Docstoc

CSC self study for ABET June 2007

Document Sample
CSC self study for ABET June 2007 Powered By Docstoc
					                                    ABET
                       Computing Accreditation Commission



                            SELF-STUDY
                     QUESTIONNAIRE FOR REVIEW
                               of the
                    COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM


                                   submitted by


                     South Dakota School of Mines & Technology
                                      Institution

                                   June 26, 2007
                                         Date



                                      to the
                        Computing Accreditation Commission




Primary contact:    Dr. Antonette M. Logar

Telephone number:    ______________________ FAX number: __________________
                    (605) 394-2471        FAX Number:    (605) 394-6078

Electronic mail:    Antonette.Logar@sdsmt.edu




ABET
                       Computing Accreditation Commission
                          111 Market Place, Suite 1050
                         Baltimore, Maryland 21202-4012
                              Phone: 410-347-7700
                               Fax: 410-625-2238
                              E-mail: cac@abet.org
                           www: http://www.abet.org/
                                                            Table of Contents
I. OBJECTIVES AND ASSESSMENTS ...................................................................................................................... 1
A. OBJECTIVES ................................................................................................................................................. 1
B. IMPLEMENTATION OF OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................... 9
C. ASSESSMENTS ............................................................................................................................................ 15
D. PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT .......................................................................................................................... 23
E. PROGRAM EVOLUTION ............................................................................................................................... 28
F. PROGRAM CURRENT STATUS ..................................................................................................................... 29
II. STUDENT SUPPORT ............................................................................................................................................ 31
A. FREQUENCY OF COURSE OFFERINGS ......................................................................................................... 31
B. INTERACTION WITH FACULTY .................................................................................................................... 32
C. STUDENT GUIDANCE.................................................................................................................................. 33
D. STUDENT ADVISEMENT ............................................................................................................................. 33
E. ACCESS TO QUALIFIED ADVISING .............................................................................................................. 34
F. MEETING THE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................... 35
III. FACULTY .............................................................................................................................................................. 38
A. FACULTY SIZE ........................................................................................................................................... 38
B. FACULTY WITH PRIMARY COMMITMENT ................................................................................................... 38
C. FACULTY OVERSIGHT ................................................................................................................................ 39
D. INTERESTS, QUALIFICATIONS, SCHOLARLY CONTRIBUTIONS .................................................................... 40
E. SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES ............................................................................................................................ 41
F. SUPPORT FOR ADVISING ............................................................................................................................. 42
G. INFORMATION REGARDING FACULTY MEMBERS ....................................................................................... 42
IV. CURRICULUM ..................................................................................................................................................... 78
A. TITLE OF DEGREE PROGRAM ..................................................................................................................... 78
B. CREDIT HOUR DEFINITION ......................................................................................................................... 78
C. PREREQUISITE FLOW CHART ..................................................................................................................... 78
D. COURSE REQUIREMENTS OF CURRICULUM ................................................................................................ 81
E. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS .............................................................................................................................. 92
V. LABORATORIES AND COMPUTING FACILITIES ..................................................................................... 200
A. COMPUTING FACILITIES........................................................................................................................... 200
B. STUDENT ACCESS .................................................................................................................................... 202
C. DOCUMENTATION .................................................................................................................................... 203
D. FACULTY ACCESS .................................................................................................................................... 203
E. SUPPORT PERSONNEL............................................................................................................................... 203
F. INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANCE................................................................................................................... 205
VI. INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES .................................................................. 210
A. FACULTY STABILITY ............................................................................................................................... 210
B. FACULTY PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES ...................................................................................................... 211
C. OFFICE SUPPORT ...................................................................................................................................... 212
D. TIME FOR ADMINISTRATION .................................................................................................................... 213
E. ADEQUACY OF RESOURCES ...................................................................................................................... 213
F. LEADERSHIP ............................................................................................................................................. 214
G. LABORATORY AND COMPUTING RESOURCES .......................................................................................... 214
H. LIBRARY RESOURCES .............................................................................................................................. 215
I. CONTINUITY OF INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT ................................................................................................ 216
VII. INSTITUTIONAL FACILITIES ...................................................................................................................... 217
A. LIBRARY .................................................................................................................................................. 217
B. CLASSROOM EQUIPMENT ......................................................................................................................... 219

                                                                               ii
C. FACULTY OFFICES ................................................................................................................................... 220
APPENDIX I-I. INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE ENTIRE INSTITUTION ........................................... 221
A. GENERAL INFORMATION ......................................................................................................................... 221
B. TYPE OF CONTROL ................................................................................................................................... 221
C. REGIONAL OR INSTITUTIONAL ACCREDITATION ...................................................................................... 221
D. ENROLLMENT .......................................................................................................................................... 223
E. FUNDING PROCESS ................................................................................................................................... 223
F. PROMOTION AND FACULTY TENURE ........................................................................................................ 223
APPENDIX I-II. GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE UNIT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE
COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM ...................................................................................................................... 227
A. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM UNIT ...................................................................................................... 227
B. ADMINISTRATIVE HEAD .......................................................................................................................... 227
C. ORGANIZATION CHART............................................................................................................................ 228
E. COMPUTER-RELATED UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS ................................................................ 229
APPENDIX I-III. FINANCES................................................................................................................................... 230
A. FINANCES RELATED TO THE COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM(S) .............................................................. 230
B. OPERATING AND COMPUTING EXPENDITURES ......................................................................................... 231
C. ADDITIONAL FUNDING............................................................................................................................. 231
APPENDIX I-IV. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM PERSONNEL .............................................................. 232
A. TERM OF APPOINTMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE HEAD ............................................................................... 232
B. NUMBER OF PERSONNEL ASSOCIATED WITH PROGRAM ........................................................................... 232
C. POLICIES .................................................................................................................................................. 232
APPENDIX I-V. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM ENROLLMENT AND DEGREE DATA .................... 235

APPENDIX I-VI. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS............................................................................................... 236
A. ADMISSION OF STUDENTS ........................................................................................................................ 236

APPENDIX II. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN .................................................... 239

APPENDIX III. SAMPLE ASSESSMENT DATA/DOCUMENTATION ............................................................ 270




                                                                               iii
Introduction

The Criteria for Accrediting Computer Science Programs are divided into seven major
Categories, each Criterion containing a statement of Intent and Standards. An intent
statement provides the underlying principles associated with a Criterion. In order for a
program to be accredited, it must meet the intent statement of every Criterion.

Standards provide descriptions of how a program can minimally meet the statements of
intent. The word ―must‖ is used within each standard to convey the expectation that the
condition of the standard will be satisfied in all cases. For a program to meet the intent of
a Criterion, it must either satisfy all the standards associated with that Criterion or
demonstrate an alternate approach to achieving the intent of the Criterion.

For each of the following seven sections, corresponding to each of the seven Categories
of the Criteria, answer all of the questions associated with the standards. If one or more
standards are not satisfied, it is incumbent upon the institution to demonstrate and
document clearly and unequivocally how the intent is met in some alternate fashion.

If you are having more than one program evaluated, particularly if the programs are on
separate campuses, the answers to these questions may vary from one program to
another. If this is the case, please use separate copies of each section for each program,
and clearly delineate which program is being described.

I. Objectives and Assessments

Intent: The program has documented, measurable objectives, including expected outcomes for
graduates. The program regularly assesses its progress against its objectives and used the results of the
assessments to identify program improvements and to modify the program’s objectives.

Standard I-1. The program must have documented, measurable objectives.

Standard I-2. The program‘s objectives must include expected outcomes for graduating students.


A. Objectives

Please attach items that support or precede the measurable objectives, e.g.,
 1. Mission statements from institution, college, department, program


  Institutional Mission, Vision, and Goal

  The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology serves the people of South Dakota
  as their technological university. Its mission is to provide a well-rounded education
  that prepares students for leadership roles in engineering and science; to advance the
  state of knowledge and application of this knowledge through research and scholarship;
  and to benefit the state, region, and nation through collaborative efforts in education
  and economic development.


                                                    iv
The School of Mines is dedicated to being a leader in 21st Century education that
reflects a belief in the role of engineers and scientists as crucial to the advancement of
society. Our vision is to be recognized as a premiere technological university in the
United States.

Most immediately, our goal is to be recognized as the university of choice for
engineering and science within South Dakota and among our peer group of specialized
engineering and science universities.


Computer Science Program Mission Statement

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science upholds and strengthens the
mission of SDSM&T by providing excellence in instruction, innovation in research and
scholarship, and service to the university, the profession, and the public. The primary
goal of the Computer Science program is to prepare the graduate to enter a rapidly-
changing field as a competent computer scientist. We expect our graduates to be
capable in all phases of software development, possess a firm understanding of
hardware technologies, have the strong mathematical background necessary for
scientific computing, and be sufficiently well versed in general theory to allow growth
within the discipline as it advances. Graduates of our program are also prepared to
assume leadership roles by possessing good communication skills, the ability to work
effectively as team members, and an appreciation for their social and ethical
responsibility in a global setting. The department is strongly committed to supporting
its faculty in their research efforts, which yield state-of-the-art instruction in the
classroom as well as the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge in the dynamic
field of Computer Science.

The mission of the department supports that of the institution and has been approved by
all levels of administration as appropriate for the department and for the achievement
of overall university goals.


2. Plans (institution, college, department, etc.)

The institution engaged in a two-year strategic planning process which generated a
Strategic Agenda and plans for implementing the action items associated with each of
four strategic initiatives. Members of the community, alumni, employers, faculty, staff,
and students participated in the process. Moreover, the planning process is ongoing,
and the action items in the campus plan are assessed yearly using a dashboard of
indicators (i.e., key summative data). Each year, a new iteration of the action items
under each of the four strategic initiatives is agreed upon and published. The four
strategic initiatives developed are:

1. Reshape the learning and teaching experience
2. Promote the acquisition, discovery, and application of knowledge

                                            v
3. Engage and serve the broader community
4. Prepare for our future as a national player in science and engineering education and
research

The complete documentation of the planning and assessing process for the campus
Strategic Agenda for the last three years can be viewed at:
http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/presidentcampusplanning

An examination of this site reveals a thorough, extensive, and inclusive process which
serves as a guide for departmental strategic planning.


3. All objectives including expected outcomes for graduates (itemize)


The objectives and outcomes for the computer science program are listed below in
section 8.

4. Process for assessments

The departmental assessment process is modeled on the institutional assessment
process for all EAC-accredited programs. All activities occur within the framework
defined by the institutional mission and the departmental mission. This yearly cycle of
continuous improvement is illustrated below.

    Periodic review                     1. Determine                Feedback
     of assessment                         program                   to/from
        process                          objectives                constituents



                                           2. Identify
                                             desired
       5. Implement                        outcomes
         responses                                                       3. Select
                                                                       measurement
                                                                       instruments

                               4b.                        4a.
                             Evaluate                    Collect
                               data                       data




 1. Determine educational objectives with feedback from constituents.


                                             vi
 2. Determine outcomes required to achieve objectives.
 3. Select measurement instruments/data-collection methods to provide evidence of
    the degree to which objectives and outcomes are met. Select a mix of direct and
    indirect measures. Identify course outcomes that support program outcomes, and
    devise the means of measuring them within the context of the course.
 4. Collect and evaluate the data.
 5. Identify areas for improvement and establish benchmarks for monitoring progress
    toward improvement goals.
 6. Periodically review the assessment process as a whole by evaluating the effective
    completion of steps 1-5 described above.




5. Who is involved in assessment and improvement?


At the institutional level, all faculty members are involved in assessment. The
maturing culture of assessment at SDSM&T was singled out for praise during the
March 2006 visit to campus of the six-member Higher Learning Commission
accreditation review team. In the Computer Science program, all faculty members are
involved in assessment and participate in the development/refinement of programmatic
objectives and outcomes. All faculty members have developed course-level outcomes
that support the departmental outcomes and objectives. All faculty members collect
data. All faculty members participate in the annual review of assessment data, and all
faculty members are involved in deciding upon appropriate responses to the data
collected and in the evaluation of the effectiveness of these responses.

No faculty member is designated as the assessment officer for the department, because
this would undermine the sense of shared responsibility for program quality. Preparing
this self-study was a collaborative effort. Each faculty member took responsibility for
preparing and reviewing course displays, writing sections of the self-study, and/or
reviewing the entire document.



