Biblio - SLT from Ellex

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					TYPE           TOPIC                PUBLICATION                       STUDY NAME
Peer review    Effect of SLT in     Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging.   Selective laser trabeculoplasty in phakic and pseudophakic eyes.
Article        specific subgroups   2007 May-Jun;38(3):182-8.
               of patients with
               glaucoma




Poster         Effect of SLT in     IGS 2007 Athens                   SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY IN PREVIOUSLY OPERATED EYES FOR
               specific subgroups                                     CATARACTS AND/OR GLAUCOMA
               of patients with
               glaucoma


Paper          Clinical evaluation of IGS 2007 Athens                 SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY AS ADJUNCTIVE TREATMENT FOR OPEN-
Presentation   SLT                                                    ANGLE GLAUCOMA
Paper          SLT as Primary       IGS 2007 Athens   EFFICACY OF 270° SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY TREATMENT IN
Presentation   Treatment                              PRIMARY OPEN ANGLE GLAUCOMA




Paper          Others               IGS 2007 Athens   SLT AND ITS EVOLVING ROLE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GLAUCOMA
Presentation

Paper          SLT vs Medications   IGS 2007 Athens   COMPARISON OF SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY (SLT) VS. MEDICAL
Presentation                                          THERAPY FOR INITIAL THERAPY FOR GLAUCOMA OR OCULAR HYPERTENSION




Paper          Effect of SLT in     IGS 2007 Athens   BASELINE FACTORS PREDICTIVE OF SLT RESPONSE: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY
Presentation   specific subgroups
               of patients with
               glaucoma
Paper          Mechanism of SLT     IGS 2007 Athens   SLT- BIOLOGICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL STUDIES
Presentation




Paper          Long-Term Efficacy   IGS 2007 Athens   SLT AS FIRST LINE THERAPY FOR PRIMARY OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA AND LONG
Presentation   of SLT                                 TERM RESULTS




Paper          Others               IGS 2007 Athens   THE FUTURE FOR SLT
Presentation




Paper          Effect of SLT in     IGS 2007 Athens   SLT FOR PACG: RESULTS OF A MULTI-CENTER STUDY
Presentation   specific subgroups
               of patients with
               glaucoma
Paper          Effect of SLT in     IGS 2007 Athens   SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY (SLT) AS A PRIMARY AND ADJUNCTIVE
Presentation   specific subgroups                     TREATMENT FOR SECONDARY GLAUCOMA PATIENTS
               of patients with
               glaucoma




Paper          Repeat treatment     IGS 2007 Athens   SELECTIVE LASER TRABECULOPLASTY: REPEATED TREATMENT RESULTS
Presentation




Paper          Others               IGS 2007 Athens   REVIEW OF SLT LITERATURE: WHERE WE ARE TODAY.
Presentation
Peer review    Clinical evaluation of Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2007 Jan   Selective laser trabeculoplasty in the treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma
Article        SLT                    9;87(2):118-20




Paper          Effect of SLT on     IGS 2007 Athens                      influence of selective laser trabeculoplasty (slt) on diurnal iop fluctuation in poag
Presentation   Diurnal Variation




Peer review    Methods of           J Glaucoma. 2004 Feb;13(1):62-5.     A comparison between 90 degrees and 180 degrees selective laser trabeculoplasty.
Article        treatment with SLT




Peer review    Mechanism of SLT     Br. J. Ophthalmol. 2005;89;1500-     A new insight into the cellular regulation of aqueous: how trabecular meshwork endothelial
Article                             1505.                                cells drive a mechanism that regulates the permeability of outflow Schlemm’s canal
                                                                         endothelial cells




Peer review    Methods of           Br J Ophthalmol. 2005                A randomised, prospective study comparing 90°, 180° and 360° Selective Laser
Article        treatment with SLT   Nov;89(11):1413-7.                   Trabeculoplasty with Latanoprost 0.005% for the control of intraocular pressure in Ocular
                                                                         Hypertension and Open Angle Glaucoma
Peer review   SLT versus ALT       Clin Exp Optom. 1999                  A review of argon and selective laser trabeculoplasty as primary treatments of open-angle
Article                            Nov;82(6):225-229.                    glaucoma.




Peer review   Mechanism of SLT     Lasers Surg Med. 2003;33(3):204-8. Acute ultrastructural changes of the trabecular meshwork after selective laser
Article                            Links                              trabeculoplasty and low power argon laser trabeculoplasty.




Peer review   SLT vs Medications   Can J Ophthalmol 2006;41:44–50        Argon laser trabeculoplasty and reduction of ocular hypotensive medication used by
Article                                                                  glaucoma patients




Peer review   SLT versus ALT       Acta Med Croatica. 2006;60(2):97-9. Argon laser trabeculoplasty or selective laser trabeculoplasty in the treatment of open-angle
Article                                                                glaucoma




Peer review   SLT versus ALT       Bull Soc Belge Ophtalmol.             Argon versus selective laser trabeculoplasty
Article                            2006;(299):5-10.




Peer review   SLT versus ALT       J Glaucoma 2004; 13(2):174-177.       Argon versus Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty.
Article
Peer review   Long-Term Efficacy   J Ophthalmol 2005                    Associations between Elevated Intraocular Pressure and Glaucoma, Use of Glaucoma
Article       of SLT                                                    Medications, and 5-Year Incident Cataract




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Br J Ophthalmol. 2005              Baseline IOP predicts selective laser trabeculoplasty success at 1 year post-treatment:
Article       SLT                    Sep;89(9):1157-60.                 results from a randomised clinical trial.




Peer review   SLT as Primary       Nippon Ganka Gakkai Zasshi. 2000     Clinical results of selective laser trabeculoplasty
Article       Treatment            Mar;104(3):160-4.




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Nippon Ganka Gakkai Zasshi. 1999   Clinical results of selective laser trabeculoplasty
Article       SLT                    Aug;103(8):612-6.




Peer review   SLT as Primary       Jpn J Ophthalmol. 2000 Sep           Clinical Results of Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty
Article       Treatment            1;44(5):574-575.




Peer review   Methods of           J Glaucoma 2004; 13(1):62-65.        Comparison between 90° and 180° Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT).
Article       treatment with SLT
Peer review    SLT versus ALT        Ophthalmology. 2004              Comparison of long-term outcomes of selective laser trabeculoplasty versus argon laser
Article                              Oct;111(10):1853-9.              trabeculoplasty in open-angle glaucoma.




Peer review    Mechanism of SLT      Ophthalmology. 2001              Comparison of the morphologic changes after selective laser trabeculoplasty and argon
Article                              Apr;108(4):773-9.                laser trabeculoplasty in human eye bank eyes.




Article        SLT versus ALT        Ocular Surgery News Supersite,   Debate over SLT continues.
                                     June 2003.




Article        Others                Ophthalmology Times, January     Dual function laser system big boon to anterior segment surgeons.
                                     2003.




Peer review    Clinical evaluation of Br. J. Ophthalmol. Feb 2006     Early IOP Measurements for SLT
Article        SLT




Paper          Effect of SLT on      AAO 06                           Effect of Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty and Prostaglandins on Diurnal IOP Fluctuations:
Presentation   Diurnal Variation                                      Randomized Clinical Trial
Poster        Effect of SLT on     ESCRS London 2006                   Effect of Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty and Prostaglandins on Diurnal IOP Fluctuations:
              Diurnal Variation                                        Randomized Clinical Trial




Poster        Effect of SLT on     Poster AAO 2006                     Effect of SLT on diurnal fluctuation as compared to Xalatan
              Diurnal Variation




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Klin Monatsbl Augenheilkd. 2003   Efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty in the treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma
Article       SLT                    Dec;220(12):848-52.




Article       Clinical evaluation of ESCRS Euro times May 2004.        Evidence supports selective laser trabeculoplasty:
              SLT




Article       Clinical evaluation of EuroTimes May 2004.               Evidence supports SLT
              SLT




Peer review   Effect of SLT in     Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2004    Five-year follow up of selective laser trabeculoplasty in Chinese eyes.
Article       specific subgroups   Aug;32(4):368-72.
              of patients with
              glaucoma
Peer review   Others                Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2005           Glaucoma lasers: a review of the newer techniques.
Article                             Apr;16(2):89-93.




Peer review   Others                J Glaucoma. 2005 Oct;14(5):400-8.    High failure rate associated with 180 degrees selective laser trabeculoplasty.
Article                             Links




Peer review   Others                Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging.      Hyphema occurring during selective laser trabeculoplasty.
Article                             2006 Sep-Oct;37(5):432-3.




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Br J Ophthalmol. 1999 Jan;83(1):29- Immediate intraocular pressure response to selective laser trabeculoplasty.
Article       SLT                    32.




Peer review   Mechanism of SLT      Eur J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jan-          Increase of free oxygen radicals in aqueous humour induced by selective Nd:YAG laser
Article                             Mar;11(1):47-52.                     trabeculoplasty in the rabbit.




Article       SLT as Primary        Ocular Surgery News 2000 Mar.17      International Clinical Experience with SLT.
              Treatment
Peer review   SLT as Primary       Coll Antropol. 2001;25 Suppl:111-5.   Intraocular pressure reduction after selective laser trabeculoplasty in primary open angle
Article       Treatment                                                  glaucoma.




Peer review   SLT as Primary       Eur J Ophthalmol. 2002 Jul-           Intraocular pressure response of capsular glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma to
Article       Treatment            Aug;12(4):287-92. Links               selective Nd:YAG laser trabeculoplasty: a prospective, comparative clinical trial.




Peer review   SLT as Primary       Ophthalmologica. 2001 Jul-            Intraocular pressure response to selective laser trabeculoplasty in the treatment of primary
Article       Treatment            Aug;215(4):267-70.                    open-angle glaucoma.




Poster        Repeat treatment     Poster AAO 2007                       IOP reduction after Repeat and Enhancement of SLT




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Ophthalmologica 2001; 215: 267-     IOP Response to Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty in the Treatment of POAG.
Article       SLT                    270.




Article       SLT as Primary       EuroTimes July 2006; Vol 11 (1); 8-9 Is selective laser trabeculoplasty the first line treatment of open-angle glaucoma?
              Treatment
Article       SLT versus ALT        EyeWorld, July 2003.               Is SLT a better choice than ALT for lowering IOP?




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of J Fr Ophtalmol. 2001              Is trabeculoplasty still indicated?
Article       SLT                    Dec;24(10):1100-2.




Peer review   SLT versus ALT        J Glaucoma. 2006 Aug;15(4):306-9   Laser trabeculoplasty trends with the introduction of new medical treatments and selective
Article                                                                laser trabeculoplasty




Article       Long-Term Efficacy    ESCRS Euro times Jan 2003          Long term SLT results promise valuable primary treatment
              of SLT




Article       SLT as Primary        EuroTimes, January 2003.           Long term SLT results promise valuable primary treatment
              Treatment




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Eur J Ophthalmol. 2006 Jan-       Long-term clinical results of selective laser trabeculoplasty in the treatment of primary open
Article       SLT                    Feb;16(1):100-4                   angle glaucoma.
Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Klin Monatsbl Augenheilkd. 2006     Long-term follow-up of selective laser trabeculoplasty in primary open-angle glaucoma
Article       SLT                    Sep;223(9):743-7. Links




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Klin Monatsbl Augenheilkd. 2005     Long-term results after selective laser trabeculoplasty -- a clinical study on 269 eyes
Article       SLT                    Apr;222(4):326-31.




Article       SLT versus ALT        Ophthalmology Times, 2003. Insert: Lowering Pressure Safely – a new laser therapy could eventually replace medication as the
                                    Spotlight on Technology &          glaucoma treatment of choice.
                                    Technique.




Chapter for   Methods of            Diagnosis and Management Editors Mastering the techniques of Glaucoma
book          treatment with SLT    Dr A Garg & Prof S Melamed




Article       Clinical evaluation of Ocular Surgery News Supersite -     New laser options exist for patients with glaucoma.
              SLT                    Europe/Asia-Pacific Edition, June
                                     2003.




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Ophthalmic Surgery & Lasers 2000;   One-Year Follow-up of laser trabeculoplasty using Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG
Article       SLT                    31(5): 394-399.                     Laser
Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Ophthalmologica. 2004 Jan-          One-year follow-up of selective laser trabeculoplasty in open-angle glaucoma.
Article       SLT                    Feb;218(1):20-5.




Article       SLT as Primary       Ophthalmology Times 2002, June;       Primary therapy with SLT has potential for durable efficacy
              Treatment            43.




