensive review of the jurisdiction's laws, regulations, and administrative policies, procedures,
     and practices
     o An assessment of how those laws affect the location, availability, and accessibility of housing
     o An evaluation of conditions, both public and private, affecting fair housing choice for all protected
     classes
     o An assessment of the availability of affordable, accessible housing in a range of unit sizes.

Recommended Strategies
1. Develop a comprehensive update to the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing. Monitor progress
toward removal of impediments on a scheduled basis.
2. Expand current education and outreach efforts, and standardize and better integrate fair housing
information into programs offered by HOME jurisdictions and sub-recipients.
3. Consider passage of a local fair housing ordinance that reflects state enforcement mechanisms.
4. Incorporate information on predatory lending in the Consortium’s website and partnering agency
homeownership materials.
5. Conduct periodic evaluation of IDIS data to identify how members of the protected classes benefit
from HOME-funded activities
6. Encourage and monitor HOME partnering agencies with primary responsibility for providing fair
housing enforcement and education services.
7. Expand availability of Fair Housing literature in multiple languages.
8. Create a central clearinghouse or identify web links for key agencies to include on their web sites.
9. Encourage fair housing opportunities for all citizens:
       Treat housing for disabled the same as family housing in codes
       Treat residential group homes for children same as family housing under code
       Target homeownership and lending marketing to African-American and Hispanic households.
       Encourage production of large family rental units to alleviate overcrowding among Hispanic
    households.




                                                     14
Affordable Housing

The following projects provided affordable housing during the program year:

Homebuyers
          Habitat for Humanity
          Longview
          2 families at 30%-50% median income
          Kelso
          1 family at 30%-50% median income

          SHARE Homeownership Program (LV & Kelso) (2002 & 2006)
          Longview
          1 family at 50%-80% median income
Rental
          CAP Transitional Phase 3
          Kelso
          1 family at 50% income

          Campus Towers
          Longview
          74 units at range between 0%-80% of median income
          20 units below 30%; 37 units below 50%; 13 units below 60% and 4 units below 80%

          Several other HOME funded rental properties are within their Period of Affordability including:
          CAP Transitional Phase 1- 4 units; Soundview Apts 16 units, Working Arts Center Apts 7
          units; Phoenix House 20 units.

Tenant Based Rental Assistance

          Longview Drug Court (2005)
          2 individual/families at 0-30%

          Longview Domestic Violence (2006)
          1 individual/families at 0-30%

          Longview Domestic Violence TBRA (2008)
          22 individuals/families at 0-30% and 1 30-50%.

          Longview Drug Court/HOPE Court TBRA (2008)
          7 individuals/families at 0-30%

          Kelso Domestic Violence TBRA (2008)
          3 individuals/families at 0-30%

          Kelso Domestic Violence TBRA (2009)
          3 individuals/families at 0-30%

          Kelso Drug Court/HOPE Court TBRA (2008)
          4 individuals/families at 0-30%



                                                  15
           Kelso Drug Court/HOPE Court TBRA (200)
           1 individuals/families at 0-30%



These activities meet Section 215 income requirements and provide relief for worst-case
housing situations (low-income renters with severe cost burdens or in substandard housing.)
The TBRA program provides transitional housing to homeless and overcrowded households.
Homebuyers have moved from a rental property to a new or renovated home with an affordable
mortgage.

Continuum of Care
The Cowlitz Housing First! Coalition is a consortium of 23 area agencies working to reduce and
end homelessness through collaboration and system improvements. A homeless person is
defined as:
       Homeless – A person/family who is not imprisoned or otherwise detained, who lacks a fixed,
       regular and adequate nighttime residence; or, having a primary nighttime residence that is:
          A supervised public or private shelter designed for temporary living accommodations (including
       welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional housing for the mentally ill);
          An institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be
       institutionalized; or,
          A public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping
       accommodation for human beings.

Prevention Activities
One measure of need for those at-risk of becoming homeless is the services provided to prevent
homelessness from occurring. Prevention is a key component of the continuum of housing. The
majority of persons seeking homeless prevention assistance needed funds to avoid eviction
from their homes. This includes help to secure housing, either through first and last month’s
rent, or a security deposit. The One-Stop Assistance Center located at Lower Columbia
Community Action in Longview received Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing (HPRP)
Program funding and was able to assist 287 unduplicated households as counted through the
HMIS (Homeless Management Information System) between September 3, 2009 and July 1,
2010. As of July 1, 2010 $228,901 has been spent on this program.

Regional emergency rental assistance in the 2009 calendar year was provided to 574 people
living in 228 households, preventing them from becoming homeless. Emergency assistance was
provided through CAP, Woodland Community Service Center in partnership with Longview
Housing Authority, Emergency Support Shelter, Community House, Salvation Army, and Red
Cross.

Emergency shelter, transitional housing and prevention services are provided in Cowlitz County
and within the Longview-Kelso urban area through five agencies: Community House on
Broadway, Emergency Support Shelter, Lower Columbia Community Action Council, Red Cross,
and Salvation Army. During 2009, the Community House (homeless shelter) and Emergency
Support Shelter (domestic violence shelter) housed a combined total of 2,151 persons and
1,607 households.




                                                  16
Community House on Broadway helped 28 households (98 persons) graduate from the
homeless recovery program operated within 20 transitional housing units located at Country
Run Apartments.

Lower Columbia Community Action constructed one unit (3 bedrooms) of transitional housing
(Phase 3) in Kelso.

Kelso Assembly of God provided 137 bed nights in the Cold Weather Shelter in late 2009.
Cowlitz County Document Recording Fees of $832 were used to pay cleaning fees once the
shelter closed.

Longview Housing Authority assisted 28 homeless veterans with transitional housing during
2009, with 6 of them graduating from the program into permanent housing. Of these, 27 were
served through the Washington State HOME Program and one through City of Woodland. Two
case managers provided services and referrals to 45 veterans during 2009. Three (3) additional
veterans were able to increase their income while on the program, and no longer qualified for
Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers upon graduation, due to increased income. One graduated
veteran was able to purchase a home through the HOP program with help from state and
federal homebuyer grants.

Longview Housing Authority provided interim housing/shelter at Pine House to eight (8)
veterans who were waiting for placement in transitional housing during 2009. Plans are
underway to use $86,000 in Neighborhood Stabilization Funds to purchase a house to replace
this leased facility.

The State of Washington HMIS system was instituted as required and actively used by shelters,
transitional housing providers, and permanent supportive housing providers.

A plan is being developed for the Community Response Center which will act as a crises center
and provide supportive services, housing referrals, and possible detox units. The plan will
include a feasibility analysis to determine the need and cost for the facility. The Re-Entry
Committee of Housing First! Coalition has been active in the pursuit of this plan.


Assessment of Gaps
Major gaps identified by the Cowlitz Housing First Coalition include:
• Outreach and shelter available for homeless youth transitioning from foster care, substance
abuse treatment, hospital discharge, and release from juvenile justice system.
• Lack of shelter, transitional housing and permanent supportive housing for those with special
needs who are hard to serve or who are not able to be served by the system of current
providers, such as physically disabled, mentally ill, chronically homeless, youth, and those with
medical treatment needs.
• A coordinated discharge planning system that includes affordable housing resources for ex-
offenders and sex offenders.
• Adequate supply of “Safe & Sober” housing for recovering substance abusers.
• Increased community awareness of homeless needs and evidence-based approaches.
• Bottle necks created by lack of turnover of shelter beds and lack of spaces available in
Transitional housing and affordable permanent housing.



                                                17
Other Actions

Public Housing

KELSO PUBLIC HOUSING PROPERTY IMPROVEMENTS AS OF AUGUST OF 2009
Kelso Housing Authority (KHA)

The Cowlitz Villa is a Public Housing property comprised of 50 senior units. These units are
located in the 900 block of Grade Street in Kelso, Washington and consist of 8 – Studio units,
30 – 1 bedroom units and 12 – 2 bedroom units. These units house seniors 62 years of age
and older.

The Cowlitz Villa property received new roofs, new exterior doors on both front and back
entrances, and new storm doors to the back entrances. The landscaping was improved with the
refreshment of the bark dust in all flower beds. Shrubbery and trees were trimmed or removed
for the purposes of visual appeal and in some cases safety. A Painting project is scheduled to
begin in September 2010 preserve the wood trim around all doors and windows on all of the
Cowlitz Villa buildings. KHA looks forward in the next few months to the addition of an electric
door installation at the Community Building called Gragg Hall. This door is being installed to
assist the elderly and disabled to have easier access to the Community Building and satellite
office located within.

The Kelso Homes are a Public Housing property comprised of 50 family units. These units are
located in the 1400 block of South Kelso consisting of 6 – 1 bedroom units, 22 – 2 bedroom
units, 20 – 3 bedroom units and 2 – 4 bedroom units. These units house families and their
children.

The Kelso Homes property received new exterior doors to both front and back entrances. The
main Kelso Housing Authority office located in the neighborhood of the Kelso Homes received a
new electric door to assist the elderly and disabled to have easier access.

The Kelso Housing Authority continues to partner with Worksource as a work site for the TANF
Community Jobs and Work Experience program. At all properties KHA is providing an
opportunity for trainees to receive instruction and build job skills in the grounds / maintenance
and/or office / clerical departments. Often times these workers come from the very housing
programs that the Kelso Housing Authority administers. Public Housing residents comment on
the fine work that these trainees are performing.

Eliminate Barriers to Affordable Housing
Local barriers include:
• Inadequate financial resources to address all affordable housing needs in older neighborhoods
• Increasing requirements and costs of infrastructure
• Rising land costs
• Zoning and building codes can discourage new construction techniques
• The need for code enforcement to balance safety with the cost of rehabilitation


                                               18
• The need to reduce the impact of housing segregation, concentrated poverty, disinvestment,
and the isolation of racial and economic classes in neighborhoods characterized by
deteriorating housing stock.

Strategies
• Develop a preference or policy for leveraging project dollars against other sources
• Fund infrastructure and/or land acquisition with local entitlement dollars in order to reduce the
cost of housing
• Review city code updates for barriers to affordability as part of the review/adoption process
• Use code enforcement activities to ensure timely and efficient compliance while limiting
displacement
• Educate the public regarding Fair Housing obligations.

The Consortium addresses the barrier of “rising land costs” through the HOME funding of land
acquisition for Home Buyer construction projects. As land has increased in price agencies have
requested more HOME funding to designate to projects for this purpose. The SHARE program
has increased their reimbursement requests for acquisition costs to keep homes affordable.

HOME also addresses the “increasing requirements and costs of infrastructure” by paying for
site improvements and related infrastructure when new projects are proposed. Habitat for
Humanity requests HOME activities which include infrastructure and building permits. They
were funded for 2-3 lots in 2009 for single-family homes in Longview and 1 lot in Kelso.

Lower Columbia Community Action Program officially changed their 8-lot Self-Help Subdivision
on 975 33rd Ave due to “increasing requirements” of State and local storm water rules. CAP
stated that the cost of each lot to $100,000 to develop and would not be affordable to the
homebuyer. They are now approved for 2010 HOME funding for partial construction cost to
construct a 6-bedroom supportive/transitional housing unit for person with low-income. The
remaining construction cost will be funded through their 2009 CHDO allocation.

The City of Longview and Kelso continue to use code enforcement to make neighborhoods and
housing safe. In 2009 PY 2 properties were dilapidated and vacant. The City worked with the
owners to have the units demolished. This provides the opportunity to for an agency, investor,
or homeowner to purchase the property and construct new housing. Often, agencies partnering
with the HOME program especially Habitat for Humanity, are eager to purchase these
properties and construct new affordable housing.

Foster and Maintain Affordable Housing
Each year a Request for Proposals is published in the local newspaper and disseminated to
housing and social service agencies. This open process enables the community to search and
submit project designs which can most timely provide the opportunity to “foster and maintain”
affordable housing. Previous year’s funding have made these projects possible in 2009 PY:
    • Cowlitz County Habitat submitted a project s in both Longview and Kelso for 2010 HOME
       funding which they were awarded. Habitat completed a Longview duplex; and one
       single-family home in Kelso this past 2009 program year.
    • Though Lower Columbia Community Action, a single-family home was purchased by a
       new home-buyer using Individual Development Account (IDA) program matched with
       CDBG funding.
    • The SHARE program rehabilitated one home for a new-homebuyer.



                                                 19
   •   Tenants were placed in two single-family homes purchased during the previous program
       year through the Cowlitz County Guidance Association d.b.a. Lower Columbia Mental
       Health Center. These two homes are for supportive housing to homeless persons with
       substance abuse difficulties.
   •   Lower Columbia Community Action Program constructed one unit of a supportive
       transitional housing in Kelso at the Fair Market Rent.
   •   Tenant-based rental assistance for shelter and domestic violence victims also provide
       very affordable housing.

The City of Longview Code Compliance section provides a means for tenants who have
requested code a rental repair which is not being performed by the landlord (as required by
State Law) to intervene on their behalf. Staff will contact the landlord or property manager
asking them to make repairs on behalf of the tenant, or be subject to possible relocation costs
for the tenant. This assures that rental property is being maintained.

Additionally, the Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Housing Advisory Council provides a sounding board for
County and local area housing providers to share information, participate in problem solving
discussions, coordinate resources, and partner or collaborate on housing projects and/or issues.

Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction
All rehabilitated homes under the HOME program and CDBG program must provide lead based
paint inspection and stabilization and/or abatement. This is done under the SHARE program
and Lower Columbia Community Action Housing Rehabilitation Program. Notices are provided
to the homeowners and renters as well. Two single-family home rehabs were inspected for
lead based paint and one was treated for lead-based paint removal.

Overcome Gaps in Institutional Structure
The City continues to implement improvements into the program as issues arise. The City has
asked subrecipients to create a file to document affirmative Marketing efforts. Project
estimates are provided to the City to review for cost reasonableness for non-bid work by HOME
recipients. CHDO information was provided to Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity upon their
request to consider applying as the Consortium’s second CHDO. Relocation training for City
staff enabled technical assistance to be provided to the Longview Housing Authority who is
planning to relocate tenants for the Comrade Quarters project in the Stratford Building.

Reduce Families Below the Poverty Level
Section 8 and public housing assistance is targeted at those with the greatest cost burdens,
thus freeing up dollars to meet other household needs that can help to reduce poverty, over the
long term. Asset development programs include Family Self-Sufficiency, Individual Development
Accounts, and Section 8 Homeownership Assistance to assist families with budgets, goal setting,
savings, and homeownership, education, or work goals. Agency coordination and referrals
make it possible to assist families and individuals with financial counseling, job placement and
training, and family/individual services which have remained a priority.

Other Community Partners are continuing to assist families to reduce poverty as described
below.
   •   Lower Columbia Community Action Programs (CAP) provides low-income services such as
       Community Services (HELP Warehouse, Community Voice Mail, In-home Care) for food and



                                               20
    commodities, Energy & Housing (for self-help housing, residential Weatherization and payment of
    electrical bills), and Career and Family Development (for job training, resume’s and job
    placement), Financial Independence Center (Bank on Cowlitz County, CAPital Investment IDA
    program, and Money Smart Financial Education), and Senior Services (frozen and home-bound
    meals. The agency partners with the Cities of Longview and Kelso, Lower Columbia College, the
    Washington State Employment Security Dept., and other agencies to alleviate poverty. CAP
    accesses a variety of grants and loans for housing projects funded through HOME, CDBG, and
    Rural Development, and as well as State & Federal grants. The agency is also classified as the
    Longview-Kelso Consortium’s Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO).
•   Goodwill provides rehabilitation services for disabled and disadvantaged adults. They offer job
    placement services, supported employment using a “job coach”, and community based
    assessments to match the employee with a job matching their skills and abilities. Several
    programs for individualized job training include retail sales, office essentials, custodial skills, basic
    computer classes, and a warehouse, transportation & logistics career program. Specialized
    employment programs are offered for offender re-entry, seniors and youth. Disabled adults are
    served through skills training, accommodation and advocacy, job search, and placement services.
•   Life Works (formally ADC Pathways to Employment) promotes employment opportunities for
    people with disabilities. Many of their clients are developmentally disabled or have had
    vocational injuries. They offer skill training, job search classes, job placement, on-the-job
    support, assessment, positive behavior support, and social skills training. A new business called
    “Linen Works” providing table linens for large and small events established a new vocational
    opportunity for clients.
•   Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity assists low-income families and individuals in achieving
    affordable homeownership by holding a zero interest mortgage. Participants assist in the
    construction of their own homes.
•   Community House provides a homeless shelter for families and individuals. It strives to assist
    those who need help and choose to progress toward stable housing and self-sufficient living. It
    has a transitional housing program at County Run Apartments in Lexington, north of Longview.
•   Lower Columbia Mental Health counsels people to overcome issues affecting their mental health
    related to substance abuse, family, and employment issues. It provides support services to
    persons within their developing continuum of housing programs by providing “instrumental
    activities to daily living” to assist them improve their lives through physical and emotional well
    being;
•   The Emergency Support Shelter assists domestic violence victims and works with them to achieve
    their personal goals and self-sufficiency.
•   Lower Columbia College in Longview provides remedial education, GED’s, educational counseling
    for low-income students, a range of Certificate programs, 2-year Associate Degree programs, and
    transfer assistance to 4-year colleges.
•   The City actively pursues economic development within the Mint Farm Industrial Park as well as
    manufacturing related businesses through their partnership with the Cowlitz Economic
    Development Council. The City continues to support the development of new businesses on
    under-developed and vacant parcels of commercial and industrial property. A new Wal Mart
    Super Store is currently under construction which will provide a few hundred jobs when it opens
    later this year.




                                                   21
Leveraging Resources

Other Funding
Other funding for completed projects totaled $2,322,964:

   •   Life Works: $1,932,048 Total - $732,048 Private for Acquisition; $700,000 Private for
       building rehabilitation and $500,000 WA Dept of Commerce “Building Communities
       Fund” building rehabilitation.

   •   CAPtial Investments: $6,000 Total - $2,000 Private Individual Development Account;
       $2,000 Assets for Independence Dept Health and Human Services; $2,000 Dept of
       Commerce.

   •   Help Warehouse: $180,670 Total - $89,328 Emergency Food Assistance Program;
       32,713 The Emergency Food Assistance Program; $45,321 donations/unrestricted,
       Community Services Block Grant $13,308

   •   Habitat for Humanity (LV): $94,870 Total: $85,000 Private and $9,870 Donated goods
       and services.

   •   Habitat for Humanity (Kelso): $46,187 Total: $45,000 Private and $1,282 Donated
       goods and services.

   •   Transitional Housing 3 (Kelso): $63,189 Total: $63,109 CAP-Owner Private


HOME Match
A total match of $255,512 was received from 4 projects:

   •   Habitat for Humanity (LV): $51,299 sweat equity; $9,870 in donated materials and
       services; $85,000 Cash Private.

   •   SHARE: $9,950 sweat equity.

   •   Soundview: $30,251 Weatherization.

   •   Habitat for Humanity (KL): $45,000 cash. $22,860 sweat equity. $1,282 donated
       material

Citizen Comments
Citizen comments are collected primarily at the Public Hearings held each year for the CAPER in
October, and CDBG and HOME Project Allocations in March and April, respectively. These can
be found at the behind the Agency Reports within Section 4. Additional comments may be
collected at City Council presentations of completed Planning projects funded by CDBG.




                                              22
Self Evaluation
The following items will be added to HOME and CDBG contracts:

A detailed cost breakdown shall be submitted by the subrecipient for each project for a cost or
price-analysis prior to the contract being executed.

The Consortium must have a reasonable expectation from the subrecipient that the project can
begin construction within 12 months of the funding commitment (written agreement.)
Contracts will not be issued unless the subrecipient can pledge to begin construction within 12
months and be willing to forgo funding or return funding should construction not begin.
Construction shall mean excavation has begun on the project site.

A final budget shall be submitted with close-out information at the end of each project showing
total costs and funding sources.

Monitoring
The following projects were monitored in the Program Year with agency visits:

Habitat for Humanity
       800 N. Pacific
       118 16th
       126 16th
Longview Housing Authority
       Phoenix House
Kelso Housing Authority
       Kelso Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Domestic Violence
       Kelso Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Drug Court
Life Works
       Acquisition (Rehabilitation for new location) and Client Count
Lower Columbia Community Action Council
       Transitional 1 & 2 HOME Court
       Our House
       46th Self-Help Housing
       Home Owner Rehab 270 19th Ave.
       Help Warehouse
Wendy and Ron Kosloski
       Working Arts Center

Several projects are behind in activity completion and noted in the previous project summaries
and project agency reports that follow:

Lower Columbia Community Action
   • 33rd Ave. Project (Transferred from Self-Help Housing to 2 Single-Family Supportive-
       Transitional homes
   • Highlands Scattered Self-Help Housing (to be completed with 46th Self-Help Phase 2)
   • 46th Self-Help Phase 2
Family Finance Resource Center
   • Homeowner Foreclosure Avoidance


                                               23
Program Narratives

CDBG
The 2009 program year goals were set in the 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan. In the 2009
Program year all funding was committed to the following program goals: the Highlands Trail
Segment 1 Phase 1 & 2 (Objective SL-1.1), the HELP Warehouse food bank (Objective SL-1.23),
and the Archie Anderson Park Master Plan (Objective SL-1.3). The Trail will be completed by
September 2011 with additional funding for Phase 3 from the 2010 Program year for
landscaping and pedestrian amenities. The HELP Warehousing runs on the following (2010)
calendar year and is currently underway. The Archie Anderson Park Master Plan will be
completed in December 2010. An additional consolidated plan project was funded through the
City for the Archie Anderson (Highlands) Basketball Court which was resurfaced (Objective SL-
1.2).

HOME funding is primarily used for housing programs instead of CDBG and so no housing
programs were supported in PY 2009. Previous years funding, however, did support some
housing projects which were completed this program year.

Previous years program accomplishments completed in PY 2009:
Housing
In 2008 the Cowlitz County Guidance Association d.b.a. Lower Columbia Mental Health was
awarded the majority of CDBG funding for housing acquisition for Homeless Individuals with
Chronic Mental Illness and Substance Abuse Difficulties and 8 persons were housed in
supportive housing in the 2009 program year.

CAPital Investment supported 1 new homebuyer in Longview through and IDA match, state
match and personal savings of the client.

Public Services
Life Works acquisition (and rehabilitation) enabled the agency to relocate to their first
permanent building since its service began in 1980 (29 years.) It serves an average of 140
clients per year.

Help Warehouse: This 2008 project runs on a calendar year and served 1482 non-duplicated
Longview families for food bank services.