6. Data from assessments


Raw assessment data is provided as part of the course displays. Summary information
is provided below.


                                         vii
7. Inputs from any supporting Office of Assessment


The institutional Assessment Officer from 2001 to 2005 was Dr. Kate Alley, assistant
to the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. In 2005, assessment
responsibilities became part of the work portfolio of the two college deans hired in
2006. Currently, the campus is in a transition process which will likely result in
assessment duties being formally transferred to the Associate Vice President for
Academic Affairs, a position held by Dr. Alley. For years, the institution has had a
Virtual Assessment Office available at http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/VAO. This website
will be rebuilt and updated over the summer as part of a more comprehensive online
institutional portfolio to be used for institutional-level accreditation. Dr. Alley
provides on-going assistance to the departments, including computer science, in
developing their assessment processes and documentation and will be available to visit
with team members to answer any questions about program, institutional, or general-
education assessment.
8. Indicate below or attach to this document the program‘s measurable objectives.
    These objectives must include expected outcomes for graduates.


                    Computer Science Program Objectives
The objectives describe the expected accomplishments of graduates of the program
approximately three to five years after graduation.

1. Graduates who have entered industry will have demonstrated a mastery of their
field.

2. Graduates who continued their education beyond the bachelor‘s level will have the
necessary background to successfully complete advanced degrees.

3. Graduates will have demonstrated their ability to assume leadership roles through
career advancement or by assuming responsibilities beyond those expected of entry-
level positions.

4. Graduates will be involved in their profession and make contributions to the field of
computer science.

5. Graduates will have the requisite foundation for life-long learning and will possess
the skills to adapt and thrive in the rapidly-changing field of computer science.




                                          viii
                    Computer Science Program Outcomes
The outcomes describe what students in the program are expected to know and be able
to do upon graduation with a degree in Computer Science from SDSM&T. The focus
of the program is on preparing graduates for software development careers that
emphasize scientific computing. The program outcomes reflect the scientific-
computing emphasis that distinguishes the program in the state system of higher
education. In addition, the program prepares students for a wide variety careers by
emphasizing communication, teamwork, and ethics, and by exploring the global and
societal impacts of innovation and technological advancement.

At the time of graduation, all students will:
   1. have a strong foundation in the software development process;
   2. be able to read and write program code in a variety of programming languages
      and have extensive experience with at least one high-level language;
   3. have experience in programming for and using a variety of computer operating
      systems;
   4. possess problem-solving and algorithm-development skills;
   5. have a strong understanding of the theoretical foundations of computing;
   6. have a strong background in computer hardware;
   7. possess an extensive background in computer-related mathematics;
   8. have an appreciation of the scientific method;
   9. have developed and practiced effective communication skills;
   10. have experience working in teams;
   11. understand and respect the professional standards of ethics expected of a
       computer scientist;
   12. have an appreciation for the societal/global impact of computing.




                                            ix
9. Describe how the program's objectives align with your institution's mission.



       Mapping the Departmental Objectives to The Institutional Mission


                                   Institutional Mission




     to provide a well-                     to advance the state       to benefit the state,
     rounded education that                 of knowledge and           region, and nation
     prepares students for                  application of this        through collaborative
     leadership roles in                    knowledge through          efforts in education
     engineering and                        research and               and economic
     science                                scholarship                development




                                                                                  graduates will be
                                                                                  able to adapt and
                                                 graduates will
       graduates will                                                                thrive in a
                                                  successfully
         possess a                                                                rapidly-changing
                                                    complete
       mastery of the                                                                    field
                                                graduate degrees
           field



                                                                     graduates will
                          graduates will                                 make
                            be able to                              contributions to
                             assume                                   the field of
                         leadership roles                          computer science




                                  Computer Science Objectives




                                                  x
Note: On the following page is a table that can be filled out with pertinent information
relating to objectives, their measurement, and their effect on the implementation of
program improvements.


B. Implementation of Objectives

Please complete the following table with as many objectives as needed.




                                           xi
                                                        Measurement of Outcomes and Objectives
                            Outcomes mapping to this objective          How Measured           When Measured        Improvements        Improvements Implemented
Objective 1:                                                                                                          Identified
Graduates who have       1. have a strong foundation in the                                                                             Added to CS1:
entered industry will    software development process                                                                                   1. Additional debugging labs
                                                                                                                  1. Need to make
have demonstrated a                                                  1. IAC*                   1. every 2 years                         *2. New in 2007 – addition of
                                                                                                                  CS1 more engaging
mastery of their field                                               2. Alumni Surveys         2. every 5 years                         trial robotics section of CS1
                                                                                                                  2. Need to
                                                                     3. Placement              3. yearly                                *3. New in 2007 – trial
                                                                                                                  introduce software
                                                                     4. Co-op reports          4. yearly                                addition of Alice in a section
                                                                                                                  engineering
                                                                     5. Curric. review         5. every 2 years                         of CS1
                                                                                                                  concepts earlier in
                                                                     6. Retention statistics   6. yearly                                Added to CS 250, 300, 372:
                                                                                                                  the curriculum
                                                                                                                                        1. More exposure to software
                                                                                                                                        engineering concepts
                         2. be able to read and write program code                                                                      1. Objects in CS2
                         in a variety of programming languages       1. IAC                    1. every 2 years                         2. Increased OOP in Data
                                                                                                                  Need for increased
                         and have extensive experience with at       2. Curric. review         2. every 2 years                         Structures
                                                                                                                  exposure to OOP
                         least one high-level language               3. Employer feedback      3. intermittent                          3. OOP and UML in
                                                                                                                                        Programming Lang.
                         3. have experience in programming for                                                    Need for increased    1. Linux coverage in Data
                                                                     1. IAC                    1. every 2 years
                         and using a variety of computer operating                                                exposure to Linux     Structures
                                                                     2. Curric. review         2. every 2 years
                         systems                                                                                  and support for       2. InstallFest
                                                                     3. Senior surveys         3. yearly
                                                                                                                  Linux                 3. Additional lab hours/help
                         4. possess problem-solving and              1. MFAT**                 1. yearly          None indicated at
                         algorithm-development skills                2. Curric. Review         2. every 2 years   this time
                         5. have a strong understanding of the       1. MFAT                   1. yearly
                         theoretical foundations of computing        2. Alumni surveys         2. every 5 years   None indicated at
                                                                     3. student research       3. yearly          this time
                                                                     4. Curric. review         4. every 2 years
                         6. have a strong background in computer                                                  Need C concepts in    Added to CS1:
                         hardware                                    1. MFAT                   1. yearly          CS1 to enable         1. Coverage of ANSI C
                                                                     2. Alumni surveys         2. every 5 years   students to work      2. Intro to hardware
                                                                     3. Curric. review         2. every 2 years   with embedded         components
                                                                                                                  systems earlier       3. Command line usage
      *IAC = Industrial Advisory Council
      **MFAT = Major Field Achievement Test




                                                                                   12
Objective 2: Graduates       Outcomes mapping to this objective        How Measured         When Measured       Improvements             Improvements
who continued their                                                                                               Identified              Implemented
education beyond the         1. have a strong foundation in the     1. IAC                1. every 2 years
bachelor‘s level will have   software development process           2. Alumni Surveys     2. every 5 years
                                                                                                             None indicated at this
the necessary background                                            3. Placement          3. yearly
                                                                                                             time
to successfully complete                                            4. Co-op reports      4. yearly
advanced degrees                                                    5. Curric. review     5. every 2 years
                             2. be able to read and write program                                                                     1. Objects in CS2
                             code in a variety of programming                                                                         2. Increased OOP in
                                                                    1. IAC                1. every 2 years   Need for increased
                             languages and have extensive                                                                             Data Structures
                                                                    2. Curric. review     2. every 2 years   exposure to OOP
                             experience with at least one high-                                                                       3. OOP and UML in
                             level language                                                                                           Programming Lang.
                             3. have experience in programming
                                                                    1. IAC                1. every 2 years   None indicated at this
                             for and using a variety of computer
                                                                    2. Curric. review     2. every 2 years   time
                             operating systems
                             4. possess problem-solving and                                                                           1. Additional
                             algorithm-development skills                                                                             computer security
                                                                                                                                      coverage
                                                                                                                                      2. Incorporated
                                                                                                             Realign elective         evolutionary
                                                                    1. MFAT               1. yearly          offerings for greater    algorithms and other
                                                                    2. Curric. review     2. every 2 years   exposure to recent       current topics into
                                                                    3. IAC                3. every 2 years   developments in the      Machine Learning
                                                                                                             field                    3. Current topics
                                                                                                                                      incorporated into
                                                                                                                                      redesigned GUI class
                                                                                                                                      including XHTML
                                                                                                                                      and XML
                             5. have a strong understanding of      1. MFAT               1. yearly
                             the theoretical foundations of         2. Alumni surveys     2. every 5 years   None indicated at this
                             computing                              3. student research   3. yearly          time
                                                                    4. Curric. review     4. every 2 years
                             6. have a strong background in         1. MFAT               1. yearly
                                                                                                             None indicated at this
                             computer hardware                      2. Alumni surveys     2. every 5 years
                                                                                                             time
                                                                    3. Curric. review     2. every 2 years
                             7. possess an extensive background     1. MFAT               1. yearly          None indicated at this
                             in computer-related mathematics        2. Curric. review     2. every 2 years   time


                                                                               13
Objective 3: Graduates will    Outcomes mapping to this objective       How Measured           When Measured      Improvements             Improvements
have demonstrated their                                                                                             Identified              Implemented
ability to assume leadership   9. have developed and practiced                                                                        1. Writing requirement
roles through career           effective communication skills                                                   1. Increase           added to Data
advancement or by                                                                                               application of        Structures
                                                                     1. course-embedded
assuming responsibilities                                                                    1. every 2 years   communication         2. Oral/written rubrics
                                                                     assessment
beyond those expected of                                                                     2. yearly          skills within CS      developed for Senior
                                                                     2. co-op reports
entry-level positions                                                                        3. yearly          courses               Design
                                                                     3. course evaluation
                                                                                             4. every 2 years   2. Improve student    3. Additional
                                                                     4. IAC
                                                                                                                feedback              written/oral
                                                                                                                mechanism             requirements in
                                                                                                                                      electives
                               10. have experience working in                                                                         Teamwork now
                               teams                                                                                                  required in
                                                                     1. course-embedded
                                                                                             1. every 2 years   Need to integrate     1. CS2
                                                                     assessments
                                                                                             2. yearly          teamwork across       2. Data Structures
                                                                     2. course evaluation
                                                                                             3. yearly          the curriculum        3. Software
                                                                     3. competitions
                                                                                                                                      Engineering
                                                                                                                                      4. Many electives
                               11. understand and respect the        1. course-embedded                                               1. Introduced in CS1
                               professional standards of ethics      assessments             1. every 2 years                         2. Reinforced in CS2
                                                                                                                Need to increase
                               expected of a computer scientist      2. course evaluation    2. yearly                                3. Tested in Data
                                                                                                                ethics coverage
                                                                     3. academic integrity   3. yearly                                Structures and
                                                                     violations                                                       Software Engineering
                               12. have an appreciation for the                                                                       1. Globalization added
                               societal/global impact of computing                                                                    to senior design
                                                                                                                                      2. Institutional study-
                                                                                                                                      abroad opportunities
                                                                                                                                      expanded
                                                                                                                Increase awareness
                                                                     1. NSSE                 1. yearly                                3. Coverage in electives
                                                                                                                of globalization in
                                                                     2. IAC                  2. every 2 years                         (parallel, GUI)
                                                                                                                computing
                                                                                                                                      4. Visiting lecturers
                                                                                                                                      from industry
                                                                                                                                      5. Globalization added
                                                                                                                                      to Computers in
                                                                                                                                      Society (HUM 375)