Peer review   Others               Can J Ophthalmol. 2006                Projected cost comparison of selective laser trabeculoplasty versus glaucoma medication in
Article                            Aug;41(4):449-56.                     the Ontario Health Insurance Plan.




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Ophthalmology. 1998                 Q-switched 532-nm Nd:YAG laser trabeculoplasty (selective laser trabeculoplasty): a
Article       SLT                    Nov;105(11):2082-8; discussion      multicenter, pilot, clinical study.
                                     2089-90.




Peer review   SLT versus ALT       bjo.2006.098855                       Randomised Clinical Trial
Article                            Br. J. Ophthalmol. published online   Trabeculoplasty: Results from a One-year
                                   9 Aug 2006;                           Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty vs. Argon Laser




Article       SLT versus ALT       Ophthalmology Times, June 2004,       Randomized controlled clinical trial finds dose-response effect of SLT
                                   55-56.
Article       Methods of           Ophthalmology Times: Issue June    Randomized controlled clinical trial finds dose-response effect of SLT:
              treatment with SLT   2004: 55-56




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Cesk Slov Oftalmol. 2004         Selective laser trabeculoplasty
Article       SLT                    Jul;60(4):267-74.




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Swiss Ophthalmic Journal Optha   Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty
Article       SLT                    Feb 2004




Chapter for   Methods of           Atlas of Glaucoma surgery,         Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty
book          treatment with SLT   Editors: T Shaarawy, A Mermoud




Article       Clinical evaluation of PR Newswire, Feb 28, 2003        Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty – A new approach to open angle glaucoma treatment
              SLT




Article       Clinical evaluation of Ocular Surgery News September    Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty – A New Treatment for Glaucoma
              SLT                    2001
Peer review   Effect of SLT in     Am J Ophthalmol. 2005                Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) complicated by intraocular pressure elevation in eyes
Article       specific subgroups   Jun;139(6):1110-3. Links             with heavily pigmented trabecular meshworks.
              of patients with
              glaucoma



Poster        Repeat treatment     American Academy of                  Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty and Retreatment:
                                   Ophthalmology, Anaheim 2003




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Am J Ophthalmol. 2005              Selective laser trabeculoplasty as a replacement for medical therapy in open-angle
Article       SLT                    Sep;140(3):524-5. Links            glaucoma




Peer review   SLT as an Adjunct    Am J Ophthalmol 2005 Sep ;           Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty as a replacement for medical therapy in open-angle
Article       or Replacement       140(3) : 524-525                     glaucoma
              Therapy




Peer review   SLT as initial and   J Glaucoma. 2006 Apr;15(2):124-30. Selective laser trabeculoplasty as initial and adjunctive treatment for open-angle glaucoma
Article       adjunct therapy




Peer review   SLT as initial and   J Glaucoma 2006;15:124–130)          Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty as Initial and Adjunctive Treatment for Open-Angle
Article       adjunct therapy                                           Glaucoma
Peer review   SLT as Primary       Arch Ophthalmol. 2003 July; 121:       Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty as Primary Treatment for Open-angle Glaucoma:
Article       Treatment            957-960.




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Arch Ophthalmol. 2003                Selective laser trabeculoplasty as primary treatment for open-angle glaucoma: a
Article       SLT                    Jul;121(7):957-60.                   prospective, nonrandomized pilot study.




Article       Clinical evaluation of Ocular Surgery News 2005 Oct 1.      Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty effective in lowering, maintaining IOP
              SLT




Peer review   Clinical evaluation of Review of Ophthalmol. 2003, June;    Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty for Glaucoma Therapy.
Article       SLT                    67-72.




Peer review   Effect of SLT in     Optom Vis Sci. 2006 Jul;83(7):421-5. Selective laser trabeculoplasty for intraocular pressure elevation after intravitreal
Article       specific subgroups                                        triamcinolone acetonide injection.
              of patients with
              glaucoma



Peer review   Effect of SLT in     Harefuah. 2005 Nov;144(11):790-3,      Selective laser trabeculoplasty treatment for medication-refractory open angle glaucoma
Article       specific subgroups   822, 821.
              of patients with
              glaucoma
Peer review    Clinical evaluation of Br J Ophthalmol. 1999             Selective laser trabeculoplasty v argon laser trabeculoplasty: a prospective randomised
Article        SLT                    Jun;83(6):718-22.                 clinical trial.




Peer review    SLT versus ALT       Br J Ophthalmol. 2006               Selective laser trabeculoplasty versus argon laser trabeculoplasty: results from a 1-year
Article                             Dec;90(12):1490-4. Epub 2006 Aug    randomised clinical trial.
                                    9. Links




Peer review    SLT versus ALT       Br J Ophthalmol 1999 Jun; 83(6):    Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty vs. Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty
Article                             718-722.




Peer review    Clinical evaluation of Ophthalmol Clin North Am. 2005    Selective laser trabeculoplasty.
Article        SLT                    Sep;18(3):409-19, vi.




Poster         Clinical evaluation of ESCRS Munich, Germany Sept 2003 Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A Randomised Clinical Trial
               SLT




Paper          Clinical evaluation of Glaucoma society (UK & Eire)      Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A Randomised Clinical Trial
Presentation   SLT                    London, Nov 2003
Paper          Clinical evaluation of American Academy of               Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A Randomised Control Trial
Presentation   SLT                    Ophthalmology, Anaheim Nov 2003.
                                      Swiss Ophthalmic Annual Congress,
                                      Lugano, September 2003.
                                      International Glaucoma Symposium
                                      held at Barcelona in March 2003.
Paper          Clinical evaluation of International Congress of Glaucoma Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A new and successful laser treatment for Open Angle
Presentation   SLT                    Surgery, Luxor in Feb 2003.        Glaucoma management
                                      American Academy of
                                      Ophthalmology, Orlando in Oct
                                      2002.
                                      Swiss Ophthalmic Annual Congress,
Poster         Clinical evaluation of Lucerne, September 2002.
                                      Royal College of Ophthalmology     Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A New Approach to Open Angle Glaucoma Management
               SLT                    Annual Congress Birmingham 2003.




Peer review    Clinical evaluation of Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2002        Selective laser trabeculoplasty: a new treatment option for open angle glaucoma.
Article        SLT                    Apr;13(2):94-6. Links




Paper          Clinical evaluation of Annual College Congress May       Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A Randomized Control Trial
Presentation   SLT                    Manchester 2004.




Poster         Clinical evaluation of Oxford Ophthalmology Congress    Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A Randomized Control Trial
               SLT                    July 2004.
                                      Annual College Congress May 2004
Article        SLT versus ALT       Ophthalmic Practice Feb 2003;         Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A review and comparison to Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty
                                    21(2).




Article        SLT versus ALT       EyeWorld, February 2005.              Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: A silver bullet for glaucoma?




Paper          Repeat treatment     AAO 06                                Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: Effect of Enhancement and Repeatability on IOP
Presentation




Paper          Repeat treatment     ESCRS London 2006                     Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: Is Retreatment a viable option?
Presentation




Paper          Long-Term Efficacy   ESCRS London 2006                     Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: Long Term Results
Presentation   of SLT




Peer review    Clinical evaluation of Br J Ophthalmol. 2006               Selective laser trabeculoplasty: predictive value of early intraocular pressure measurements
Article        SLT                    Jun;90(6):741-3. Epub 2006 Feb 7.   for success at 3 months.
Paper          SLT vs Medications   AAO 06                             Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: Replacement for Medical Treatment in Glaucoma patients
Presentation




Paper          SLT vs Medications   ESCRS London 2006                  Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: Replacement therapy for Medical Treatment
Presentation




Peer review    Others               Exp Eye Res 1995; 60: 359-372.     Selective targeting of trabecular meshwork cells: in vitro studies of pulsed and CW laser
Article                                                                interaction.




Peer review    Mechanism of SLT     Exp Eye Res. 1995 Apr;60(4):359-   Selective targeting of trabecular meshwork cells: in vitro studies of pulsed and CW laser
Article                             71.                                interactions.




Peer review    SLT versus ALT       Eye. 2004 May;18(5):498-502.       Selective vs argon laser trabeculoplasty: hypotensive efficacy, anterior chamber
Article                                                                inflammation, and postoperative pain.




Peer review    SLT versus ALT       Eye 2004; 18: 498-502.             Selective vs. argon laser trabeculoplasty: Hypotensive efficacy, anterior chamber
Article                                                                inflammation, and postoperative pain.
Peer review    Clinical evaluation of DOS Times 2004; 9 (9): 391-392.   SLT – Review of a New Technique.
Article        SLT




Article        SLT versus ALT       Ophthalmology Times, May 2002.      SLT a safe alternative to ALT.




Paper          Effect of SLT in     Manchester RCO 2006                 SLT and secondary glaucoma - Case series
Presentation   specific subgroups
               of patients with
               glaucoma



Article        SLT vs Medications   Ocular Surgery News Supersite, 26   SLT compared to drugs as first line glaucoma therapy.
                                    October 2004.




Peer review    SLT vs Medications   Br. J. Ophthalmol 2005. 89; 1413-   SLT compared with latanoprost for OHT and OAG
Article                             1417.




Article        SLT versus ALT       Ocular Surgery News Supersite,      SLT equally effective as ALT at 3-year follow-up.
                                    October 2003.
Peer review    SLT versus ALT       Review of Ophthalmol. 2001; 113-     SLT Evolves as a Treatment for Open-angle Glaucoma.
Article                             118.




Article        SLT as Primary       Ophthalmology Times, April 15,       SLT fares best as early intervention in glaucoma – laser therapy compares favorably with
               Treatment            2005.                                medications in terms of efficacy, side effects, compliance




Poster         Effect of SLT in     APO 2006 Annual College              SLT in Secondary Glaucoma: Case Report
               specific subgroups   Congress May 2006
               of patients with
               glaucoma



Article        Repeat treatment     Ocular Surgery News: International   SLT safely lowered IOP in glaucoma patients, surgeon says.
                                    Edition, October 2004. 28-31.




Article        SLT as Primary       EyeWorld, March 2003.                SLT to be tested as a first line therapy for open-angle glaucoma.
               Treatment
Article        SLT vs Medications   Ocular Surgery News Europe/Asia      SLT’s effect on IOP equal to medical therapy, study shows.
                                    Pacific. Oct. 2004.
Peer review    SLT vs Medications   Glaucoma Today Nov-Dec 2004; 31-     The Effect of Topical Glaucoma Medication on the Efficacy of SLT.
Article                             33.
Peer review    SLT versus ALT       Am J Ophthalmol. 1995; 120: 718-     The Glaucoma Laser Trial (GLT) and Glaucoma Laser Trial Follow Up study: Results of ALT
Article                             731.                                 vs. Topical Medicines
Paper          Effect of SLT in     SEO Spain September 2006             Trabeculoplastia Selectiva Una alternativa multifuncional al tratamiento del glaucoma de
Presentation   specific subgroups                                        ángulo abierto
               of patients with
               glaucoma
Article        SLT versus ALT       Ophthalmology Times 2002, May        Treating POAG: SLT a safe alternative to ALT.
Poster         SLT vs Medications   EVER Portugal 2006                   Trial of SLT laser treatment versus prostaglandine in the treatment of POAG
Article   Effect of SLT in     Ocular Surgery News Supersite “Hot Trials find SLT safe, effective in different populations.
          specific subgroups   Stories”, 29 March 2005
          of patients with
          glaucoma
LANGUAGE             AUTHORS                                            PLACE
Article in English   Werner M, Smith MF, Doyle JW.                      University of Florida, Department of
                                                                        Ophthalmology, 1600 SWArcher Rd.,
                                                                        Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.