Additional resources are secured by the agency submitting projects and are noted under the
Leveraging Resources section above for completed projects during the program year. Other
projects underway are securing resources as noted within the 2009 Annual Plan. These are the
Highlands Trail which will be funded with $47,998 from the City’s Capital Budget; The Help
Warehouse is being funded with $189,000 from state, federal and private sources; and the
Archie Anderson Park which is supported with $1,835 in Program Income.

2009-2013 Consortium goals and accomplishments to date can be found in Transition Table 2C
at the end of this section.



                                              24
Certification of Consistency for projects are issued based upon a staff review of the Goals and
Objectives within the Consolidated Plan and signed by the City Manager. This year the
Longview Housing Authority requested a Certificate of Consistency for their agency’s Annual
Plan.

Consolidated Planning and Annual Planning implementation is done through an open and public
process. All projects designs submitted are forwarded to the City Council for review if eligible.
Eligibility questions are forwarded to the Seattle HUD office prior to Council selection.

All funding was used to meet National Objectives. As a rule 5% of CDBG Administration is used
for planning set-asides. This year one Planning project was funded: the Archie Anderson Park
Master Plan.

The City works with agencies early in the process to avoid displacement. As a rule only
previously vacant rental properties are considered for projects. Owner-occupied properties are
only considered if they are currently for sale. However, the Longview Housing Authority will be
relocating tenants from the Stratford Building for their 2010 PY Comrade Quarters project for
homeless veterans. Informational Notices have been issued for tenants not to move in order to
be eligible for relocation benefits.

The City had no economic development projects under CDBG this program year.

CDBG Program income received was $41,179.87
The sources were:
   • Housing Rehabilitation Deferred Loans $39,136.67
   • New Housing (D. B. Story): $2,043.20
Program income is held until the end of each Program Year to determine if the amount is less
than 1/12 of the Entitlement Grant and therefore not considered as Program Income. Program
Income exceeded 1/12 of the Entitlement amount this Program Year and will applied to 2011
CDBG projects.

There were no prior period adjustments, float-funded activities or lump sum agreements.

Deferred outstanding loans include those projects which the Council has requested payment
should the property be sold, or changes its purpose from the original project for which it was
funded.

   •   $240,000 Supportive Housing for Homeless Individuals with Substance Abuse
       Difficulties Cowlitz County Guidance Association
   •   $144,940 (9 Loans total) CDBG Rehabilitation


Program Narratives

HOME
Consortium Allocations & Goals
In 2009 five (5) projects were funded within the Consortium: Campus Towers (elderly
retirement home) Bathtub Conversion to showers with a low step-in access for 74 units and


                                               25
with the additional 17 units funded by the owner for a total of 91 units (Objective DH-3.1).
Two (2) Tenant Based Rental Assistance projects in Kelso for Drug Court and Domestic Violence
victims (Objective DH-2.3) and 2 Habitat for Humanity Projects (Longview and Kelso) (Objective
DH-1.5.)

Consortium Unit Goals & Accomplishments
Over the 2009 period designated for the 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan, Consortium projects will
produce the following goals: 74 units rental housing rehabilitation, 4 units of homeownership (3
properties have been purchased and 1 home is under construction), and 4 units of tenant based
rental assistance.

Previous years program accomplishments completed in PY 2009:
The completion of tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA) for individuals/families housed under
previous years programs (as noted in the Executive Summary) for the Longview Housing
Authority (2006) Domestic Violence totaled 14 of which 8 transferred to Section 8 housing and
(2005) Drug Court TBRA which totaled 11 individuals/families of which 6 transferred to Section
8 housing.

2006/2008 PY Habitat for Humanity completed 3 units of homeownership (2 in Longview and 1
in Kelso); the 2002/2006 PY SHARE program completed 1 unit of homeownership; and Lower
Columbia Community Action (2004) completed 1 unit of transitional housing.

2009-2013 Consortium goals and accomplishments to date can be found in Transition Table 2C
at the end of this section.

Match Report
A Match matrix is included following this HOME narrative. The total match for HOME in 2009 PY
was $255,512 from 4 projects. The Consortium is required to match 12.5% (a 50% reduction
due poverty within the Consortium) of all HOME expenditures except Administration.

Bank Loans totaling $5,236,656 were removed from the Consortium match credit for years
1998-2006 and the overall match was adjusted for the 2009 program year. The current match
credit ending in 2009 PY $2,365,241.

Rental Inspections
Six rental inspections was made in PY 2009 under the Period of Affordability for the Mary Barta
House at 235 Carolina St., 284 18th, 91 A, B & C Home Court and 99 Home Court in Kelso.
Minor repairs were identified and completed for 91 and 99 Home Court. No other repairs were
needed.

The Soundview Apartments (24 units) were also be inspected for final Building Code compliance
in conjunction with the rehabilitation.

Affirmative Marketing
Each agency receives an affirmative marketing list as part of their HOME contract. This list was
updated in June 2010 and follows the narrative. Marketing efforts are requested during
monitoring, and agencies were sent an e-mail as a reminder to keep track of their outreach
efforts a separate file folder. Agencies were asked to maintain the following information: Date,


                                               26
Type of Marketing effort (brochure, flier, mailing) Project, Topic, Place, Person, and
Organization of each Outreach effort (real estate, banks, new homebuyer presentations) with
the materials they provided.

Outreach to Minority and Women-Owner Business
Each contract lists the website for the Washington State Office www.omwbe.wa.gov and is
requested to post their project bid on the site or search and contact qualified contractors to
notify them of the advertisement of bid. No Minority or Women Owner Businesses were hired
this program year.




                                               27
28
29
Affirmative Marketing
The following list of local organizations and publications should be contacted for advertising or
marketing this HOME project:

Ethnic Minority
       Ethnic Support Council, 311 Oak St.., Kelso, WA 98626 360.636.2791
       Iglecia Latina, 2045 Tibbets #6 St., Longview, WA 98626 360.414.1414 or 360.577.0203
       Templo Emanuel, (Jessie Lopez), 3303 Pine St., Longview, WA 98632 360.423.0102
       St. Rose Catholic Church, 701 26th Ave (Office)., Longview, WA 98632 360.425.4660
       Centro Christino at 20th Ave Baptist, 317 20th Ave., Longview, WA 98632
               360.425.1960
       Seventh-Day Adventist, (Spanish Pastor) 77 Solomon Rd., Kelso, WA 98626
       360.992-0686

Senior
         Longview Senior Center, 1111 Commerce Ave., Longview, WA 98632 360.636.0210
         Senior Information and Referral, PO Box 539, Kelso, WA 98626        360.577.4929
         Retired Senior Volunteer Program, (RSVP) 1526 Commerce Ave., Longview, WA 98632
                360.577.2389
         The Longview Daily News Supplement Second Half published monthly, 770 11th Ave.,
         Longview, WA 98632 Contact: Bernie Altman, Editor      360.577.2516

Disabled
       Life Works, 906 New York St., Longview, WA 98632          360.577.9093
                                                        th
       Lower Columbia Council for the Blind, 309 SW 4 Ave., Kelso WA 98632 360.425.5369
       The Arc of Cowlitz County, 1410 8th Avenue, Room 15, Longview, WA 98632 360.425.5494
       Disability International Foundation, P O Box 1781, Longview, WA 98632 360.577.0243
       DisAbility Resources, 2700 NE Andressen Rd. Suite D5, Vancouver WA 98661 360.694-
       6790

General
      The Longview Daily News Sasquatch Edition, Classifieds 770 11th Ave., Longview, WA
      98632 360.577.2500




Revised June 2010                                  30
                                                          Transition Table 2C
                   Summary of Specific Housing/Community Development Objectives
                                                                   (Multi-Year)
                                                 (Table 2A/2B Continuation Sheet)

Objective                 Specific Objectives                  Sources of Funds        Performance        Expected         Actual             Outcome/ 
   #                                                                                    Indicators        Number          Number              Objective* 
             Rental Housing                                                                                                                         
DH-1.1       Assist chronically homeless persons with          HOME; Doc Fees;     # PSH beds                 15                                    
             special needs to secure stable housing with       HGAP; HTF;          created                                                         DH‐1 
             supportive services.                              McKinney‐Vento 
DH-1.2       Assist homeless persons with special needs        HPRP; Doc Fees;     # Persons                  35                                    
             to secure stable interim housing with             CDBG; ESG; ESAP;    placed in                                                       DH‐1 
             supportive services.                              HGAP                interim housing 
DH-1.3       Assist homeless persons or those at risk of       HPRP; Doc Fees;     # Households               80                                    
             homelessness in retaining stable housing or       CDBG; ESG; ESAP;    rapidly re‐                                                     DH‐1 
             rapid re‐housing placement in affordable          HGAP                housed 
             housing with transitional services. 
DH-1.4       Assist persons with severe mental illness to      HOME; Doc Fees;                                15                                
             secure stable housing with supportive             HTF; RSN; CDBG;                                                                 DH‐1 
             services.                                         FHLB‐AHP 
DH-2.1       Assist frail elderly with extreme cost burden.    HOME & CDBG         #Units of TBRA             19                                   DH‐2 
DH-2.2       Assist physically handicapped with extreme        HOME & CDBG         #Units of TBRA             19                                   DH‐2 
             cost burden. 
DH-2.3       Assist domestic violence survivors and            HOME & CDBG         #Units of TBRA             35            4                      DH‐2 
             persons in recovery with a cost burden. 
             2009 TBRA Underway 
DH-3.1       Provide home modification and                     HOME & CDBG &       # Units                    10            60                      
& 3.2        weatherization assistance to disabled and         Weatherization      modified; #                                                DH‐3 
             elderly low income renters                                            weatherized 
             2009 Campus Towers Underway 
DH-3.3       Preserve and improve the condition of the         HOME & CDBG         # Units                   14              1             
             existing affordable housing stock through                             rehabilitated                                                   DH‐3 
             acquisition and/or rehabilitation.                                     
DH-3.4       Prevent the loss of existing subsidized           Doc Fees            #Units Acquired           13                                
             housing and affordable private multi‐family       HOME CDBG                                                                      DH‐3 
             housing for low income and special needs 
             populations. 
                                                                                                                                                
             Owner Housing                                                                                                                           
DH-          Expand homeownership for low/mod                  HOME & CDBG         # New                      12                 3                 DH‐1 
1.5          households & promote neighborhood                                     homeowners 
             stability. 
             2009 Habitat for Humanity Underway 
DH-3.1       Provide home modification and                     HOME & CDBG ;       # Units                    25                                   DH‐3 
& 3.2        weatherization assistance to disabled and         Weatherization      modified; # 
             elderly low income homeowners                                         weatherized 
DH-3.3       Preserve and improve the condition of the         HOME & CDBG         # Units                    20                               DH‐3 
             existing affordable housing stock through                             rehabilitated 
             rehabilitation.                                                        




                                                                        31
                                           Transition Table 2C
                     Summary of Specific Housing/Community Development Objectives
                                                                     (Multi-Year)
                                                    (Table 2A/2B Continuation Sheet)

                                                                                                                                           
     Obj                  Specific Objectives                    Sources of Funds        Performance      Expected       Actual      Outcome/
      #                                                                                   Indicators      Number        Number       Objective* 
               Community Development                                                                                                             
    SL‐1.1     Highlands Neighborhood Trail                  CDBG; WA Trail          Phases completed;                                      
               Phases 1, 2 & 3                               Funds; private          Segments             3 Phases      Segment          SL‐1 
               2009 Trail Segment 1, Phase 1 & 2                                     completed            2 Segments    1 Phases 
                                                                                                                          1&2 
    SL‐1.2     Highlands ‐ Resurface basketball courts at    CDBG                    # courts                                            
               Archie Anderson Park                                                  resurfaced                1              1         SL‐1 
               2009  Completed with City Funds               City of Longview 
    SL‐1.3     Highlands ‐ Develop master plan for           CDBG; private           Master plan                                           
               Archie Anderson Park                                                  created                   1                        SL‐1 
               2009 Master Plan underway. 
    SL‐1.4     Highlands Community  Center                   CDBG; foundations;      Community center                                       
               development                                   private; WA Parks       completed                 1                         SL‐1 
                                     
    SL‐1.5     Highlands – Archie Anderson Park              CDBG; city; WA park     Water Feature;                                         
               Improvements                                  funds; private          Ball Field                2                         SL‐1 
                                                                                     Improvmts. 
    SL‐1.6     Highlands parks & open space                  CDBG; city;             # Park/open space                                      
               improvements                                  foundations;            improvements          Unknown                       SL‐1 
                                                             private; WA Parks 
    SL‐1.7     Highlands mini‐grants to fund community       CDBG; city; private     # Projects            Unknown                          
               projects                                                                                                                  SL‐1 
    SL‐1.8     Highlands ‐ Public/private property           CDBG; city; private     # Properties          Unknown                          
               improvements to reduce crime (CPTED)                                  improved                                            SL‐1 
    SL‐1.9     Victoria Freeman Park Improvements            CDBG; city; WA park     Field imprvmnts;                                       
                                                             funds; private          New features          Unknown                       SL‐1 
    SL‐1.10    Kellogg Park Improvements                     CDBG; city; WA park     Imprvmnts &                                            
                                                             funds; private          Upgrades              Unknown                       SL‐1 
    SL‐1.11    Paths, trails & open space development        CDBG; city; WA trail    # Parks                                                
                                                             funds; private          L.F. Trails           Unknown                       SL‐1 
                                                                                     # Open spaces 
    SL‐1.12    Upgrade Catlin Building for recreational      State CDBG; city;       Building                                               
               use* (Kelso)                                  WA park funds;          imprvmnts                 1                         SL‐1 
                                                             private                 Installed 
    SL‐1.13    Recreation/Drop In Center for youth           CDBG; city; WA park     Develop building                                       
                                                             funds; private          & site                    1                         SL‐1 
    SL‐1.14    Senior Center                                 CDBG; foundations;      Develop building                                       
                                                             private; WA Parks       & site                    1                         SL‐1 
    SL‐1.15    Center for Disabled Persons                   CDBG; city; private;    Develop building                                       
                                                             foundations;            & site                    1                         SL‐1 
                                                             WA CTED 
    SL‐1.16    Child Care Centers                            CDBG; city; private;    Develop buildings                                      
                                                             foundations;            & sites                   1                         SL‐1 
                                                             WA CTED 
    SL‐1.17    Adult day care facility for elderly &         CDBG; city; private;    Develop building                                       
               mentally disabled                             foundations;            & site                    1                         SL‐1 
                                                             WA CTED 




                                                                          32
    SL‐1.18    “Clubhouse” facility for special needs         CDBG; city; private;      Develop building                                        SL‐1 
               populations                                    foundations;              & site                        1 
                                                              WA CTED 
               Infrastructure                                                                                                                     
    SL‐3.1     Highlands water & sewer improvements           CDBG; city; private       L.F. waterline             Unknown                     SL‐3 
                                                                                        L.F. sewer line            Uknown                               
    SL‐3.2     Highlands storm drainage – Beech Street        CDBG; city; private       L.F. stormdrain            Unknown                     SL‐3 
                                                                                        # streetscape              Unknown 
                                                                                        enhancements 
    SL‐1.19    Streetscape improvements – Downtown            CDBG; city; private       # Street trees             Unknown                      SL‐1 
               & Highlands                                                              # Street furniture         Unknown 
    SL‐1.20    Street & alley lighting – Downtown &           CDBG; city; PUD;          # Blocks lit               Unknown                     SL‐1 
               Highlands                                      private                   # Alley blocks             Unknown 
    SL‐3.3     Improved street connectivity in eligible       State CDBG; city;         # Streets                  Unknown                     SL‐3 
               areas* (Kelso)                                 private                   connected 
    SL‐3.4     Street improvements in eligible areas*         State CDBG; city;         # Streets                  Unknown                     SL‐3 
               (Kelso)                                        private                   Improved 
               Public Facilities                                                                                                                  
    SL‐1.21    Homeless shelter & services for youth          Doc Fee; CDBG;            # beds created                1                           
                                                              state/federal; private    # youth served 
    SL‐1.22    Create a “one‐stop” homeless resource          Doc Fee; CDBG;            Resource Center               1                        SL‐1 
               center.                                        private;                  created 
    DH‐1.6     Operational & capital improvement              Doc Fee;  CDBG;           # Shelters assisted           2                        DH‐1 
               support for emergency shelters.                ESAP; ESG 
               Public Services                                                                                                                          
    DH‐1.7     Fair housing & housing counseling              CDBG; State;              # persons served           Unknown                     DH‐1 
                                                              private 
    DH‐1.8     Highlands ‐ Housing counseling &               CDBG; State;              # persons served           Unknown                     DH‐1 
               financial education services                   private 
    DH‐2.4     Homeownership/Foreclosure prevention           CDBG; State;              # persons served                                       DH‐2 
               counseling                                     private                   # foreclosures             Unknown 
                                                                                        prevented 
    SL‐1.23    Expand food bank services.                     CDBG; State; United       # households                                            SL‐1 
               2009 Help Warehouse underway                   Way; private              served                     Unknown 
    SL‐1.24    After‐school and recreation programs for       CDBG; State;              # youth served             Unknown                     SL‐1 
               youth, teens & families                        private; UWay 
    SL‐1.25    Recreational Programs for seniors &            CDBG; State;              # persons served           Unknown                     SL‐1 
               disabled                                       private; UWay 
    SL‐1.26    Access to primary & behavioral health          CDBG; State;              # persons served           Unknown                     SL‐1 
               care                                           private;  
    SL‐1.27    Early intervention services to families in     CDBG; State;              # families served          Unknown                     SL‐1 
               generational poverty                           private; UWay 
    SL‐1.28    Palliative/Home health care                    CDBG; State;              # persons served           Unknown                     SL‐1 
                                                              private 
    SL‐1.28    Senior services                                CDBG; State;              # seniors served           Unknown                     SL‐1 
                                                              private 
    SL‐1.29    Disabled services                              CDBG; State;              # disabled persons                                     SL‐1 
                                                              private                   served                     Unknown 
    SL‐1.30    Highlands “Adopt‐a‐Street” programs to         CDBG; State;              # Streets adopted                                      SL‐1 
               assist with landscaping, lighting, painting    private                   # Sponsors                 Unknown 
               Economic Development                                                                                                               
    EO‐1.1     Highlands ‐ Small business/micro‐              CDBG; State; private      # people assisted          Unknown                     EO‐1 
               enterprise technical assistance & venture                                # businesses 
               capital                                                                  funded 




                                                                            33
        EO‐1.2    Highlands ‐ Low income credit union/2nd       CDBG; State;            # LMI members        Unknown                       EO‐1 
                  Chance banking                                private; Treasury       # persons banked 
        EO‐1.3    Highlands commercial development              CDBG; State;            S.F. commercial      Unknown                       EO‐1 
                                                                private;                development 
        EO‐1.4    Business technical assistance & services      CDBG; State;            # persons            Unknown                       EO‐1 
                  to for‐profit/non‐profit                      private;                counseled 
                                                                                        # businesses 
                                                                                        served 
        EO‐1.5    Small/micro‐business assistance & job         CDBG; State;            # persons                                          EO‐1 
                  training                                      private;                counseled            Unknown 
                                                                                        # businesses 
                                                                                        served 
        EO‐2.1    Public works infrastructure that serves       CDBG; city; State;      L.F. streets                                       EO‐2 
                  business                                      private                 L.F. utilities       Unknown 
         EO       Downtown Façade Improvement                   CDBG; city; state;      # façade                  
         3.1      Program                                       private                 improvements         Unknown                       EO‐3 
                  Neighborhood                                                                                                                      
                  Revitalization/Other 
        DH‐1.9    Planning & Administration:                    CDBG; local Doc         Develop AI               1                            
                      •    Fair Housing AI                      Fees                    Update Ten Year                                    DH‐1 
                      •    Monitor AI                                                   Plan                     1 
                      •    Ten Year Plan Update 
                                                                                                                                              
                   
 
    *Outcome/Objective Codes  
                                            Availability/Accessibility                Affordability                   Sustainability 
     Decent Housing                                         DH‐1                                    DH‐2                         DH‐3 
     Suitable Living Environment                             SL‐1                                    SL‐2                         SL‐3 
     Economic Opportunity                                   EO‐1                                    EO‐2                         EO‐3 




                                                                            34
HOME Match Report                                                                    U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
                                                                                     Office of Community Planning and Development
                                                                                                                                                                                        OMB Approval No. 2506-0171
                                                                                                                                                                                                  (exp. 11/30/2001)

                                                                                                                                                                     Match Contributions for
Part I Participant Identification                                                                                                                                    Federal Fiscal Year (yyyy)         2009
1. Participant No. (assigned by HUD) 2. Name of the Participating Jurisdiction                                                                 3. Name of Contact (person completing this report)
           M09-DC530203                    Longview-Kelso Consortium (City of Longview)                                                            Julie Hourcle'
5. Street Address of the Participating Jurisdiction                                                                                            4. Contact's Phone Number (include area code)
   1525 Broadway / PO Box 128                                                                                                                                               360 442-5081
6. City                                                                   7. State                 8. Zip Code
   Longview                                                                  WA                      98632
Part II Fiscal Year Summary
           1. Excess match from prior Federal fiscal year                                                                                      $                     2,157,836

           2. Match contributed during current Federal fiscal year (see Part III.9.)                                                           $                        255,512

           3. Total match available for current Federal fiscal year (line 1 + line 2)                                                                                               $                  2,413,348

           4. Match liability for current Federal fiscal year                                                                                                                       $                      48,107

           5. Excess match carried over to next Federal fiscal year (line 3 minus line 4)                                                                                           $                  2,365,241

Part III Match Contribution for the Federal Fiscal Year                                                                                     7. Site Preparation,
          1. Project No.           2. Date of               3. Cash         4. Foregone Taxes,        5. Appraised         6. Required     Construction Materials,           8. Bond                 9. Total
           or Other ID            Contribution        (non-Federal sources)    Fees, Charges       Land / Real Property   Infrastructure       Donated labor                Financing                 Match
                                  (mm/dd/yyyy)
91 LV Soundview Apts              07/06/2010                     30,251                                                                                                                                     30,251

39 LV SHARE 24th                  09/18/2009                                                                                                               9,950                                                9,950

90 LV Habitat 18th A              03/01/2010                     22,000                                                                                  27,047                                                 49,047

90 LV Habitat 18th B              03/01/2010                     63,000                                                                                  34,122                                                 97,122

#80 KL Habitat N. Pac             03/01/2010                     45,000                                                                                  24,142                                             69,142