                                                                                14
Objective 4: Graduates       Outcomes mapping to this objective             How Measured        When Measured         Improvements               Improvements
will be involved in their                                                                                               Identified                Implemented
profession and make          1. have a strong foundation in the          1. IAC                 1. every 2 years
contributions to the field   software development process                2. Alumni Surveys      2. every 5 years
                                                                                                                   None indicated at this
of computer science                                                      3. Placement           3. yearly
                                                                                                                   time
                                                                         4. Co-op reports       4. yearly
                                                                         5. Curric. Review      5. every 2 years
                             4. possess problem-solving and              1. MFAT                1. yearly          None indicated at this
                             algorithm-development skills                2. Curric. Review      2. every 2 years   time
                             5. have a strong understanding of the       1. MFAT                1. yearly
                             theoretical foundations of computing        2. Alumni surveys      2. every 5 years   None indicated at this
                                                                         3. student research    3. yearly          time
                                                                         4. Curric. review      4. every 2 years
                             6. have a strong background in              1. MFAT                1. yearly
                                                                                                                   None indicated at this
                             computer hardware                           2. Alumni surveys      2. every 5 years
                                                                                                                   time
                                                                         3. Curric. review      3. every 2 years
                             7. possess an extensive background in       1. MFAT                1. yearly          None indicated at this
                             computer-related mathematics                2. Curric. review      2. every 2 years   time
                             8. have an appreciation of the scientific   1. student research    1. yearly          None indicated at this
                             method                                      2. competitions        2. yearly          time
                             9. have developed and practiced                                                                                1. Writing requirement
                             effective communication skills                                                        1. Increase              added to Data Structures
                                                                         1. course-embedded     1. every 2 years   application of           2. Oral/written rubrics
                                                                         assessment             2. yearly          communication skills     developed for Senior
                                                                         2. co-op reports       3. yearly          within CS courses        Design
                                                                         3. course evaluation                      2. improve student       3. Additional written/oral
                                                                                                                   feedback mechanism       requirements in electives
                                                                                                                                            4. Many electives
                             10. have experience working in teams                                                                           Teamwork now required
                                                                         1. course-embedded                                                 in
                                                                                                1. every 2 years   Need to integrate
                                                                         assessments                                                        1. CS2
                                                                                                2. yearly          teamwork across the
                                                                         2. course evaluation                                               2. Data Structures
                                                                                                3. yearly          curriculum
                                                                         3. competitions                                                    3. Software Engineering
                                                                                                                                            4. Most electives
                             12. have an appreciation for the            1. course-embedded                        Increase involvement
                                                                                                1. every 2 years                            Encourage student
                             societal/global impact of computing         assessments                               in professional
                                                                                                2. yearly                                   membership in ACM
                                                                         2. course evaluation                      societies


                                                                                    15
Objective 5: Graduates will Outcomes mapping to this objective     How Measured            When Measured      Improvements          Improvements
have the requisite                                                                                            Identified            Implemented
foundation for life-long       4. possess problem-solving and                                                                       Institution-wide Tablet
                                                                                                              Need to increase
learning and will possess      algorithm-development skills                                                                         PC program
                                                                   1. MFAT                 1. yearly          integration of
the skills to adapt and thrive                                                                                                      implemented with
                                                                   2. Curric. review       2. every 2 years   technology into the
in the rapidly-changing                                                                                                             accompanying course
                                                                                                              classroom
field of computer science                                                                                                           material development
                               5. have a strong understanding of   1. MFAT                 1. yearly
                               the theoretical foundations of      2. Alumni surveys       2. every 5 years   None indicated at
                               computing                           3. student research     3. yearly          this time
                                                                   4. Curric. review       4. every 2 years
                             6. have a strong background in        1. MFAT                 1. yearly
                                                                                                              None indicated at
                             computer hardware                     2. Alumni surveys       2. every 5 years
                                                                                                              this time
                                                                   3. Curric. review       3. every 2 years
                             7. possess an extensive background    1. MFAT                 1. yearly          None indicated at
                             in computer-related mathematics       2. Curric. review       2. every 2 years   this time
                             8. have an appreciation of the        1. student research     1. yearly          None indicated at
                             scientific method                     2. competitions         2. yearly          this time
                             11. understand and respect the        1. course-embedded
                             professional standards of ethics      assessments             1. every 2 years
                                                                                                              None indicated at
                             expected of a computer scientist      2. course evaluation    2. yearly
                                                                                                              this time
                                                                   3. academic integrity   3. yearly
                                                                   violations
                             12. have an appreciation for the                                                                       1. Globalization added
                             societal/global impact of computing                                                                    to Senior Design
                                                                                                                                    2. Institutional study-
                                                                                                              1. Increase           abroad opportunities
                                                                                                              awareness of          expanded
                                                                                                              globalization in      3. Coverage in electives
                                                                   1. course-embedded
                                                                                           1. every 2 years   computing             (Parallel, GUI)
                                                                   assessments
                                                                                           2. yearly          2. Increase           4. Visiting lecturers
                                                                   2. course evaluation
                                                                                                              involvement in        from industry
                                                                                                              professional          5. Globalization added
                                                                                                              societies             to Computers in
                                                                                                                                    Society (HUM 375)
                                                                                                                                    6. Encourage student
                                                                                                                                    membership in ACM


                                                                              16
Standard I-3. Data relative to the objectives must be routinely collected and documented, and used in
program assessments.

Standard I-4. The extent to which each program objective is being met must be periodically assessed.

Standard I-5. The results of the program‘s periodic assessment must be used to help identify opportunities
for program improvement.

C. Assessments


For each instrument used to assess the extent to which each of the objectives is being met
by your program, provide the following information:

 1. Frequency and timing of assessments
 2. What data are collected (should include information on initial student placement and
    subsequent professional development)
 3. How data are collected
 4. From whom data are collected (should include students and computing
    professionals)
 5. How assessment results are used and by whom

Attach copies of the actual documentation that was generated by your data collection and
assessment process since the last accreditation visit, or for the past three years if this is
the first visit. Include survey instruments, data summaries, analysis results, etc.


  The department has identified twelve data-collection instruments which are the
  centerpiece of the assessment process. These twelve are not the only data-collection
  instruments used in the department. Additional information is provided by institution-
  wide assessments, such as the CAAP exam (described in Appendix II) and surveys of
  student satisfaction, and by special purpose instruments such as a survey of female CS
  students to determine what attracted them to the program. The primary assessment
  tools, however, are those listed below.

  1. MFAT
           Type of measurement – Objective
           Frequency of collection – Every year
           Frequency of analysis – Every three years (Although results are reviewed every
           year, action is not taken as a result of any one year‘s results.)
           How collected and from whom – The exam is given as part of the Senior Design
           course. All students enrolled in Senior Design are required to take it, and a
           portion of the grade is based on the student‘s performance.
           Benchmarks – The exam provides feedback in three areas


                                                    17
              Programming fundamentals
              Computer organization, architecture, operating systems
              Algorithms, theory, computer math

       (a) Programming fundamentals – Students receive a solid foundation in
       programming, however, other schools provide similar rigor. Thus, the
       benchmark is to be above average in this category and strive to achieve the 80%
       mark on the departmental composite score.
       (b) Hardware and OS – Students should be above the national average in this
       category. The benchmark is 70%, with a goal of 80%.
       (c) Theory and math – Students should be above average in algorithms and
       mathematics but average in theory. The benchmark is to be above average, and
       the goal is to achieve the 75% mark.

       [Note that the older version of this exam gave feedback in four areas:
       Programming Methodology, Software Systems, Computer Organization and
       Design, and Theory and Mathematics.]


2. Alumni Surveys
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: The survey contains both
       subjective questions (―My degree prepared me well for my job‖) and objective
       questions (―Advanced degrees earned‖).
       Frequency of collection – Every five years
       Frequency of analysis – Every five years
       How collected and from whom – Paper copies of the survey are mailed to
       alumni. The Alumni Office maintains a database of addresses and generates
       mailing labels to assist with this effort.
       Benchmarks – At least 85% of respondents report possessing a mastery of their
       field (Questions 10 and 11 map to Objective 1). At least 85% of respondents
       report having the skills to adapt and thrive in the changing environment
       (Question 13 maps to Objective 5). Graduates have been able to earn advanced
       degrees. Benchmarking a number of students who earn advanced degrees is
       impractical, given the number of variables that affect matriculation into and
       graduation from graduate school.


3. Student Course Evaluations
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective. Objective questions gather
       information on leadership positions held and team involvement. Subjective
       questions ask for feedback on level of preparation in the soft skills. Students
       are asked to respond to their level of preparation in communication skills, team


                                         18
       work, ethics, and globalization. Each response is subjective, but the trend of
       replies taken over all classes over time provides an objective measurement of
       student confidence in their abilities in this areas and, perhaps more importantly,
       in the changes in this level of confidence over time.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of evaluation – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Data is gathered as part of the course-
       evaluation process in every class. Computer Science majors at all levels are
       asked to answer the basic questions and extra questions are provided for
       graduating seniors. The questions are provided in Appendix III.
       Benchmarks – As noted below, the benchmark for competitive team
       involvement is approximately 15% of the students (roughly 15-20 students per
       year). No benchmark is set for students holding leadership positions, but the
       number is monitored to provide evidence that students are preparing to assume
       leadership roles in industry. This survey is a new instrument for the
       department. When sufficient data has been collected, the benchmark will be to
       demonstrate an increase in student confidence in their abilities in
       communication, teaming, and ethics from freshman year to senior year.

4. Senior Exit Interviews
       Type of measurement – Subjective: Seniors are asked to identify strengths and
       weaknesses of the existing program and to suggest improvements.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of analysis – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Small Group Instruction Diagnostic (SGID)
       for graduating seniors. Seniors meet with the campus Assessment Officer (Dr.
       Kate Alley) and do a group assessment using the SGID process.
       Benchmarks – Not applicable

5. Industrial Advisory Council
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: Objective feedback is provided
       by the participants through statistics on the numbers and types of jobs alumni
       have in different sectors of the industry. Subjective feedback is provided on
       how well prepared graduates are to enter the workforce.
       Frequency of collection – Every two years
       Frequency of review – Every two years
       How collected and from whom – Alumni come to campus for intensive sessions
       focusing on curriculum, student preparation, and other issues identified for a
       given meeting. Representatives are chosen from diverse companies and diverse
       market segments within the industry (defense, networking, algorithm
       development, database-driven, hardware-driven, etc.).


                                          19
      Benchmarks – At each meeting the council is asked to identify the next big
      change taking shape in the industry and to define how well SDSM&T is
      positioned to take advantage of the coming changes. The benchmark is to
      receive a ―passing‖ score on this question. That is, the curriculum is evolving
      in the right direction, and only minor course corrections are required to keep the
      program on track to address developing needs in industry.

6. Course-Embedded Assessments
      Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective
      Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every two years in conjunction with the focused
      curriculum review
      How collected and from whom – Data is collected by faculty members teaching
      the courses selected for the embedded assessments. The entire faculty reviews
      the work products of the students to determine if the desired outcomes are being
      achieved across the curriculum. For example, communication skills are
      integrated in freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior courses. The faculty
      review writing samples from those courses and determine whether sufficient
      coverage is provided to achieve the outcome of students having the ability to
      communicate effectively. Writing rubrics assist with this process.
      Benchmarks – Students show improvement throughout the curriculum in three
      of the areas: communication, ethics, and teamwork. Students are expected to
      be exposed to globalization in the curriculum, but no benchmark has been set.
      This assessment consists of faculty evaluation of student growth in soft skills.
      The student surveys listed above measure the student’s perception of his or her
      growth in these areas.

7. Focused Curriculum Review
      Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: Objective evidence is provided in
      the mappings. The coverage of program outcomes in courses, the currency of
      material covered in each course, and the distribution of topics covered are
      important objective measures of the appropriateness of the curriculum to the
      program‘s stated objectives and outcomes. The focused curriculum review is
      done every two years in preparation for the Industrial Advisory Council
      meeting. As part of the IAC meeting, the participants provide feedback on the
      focused curriculum review. Subjective information is provided through
      discussions about the appropriate placement of material in the curriculum and
      best practices for covering key topics.
      Frequency of collection – Every two years
      Frequency of review – Every two years.
      How collected and from whom – The curriculum data is compiled and reviewed
      by the faculty.


                                         20
      Benchmarks – All course outcomes must map to program outcomes. All
      program outcomes must be supported by appropriate course outcomes.

8. Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
      Type of measurement – Objective
      Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every year
      How collected and from whom – The computer science faculty review database
      information provided by the Alumni Association on the career paths of students
      who have graduated in the past ten years. The Outstanding Recent Graduate
      Award recognizes a graduate who has a record of high achievement in his or her
      profession. The faculty review the data and select a nominee. The award is a
      side benefit of the process, however. The true value in selecting a nominee for
      this campus award is the review of graduate achievements. This process
      provides data to assess objectives one through four.
      Benchmarks – The goal is to have a computer science student selected as a top
      achiever each year. The benchmark is to have a graduate selected for this
      award once every three years.

9. Student Competition Involvement
      Type of measurement – Objective: Faculty track the number of students
      involved in competition teams. This includes interdisciplinary teams under the
      Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP),
      such as the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Team, and computer science teams such
      as the ACM Programming Team.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every year
      How collected and from whom – Team-project advisors and student participants
      provide the data.
      Benchmarks – The institution has a strong team-project orientation. The goal is
      to give all students the opportunity to work on a competitive team. However,
      many students do not have the time or inclination to work on such teams. The
      benchmark is to have approximately 15% of the students involved in a team
      competition. That is typically 15 – 20 students per year.

10. Co-op Reports
      Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: Co-op has been identified as an
      important educational experience, and students are encouraged to participate.
      The number of students who are offered (and accept) co-ops is an objective
      measure of the employability of our students. Employers are asked to complete
      a survey which also provides a subjective measure of the technical abilities,


                                         21
       communication skills, and other attributes of students who have not yet
       completed the program.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of review – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Career Planning provides data on the number
       of co-ops offered. Dr. Penaloza, the co-op coordinator, performs an assessment
       of the employer surveys.
       Benchmarks – The goal is for every student to have the opportunity to
       participate in a co-op. The benchmark is for at least 30% of graduates to have
       done a co-op.

11. Undergraduate Research Involvement
       Type of measurement – Objective: The faculty track the number of students
       involved in undergraduate research each year.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of review – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Collected from faculty members who direct
       undergraduate research
       Benchmarks – The goal is for all students to have the opportunity to participate
       in undergraduate research to encourage them to pursue graduate school. The
       benchmark is to have at least as many students participate in undergraduate
       research as continue to graduate school each year - approximately 10% of the
       graduating class.

12. Placement rates/Starting salaries
       Type of measurement – Objective
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of review – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Collected by the Career Planning Office
       Benchmarks – The goal is full employment with a competitive salary. Given
       that some students choose to work in a small South Dakota town, a realistic
       benchmark is 85% placement in computer science positions. The average
       salary is separated into ―within South Dakota‖ and ―outside of South Dakota‖.
       The benchmark is that the average salary for students leaving South Dakota will
       be comparable to the national average, and the salary for students staying in
       South Dakota will be 80% of the national average.




                                          22
                                                                            Assessment Instruments
                                   Senior                                  Course-      Placement                 Undergradua     Student       Student     Outstanding    Focused
                                     exit                      Alumni     embedded     rates/Starting    Co-op     te research    course      competition   recent grad   curriculum
Program Outcomes                 interviews   MFAT      IAC    surveys   assessments      salaries      reports   involvement    evaluation   involvement     awards        review
1. have a strong foundation                            every
                                                               every 5                                                                                                     every 2
in the software development                              2                                  yearly      yearly
                                                                years                                                                                                       years
process                                                years
2. be able to read and write
program code in a variety of
                                                       every
programming languages and                                                                                                                                                  every 2
                                                         2
have extensive experience                                                                                                                                                   years
                                                       years
with at least one high-level
language
3. have experience in
                                                       every
programming for and using a                                                                                                                                                every 2
                                                         2
variety of computer operating                                                                                                                                               years
                                                       years
systems
4. possess problem-solving                             every
                                                                                                                                                                           every 2
and algorithm-development                     yearly     2
                                                                                                                                                                            years
skills                                                 years
5. have a strong
understanding of the                                           every 5                                                                                                     every 2
                                              yearly                                                                 yearly
theoretical foundations of                                      years                                                                                                       years
computing
6. have a strong background                                    every 5                                                                                                     every 2
                                              yearly
in computer hardware                                            years                                                                                                       years
7. possess an extensive
                                                                                                                                                                           every 2
background in computer-                       yearly
                                                                                                                                                                            years
related mathematics
8. have an appreciation of
                                                                                                                     yearly                     yearly
the scientific method
                                                                          collected
9. have developed and                                  every               yearly,
practiced effective                                      2                reviewed                      yearly                    yearly
communication skills                                   years              every two
                                                                            years
                                                                          collected
                                                                           yearly,
10. have experience working
                                                                          reviewed                                                yearly        yearly
in teams
                                                                          every two
                                                                            years
                                                                          collected
11. understand and respect
                                                                           yearly,
the professional standards of
                                                                          reviewed                                                yearly
ethics expected of a
                                                                          every two
computer scientist
                                                                            years
                                                                          collected
12. have an appreciation for                           every
                                                                           yearly,
the societal/ global impact of                         2                                                                          yearly
                                                                          reviewed
computing                                              years
                                                                          every two

                                                                                       23
years




        24
                                                                              Assessment Instruments


                                                                            Course-       Placement                Undergraduate    Student       Student     Outstanding    Focused
                                 Senior exit                    Alumni     embedded     rates/Starting    Co-op       research      course      competition   recent grad   curriculum
Program Objectives               interviews    MFAT     IAC     surveys   assessments      salaries      reports    involvement    evaluation   involvement     awards        review
Graduates who have entered
industry will have                                    every 2   every 5
                                                                                                                                                                yearly
demonstrated a mastery of                             years      years
their field
Graduates who continued
their education beyond the
bachelor‘s level will have                                      every 5
the necessary background to                                      years
successfully complete
advanced degrees
Graduates will have
demonstrated their ability to
assume leadership roles
through career advancement                                      every 5
                                                                                                                                                                yearly
or by assuming                                                   years
responsibilities beyond
those expected of entry-level
positions
Graduates will be involved
in their profession and make
                                                                                                                                                                yearly
contributions to the field of
computer science
Graduates will have the
requisite foundation for life-
long learning and will
                                                                every 5
possess the skills to adapt        yearly                                                                                                                       yearly
                                                                 years
and thrive in the rapidly-
changing field of computer
science.




                                                                                        25
Standard I-6. The results of the program‘s assessments and the actions taken based on the results must be
documented.

D. Program Improvement


Describe your use of the results of the program‘s assessments to identify program
improvements and modifications to objectives.
Include:
  1. Any major program changes within the last five years
  2. Any significant future program improvement plans based upon recent assessments

  The following is a list of significant changes made to the program as a result of the
  assessment process. The problem is described; the assessment instrument that
  identified the problem is given; and the actions taken as a result (as well as an
  evaluation of those actions, where applicable) are also provided.

  1. Increasing hardware support and programming help available to students.
      How identified:
      Industrial Advisory Council, Focused Curriculum Review, Senior Survey, Student Opinion
      Surveys
      Actions taken:
      (a) Roger Schrader was hired in 2000 to perform system administration for the
      department and to teach freshman programming courses. In addition to
      administering the department‘s computers, Roger became a resource for fixing
      student computer problems. He also provides evening and weekend help to
      students in CS1 and CS2.
      (b) InstallFest. The Student Chapter of the ACM, in conjunction with the
      SDSM&T Linux Users Group, offers free computer configuration help on a
      Saturday at the beginning of each semester. Students use this opportunity to
      partition their hard drives and install Linux, install software available through the
      Microsoft Academic Alliance, and take advantage of the hardware-trouble-shooting
      expertise available.
      (c) Additional lab hours with graduate student support. The departmental labs are
      staffed by a graduate-student four nights each week, providing help until 9PM
      Monday through Thursday.
      Evaluation: There are two indicators that the additional programming support has
      made an impact on this area: the number of students who utilize this help, and the
      ease of the transition to Linux in Data Structures. Conservatively, half of the
      students in CS1 and CS2 avail themselves of the additional help, and students
      report great satisfaction with the programming help available to them. Data
      Structures faculty report fewer start-up difficulties and greater student satisfaction
      with the switch to Linux.
2. Increasing the application of oral and written communication skills in computer
science courses.
   How identified: course-embedded assessment, co-op reports, course evaluation,
   Industrial Advisory Council
   Actions taken:
   (a) A writing requirement was added to Data Structures in 2005.
   (b) Rubrics for evaluating oral and written student work were added to Senior
   Design.
   (c) Almost all electives incorporate either a paper or a presentation as a requirement
   of the course. Students are required to take three electives which provide additional
   opportunities to apply communications skills in computer science courses.

3. Increasing global awareness
   How identified: Approximately 90% of SDSM&T undergraduates are from South
   Dakota or contiguous states, making global awareness an important topic in the
   curriculum. The Board of Regents, NSSE, consultation with our institutional
   Academic Advisory Board and our departmental Industrial Advisory Council
   helped to identify this need.
   Actions taken:
   (a) Globalization is included as a topic in Senior Design as of fall 2005.
   (b) The institution is increasing study-abroad opportunities for students. The
   university has a long-standing student exchange program with Telemark and other
   universities in Norway, Germany, and Denmark. Memoranda of Understanding are
   in place with universities in India, Mongolia, China, Poland, Bangladesh, South
   Korea, Turkey and Serbia, increasing opportunities for study abroad.
   (c) Cultural differences in interface design are discussed in the GUI course.
   (d) Lecturers from industry visit classrooms to discuss the challenges of working on
   distributed, cross-cultural teams.
   (e) Globalization is included in HUM 375 Computers in Society.
   Evaluation: The faculty are still struggling with the most effective way to help
   students understand the expectations of employers in a global economy. The above
   changes are a positive step but may not be the full solution.

4. Increasing ethics coverage in required courses
   How identified: academic integrity violations, course-embedded assessments, and
   student surveys
   Faculty observed a small but troubling increase in academic integrity violations
   between 2003 and 2006. At least one student was investigated by the FBI for
   alleged file sharing of copyrighted material. In the same time frame, several high-
   profile articles related to copyright infringement on the web (Napster) appeared in

                                          ii
   the media. All of the above suggested that more attention should be focused on
   ethical issues.
   Actions taken: The faculty voted to increase the coverage of ethics throughout the
   curriculum. As a result, the following additions have been made:
   (a) CS1 (freshman course) introduces the SDSM&T Computer Science Program
   Academic Integrity Policy and the ACM Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct.
   (b) CS2 (freshman/sophomore course) reinforces the institutional code of conduct.
   Students are tested on the institutional code and the ACM code of conduct.
   (c) Data Structures (sophomore/junior course) requires an essay that addresses
   ―situational ethics‖.
   (d) Ethics is now a required part of Software Engineering (senior course).
   (e) CS students attended a campus-wide ethics workshop in 2005. They received a
   tutorial on ethics which has been incorporated in Software Engineering.
   Evaluation: No academic integrity violations were reported in 2006-2007. A
   longer record will be needed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of this change.

5. Increase experience with object-oriented programming
   How identified: Industrial Advisory Council, Focused Curriculum Review
   Actions taken:
   (a) Coverage of trees was moved from CS2 to Data Structures to make room in CS2
   for an earlier introduction to objects.
   (b) Object-oriented programming coverage was increased in Data Structures..
   (c) Object-oriented concepts and Unified Modeling Language (UML) were added
   to Programming Languages. This required the addition of one extra credit hour to
   that course.

6. CS1 was not serving the needs of all constituents
   How identified: Focused Curriculum Review, with input from the Computer
   Engineering Curriculum Committee. One of the department‘s curriculum-
   assessment mechanisms for shared courses is surveying faculty members in other
   departments about student preparation in subsequent courses. CS1 is one such
   course. CS2, Data Structures, Finite Structures, Assembly Language, Software
   Engineering, and Operating Systems must also satisfy external constraints. The
   Computer Engineering Curriculum Committee, with the concurrence of the other
   departments that require CS1, brought forth concerns about missing content in that
   course. In particular, students who use embedded processors and micro-controllers
   need exposure to tools other than the Visual Studio development environment.
   Actions taken: In response, the following material was added to the first
   programming course.
   (a) coverage of ANSI C


                                          iii
   (b) introduction to hardware components
   (c) command-line usage
   (d) additional debugging lab
   Evaluation: Subsequent faculty feedback indicates a high degree of satisfaction
   with the additions.