Article in English   Benítez-del-Castillo J, Molina E, Molina E, Mota   Hospital General del S.A.S. de Jerez,
                     I.                                                 Jerez (Cádiz), ESPAÑA




Article in English   F. Ozturk , U. Inan, S. Ermis                      Afyon, Turkey
Article in English   P. Sebesta , P. Vyborny, J. Pasta            Prague, Czech Republic




Article in English   M.A. Latina                                  Reading, MA, USA


Article in English   L.J. Katz , W.C. Steinmann, G. Marcellino,   Philadelphia, PA, USA
                     SLT/MED Study Group




Article in English   P.J. Harasymowycz , P. Roy, M.R. Lesk        Montreal , Quebec, Canada
Article in English   J. Alvarado          San Francisco, CA, USA




Article in English   Madhu Nagar          Wakefield, UK




Article in English   IVAN GOLDBERG        EYE ASSOCIATES, SYDNEY EYE
                                          HOSPITAL, AUSTRALIA




Article in English   PRIN ROJANAPONGPUN   Dr. Prin Rojanapongpun
                                          (Chulalongkorn University & Hospital,
                                          Thailand), Dr. Ho Ching Lin (Singapore
                                          National Eye Center, Singapore), Dr.
                                          Jimmy S.M. Lai (United Christian
                                          Hospital, Hong Kong), Dr. Mario V.
Article in English   MIROSLAV VUKOSAVLJEVIC   EYE CLINIC MEDICAL MILITARY
                                              ACADEMY, BELGRADE, SERBIA




Article in English   ENPING CHEN              GLAUCOMA SERVICE, ST. ERIK’S
                                              EYE HOSPITAL, KAROLINSKA
                                              INSTITUTE, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN




Article in English   MICHAEL BELKIN           TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY, SHEBA
                                              MEDICAL CENTER, ISRAEL
Article in Chinese   Qian SH, Sun XH.                              Eye & ENT Hospital, Fudan University,
                                                                   Shanghai 200031, China




Article in English   G. Hollo , P. Kothy, M. Toth                  Budapest, Hungary




Article in English   Chen E, Golchin S, Blomdahl S.                Glaucoma Service, St Erik's Eye
                                                                   Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
                                                                   enping.chen@sankterik.se




Article in English   Alvarado, JA et al.




Article in English   Nagar M, Ogunyomade A, O'Brart DP, Howes F,
                     Marshall J.
Article in English   Sanfilippo P.                                  96 Nellie Street, Queensland, 4012,
                                                                    Australia.




Article in English   Cvenkel B, Hvala A, Drnovsek-Olup B, Gale N.   Eye Clinic, University Medical Centre
                                                                    Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
                                                                    barbara.cvenkel@kclj.si




Article in English   Vaidergorn, P. et al.




Article in English   Bojic L, Ivanisevic M, Mandic Z.




Article in English   Van de Veire S, Zeyen T, Stalmans I.




Article in English   Latina, Mark; Cioffi et al.
Article in English   Chandrasekara, S et al.




Article in English   Hodge WG, Damji KF, Rock W, Buhrmann R,
                     Bovell AM, Pan Y.




Article in Japanese Kajiya S, Hayakawa K, Sawaguchi S.         Department of Ophthalmology,
                                                               University of Ryukyu Faculty of
                                                               Medicine, Okinawa, Japan.




Article in Japanese Kano K, Kuwayama Y, Mizoue S, Ito N.       Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka
                                                               Koseinenkin Hospital, Japan.




Article in English   Kajiya S, Hayakawa K, Sawaguchi S.        Department of Ophthalmology,
                                                               University of Ryukyu Faculty of
                                                               Medicine, Ryukyu, Japan




Article in English   Chen, Enping; Saeed, Glochin et al.
Article in English   Juzych MS, Chopra V, Banitt MR, Hughes BA,   Kresge Eye Institute, Wayne State
                     Kim C, Goulas MT, Shin DH.                   University School of Medicine, Detroit,
                                                                  Michigan 48201-1423, USA.
                                                                  mjuzych@med.wayne.edu



Article in English   Kramer TR, Noecker RJ.                       Emory Eye Center, Emory University
                                                                  School of Medicine, 1365-B Clifton
                                                                  Road N.E., Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.




Article in English   Wolkoff, L.




Article in English   Guttman, C.




Article in English   Johnson, P. et al.




Article in English   Madhu Nagar
Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in German    Gracner T, Pahor D, Gracner B.      Augenabteilung des
                                                         Lehrkrankenhauses Maribor, Slovenia.
                                                         tomaz.gracner@sb-mb.si




Article in English   Madhu Nagar, Latina M.




Article in English   Nagar, M.




Article in English   Lai JS, Chua JK, Tham CC, Lam DS.   Department of Ophthalmology, United
                                                         Christian Hospital, Kwun Tong,
                                                         Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.
                                                         laism@ha.org.hk
Article in English   Holz HA, Lim MC.




Article in English   Song J, Lee PP, Epstein DL, Stinnett SS,
                     Herndon LW Jr, Asrani SG, Allingham RR,
                     Challa P.




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Article in English   Lanzetta P, Menchini U, Virgili G.              Department of Ophthalmology,
                                                                     University of Udine, Italy.




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                                                                     Sanliurfa, Turkey. guzey@turk.net




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Article in English   Gracner T.                                         Department of Ophthalmology, Maribor
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Article in English   Gracner T.                                         Department of Ophthalmology, General
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Article in English   Ralf Buhrmann and Yi I. Pan
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Article in English   Geyer O, Wolf A, Levinger E, Orev T, Segev E.
Article in English   Damji KF, Shah KC, Rock WJ, Bains HS,    University Of Ottawa Eye Institute,
                     Hodge WG.                                Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario,
                                                              Canada.




Article in English   Damji KF, Bovell AM, Hodge WG, Rock W,
                     Shah K, Buhrmann R, Pan YI.




Article in English   Damji, Karim F; Shah, Kirtida C et al.




Article in English   Latina MA, de Leon JM.




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Article in English   Madhu Nagar
Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Latina MA, Tumbocon JA.   Glaucoma Fellow, Massachusetts Eye
                                               and Ear Infirmary, Boston,
                                               Massachusetts, USA.
                                               jtumbocon@aol.com



Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Madhu Nagar
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Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Madhu Nagar




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Article in English   Latina, MA; Park C.




Article in English   Latina MA, Park C.                               Wellman Laboratories, Massachusetts
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Article in English   Martinez-de-la-Casa JM, Garcia-Feijoo J,         Instituto de Investigaciones,
                     Castillo A, Matilla M, Macias JM, Benitez-del-   Oftalmologicas Ramon, Castroviejo
                     Castillo JM, Garcia-Sanchez J.                   Hospital Clinico, San Carlos,
                                                                      Universidad Complutense de Madrid,
                                                                      Madrid, Spain.
                                                                      martinezcasa@jazzfree.com
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Article in English   Tuli, Deven; Sihota, Ramanjit et al.




Article in English   Scerra, Chet.




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Article in English   Madhu Nagar




Article in English   Latina, Mark A.




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Article in English   The Glaucoma Laser Trial Research Group.

Article in English   M. Javier González Rodríguez




Article in English   Scerra, Chet.
Article in English   E. Ansari
Article in English   N/A
SYNOPSIS
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of pseudophakia on the success of selective laser trabeculoplasty in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP). PATIENTS
AND METHODS: In this retrospective, nonrandomized clinical trial, a chart review of all patients who underwent selective laser trabeculoplasty from September 2002 to June 2004
using a frequency-doubled Q-switched 532-nm Nd:YAG laser was performed. Changes in IOP and statistical significance were determined at each follow-up period. Average
decrease in IOP and success rates for phakic and pseudophakic eyes were compared statistically at each time period. RESULTS: In the phakic group, mean IOP decreased from
18.1 to 15.5 mm Hg (P < .0005) and mean glaucoma medication use decreased from 2.1 to 1.6 medications after 24 months of follow-up. In the pseudophakic group, mean IOP
decreased from 18.3 to 15.2 mm Hg (P < .005) and mean glaucoma medication use decreased from 2.2 to 1.6 medications. Success rates ranged from 54% to 67% in the phakic
group and 52% to 65% in the pseudophakic group. No statistically significant difference between phakic and pseudophakic eyes in decreased IOP or success rates was seen at
any time point (P > .05). No significant complications occurred in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Selective laser trabeculoplasty is effective (trabeculectomy) needed for ocular
Objective:To evaluate effectiveness and safety of selective laser trabeculoplasty in previously operated eyes for cataract and/or glaucoma in lowering IOP in both phakic and
hypotensive medication. Methods: A prospective study of 21 eyes (10 eyes operated for cataract, 10 operated for         glaucoma and 1 eye for both) of 14 patients with follow-up
time of 9 months who underwent to SLT “Solo” ELLEX (standard protocol 180º). Kaplan-Meier survival curves have been designed and compared with Logrank test. Predictive
factors have been analysed with Cox proportional-hazards regression. Results: Mean base IOP is 22.5 mmHg (SD 3.8) and final IOP is 17.3 mmHg (SD 3.8) after 9 months follow-
up. Mean difference is 5.1 mmHg (22.8% reduction) which is statistically significant (P<0.0001). In cataract operated eyes mean difference between base and final IOP is 4.6
mmHg (21.5%) which is statistically significant (P=0.0037). In glaucoma operated eyes mean difference between base and final IOP is 5.6 mmHg (23.8%) which is statistically
significantTo investigate the efficacy and safety of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) as equal or more than a of open-angle glaucoma (OAG). curves are designed and
Purpose: (P<0.0001) Attending to a success criteria of final IOP achieving a reduction of adjunctive treatment 20% of base IOP Kaplan survival
Materials and Methods: A prospective non-randomized clinical trial was performed in the Department of Ophthalmology in Afyon Kocatepe University. Patients diagnosed OAG
were assigned to selective laser treatment. All patients underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation before and at intervals after treatment. A total of approximately 50 spots were
placed over 180ºof the trabecular meshwork. Patients were followed up 1 week, 1 and 3 months. The primary outcome of the study was the intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering
effect of SLT. "Success" of the laser treatment was defined as a reduction of 20% of pre-treatment IOP and "Response" was defined as 3 mm Hg decrease of IOP with no
additional anti-glaucomatous interventions. The hypotensive medication during the study remained unchanged.
Results: Twenty eyes of 20 patients were enrolled. The mean baseline IOP was 19.8 ± 2.1 mm Hg. The average absolute and percent reductions in IOP were 2.4 ± 1.5 mm Hg or
12.1% in month 1 and 2.7 ± 1.0 mm Hg or 13.4% in month 3. The success rate was 25% in month 1 and 20% in month 3. The response rates were 45% in month 1 and 60% in
month 3. There was no significant complication.
Conclusion: SLT was found to be efficacious and safe as additional therapy in reducing IOP in OAG over 3 months. Long-term follow-up studies with a large sample size, and
Purpose: To determine the efficacy of 270°selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) treatment to reduce elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG).

Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with POAG treated with 270° SLT. We documented sex, age and glaucoma medication use. Primary outcome
was decrease in IOP from pretreatment baseline. We noted the IOP after the procedure at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 18 months.

Results: 96 eyes of 56 POAG patients were reviewed. They received 270° SLT treatment. The mean pre-SLT IOP was 21.5 mmHg. The mean IOP at 1 month (N=77) post SLT
was 17.8 mmHg (17.2 % reduction), at 3 months (N=69) post SLT was 17.8 mmHg (17.2 % reduction), at 6 months (N=88) post SLT was 17.3 mmHg (19.5 % reduction), at 12
months (N=70) post SLT was 18.3 mmHg (14.9 % reduction) and at 18 months ( N=40) post SLT was 17.8 mmHg (17.2 % reduction). The antiglaucoma medication at 3 months
post SLT could be tapered according to the IOP reduction in 15 eyes, remained stable in 74 eyes and was increased in 7 eyes.

Conclusion: SLT procedure in 270° was found to be an efficacious IOP lowering method in POAG patients followed up to 18 months post-treatment.