                                                                                                             35
                                                                                                      page 1 of 4 pages                                                                   form HUD-40107-A (12/94)
                                                                             HOME MATCH LOG

                                                                                                        Amount of
              Date                                                                                       Match          Value of
             Project                                              Project   HOME Funds     Date HOME     Liability      Match        Type of   Date Match
Activity   Committed              Activity Name or Address         Type      Expended      $ Expended   Incurred      Contribution   Match     Recognized   Comments
  (1)           (2)                              (3)                (4)         (5)            (6)          (7)           (8)          (9)        (10)        (11)


  99          2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance        H            $920.00    8/11/2009       $115.00
  100         2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $1,045.00    8/11/2009       $130.63
  39           1/9/2003          LHA-SHARE Self-Help & Rehab        H          $4,800.00    8/11/2009       $600.00
  77          7/31/2007             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H            $421.00    8/11/2009        $52.63
  102          3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $3,189.00    8/26/2009       $398.63
  67         11/14/2005             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H            $314.00    8/26/2009        $39.25
  77          7/31/2007             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H             770.00    8/26/2009        $96.25
  99          2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance        H           1,619.00    9/22/2009       $202.38
  100         2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $1,357.00    9/22/2009       $169.63
  103          3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H            $312.00    9/22/2009        $39.00
  77          7/31/2007             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H           $770.00     9/22/2009        $96.25
  102          3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $3,646.00    9/22/2009       $455.75
  67         11/14/2005             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H             314.00    9/22/2009        $39.25
  44         7/27/2004              LCCAC-Scattered SH 9/08         H           1,157.07    9/22/2009       $144.63
  50          11/4/2004                  LCCAC 46th SH 02/09        H          $2,859.37    9/22/2009       $357.42
  50          11/4/2004                  LCCAC 46th SH 03/09        H          $1,264.49    9/22/2009       $158.06
  50          11/4/2004                  LCCAC 46th SH 04/09        H          $1,374.43    9/22/2009       $171.80
  50          11/4/2004                  LCCAC 46th SH 05/09        H          $1,887.20    9/22/2009       $235.90
  50          11/4/2004                  LCCAC 46th SH 06/09        H          $1,849.08    9/22/2009       $231.14
  50          11/4/2004                  LCCAC 46th SH 07/09        H          $1,481.34    9/22/2009       $185.17
  81         11/9//2007                  LCCAC Housing Rehab        H          28,541.90    9/29/2009     $3,567.74
  99          2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance        H           1,619.00    10/6/2009       $202.38
  100         2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $1,367.00    10/6/2009       $170.88
  51          11/4/2004          LCCAC-Kelso Transitional House     H         $23,489.83    10/6/2009     $2,936.23
  51          11/4/2004          LCCAC-Kelso Transitional House     H         $16,646.82    10/6/2009     $2,080.85
  67         11/14/2005             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H            $314.00   10/20/2009        $39.25
  77          7/31/2007             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H            $770.00   10/20/2009        $96.25
  102          3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $3,834.00   10/20/2009       $479.25
  103          3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H          $2,647.00   10/20/2009       $330.88
  100         2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $1,280.00   11/18/2009       $160.00
  99          2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance        H           1,619.00   11/18/2009       $202.38
  103          3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H          $2,731.00   11/18/2009       $341.38
  102          3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $3,837.00   11/18/2009       $479.63
  67         11/14/2005             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H            $314.00   11/18/2009        $39.25
  103          3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance        H          $2,731.00   12/18/2009       $341.38
  102          3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $3,837.00   12/18/2009       $479.63
  100         2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance        H          $1,280.00   12/18/2009       $160.00
   99         2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance        H          $1,619.00   12/18/2009       $202.38
                                                                                      36
     1997, 1998, 1999 - 100% reduction
     2000-2007 - 50% reduction                                                                                                                               Page 1
                                                                                     HOME MATCH LOG

                                                                                                                Amount of
                Date                                                                                             Match           Value of
               Project                                                    Project   HOME Funds     Date HOME     Liability       Match        Type of   Date Match
Activity     Committed              Activity Name or Address               Type      Expended      $ Expended   Incurred       Contribution   Match     Recognized   Comments
  (1)             (2)                           (3)                         (4)         (5)            (6)          (7)            (8)          (9)        (10)        (11)
  99            2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $1,619.00    1/13/2010       $202.38
  100           2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $1,228.00    1/13/2010       $153.50
  103            3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $2,731.00    1/26/2010       $341.38
  102            3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $3,837.00    1/26/2010       $479.63
  117          12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion          H            $236.50    1/28/2010        $29.56
  80             8/2/2007         Cowlitz Co. Habitat for Humanity          H          $5,590.69    2/23/2010       $698.84
  102            3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $3,861.00    2/23/2010       $482.63
  103            3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $2,270.00    2/23/2010       $283.75
  99            2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $1,355.00    2/23/2010       $169.38
  100           2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $1,426.00    2/23/2010       $178.25
  112           2/10/2010            KHA-ESS Rental Assistance              H            $323.00    2/23/2010        $40.38
  112           2/10/2010            KHA-ESS Rental Assistance              H            $794.00    3/11/2010        $99.25
   99           2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $1,355.00    3/11/2010       $169.38
  100           2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $1,898.00    3/11/2010       $237.25
  118           2/23/2010             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H            $181.00    3/11/2010        $22.63
   90           6/25/2008         Cowlitz Co. Habitat for Humanity          H         $11,208.11    3/11/2010      $1,401.01
  90           6/25/2008     Cowlitz Co. Habitat for Humanity (PI Used)     H         $23,914.20   3/11/2010      $2,989.28
  102            3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $3,995.00    3/24/2010       $499.38
  103            3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $4,381.00    3/24/2010       $547.63
  112           2/10/2010            KHA-ESS Rental Assistance              H          $1,108.00    3/24/2010       $138.50
  99            2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $1,355.00    3/24/2010       $169.38
  100           2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $2,117.00    3/24/2010       $264.63
  118           2/23/2010             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H            $320.00    3/24/2010        $40.00
  110          11/18/2009         Cowlitz Co. Habitat for Humanity          H         $35,000.00    4/22/2010     $4,375.00
  102            3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $3,995.00    4/22/2010       $499.38
  103            3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $6,219.00    4/22/2010       $777.38
  99            2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance              H          $1,355.00    4/22/2010       $169.38
  100           2/13/2009             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $2,117.00    4/22/2010       $264.63
  112           2/10/2010            KHA-ESS Rental Assistance              H          $1,044.00    4/22/2010       $130.50
  118           2/23/2010             KHA-DC Rental Assistance              H           $320.00     4/22/2010        $40.00
  111           12/1/2009         Cowlitz Co. Habitat for Humanity          H         $29,000.00    4/22/2010     $3,625.00
  51            11/4/2004          LCCAC-Kelso Transitional House           H         $31,281.89    5/12/2010     $3,910.24
  117          12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion          H          $6,611.60    5/26/2010       $826.45
  103            3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance              H         $12,476.00    5/26/2010     $1,559.50
  102            3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $3,368.00    5/26/2010       $421.00
  117          12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion          H          $6,611.60    6/10/2010       $826.45
  103            3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance              H         $10,157.00    6/23/2010     $1,269.63
  102            3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance              H          $2,556.00    6/23/2010       $319.50
  117          12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion          H          $2,644.64    6/23/2010       $330.58
                                                                                              37
       1997, 1998, 1999 - 100% reduction
       2000-2007 - 50% reduction                                                                                                                                      Page 2
                                                                                          HOME MATCH LOG

                                                                                                                     Amount of
              Date                                                                                                    Match          Value of
             Project                                                        Project      HOME Funds     Date HOME     Liability      Match           Type of      Date Match
Activity   Committed              Activity Name or Address                    Type        Expended      $ Expended   Incurred      Contribution       Match       Recognized       Comments
  (1)           (2)                               (3)                          (4)           (5)            (6)          (7)           (8)              (9)          (10)              (11)
  117        12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion                H           $2,644.64    6/23/2010       $330.58
  118         2/23/2010             KHA-DC Rental Assistance                    H             $320.00    6/23/2010        $40.00
  99          2/12/2009             KHA-DV Rental Assistance                    H           $1,203.00    6/23/2010       $150.38
  117        12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion                H           $3,305.80    7/8/2010        $413.23
  117        12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion                H           $3,305.80    7/8/2010        $413.23
  103          3/9/2009             LHA-DV Rental Assistance                    H           $7,689.00    7/8/2010        $961.13
  102          3/9/2009             LHA-DC Rental Assistance                    H           $1,398.00    7/8/2010        $174.75
  117        12/23/2009         Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion                H           $3,305.80    7/8/2010        $413.23
                                                                                H                                          $0.00
                                                                                H                                          $0.00
                                                                                H                                          $0.00
  91         7/22/2008           Lower Columbia Commnity Action                 H                                          $0.00          30,251 Cash              7/6/2010    Soundview Apts
  39           1/9/2003        SHARE -Longview Housing Authority                H                                          $0.00             9,950 Sweat Equity    9/18/2009   416 24th Ave., LV
  90         6/25/2008                   Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00         22,000 Cash               3/1/2010    336-A 18th Ave., LV
  90         6/25/2008                   Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00          22,162 Sweat Equity      3/1/2010    336-A 18th Ave., LV
  90         6/25/2008                   Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00             4,885 Donated Mat     3/1/2010    336-A 18th Ave., LV
  90         6/25/2008                   Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00         63,000 Cash               3/1/2010    336 B 18th Ave., LV
  90         6/25/2008                   Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00          29,137 Sweat Equity      3/1/2010    336 B 18th Ave., LV
  90         6/25/2008                   Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00             4,985 Donated Mat     3/1/2010    336 B 18th Ave., LV
  80           8/2/2007                  Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00         45,000 Cash               3/1/2010    800 N Pacific KL
  80           8/2/2007                  Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00         22,860 Sweat Equity       3/1/2010    800 N Pacific KL
  80           8/2/2007                  Habitat for Humanity                   H                                          $0.00             1,282 Donated Mat     3/1/2010    800 N Pacific KL
                                                                                H                                          $0.00
                                                                                H                                          $0.00
                                                                                H                                          $0.00




                                                                   Current Fiscal Year       $384,860                   $48,107        $255,512


                                              Excess Match from Previous Fiscal Year                                                 $2,157,836
                                         Total Match Available for Current Fiscal Year                                               $2,413,348
                                               Match Liability for Current Fiscal Year                                                  $48,107
                                    Excess Match Carried Over to Next Fiscal Year                                                    $2,365,241




                                                                                                   38
     1997, 1998, 1999 - 100% reduction
     2000-2007 - 50% reduction                                                                                                                                                       Page 3
         Part 2

HOME Subrecipient Reports




            39
40
CAMPUS TOWERS                                                                    1767 – 20th Avenue
   Affordable Senior Housing                                                   Longview, WA 98632
                                                                                      360-423-6200
                                                                                  Fax 360-696-9193



                                       2010 Home Report

We again want to thank the Council and staff for the grant which is enabling us to modify the bathtubs
making it easier to get in for our seniors. As a reminder, we are modifying 91 tubs by cutting out the
side and installing a preformed filler that creates a low step for the residents to enter the tub.

We followed the rules concerning local advertisement requirements as well as advertising in Portland
and Seattle. We also solicited bids from minority and women owned business. We had seven requests
for bids from local contractors and local plumbing companies, as well as some from out of state. The
number of firms who responded with a quote was four. Attached is a summary of the bid opening
information. We selected Burien Tub based on being the lowest bidder as well as having the most
experience doing this type of work. We are still in the construction, or better, the modification stage of
our project. We have modified sixty-six tubs to date, and we expect that the tubs will all be completed
by the first week of October.

The winning bid came in with a bid of $695.96 per tub cut-out, including tax. However, based on the
HOME requirements of spending a minimum of $1,000.00 per apartment, our plan is to replace the
bathroom sink faucets with ADA handles and the toilet with a taller ADA unit. Home is paying for 74
of the total 91 tubs and Campus Towers will be matching the amount per unit for the remaining 17.

As you can see by the photos, we went with a preformed step that makes a better surface to step on as
well as reducing the worry of paint cracking, etc.




Again, thank you for your support!

Jim Conrod
Administrator
Campus Towers
                                                    41
                                     Campus Towers
                                   Bathtub Modification
                              Bid Opening: 3/31/10 - 2:00 pm
                                  Note: No Contractor Attendees
                                                                    PRIOR TUB
                                                             MODIFICATION EXPERIENCE

Lewis Construction – Longview, WA                                     NO
$63,959.44 – includes tax and bond (74-91 tubs)
Scope of work – item 2 not returned (Items 6 & 7 returned)

Bid Bond received 3-22-10 (after bid closing)


Sessions Plumbing – Longview, WA                                      NO
$66,195.05 – includes tax (91 tubs)
Scope of work – item 2 not returned (Items 6 & 7 returned)
Cashier’s check enclosed: $3,309.76


Burien Tub & Tile Refinishing – Burien, WA                            YES
$63,332.00 – includes tax (91 tubs)
Timeline included in quote.
Scope of work – item 2 not returned (Items 6 & 7 returned)
Cashier’s check enclosed: $3,167.00


J. H. Kelly – Longview, WA                                            NO
$69,816.00 – includes tax (91 tubs)
Timeline included in quote.
Scope of work – item 2 not returned (Items 6 & 7 returned)
Bid Bond enclosed.




Project awarded to Burien Tub & Tile Refinishing.
                                                  42
                                     P.O. Box 1451 Longview, WA 98632
                               Phone: (360) 425-6177      Fax: (360) 423-7279
                           www.cowlitzhabitat.org  E-mail: office@cowlitzhabitat.org

                                      2009 HOME Funds Report
                 August 1, 2009- July 31, 2010 Longview and Kelso Projects - RECAP

THANK YOU Longview and Kelso City Council Members:

It is our privilege and pleasure to thank you for your support and for the mutual success we have enjoyed this past
year! We’d like to share some of the accomplishments from the HOME projects you have so generously supported.

As you are aware, there is a nation-wide crisis in affordable housing, and Cowlitz County is not exempt. Cowlitz
County Habitat for Humanity works vigorously to respond to this crisis by making decent, affordable, safe, energy-
efficient housing possible in our community.

Houses form only one part of our mission and overall vision. While it would be possible simply to build houses
and give them over to families in need, we have a home ownership process designed to empower families for
leveraging their experience with us toward ongoing success. We are proud that our program is a “hand-up” and not
a “hand-out” philosophy. We encourage our families to participate in giving back to our community and continue
to help others do the same. As people come together to contribute what they can, where they can, we find that we
are building a stronger community for us all along the way.

Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity is an equal housing opportunity lender; servicing under-served individuals
and/or families who fall within 25% to 60% of the median income and currently living in sub-standard housing.
Homeownership through Habitat for Humanity offers a permanent solution to those in need of affordable housing
and we implement the funding from the Home Funds program for land acquisition and infrastructure, which
includes almost everything up to the foundation.

Each homeowner partnering with Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity contributes towards the construction of
their own home, providing them with a sense of ownership, valuable skills and an appreciation of the community.
Additionally, your support of Habitat far outreaches the number of families we serve each year through
homeownership. As a volunteer-based organization, we have had approximately 400 volunteers and
approximately 4500 hours donated through our affiliate during this time period. Both the families and the
community benefit through personal and property improvement and Habitat for Humanity strives to build upon
this with each and every potential partnering family.

Our partner families significantly add to your sponsorship and supporting our community by becoming taxpayers;
working and shopping in the community that supported them. We have been fortunate enough that we have a 0%
foreclosure rate and no homeowner is behind in their payments. With their 0% interest-free mortgage, the money
used to pay their mortgage is then reinvested in future Habitat homes. Additionally, our families become strong
advocates in their newly surrounded areas – such as the revitalization of the Highlands and their own community
neighborhood watch programs.

The HOME funds assistance these families receive is imperative to them becoming successful on both a short-
term and long-term basis. The value of homeownership; the ability to provide a safe, decent, affordable home for
their families; to maintain stability and health for their children is monumental. It is evident that your support
clearly benefits (very) low income families and supports the community at large by this effort. We have attached
the projects we have been fortunate enough to pursue, during this reported timeframe, along with photographs and
a brief outline of the status of each project.



August 2010 - Page 1                                    43
We are currently building our house #14 in Kelso for a very deserving family and they are excited about the idea
of one day having a home of their own. Additionally, we completed on our first duplex project – located in
Longview. In our strategy planning, we have continued our goal of building 2 to 3 homes in Cowlitz County in
2010 and are diligently working on selecting our next partner families. We are working through the selection
process whereby we will be selecting up to 3 additional families

Each person touched by Habitat--whether a homeowner or a volunteer---becomes a force of change, a link in the
chain of real solutions to real problems of inadequate housing in our world. Once again, on behalf of the
Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity Board of Directors, staff and our entire affiliate, we thank
you for your support and for making a significant difference in supporting housing needs in our
community.

Gratefully,



Executive Director
Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity




August 2010 - Page 2                                    44
                                        LONGVIEW PROJECTS
1.      LONGVIEW:

        We acquired a lot in the Highlands, with the help of HOME funding, that was zoned for a duplex and we
        underwent our first duplex project. Houses 12 & 13 are located at 336 18th in Longview:

        House #12: Thrivent Financial and Habitat for Humanity joined together to create Thrivent Builds: an
        unprecedented alliance that will put the faith of Lutherans and their communities into action to help working
        families move into the economic mainstream and put an end to poverty housing. Thrivent Financial is a
        faith-based membership organization committed to helping its nearly three million members achieve
        financial security and give back to their congregations and communities. With the help of HOME Funds,
        Thrivent, the local Thrivent Chapter and several local Lutheran Churches – House #12 is complete and a
        family of 4 living a dream of homeownership!

        House #13:
        To further the strategy and vision of implementing the help and support of other local community
        churches, CCHFH established and implemented an Apostolic Build, in the Highlands area. This build
        consisted of working with several various community churches to construct a home. The churches
        assisted Habitat by providing financial and volunteer support. A wonderful family of 5 resides here.




                                                                       336 18th A – Longview, WA
                 th
           336 18 B - Longview, WA                                  CCHFH/Apostles Build – House #13
        CCHFH/Thrivent Build - House #12                                Completed in 2009/2010
         Completed in November 2009.                                 Family Moved in February 2010
        Family moved in December 2009.

Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity is thrilled to be included in the planning and organizational stages of the
Highlands Revitalization Project. We have partnered with several local organizations, including Cowlitz Housing
1st Coalition and local businesses such as Flaskerud Realty, Lowes and Lumbermens/Pro-Build to make a
significant impact in the Highlands area of Longview, Cowlitz County.

Our partner families residing in the Highlands area have become very active in the Revitalization process; one
family actually serves on the Revitalization Board and participates in the community meetings.

2.      New Longview Purchases:

        During this reporting period, Cowlitz County Habitat, with HOME Funds assistance, was able to
        purchase additional lots at 354 16th and 107 18th. We anticipate the start of building on these sites
        in late 2010 and early 2011.


August 2010 - Page 3                                     45
                                         KELSO PROJECTS –

It is Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity’s (CCHFH) continued desire to construct or rehabilitate one
house per year in the City of Kelso. We were awarded funding recently applied to the City of Kelso.
These funds were used to purchase property 1204 N. 3rd.

PNE Charitable Foundation named us again as their 2008 and 2009 Golf Tournament beneficiary and
sponsored House #14. Partial proceeds from the 2010 tournament will go towards house #14.

1204 N. 3rd – KELSO:




                       1204 N. 3rd – Purchased Property in April 2010.




        1204 N. 3rd As shown in May 2010 during our
           Women Build – 1st day of Construction!
                                                                            1204 N. 3rd Kelso – May 2010
                                                                         Women Build – 1st Day of Construction.




August 2010 - Page 4                                    46
                            Longview and Kelso Home Updates
House #1:       242 Beech Street, Longview – New Construction
                Owner occupied since January 2001 by the Melissa Burr Galindo Family.

House #2:       248 Beech Street, Longview – New Construction
                Owner occupied since December 2001 by the Terri & Annisa Gilbert Family.

House #3:       345 15th Avenue, Longview – New Construction
                Owner occupied since March 2003 by the Jonnie* & Linda Wasson Family.
                     *Sadly, Jonnie Wason, Sr. died of a heart attack in April 2007.
                   Linda and family are even more grateful to have a Habitat home during this tragic time.

House #4:       139 15th Avenue, Longview – New Construction
                Owner occupied since August 2004 by the Calixto & Maria Contreras Family.

House #7:       311 18th Avenue, Longview – New Construction (Weyerhaeuser Sponsor)
                Owner occupied since February 2006 by the L. Piper Family.

House #8:       1504 Bowmont, Kelso – New Construction (Thrivent Sponsor)
                Owner occupied since September 2006 by the C. Ruiz Family.

House #5:       278 27th Avenue, Longview – Relocated and Rehab House
                       (Flaskerud/Coldwell Sponsor)
                Owner occupied since December 2006 by the N. Noss Family.

House #6:       601 Lewis, Kelso – Relocated and Rehab House
                Owner occupied since September 2007 by the Aguilar Family.

House #9:       126 16th Avenue, Longview – New Construction (PNE Sponsor)
                Owner occupied since February 2008 by the Hylton Family.

House #10:      118 16th Avenue, Longview – New Construction
                Owner occupied since September 2008 by the Norum/Clement Family.

House #11:      800 N. Pacific, Kelso, WA – New Construction (PNE Sponsor)
                Owner occupied since September 2009 by the Taylor Family.

House #12:      336 18th – A, Longview, WA – New Construction (Thrivent)
                Owner occupied since December 2009 by the Durham Family.

House #13:      336 18th – B, Longview, WA – New Construction (Apostles Build)
                Owner occupied since February 2010 by the Mikkola Family.

House #14:      1204 N. 3rd – Kelso, WA - Construction in Progress
                Due to complete construction in November 2010.


House #15:      To start in 2010 – Longview Location (Highlands area)



August 2010 - Page 5                                     47
                                                                                           Executive Director
                                                                                          Marion P.Olmsted



August 19, 2010



Kelso Housing Authority is pleased to be a part of the Home TBRA programs. As an agency, we strive and
take pride to do our best to meet the needs of our participants.

For the year 2009 in the TBRA Drug Court program, we had a total of 5 vouchers. Out of these vouchers:

   •   1 graduated to the Section 8 rental assistance program and is doing well.

   •   1 is currently transitioning to the Section 8 rental assistance program. She obtained employment
       however had to stop working so that she can concentrate on her studies. She is attending Lower
       Columbia College full-time.