7. Students need more experience working on teams
   How identified: Student course evaluations, competition team advisor feedback.
   Previously, the only courses with a requirement for student teamwork were
   Software Engineering and Senior Design. The faculty reviewed the assessment
   data on this topic and agreed to incorporate teamwork throughout the curriculum.
   Actions taken:
   (a) CS2 (freshman/sophomore course) requires at least one team assignment and
   teammate evaluation.
   (b) Data Structures (sophomore/junior course) requires two team assignments and
   requires students to convey their expectations to their teammates in writing before
   the assignments begin. Written teammate evaluation is required.
   (c) The capstone sequence of Software Engineering and Senior Design (senior
   courses) has been enhanced to better model teamwork in industry.
   (d) Other courses, including most electives, may require team projects. For
   example, team activities are typically assigned in Computer Organization and
   Architecture, Image Processing, and Programming Languages. Samples of those
   assignments are included in the course displays.
   (e) Student were encouraged to participate in interdisciplinary teams, particularly
   the student competition teams under CAMP. The number of students participating
   in competitive team activities has increased since 2003.

8. Elective-offering adjustments
   How identified: Focused curriculum review, MFAT, Industrial Advisory Council
   Actions taken:
   (a) Computer security was identified as an important emerging discipline during the
   Industrial Advisory Council discussions. A subsequent curriculum review
   identified two logical places to include this material in the curriculum: computer
   security coverage was added to the cryptography elective, and additional computer
   security material was added to operating systems.
   (b) Advanced Artificial Intelligence was redesigned as Machine Learning with the
   addition of topics such as evolutionary algorithms; ant colony, swarm, and agent-
   based approaches; cellular automata, patterns and growth; and artificial immune
   systems.
   (c) GUI was originally two courses: GUI Design and GUI Programming. In

                                         iv
   response to curriculum review and feedback from the Industrial Advisory Council,
   these two courses were merged into a single GUI elective.

9. Introduce software engineering concepts earlier in the curriculum
   How identified: Focused curriculum review, Industrial Advisory Council
   Actions taken:
   (a) The software lifecycle model is introduced in CS2. Students write a testing
   document in conjunction with a programming assignment.
   (b) Additional coverage of the software lifecycle is presented in Data Structures.
   Students write a testing document and/or a design document.
   (c) More discussion of testing was added to Analysis of Algorithms. Students write
   a testing document in conjunction with a programming assignment.


B. Changes In Progress for 2007-2008

1. Institutional assessments indicate a need for greater integration of technology into
the classroom.
   How identified: Institutional strategic planning sessions
   Actions taken: Starting in the Fall of 2006, all freshmen were required to lease a
   Tablet PC. This allows students to participate in active learning during class hours
   and provides a consistent platform for computing resources. The tablets are pre-
   loaded with much of the software the CS student will need. Students receive
   prompt hardware and software support during business hours. Tablets are used in
   some CS1 sections.
   Evaluation: An initial assessment of the impact of the new Tablet PC program was
   done in 2006-2007. This report should be available when the ABET team is on
   campus in the fall.

2. Declining enrollments indicate a need for a more attractive first course in
programming.
   How identified: CS major enrollment statistics, student opinion surveys from CS1,
   completion rates in CS1
   Actions taken:
   A section of CS1 will use robotics as an aid to learning programming concepts.
   Course development is funded by a grant from NASA. A second section of CS1
   will experiment with the Alice programming environment. Both experiments will
   be evaluated before the start of the fall semester in 2008.
   Evaluation: Not yet implemented.




                                           v
E. Program Evolution

1. Describe in what respect, if at all, the philosophy and direction of the computer science program has
changed at your institution during the last five years, or since the last accreditation visit, whichever is the
more recent.


As part of the institutional strategic planning process described above, the university
reaffirmed its mission to educate engineers and scientists. The institution had been
poised to either become a comprehensive university or to focus on science and
engineering. The direction was set in 2005: the university will dedicate itself to
strengthening its regional and national reputation as a quality engineering and science
institution. This is likely to have a positive impact on the computer science program.
More stringent entrance requirements were put into place for Freshmen entering in Fall
2006. The average ACT composite score for that group was 25.4, the average math
composite ACT score was 26.4, and the average high school GPA was 3.53. For
comparison, the entering class in Fall 2005 had an average composite ACT score of 24.4,
an average composite math ACT score of 25.1, and an average high school GPA of 3.42.
In addition, the department has noticed lower enrollments in the remedial math classes
and an increase in students taking the second semester of calculus in the fall semester of
2006. This should be advantageous to computer science, given the mathematical
emphasis present in the program.

Administration support for faculty research has also increased. Support for research has
always been present, but the renewed focus and new initiatives have made that support
even stronger. This includes three new Ph.D. programs in the last five years and new
research centers such as the Center for Accelerated Applications at the Nanoscale, the
Advanced Materials Processing Center, the Center for Bioprocessing Research and
Development, and the Additive Manufacturing Laboratory.

The basic philosophy of the department has not changed since the last visit. The
emphasis is still on quality teaching enhanced by appropriate scholarly activity. Quality
teaching requires a faculty member to be student focused, to provide materials that are
up-to-date in the field, and for the department to provide resources to support these
activities. As expected, these ideals are realized using slightly different approaches than
they were at the last visit. The Tablet PC program described above has provided a new
avenue for exploring active learning in the classroom. All classrooms are now equipped
with computer projection equipment that provides opportunities for additional
pedagogical exploration, such as incorporating graphical simulations and web resources.
Faculty members continue to participate in research projects but with an increased
awareness of the importance of involving undergraduates in those research projects. The
past three years have seen an increase in interdisciplinary research projects which have
brought interesting new applications of computer science techniques to the students.
Thus, the specifications remain constant, but the design and implementation are
constantly changing.




                                                        vi
2. Describe any major developments and/or progress made in connection with the program in the last five
years, or since the last accreditation visit, whichever is the more recent, that is not included in your
response to Question I.C.



All improvements to the program are discussed above.




F. Program Current Status

1. List the strengths of the unit offering the computer science program.


The department has many strengths, including:
1. quality students: SDSM&T is widely regarded as a school with high academic
standards, and students self-select when applying for admission.
2. dedicated faculty: Faculty are hired primarily for their excellence in the classroom
but also participate in significant research projects.
3. a student-centered departmental philosophy: The department has agreed upon core
values of quality, fairness, respect, and currency in the educational experience.
Students understand and appreciate this.
4. excellent support from the administration
5. a rigorous curriculum that prepares students for graduate school and meets the needs
of employers: For students who are not location-bound, the placement rate is 100%.
Starting salaries are among the highest on campus and are generally at or above the
national average.
6. educational opportunities that extend beyond the classroom: Students and faculty
work together on multi-disciplinary research projects and competitive teams. Many
students take advantage of co-op opportunities. Typically, at least 75% of seniors have
had work experience before graduation through co-ops, internships, and part-time
employment within the field.
7. productive synergy between the Mathematics and Computer Science programs, as
well as between Computer Science and other engineering disciplines.
8. an outstanding work environment: Faculty and students appreciate being part of a
collegial department.




2. List any weaknesses or limitations of the institution or unit offering the computer science program.




                                                     vii
1. Declining enrollments: The nationwide drop in CS enrollments has also occurred in
South Dakota. The media blitz over outsourcing continues to be a significant hindrance
to recruiting in CS/CENG. The institution has increased its recruiting efforts, and the
department has responded by posting articles and employment opportunities on the web
site for prospective students and their parents. ―Why Computer Science?‖ postcards were
mailed to prospective students, new handouts were prepared for students visiting campus,
K-12 computer summer camps were developed, and the department website was updated.
However, this remains a continuing concern for the department.

2. Graduate-student support: The faculty feel the graduate program greatly enhances the
undergraduate program. The department is allocated approximately $18,000 per year to
fund teaching assistants and graders, which is one of the primary sources of graduate-
student funding. Some grant funding is also available, but the total graduate-student
support available is barely adequate. While this does not directly impact the
undergraduate program under review, it is a concern the department is striving to address.

An additional temporary weakness in 2006-2007 was limited secretarial support due to a
prolonged illness and subsequent resignation of the department‘s full-time secretary.
This has been remedied by hiring a replacement who will start fall 2007.



3. List any significant plans for future development of the program.


Two initiatives are under development to address the recruiting issue mentioned above.
The first is the development of freshman experience courses which would assist first-
semester students to become acclimated to college and infuse them with a passion for
science and engineering. The second is the introduction of robotics into the CS1 course.
This is funded by a grant from NASA and will give students a more engaging (and fun)
first experience with programming. The teamwork required in the class is also designed
to build a cohort, since research shows that building a support system is an important
factor in college success, particularly for female students and minorities.


II. Student Support

Intent: Students can complete the program in a reasonable amount of time. Students have ample
opportunity to interact with their instructors. Students are offered timely guidance and advice about the
program’s requirements and their career alternatives. Students who graduate the program meet all
program requirements.

Standard II-1. Courses must be offered with sufficient frequency for students to complete the program in a
timely manner.

A. Frequency of Course Offerings




                                                    viii
1. List below the course numbers, titles, and semester hours of courses required for the
   major that are offered less frequently than once per year.

 Dept Course #         Title of course                                    Semester hrs




2. Explain how it is determined when they will be offered, e.g., rotation, odd-numbered
   years, or whatever.

  All required courses are offered at least once per year. A table at the end of this
 sections shows the frequency with which required and elective courses are offered.


3. List below the course numbers, titles, and semester hours of courses allowed for the
major but not required (i.e., either free electives or lists of courses from which students
must choose a certain number), that are offered less frequently than once per year.

 Dept Course #      Title of course                                        Semester hrs
 CS 410             Parallel Processing (odd spring, e.g., S09)            3
 CS 421             Graphical User Interfaces (even fall, e.g., F08)       3
 CS 433             Computer Graphics (even spring, e.g., S08)             3
 CS 445             Theory of Computation (even fall, e.g., F08)           3
 CS 447             Artificial Intelligence (odd spring e.g., S09)         3
 CS 448             Machine Learning (odd fall, e.g., F07)                 3
 CS 463             Data Communications (even spring, e.g., S08)           4
 CS 464             Image Processing (odd fall e.g., F07)                  3
 CS 492             Cryptography (odd spring, e.g., S09)                   3
 MATH 471           Numerical Analysis (odd spring, e.g., S09)             3



 4.Explain how it is determined when they will be offered, e.g., rotation, odd-numbered
 years, or whatever.

    Electives are offered on a stable two-year rotation and at least two electives are
    available every semester. In addition, a co-op can be used as an elective, expanding
    the student‘s options even further. Students do not have trouble fulfilling the three-
    elective requirement. The table above indicates when each course is offered.




                                              ix
Standard II-2. Computer science courses must be structured to ensure effective interaction between
faculty/teaching assistants and students in lower division courses and between faculty and students in upper
division courses.

B. Interaction with Faculty


1. Describe how you achieve effective interaction between students and faculty or
teaching assistants in lower-division courses, particularly in large sections.



      SDSM&T is a small school with an emphasis on quality instruction. Lower-division
      programming class sizes rarely exceed 35 and lab sections are capped at 20. All
      courses except CSC 150 are taught by full-time faculty. A section of CSC 150 will
      occasionally be taught by a graduate teaching assistant with extensive supervision.

      All instructors are required to be available to the students. The minimum number of
      office hours expected is four hours per week, but, within the Mathematics and
      Computer Science department, faculty maintain an open-door policy providing
      students with many hours per day for assistance. It is also expected that faculty
      will make time available if students are unable to meet during the chosen hours.
      Sections that have labs will also have lab/teaching assistants. Teaching assistants
      are also expected to maintain office hours to provide additional assistance. A list of
      class sizes from Spring 2007 is presented at the end of this section as an example of
      typical section sizes.



2. Describe how you achieve effective interaction between students and faculty in upper-
division courses. Give detailed explanation and/or documentation how you do this for
sections with more than thirty students, if applicable.


      All upper-division courses are taught by tenure-track faculty. All faculty are
      required to be available to the students in the manner described above. Course
      enrollments in upper-division courses rarely exceed 30 and are most typically in the
      20 – 25 range. A list of class sizes from Spring 2007 is presented at the end of this
      section as an example of typical section sizes.