The use of Selective Laser TRabeculoplasty (SLT) has become more widespread and the role of SLT in the management of glaucoma continues to evolve. A variety of SLT
clincial studies will be presented with emphasis on the safety and efficacy of SLT as primary therapy, use of SLT to reduce the need for anti-glaucoma medications, repeatbility of
SLT, and the effect of SLT on IOP fluctuation. A paradigm shift in glaucoma management towards earlier treatment of glaucoma with SLT will be discussed.
To compare selective laser trabeculoplasty with medical therapy for the initial treatment of open angle glaucoma
Design: Prospective, multi-center (17 sites) randomized double-arm trial. Both eyes of eligible patients were randomized to receive either SLT in both eyes (Group 1) or medical
therapy (Group 2).
Participants: 47 patients (94 eyes) with open angle glaucoma on no medical therapy or previous laser trabeculoplasty or eye surgery
Target intraocular pressure (IOP) was determined by a formula developed for the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study (CIGTS) based on the starting IOP and severity
of the baseline perimetry visual field results. Failure was called if the IOP exceeded 2 mmHg above the target IOP range and the next step in the treatment paradigm was SLT
repeated in the SLT arm and changes in the medical regime in the medicine group.
Main Outcome Measures: Goldmann applanation tonometry before and at least 8 months after treatment initiated. The mean IOP was obtained for both groups and individual
success was determined by falling within the calculated target IOP range. Serial perimetry and optic nerve evaluation were performed to detect any glaucomatous progression
which also signaled failure and the need for additional treatment.
Results: After a follow-up interval of at least 8 months there was a near IOP reduction of 7.6 mmHg in the medical treatment group (36 eyes) and 6.7 mmHg in the eyes following
SLT (58 eyes). The number of steps in the treatment paradigm was 1.1 for the SLT group and 1.3 for the medical group suggesting that target IOP range was achieved in the
Background and aims: groups.
majority of eyes in bothDetermine whether angle pigmentation and other baseline patient characteristics may be predictive of IOP lowering response of SLT.
Methods: Patients were prospectively examined and angle pigmentation was graded using a standardized scale. Baseline demographic and eye characteristics were noted.
Patients then underwent 180 degree of SLT, and IOP lowering of the same eye, as well as IOP lowering as compared to the contralateral eye, were noted at the 1 month, 6 month
and 1 year visits post SLT. Statistical analyses including ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficients were examined.
Results: 74 eyes of 60 patients were examined. SLT response was independent of age, gender, degree of angle pigmentation and whether ALT had been previously performed, or
whether patients had OHT, or NTG as compared to POAG. Pseudophakes had a smaller decrease in IOP at all time points (0 vs -3mmHg, p=0.01), and patients with PXF also had
a marginally lower IOP response at months 1 and 6 (-0.5 vs -3.3 mmHg, p=0.06, Figure 1). Patients on prostaglandin analog treatment prior to SLT had a smaller decrease in IOP,
even when corrected for baseline IOP (-2.5 vs -4.5 mmHg, p=0.006).
Purpose: To test the hypothesis that trabecular meshwork endothelial cells (TMEs) regulate aqueous outflow by actively releasing ligands that upon binding to Schlemm's canal
endothelial cells (SCEs) increase transendothelial flow, thereby facilitating the egress of aqueous.
Methods: We tested our hypothesis by (1) activating the TMEs in vitro using a laser procedure known to increase aqueous outflow in vivo; (2) demonstrating that lasered TMEs
become activated at the genome-wide level and synthesize ligands; (3) ascertaining that media conditioned by laser-activated TMEs and ligands therein increase transendothelial
flow when added to SCEs; and (4) determining that ligands identified as synthesized by TMEs increase permeability when added to SCEs.
Results: Adding either media conditioned by lasered TMEs or ligands synthesized by TMEs to naïve control SCEs increases permeability. Adding media boiled, diluted, or
conditioned by non-lasered TMEs abrogates these permeability effects. Media conditioned by either lasered TMEs or SCEs (TME-cm/SCE-cm), when added to untreated controls
of each cell type, induce congruous gene expression and flow effects: TME-cm induces far more differentially expressed genes (829 in control TMEs and 1,120 in control SCEs)
than does the SCE-cm (12 in control TMEs and 328 in control SCEs), and TME-cm also increases flow much more (more than 11-fold in control TMEs and more than fourfold in
control SCEs) than does the SCE-cm (fivefold in control TMEs and twofold in control SCEs).
Purpose: Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) is increasingly being used to lower IOP in clinical practice. Preliminary published evidence suggests that this is an effective and a
safe procedure, with minimal, transient and self-limiting side effects but jury is out on long term results.
Methods: Retrospective case study of all the patients undergoing SLT: 2000 – 2006
SLT was performed as Primary, Adjunctive and Replacement treatment. Base line IOP prior to SLT and IOP post SLT recorded at week 1, month 1, month 3, month 6, year 1 and
from then on annually. Response to SLT was defined as a 20% drop from the baseline level.
Conclusion: SLT is an effective, safe and non-invasive method. The study has shown that the effect of SLT lasts for a considerable period. SLT is free of compliance factor hence
we recommend it as a first line treatment to reduce IOP. Results of SLT as a primary treatment modality will be presented.

The classical “step-wise” paradigm for glaucoma management has been intraocular pressure reduction, firstly with medications, secondly with laser trabeculoplasty and finally
drainage surgery. This paradigm has been based on the principle of “first do no harm” and taking potential benefits and possible problems into account. SLT represents a
significant advance in potential advantages of laser trabecular surgery: while effectiveness is comparable with earlier techniques involving Argon and diode lasers, histological
safety (with appropriate technique) and potential reproducibility appear to be improved.
In the overall management of chronic open-angle glaucoma, this offers clinicians greater flexibility in the timing of laser trabecular modification. SLT can be offered as an
alternative to medical therapy at an earlier stage in management, and may be offered repeatedly.
With reduction in repeat costs linked with ongoing medical therapy, if effective, SLT may offer savings to patients and health care payors. This may result from avoiding medical
therapy altogether, or by minimizing the number of products needing to be used.
Clinicians need to take these facts into account when advising a patient on the optimal therapy for him/her at that particular time in their care.

PURPOSE: To assess the efficacy and safety of Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) as a treatment for Primary Angle Closure glaucoma (PACG).
METHODS: All the visible pigmented trabecular meshwork of 67 eyes with PACG, a patent peripheral iridotomy and a clear view of at least 90 degrees of the angle were treated
by SLT.
RESULTS: From a mean baseline IOP of 24.7±2.5 mmHg, it was reduced by 21.9% to 19.3 mmHg in the 64 eyes that reached 3 months of follow up. In the 56 eyes that reached
the 6 months the mean IOP was 19.2±2.5 mmHg (22.2% reduction). There were no significant or permanent complications.
CONCLUSION: SLT seems to be an effective and safe method of treating eyes with PACG and a patent iridotomy if at least a quarter of the angle is visible.
TITLE: Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) as a primary and adjunctive treatment for secondary glaucoma patients.
AUTHORS: Vukosavljevic, M., Aleksic, P., Milivojevic, M., Jojic-Savicevic, Z., Civcic, N., Mrdja-Radosavljevic, T.
INSTITUTION: Eye Clinic Medical Military Academy, Belgrade, Serbia.
AIM: To evaluate SLT hypotensive effects with secondary glaucoma patients.
METHODS: We examined 106 eyes in 54 patients with secondary glaucoma. 72 eyes (29 patients) were with capsulary glaucoma, 8 eyes (4 patients) with pigmentary glaucoma,
23 eyes (18 patients) were with secondary glaucoma caused by silicon oil post-operatively, and 3 eyes (3 patients) were with increased IOP due to post uveitic reaction. We
performed SLT as a primary therapy for 32 eyes (six eyes with pigmentary glaucoma, 19 eyes with silicon oil after pars plana vitrectomy-VPP, and 7 eyes with capsulary
glaucoma). In all other cases SLT was additional therapy. We performed SLT on inferior part of the pigmented trabecular meshwork at an energy level from 0.5 mJ for heavily
pigmented eyes to 1.1. mJ per pulse for poorly pigmented eyes and eyes with silicon oil. We measured IOP at selected intervals; one hour post-operatively, one week, one month,
three months and six months post-operatively.
RESULTS: In each patient group we had an overall reduction of IOP, raging from 18% to 35%, with only 4 eyes remaining without effect. We observed the best results with SLT
when used as a primary therapy with capsulary and pigmentary glaucoma. This reduction was 33% and we achieved controlled IOP without medical therapy. In eyes with
glaucoma caused by silicon oil the base line IOPTrabeculoplasty (SLT) 42 mmHg) and post-operatively we study. SLT with 25 laser of 54%.on 90 degree of trabecular meshwork
Repeatability of the 90 degrees Selective Laser was very high (mean was investigated in a retrospective got significant reduction effects However, this effect is short termed
was performed as adjunctive therapy in 76 eyes of 76 patients. SLT was carried out twice in 48 eyes, and triply in 15 eyes. The intervals between the laser treatment and the loss
of IOP control were analyzed with a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The intervals of IOP control among repeated SLT treatments were compared. The effect of age, the previous
ALT, the exfoliation and the pigmentation of the trabecular meshwork on the period of IOP control was investigated.
The mean interval of IOP control after a first-time SLT treatment was 296 days (95% confidence interval 228 to 364 days). Repeated SLT had similar duration of IOP regulation (p
= 0.10). The age, the previous ALT, the exfoliation and the pigmentation of the trabecular meshwork did not influence the period of IOP control.


The efficacy and safety of SLT for the treatment of open angle glaucoma was tested thus far by over 40 clinical trials including seven randomized controlled ones. The results of
the trials indicate that SLT:
- Is as effective a treatment modality for IOP reduction as a single medication while solving the inherent compliance problem associated with drug therapy
- Is as effective as ALT in IOP reduction without causing the structural damage characterizing the latter
- Can be used to treat various forms of OAG
- Can probably be used in the treatment of angle closure glaucoma
- Does no cause any long-term side effects
- Produces satisfactory IOP reduction that can last in many cases up to five years
- Can be used as primary secondary or adjunctive therapy
- Can be used regardless of angle pigmentation, but there are more complications in eyes with heavily pigmented trabeculum
- Is enhanceable and repeatable
- There are no reports of SLT preceding or following trabeculectomy.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in the treatment of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS: In a prospective
non-randomized clinical study, 63 patients (85 eyes) with POAG and medically uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) underwent SLT. A total of 50 +/- 5 adjacent but
nonoverlapping spots were placed over inferior 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork using a 532 nm, Q-switched, Nd: YAG laser at energy levels ranging from 0.6
approximately 1.8 mJ per pulse. After SLT, the eyes continued to receive the identical drug regimen. All patients were observed before and 1, 2 hours, 1, 7 and 14 days, and 1, 2,
3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months after the treatment. RESULTS: The average pre-operative IOP was (25 +/- 4) mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa).
The mean IOP reduction from baseline were 8.1 mm Hg (32.0%) 1 day after the SLT, 5.6 mm Hg (22.1%) 7 days after the SLT, 4.7 mm Hg
(18.6%) 14 days after the SLT, 5.5 mm Hg (21.7%) 1 month after the SLT, 5.1 mm Hg (20.2%) 2 months after the SLT, 5.9 mm Hg (23.3%) 3 months after the SLT, 5.2 mm Hg
(20.6%) 6 months after the SLT, 4.0 mm Hg (15.8%) 9 months after the SLT, 4.2 mm Hg (16.6%) 12 months after the SLT, 3.8 mm Hg (15.0%) 18 months after the SLT, and 3.3
mm Hg
(13.0%) 24 months after the SLT (P < 0.01 or 0.05). Adverse reactions were minimal, including conjunctival injection, mild anterior chamber reaction, and transient pressure spike.
Aims: To investigate the influence of SLT on mean diurnal IOP (mean-IOP) and diurnal IOP fluctuation.
Methods: Twenty-six eyes of 13 POAG patients underwent a 4-week washout before baseline diurnal IOP curve. Standard 360-degree SLT was performed. The IOP curve was
repeated after 3 and 6 months. IOP lowering medication was started (failure) if mean-IOP was higher than 22 mmHg or any single IOP value exceeded 26 mmHg at any visit.
Results: Post-treatment IOP elevation >5 mm Hg was found in 16 eyes (62%). An at least 20% decrease of the mean-IOP was not reached. Medication was introduced in 16 eyes.
Baseline mean-IOP and diurnal IOP fluctuation (mean±SD) were higher for the 11 eyes requiring medication before the month 3 visit than for the other eyes (mean IOP: 28.8±5.2
mmHg vs. 20.8±3.1 mmHg, unpaired t-test, p<0.0001; IOP fluctuation: 9.5±3.7 mmHg vs. 6.8±1.9 mmHg, p=0.0423). For the eyes with no medication mean-IOP changed from
19.3 ± 1.4 mmHg (baseline) to 18.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (month 3, Duncan test, p=0.090) and to 18.2 ± 2.0 mmHg (month 6, p=0.017). No difference was seen between month 3 and 6
PURPOSE: To compare two regimens of SLT, ie, 7.2 with mmHg spots on to degrees mmHg (month 3, p=0.0004) and with 50 1.7 mmHg on 180 degrees of No difference
(p=0.351). Diurnal IOP fluctuation decreased fromSLT ± 2.325 laser(baseline) 90 4.3 ± 1.7 of trabecular meshwork and SLT to 5.1 ± laser spots (month 6, p=0.004).trabecular
meshwork in patients with open-angle glaucoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a prospective clinical study, the authors compared pressure-lowering effect of SLT in 2 groups of
patients; 1 group (32 patients) received SLT with 25 laser spots on 90 degrees of trabecular meshwork, the other group (32 patients) SLT with 50 laser spots on 180 degrees of
trabecular meshwork. RESULT: There was no difference in the pressure reduction between these two treatment regimens. Moreover, the pressure reduction was not influenced by
previous ALT treatments. The pigmentation in the trabecular meshwork is related to a delayed effect on the pressure lowering after SLT. CONCLUSION: SLT with 25 laser spots
on 90 degrees of trabecular meshwork has a similar pressure-lowering effect to SLT with 50 laser spots on 180 degrees of trabecular meshwork. The new treatment regimen with
less laser spots could increase the repeatability of SLT and reduce potential tissueincrease transmission through Schlemm's canal endothelium under normal circumstances.
Substantiates hypothesis that trabecular endothelial cells secrete substances that damage in the trabecular meshwork.
When SLT energy is applied, it activates the trabecular endothelium to secrete more of the substances, thus increasing aqueous outflow and reducing IOP.