   •   1 graduated from Drug Court. He has transitioned to a Section 8 rental assistance program and is
       attending Lower Columbia College full-time. He is currently doing work study and has gotten
       engaged to his longtime girlfriend. He has expressed interest in the Family Self Sufficiency
       Program. This program can help him meet his goals of obtaining homeownership. He has a positive
       attitude about life and his future.

   •   1 graduated from Drug Court and has transitioned to a Section 8 rental assistance program and is
       attending Lower Columbia College full-time. He is currently doing work study. This participant
       has signed up for the Family Self Sufficiency Program and is looking forward to becoming a home
       owner. What I am impressed about this person is when you give him a task, he is all over it. He
       never complains and always has a smile on his face. He too has a positive attitude about his life and
       future. I know he is going to do well in life.

   •   1 graduated from Drug Court and is in the process of being transitioned to the Section 8 rental
       assistance program. He has obtained a part-time job.

As for the TBRA Domestic Violence program we had 4 vouchers. Out of these vouchers:

   •   1 participant graduated from the TBRA program and moved to Pierce County to be closer to her
       family.

   •   1 participant has transitioned to Section 8 rental assistance program and is enrolled at Lower
       Columbia College full-time. She spent several weeks this summer shadowing a person in the
       construction field learning new things such a tile work, carpeting and painting.




                                 1415 South Tenth • Kelso, Washington 98626
                        Phone (360) 423-3490 • Fax (360) 577-6694 • TDD (360 423-3490
                                                      48
   •   1 participant is currently transitioning to the Section 8 rental assistance program.     She too is
       attending Lower Columbia College full-time while raising her 3 boys.

   •   1 participant was only on the program for 3 months however she received a Section 8 rental
       assistance voucher from Longview Housing Authority. She is doing well.

This program has not only helped them to obtain decent, safe and sanitary housing, it has also helped them
with achieving their lifetime goals.

It is with great pleasure, to work with these participants and to see them excited about life. Thank you for
allowing us to partner with you on these great programs.


Sincerely,




Cecilia Larson
Cecilia Larson
HCV Occupancy Coordinator




                                                     49
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                                                      Building Healthy Communities
                                                      One Family At A Time

1526 Commerce Avenue * Longview, Washington 98632 * 360-425-3430 * toll free 800-383-2101 * www.LowerColumbiaCAP.org


                                               Lower Columbia CAP
                                           Energy and Housing Department
                                                2010 Annual Report

       HIGHLANDS SELF-HELP
       LOWER COLUMBIA CAP

       CAP is trying to recruit families for these four lots. They will be done in combination with the 6 lots in the
       46th subdivision.

       The 33rd Ave. site has been changed from Self-Help to a rental site for transitional housing. CAP has
       proposed building a three bedroom house in 2011 and a six bedroom house in 2012. The site re-platting
       process has been started.

       46th ST. SELF-HELP
       LOWER COLUMBIA CAP

       With the economy, we have not been able to recruit families. We are starting to get inquiries now though and
       hope to build out the final 6 lots next year.

       LONGVIEW/KELSO TRANSITIONAL HOUSING 3 (Kelso)
       LOWER COLUMBIA CAP

       The 3-bedroom, 2-bath home was completed in early 2010 and has been rented.




       Sheila Girt, Energy & Housing Program Director
                                                               58
         Part 3

CDBG Subrecipient Reports




            59
60
P.O. Box 128
Longview, WA 98632-7080
www.ci.longview.wa.us



       Date:   August 18, 2010


       Subject: Annual CDBG Project Reports
                Highlands Neighborhood Trail Project
                Segment 1, Phases 1&2


       The goal for the Highlands Neighborhood Trail Project is to provide a safe transportation/
       recreational trail that connects the entire Highlands community. Initial funding for Trail
       Segment-1, Phases 1 and 2 to establish and pave a 10-ft wide trail from Oregon Way to
       Beech Street was received through the 2009 CDBG grant process. The CDBG grant
       contract was signed on December 14, 2009.

       The Engineering Staff applied for and received additional funding to improve and extend
       the Highlands Trail. CDBG 2010 grant funds in the amount of $ 350,000 were
       authorized to provide lighting and landscaping to Trail Segment 1. 2010 STPE funds
       totaling $ 350,000 that includes $ 35,000 in matching funds from the City of Longview
       were recently authorized to extend the paved, lighted and landscaped trail from Beech
       Street to Douglas Street. A summary of the project funding is shown in Table-1 below.
       All the funding should become available by the end of 2010.


       TABLE-1 FUNDING SOURCES
       Description        Funding Source                Local / Match        Totals
       Trail Segment-1    CDBG-2009                     City of Longview
       Paved OR-Way/Beech $ 352,001.50                  $ 47,998.50          $   400,000.00

       Trail Segment-1            CDBG-2010             No Matching
       Lighted & Landscaped       $ 350,000.00          Funds                $ 350,000.00

       Trail Segment-2         STP-E                    City of Longview
       Beech/Douglas           $ 315,000.00             $ 35,000.00          $ 350,000.00
       Paved,Lights,landscaped

       Total                                            $ 82,998.50          $ 1,100,000.00




                                                   61
Two conflicting projects have delayed the design concepts for the Highlands Trail
Project. Both projects have potential impact to the final alignment of the trail system.
Cascade Natural Gas recently completed the relocation of the natural gas main within the
Reserve area and the West Longview Sewer Main project is just under construction with
completion scheduled for the fall of 2010. Once the dust settles from the two
construction projects a final trail design concept can be determined.

The trail is planned for the 70-ft wide Reserve area south of the Highlands Plats. The
City of Longview owns a 30-ft wide section of the Reserve adjacent to the Highlands
Plats and the USA/BPA owns the remaining 40-ft wide section of the Reserve. Contact
with the Bonneville Power Administration and application for use of BPA Right of Way
is in process. A BPA easement will provide a suitable trail alignment within the Reserve
Area yet restrict the landscaping alternatives in order to comply with the North American
Electric Reliability Corp. stringent vegetation management standards for electric
transmission lines.

A single set of design plans and specs are planned that coordinates all of the project
funding noted above. Although a challenge there is a potential for savings for all phases
of the project. Through the summer of 2010 some preliminary survey work was
completed to aid in the alignment of the trail and the preliminary design concept plans.
The schedule to completion involves additional permits and applications, design
concepts, public input, final plans/specifications, bid advertisement, contract and
construction. Permits and design concepts should be complete by the end of 2010, public
input and final plans/specifications by March of 2011. Bid advertisement and contract
are planned for June 2011 with trail construction including lighting and pedestrian
amenities complete by the end of September 2011.

With receipt of the additional grant funding, commitment of matching funds from the
City of Longview and the use BPA Right of Way the goal to provide a safe paved
transportation/recreational trail with lighting, landscaping, access, and trail amenities
from Oregon Way to Douglas Street is in sight The entire project as it stands represents
1.3-miles of improve trail servicing the entire Highlands community.




Chris L. St.Onge
City of Longview Staff Engineer




                                            62
      




63
Highlands Neighborhood Trail Segment 1




              30-FT Longview




                     64
                             Proposed Crosswalk

                                     Reserve Area 70-ft Wide
     USA/BPA 30-ft                     Existing BPA            City of Longvie
                                       Easement 10 ft
    Additional Easement Required




Paved Trail 10-Ft                 Landscape Area 10-Ft


                        65
Subject: Annual CDBG Project Reports
      American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
         Highlands Infrastructure Project



The Highlands Street Lights project goal is to provide illumination for vehicular and pedestrian
traffic and improve pedestrian connectivity. There is only one existing streetlight on the 200
block of 25th Ave that provides very limited capacity and safety effectiveness. With this project,
seven new street lights with LED fixtures will be installed on 25th Ave. The existing street light
fixtures in the 200 block of 26th Ave will be replaced with LED lights. The LED fixtures will
provide energy savings and reduce maintenance cost. Additionally, assessable ramps on the
corners of Alabama St and 25th Ave / 26th Ave will be upgraded to ADA standards. The
sidewalks in the 200 block of 25th Ave and 26th Ave that are potential tripper hazards will be
replaced. Five (5) white dogwood trees would also be planted in the median located in the 200
block of 26th Ave.

Bids for this project were opened on April 6th, 2010. Three bids were received. The project was
awarded to Signal Electric in the amount of $87,695. The trees were planted in March by Parks
Department. The project construction is scheduled to start in August 2010 due to fabrication
time for the street lights material. Completion of the project is expected in September of 2010.
This project will provide more focused illumination for pedestrians, improved connectivity and
improved safety of the neighborhood.

Ivona Kininmonth
City of Longview
Staff Engineer




                                                66
Sign and Trees planted in the median on 26th Ave.




                       67
                        Existing Ramp on 25th Ave


New Ramp on 25th Ave.




                                   68
69
70
 

 




August 16, 2010


City of Longview
CAPER (Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report)


CAPital Investments IDA (Individual Development Account)
Final/Annual HOME and CDBG report for Program Year 2009 for Lower
Columbia CAP/



CAPital Investments IDA (Individual Development Accounts) has been in
existence since 2001 serving Cowlitz, Wahkiakum, Clark and Lewis County,
low and moderate income residents to establish savings, increase financial
literacy and obtain affordable assets.

CAPital Investments has contracted with Washington State Department of
Commerce (formerly CTED) and the US Department of Health and Human
Services, AFI (Assets for Independence) IDA program to provide a 2:1 match
of participant savings. The contract with the City of Longview CDBG funding
has provided a third match to this funding for potentially three (3) IDA
individuals or families seeking to purchase a first time home in the City of
Longview. Eighteen IDA account holders have been identified and notified of
eligibility of this 3:1 match offer. To qualify these account holders must have
lived in the city limits when applying for the IDA program, and must purchase
their home within the 400 Tax code identified through the county assessor’s
office. The CDBG match has been awarded for a first time home purchase.

By the end of this contract in June of 2010, only one IDA account holder has
been able to access the CDBG match offered by the City of Longview. Of the
eighteen account holders identified, only two have met the required eligibility
for this third match to their IDA savings. D. Berra was able to purchase a home
at 608 18th Ave in Longview in April of 2010. We have invoiced the City of
Longview for $2000.00 of CDBG funds which was extended as a third match to
the account holders savings of $2000.00. This match along with both the state
of Washington and Federal Asset For Independence IDA match brought her



                                  71
total down payment assistance to $8012.37. The other account holder, A. Sloan
purchased her home at 2460 Archwood Dr in Longview. She was not able to
access the CDBG match as she brought purchase documents in for her qualified
withdrawal one week before closing on her first time home purchase. Due to
the requirement of a completed Environmental Review, which requires a 30 –
60 day processing window, while offered to the participant, the match was
declined.

With the economic and housing crisis the US has weathered for the last few
years, it is now required for homebuyers to be even more stable in their income
source and credit scores. For low and moderate income first time homebuyers it
is also important they access down payment assistance programs and affordable
housing projects. There has been an increase in lenders requiring a higher
percentage of down payment of which the IDA program match funds are
designed to accommodate. Without the match funding available through the
IDA program, many of our low and moderate working families would not have
the opportunity or education to purchase their first home.

Over the last 10 years, asset building has emerged as a potent and proven
strategy to advance the lives of working low and moderate income households.
The central idea behind this approach is that the accumulation and ownership of
assets are critical to moving those at low economic status into the middle class.
Assets bring a sense of ownership, independence, and security that go well
beyond the benefits of monthly income. Asset Building activities such as those
offered through the CAPital Investments IDA program, support actions that
improve the financial savvy, behaviors, and decisions of low and moderate
income people, resulting in increased savings, and asset purchases such as; a
first time home, funding an education or starting a small business.

During the home buyer counseling provided by CAPital Investments IDA staff
to account holders indicating a first time home purchase as their desired asset,
account holders are introduced and directed to seek the services of several local
affordable housing options. These options include but are not limited to; CAP
Self Help Housing, Longview Housing Authority Section 8 Homeownership
vouchers, and SHARE programs, and Habitat for Humanity. Unfortunately IDA
accountholders utilizing these programs, because of their state and federal
funding sources, do not qualify for the City of Longview CDBG funds.

CAPital Investments IDA has had twenty-six first time home purchases
acquired within the dates of our CDBG contract. As previously mentioned only
two met the full requirements for the CDBG match. In addition, eight have
engaged in building their own home through the CAP Self Help Housing


                                  72
Project. Six have rehabilitated a local home through the LHA SHARE Program.
Two have utilized their Section 8 rental voucher and converted it to a mortgage
voucher through LHA and two have built and purchased their homes through
Habitat for Humanity. Six first time home purchases have been acquired within
Cowlitz County but outside the City of Longview 400 tax code.

In the four years of the current IDA program we have had 157 savers open IDA
accounts. 83 are still active with 39 indicating their asset purchase will be for
first time homeownership. As indicated, there have been 26 successful home
purchases since January 2008. Of the 26, only 18 have been qualified as eligible
for the City of Longview CDBG funding based on their address at the time of
intake being within the city limits. Due to their personal choice in where to
obtain additional funding for their purchase, or their choice of location for their
purchase, 16 have not had the ability to access this addition match funding.

We regretfully release the remaining unused funds of $4000.00 to the City of
Longview Community Development Department. We appreciate and support
the intent of these funds to increase the down payment potential for low and
moderate income home buyers, and regret that the use of these funds were not
maximized as intended. There has been every attempt by staff to engage our
account holders in this generous opportunity by the City of Longview and we
wish to thank the Community Development Staff, especially Julie Hourcle, for
her assistance and guidance through the entire two year process.



Signed by




Elizabeth Myntti
Lower Columbia CAP, Financial Independence Center
Program Manager
Lizm@lowercolumbiacap.org
360.425.3430x215




                                   73
August 18, 2010

Life Works Community Services Building
Annual CDBG Project Report for 2009
Life Works is dedicated to the following mission:

Transforming lives by building the capacity of individuals, families, organizations, and the
community to thrive and achieve their goals regardless of personal challenge
   • Promoting self determination, dignity, and respect
   • Creating opportunities for living, learning, working, and personal growth.

As a result of CDBG funding received from the City of Longview in 2007, Life Works was able to
purchase the property located at 906 New York Street in Longview. From January 1, 2009 to
December 31, 2009, Life Works completed a planning goal of creating a base of operations that
fits the current and future needs of the organization and the community. The name of the
strategic plan goal is the One Giant Step Capital Campaign.

Life Works has been able to reach new milestones concerning the project during 2009.

2009 Activities and Accomplishments: The agency made considerable progress towards goals
outlined in the One Giant Step Capital Campaign:
             • Fundraising continued and expanded due to early funding from the City of
                 Longview’s CDBG financial support. Grantors and private donors made
                 significant contributions to the One Giant Step captial campaign as well despite
                 the continued local and national economic downturns.
             • Life Works merged with the Adult Developmental Center (ADC)-Pathways to
                 Employment as of January 1, 2009. The agency was approached by the ADC
                 Board of Directors to research the possibility of a merger in 2008 to expand
                 vocational opportunities for people with disabilities in Cowlitz County.
             • The rehabilitation of the Life Works Community Services building was
                 completed in early November 2009 at a cost of $1.2 million. Life Works has a
                 mortgage for the portion of the One Giant Step capital campaign that was not
                 completed. Donations for the campaign have continued in 2010.
             • Life Works moved into the new facility in November of 2009. We vacated a
                 facility of approximately 6800 square feet, and moved into a facility of 18,000
                 square feet.
             • Non-profit groups from around Cowlitz County began using the community
                 room to provide services and hold meetings. Groups such as the Red Cross,
                 Stageworks, Longview Early Edition Rotary, Longview Noon Rotary, United
                 Way of Cowlitz County, the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, Big Brothers-Big Sisters, etc.
                 Currently, the community room averages 15-25 hours of extra community
                 services monthly through classes or services that are now available to the
                 community as a result of the space that is available.



                                               74
             •   The new facility offers more opportunities for children and adults with
                 disabilities and disadvantages to socialize and learn new skils. For example, the
                 kitchen area in the facility is used to offer cooking classes to people with
                 disabilities so they can gain independence skills, and learn healthy cooking
                 habits.
             •   Life Works is still creating new possibilities for children with disabilities and
                 disadvantages through new services, such as sensory equipment. This
                 equipment is not available until now for families with children with disabilities
                 (such as Autism) in Cowlitz County. Up until now, families would have to
                 travel to Vancouver or Portland to obtain services using this equipment at $100
                 to $150 an hour.
             •   The Community Service Center has allowed Life Works the freedom to explore
                 more vocational opportunities, such as a new business called Linen Works. We
                 can provide quality, affordable table linens for large or small events. People with
                 disabilities provide the labor for the business, and in turn, they gain new skills
                 and retain employment. The Service Center has the space for a new venture such
                 as Linen Works, to grow and create new ecnomic opportunities for our
                 community.
             •   Local labor was used to complete the project. Architect Craig Collins and JH
                 Kelly were instrumental in completing the rehabilitation of the facility. The
                 design of the facility allowed for the Life Works to move in, provide more
                 complete and extra services, and room for growth.
             •   Life Works hosted its first fundraising event called “Jeans & Jewels in New
                 York”. The warehouse portion of the facility was decorated to look like New
                 York city on September 26, 2010. Life Works raised over to $50,000.

Future: Life Works is making plans to move the ADC base of operations from 1024 Broadway,
Longview, to the new facility. The room available in the “warehouse” portion of the facility is
allowing the agency to grow its base of operations.

We are hosting our second annual Jeans & Jewels event with a Paris, France theme on
September 25, 2010. Life Works expects to exceed the funds raised at the 2009 event.

Each day, Life Works receives phone calls from community members seeking service for a friend,
a family member, or a child. Often, Life Works acts as a resource for people to find the most
appropriate service for their needs, even if it is not withing the scope of our services. We are
currently researching the possibility of adding a resource room that includes materials regarding
disabilities so that people can find the best services for their needs.

Conclusion: The City of Longview CDBG funding continues to enahnce Life Work’s ability to
further its mission to serve our community now and in the future. We are proud to partner with
the City of Longview to make our community a great place to live, work, and prosper.

Sincerely,



Wendy Keegan
Community Relations Administrator




                                                 75
     Life Works staff using the
     kitchen in the new facility for a
     cooking class.




     A child using sensory equipment
     at the new facility.




     A family using the sensory
     equipment. One of the children
     has Autism, but the siblings and
     Mom can share in the fun.




76
     The Life Works building in the
     process of rehabilitation during
     2009.




77
     Elementary school children using
     AmeriCorps room to create cards
     for Veterans.




     Front of Life Works Community
     Service Center – 2010.




     Weekly cooking class.




78
     Client open house, November 30,
     2009.




79
                  Progress Center
                             Early Intervention Program 
                            & Neuromuscular Clinic 
 
                           “Building a better community, one child at a time” 
 

                                               CDBG Entitlement Funds 
                                                         Project Report 
                                                          Aug. 17, 2010 
 

Here is the Progress Center’s project report for the past year regarding the CDBG Entitlement Funds awarded to the 
Progress Center in 2005, and the CDBG Entitlement Funds awarded to the Progress Center in April, 2010. 

The Progress Center is a non‐profit organization providing early intervention services to infants and toddlers with 
developmental delays, high risk of developmental delays, and special health care needs.  As a Level One Neuromuscular 
Development Clinic, the Progress Center is the Local Lead Agency for children from birth to three in Cowlitz and 
Wahkiakum Counties. 

In 2005, the Progress Center facility at 1600 3rd Ave. was bursting at the seams.  We sought the Entitlement Funds to 
partially fund expansion of our building.  The purpose of the expansion was threefold:  to allow us to increase outpatient 
services, to treat drug‐affected children and to provide respite care for children with special health care needs.  In 2005 
Progress Center was awarded $217,867.75, which was used to purchase the land adjacent to our property, and to fund 
architectural and engineering services to develop plans and specifications for the expansion.  In 2006 the Progress 
Center returned $31,489.17 of unused grant funds to the City of Longview. 

In 2006, Cowlitz County Commissioners sponsored the Progress Center’s application for a Community Development 
Block Grant for $729,756.74 to fund completion of the addition.  In the interim, Progress Center’s service delivery was 
substantially changed by federal mandate to provide Birth‐3 early intervention services in natural settings, most 
commonly in children’s homes.  This change dramatically reduced the use of the classrooms and therapy rooms in our 
facility, and we were not successful in securing the CDBG funding. 

The acquisition of the adjacent land makes it possible for the Progress Center to expand its facility.  For the past two 
year, with clearer interpretation of the “natural environments” requirement, and with the addition therapeutic services 
for children older than three, the Progress Center is again bursting at the seams.   

 

 
           1600 Third Avenue •  Longview, WA 98632 • (360) 425‐9810 • Fax (360) 425‐1053 • Email: eiworks@theprogresscenter.org 
                                                                   80
                                                     “An Equal Opportunity Employer” 
                  Progress Center
                             Early Intervention Program 
                            & Neuromuscular Clinic 
 
                           “Building a better community, one child at a time” 
 

 

In December, 2009, the Progress Center Board of Directors voted to proceed with construction of a detached addition to 
our facility.  The scope of use of the facility has been narrowed, and will be used to provide larger and improved 
therapeutic treatment facilities for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  The new facility will free up space in the 
existing center, and allow us to use a team approach to treat children with sensory disorders. 

Architect Craig Collins was hired for the project, and completed the plans.  Following City of Longview approval of the 
plans, a call for bid was placed, and bids opened June 24.  Pacific Tech Construction of Longview, with a total bid of 
$284,102.00 was the low bidder.  A total of six contractors submitted bids for the project. 

The construction contract for the project was signed Aug. 16, 2010, and construction scheduled to begin Aug. 24, 2011.  
The Progress Center will host a ground breaking ceremony on Aug. 23, 2010 at noon. 

In February, 2010, the Progress Center submitted a proposal to the City of Longview for consideration for CDBG funding 
in 2010.  The proposal was well‐received, and in April, Progress Center was awarded $100,000.00 for construction of the 
new facility. 

The board and staff of the Progress Center are very excited that the new facility is coming to fruition, and that this will 
be our last “in‐process” report.  When this report is filed in 2011, the project will have been complete for several 
months. 

The Progress Center is a place where miracles occur on a daily basis.  It is an honor for us to have the opportunity to help 
the community’s infants and toddler prepare for success in their lives.  The support of the City of Longview has been 
invaluable to our ability to meet the needs of the children, and we appreciate it very much. 