Standard II-3. Guidance on how to complete the program must be available to all students.

C. Student Guidance




                                                     x
Describe what determines the requirements that a student will follow and how the student
is informed of these requirements.


     The degree requirements are published in the school catalog and are also available
     on the website and at the department office. Students receive a catalog upon
     enrollment. A freshman CS advisor ensures that students are familiar with all the
     relevant information contained in the catalog and provides the student with
     information about starting the degree program. The student is stepped through the
     requirements and given a checklist and a prerequisite flowchart for the degree at the
     first meeting. The campus student database (Web Advisor) has a degree-audit
     module which allows students and advisors to track student progress through a
     program of study. Copies of the flowchart and checklist are located in the
     Curriculum section below.




Standard II-4. Students must have access to qualified advising when they need to make course decisions
and career choices.

D. Student Advisement


Describe your system of advisement for students on how to complete the program.
Indicate how you ensure that such advisement is available to all students.

    All first-time undergraduate degree-seeking students are assigned a freshman advisor.
    Freshman advisors are faculty members who have been selected to work with first-
    year students because of their special interest in, and commitment to, new students.
    They assist the students in all aspects of starting college life including, but not
    limited to, academic advising. In addition to helping first-year students interpret their
    placement scores and plan a class schedule, the freshman advisor offers guidance on
    setting educational and career goals, on managing time effectively, and on getting
    involved in campus and professional activities. Roger Schrader will serve as
    freshman advisor for all entering freshman in computer science.

    After the freshman year, students are assigned an advisor within the department who
    will monitor their progress throughout their academic careers. All students are
    encouraged to meet with their advisor at least twice per year. However, many
    students feel capable of making course selections without an advisor and only seek
    guidance when they need help. The advisors have the option of blocking registration
    to force the student to see his or her advisor. This is routinely done when a student is
    having academic difficulty.

    Advising duties are evenly divided among all the faculty (CS and Math). Advisors

                                                   xi
    provide copies of the requirements, requirement checklists, and flow charts to the
    student. They also perform degree audits as mentioned above. The department
    faculty are known to be approachable, and students regularly stop in faculty offices
    for career advice. The department advertises job opportunities, including co-ops, by
    inviting recruiters to classes, posting notices in the halls, and sending email notices to
    all majors. The department has a close working relationship with Career Services
    and is actively involved with securing employment opportunities for its students.




E. Access to Qualified Advising


When students need to make course decisions and career choices, what is their procedure
for obtaining advising? Do they have adequate access to qualified professionals when
necessary?

    All students have access to qualified advising. All departmental faculty are well
    versed in the undergraduate courses and can assist a student in course decisions. If
    more information is desired regarding a class or special circumstances regarding a
    class, the advisor will direct the student to the course instructor. Advisors also know
    the areas of expertise of each faculty member and can direct students to these
    individuals for consultation in career paths. Many faculty members are involved
    with industry collaborations and thus can provide in-depth information regarding
    careers with industry. The Career Services office is available to provide advice to
    students, workshops in resume writing, interview skills, and other topics relevant to
    finding employment. For more information about career planning services available
    to all students see http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/sdsmt/careerplanning.

    Each semester, the Office of Academic and Enrollment Services provides training for
    advisors. This training includes updates on Board of Regents and university general
    education requirements, policies and procedures, placement and proficiency testing,
    course changes, and new services available for students.



Standard II-5. There must be established standards and procedures to ensure that graduates meet the
requirements of the program.

F. Meeting the Requirements
Describe your standards and procedures for ensuring that graduates have met all of the
requirements of the program.

    All advisors have access to student transcripts and degree audits. Students must meet
    with their advisor in the senior year to conduct a degree audit. The electronic degree
    audit makes it possible for students and advisors to monitor the student‘s progress
    throughout his or her career and prevents unpleasant surprises in the student‘s final

                                                    xii
semester. It also provides an additional progress check for students when they are
selecting courses. When the student is ready to graduate, advisors perform a final
degree check and send the results to Academic and Enrollment Services (AES). At
AES, the degree check is verified using a checklist provided by the department, the
college catalog, and campus policy documents. The student‘s name is then
forwarded to the Degrees Committee. If the Degrees Committee approves, the
student‘s name goes to the faculty senate for final approval.




                                       xiii
                                                 Frequency of Course Offerings
                                      Fall 07          Spring 07        Fall 06        Spring 06      Fall 05

Required CS   Title                   Professor(s)     Professor(s)     Professor(s)   Professor(s)   Professor(s)
CS 150        CS 1                    Manes (2)        Manes (3)        Manes (3)      Manes          Logar
                                      McGough                           Weiss          Logar          Schrader
                                      Logar                                            Schrader       Manes (2)
CS 250        CS 2                    Schrader (2)     Schrader         Schrader (2)   Schrader       Schrader (2)
CS 251        Discrete Math           Logar            Logar            Logar          Logar          Logar
CS 300        Data Structures         Weiss            Logar/Schrader   Logar          Weiss          Weiss
CS 314        Assembly                Wei              Opp              Opp                           Opp
CS 317        COA                                      Penaloza                        Penaloza
CS 372        Algorithms              Corwin                            Corwin                        Corwin
CS 440        Adv. Digital            Wei                               Wei                           Carda
CS 456        Operating Systems       Corwin           Wei              McGough        Corwin         Corwin
CS 461        Programming Lang.                        Penaloza                        Penaloza
CS 465        Senior Design                            Wei                             Hansen
CS 470        Software Engineering    TBA                               McGough                       Hansen
CS 484        Database                Penaloza                          Wei                           Penaloza

Electives
CS 410        Parallel                                 McGough
CS 421        GUI                                                       Weiss
CS 433        Graphics                                                                 Weiss
CS 445        Theory of Computation                                     Corwin
CS 447        AI                                       Weiss
CS 448        Machine Learning        McGough                                                         McGough
CS 463        Data Comm.                                                               Carda
CS 464        Image Processing        Weiss                                                           Weiss
CS 492        Cryptography                             Corwin
Math 471      Numerical Analysis                       Riley

Math
MATH 441                                               Johnson                         Johnson
MATH 442                                               Johnson                         Johnson




                                                                   14
        III.     Faculty

Intent: Faculty members are current and active in the discipline and have the necessary technical breadth and depth to support a
modern computer science program. There are enough faculty members to provide continuity and stability, to cover the curriculum
reasonably, and to allow an appropriate mix of teaching and scholarly activity.

If different programs have different faculty members, please identify which faculty members are associated with which program(s),
and the percentage of time allotted, if they are associated with more than one.

Standard III-1. There must be enough full-time faculty members with primary commitment to the program to provide continuity and stability.

A. Faculty Size

The purpose of this section is to determine whether you have sufficient faculty to offer courses often enough for students to complete
the program in a timely manner.

In Section II you gave the course numbers of courses required for the major which are offered less frequently than once per year, and
those allowed for the major but not required, and explained how it is determined when they will be offered. Explain (if applicable) any
difficulties you have offering required or optional courses frequently enough, particularly as they might be affected by faculty size.


    The department is able to offer all required courses at least once each year, with many courses offered each semester. Electives
    are offered on a stable two-year rotation, and students have at least two elective options each semester. The size of the faculty is
    adequate to maintain this schedule of offerings.



B. Faculty with Primary Commitment

1. Indicate the number of faculty with primary commitment to the program, that is, who regularly teach courses in the computer
science segment of the program: 8.5 .




                                                                           15
The purpose of the next question is to ascertain the continuity and stability provided by the faculty with primary commitment to the
program.

2. Please list below the number (FTE) of faculty with primary commitment to the program in each academic rank, broken down within
rank by tenure status.



                     Full                    Associate Professor Assistant Professor     Instructor or                Other
                     Professor                                                           Lecturer                     Faculty
Tenured                          4                    1
Untenured                                                                   1                            2                   0.5


                                                         Rank                           Tenure status                Effort in CS
Ed Corwin                                             Professor                            tenured                      100%
Antonette Logar                                       Professor                            tenured                      100%
Val Manes                                             Instructor                       not tenure track                 100%
Jeff McGough                                      Associate Professor                      tenured                      100%
Roger Opp                                         Emeritus Professor                                                     50%
Manuel Penaloza                                       Professor                            tenured                      100%
Roger Schrader                                        Instructor                       not tenure track                 100%
Jianbin Wei                                       Assistant Professor                    tenure track                   100%
John Weiss                                            Professor                            tenured                      100%




                                                                  16
Standard III-2. Full-time faculty members must oversee all course work.

Standard III-3. Full-time faculty members must cover most of the total classroom instruction.


C. Faculty Oversight

Full-time faculty must oversee all computer science course work allowed towards the major. That means each course must be either
taught or coordinated by a full-time faculty member with primary commitment to the program. For those courses with sections not
taught by full-time faculty during the last or current academic year, list the course numbers below and the name of the full-time
faculty coordinator. (The last academic year is the academic year prior to the year in which this report is prepared.)

                    Dept Course #                                                                Full-time Faculty Coordinator
CSC 150 C++ Programming                                                         Mr. Val Manes / Dr. Antonette Logar


All courses above CSC 150 are taught exclusively by full-time faculty with the exception of CSC 314, Assembly Language, taught by
Emeritus Professor Roger Opp. CSC 150, the first course in C++ programming, is taken by a large number of students from other
disciplines on campus. Multiple lecture sections (3 or 4) and multiple lab sections (6 to 8) are required to meet this demand. Creation
of the syllabus, content, exams, and management of that course are assigned to a full-time faculty member. In addition, at least one
lecture section is taught by a full-time faculty member. Graduate teaching assistants teach the labs and occasionally, if a graduate
student is available with excellent classroom skills, teach one of the lecture sections.


Standard III-4. The interests and qualifications of the faculty members must be sufficient to teach the courses and to plan and modify
the courses and curriculum.




                                                                               17
Standard III-5. All faculty members must remain current in the discipline.

Standard III-6. All faculty members must have a level of competence that would normally be obtained through graduate work in computer science.

Standard III-7. Some full-time faculty members must have a PhD in Computer Science.


D. Interests, Qualifications, and Scholarly Contributions

The Criteria states that the interests, qualifications, and scholarly contributions of the faculty must be sufficient to teach the courses,
plan and modify the courses and curriculum, and to remain abreast of current developments in computer science. This information
should be contained in the faculty vitas attached to this report and need not be repeated here. A sample vita questionnaire is attached
in Section G below. Although it is not necessary to follow this format, it is important that whatever format is followed contain all the
information asked for. And, to make things easier for the visiting team, please see that all faculty vitas are in the same format,
whichever format is used.



All full-time computer science faculty hold an advanced degree in computer science or a closely related field. Three hold a Ph.D. in
Computer Science, one a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering, and one a Ph.D. in Mathematics with an emphasis on Computational
Mathematics. Val Manes has significant experience as a developer from his own business and from the Air Force in addition to the
M.S. in Computer Science. Roger Schrader has significant experience in system administration and consulting in addition to his M.S.
in Computer Science. Dr. Weiss has 26 years of experience, including consulting and extensive research activity, in addition to an
M.S. in Computer Science and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry.




                                                                             18
                                                                   Degree                                                   Year
Ed Corwin                                         Ph.D. Computer Science / Ph.D. Mathematics                             1995 / 1977
Antonette Logar                                            Ph.D. Computer Science                                           1992
Val Manes                                                  M.S. Computer Science                                            2001
Jeff McGough                                                 Ph.D. Mathematics                                              1993
Roger Opp                                                     M.S. Mathematics                                              1965
Manuel Penaloza                                            Ph.D. Computer Science                                           1989
Roger Schrader                                             M.S. Computer Science                                            1999
Jianbin Wei                                              Ph.D. Computer Engineering                                         2006
John Weiss                                        M.S. Computer Science/ Ph.D. Biochemistry                              1984 / 1980

This is an appropriate place to insert a description of general departmental or institutional activities that promote faculty currency, if
such exist.