AIM: To compare 90 degrees , 180 degrees , and 360 degrees selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT, 532 nm Nd:YAG laser) with latanoprost 0.005% for the control of intraocular
pressure (IOP) in ocular hypertension (OHT) and open angle glaucoma (OAG). METHODS: A prospective, randomised clinical trial in the Department of Ophthalmology, St
Thomas's Hospital, London, and Clayton Eye Centre, Wakefield, West Yorkshire. 167 patients (167 eyes) with either OHT or OAG were randomised to receive 90 degrees , 180
degrees , and 360 degrees SLT or latanoprost 0.005% at night and were evaluated at 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: The mean follow up was 10.3
months (range 1--12 months). Early, transient, complications such as postoperative ocular pain, uveitis, and 1 hour IOP spike occurred in a number of eyes after SLT, with pain
being reported more frequently after 360 degrees than 90 degrees treatments (p>0.001). Success rates defined in terms of both a 20% or more and a 30% or more IOP reduction
from baseline measurements with no additional antiglaucomatous interventions were better with latanoprost than 90 degrees (p<0.001) and 180 degrees SLT (p<0.02) treatments.
It is generally accepted within the ophthalmic community that medical therapy is the preferred primary treatment in open-angle glaucoma, followed by laser trabeculoplasty if the
medical therapy is unsuccessful, with surgery employed more as an end-stage option when these avenues have been exhausted. This review discusses the efficacy of argon laser
trabeculoplasty, alone and in comparison with medical therapy as a primary treatment of glaucoma. It will also discuss the new laser technique, selective laser trabeculoplasty.




BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To compare the histopathological changes in the human trabecular meshwork after low power argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) and
selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) with a Q-switched, frequency-doubled, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS:
In gonioscopically normal trabecular meshwork of three patients awaiting enucleation due to malignant melanoma of the choroid, SLT and ALT were performed 1-5 days prior to
enucleation. In each eye, the lower half of trabecular meshwork received SLT, one quadrant low power (460 mW) ALT and one quadrant was left untreated. Specimens were
evaluated with light and transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: A sharp demarcation line was visible between the laser treated and untreated intact trabecular meshwork
after ALT and SLT. Both lasers caused disruption of trabecular beams, but the extent of the damage was smaller after SLT. The collagen component of trabecular beams was
mostly amorphous, the long-spacing collagen was scanty after ALT, butof: 1. better compliance with less intertrabecular spaces fragmented cells and tissue debris withoral a few
ALT (and, by inference, SLT) can reduce chronic drug use Implications more abundant after SLT. In the drugs 3. monetary saving 4. less medical complications. e.g., only
acetazolamide occasionally has severe systemic complications, pilocarpine reduces vision at the cataract age group, timolol is relatively contraindicated in many patients at the
relevant age-group.




Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) and selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) are effective treatment modalities for intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering in open angle glaucoma
patients. SLT and ALT produce equivalent IOP reduction. The choice of either option will depend on the state of glaucoma, previous and current treatment, side effects and
patient's reference. Preservation of the angle trabecular meshwork structures and effective retreatment for IOP lowering after ALT has failed, offer some theoretical advantage of
SLT.



PURPOSE: To compare conventional argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) with selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in terms of their efficiency in lowering the intra-ocular pressure.
METHODS: In this retrospective study, 56 eyes from 44 patients with primary open angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, pseudo-exfoliative (PXF) or pigment dispersion glaucoma
(PDG) were included. Patients underwent either ALT (n=18) or SLT (n=38). The intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured immediately prior to and 3 to 5 weeks after the theraPY.
RESULTS: At 3 to 5 weeks the lOP-reduction was 22.4% after ALT and 15.5% after SLT (p = 0.141). Of note, of the four patients with PDG 2 underwent ALT and 2 SLT.
Remarkably, both patients who had had SLT showed a paradoxical rise in lOP after the procedure (+15.5%). When these patients were excluded from the analysis, a similar
hypotensive efficacy was found between ALT (-19%) and SLT (-17.9%) (p = 0.836). A small additional study with lower energy levels (< 0.9 mJ) confirmed the paradoxical IOP rise
in 6 patients with heavily pigmented anglesbetween SLTand 2 with PXF)treatment of OAG
Address practical & theoretical differences (2 with PDG and ALT in the (+19.2%). It occurred in the absence of steroid treatment and persisted until 12 weeks after treatment.
Elevated IOP may increase the risk of nuclear cataract, but not that of other types.Use of glaucoma medications could magnify this risk - benefit of SLT given that it doesn't cause
cataract while reducing IOP.




BACKGROUND/AIMS: The efficacy and safety of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) has been found to be equivalent to argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT). Since SLT produces
significantly less disturbance to the trabecular meshwork and is theoretically more repeatable than ALT, it has potential to replace ALT as the standard procedure to treat medically
uncontrolled open angle glaucoma. This study's objective is to determine factors that predict successful SLT at 1 year post-treatment. METHODS: As part of a randomised clinical
trial comparing the efficacy and safety of SLT to ALT, data on 72 SLT patients were collected, and successful SLT defined as having an SLT induced intraocular pressure (IOP)
reduction of >or=20% at 1 year post-treatment follow up. RESULTS: 43 out of the 72 patients who had completed their 1 year follow up visit had an IOP reduction of >or=20% from
baseline. No glaucoma risk factors studied predicted successful SLT. The amount of trabecular meshwork pigmentation was not a significant predictor. However, it was discovered
that baseline IOP strongly predicted SLT success is a new technique aimed to developed to impact pigmented trabecular cells predicted by baseline IOP but not byargonsex, other
PURPOSE: Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) (odds ratio=1.16; p=0.0001). CONCLUSION: SLT success was significantly selectively. Compared with ordinary age, laser
trabeculoplasty, it is expected to have fewer complications with more efficacy for open-angle glaucoma. In this study we performed SLT on 17 eyes of 10 patients with primary
open-angle glaucoma and 1 eye with capsular glaucoma. METHODS: Follow-up period was up to 10 months. Average energy irrachieted was 28.14 mJ (0.47 mJ x 59 spots)
against pigmented trabecular band over the half circumference of anterior chamber angle. RESULTS: Preoperative mean intraocular pressure (IOP) was 22.8 mmHg and
postoperative mean IOP was decreased significantly to 8.6, 17.3, and 16.1 mmHg at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment, respectively. The average maximum IOP reduction was
8.8 (3-18) mmHg after SLT. Among 11 eyes showing transient IOP elevation, 6 eyes had an elevation of more than 5 mmHg. No remarkable postoperative complications were
PURPOSE: Selective laser is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma Q-switched Nd: YAG laser glaucoma (POAG) and capsular parameters
noted. CONCLUSION: SLT trabeculoplasty (SLT) is a new laser procedure using a frequency-doubledsuch as primary open-angle(wavelength: 532 mm). The laser glaucoma. are
set to selectively target pigmented trabecular meshwork (TM) cells without coagulative damage to the TM structure or non-pigmented cells. We investigated the safety and efficacy
of SLT in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP). SUBJECTS AND METHOD: Sixty-seven eyes of 67 patients with uncontrolled open angle glaucoma were treated with the Coherent
Selecta 7000 (Coherent Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Nineteen of 67 patients had previously received argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT). A total of approximately 60 non-overlapping spots
were placed over 180 degrees of the TM ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 mJ per pulse. The maximum energy level at which no bubble formation was observed determined choice.
RESULTS: The average preoperative IOP was 22.4 mmHg. Six months after the operation, mean IOP reduction was 4.4 mmHg, and mean outflow pressure (OP) reduction was
38.1%. One month after the operation 68.7% ofis a new technique aimed to developed toOP reduction of at least 20% ("responders"). Transient IOP elevation of argon laser
Purpose: Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) patients responded to treatment with an impact pigmented trabecular cells selectively. Compared with ordinary 5 mmHg or
trabeculoplasty, it is expected to have fewer complications with more efficacy for open-angle glaucoma. In this study we performed SLT on 17 eyes of 10 patients with primary
open-angle glaucoma and 1 eye with capsular glaucoma.Methods: Follow-up period was up to 10 months. Average energy irrachieted was 28.14 mJ (0.47 mJ x 59 spots) against
pigmented trabecular band over the half circumference of anterior chamber angle.Results: Preoperative mean intraocular pressure (IOP) was 22.8 mmHg and postoperative mean
IOP was decreased significantly to 8.6, 17.3, and 16.1 mmHg at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment, respectively. The average maximum IOP reduction was 8.8 (3 approximately 1
8) mmHg after SLT. Among 11 eyes showing transient IOP elevation, 6 eyes had an elevation of more than 6 mmHg. No remarkable postoperative complications were
noted.Conclusion:spotsis a 90¡ ofand effective modality for the treatment of50 spots on 180° Potential for increased repeatability New treatment regimen?
SLT with 25 laser SLT on safe TM has a similar IOP-lowering effect as open-angle glaucoma such as primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and capsular glaucoma.
PURPOSE: To compare the long-term success rate of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) versus argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT). DESIGN: Retrospective chart review.
PARTICIPANTS: One hundred ninety-five eyes of 195 patients with uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma (OAG), of which 154 eyes underwent ALT and 41 eyes underwent SLT and
were followed up for a maximum of 5 years. INTERVENTION: The SLT patients were treated with the frequency-doubled q-switched neodymium:yytrium-aluminum-garnet laser
(532 nm). Approximately 50 to 55 nonoverlapping spots were placed over 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork at energy levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 mJ per pulse. The ALT
patients were treated with the argon blue-green laser with between 45 to 55 adjacent, nonoverlapping spots over 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork at 470 to 1150 mW of
energy per pulse. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The success rates were defined by criterion I and criterion II. Success by criterion I was defined as a decrease in intraocular
pressure (IOP) ofcompare themore with no additional medications, laser, or glaucoma surgery. Criterion II had thetrabeculoplasty (ALT) and selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT)
OBJECTIVE: To 3 mmHg or histopathologic changes in the human trabecular meshwork (TM) after argon laser same requirements as criterion I, except that a 20% or more IOP
with a Q-switched, frequency-doubled, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. DESIGN: Human "in vitro" experimental study. TISSUE AND CONTROLS: Eight human autopsy
eyes were obtained within 18 hours of death from persons aged 71 to 78 years. METHODS: The anterior segment of autopsy eyes was isolated, and one half of each trabecular
meshwork underwent SLT and the other half ALT. Specimens were evaluated with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Structural
changes in the TM were detected by scanning electron microscopy, and cellular or intracellular changes were seen with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Evaluation
of the TM after ALT revealed crater formation in the uveal meshwork at the junction of the pigmented and nonpigmented TM. Coagulative damage was evident at the base and
along the edge of craters, with disruption of the collagen beams, fibrinous exudate, lysis of endothelial cells, and nuclear and cytoplasmic debris. Evaluation of the TM after SLT
Latina and Wilson discuss benefits of SLT as opposed to ALT




Discusses the benefits and cost effectiveness of the SLT/YAG combination system




SLT effective over short observation period




It is well documented that the range of the daily fluctuations in IOP is greater in patients with glaucoma. A report by Asrani et al. suggested that the range of the diurnal fluctuation
may be an independent risk factor for the progression of visual field loss and a single measurement in the ophthalmologist's office may or may not reflect what the IOP is at other
times of the day or night.Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) is safe and effective in reducing IOP but its effect on diurnal IOP fluctuation is warranted.Selective Laser
Trabeculoplasty is effective in reducing Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP) but its effect on diurnal IOP fluctuation is warranted.
SLT and Latanoprost significantly reduced IOP and IOP fluctuations.
It is well documented that the range of the daily fluctuations in IOP is greater in patients with glaucoma. A report by Asrani et al. suggested that the range of the diurnal fluctuation
may be an independent risk factor for the progression of visual field loss and a single measurement in the ophthalmologist's office may or may not reflect what the IOP is at other
times of the day or night.Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) is safe and effective in reducing IOP but its effect on diurnal IOP fluctuation is warranted.Selective Laser
Trabeculoplasty is effective in reducing Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP) but its effect on diurnal IOP fluctuation is warranted.
SLT and Latanoprost significantly reduced IOP and IOP fluctuations.