Sincerely, 




                                    

Philip L. Olson 
Executive Director 
 

 

 
           1600 Third Avenue •  Longview, WA 98632 • (360) 425‐9810 • Fax (360) 425‐1053 • Email: eiworks@theprogresscenter.org 
                                                                   81
                                                     “An Equal Opportunity Employer” 
82
                        Lower Columbia CAP
                         HELP Warehouse
                        CDBG Annual Report

The Board of Directors and staff of Lower Columbia CAP wish to express our sincere
appreciation to the Longview City Council for your support of Help Warehouse. The CDBG
funds allotted by the City for the Help Warehouse are crucial to the programs.

The Help Warehouse distribution center started in 1982, to increase local food donations by
having a central point where food could be collected, sorted, and distributed to seven local area
food banks. The Longview food banks include Salvation Army, FISH (which includes 17
churches), and St. Vincent de Paul. These food banks serve approximately 7800 Longview
residents each month. Approximately 43% of the food distributed from these food banks comes
from the Help Warehouse.

The Help Warehouse receives, organizes, and distributes the USDA commodities on a monthly
basis. Currently, six of the seventeen distribution sites serve Longview citizens. The Help
Warehouse delivers commodities to 4 Longview senior apartments complexes, Applied
Industries, and has 2 home bounds routes. St. Vincent de Paul provides evening distribution of
commodities once a month to better serve the working poor who are employed in lower-paying
jobs and cannot make it to the food banks during the day. The remaining clientele receive their
commodities directly from Help Warehouse. During 2009 an average of 358 Longview families
received USDA government commodities each month from the nine Longview sites, an increase
of 43% over the previous year.

In addition, Help Warehouse provides emergency services (blankets, infant formula, diapers, and
personal care items), and assists people in applying for the Basic Food Quest Card (formerly
called Food Stamps). Other services include Administration of the Homeless Prevention and
Rapid Rehousing Program (HPRP), and the organization of a “Back to School” haircut program.

The CDBG funds from the City of Longview ($54,495.00) help defray the cost of operating the
Help Warehouse. More specifically, funds are used for the salaries for the warehouse staff that
coordinate, collect and distribute the food, and gas and maintenance of the Help Warehouse
vehicles which carry food from places such as the discount food buying services in Seattle, the
dairies in Yelm, and the fish hatcheries to Longview.

With two full-time and two part-time (3.5 FTE) staff, the Help Warehouse distributed 1,136,947
pounds of food last year. This was only possible due to the dedication and support of over 100
volunteers who served a total of 7631 hours during 2009, at an average total of 634 hours each
month. The Help Warehouse strengthens our community by addressing the nutritional needs of
our most vulnerable citizens.

Sincerely,



Ilona Kerby
Executive Director
Lower Columbia CAP 1526 Commerce Avenue Longview WA 98632
                                      83                                 360-425-3430
                Family Finance Resource Center
              A Non-Profit Community Development Corporation
   Assistance, Counseling, and Advocacy for creating stable families and communities
                   1312 Hemlock Street, Longview,WA 98632
                               360-423-9197


Dear City of Longview Staff and Leadership,

We are excited to announce the success and accomplishments of the Homeowner
Foreclosure Avoidance Counseling program. The Family Finance Resource Center
(FFRC) is a Community Development Corporation which concentrates on assisting
families by encouraging positive socio-economic change. Our mission is to identify local
needs and trends in order to protect a family’s ability to achieve economic stability.

Our primary goal for this program is to preserve responsible and affordable
homeownership. The Family Finance Resource Center has helped 189 homeowners of the
City of Longview since 2007 with foreclosure prevention counseling.
During the program period from November 1st, 2009 to July 31st, 2010 the FFRC has
assisted 51 homeowners in the City of Longview, in which 10 were qualified for the
CDBG program.

This program is designed to provide homeowner counseling services aimed at foreclosure
intervention for qualified low-income citizens of the City of Longview. This program
provides guidance to homeowners at risk of default on their mortgage and assists them in
proactive communication with their lender. The intent is to preserve homeownership by
offering a sustainable and affordable mortgage payment that benefits both borrower and
lender.

The Family Finance Resource Center is focused on helping these citizens in need and
preventing the local housing market from further erosion due to foreclosures and defaults
within the City of Longview and Cowlitz County. The strategic objectives we have
established for dealing with these issues include one-on-one counseling, direct
intervention with lenders, and community outreach. Our focus is to assist homeowners in
communication with their lender on their underlying financial issues and life variables, in
order to pursue options to resolve their mortgage default. We have gained the support
and referrals from community advocates and real estate professionals which has been
crucial in reaching homeowners in need in a timely manner.

The national real estate and mortgage crisis has made the scope and magnitude of our
efforts even more imperative. We project that the numbers of foreclosures will continue
to increase with rising unemployment and the decreased job opportunities in Cowlitz
County. Loss of employment and insufficient savings are the main reasons why local
homeowners seek our counseling services.



                                            84                                            1
We are proud of our successes and accomplishments by helping one homeowner at a
time, and we measure our positive outcomes with saving a home and a family in the
community. Our goal is to maintain the Foreclosure Prevention Counseling program and
to effectively utilize this resource to insure its future for our community.

We thank you for the continued support and concern for the citizens of our community
and the City of Longview’s leadership and vision.

Sincerely,



Alex Kamaunu
Executive Director
Family Finance Resource Center




                                          85                                           2
                              Archie Anderson Park Master Plan
                                    CDBG Project Report
Summary
Longview Parks & Recreation Department received a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to
master plan a redesign of Archie Anderson Park due to the age and condition of the park. This project
includes hiring a park planning and design consulting firm to work with staff and neighborhood partners
to redesign the park with public input. The project is in collaboration with neighborhood partners which
include the Highlands Neighborhood Association, Highlands Activity & Beatification Committee, and
Central Youth Baseball. Listed below are the planning steps, progress, accomplishments and process
through July 31, 2010 and a projection of tasks to complete the project.

Project Overview (schedule & time line)
Completed
November 24, 2009 – Distributed Request For Proposals (RFP) to firms
December 21, 2009 – RFP due date
January 12 & 13, 2010 – Selection Committee interviewed consultant firms
February 3, 2010 – Selection Committee chose consultant (MIG) to negotiate an agreement
March 19, 2010 – Agreement for Master Planning Services signed with consultant
April 14, 2010 – Site Analysis performed by consultant
April 14, 2010 – Stake Holder Interview held by consultant
May 24, 2010 – Vision Workshop held to obtain public input
June & July 2010 – Consultant worked on design options
Projected Timeline
August 2010 – Conduct a design open house at the park to get public input on design options
September & October 2010 – Final plan design completed

Request for RFP
On November 24, 2009 Longview Recreation distributed a Request for Proposals from landscape
architect firms to complete the park master plan with public input. The firms were qualified on the City
of Longview consultant roster. Firms in the cities Consultant Database 2009 from southwest Washington
and surrounding areas were notified along with the State of Washington Office of Minority & Women’s
Business Enterprises. We received eight proposals from firms by the December 21, 2009 deadline. Staff
reviewed the proposals and disqualified two firms due to their proposals not being complete. Interviews
were set for six firms which provided complete proposals as outlined in the RFP.



                   Parks & Recreation Department, 2920 Douglas Street, Longview WA 98632


                                                    86
Consultant Interviews
Six firms were selected to interview based on their RFP. The selection committee included the following
people from staff and community partners involved in the planning project:
Janice Barrera, Highlands Neighborhood Association
Liz Haeck, Highlands Neighborhood Association
Dave Grumbois, Highlands Activity & Beautification Committee
Jason Cook, Cowlitz on the Move healthy lifestyles coalition
Rich Bemm, Parks & Recreation Department
Dick Mueller, Parks & Recreation Department
Central Youth Baseball did not chose to send a representative

The following firms where interviewed:
January 12
3 pm – JD Walsh
4 pm - Berger
5 pm – Mayer-Reed
January 13
3 pm – AKS
4 pm – Landcurrent
5 pm – MIG

Each firm presented their proposal and answered questions from the committee. The selection
committee discussed and rated the firms. We had two that stood out and were considered finalists for
further consideration. These were JD Walsh from Vancouver, Washington and MIG from Portland,
Oregon. The selection committee decided to conduct reference checks on these two firms before making
a final decision. During the last two weeks of January staff conducted several reference checks on each
firm. After completing reference checks the committee agreed on MIG as the firm selected to negotiate
an agreement for the park master plan project.

Consultant Firm Selected
On February 3, 2010 MIG was selected by the committee and staff negotiated an agreement, based on
the CDBG proposal, to complete the Archie Anderson Park master plan with public input. An agreement
was signed in March with MIG and the city after negotiating the services to be performed in the
planning process and agreeing upon a scope of work.

Site Analysis
On April 14, 2010 the consulting firm MIG performed a site analysis in preparation of the park plan.
The firm’s park planner and designer did a through analysis of the features, amenities, utilities, and other
items at the park. MIG staff met with parks employees at the park and in the office to obtain all the
historical and pertinent information, designs, and plans of the park.

Stake Holder Interviews
On April 14, 2010 skate holder interviews were held with community members and organizations that
have a vested interest or are a major user of the park. The following is a list of organizations interviewed
and schedule.
3:00 pm - Interview with Longview Police Sergeant Ray Hartley
3:30 pm - Interview with Longview Youth Soccer representative Fabio Aloe

                                                     87
4:00 pm - Interview with Cowlitz on the Move health lifestyle coalition representative Jason Cook &
Lower Columbia School Gardens representative Ian Thompson
4:30 pm - Interview with Highlands Activity & Beatification Committee representatives Cindy Helms &
Dave Grumbois
5:15 pm - Interview with Highlands Neighborhood Association representatives Janice Barrera & Liz
Haeck
6:00 pm - Interview with Central Youth Baseball League representatives Tom Shipley & Alisa Shipley

During stake holder interviews representatives were asked about the parks opportunities and limitations
and also about their organizations needs at the park. The firm planning the park explained the planning
time line, process, and public input opportunity to each representative.

Vision Workshop
To obtain public input a Neighborhood Park Vision Workshop was held on Monday, May 24 at 6:00 pm
in St. Helens School gym. On May 17 a flyer was printed in both English & Spanish was sent home
from school and delivered by Highland Neighborhood Association volunteers to neighborhood residents.
The flyers were also provided to and available at the Ethnic Support Council, Lifeworks and Longview
Senior Center. At the May 24th workshop a Spanish translator from the Ethnic Support Council was
available. On May 24th in place of the regular Highlands Neighborhood Association meeting we held the
Vision Workshop to obtain public input for the park plan. The consultations used an interactive graphic
approach as they informed the residents about the planning process, showed photos or other parks, and
collected public input and ideas about the park plan. There were over 60 people in attendance at the
workshop.

Park Design Options
During June and July MIG consultants worked to create five draft park design plans to prepare for the
second public input meeting to be held in August. The design plans will be based on information and
input provided during stake holder interviews and from the vision workshop.

Park Design Open House
There will be a Park Design Open House at Archie Anderson Park in August as part of the 3 on 3
Basketball Tournament held by the Highlands Activity & Beatification Committee, Movie in the Park
shown by the Highlands Neighborhood Association, and Prevention Fair conducted by the Family
Health Center. This will be the second public involvement opportunity for residents of the neighborhood
and community to provide input on the park plan and design. MIG will present two alternate park design
plans at the open house for resident to comment on and provide their input. The designs are based on the
input from the vision workshop and stake holder interviews.

Final Plan
The consulting firm MIG will work on the final plan based on information and input residents and
neighborhood partners provided at the Park Design Open House. During September and October MIG’s
planners and designer will work with staff and neighborhood partners to finalize the park master plan.

Submitted By:
Dick Mueller
Dick Mueller
Recreation Superintendent

                                                   88
Archie Anderson Park Master Plan “Vision Workshop” held May 24, 2010 at St. Helens School




                                                     




                                                                                             




                                                             
                                           89
Head Start Center Feasibility Plan

Background and Project Summary

The Lower Columbia College Head Start / ECEAP program provides early
childhood education and family support services to low-income families in
Cowlitz County. Using a shared administrative platform, LCC delivers both
the federally funded Head Start program and the Washington State funded
ECEAP program. In combining both programs, LCC has created a one-stop
child and family development program that is currently able to serve
approximately 500 Cowlitz County children.

In late 2008, the City of Longview allocated CDBG funds ($25,000) to the
Lower Columbia College Head Start / ECEAP program (Head Start) for a one-
year project to assist the program with solving three key facilities challenges:
        1) Identifying the best option for relocating the program’s
           administrative facilities to a new, long-term location;
        2) Addressing concerns about the program’s continued dependence on
           the aging Broadway School facility; and
        3) Addressing a potential need for expanded classroom facilities
           because of program expansion through the addition of Early Head
           Start (EHS) services.

The process for addressing these challenges kicked off in earnest in February
2009 with the hiring of a planning consultant, ShoreBank Enterprise Cascadia
(SBEC). Initially, SBEC worked with Head Start / ECEAP staff to evaluate
the potential need for new facilities, the ideal size and location for new
facilities, and options for capitalizing the construction / renovation of new
facilities. A community-based Advisory Committee assisted SBEC and Head
Start program staffs in this approach.

This team placed an early emphasis in the process on developing a program
statement for an “ideal” new Head Start facility. Conceptually, this new
facility would replace the current administration building, absorb classroom
capacity currently located at the Broadway Learning Center, and provide
additional expansion classrooms for the anticipated development of an Early
Head Start (EHS) program for Cowlitz County.

The initial Program Statement (included in the final report) provided a clear
look at the need for an additional facility. It identified an ideal-sized building




CDBG Report, August 13, 2010                                                         pg
Lower Columbia College Head Start
                               90
to be in the range of 14,000 square feet. Specifically, the building would be able to
accommodate:
        • The relocation of four existing Broadway School classrooms to a new facility;
        • Two new Early Head Start Classrooms capable of serving 60 new children;
        • Two new Head Start / ECEAP classrooms capable of serving 80 new children; and
        • A new suite of meeting rooms and office spaces that will unlock access to 1-2
            additional existing classrooms in East and West, allowing for additional service
            expansion of 40-80 new children.

While this building could directly address the primary facilities challenges facing Head Start, it
became clear that a building of this scale had a very limited set of site options, and would
generate an overall price tag that put it on a very long-term capitalization timeline (3-5 years).
Given Head Start’s potential need for short-term EHS classrooms (12 months) and mid-term
options for new administrative space (2-3 years), the Advisory Committee opted to pursue a
different strategy.

Given the constraints outlined above, the Advisory Committee and Head Start staff decided to
narrow the focus of the project on three key goals:
       1. Provide new capacity for Early Head Start or expanded Head Start / ECEAP
          programming.
          A new Early Head Start program will require a minimum of two additional
          classrooms. Pursuit of ARRA expansion funds for Head Start will require a minimum
          of two additional classrooms.
       2. Create additional administration and office space through relocation of 1-2 East and
          West Building classrooms to off-campus locations.
          Current facilities are not adequate for current operations. Relocation of existing
          classrooms to off-site locations could create space for additional administrative
          activities on campus.
       3. Add capacity for large and small meetings.
           Current facilities cannot accommodate the current demand for large meetings, and
           are just adequate for smaller meetings and parent conference needs.

Working with the consultant, Head Start staff identified options for new EHS classrooms that
could accommodate EHS programming within the year. Second, the consultant began
investigations into off campus sites that could potentially accommodate a new classroom facility.
Third, staff continued to search for additional funding opportunities that could support the
immediate construction or remodel of a facility.

On this last point, Head Start staff were made aware of a one-time Head Start Regional Office
grant option in July 2009 that would provide up to $350,000 in funding for a new administrative
facility. Acting quickly, Head Start and LCC identified a potential site on-campus that would
accommodate a new building, a roughly .20 acre site directly adjacent to the “West Building”
which houses both Head Start and LCC’s Home and Family Life program. The proposed
building would replace the current administration “house” with a new 3,700 sq. ft. building,


CDBG Report, August 13, 2010                                                                   pg. 2
Lower Columbia College Head Start
                                                 91
providing both some expansion room for Head Start administration activities, and allowing LCC
to plan a future use for the current administration building.

In September of 2009, Head Start convened the project Advisory Committee to solicit guidance
on the changing nature of the project. The Advisory Committee agreed that a redirected focus on
an owned or leased facility in the Highlands neighborhood of Longview would be the preferred
off-campus outcome. In addition, the Committee agreed that further collaboration with the
Longview School District at the Broadway School site could provide a short-term solution to any
additional space needs. The Committee also agreed that, pending the receipt of the grant
application described above, Head Start would pursue the renovation of a building on the LCC
campus to create a new administrative office facility and to add classroom space.

In Late September 2009, Head Start learned that the grant application to the Head Start Regional
Office was approved for $155,500 toward a new facility. In collaboration with the LCC
administration, Head Start moved quickly to find additional funding that would be sufficient to
support a scaled-down version of the original proposal. The final project was reduced in size to
fit a smaller budget, but was given approval by LCC. The project broke ground in summer 2010,
and will include administrative and expanded meeting space on the LCC campus.

Parallel to the development of an on-campus facility, Head Start and the consulting team
developed a strategy in the Highlands neighborhood focused on a) finding a suitable location for
either a new, modular building, or b) partnering with another institution/organization to build or
renovate an existing structure. The final “Community-based Expansion Memo” included in the
final report details the results of the Highlands strategy.

In Spring 2010, because of the renewed focus on developing a facility in the Highland
neighborhood, Head Start received word that a privately owned facility in the neighborhood was
potentially available for Head Start use. The facility, located on the west side of the Highlands,
was previously used both as a childcare facility and as an off-campus Head Start classroom.

Negotiations are currently underway, but it appears that Head Start will be able to program this
facility for classroom use for the 2010-2011 school year in partnership with the Highlands
Neighborhood Association (HNA).

Finally, Head Start agreed with the Longview School District on revised terms for use of the
Broadway School. Two classrooms are currently being renovated at the Broadway School to
meet the needs of Infants and Toddlers in the new Early Head Start program.

Specific Accomplishments and Successes This Year

   •   Developed baseline program statement for new Head Start administrative and classroom
       space;
   •   Developed Revised Program Statement for new Head Start administrative and classroom
       space;
CDBG Report, August 13, 2010                                                                  pg. 3
Lower Columbia College Head Start


                                                92
   •   Identified alternative classroom sites;
   •   Secured sites for Early Head Start classrooms;
   •   Requested funding for new administrative facility;
   •   Secured funding for new administrative facility;
   •   Began construction on new administrative facility;
   •   Began exploration of site options for a new, neighborhood-based classroom facility; and
   •   Secured a new neighborhood-based classroom facility (Highlands) and expanded an
       existing neighborhood-based classroom facility (Broadway).


Noted Difficulties/Problems This Year

Time and resources reshaped this project yet delivered the desired results. The worsening local
and national economy caused potential building collaborators to withdraw their interest in the
project because of the uncertainty of their funding. Longview Housing Authority desired a
building to serve the downtown Longview area, away from target Head Start families.

Federal funding for a larger on-campus structure was cut in half, forcing the downsizing of the
project to fit the available financial resources. The completion of the new addition to the Head
Start West Building will happen by year’s end.

Award of the Early Head Start grant to serve pregnant women and children from birth to three
necessitate the rapid setup of classroom and office space at the Broadway Learning Center. If
the program expands in the near future, additional classroom space will be hard to find.

The opportunity to share a facility with the Highlands Neighborhood Association (HNA) can be
beneficial to both parties. Foundation funds for the HNA will expire in two years and Head Start
will need to be diligent in finding another partner agency, if new funds are not made available to
HNA.

The CDBG Project with the City of Longview is complete. Lower Columbia College Head
Start/Early Head Start/ECEAP is extremely grateful for the support and opportunity to expand
our services to the low-income children and families in Longview with expanded and new
facilities.

Sincerely,



Sandra Junker
Director




CDBG Report, August 13, 2010                                                                  pg. 4
Lower Columbia College Head Start


                                                93
                  Attachments: Construction and classroom photos




                                     Highlands Center

Renovation at Broadway Learning                  Renovation / construction for Head
Center for Early Head Start Program              Start / EHS / ECEAP Administration
                                                 Building on campus of LCC




 CDBG Report, August 13, 2010                                                   pg. 5
 Lower Columbia College Head Start


                                            94
                                          “You know, helping people you can’t talk down to them, it’s not telling them
                                          what to do. It’s listening to what they need.” Sherri Fittro




OUR GOAL
Our continuing objective is to bring a residential facility to the Longview Community that will aide in the transition of those recently
disabled, from rehab out into the world as contributing members of the community. The Sherri Fittro Building will become a resource to
provide opportunities for transitional individuals while at the same time offer opportunities to give back.

Sherri Fittro applied for a 2007 CDBG Planning grant for a feasibility study to design a transitional apartment complex with commercial
and supportive services for persons with recent spinal cord injuries in order to assist them while they gain their independence and
transition back to work and life in general.

Sherri had a spinal cord injury due to a car accident at the age of 27. It is through this direct experience that her vision of creating a
housing complex with supportive services could help others newly disabled. Sherri overcame her injury through perseverance, living
mostly independently, and working as the Tutor Coordinator at Lower Columbia College. She was an inspiration to all that knew her.

THE SHERRI FITTRO BUILDING
The Sherri Fittro Building is a transitional living facility for those who have recently suffered a spinal cord injury or certain types of brain
injuries. This facility provides term residential living specialized to these types of handicaps as well as commercial and resource accom-
modations intended to provide work options to those residing in the building.

Transitional independence is providing a support structure for those who need the time to make adjustments for independent living,
develop skills to help them return as contributing members of their community and a beacon for hope as those in need learn how to
best help themselves. Our programs will serve these needs by giving those with spinal cord injuries a place to live that is equipped with
cutting edge accessibility equipment and appliances which will allow them to handle many day-to-day tasks themselves. Our work
programs and educational support will generate perhaps the most important element of this new stage of their lives – options. After
their term as residents in our facility our hope is that we have provided a vital boost in their transition.