   Departmental activities that promote currency:
      The department has strong industrial relationships. These relationships include research activities on campus, feedback from
       our industrial advisory council every two years, meetings with recruiters, and invited speakers. These interactions serve to
       keep the department abreast of developments in industry.
      The department has an established colloquium series which provides a forum for learning about advances in the field. Faculty
       and students are encouraged to participate, and outside speakers are actively recruited.
      The department maintains a departmental library of books and periodicals for reference by faculty and students.
      The department engages in an on-going self-assessment process concerning the incorporation of new material into the
       curriculum.

Scholarly activity is required for all faculty appointments. Faculty are encouraged to attend conferences and present the results of
scholarly activity. Department funds are allocated to support this activity. Faculty summarize their accomplishments each year as
part of an annual review process. This summary is reviewed by the department chair, and the faculty members receive feedback as to



                                                                   19
the sufficiency of their participation in scholarly activity.




Standard III-8. All full-time faculty members must have sufficient time for scholarly activities and professional development.


E. Scholarly Activities

Describe the means for ensuring that all full-time faculty members have sufficient time for scholarly activities and professional
development.


    Faculty in Computer Science generally teach two courses per semester, or at most two preparations. This teaching load is in
    recognition of the time required for scholarly pursuits and for keeping current in the field.




Standard III-9. Advising duties must be a recognized part of faculty members‘ workloads.


F. Support for Advising

Advising duties must be a recognized part of faculty members‘ workloads, which means that faculty with large numbers of advisees
must be granted released time. Explain your advising system and how the time for these duties is credited.




                                                                                20
   Every year, an attempt is made to distribute the advising duties uniformly across the department. Some advising loads are larger
   than average if that faculty member has a specialty area. In particular, one faculty member is responsible for transfer students to
   ensure that course equivalency evaluations are handled consistently. Another faculty member specializes in double majors in
   Math and Computer Science. Still another is responsible for the academic advising of all graduate students. In addition to the
   eight faculty members dedicated to the computer science program, ten additional faculty members with primary commitment to
   the mathematics program assist with advising. They also provide advising for the 45 mathematics majors. Thus, the
   approximately 100 undergraduate computer science majors are apportioned to 17 faculty members and the 15 graduate students
   receive academic advising from the graduate program coordinator. As a result, no single advisor has a substantial advising load,
   and release time is not necessary. However, advising is an important part of a faculty member‘s responsibilities and is a separate
   category within the annual performance review. The faculty in the department of Mathematics and Computer Science are widely
   regarded as excellent advisors.



G. Information Regarding Faculty Members

On separate pages, please furnish the following information for all faculty members that teach courses allowed for the major,
including those who have administrative positions in the department (chair, associate chair, etc.). Use the form given below as
guidance. This form need not be followed exactly, but all requested information should be supplied. Please use a common format for
all vitas. Please limit information to no more than three pages per person, if at all possible. Please place the form(s) for
administrator(s) first, followed by the others in alphabetical order.




                                                                  21
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Edward Corwin, Professor, Tenured



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

    Associate Professor, 8/81
    Professor, 8/87



3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field           Institution                                     Date
                       B. S.      Math            Lehigh University                               1974
                       M. S.      Math            Lehigh University                               1975
                       Ph. D.     Math            Lehigh University                               1977
                       M. S.      Comp Sci        Texas Tech University                           1992
                       Ph. D.     Comp Sci        Texas Tech University                           1995


4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.




                                                                  22
 Not applicable




5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

 This is a sample of conferences and workshops from different areas in the past 5 years:
 1. TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) Annual Conference, Orlando,
 February, 2007
 2. TWI (The Welding Institute) Annual Conference, Montreal, October, 2006
 3. Tablet PC/DyKnow/OneNote/Maple Workshops, Spring and Summer 2006
 4. ABET/CAC Evaluator Training (2000 and 2004)
 5. Ethics in Computing Workshop, September 2005
 6. Rocky Mountain Small College Computing Symposium, Orem, Utah, October 2004.
 7. Numerous on-campus colloquia




                                                                  23
6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

        Lecturer in Department of Computer Science at Texas Tech University
        Fall 1989 - Fall 1991
        Duties: teach data structures and analysis of algorithms

        Instructor in Computer Science for the University of Maryland‘s European Division
        Fall 1988 - Spring 1989
        Duties: teach computer science courses including data structures, operating systems,
        database design, BASIC, assembly language, C

        Software Engineer for ETA Systems (St. Paul, Minnesota)
        Summer 1984, July 1985-July 1986, Summer 1987 (on leave from SDSM&T)
        Duties: Design and implementation of parallel operating systems software

        Assistant Professor in Division of Natural Science at Indiana University Southeast
        Fall 1978 - Spring 1981
        Duties: teach computer science and mathematics.

        Software Engineer for the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, Pennsylvania.
        Contract through Computer Sciences Corporation.
        Fall 1977 - Spring 1978
        Duties: design and implementation of operating systems and numerical software

7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

        Consultant for Comuniq, Inc.
        Summer 2000 – Spring 2002
        Duties include design and implementation of digital signal processing software.




                                                                 24
        Sun Microsystems, 1999 – Spring 2001
        Tools for high performance computing



8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.

 Enkhsaikhan Boldsaikhan, Edward Corwin, Antonette Logar, Jeff McGough, and William
 Arbegast, ―Phase Space Analysis of Friction Stir Weld Quality‖, TMS 2007: Linking Science
 and Technology for Global Solutions (annual meeting of The Minerals, Metals, & Materials
 Society), Orlando, February, 2007.

 Antonette Logar, Edward Corwin, Enkhsaikhan Boldsaikhan, Daniel Woodward, and William
 Arbegast, ―Real-time Classification of Friction Stir Weld Quality‖, TMS 2007: Linking
 Science and Technology for Global Solutions (annual meeting of The Minerals, Metals, &
 Materials Society), Orlando, February, 2007.

 Antonette Logar, Edward Corwin, Enkhsaikhan Boldsaikhan, Daniel Woodward, and William
 Arbegast, ―Applications of Artificial Intelligence to Friction Stir Welding‖, National
 Conference on Recent Advancement in Information technology, Coimbatore, India, February,
 2007.

 Edward Corwin, Antonette Logar, Troy McVay, and Nathan Sachs, ―An Overview of Satellite
 Image Processing Research at SDSM&T‖, National Conference on Recent Advancement in
 Information technology, Coimbatore, India, February, 2007.

 E. Boldsaikhan, E. Corwin, A. Logar, and W. Arbegast, ―Neural Network Evaluation of Weld
 Quality using FSW Feedback Data‖, International Symposium on Friction Stir Welding, TWI –
 the Welding Institute, Montreal, Canada, October, 2006.

 Edward Corwin & Antonette Logar, ―Sorting in Linear Time – Variations on the Bucket Sort‖




                                                                   25
 – Rocky Mountain Consortium for Computing at Small Colleges, October 2004.

 Antonette Logar & Edward Corwin, ―Counting Using Finite State Automata‖, Rocky Mountain
 Consortium for Computing at Small Colleges, October 2004.



9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 Grant activity has concentrated on the friction stir welding project and proposals under the
 umbrella of the Center for Advanced Materials Processing. Two graduate students, one
 undergraduate student, and two faculty have been supported on this effort. Funded 2005, 2006,
 2007.

 Patent application submitted as follows on November 16, 2006 :
 Title of Invention : Friction Stir Processing evaluation and control using phase space analysis
 of welding process feedback . Includes a significant piece of software for non-destructive
 testing of weld quality.




                                                                   26
10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                                                                                 Semester   Class
                     Term/year    Course number                    Course title                    hrs      size
                     Fall 2005    CSC 372           Analysis of Algorithms                          3        19
                     Fall 2005    CSC 456           Operating Systems                               4        19
                     Spr 2006     CSC 456           Operating Systems                               4        13
                     Spr 2006     CSC 762           Neural Networks                                 3        11
                     Fall 2006    CSC 372           Analysis of Algorithms                          3        15
                     Fall 2006    CSC 545           Theory of Computation                           3        15
                     Spr 2007     MATH 225          Calculus 3                                      4        19
                     Spr 2007     CSC 492           Cryptography                                    3        15



11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

       Programming team coach. I do this on a volunteer basis but it is the equivalent of an additional course in the fall. We took
       teams to the World Finals in 2006 and 2004.

       Putnam team coach. This is a much lighter load involving only a couple of hours a week for the month of November.

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:     20

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:    20 %. Please give a brief description of
    your major research and scholarly activities:




                                                                  27
 Major research work currently relates to analysis and control algorithms for friction stir
 welding.


14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:   %. Percentage of this time allocated to
    the computer science program being evaluated:        %.




                                                                  28
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Dr. Antonette M. Logar, Professor, Tenured



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 Assistant Professor 8/86
 Associate Professor 8/95
 Professor 8/00


3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field           Institution                                     Date
                       B.S.       Geology         Lehigh University                               1978
                       J.D.       Law             University of Louisville                        1982
                       B.S.       CS              SDSM&T                                          1985
                       M.S.       CS              University of Minnesota                         1986
                       Ph.D.      CS              Texas Tech University                           1992


4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.




                                                                   29
 Not applicable




5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

 This is a sample of conferences and workshops from different areas in the past 5 years :
 1. TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) Annual Conference, Orlando,
 February 26 – March 1, 2007
 2. TWI (The Welding Institute) Annual Conference, Montreal, October, 2006
 3. Tablet PC/DyKnow/OneNote/Maple Workshops, Spring and Summer 2006
 4. ABET Commissioner Training, July 2005
 5. Ethics in Computing Workshop, September 2005
 6. Microsoft .Net Training Seminar, March 1 and 2, SDSM&T, 2004
 7. Rocky Mountain Small College Computing Symposium, Orem, Utah, October 2004.
 8. Using Foundation Coalition Modules to Address Key ABET a-k Outcomes, May 2003
 9. University Accountability : Content and Pedagogy, August 2003
 10. Numerous on-campus colloquia



6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)




                                                                 30
        Raytheon / EROS Data Center, 1999 – 2001
        Duties : develop satellite data processing software

        Sun Microsystems, 1999 – Spring 2001
        Duties : Tools for high performance computing – project manager

        Researcher at NASA Global Hydrology and Climate Center, Huntsville,
        Alabama, 1998
        Duties : develop satellite imagery pattern recognition software

        Instructor in Computer Science for the University of Maryland‘s European Division
        Fall 1988 - Spring 1989
        Duties: teach computer science courses including CS1, CS2, programming languages,
        and various computer training courses.

        Software Engineer for ETA Systems (St. Paul, Minnesota)
        July 1985-July 1986, Summer 1986, 1987 (on leave from SDSM&T)
        Duties: Compiler team, Tools team


7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

 Council for the Advancement of Standards – CD development 2002-2004
 Web Master, Black Hills Symphony 2000 - 2006



8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.




                                                                   31
1. E. Boldsaikhan, E. Corwin, A. Logar, ―Phase Space Analysis of Friction Stir Weld
Quality‖, Friction Stir Welding and Processing IV, Edited by R.S. Mishra, et al, TMS (The
Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2007.

2. Antonette Logar, Edward Corwin, Enkhsaikhan Boldsaikhan, Daniel Woodward, and
William Arbegast, ―Real-time Classification of Friction Stir Weld Quality‖, Friction Stir
Welding and Processing IV, Edited by R.S. Mishra, et al, TMS (The Minerals, Metals &
Materials Society), 2007.
3. Karl A. Lalonde and Antonette M. Logar, ―Clustering and Analysis of Remotely-Sensed
Imagery using the Growing Neural Gas Pattern Recognition Algorithm‖, National
Conference on Recent Advancement in Information technology, Coimbatore, India,
February, 2007.
4. Antonette Logar, Edward Corwin, Enkhsaikhan Boldsaikhan, Daniel Woodward, and
William Arbegast, ―Applications of Artificial Intelligence to Friction Stir Welding‖,
National Conference on Recent Advancement in Information technology, Coimbatore,
India, February, 2007.
5. Edward Corwin, Antonette Logar, Troy McVay, and Nathan Sachs, ―An Overview of
Satellite Image Processing Research at SDSM&T‖, National Conference on Recent
Advancement in Information technology, Coimbatore, India, February, 2007.
6. E. Boldsaikhan, E. Corwin, A. Logar, and W. Arbegast, ―Neural Network Evaluation of
Weld Quality using FSW Feedback Data‖, Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium
on Friction Stir Welding, TWI – the Welding Institute, Montreal, Canada, October, 2006.
7. Edward Corwin & Antonette Logar , ―Sorting in Linear Time – Variations on the Bucket
Sort‖, Rocky Mountain Consortium for Computing at Small Colleges, October 2004.
8. Antonette Logar & Edward Corwin, "Counting Using Finite State Automata", Rocky
Mountain Consortium for Computing at Small Colleges, October 2004. Material from this
research has already been incorporated into CSC 251.