Prospective




BACKGROUND: Our aim was to investigate the efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) for the treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in a prospective clinical
study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 36 eyes of 36 patients suffering from uncontrolled POAG, treatment was carried out with a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser
(532 nm). The intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured before the treatment and one day, one week, one month and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 and 48 months after. A failure
was defined as an IOP reduction of less than 20% from pretreatment IOP, or a progression of visual field or optic disc damage requiring filtering surgery. The hypotensive
medication during the study period remained unchanged. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 34 months (SD 12.9). The mean pretreatment IOP was 22.9 mm Hg (SD 2.1).
At one month of follow-up, the mean IOP reduction was 5.3 mm Hg (SD 2.1) or 23.1% and at 6 months 5.6 mm Hg (SD 2.6) or 24.5%. At 12 months of follow-up, the mean IOP
reduction was 5.6 mm Hg (SD 2.3) or 24.5% and at 24 months 6.2 mm Hg (SD 2.5) or 27%. At 36 months of follow-up, the mean IOP reduction was 6.4 mm Hg (SD 2.1) or 27.4%




SLT safe and efficacious treatment for OAG




PURPOSE: To study the effectiveness and safety of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension in Chinese eyes. METHODS:
This was a prospective randomized controlled clinical study in which 58 eyes of 29 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension were included. One eye of
each patient was randomized to receive SLT (Group 1) and the fellow eyes received medical treatment (Group 2). Patients were evaluated after laser treatment at 2 h, 1 day, 1
week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and then yearly. RESULTS: All patients (13 male, 16 female) were Chinese. The mean age was 51.9 +/- 14.7 years. The mean
baseline intraocular pressure was 26.8 +/- 5.6 mmHg in group 1 and 26.2 +/- 4.2 mmHg in group 2 (P = 0.62). The failure rate, defined as intraocular pressure >21 mmHg with
maximal medications, was 17.2% in group 1 and 27.6% in group 2 at 5-year follow-up (P = 0.53). Eight eyes (27.6%) in group 1 required medications to control the intraocular
pressure to below 21 mmHg. There was no statistically significant difference in the intraocular pressure reductions between the two groups at all time intervals (P > 0.05). The
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This paper serves to review the safety and efficacy of new laser techniques for the treatment of glaucoma with emphasis on those studies published
within the past year. RECENT FINDINGS: Recently published studies have reinforced the strong safety profile, and efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT). Endoscopic
photocoagulation, while more technically challenging and more invasive, offers several advantages over transcleral cyclophotocoagulation including direct observation of treatment
and therefore, fewer complications. Laser goniopuncture is a fledgling technology with, thus far, a good safety profile, and benefits that include conjunctival sparing and good
treatment response. Many unanswered questions remain including long-term success rates and ideal treatment parameters. SUMMARY: The benefits of laser in the treatment of
glaucoma have been well established, and while some techniques will add to the ophthalmologists' armamentarium, others will fall into disuse as the efficacy and safety profiles of
these procedures becomethe efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in a tertiary care referral center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study of selective
PURPOSE: To determine recognized. Novel laser modalities, as well as the more traditional ones, require continued evaluation to further refine treatment parameters and to
laser trabeculoplasty performed by five physicians, 94 eyes from 94 patients were included. A majority (83/92, 90%) underwent 180 degrees selective laser trabeculoplasty.
Selective laser trabeculoplasty failure was defined in two ways: (1) IOP decrease <3 mm Hg (definition one), or (2) IOP decrease <20% (definition two), on two successive visits >
or =4 weeks after SLT. RESULTS: Overall failure rates were 68% (64/94) and 75% (70/94) (by definitions one and two, respectively). By survival/life-table analysis, mean time to
failure was 6 months and 5.5 months, by definitions one and two, respectively. By the end of the study (14.5 months), the failure rates were 86% and 92% by definitions one and
two, respectively. By each definition, in both univariable and multivariable analysis, only lower baseline IOP was a significant predictor of failure. CONCLUSIONS: Selective laser
trabeculoplasty had an overall low success selective laser trabeculoplasty in anwith overall failure rates of 68% to described. A 77-year-old man 180 degrees selective laser
The first case of hyphema occurring during rate in our tertiary clinic population, eye without neovascularization is 74% in those who underwent with uncontrolled open-angle
glaucoma received selective laser trabeculoplasty in both eyes for high intraocular pressure with maximally tolerated medical treatment. Hyphema occurred during selective laser
trabeculoplasty in the left eye. This resolved spontaneously without sequelae. Successful intraocular pressure control was achieved. Hyphema and bleeding can happen during
selective laser trabeculoplasty. Although this was transient and uneventful in one patient, careful monitoring of intraocular pressure and anterior chamber reaction is advised.



BACKGROUND/AIMS: Selective laser trabeculoplasty targets the pigmented trabecular meshwork cells without damage to the trabecular meshwork architecture in vitro. A study
was conducted in vivo of eight eyes with uncontrolled open angle glaucoma to ascertain the immediate intraocular response to selective laser trabeculoplasty. METHODS: The
trabecular meshwork of each eye was treated 360 degrees with a frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Intraocular pressure was measured 1, 2, 24 hours and 1, 4, 6
weeks after treatment. RESULTS: The average preoperative intraocular pressure was 26.6 (SD 7) mm Hg (range 18-37). Two hours and 6 weeks respectively after selective
trabeculoplasty intraocular pressure was reduced in all the eyes treated with an average fall of 10.6 (5.2) mm Hg or 39.9%. A pressure spike of 10 mm Hg verified in one eye 1
hour after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Selective laser trabeculoplasty decreased intraocular pressure by an amount similar to that achieved with standard trabeculoplasty.
PURPOSE: To is needed the impact of selective Nd:YAG laser trabeculoplasty on free longer radicals follow up.
Additional studyinvestigate to determine whether the beneficial effect is sustained over aoxygen period ofand antioxidant enzymes of the aqueous humour in the rabbit. METHODS:
One eye of 18 rabbits was subjected to 360 degrees selective laser trabeculoplasty (LT) with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The anterior chamber aqueous humour
was aspirated 3, 12 hours and 1, 3, 7, 10 days after treatment. Lipid peroxide (LPO) and glutathione S transferase (GST) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of
aqueous humour were measured. RESULTS: Concentrations of LPO in the aqueous humour of the treated eyes were significantly higher than the untreated eyes until the 7th day.
Aqueous SOD activity significantly decreased 3 hours after LT and remained low until day 7. Aqueous GST levels were significantly decreased between 12 hours and 7 days after
the LT. CONCLUSIONS: Selective LT was followed by an immediate increase in the aqueous humour LPO concentration and decreases of SOD and GST in the rabbit, probably
due to photovaporization and photodisruption caused by the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The increased aqueous LPO levels suggest that free oxygen radicals are formed in
SLT safe as both primary and adjunctive therapy
The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in patients with primary open-angle
glaucoma (POAG). SLT represents a new method in the treatment of POAG. Fifty eyes with uncontrolled POAG were treated with a frequency doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser
(532 nm). The pattern of treatment was applying approximately 50 burns to 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork at energy levels ranging from 0.40-0.92 mJ per pulse. After
SLT eyes were maintained with the identical hypotensive medical therapy as that before treatment. IOP was measured before treatment, 1 and 7 days after treatment and 1, 3, 6
and 12 months after treatment. The mean pretreatment IOP was 22.48 (SD 1.84) mm Hg. At the end of 1 month follow-up period the mean reduction of IOP was 4.86 (SD 2.38)
mmHg or 21.6%; after 3 months the mean reduction was 5.66 (SD 2.40) mmHg or 25.2%; after 6 months the mean reduction of IOP was 5.06 (SD 2.37) mmHg or 22.5%; at the
PURPOSE: To evaluate the intraocular pressure (IOP) response to selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in the treatment presents a new and effective method of IOP (POAG) in
end of 12 months follow-up period the mean reduction was 4.92 (SD 2.58) mmHg or 21.9%. It can be concluded that SLTof uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucomareductionin
a prospective clinical study. SLT is a new laser procedure that selectively targets trabecular meshwork (TM) cells without coagulative damage to the TM. METHODS: 50 eyes with
uncontrolled POAG were treated with a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). A total of approximately 50 nonoverlapping spots were placed over 180 degrees of
the TM at energy levels ranging from 0.40 to 0.92 mJ/pulse. After SLT, the eyes were maintained with the identical hypotensive medical therapy as that before treatment. IOP was
estimated before and 1 day, 7 days, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after treatment. RESULTS: The mean pretreatment IOP was 22.48 mm Hg (SD 1.84). At the end of 1 month
of follow-up IOP was reduced with a mean of 4.86 mm Hg (SD 2.38) or 21.6%; after 3 months, IOP was reduced with a mean of 5.66 mm Hg (SD 2.40) or 25.2%; at the end of 6
months of follow-up, IOPthe intraocularwith a mean of 5.06 mm Hg (SD 2.37) laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in theis an effective method for loweringopen-angletreatment of POAG.in
PURPOSE: To evaluate was reduced pressure (IOP) response to selective or 22.5%. CONCLUSIONS: SLT treatment of uncontrolled primary IOP in the glaucoma (POAG)
a prospective clinical study. SLT is a new laser procedure that selectively targets trabecular meshwork (TM) cells without coagulative damage to the TM. METHODS: 50 eyes with
uncontrolled POAG were treated with a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). A total of approximately 50 nonoverlapping spots were placed over 180 degrees of
the TM at energy levels ranging from 0.40 to 0.92 mJ/pulse. After SLT, the eyes were maintained with the identical hypotensive medical therapy as that before treatment. IOP was
estimated before and 1 day, 7 days, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after treatment. RESULTS: The mean pretreatment IOP was 22.48 mm Hg (SD 1.84). At the end of 1 month
of follow-up IOP was reduced with a mean of 4.86 mm Hg (SD 2.38) or 21.6%; after 3 months, IOP was reduced with a mean of 5.66 mm Hg (SD 2.40) or 25.2%; at the end of 6
months of follow-up, IOP was reduced with a mean of 5.06 mm Hg (SD 2.37) or 22.5%. CONCLUSIONS: SLT is an effective method for lowering IOP in the treatment of POAG.
Prospective




At one month follow-up IOP was reduced with a mean of 4.86 mmHg         At the end of six months IOP was reduced by a mean of 5.06 mmHg




SLT in early stages yields better results SLT makes compliance less of an issue
Points out that SLT has no clinical applications other than for OAG, therefore expensive acquisition?? Reports results from Juzych’s study, concluding that SLT is as effective as
ALT, but a much more gentle treatment option




Trabeculoplasty was introduced in 1979 to decrease intra ocular pressure. Long-term results have been unsatisfactory compared to the first publications, because of the repeated
relapse of initially successfully treated eyes. However, the technique may be particularly useful in numerous clinical conditions: pseudo exfoliation syndrome, pigmentary
dispersion, slight cataract waiting for combined surgery, and in elderly patients. Developing new energy sources (i.e., selective laser trabeculoplasty) could extend the indications
of this method, with longer-lasting results and/or completely harmless retreatments.