                                                                       95
OUR PROGRESS

            We have structured our research to discover the most economical way to maximize the use of the Sherri
            Fittro transitional living facility as a resource to those with this type of need. We have done this by
            researching the specific practical needs of individuals that would use this facility, especially in the Longview
            area.
            We have interviewed individuals recently handicapped from Vancouver, Los Angeles and San Diego to
            assess the initial primary concerns of those that would be candidates for residence in the facility and have
            included these findings in our presentational report.
            Although the Sherri Fittro Building will be a unique hybrid of some of these facilities, we have visited rehab
            centers, residential centers and other institutes similar to what we are looking to create. These facilities are
            located in Portland OR, Medford OR, San Diego CA and Scottsdale AZ. We have consulted with the adminis-
            trators of these facilities as to the services and programs that they provide and the staffing required to
            maintain their operations. We have extrapolated the relevant aspects to our project into our presentational
            report.
            We have consulted with a specialty manufacturing company in Milwaukee WI as to the building consideration
            and requirements for such a facility as well as researching the contemporary technologies available to
            accommodate self sustained handicapped living. Whether it be residential appliances or equipment of a
            rehabilitory nature, we have worked these costs into our budget for design construction.
            We have designed a website that will be launching in conjunction with our presentation to aide the founda-
            tion in fund raising and providing information to potential partners.
            LA Design Studio has aided us in developing materials the include and organize all of our findings into a
            comprehensive presentation to the City of Longview which we are very excited to share.
            Doug Geerdes, a brilliant young architect based in Portland has developed a compelling and appropriate
            design that is based on the architectural spirit of Downtown Longview as well as provides creative solutions
            for a special use of space.
            Our budget provides a specific assessment of the financial need required to construct and equip the facility
            as well as planning a 5-year financial a business plan to project the costs of continually maintaining its
            programs.

OUR CURRENT CALENDAR

Final Presentational Adjustments:
We are in the process of completing our budget assesment along with updating
our report with current need statistics.
Our planning presentation:
Upon internal review, our report should be ready for presentation before the end
of the year.
                                                                                                      Johnathan Harris
                                                                                                      PRESIDENT Sherri Fittro Foundation
                                                                    96
       Part 4

Citizen Participation




          97
98
                                  City of Longview
                      REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
            Do you have a project idea? Grants & Loans Available
             2009 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program
                     2009 HOME Program (Longview & Kelso)
                     2009 Document Recording Fee Program

 COMMUniTy DEvELOPMEnT BLOCK GRAnT
 This program was created to develop viable urban communities by providing decent
 housing, create a suitable living environment, and expand economic opportunities for
 low- and moderate-income persons. Project activities must principally benefit Longview
 residents.
 	          ■ Housing
 	          ■	Community Facilities                    ■	Local Match.
 	          ■	Public Facilities                       ■	Public Services
 	          ■	Economic Development                    ■	Planning Activities

         Approximately $236,000 will be available on a locally
                  competitive basis. Projects must:
      ■		Principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons; or
      ■		Prevent or eliminate slums or blight
  Additional funding is available for Public Services up to approxi-
  mately $54,495. Planning funding is also available. Funded through
the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    Proposals for CDBG must be submitted by February 2, 2009.
           City Council Public Hearing/Project Selection -
                 Thursday, March 26, 2009 at 7:00 PM

HOME Program for Affordable Housing
Longview - This program provides funding to
agency and business “partners” to increase and
maintain affordable housing in Longview and
Kelso. Housing projects must target persons
with incomes less than 80% of the Cowlitz
County Median Income based on family size.
A draft 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan will guide project priorities. Approximately
$194,000 in funding is available in Longview.

Kelso - The City of Kelso will target housing projects as it drafts housing priori-
ties for the 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan. Approximately $64,715 in funding is
available in Kelso.
Funded through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Document Recording Fee
This Longview program provides for a variety of housing projects for persons
with incomes below 50% of the Median Income for Cowlitz County based on
family size. Operation and maintenance of Housing Trust Fund projects and
shelters are also eligible under this program. Approximately $50,000 is
available for funding in Longview. Funded by the Cowlitz County Document
Recording Fee Surcharge.
Proposals for HOME & Document Recording Fee projects are due by March 2, 2009.
     Longview City Council Public                   Kelso City Council Public
  Hearing/Project Selection - Thursday,        Hearing/Project Selection - Tuesday,
       April 23, 2009 at 7:00 PM                    April 21, 2009 at 7:00 PM
All projects will be available for public review one week prior to their public hearing.
        For more information, technical assistance and Project Design Form
     Contact Julie Hourcle’, 360.442.5081, 8 AM. - 5 PM, Monday through Friday.
                       E-mail: julie.hourcle@mylongview.com                          351672

                                          99
     2009 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
        2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
             Longview Project Design Allocations
               Join Us for two Public Hearings
Speak in Support of Selecting One or More of the Projects Below
The Longview Community Development Block Grant Program
This program was created to develop viable urban communities by providing decent
housing, a suitable living environment, and expand economic opportunities principally
for low- and moderate-income persons. Project activities may center on housing,
community facilities, public facilities, and economic development or funding may
be used as a local match. Public services and planning activities may also be funded.
Funded through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  Project Design Proposals are available for review at the Longview City Hall,
   Community Development Department, 1525 Broadway, Monday-Friday,
         8 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by calling 442-5081 for further information.
Main Entitlement Projects
Estimated Available $349,832.45 (includes Program Income) Requested $400,000
Highlands Neighborhood Trail – Construct a 10’ wide 5,250 lineal foot paved
recreational trail from Oregon Way to Beech St. along the Dike at the south edge
(100-200 Blocks) of the neighborhood. A future phase (not funded) will include
lighting and landscaping.
City of Longview Public Works Department $400,000
Public Service Projects – Estimated Available $54,495 Requested $54,495
HELP Warehouse – Support food bank services to Longview residents.
Lower Columbia Community Action Program $54,495
Planning Projects – Estimated Available $18,165*           Requested $20,000
Archie Anderson Park Master Plan – Develop a master plan for a park
located within Highlands neighborhood. A landscape architectural firm will be
hired to bring together concepts for park improvements suggested by various
community partners.
City of Longview Parks & Recreation Dept. $20,000.
*Any remaining amount goes back to Administration funding.
           2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has been developed by Congress
to provide an economic stimulus to the U. S. Economy. Its primary purpose is to
provide or create jobs. Congress has provided some of this money on a formula
basis to CDBG Entitlement programs amounting to 27% of its 2008 CDBG Program
Year’s allocation. Project must benefit low and moderate income persons and meet
CDBG eligibility. This program requires that projects can be undertaken within 120
days of HUD approval. Therefore, the City of Longview considered projects which
were submitted for 2009 CDBG funding and can begin immediately.
Funded through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Main Entitlement Projects
Available - $98,660.00      Remaining Available - $15,204.05
Campus Towers Bath Tub Conversion – Modify bathtub sides to allow
walk-in entry for showers to improve elderly safety and hygiene.
Campus Towers $83,455.95
Public Hearing Date & Time:                 Thursday, March 26, 2009 at 7:00 PM
Place:                                      Longview City Hall Council Chambers
                                            1525 Broadway, Longview WA
The purpose of these Public Hearings are to provide information on the Community
Development Block Grant Program and the American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act and identify community development needs and project designs eligible for
funding, hear public comment particularly from low and moderate-income persons
regarding proposed projects, ensure broad-based community support for a project,
and select projects for funding.
Anyone interested may appear and be heard in regard to this public hearing. The
Longview City Hall is accessible for persons with disabilities. Please let us know
24 hours in advance if you will need any special accommodations to attend the
meeting or an interpreter. If you are unable to attend, you may direct written
                                         100
correspondence the Longview City Clerk, PO Box 128, Longview, WA 98632.
For further information, contact Julie Hourcle’ at 442.5081.
                    Longview-Kelso HOME Consortium
                   Affordable Housing
             2009 Project Design Allocations
                    - Join Us for Public Hearings -
   Speak in Support of Selecting One or More of the Projects Below

                        The HOME Investment Partnerships Program
    This program provides funding to agency and business “partners” to increase and maintain
affordable housing in Longview and Kelso. Projects must target persons with incomes less than 80%
  of the Cowlitz County Median Income based on family size. Funded by the U.S. Department of
                                Housing and Urban Development.
Project Design Proposals are available for review at: Longview City Hall (1525 Broadway, Longview)
& Kelso City Hall (203 S. Pacific, Kelso) Community Development Departments, and Monday-Friday,
                                            8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

                          2009 Longview HOME Project Summaries
Amount Estimated Available $194,195                           Amount Requested $212,000
  Campus Towers Bath Tub Conversion – Modify bathtub sides to allow walk-in entry for showers to
      improve elderly safety and hygiene. Campus Towers Remaining amount up to $92,000
(This project originally requested CDBG/ARRA Stimulus funding but was not funded. Campus Towers
                  has requested to be considered for remaining 2009 HOME funding.)
               Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity Longview – Building HOPE 2009-2010
     Acquisition, permits, and infrastructure of 2 parcels of property to construct 2 to 3 homes for
   low income families. Demolition costs may be included. Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity
                                                 $120,000

                             2009 Kelso HOME Project Summaries
Amount Estimated Available $64,715                                 Amount Requested $67,660
                 Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity Kelso – Building HOPE 2009-2010
Acquisition, infrastructure, utility and construction permit costs for a single-family or multi-family lot in
    Kelso. Demolition costs may be included. Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity $40,000
      Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Cowlitz County Drug and/or HOPE Court Participants
 Provide rental assistance to 2 families/individuals for 15 months. Kelso Housing Authority $13,830
   Tenant Based Rental Assistance for Domestic Violence Survivors – Provide rental assistance to 2
               families/individuals for 15 months. Kelso Housing Authority $13,830
                       Longview Document Recording Fee Program
  This Longview program provides for a variety of housing projects for persons with incomes below
50% of the Median Income for Cowlitz County based on family size. Operation and maintenance of
Housing Trust Fund projects and shelters are also eligible under this program. Funded by the Cowlitz
                           County Document Recording Fee Surcharge.

            2009 Longview Document Recording Fee Project Summaries
Available Amount $39,715.61                                        Requested $85,134
Cedar Group Home Rehabilitation – Install new fire panel, repair exterior roof rafter, and siding for a
           developmentally disabled group home. Residential Resources $24,134
  Community House on Broadway Operations – Provide 12-months of support for operations at the
          Longview area homeless shelter. Community House on Broadway $24,000
  Emergency Support Shelter Operating Costs – Provide support for operations to the community’s
       women’s shelter for domestic violence victims. Emergency Support Shelter $15,000
     Habitat for Humanity Construction Support Operating Costs – Provide support for funding
 construction supervision for building affordable Habitat homes in Longview for low-income families.
                            Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity $22,000

                              Public Hearing Dates & Times:
                           Longview                                      Kelso
               Thursday, April 23, 2009 at 7:00 PM         Tuesday, April 21, 2009 at 7:00 PM
              Longview City Hall Council Chamber           Kelso City Hall Council Chambers
                 1525 Broadway, Longview WA                  203 S. Pacific Ave., Kelso WA

   The purpose of the Public Hearings is to provide information on the HOME
     Program and Longview Document Recording Fee Program, to identify
      housing needs and project designs eligible for funding, hear public
   comment particularly from low and moderate-income persons regarding
   proposed projects, ensure broad-based community support for a project,
                       and select projects for funding.

  Anyone interested may appear and be heard in regard to this public hearing. The
  Longview and Kelso City Halls are accessible for persons with disabilities. Please let
 us know 24 hours in advance if you will need any special accommodations to attend
   the meeting or an interpreter. If you are unable to attend, you may direct written
                                           101
   correspondence the respective City Clerk’s Office: Kelso City Clerk, PO 819, Kelso,
  WA 98626 or the Longview City Clerk, PO Box 128, Longview, WA 98632 For further
                    information, contact Julie Hourcle’ at 442.5081.
360621
             Longview–Kelso HOME Consortium &
    Longview Community Development Block Grant Program
                   Invites You to Review our
             Draft 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan
                & 2009 Annual Action Plans
     Public Review and Comment Period – May 1–30, 2009
What is this Plan?
This document is required in order to plan housing, community facilities, public
facilities, economic development projects, and public services and priorities for
program years 2009-2013. Approximately $345,000 is available to the
Longview–Kelso Consortium for the HOME Program and $363,000 is available
for the Longview Community Development Block Grant Program annually.

Contents of Consolidated Plan
The Plan contains a Housing & Homeless Needs Assessment, Housing Market
Analysis, Strategic Plan and a 2009 Annual Action Plan. The Plan identifies the
types of activities which may be undertaken, and specifies the activities and the
amount of funds which are allocated to benefit targeted populations in 2009. The
Plan identifies a strategy, goals and objectives for affordable housing needs, and
community and economic development needs. It also reviews public housing needs,
homeless and at-risk homeless, special population needs, lead-based paint concerns,
minority housing needs, and barriers to affordable housing.

2009 Annual Plan Projects - Selected by Longview and Kelso City
Councils Respectively
Longview
 Highlands Neighborhood Trail Segment 1, Phase 1 & 2 Up to $400,000 (CDBG)
 HELP Warehouse $54,495 (CDBG)
 Archie Anderson Park Master Plan $20,000 (CDBG)
 Archie Anderson Basketball Court Resurfacing $85,100 (CDBG-R/Stimulus)
 Campus Towers Bathtub Conversion $74,154 (HOME)
 Habitat for Humanity Acquisition & Infrastructure $120,000 (HOME)

Kelso
 Habitat for Humanity Acquisition & Infrastructure $40,000 (HOME)
 Emergency Support Shelter Tenant Based Rental Assistance $13,830 (HOME)
 Drug/HOPE Court Tenant Based Rental Assistance $10,888* (HOME)
 * To be allocated to the Emergency Support Shelter if Drug Court ceases.

Who benefits from the Plan?
Both programs must principally benefit low and moderate income persons, and the
CDBG Program may also prevent or eliminate slums or blight.

Where is the plan?
The 2009-2013 Consolidated HOME and CDBG Plan is available for review
at the following locations:
  • City of Longview Community Development Department, 1525 Broadway, Longview;
  • Longview Housing Authority, 1207 Commerce Avenue, Longview;
  • Longview Public Library Reference Desk, 1600 Louisiana St., Longview
  • Kelso Housing Authority, 1415 S. 10th, Kelso;
  • City of Kelso, Community Development, 203 S. Pacific, Kelso;
  • Kelso Public Library, 314 Academy St. Kelso.
  • Lower Columbia Community Action Program, 1526 Commerce Ave., Longview
  • On the web at: http://www.mylongview.com/communitydev/cdbg.html.
    Under “Important Links”

           All comments must be received by May 30, 2009.
           Please direct all written comments to Julie Hourcle’, Community
           Development, Longview City Hall, PO Box 128/1525 Broadway,
          Longview, Washington, 98632-7080. Comments by E-mail will also
            be accepted sent to julie.hourcle@mylongview.com titled in the
                                          102
        Subject Line: “Comment for the Draft 2009-2013 Consolidated Plan.”
               For information or assistance on projects or the plan call
                   Longview Community Development at 442.5081.
                                          361615
                 The Cities of Longview and Kelso want you to know
       What are Local Agencies, Individuals and Cities doing for
Affordable Housing and Community Development Entitlement Projects?
   2008 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)
Public Review and Comment Period October 15 through October 29, 2009

 WHAT ARE THE HOME & CDBG PROGRAMs?
   ■ The HOME Investment Partnership program provides funding to increase and
     maintain affordable housing in the Cities of Longview and Kelso. $345,164
   ■ The Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) provides grants for
     public and community facilities, infrastructure, housing, economic development,
     public services and planning activities within the City of Longview. $363,304
   ■ Projects benefit low/moderate income residents and redevelopment activities.
   ■ Funded through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).


 WHAT ARE OuR CuRREnT & 2008 COMPLETED PROjECTs?
 HOME                         CDBG
 Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity                     Main Entitlement Projects
   Land Acquisition & Infrastructure                     City of Longview
                                                            Downtown Intersection Illumination
 Kelso Housing Authority                                 Cowlitz County Guidance Association
   Tenant Based Rental Assistance for                       Supported Housing for Homeless
   Domestic Violence & Drug/HOPE Court                      With Substance Abuse Difficulties
                                                          Progress Center
 Longview Housing Authority                                 Development Status for Addition
   SHARE Home Ownership & Rehab                          Life Works
   Phoenix House, 705 Clark St., Kelso                      Community Service Building
   Tenant Based Rental Assistance for                       906 New York St.
   Domestic Violence & Drug/HOPE Court                   Lower Columbia Community Action
                                                            CAPital Investment (IDA Match)
 Lower Columbia Community Action Program                 Toutle River Ranch/Youth & Family Link
   Transitional Housing                                     Wollenberg Gym, 907 Douglas St., LV
   Housing Rehabilitation                                Public Services
   Soundview Apts. Residing & Site Improv.               Lower Columbia Community Action Council
   Highlands Self-Help Housing                              Help Warehouse
   46th Ave at Windemere. Self-Help Housing              Family Finance Resource Center
   33rd Ave. Self-Help Housing                              Homeownership Counseling
                                                            Home Owner Foreclosure Avoidance
                                                            Counseling
                                                         Planning
                                                         Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Council of Governments
                                                            Highlands Neighborhood Revitalization Plan
                                                         Lower Columbia Head Start/ESCAP
                                                            Head Start Center Feasibility Plan
                                                         Sherri Fittro Foundation
                                                            Sherri Fittro Building Planning

Contents of the HOME & CDBG Annual Performance Report
   •   Narrative of goals and accomplishments of current projects
   •   2008 Budgets and matching funds received
   •   Partnership Agency Reports and photos
   •   Longview and Kelso Council Minutes on HOME & CDBG
   •   Membership Lists for the Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Housing Advisory Committee (HAC);
       Cowlitz Housing First! Coalition, and Cowlitz Re-Entry Council
Where is the HOME & CDBG Annual Report?
   •   City of Longview Community Development Department, 1525 Broadway, Longview
   •   Longview Housing Authority, 1207 Commerce Avenue, Longview
   •   Longview Public Library Reference Desk, 1600 Louisiana St., Longview
   •   Lower Columbia Community Action Program, 1526 Commerce Ave., Longview
   •   Kelso Housing Authority, 1415 S. 10th, Kelso
   •   City of Kelso, Community Development, 203 S. Pacific, 2nd floor, Kelso
   •   Kelso Public Library, 314 Academy St. Kelso
   •   On the web under Important Links:http://www.mylongview.com/communitydev/cdbg.html

            All COMMEnTs must be received by October 29, 2009
     Please direct all written comments to Julie Hourcle’, Community Development,
 Longview City Hall, PO Box 128/1525 Broadway, Longview, Washington, 98632-7080
 or e-mail julie.hourcle@mylongview.com. For information about the HOME & CDBG
            programs call Longview Community Development at 442.5081
                                                                                                         374216




                                                     103

               A PUBLIC HEARING will be held on
          October 22, 2009 at Longview City Hall, 7 PM.
                                                  National Association of Housing
                                                  and Redevelopment Officials
                                                  Alaska, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon

               [I Hi   ,w
lthtnil=s

       Pacific Northwest Regional Council
                       Fair Housing Workshop
                            Friday, October 16, 2009 (9:00AM to 4:00 PM)

              Cowlitz County PUD, 961 12th Ave., Longview, WA 98632
Equal access to decent, affordable housing is one of the components that individuals and families need to
build successful lives in our society. In order to insure that such access is possible and to prevent
prohibited discrimination, there are a number of laws and requirements that affect both private and public
sector landlords. While the basic premise of fair housing seems quite simple, the actual implementation
can be complicated and not universally understood. Periodic refresher training is essential for housing
authorities & other housing providers to insure the proper administration of affordable housing programs
and compliance with the law.

On Monday, October 16, 2009, PNRC-NAHRO will offer a one-day Fair Housing Workshop with four
consecutive sessions:


Fair Housing Laws — This introductory session will discuss the basics of fair housing laws and non
discrimination in housing. This session is an excellent primer for employees new to affordable housing
programs, for employees whose primary duties are not management of rental units, and for more
experienced employees seeking a refresher course as well as an update on current requirements and
precedents.

HUD's Fair Housing Enforcement Program --- This session will provide an overview of HUD's Fair
Housing & Equal Opportunities Office's fair housing mandates and priorities. Included will be compliance
reviews and what HUD looks for in these visits, accessibility issues, and Limited English Proficiency
guidance provided by a Seattle FHEO Office staff member.

Reasonable Accommodations — Michael Mirra, Executive Director, Tacoma Housing Authority and
former legal services attorney, will present an overview of the reasonable accommodation obligation,
Tacoma Housing Authority's Reasonable Accommodation Policy and a description of how it has been
implemented in Tacoma.

Service Animals — The final session will cover service animals, therapy animals, and companion
animals and will look at issues landlords have in accommodating tenants with these animals. There will
be an emphasis on Guide Dogs for the Blind with a visit from one or more working guide dogs and/or a
puppy in training.


The cost of the seminar is only $49.00. To register staff for this Workshop, please complete the attached
Registration Form and send it to PNRC-NAHRO along with a check for the registration fee. Registrations
may be e-mailed or faxed as long as payment is received prior to the date of the Workshop. The can
cellation deadline is Tuesday, October 2, 2009 after which no refunds will be given. Substitutions may be
made at any time.



                                          10832 - 36* Avenue SW
                                      Seattle, Washington 98146-1731
                               Telephone: (206) 901-0330 • Fax: (206) 248-6398
                                                104
                                  Email: RONALDLOLDHAM@MSN.COM
                                            www.pnrcnahro.org
                                           National Association of Housing
                                           and Redevelopment Officials
                                                ka, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon




      Pacific Northwest Regional Council
                                       AGENDA

                             "Fair Housing Workshop"

8:30 AM      Rolls and coffee


9:00 AM      Welcome and introduction of the day's program - Ron Oldham, Executive
             Director, PNRC-NAHRO

9:10 AM      Introduction to Fair Housing Laws and Requirements (Speaker to be announced)

10:45 AM     Break


11:00 AM     An Overview of HUD's Fair Housing Enforcement Program, HUD's Fair Housing
             & Equal Opportunity Office, Region X Seattle Office (Speaker to be announced)

12:00 PM     Lunch on your own (a list of local restaurants will be provided)

1:00 PM      Reasonable Accommodations - Best Practices - Michael Mirra, Executive
             Director, Tacoma Housing Authority

2:30 PM      Break


2:45 PM      Service Animals & Other Critters in Residential Housing (Speaker to be
             announced)

4:00 PM      Workshop ends




To register staff for the Fair Housing Workshop on October 16, 2009 in Longview, WA complete
        the attached registration form and return it with payment as soon as possible to:

                                       PNRC-NAHRO
                                 10832-36th Avenue SW
                                 Seattle, WA 98146-1731

           For questions, contact Ron Oldham, PNRC Director, at 206-901-0330 or
                             RONALDLOLDHAM@MSN.COM .




                                   10832 - 36" Avenue SW
                                Seattle, Washington 98146-1731
                        Telephone: (206) 901-0330 • Fax: (206) 248-6398
                                              105
                            Email: RONALDLOLDHAMQMSN.COM
                                     www.pnrcnahro.org
                                   "Working Together" to                                                     -•'••:.