PURPOSE: To correlate trends of laser trabeculoplasties (LTPs) with the introduction of medical therapies for glaucoma and to assess whether these trends changed after the
introduction of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in 2001. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of LTP numbers, filtration surgeries, glaucoma medications dispensed, and
population distribution by age in Ontario, Canada, between April 1992 and March 2005. RESULTS: The number of LTP per 1,000 persons estimated to have primary open angle
glaucoma (POAG) increased from 138.05 in 1992 to a maximum of 149.23 in 1996 (8.1% increase, 1.96% annual increase) and then steadily decreased to 70.65 in 2001 (47.3%
decrease, 14% annual decrease). From 2001 to 2004, the LTP rate increased to 162.54 (230% increase, 32% annual increase). The number of filtration surgeries per 1,000
persons estimated to have POAG steadily decreased from 1996 to 2004 by 21.42% (2.4% annual decrease). The number of glaucoma medications dispensed in Ontario
increased from 1992 to 2004 by 91.5% (10.5% annual increase). There were no significant correlations between the LTP rates and the new glaucoma medications rates (r=-0.35
SLT suitable for primary OAG treatment




SLT suitable for primary OAG treatment




PURPOSE: To investigate the long-term efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in primary open-angle glaucoma, the authors performed a non-randomized, prospective,
non-comparative clinical case series. METHODS: Fifty-two eyes of 52 patients (19 male, 33 female) with primary open angle glaucoma were treated with SLT. Patients were
treated with the Coherent Selecta 7000 (Coherent, Palo Alto, CA, USA) frequency-doubled q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). A total of approximately 50 non-overlapping spots
were placed over 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork at energy levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.4 mJ per pulse. After surgery, patients were maintained with the drug regimen
identical to that before treatment. RESULTS: After 1 year the average reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) from the baseline was 24.3% (6.0 mmHg), after 2 years 27.8% (6.12
mmHg), after 3 years 24.5% (5.53 mmHg), and after 4 years 29.3% (6.33 mmHg). A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a 1-year success rate of 60%, a 2-year success rate
of 53%, a 3-year success rate of 44%, and a 4-year success rate of 44%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a declining success rate, SLT is an effective method to lower IOP over an
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to investigate the outcomes of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) for the treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in a prospective
clinical study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 90 eyes suffering from POAG, treatment was carried out with a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The
intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured before the treatment and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66 and 72 months after. A failure was defined as an IOP reduction of
less than 20 % of the pretreatment IOP, or a progression of visual field or optic disc damage requiring filtering surgery. The hypotensive medication during the study period
remained unchanged. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 41.2 months (SD 20.0). The mean pretreatment IOP was 22.4 mmHg (SD 2.3). At one month of follow-up, the
mean IOP reduction was 5.0 mmHg (SD 2.3) or 22.3 % and at 6 months 5.2 mmHg (SD 2.4) or 23.2 %. At 12 months of follow-up, the mean IOP reduction was 5.4 mmHg (SD 2.4)
or 24.0 % and at 24 months 5.8 mmHg (SD 2.3) or 25.5 a new 36 months reduce intraocular pressurereduction was 5.7 mmHg (SD 2.1) or 25.1 %With a Q-switched,of follow-up,
BACKGROUND: Selective laser trabeculoplasty SLT is %. At method to of follow-up, the mean IOP in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma. and at 48 months frequency-
doubled Nd:YAG laser it targets the pigmented trabecular meshwork cells without visible damage to the adjacent non-pigmented tissue. SLT acts non-thermally, the intracellular
microdisruptions triggered by the laser are confined to the targeted cells, the laser pulses are so short that heat created within the targeted cells does not have time to spread to
the surrounding tissue. A clinical prospective study was conducted to evaluate the long-term results, safety and efficacy of SLT in the treatment of open angle glaucoma.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Since 2002, we have performed a selective laser trabeculoplasty in 269 eyes: in 17 eyes with ocular hypertension, in 239 eyes with primary open
angle glaucoma, in 11 eyes with low tension glaucoma, while 2 eyes had a secondary glaucoma due to uveitis. In 22 eyes the primary initial treatment was SLT. RESULTS: Three
months after treatment, the mean IOP reduction from Non thermal 3). Repeatable 4). Effective for patient who havethe mean IOP reduction was 3.0 mm Hg (12.9 %), and after 24
Highlights four main benefits of SLT: 1). Selective 2). baseline was 3.4 mm Hg, respectively 15 %, after 12 months undergone prior ALT treatment




Introduction to SLT and Xe-CI excimer laser for glaucoma treatment Espouse benefit of potential repeatability with SLT




SLT shown efficacy and safety over a one year period Mean IOP reduction of 4.94 mmHg at 12 months
BACKGROUND: Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) targets the pigmented trabecular meshwork (TM) cells without damage to the adjacent non-pigmented tissue. A study was
conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SLT in the treatment of uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma. METHODS: In a prospective non-randomized study 44 eyes of 31
patients with uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma were treated with a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A total of approximately 50 spots were placed over 180
degrees of the TM at energy levels ranging from 0.7 to 0.9 mJ. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured 1, 2, and 24 h, 1 and 2 weeks and 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after
treatment. RESULTS: The average pre-operative IOP was 25.6 (SD 2.6) mm Hg (range 22-34). The mean IOP reduction from baseline at 24 h, 3, 6 and 12 months was 7.1 mm
Hg (SD 3.5) or 27.6%; 4.2 mm Hg (SD 3.5) or 16.4%; 4.7 mm Hg (SD 4.2) or 18.6%, and 4.4 mm Hg (SD 3.8) or 17.1%, respectively. The percent of eyes with IOP reduction of 3
Patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, pseudoexfoliation glaucoma can of 8 mm Hg control
mm Hg or more at 3, 6 and 12 months was 66, 78 and 62%. A pressure spike maintain IOPor more was detected in 4 eyes (9.1%). Anterior chamber reaction was seen 1 h after




BACKGROUND: The projected 6-year cost comparison of primary selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) versus primary medical therapy in the treatment of open-angle glaucoma
for Ontario patients aged 65 years or more is presented. Costs are taken from the perspective of the Ontario Health Insurance Plan at a per-patient level. METHODS: The cost of
each medication was obtained from the 2003 Ontario Drug Benefits formulary. The average annual cost of medications was determined by estimating the provincial prescription
rate of glaucoma medications, with reference to both a volume-per-bottle study of these drugs and a study of pharmacy claims reports. A representative provincial prescription rate
was calculated by reviewing 707 patient charts selected randomly from 5 ophthalmologic practices across Ontario. Medication therapies were categorized into mono-, bi-, and tri-
drug therapy groups. The cost of SLT was analyzed under the following 2 scenarios. SLT rep 2y assumed a duration of 2 years before repeat SLT was necessary. SLT rep 3y
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the safety and efficacy of necessary. procedure using a q-switched 532-nm neodymium (Nd):YAG was assumed. The cost of laser trabeculoplasty,"
assumed a duration of 3 years before repeat SLT was a new laser Bilateral 180 degrees SLT treatment and repeatability of SLT laser, also called "selectivesurgery for patients who
to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG). The laser parameters were set to selectively target pigmented trabecular meshwork (TM) cells
without coagulative damage to the TM structure or nonpigmented cells. DESIGN: Nonrandomized, prospective, clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty eyes of 30 patients with
uncontrolled OAG (OAG group) and 23 eyes of 23 patients with uncontrolled OAG treated previously with argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT group) were observed for 4 to 26
weeks. Forty-four of the 53 eyes were observed for 26 weeks. INTERVENTION: Patients were treated with the Coherent Selecta 7000 (Coherent, Inc, Palo Alto, CA) frequency-
doubled q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). A total of approximately 50 nonoverlapping spots were placed over 180 degrees of the TM at energy levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 mJ
AIMS: To After surgery, patients were maintained with the identical drug regimen as that before treatment. RESULTS: Both the OAG lowering, in patients with open-angle
per pulse. compare selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) and argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT), in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP) and ALT groups showed similar IOP
glaucoma. METHODS: 176 eyes of 152 patients were enrolled in this study, 89 in the SLT and 87 in the ALT groups. Patients were randomised to receive either SLT or ALT
treatment to 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork. Patients were followed up to 12 months after treatment. The main outcome measured was IOP lowering at 12 months after
treatment, compared between the SLT and ALT groups. RESULTS: No significant difference (p = 0.846) was found in mean decrease in IOP between the SLT (5.86 mm Hg) and
ALT (6.04 mm Hg) groups at 1 year or at any other time points, nor were there any significant differences in the rate of early or late complications between the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS: SLT is equivalent to ALT in terms of IOP lowering at 1 year, and is a safe and effective procedure for patients with open-angle glaucoma.
SLT safe and efficacious alternative to ALT SLT repeatable due to lack of coagulation
The prospective clinical study of the selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) by means the Coherent Selecta 7000 laser (wave length 532 nm) was conducted. Totally 108.7 +/- 18.3
laser non-overlapping spots (mean energy level 1.04 +/- 0.22 mJ) along the whole circle of the trabecular meshwork in the anterior chamber angle were applied. The study
included 258 eyes of 146 patients (50 of them were men) with glaucoma. The mean age of the whole group was 55.9 +/- 13.7 years. The group of unsuccessfully treated patients
(30 patients, 41 eyes) in whom the intraocular pressure (IOP) elevated from 23.2 +/- 3.7 mm Hg in 4.7% (measured 493 +/- 474 days after the treatment) during the follow up, was
removed from the study. In the group with good response to the SLT, 116 patients (217 eyes) were evaluated 650 +/- 405 days after treatment. Before treatment, in this group the
IOP was 23.9 +/- 3.0 mm Hg, at the end of the study the IOP was lowered by 4.5 +/- 2.9 mm Hg, in total by 18.6%. IOP decrease was more pronounced in patients with higher level
of IOP at the beginning. Immediately after SLT, no significant rising of the IOP level was recorded. Selective laser trabeculoplasty preserves the integrity of the trabecular




167
PURPOSE: To report and assess the complication of intraocular pressure (IOP) elevations after selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in patients with heavily pigmented trabecular
meshworks. DESIGN: Noncomparative, observational case series. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the medical files of four glaucoma patients with heavily pigmented
trabecular meshwork, who presented with IOP elevations after SLT. RESULTS: All four glaucoma patients presented with post-SLT IOP elevations. Three had features of
pigmentary dispersion syndrome, and the fourth had a heavily pigmented trabecular meshwork. Two patients had previous argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) in the same eye in
which SLT was performed, and one had a previous ocular trauma. Eventually, three of the patients required surgical trabeculectomy. CONCLUSIONS: This case series suggests
that post-SLT IOP elevations can be a serious adverse event in some glaucomatous patients. It is recommended by the authors that patients with a deeply pigmented trabecular
meshwork, taking multiple topical medications and having previous ALT treatment, should be considered at higher risk for this complication.




PURPOSE: To evaluate selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) as a replacement for medical therapy in controlled open-angle glaucoma. DESIGN: Prospective, non-randomized,
interventional clinical trial. METHODS: SLT was performed inferiorly in 66 eyes of 66 patients with medically controlled primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or exfoliation
glaucoma, and no history of glaucoma surgery. The primary outcome was number of medications at 6 and 12 months while maintaining a pre-determined target intraocular
pressure (IOP). RESULTS: The mean of the differences in medications from baseline was 2.0 (95% confidence interval = 1.8-2.3) at 6 months, and 1.5 (1.27-1.73) at 12 months (P
< .0001). The group mean of medications was 2.8 +/- 1.1 at baseline, 0.7 +/- 0.9 at 6 months, and 1.5 +/- 0.9 at 12 months (P < .0001). Reduction in medications was attained in
64 of 66 eyes (97%) at 6 months, and 52 of 60 (87%) at 12 months. CONCLUSION: SLT enabled a reduction in medicine in controlled OAG over 12 months.
Prospective, non-randomized, interventional clinical trial 97% reduction in medications attained (64 of 66 eyes) SLT enabled reduction in medicine




PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of selective laser trabeculoplasty as an initial treatment for newly diagnosed open-angle glaucoma, and its role as adjunctive
therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective multicenter nonrandomized clinical trial was performed. Patients with newly diagnosed open-angle glaucoma or ocular
hypertension were assigned to the primary (selective laser trabeculoplasty) treatment group or the control (latanoprost) group according to patient choice. Both groups were
followed up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A secondary treatment group was also included to study the efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty for patients intolerant of medical
therapy or in whom such therapy was unsuccessful, with or without a history of previous argon laser trabeculoplasty. RESULTS: One hundred eyes (61 patients) were enrolled, 74
in the primary treatment group and 26 in the control group. The average absolute and percent reductions in intraocular pressure for the primary treatment group were 8.3 mm Hg or
31.0%, compared with 7.7 mm Hg or 30.6% for the control group (Pinitial glaucoma = 0.879). SLT safe and efficacious OAG primary and adjunctive therapy 84% for the primary and
Study results support contention that SLT should be the preferable = 0.208 and P therapy The responder rates (20% pressure reduction) were 83% and
A prospective, non-randomized pilot study SLT safe and effective as primary treatment for OAG Mean IOP reduction of 7.7 mmHg




OBJECTIVE: To examine the safety and efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty as primary treatment for patients with open-angle glaucoma. METHODS: Forty-five eyes of 31
patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (intraocular pressure [IOP] >or=23 mm Hg on 2 consecutive measurements) underwent selective laser trabeculoplasty
as primary treatment. All patients underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation before and at intervals after treatment. This evaluation included visual acuity, slitlamp examination,
ophthalmoscopy, gonioscopy, and visual field analysis. The IOP was measured 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week, and 1, 3, 6, 12, 15, and 18 months postoperatively. During the follow-up
period, patients were treated with topical antiglaucoma medications as required. RESULTS: Mean +/- SD decreased by 7.7 +/- 3.5 mm Hg (30%), from 25.5 +/- 2.5 mm Hg to 17.9
+/- 2.8 mm Hg (P<.001). Only 2 eyes (4%) did not respond to selective laser trabeculoplasty, and 3 eyes (7%) required topical medications to control their IOP at the end of the
follow-up period. Forty eyesof 850 eyes a decrease of 5 mm Hg or more. Visual acuity, visual fields, and gonioscopic findings remained unchanged. Complications included
Retrospective chart review (89%) had Significantly reduced no. of medications over long-term




SLT is a viable, primary treatment alternative to medical therapy, especially for non-compliant [patients




PURPOSE: Intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide has increasingly become a therapeutic option for neovascular, inflammatory, and edematous intraocular diseases. A
common side effect of this treatment is a steroid-induced elevation of intraocular pressure. In most of these patients, the rise in intraocular pressure can be treated topically. Those
cases that cannot be treated medically have been treated with filtering surgery. This report presents a case of intraocular pressure elevation after intravitreal triamcinolone
acetonide injection that was successfully treated with selective laser trabeculoplasty. CASE REPORT: A 63-year-old white man presented with brow ache on the right side
approximately 3 months after undergoing intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide for diabetic macular edema in the right eye. Applanation tonometry revealed an intraocular
pressure of 45 mm Hg in the involved eye. After initial treatment with topical medications, the patient underwent selective laser trabeculoplasty. Now, 6 months postlaser treatment,
the intraocular pressure in the involved eye is stable at is amm Hg without topical medications. CONCLUSIONS: A steroid-induced elevation of intraocular pressure is a common
BACKGROUND: Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) 15 new method to reduce intraocular pressure in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma. The laser parameters are set to
selectively target pigmented trabecular meshwork (TM) cells without damage to the adjacent non-pigmented tissue. PURPOSE: A clinical retrospective study was conducted to
evaluate the 12 months results of SLT in the treatment of medically uncontrolled open angle glaucoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During the period March to September 2004,
the authors performed a SLT in 50 patients (50 eyes) with open angle glaucoma uncontrolled on maximally tolerated medical therapy. Treatment was carried out with a frequency-
doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser 532 nm.(Selectra 7000 Laser Coherent, Inc., Palo Alto,CA). Approximately 85 to 90 non-overlapping laser spots were placed over 180 degrees
of the trabecular meshwork at energy levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.4 mJ per pulse. In patients who required additional SLT therapy, the untreated 180 degrees was treated. During
the follow-up period, patients were treated with antiglaucoma medications as required. The success rates were defined as decreases in intraocular pressure (IOP) of 3 mmHg or
AIMS: To compare the effectiveness of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT, a 532 nm Nd:YAG laser) with argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) in lowering the intraocular pressure
(IOP) in patients with medically uncontrolled open angle glaucoma. METHODS: A prospective randomised clinical trial was designed. Patients were randomised to treatment with
either SLT or ALT and were evaluated at 1 hour, 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months post-laser. RESULTS: There were 18 eyes in each group. Baseline characteristics were similar in
both groups. In the SLT group the mean IOP at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months was 22.8 (SD 3.0), 20.1 (4.6), 19.3 (6.0), and 17.8 (4.8) mm Hg, respectively. In the ALT group, the
mean IOP at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months was 22.5 (3.6), 19.5 (4.7), 19.6 (5.6), and 17.7 (3.3) mm Hg, respectively. There was a greater anterior chamber reaction, 1 hour after
SLT v ALT (p< 0.01). Patients with previous failed ALT had a better reduction in IOP with SLT than with repeat ALT (6.8 (2. 4) v 3.6 (1.8) mm Hg; p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: SLT
appears to be equivalent to ALT intrabeculoplasty (SLT)the first 6 monthstrabeculoplasty (ALT), in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP) reaction 1in patients SLT.open-angle
AIMS: To compare selective laser lowering IOP during and argon laser after treatment. There is a slightly greater anterior chamber lowering, hour after with Patients with
glaucoma. METHODS: 176 eyes of 152 patients were enrolled in this study, 89 in the SLT and 87 in the ALT groups. Patients were randomised to receive either SLT or ALT
treatment to 180 degrees of the trabecular meshwork. Patients were followed up to 12 months after treatment. The main outcome measured was IOP lowering at 12 months after
treatment, compared between the SLT and ALT groups. RESULTS: No significant difference (p = 0.846) was found in mean decrease in IOP between the SLT (5.86 mm Hg) and
ALT (6.04 mm Hg) groups at 1 year or at any other time points, nor were there any significant differences in the rate of early or late complications between the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS: SLT is equivalent to ALT in terms of IOP lowering at 1 year, and is a safe and effective procedure for patients with open-angle glaucoma.
SLT equivalent to ALT Patients with previous failed ALT had a much greater drop in IOP when treated with SLT vs. ALT




Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) has been shown to be safe, well tolerated, and effective in intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction as therapy in several forms of open-angle
glaucoma. The preservation of trabecular meshwork (TM) architecture and the demonstrated efficacy in lowering IOP make SLT a reasonable and safe alternative to argon laser
trabeculoplasty (ALT). SLT may also be effective for cases of failed ALT and is a procedure that may also be repeatable, unlike ALT. SLT is also a simple technique for an
ophthalmologist to learn as the large spot size eliminates the need to locate a particular zone of treatment on the TM. SLT has been demonstrated to be effective as primary
treatment for open angle glaucoma and can be an effective adjunct in the early treatment of glaucoma. Furthermore, SLT can be considered as a primary treatment option in
patients who cannot tolerate or who are noncompliant with their glaucoma medications, without interfering with the success of future surgery.
Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is a safe and effective treatment modality for lowering the intraocular pressure in patients with open angle glaucoma. The preservation of the
trabecular meshwork architecture and the demonstrated efficacy in lowering intraocular pressure makes the SLT a reasonable and safe alternative to argon laser trabeculoplasty.
In addition, SLT is a potentially repeatable procedure because of the lack of coagulation damage to the trabecular meshwork and the demonstrated efficacy in patients with
previously failed argon laser trabeculoplasty treatment. Furthermore, SLT can be considered as a primary treatment option in patients who cannot tolerate or are noncompliant with
their glaucoma medications, while not interfering with the success of future surgery. Due to its nondestructive properties and low complication rate, SLT has the potential to evolve
as an ideal first-line treatment in open angle glaucoma.
Highlights obsolescence of ALT due to emergence of SLT Demonstrated efficacy of SLT on patients who have already undergone ALT




Introduction: Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty is a new safer alternative to Argon laser trabeculoplasty and for non-compliant patients on medical therapy. Its key features are
minimal damage to surrounding tissue hence minimal and transient side effects but response to repeat treatment is not yet established.
Purpose: To determine the long term effect of selective laser trabeculoplasty enhancement (treating previously untreated area) and repeatability (re-treating previously treated
area) on IOP control.
Method: Retrospective analysis of case notes.
Result: 27 eyes had enhancement of SLT and 15 eyes had repeat SLT. Average SLT life after enhancement was 18.26 months and after repeat treatment was 17.47 months. SLT
enhancement success rate was 70.37% after 1 year, 55.55% after 2 years and 25.93% after 3 years. With repeat treatment success rate was 70.37% at 1 year and 53.33% after 2
years.
Conclusion: Enhancement and Retreatment with SLT is effective in reducing IOP.




AIM: To determine the predictive value of the 2 week post-selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) intraocular pressure (IOP) by comparing it to the 4 week and 3 month values.
METHODS: A retrospective chart review of eyes that underwent SLT between 2001 and 2004 was performed. The primary outcome measure was IOP. Demographic and medical
data were collected for correlational analysis. RESULTS: 132 eyes of 95 patients were identified, none was excluded. Of the eyes that exhibited a decrease in IOP of >1 mm Hg at
2 weeks postoperatively, 99.24% continued to show a lowered IOP at the 4 week and 3 month visits. For these patients, the Pearson's r value between 2 weeks and 4 weeks was
0.708 (p value = 0.01) while the r value between 2 weeks and 3 months was 0.513 (p value = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The 2 week visit post-SLT predicted the 4 week and 3 month
visits if the 2 week visit demonstrated a decrease in IOP. These findings suggest that those patients who had a decreased IOP at 2 weeks and are at their goal IOP may not need
to be screened until 3 months postoperatively.
SLT is an accepted treatment modality for Open Angle Glaucoma. It lowers IOP as effectively as drug therapy, is relatively non-invasive and safe, and above all, can obviate, or at
least reduce need for years of treatment with expensive glaucoma medications.

SLT is an effective alternative, medical treatment was reduced following SLT and so did compliance and target IOP was achieved in majority of patients




Demonstrated selective targeting of pigmented TM cells (one of the first foundation papers)




The purpose of the present study was to selectively target pigmented trabecular meshwork cells without producing collateral damage to adjacent non-pigmented cells or structures.
The ability to selectively target trabecular meshwork cells without coagulation, while preserving the structural integrity of the meshwork, could be a useful approach to study
whether the biological response of non-coagulative damage to the trabecular meshwork and trabecular meshwork cells is similar to that seen with coagulative damage to the
trabecular meshwork which occurs with argon laser trabeculoplasty. This approach also may be useful to non-invasively deplete trabecular meshwork cells while preserving the
structural integrity of the trabecular meshwork in an animal model. A mixed cell culture of pigmented and non-pigmented trabecular meshwork cells were irradiated with Q-switched
Nd-YAG and frequency-doubled Nd-YAG lasers, microsound pulsed dye-lasers, and an argon ion laser in order to define a regime where laser absorption would be confined to
PURPOSE: To compare selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) with conventional argon laser trabeculoplasty collateral thermal damage to efficacy, anterior chamber inflammation,
pigmented trabecular meshwork cells, thereby permitting selective targeting of these cells without producing (ALT) in terms of hypotensive adjacent non-pigmented cells. Pulse
and pain reported by the patients treated. METHODS: A prospective study performed on 40 consecutive patients. Group I (n = 20): SLT 180 degrees. Group II (n = 20): ALT 180
degrees. Intraocular pressure, flare (Laser-Flare-Meter, Kowa FM-500, Japan), and pain (Visual Analogue Scale) were measured before treatment and 1 h, 24 h,1 week, and 1, 3
and 6 months after treatment. Statistically significant differences were determined by an independent-sample Student's t-test. RESULTS: At 6 months after treatment, pressure
reduction was similar in both groups: SLT 22.2% (range 0-36.3%) and ALT 19.5% (range 0-30.2%), P= 0.741. The energy released during treatment was significantly lower in SLT
(48.3 SD 7.4 mJ) than in ALT (4321 SD 241.7 mJ), P < 0.001. At 1 h after treatment,anterior chamber flare was also lower in SLT(13.3 SD 6.3 vs 20.7 SD 7.4 photons/ms),P =
0.003. Pain reported by thefor both treatments Energy released during treatment in SLT(2.0 SD 0.7 in postoperativeP<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Thewith SLT SLTefficacy of both
IOP lowering effect similar patients during the treatment was significantly lower and inflammation vs 4.3 SD 1.3), period were significantly lower hypotensive procedure better
tolerated than ALT, producing less discomfort
SLT suitable for primary OAG treatment




Positions SLT as a suitable first line treatment for OAG




Prospective




Introduction to randomized trial comparing SLT to medical therapy as initial therapy for OAG – SLT/Med study




Randomized, prospective study




Refers to results from Karim and Damji’s study SLT proven as effective as ALT a three-year follow-up
SLT a safe and efficacious alternative to ALT SLT repeatable due to lack of coagulation




“SLT is cost effective to patients, eliminates compliance issues, and improves quality of life.”SLT can be used at a variety of intervention points SLT appears most effective as
primary therapy or in conjunction with meds




Retrospective analysis of case notes of patients with
secondary glaucoma treated with SLT between 2000 – 2003
Patients included were Pseudophakic glaucoma / Juvenile / glaucoma / Traumatic glaucoma




SLT used in conjunction with aqueous suppressants provides better IOP response Repeat SLT has higher response rate in first-time responders




Refers to Lumenis-sponsored SLT/Med study Highlights problems of compliance, i.e. side effects and cost

SLT generates a reduction in IOP comparable to medical therapy.

The type of medication affects additional IOP lowering with SLT SLT more effective if eyes concomitantly receive aqueous suppressants vs. Prostaglandins SLT an “outflow
therapy”
Randomized clinical trials involving 271 patients ALT safe and efficacious OAG treatment alternative to topical medications

Long term evaluation of SLT on different groups of patients




SLT a safe alternative to ALT
Summarized studies presented by Dr. Goldberg and Dr. Lai at APAO 2005 SLT shown to be effective and safe in Asian and Australian populations
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