                                 Find the Right Renter
                                                         Presented by:
        Cowlitz Meth Action Team, Longview Housing Authority,
            and Longview Police Community Services Unit


                          Thursday, August 27,2009
                    9:00 am to 4:00 pm - PUD Auditorium
  This training isfor all landlords as well as propertyowners and managers. The collaborative agencies are
working to help team with you, the owners and managers, to develop a system ofknowledge and cooperation.

                                                                                     TO REGISTER:
                                                                    $15               Please contact:
                                                                           Susan Mourning at 360-442-5926 or
                                                                         susan.mourning@ci.longview. wa.us OR
Please Join us for a morning with John Campbell                           Fill out the registation form and fax to:
                                                                                     360-442-5963 OR
      of Campbell DeLong Resources, Inc.
     John has created a national program on                             mail to PO Box 128 - Longview WA 98632
   Landlord Training: Keeping Illegal Activity
             out of Rental Property                             Name(s)
                             •




       Afternoon sessions will include:                         Address

     Code Compliance - working together
        Longview Housing Authority -                            Email                             Phone

      Section 8 & Ready-to-Rent Program
Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design                   Cell or Contact Number

& CPTED/BIock Watch/Crime-Free Multi Housing
Department of Corrections - the value of working
       together with tenants and clients                                          Speakers Include:
Evictions and Unlawful Detainers - how we can work                      John Campbell - Landlord Tenant Issues
            to streamline the process                                       Ken Hudson - Code Compliance
 Gangs in our community - what to watch for and                       Vickie Rhodes - Longview Housing Authority
                how can you help.                                   Cindy Lopez-Werth - CPTED/BIock Watch/CFMH
                                                                          Eric Morgan & Tracy Peters - DOC
                       Lunch &
                                                                       Doug Monge - Gangs & Gang Recognition
              Refreshments Provided
              Door Prizes Given Out
                                                                                         ^         '
                     Some include:
        gardening tools • paint • gift certificates                              For more information contact:
    cleaning supplies • peep holes • exterior lighting                   Cindy Turpen (cindy.turpen@ci.longview.wa.us)
           energy efficient lighting • gift cards                     Vickie Rhodes (vrhodes@longviewha.org 423-0140)
            1free year membership in RPOA                                Shannon Miller (smiller@cwcog.org 577-3041)
                                                              106
           Cowlitz County Housing Forum Committee
                                          presents


         LANDLORD & PROPERTY MANAGER
              Housing Workshop Series


6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursdays
Cowlitz County Administration Building
  general meeting room on 3rd floor
207 N. Fourth Ave., Kelso

   Training is FREE!!



                                   March 4, 2010
                   Insect Eradication Problems & Solutions
                for travelers, landlords, tenants & homeowners
                           George Sykora of Bug off Exterminators

                                  March 11, 2010
                             Evictions & Civil Liability
                 Attorney Chelsea Baldwin of Walstead Mertsching law firm

                                  March 18, 2010
                       Property management tips & tricks
                           to increase the bottom line
                property owner Troy Bischoff & property manager Sheila Soto


                               Light refreshments will be served.


        For more information, call 360-577-3041 or send an e-mail to cwcog@cwcog.org.
                                             107
108
 Healthy Homes Presents:                                                 Free
                                                                              Train
                                                                                    in g

  *Indoor Air Pollution Uncovered*
               Originally presented by the American Lung Association of Washington

  Participants will gain new knowledge on how to improve indoor air quality and
                        how to perform in-home assessments


Training topics include: Healthy Homes Program, Asthma, Secondhand
Smoke, Dust/Mites & Track-In, Lead, Asbestos, Pets/Dander, Moisture &
Mold, Ventilation, Household Chemicals, Pest Control, and Lawn & Garden
Care.

    Who should attend:                                          Where:
                                                             1952 9th Ave
       Community Members
                                                          Longview WA 98632
       Landlords
       Tenants
       Homeowners                                              When:
       Medical Staff                                     Thursday March 4
       Environmental Health Staff                        9:00am to 4:30pm
       Potential Program Volunteers                        Friday March 5
       Students                                          9:00am to 3:00 pm



  REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE

For more information or to REGISTER contact:
Cowlitz County Healthy Homes
Phone: 360-414-5581
Email: HealthyhomesCowlitz@gmail.com
Website: www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/health/ceha/MHE.htm

         Lunch Graciously Provided By Subway
                                           109
110
City Council                                       Minutes - Final                                        March 26, 2009

                          policing effort. He also feels Chief Alex Perez does a great job for the community.

   8.         PUBLIC HEARINGS

   8.A       09-0528      PUBLIC HEARING TO ALLOCATE 2009 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
                          BLOCK GRANT FUNDING (CDBG) [30 Min.]

                          COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                          Priority #10 Seek opportunities for funding and support of policies that will
                          enhance the quality of life for Longview residents.

                          CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW: N/A

                          SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                          The City of Longview Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is
                          funded by the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development
                          (HUD) with the purpose of developing viable urban communities,
                          principally for low/moderate income persons through decent housing, a
                          suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunity.

                          The purpose of this public hearing is to accept comments from the public
                          on community development needs in general and on submitted project
                          designs, and to make allocations for the 2009 Community Development
                          Block Grant Program.

                          RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                          A motion to allocate funding to 2009 Community Development Block
                          Grant Projects as identified on the complete agenda summary sheet.
                          Attachments:     CDBG Entitlement Funding.xls

                          Entitlement Program Coordinator Julie Hourclé stated she has not yet been advised
                          of the final CDBG award amount. She had prepared information by utilizing last
                          year’s figure; she anticipates the 2009 CDBG award should be at least that amount or
                          greater. Ms. Hourclé recapped the requirements of the program regarding eligible
                          activities: projects should develop viable urban communities, principally benefit low-
                          to moderate-income persons through decent housing, a suitable living environment,
                          and expanded economic opportunity.

                          For project funding, City of Longview Public Works proposed constructing a 10’ wide,
                          5250 lineal feet path north of the ditch that parallels Industrial Way, from Oregon Way
                          to Beech Street. Public services funding had been requested by Help Food
                          Warehouse in the amount of $54,495, and planning funds of $20,000 had been
                          requested by City of Longview Parks Department for design of redevelopment and
                          improvements to Archie Anderson Park. In order to fully fund the planning grant, Ms.
                          Hourcle recommended Council award the entire $18,165 available of the planning
                          funds under the new grant award, and make up the balance of $1,835 from the
                          program income funds.

                          Mayor Anagnostou opened up the floor for public comment at 8:07 p.m.

                          Representing the Help Food Warehouse, Jan Clifford appealed to Council to continue
                          to fund their operation of distributing food to needy people. She said the Help

City of Longview                                       Page 3
                                                        111
City Council                                    Minutes - Final                                           March 26, 2009

                       Warehouse often is the first stop for many people who have lost their jobs, and they
                       provide resource information regarding other social services available to assist
                       families suffering hardships.

                       Pathways 2020 Director Paul Youmans, also representing Cowlitz on the Move, said
                       all three of the funding proposals meet their program’s objectives. He urged Council
                       to fund each of the proposals.

                       Dick Mueller, Recreation Superintendent, spoke in favor of the planning grant for
                       design and redevelopment of Archie Anderson Park. He was joined at the podium by
                       Kelly McGraw, Central Baseball; Janice Barrera, Highlands Neighborhood
                       Association president; Cindy Helms, Highlands Activities & Beautification Committee;
                       and Karen Plank, Central Baseball Board of Directors. All these individuals
                       addressed Council, urging Council to fund the planning proposal to renovate Archie
                       Anderson Park.

                       Angie Gogerty, also with the Highlands Activities & Beautification Committee, echoed
                       her support of the Archie Anderson Park planning grant.

                       Director of Public Works Jeff Cameron showed Council some information on the
                       proposed Highlands-area trail. The trail would be phased in as funds allow. This
                       proposal would fund 5,250 feet of trail, 10’ wide, along the ditch adjacent to Industrial
                       Way, from Oregon Way to Beech Street. Since the project has not yet been
                       designed, Mr. Cameron could not give details as to its construction.

                       Councilmember Jensen voiced his hope that the trail would meander along the ditch
                       and not simply be constructed in a straight line. Plantings and landscaping would be
                       added in a later phase of construction.

                       Cowlitz County Commissioner Axel Swanson said he supported all the funding
                       proposals. He is especially interested in seeing indoor activity areas being
                       developed for youth; given our climate, the rain prevents use of outdoor facilities
                       during at least six months of the year.

                       There being no further comment, either written or oral, the public hearing was closed
                       at 8:34 p.m.

                       A motion was made by Council Member Melink, seconded by Council Member
                       Busack, that staff's recommendations for CDBG funding be awarded as stated,
                       including the additional planning funds to complete the Archie Anderson
                       planning project. The motion carried unanimously.

   8.B       09-0540   PUBLIC HEARING TO ALLOCATE 2009 AMERICAN RECOVERY AND
                       REINVESTMENT ACT FUNDING [30 Min.]

                       COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                       Priority #10 Seek opportunities for funding and support of policies that will
                       enhance the quality of life for Longview residents.

                       CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW: N/A

                       SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                       The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has been developed
                       by Congress to provide an economic stimulus to the U. S. Economy. Its
                       primary purpose is to provide or create jobs. Congress has provided some

City of Longview                                     Page 4
                                                      112
City Council                                Minutes - Final                                         March 26, 2009

                   of this money on a formula basis to CDBG Entitlement programs amounting
                   to 27% of its 2008 CDBG Program Year’s allocation. Projects must benefit
                   low and moderate income persons and meet CDBG eligibility. This program
                   requires that projects be undertaken within 120 days of HUD approval.
                   Therefore, the City of Longview should consider projects which were
                   submitted for 2009 CDBG funding and can begin immediately. HUD has not
                   yet determined what percentage of this funding will be available for
                   administration or public services. The ARRA is funded through the Federal
                   Department of Housing and Urban Development.

                   2009 ARRA Project Summary
                   The following project request has been received:

                   Main Entitlement Project
                   Available - $98,660.00   Remaining Available - $15,204.05

                   Campus Towers Bath Tub Conversion - Modify bathtub sides to allow
                   walk-in entry for showers to improve elderly safety and hygiene.
                   Campus Towers $83,455.95

                   RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                   Motion to allocate 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
                   funding to Campus Towers for $83,455.95.
                   Attachments:     CDBG Entitlement Funding.xls
                                    2009 CDBG Recovery Project Summary
                                    Archie Anderson Presentation
                   Ms. Houcle reported that some of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
                   federal stimulus funds were being distributed through the CDBG program. Funds
                   were being distributed equal to 27% of the 2008 CDBG program allocation to
                   entitlement programs. Criteria for use of the funds is the same as all CDBG projects,
                   noted above, in addition to being ready to commence work within 120 days.

                   A proposal from Campus Towers had been submitted for regular entitlement 2009
                   CDBG funding, but was determined to qualify for this source of funding, too. This
                   proposal would convert bathtubs to walk-in showers to enhance safety and hygiene
                   for seniors living at this facility. Campus Towers had solicited estimates from several
                   contractors who do this type of work; one estimate of $83,455.95 had been submitted
                   with the application.

                   After the Council meeting agenda had been published, a second project proposal
                   currently on the City’s capital projects funding list was also determined to meet the
                   requirements of the ARRA funding. This proposal was for resurfacing the basketball
                   courts at Archie Anderson Park, and presented three options for repair with
                   corresponding price differences. Click on the above last two links to view this
                   updated information.

                   The public hearing was opened for comment at 8:43 p.m.

                   Jim Conrad, Director of Campus Towers, said completion of the Campus Towers tub
                   conversion project would eliminate some calls to 9-1-1. Campus Towers is a 501(c)
                   (3) corporation; while they are associated with the Northlake Baptist Church, no funds
                   are transferred between the two entities. They are a non-profit organization whose
                   goal is to offer low rent rates and “just make ends meet.” Mr. Conrad presented a

City of Longview                                Page 5
                                                 113
City Council                                      Minutes - Final                                         March 26, 2009

                        petition signed by 92 of the 94 residents in support of this project.

                        Seniors Vivan Schroeder, Vada Van Vessen, Genevieve Weatherman, and Estelle
                        Johnson all testified in support of converting the tubs since it would make it safer and
                        easier for them to bathe.

                        Councilmember Botero asked whether resurfacing the basketball courts was prudent
                        in light of the planning grant to renovate the park. Director of Parks and Recreation
                        Rich Bemm stated the basketball courts are a primary amenity at the park. Since the
                        courts are ideally located in one corner, any master plan being developed would work
                        around this facility.

                        Councilmember Busack asked why the Archie Anderson resurfacing project had not
                        been included in the Council packet.

                        City Manager Gregory said this project had already been included in the capital
                        projects budget. Staff realized this project would also fit the requirements of the
                        stimulus funds, so brought it forward for Council’s consideration.

                        There was some discussion regarding the process of distributing funds and the
                        timelines established for submitting projects.

                        Councilmember Weber moved to fund the Campus Towers tub conversion project.
                        This motion was seconded by Councilmember Wallace.

                        Councilmember Melink stated she is committed to the Council initiative of
                        rehabilitating the Highlands neighborhood, and would not be supporting this motion.

                        There was some confusion voiced and discussion about the estimated project
                        amount of $83,455.95. This bid had been submitted by a contractor in Maryland.
                        Since the purpose of the stimulus funds is to get people back to work, it was felt a
                        local contractor should be used. It was emphasized that the figure was an estimate
                        only; since federal funds are involved in this project, the project would have to be put
                        out for bid. A contractor from Washington or Oregon might ultimately be the
                        successful bidder.

                        City Manager Gregory clarified that the Campus Towers tub project had been
                        submitted to compete for the regular 2009 CDBG entitlement funds; this project
                        would have been competing against the Highlands trail project for funding.
                        A motion was made by Council Member Weber, seconded by Council Member
                        Wallace, that the ARRA CDBG funds be awarded to the Campus Towers
                        project. The motion failed by the following vote:

                        Ayes:   3-   Council Member Busack, Council Member Wallace and Council Member
                                     Weber
                       Nayes:   4-   Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Botero, Mayor Pro Tem Jensen
                                     and Council Member Melink

             09-0583    MOTION TO FUND ARCHIE ANDERSON PARK BASKETBALL COURT
                        RESURFACING PROJECT
                        Councilmember Melink moved to award the 2009 ARRA CDBG funds to Option 2,
                        Archie Anderson Park basketball court resurfacing, and to set aside any fund balance
                        remaining. This motion was seconded by Councilmember Jensen.

                        Mayor Anagnostou stated he wished the motion had been made for Option 1, since

City of Longview                                      Page 6
                                                       114
City Council                                        Minutes - Final                                           March 26, 2009

                          funds had already been set aside in the capital projects fund and should still be
                          available to make up the shortfall.

                          Councilmember Busack said he would support this motion. Both projects are
                          valuable and one particular organization is no less deserving than another.
                          A motion was made by Council Member Melink, seconded by Mayor Pro Tem
                          Jensen, that the motion to fund the Archie Anderson basketball court
                          resurfacing project be approved. The motion carried by the following vote:

                         Ayes:   6-    Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Botero, Council Member
                                       Busack, Mayor Pro Tem Jensen, Council Member Melink and Council
                                       Member Wallace
                        Nayes:   1-    Council Member Weber

                          Mayor Anagnostou declared a recess at 9:36 p.m. The meeting was reconvened at
                          9:48 p.m.

             09-0584      MOTION TO RECONSIDER LAST MOTION TO FUND ARCHIE
                          ANDERSON PARK BASKETBALL RESURFACING PROJECT
                          Returning from break, Councilmember Jensen said he had been on the prevailing
                          side of the last motion, and he wished to move to reconsider the last action taken.
                          He said Councilmember Busack had come up with a plan to fund both projects. This
                          motion was seconded by Councilmember Busack.

                          City Attorney Marilyn Haan pointed out that a motion to reconsider requires a 2/3
                          majority vote to pass.

                          Councilmember Weber attempted to discern why the Campus Towers project had
                          been switched to a different CDBG funding source and put into competition with the
                          Archie Anderson basketball court resurfacing project; he felt this might have misled
                          the Campus Towers management. Initially, the Campus Towers tub project had
                          been vying with the Highlands trail proposal for 2009 CDBG entitlement funds, a
                          much larger grant resource.

                          Councilmember Melink reiterated her support of the basketball court resurfacing
                          project since the Highlands area is priority #6 on the 2009 Council Initiatives list.

                          A motion was made by Mayor Pro Tem Jensen, seconded by Council Member
                          Busack, that this motion to reconsider be approved. Since a two-third majority
                          vote was necessary to pass, the motion failed by the following vote:

                         Ayes:   4-    Council Member Busack, Mayor Pro Tem Jensen, Council Member
                                       Wallace and Council Member Weber
                        Nayes:   3-    Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Botero and Council Member
                                       Melink

              Change to Agenda Order
                          Councilmember Jensen moved to hear item 13.A. at this time because of the late
                          hour; he would like to discuss the interlocal agreement involving Cowlitz County and
                          the Cowlitz Public Facilities District, since both entities had sent representatives to
                          the meeting.

   13.A      09-0529      INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT FOR ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY AND
                          MARKET ANALYSIS OF EXPO CENTER [10 Min.]

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                          set-back, but was slightly too small. She would like to see the minimim one acre
                          removed from the proposed zoning changes.

                          Both Ms. Allison and Ms. Brown left information with the City Clerk for distribution to
                          Council.
                          A motion was made by Council Member Chuck Wallace, seconded by Mayor
                          Pro Tem Don Jensen, that this matter be postponed until May 14, 2009. The
                          motion carried unanimously.

   8.         PUBLIC HEARINGS

   8.A       09-0594      PUBLIC HEARING TO ALLOCATE 2009 HOME PROGRAM FUNDING
                          [10 Min.]

                          COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                          Priority #15 Seek opportunities for funding and support of policies that will
                          enhance the quality of life for Longview residents.

                          CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW:                  N/A

                          SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                          This Public Hearing is being held to present Longview HOME Investment
                          Partnership Program project design proposals, to hear public comment
                          supporting the submitted proposals, and to allocate 2009 program year
                          HOME funds. This program provides grants and loans for low-moderate
                          income housing. Projects must benefit families whose income is less than
                          80% of the Cowlitz County Median Income based on family size.

                          The following HOME Project Designs have been received:

                          2009 Longview HOME Project Summaries
                          Amount Estimated Available $194,154                     Amount Requested: $212,000

                          Campus Towers Bath Tub Conversion - Modify bathtub sides to allow
                          walk-in entry for showers to improve elderly safety and hygiene. Campus
                          Towers Remaining amount up to $92,000
                          (This project originally requested CDBG/ARRA Stimulus funding but
                          was not funded. Campus Towers has requested to be considered for
                          remaining 2009 HOME funding.)

                          Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity Longview - Building HOPE
                          2009-2010
                          - Acquisition, permits, and infrastructure of 2 parcels of property to construct
                          2 to 3 homes for low income families. Demolition costs may be included.
                          Cowlitz County Habitat for Humanity        $120,000

                          RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                          Motion to allocate the 2009 HOME funding as noted on the full agenda
                          summary sheet.


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City Council                                Minutes - Final                                           April 23, 2009


                   Attachments:      HOME Entitlement Funding 2009
                                     HOME Admin
                                     HOME & DRF Allocation Ad.pdf
                   Entitlement Program Coordinator Julie Hourcle recapped the HOME program
                   requirements, and spoke about the advertising, review of projects, and outlined the
                   complaint process.

                   One proposal submitted for Council’s consideration was the Campus Towers bathtub
                   conversion that had been originally submitted for CDBG funding. Staff felt it met the
                   requirements for ARRA funds distributed through the CDBG process, and submitted
                   it to Council for funding from that source, but the project was not funded.

                   Councilmember Jensen asked whether the HOME dollars could be combined with the
                   Auditor’s Document Recording fees funds. Mr. Hourcle advised the programs have
                   different requirements; the Auditor’s funds require use for persons at or lower than
                   50% of average income and to provide permanent housing.

                   Questions were raised about the funds directed toward Administration costs, and
                   whether the Council had any control over the Admin funds given to the Lower
                   Columbia Community Action Plan (CAP) as the City’s CHDO. City Manager Bob
                   Gregory advised the City’s portion of Administration funds helps to defray the cost of
                   staff in managing and monitoring the programs; this amount does not come close to
                   fully paying for staff’s time. City Attorney Marilyn Haan also noted some of the City’s
                   admin funds are used to recover funds from owners whose project no longer fits the
                   program requirements. The funds directed to CAP are a requirement of federal law;
                   the City has no oversight over how they spend these funds. However, Ms. Hourcle
                   said CAP uses the funds to oversee the self-help housing projects at 46th and 33rd
                   Avenues.

                   In addition to increasing costs of staff time, Ms. Hourcle also pointed out the legal
                   publication costs have increased over the years: the large display ad announcing the
                   projects and public hearings costs now run between $600 and $700 per year.

                   Mayor Anagnostou opened the public hearing at 8:24 p.m.

                   Campus Towers Executive Director Jim Conrad spoke in favor of the bathtub
                   conversion project that had been proposed at the last meeting but not funded. He
                   recapped the effort his organization had put forth to furnish financial information to
                   assure Council of its non-profit status and separateness from the Baptist Church.
                   Councilmember Melink asked whether Campus Towers could make up a shortfall in
                   funds if this project were only partially funded. Mr. Conrad acknowledged his
                   organization has some reserve funds set aside for capital projcts.

                   Habitat for Humanity Len Malkovich spoke in favor of his project to purchase property
                   on which to construct homes. He said, “It’s not about wood, brick and windows; it’s
                   about people.” Habitat’s request is to purchase land in the Highlands, tear down the
                   existing house and construct duplexes (semi-detached housing) to maximize housing
                   and minimize the cost.

                   Mr. Malkovich was asked whether Habitat could make up a shortfall if Council did not
                   fully fund this request. He responded Habitat would have to do more fundraising
                   which would slow down the pace of construction.

                   Dianne Perrin, Project Manager for Habitat, encouraged Council to fund the Habitat
                   request, stating the funds are returned to the City in the form of permits, taxes, etc.
                   Prospective homebuyers are required to attend budgeting and financial management
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City Council                                    Minutes - Final                                          April 23, 2009

                        classes.

                        Habitat for Humanity homebuyer/builder Rochelle Duram told about her life and the
                        wonderful opportunity Habitat has given her to own her own home. She has worked
                        hard to finish college, work on the house, and work in order to care for herself and
                        three children.

                        Mortage banker Marchelle Broulet stated in many instances Habitat for Humanity is
                        the only way young people can get into a home. Les Foss, a volunteer for Habitat,
                        said the program helps people find homes, build hope and build communities.

                        There being no further comment, the public hearing was closed at 8:52 p.m.

                        Councilman Jensen moved to fund the Campus Towers tub conversion project up to
                        $92,000, and award the balance to Habitat for Humanity. For purposes of
                        discussion, the motion was seconded by Councilmember Botero.

                        Councilmember Botero said he would feel better if the two competing applicants “split
                        the difference” in funding, i.e., each be awarded about $8,000 less than requested.

                        Councilmember Melink thanked Mr. Conrad for patiently answering all Council
                        questions. She had toured another facility that converted bathtubs to showers, and
                        said they did not look very good and didn’t look like they would hold up well. She
                        would prefer to fund one-half the bathtub conversion. It is an expensive project and
                        could be done in phases. She would prefer to fund Habitat’s request in full, provide
                        $40,000 to Campus Towers, and use the balance, if possible, to fund projects
                        submitted for the Auditor’s Document Recording fee funds. She therefore did not
                        think she would be supporting this motion.

                        Mayor Anagnostou agreed with Councilmember Melink’s desire to fund Habitat’s
                        project in its entirety; the Habitat project meets Council’s goal of 50/50
                        homeownership/rental assistance. Councilmembers Jensen and Botero thought the
                        seniors should be helped.
                        A motion was made by Mayor Pro Tem Jensen, seconded by Council Member
                        Botero, that the Campus Towers project be funded up to $92,000, and Habitat
                        for Humanity be awarded the balance available. The motion failed by the
                        following vote:

                        Ayes:   3-   Council Member Busack, Mayor Pro Tem Jensen and Council Member
                                     Wallace
                       Nayes:   3-   Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Botero and Council Member
                                     Melink

             09-0679    SECOND MOTION TO DISTRIBUTE HOME FUNDS

                        Councilmember Botero said he would be voting against this motion also, since he
                        think it is only fair to make the parties split the difference.
                        A motion was made by Council Member Melink, seconded by Council Member
                        Wallace, that the Campus Towers bathtub conversion project be awarded
                        $40,000, Habitat for Humanity's request be funded in full, and the balance of
                        the fund be spent for funding projects submitted for funding from the Auditor's
                        Document Recording fees. The motion failed by the following vote:

                        Ayes:   2-   Council Member Melink and Council Member Wallace



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City Council                                   Minutes - Final                                      April 23, 2009


                       Nayes:   4-   Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Botero, Council Member
                                     Busack and Mayor Pro Tem Jensen

             09-0680    THIRD MOTION TO AWARD HOME FUNDS

                        A motion was made by Council Member Busack, seconded by Council Member
                        Wallace, to award Habitat for Humanity $120,000, and the balance of available
                        funds to Campus Towers for the bathtub conversion project. The motion
                        carried by the following vote:

                        Ayes:   5-   Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Busack, Mayor Pro Tem
                                     Jensen, Council Member Melink and Council Member Wallace
                       Nayes:   1-   Council Member Botero


              Recess
                        A recess was called at 9:10 p.m. The meeting was reconvened at 9:23 p.m.

   8.B       09-0600    PUBLIC HEARING TO ALLOCATE 2009 DOCUMENT RECORDING
                        FEE FUNDING [10 Min.]

                        COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                        Priority #15 Seek opportunities for funding and support of policies that will
                        enhance the quality of life for Longview residents.

                        CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW: N/A

                        SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                        This Public Hearing is being held to present 2009 Longview Document
                        Recording Fee project design proposals, to hear public comment supporting
                        the submitted proposals, and to allocate 2009 program year funds. This
                        program provides grants for low income housing, shelters, and tax credit
                        projects.

                        These housing projects must benefit families whose income is less than 50%
                        of the Cowlitz County Median Income based upon family size. The 2009
                        Longview disbursement from Cowlitz County for the Document Recording
                        Fee is $39,715.61. Interest from 2004, 2005, 2007 & 2008 has become
                        available plus a small carryover from 2008 which taken together amounts to
                        $12,521.31. The total allocation now available is $52,236.92. This program
                        is funded through the Cowlitz County Document Recording Fee Surcharge.

                        2009 Document Recording Fee Project Summaries
                        Available Amount $52,236.92         Requested $85,134

                        Cedar Group Home Rehabilitation - Install new fire panel, repair exterior
                        roof rafter, and siding for a developmentally disabled group home.
                        Residential Resources $24,134

                        Community House on Broadway Operations - Provide 12-months of
                        support for operations at the Longview area homeless shelter.

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City Council                               Minutes - Final                                           April 23, 2009

                   Community House on Broadway $24,000

                   Emergency Support Shelter Operating Costs - Provide support for
                   operations to the community’s women’s shelter for domestic violence victims.
                   Emergency Support Shelter $15,000

                   Habitat for Humanity Construction Support Operating Costs- Provide
                   support for funding construction supervision for building affordable Habitat
                   homes in Longview for low-income families. Cowlitz County Habitat for
                   Humanity $22,000

                   RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                   Motion to allocate the 2009 Document Recording Fee funding as noted on
                   the full agenda summary sheet.
                   Attachments:     HOME & DRF Allocation Ad.pdf
                                    DRF Executive Summary.xls
                   The public hearing was opened at 9:30 p.m.

                   Wendy Keegan with Lifeworks, formerly Residential Resources, said her organization
                   had reduced its request to only $4,800, which will pay for a new fire panel to control
                   the sprinkler system in this group home. Community volunteers are being used to
                   repair the exterior of the home.

                   Sherrie Tinoko, Executive Director of the Emergency Support Shelter, urged Council
                   to continue to fund their operations: they serve approximately 300 women and
                   children per year. The slowing economy has affected the amounts they receive in
                   donations.

                   Community House on Broadway Executive Director Rich Kirk said the $24,000 the
                   City normally provides is even more important than ever this year. Many of
                   Community House’s funding sources are being cut. Community House is at the very
                   bottom of the safety net. He anticipates an increase in the need for services due to
                   the increase in homelessness, and the demand for meals has already shown an
                   increase.

                   Len Malkovich, Habitat for Humanity, urged Council to fund its request for assistance
                   paying a construction site supervisor. In order to keep the volunteer workers focused
                   and working, a paid supervisor is needed.

                   Barbara Price also spoke in favor of the Habitat proposal. She spoke about the
                   benefit these new homes bring to the neighborhood where they are being built:
                   neighbors have been welcoming new growth in their community. Volunteerism and
                   cooperation is being promoted and should be fostered.

                   Nathan Dozier said he works on the sites every Saturday and affirmed that skilled
                   supervision is necessary.

                   There being no further comments, either written or oral, the public hearing was
                   closed at 9:55 p.m.

                   A motion was made by Council Member Melink, seconded by Council Member
                   Botero, to fund the Community House on Broadway and Emergency Support
                   Shelter requests in full. The motion carried by the following vote:



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City Council                                      Minutes - Final                                    April 23, 2009


                           Ayes:   5-   Mayor Kurt Anagnostou, Council Member Botero, Mayor Pro Tem Jensen,
                                        Council Member Melink and Council Member Wallace
                          Nayes:   1-   Council Member Busack

             09-0681       MOTION TO DISTRIBUTE BALANCE OF AUDITOR'S DOCUMENT
                           RECORDING FEES
                           A motion was made by Council Member Melink, seconded by Council Member
                           Botero, that the balance of the Auditor's Document Recording Fees be awarded
                           to Habitat for Humanity's proposal. The motion carried unanimously.

   10.        ORDINANCES & RESOLUTIONS

   10.A      OR 09 3084    ORDINANCE NO. 3084 REZONING AREA NEAR NE CORNER OF
                           38TH AVENUE AND OCEAN BEACH HIGHWAY FROM SUBURBAN
                           RESIDENTIAL TO C-4 COMMERCIAL DISTRICT [5 Min.]

                           COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                           Priority 7: Facilitate the preservation of existing neighborhoods and
                           support sustainable, managed growth

                           CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW: REQUIRED

                           SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                           Ordinance Number 3084 adopts a Zoning Map for five Assessor’s parcels
                           and a portion of two other parcels from Suburban Residential District to C-4
                           Commercial District. The proposed rezone area includes the eastern half of
                           the 38th Avenue right-of-way that is adjacent to the parcels.

                           The matter was heard by the City Council at the March 26, 2009 regular
                           meeting. At that meeting, a motion unanimously passed to direct the City
                           Attorney to bring back an ordinance to the City Council to adopt the
                           proposed amendment.

                           RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                           Motion to adopt Ordinance No. 3084.


                           Attachments:     Ord 3084


                           A motion was made by Mayor Pro Tem Jensen, seconded by Council Member
                           Botero, that this Ordinance be adopted. The motion carried unanimously.

   10.B      OR 09 3085    ORDINANCE NO. 3085 AMENDING SECTION 19.39.010 OF THE
                           LONGVIEW MUNICIPAL CODE - CIVIC CENTER DISTRICT [5 Min.]

                           COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                           Priority 7: Facilitate the preservation of existing neighborhoods and
                           support sustainable, managed growth


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City Council                                    Minutes - Final                                       August 13, 2009


                       Attachments:     2009 Q2 General Fund Financial Review(R).ppt

                       Finance Director Kurt Sacha presented a 2nd quarter update of the financial status of
                       the City's General Fund. Mr. Sacha reported that sales tax, a primary source of
                       revenue, is down $1.1 million or 16.2% from last year's collections. Business and
                       occupation taxes have increased 5.7% over last year due primarily to an increase in
                       utility taxes. For 2009, projected General Fund revenue of $28.6 million is $2 million
                       less than budgeted. This revenue shortfall is the result of declining sales tax revenue
                       and a significant drop in interest earnings.

                       2009 projected expenditures totaling $29.4 million are $1.63 million under budget and
                       45% less than 2008 expenditures of $30.8 million. 2009 expenditure savings comes
                       from employee furloughs, salary freezes, retirements, vacant positions and the
                       concessions made by the firefighter unions. Additionally, a reduction in the employer
                       pension contribution to the State of Washington, and suspension of the motor pool
                       depreciation also contributed to reduction in expenditures.

                       Although projections are holding steady with Mr. Sacha's 1st quarter report, the city
                       will still need to drawn down its fund balance approximately $800,000 in 2009. Mr.
                       Sacha stressed that staff and Council will have more work to do in the 4th quarter to
                       maintain the General Fund's financial status.

                       The projected outlook for 2010 forecasts that the City will have to draw down $1.4
                       million leaving an 8% ending fund balance. To avoid a further reduction in reserves
                       in 2010, the Finance Director recommended many of the same cost-cutting
                       measured employed during 2009.

                       Councilmember Weber inquired whether staff was estimating a financial impact from
                       stimulus dollars. City Manager Gregory acknowledged that stimulus grants will not
                       directly impact the General Fund.

             09-0775   SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT TO THE 2009 CDBG ANNUAL PLAN [5
                       Min.]

                       COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                       Priority #15: Seek opportunities for funding and support of policies that
                       will enhance the quality of life for Longview residents.

                       CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW: N/A

                       SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                       The City was notified in early March 2009 it will be allocated $98,660 in
                       CDBG-R (stimulus) funding through HUD. The Council approved $85,100
                       at their March 26, 2009 Public Hearing for the Archie Anderson Basketball
                       Court Resurfacing Project. HUD denied this activity in early June due to
                       the Presidential Memo "Ensuring Responsible Spending of Recovery Act
                       Funds" finding recreational projects "imprudent" for the allocation of
                       stimulus funding.

                       The Community Development Department, Public Works Department,
                       and Executive staff have agreed upon another project to benefit the
                       Highlands Neighborhood through new street related infrastructure and
                       meet the Recovery Goal of "Investing in transportation, environmental
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City Council                                Minutes - Final                                        August 13, 2009

                   protection, or other infrastructure that will provide long-term economic
                   benefits." This project was unanimously accepted by the Highlands
                   Neighborhood Association in July.

                   The new project "Highlands Neighborhood Infrastructure" will provide for
                   street light replacement and installation for neighborhood blocks to provide
                   more efficient illumination for vehicular and pedestrian traffic. This will be
                   accomplished by replacing twelve street light fixtures with energy efficient
                   fixtures on existing street lights, install new street lights with energy efficient
                   fixtures, replace approximately 220 square yards of sidewalk, upgrade ADA
                   ramps on each corner of the block to provide better accessibility and install 5
                   trees. The existing street lights have limited capacity, limited pedestrian
                   safety effectiveness, and limited efficiency. By installing addition
                   illumination, replacing the sidewalks and ADA ramps, significant
                   improvements in safety, visibility, and uniformity will be accomplished.

                   The Community Development Department has prepared the required
                   Substantial Amendment to its 2009 Annual Plan in order to receive
                   CDBG-R (Stimulus) funding. All public participation requirements have
                   been previously satisfied. HUD approval is expected immediately for an
                   estimated start date of August 21, 2009 and completion date by May 30,
                   2010.

                   RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                   Motion to approve the Highlands Neighborhood Infrastructure project for
                   CDBG-R Stimulus funding and submit a Substantial Amendment to the
                   2009 CDBG Annual Plan.
                   Attachments:      Substantial Amendment.doc
                                     Project Timeline.doc
                                     CDBG-R Budget.xls
                   Community Development John Brickey reported that $98,660 previously allotted to
                   City for CDBG projects was later rejected by HUD as an approved project.

                   Since there were several projects that would qualify, be approved by HUD, and
                   quickly initiated, staff recommended funding the Highlands Revitalization program.
                   The project includes installation of twelve street light fixtures with energy efficent
                   lighting, 220 square yards of sidewalks added, two ADA ramps constructed, and five
                   trees planted in the median along 26th Avenue.

                   Councilman Jensen wanted to see more assessible ramps be constructed. Public
                   Works Director Cameron offered to modify the project description to use HUD funds.
                   He also suggested utilizing city funds to install several ramps.

                   Councilmember Weber asked what prompted starting project along 26th Avenue
                   location instead of a more problematic neighborhood.

                   Highlands Neighborhood Association (HNA) President Janice Berrera supports staff's
                   recommendation to fund the project. She further explained that a designated steering
                   committee unaminously identified 26th avenue as a good place to start. Their
                   strategy is to start in the middle of a highly visable location and expand out until the
                   upgrades reach the outer perimeter of the neighborhood.

                   A motion was made by Council Member Melink, seconded by Council Member

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City Council                                   Minutes - Final                                       August 13, 2009

                       Weber, that this Agenda Item be approved. The motion carried unanimously.

             09-0783   HOME OWNER REHABILITATION MODIFICATION REQUEST BY LCCAP

                       COUNCIL STRATEGIC INITIATIVE ADDRESSED:
                       Priority #15: Seek opportunities for funding and support of policies that
                       will enhance the quality of life for Longview residents.

                       CITY ATTORNEY REVIEW: N/A

                       SUMMARY STATEMENT:
                       Lower Columbia Community Action Program (LCCAP) is requesting to
                       modify the payment terms of their HOME Homeowner Rehabilitation
                       Program. They would like to change the program from a monthly loan
                       program for the homeowner, as was originally stated in the project design
                       and approved by Council, to a deferred loan program. The deferred loan
                       would be paid at the time the owner sells the home, moves, or dies while
                       occupying the home.

                       Although the housing target area for this project (the Highlands) was
                       expanded 3 different times to ultimately City-Wide, the issue remained that
                       CAP had difficulty finding families or individuals who had clear title and a
                       good loan to equity value ratio which allowed the homeowner to carry the
                       monthly loan.

                       One client may take advantage of this program prior to September 22nd.
                       HUD has requested the return of remaining HOME funds by September 30,
                       2009 under this activity because it has exceeded it 5-year activity limit. The
                       program was originally funded in 1998 and 3 homes were completed out of 7
                       planned.

                       RECOMMENDED ACTION:
                       Motion to approve the modification of the HOME Homeowner
                       Rehabilitation Program from a monthly loan to a deferred loan program.
                       Attachments:     CAP Rehab Modification Request 7-27-09.pdf

                       Councilmember Botero inquired why the city had to return all remaining, unused
                       HOME funds by Sept 30, 2009.

                       Community Development Director John Brickey explained that there is a five-year
                       limitation on funds allocated for HOME projects. If the dollars are not expended,
                       then HUD asks for them back. Last year a modification was made to the program to
                       make the funds available to other parts of the community, but the program still proved
                       unsuccessful due to the way the payment structure was designed.

                       City Manager Gregory noted that changing the monthly loan program to a deferred
                       loan program may help the city utilize these funds in the future. He also suggested
                       that staff review these funds more frequently to prevent them from being sent back to
                       HUD.
                       A motion was made by Council Member Botero, seconded by Council Member
                       Wallace, that this Agenda Item be approved . The motion carried by the

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City Council                                        Minutes - Final                                        August 13, 2009

                            following vote:

                         Ayes:     6-   Council Member Botero, Council Member Busack, Mayor Pro Tem
                                        Jensen, Council Member Melink, Council Member Wallace and Council
                                        Member Weber
                        Nayes:     1-   Mayor Kurt Anagnostou

             09-0786        ECONOMIC STIMULUS STATUS REPORT


                            Attachments:      Economic Stimulus Status Report

                            City Manager Gregory provided a PowerPoint presentation displaying the status of
                            various applications and programs. The stimulus will provide: economic development
                            for the South Weber infrastructure; a grant that allows the hiring of three additional
                            police officers; and, the ability to hire people to conduct energy audits through a
                            weatherization program offered by the CAP Energy and Housing Program.

                            One six-week program sponsored by the Southwest Washington Workforce
                            Development Council (SWWDC) involved hiring 17 people that worked in various city
                            departments. As part of the completion program, the Human Resources department
                            helped the workers develop their interviewing skills through mock interviews and also
                            helped with resume writing.

                            City Manager Gregory also noted that the city should receive notice later this year on
                            an aplication submitted for a firefighters recovery grant provided by FEMA for
                            construction of new fire station.

   14.        MISCELLANEOUS

             09-0787        NEW BUSINESS LICENSES

                            Attachments:      New Business Licenses 7-20-09


   15.        ADJOURNMENT

                            Mayor Kurt Anagnostou noted that he would be absent at the next Council workshop
                            scheduled August 19, 2009. Councilmember Ken Botero asked that he be excused
                            from attending the September 10, 2009 regular Council meeting.

                            The Mayor recessed the meeting to attend an Executive Session at 9:53. Council
                            reconvened at 10:45 p.m. and the Mayor promptly adjourned the meeting.
                            The next scheduled meeting of the Council is September 10, 2009.




                            C. Maureen Wingler
                            Deputy City Clerk




                            Approved: __________________________
                                              Mayor

City of Longview                                        Page 16
                                                          127
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131
132
133
                         Cowlitz Housing First! Coalition 
             Voting Membership, by Category & Member Representative 

    Category of Membership/Representative                Minimum    Maximum
    Local Government                                        3          6 
    Cowlitz County‐Jeni O’Neil/Axel Swanson                              
    City of Longview – Ken Botero/Bob Gregory                            
    City of Kelso – Mike Kerins                                          
    Kalama – Sheila Turner                                               
    Woodland – JoAnn Heinrichs                                           
    Castle Rock – Jack Reilly                                            
                                                                         
    Faith Community                                         1          3 
    FISH ‐ George Robertson                                              
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
    Law Enforcement                                         1          3 
    WA State Department of Corrections – Marty Franke                    
    Longview Police Department – Alex Perez                              
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
    Business Community                                      1          3 
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
    Health Providers (Health Strategies)                    3          6 
    Center for Behavioral Solutions – Claudine Walker                    
    Drug Abuse Prevention Center – Gus Nolte                             
    Family Health Center – Sue Peterson                                  
    Lower Columbia Mental Health – Dennis Meyers                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         
                                                                         




                                            134



Adopted 10/21/2009                                                            1
    Social Service Providers (Income & Prevention    5     10 
    Strategies) 
    LifeWorks – Pam Howe                                     
    Goodwill/Vocations Unlimited – Madeline Loren            
    HeadStart – Sandy Junker                                 
    Youth & Family LINK – Steve Watters                      
    Washington State DSHS – Debbie Thompson                  
    Longview School District – Deb Whitney                   
                                                             
                                                             
                                                             
    Housing Providers (Housing Strategies)           4     6 
    Longview Housing Authority – Chris Pegg                  
    Emergency Support Shelter – Sherrie Tinoco               
    Habitat for Humanity – Diane Perron                      
    Lower Columbia CAP – Ilona Kerby                         
                                                             
                                                             
                                                             
                                                             
                                                             

   At‐Large Representatives                           3     5 
                                                              
   Jim Williams                                               
   David Williams                                             
   Janette Williams                                           
   Jack Keolker                                               
                                                              
                                                              
   TOTAL                                             21    42 
   Actual Representation at time of Adoption:        24    24 

May 2010 Membership Categories Representatives BK




                                             135



Adopted 10/21/2009                                               2
                    Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Housing Advisory Committee Members
City of Castle Rock                                     Rebecca Ambrose, Executive Director
                                                        Kalama Housing Authority

Martin Franke
Washington State Dept. of Corrections                   Marion P. Olmsted, Executive Director
                                                        Kelso Housing Authority

Bill Hallanger, Commissioner
Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue Board                           Christina Pegg, Executive Director
                                                        Longview Housing Authority

Steve Harvey, Director
Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Council of Governments                JoAnn Heinricks, Clerk-Treasurer
                                                        City of Woodland

Julie Hourcle’, Entitlement Program Coordinator
City of Longview                                        Melissa Taylor, Managing Planner
                                                        Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Council of Governments

Pam Howe, Community Relations Administrator
Life Works                                              Jim Williams
                                                        CAP Board

Alex Kamaunu
Finance Education Resource Center                       George Robertson
                                                        FISH

Jack Keolker, Sr.
Kelso Citizen                                           Mike Kerins
                                                        City of Kelso

Ilona Kerby, Executive Director
Lower Columbia Community Action Council                 Sheila Thomas
                                                        City of Kalama

Assoc. Community Planner
Cowlitz County                                          Diane Perron
                                                        Habitat for Humanity

Dennis Meyers, PATH Outreach
Lower Columbia Mental Health Center                     Michael Torres
Gus Nolte, Director                                     Lower Columbia CAP
Drug Abuse Prevention Center
                                                                                 C-W HAC Name only list 10-10




                                                  136

				
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