                                                           32
9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 Grant activity has concentrated on the friction stir welding project and proposals under the
 umbrella of the Center for Advanced Materials Processing. Two graduate students, one
 undergraduate student, and two faculty have been supported on this effort. Funded 2005, 2006,
 2007.

 Patent application submitted as follows on November 16, 2006 :
 Title of Invention : Friction Stir Processing evaluation and control using phase space analysis
 of welding process feedback . Includes a significant piece of software for non-destructive
 testing of weld quality.




                                                                   33
10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
    prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
    Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                       Course                                                     Semester    Class
                        Term/year      number                      Course title                     hrs        size
                       Spring 2007    CSC 251       Discrete Mathematics                          4           25
                       Spring 2007    CSC 300       Data Structures                               4           20
                       Spring 2007    CSC 691       Independent Study                             2           3
                       Spring 2007    CSC 791       Independent Study                             3           1
                       Spring 2007    CSC 798       Thesis Research                               3           1

                       Fall 2006      CSC 251       Discrete Mathematics                          4           34
                       Fall 2006      CSC 300       Data Structures                               4           15

                       Spring 2006    CSC 150       Computer Science I                            3           19
                       Spring 2006    CSC 251       Discrete Mathematics                          3           19
                       Spring 2006    CSC 491       Independent Study – Neural Networks           3           2

                       Fall 2005      CSC 150       Computer Science I                            3           16
                       Fall 2005      CSC 251       Discrete Mathematics                          4           36




11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.
       I perform a significant amount of service for the department and the university. The three most time-consuming activities are :
               1. Graduate program coordinator
               2. Assessment activities, such as HLC, ABET and others



                                                                    34
              3. Programming team coach. I do this on a volunteer basis but it is the equivalent of an additional course in the fall.
              We took teams to the World Finals in 2006 and 2004.
       Although I do not officially receive release time for these activities, the department always gives me a somewhat lighter course
       schedule to allow me to participate in these activities.

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor: 15
      I serve as academic advisor to all of the graduate students.

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:     20   %. Please give a brief description of
    your major research and scholarly activities:

 Major research area : pattern recognition and neural networks.
 Primary application area : Friction stir welding. This new welding process presents two
    significant challenges (1) non-destructive testing to certify a weld as valid for mission
    critical areas such as aerospace. My current research uses neural networks to detect flaws in
    existing welds by processing the machine feedback signals. This is essentially a pattern
    recognition problem. (2) control of the welding machine to adapt during welding to improve
    weld quality.      The current approach uses the phase space properties of the welding
    feedback to establish the existence of ―stability‖. The hypothesis currently being tested is
    that the degree of stability is highly correlated to the quality of the weld being made. This
    should provide a control mechanism that is fast enough to operate in a real-time
    environment. This work is done in conjunction with the AMP Center – the Advanced
    Materials Processing Center and funded by an NSF IUCRC program.
 Secondary area of application : satellite image processing. Again, this is essentially pattern
    recognition research aimed at finding particular scene elements in satellite imagery. This
    work has been funded in the past by NASA and by EROS data center. No funding is
    available at the moment but proposals for additional funding are pending.

14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:         %. Percentage of this time allocated
    to the computer science program being evaluated:          %.




                                                                  35
36
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Val N. Manes, Instructor, Nontenured


2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 Instructor, 9/01



3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field           Institution                                     Date
                       A.A.S.     Instructor in   Community College of the Air Force              1987
                                  Technology
                       B. A.      Comp Sci        University of Maryland, European Division       1989
                       M. S.      Comp Sci        South Dakota School of Mines and Technology     2001
                       Degree     Field           Institution                                     Date


4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.

 Not applicable




                                                                  37
5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

        Information Assurance Workshop, July 2002, Iowa State University, IA (2002)
        Microsoft DevDays 2004, March 2004 Minneapolis, MN (2004)
        Information Assurance and Computer Security Symposium, January 2005, Dakota State
        University (2005)
        Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges Conference, October 2005,
        Metropolitan State College of Denver, CO (2005)




6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

 Development, marketing and customer support of self-published software. The BeadWizard
 program is a graphical application for designing beadwork, incorporating drawing tools and
 image conversion capabilities.

7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

 Black Hills Railway Society Web Master, 1999 – present
 M.E.A.L.S Program Web Master, 2006 – present


8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.

 Manes, V. (2003). Visual C++.NET 2003 Tutorial. Thomson-Course Technology. Boston




                                                                   38
9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 Developed two graphical demonstration programs to illustrate C++ memory allocation
 concepts.


10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                   Course                                                         Semester   Class
                     Term/year     number                        Course title                       hrs      size
                     Sp 2007      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        15
                     Sp 2007      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        30
                     Sp 2007      CSC 105      Introduction to Computers                             3        17
                     Fa 2006      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        12
                     Fa 2006      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        28
                     Fa 2006      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        18
                     Sp 2006      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        23
                     Sp 2006      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        28
                     Sp 2006      CSC 105      Introduction to Computers                             3        14
                     Fa 2005      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        33
                     Fa 2005      CSC 150      Computer Science I                                    3        20
                     Fa 2005      CSC 105      Introduction to Computers                             3        18



11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.




                                                                   39
       Coordinator for CSC 150, Computer Science I, 4 hours per week

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:        3

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:     5 %.   Please give a brief description of
    your major research and scholarly activities:

 Pedagogical applications of laptop and tablet PCs in the computer science classroom.



14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:      %. Percentage of this time allocated
    to the computer science program being evaluated:      100 %.




                                                                  40
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Jeff Scot McGough, Associate Professor, Tenured



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 Appointment: 8/98, promotion to associate professor: 6/04, tenure: 6/05




3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                        Degree               Field            Institution                     Date
                        BS                   Mathematics      University of Utah              1985
                        BS                   Anthropology     University of Utah              1985
                        Ph.D.                Mathematics      University of Utah              1993


4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.

    Postdoctoral Fellowship in Scientific Computing,
       Center for Scientific Computing, University of Utah, 1993-94.




                                                                 41
5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

 Feb 2007, India, Grammatical Evolution – Video. Introduction to Genetic Programming and
 Grammatical Evolution tutorial.

 April 2005, A Numerical Approach to the Pohozaev Identity. Mississippi State Conference on
 Differential Equations and Computational Simulations. Application of Genetic Algorithms to
 problems in pure mathematics.

 Jan 2004, Domain Geometry and the Pohozaev Identity. AMS-MAA-SIAM National Meeting.
 Computational geometry and differential equations.
 April 2003, MICS (Midwest Instructional Computing Conference). Papers on parallel
 algorithms.



6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

 1999 - 2003: SunTech Collaboration Member,
 SunTech: Sun Microsystems and SDSMT Collaboration,
 SunTech projects: Parallel/High Performance Computing Tools,
 Duties: Project Lead for 3 projects.
 (Note, in the 1999-2000 academic year, SunTech was the largest Academic collaboration for
 Sun Microsystems world wide)


7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project




                                                                 42
 June 2000 - Sun Microsystems
  One month (on site) with the Performance Library Group on a suite of parallelization tools.
     This included some testing, documentation, etc.



8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.

 Symbolic Computation using Grammatical Evolution, Invited Paper: NATIONAL
 CONFERENCE ON RECENT ADVANCEMENT IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY,
 India, Feb 2007

 Domain Geometry and the Pohozaev Identity, Jeff McGough, Gregg Stubbendieck, Jeff
 Mortensen; Electronic Journal of Differential Equations. Vol. 2005, No. 32

 Apriori Bounds for reaction-diffusion systems arising in chemical and biological kinetics, J.
 McGough and K. Riley. Applied Mathematics & Computation 163 (2005) 1-16

 Finding Analytic Solutions to equations using genetic programming and predator prey
 dynamics. D. Rausch and J. McGough. March 2004 Midwest Instructional Computing
 Conference.

 Pattern formation in the Gray-Scott model, J. McGough and K. Riley. Nonlinear Analysis
 Real World Applications, Volume 5, pp. 105-121, February, 2004

 Scientific Computing Tool Ajaykumar Poondla, Haining Liu; Jeff McGough; MICS, Duluth,
 April 11--12, 2003 (in conference proceedings).

 Automatic Parallelization of Sequential C Code, Pete Gasper, Caleb Herbst, Jeff McGough,
 Chris Rickett, Gregg Stubbendieck, MICS Duluth, April 11--12, 2003 (in conference
 proceedings).



                                                                   43
 Hybrid Process Farm/Work Pool Implementation in a Distributed Environment using MPI.
 Nathan Sachs, Jeff McGough; MICS Duluth, April 11--12, 2003 (in conference proceedings).


9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 NASA SDSGC Program Initiation Grant: Interdisciplinary Robotics Initiative, $11,250,
 2007

 Sun MicroSystems Collaborative Research Award, Principle Investigator. Advanced Scientific
 Computing Toolkit . $92,000, 2002-2003

 Sun MicroSystems Collaborative Research Award, co-Principle Investigator. Sun Advanced
 Tool Set}. $450,000, 1999-2003

 NSF Award: A New On-Line Mathematics Testing, Remediation and Assessment Strategy for
 Engineering Majors, $22,238, DUE-9980687 2000 - 2002.


10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.


                       year/term   course number      course title                       credits No. of students
                       2005/F      Math 123           Calculus I                            4          30
                       2005/F      CSC 448            Machine Learning                      3          25
                       2006/S      Math 225           Calc III                              4          35
                       2006/S      Math 315           Linear Algebra                        4          30




                                                                   44
                       2006/S      CSC 789            Thesis research                       3              1
                       2006/F      Math 431           Dynamical Systems                     3             20
                       2006/F      CSC 456            Operating Systems                     3             20
                       2006/F      CSC 798            Thesis Research                       3              1
                       2007/S      Math 225           Calculus III                          4             30
                       2007/S      CSC 498            Undergraduate research                1              1
                       2007/S      CSC 798            Thesis Research                       3              3
                       2007/S      CSC410             Parallel Computing                    3             20



11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

   Transfer coordinator. I evaluate and approve all CS and Math course transfers for the department. This is a couple of hours per
   week with no compensation.

   Campus Library Committee
   State Information Technology Committee

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:        15

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:       20   %. Please give a brief description of
    your major research and scholarly activities:

    I have published in the areas of genetic programming, parallel computing, scientific
    computing, nonlinear analysis, partial differential equations, and mathematical
    modeling.. My current work involves evolutionary algorithms, robotics, parallel
    algorithms, parallelization tools, and computational geometry.




                                                                  45
14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:   %. Percentage of this time allocated
    to the computer science program being evaluated:      100 %.




                                                                  46
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Opp, Roger L.; Professor Emeritus; untenured



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 August, 1966

        1966-1970 - Assistant Professor
        1970-1981 - Associate Professor
        1981 – Professor
        2003-Present — Professor Emeritus, teaching assembly language


3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field           Institution                                     Date
                       B.S.       Second. Ed      Northern State College                          1962
                                  Math            Kansas University                               1962-63
                       M.S.       Math            SD School of Mines & Technology                 1965



4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.




                                                                 47
 Coursework at Kansas University (1963)
 Informal auditing of classes conducted by computer professionals
 Interest in, and development of, computer implementation of mathematical algorithms


5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science




6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

        Preparation of software for campus Keynote graphics terminals
        Development of TI software to simulate IBM turbo Pascal graphics
        Development of SUBMIT program for the Network


7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

        Institute of Atmospheric Sciences: Development of a SUN workstation            graphical
        display software for lightning data. (supervisor and chief architect using PHIGS graphic
        software)

        Black Hills Materials: Software development (gallons vs. depth, horizontal cylinder)

        Mikohn Gaming Corp.: Software development (cone from a disc minus a wedge)




                                                                 48
8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.

        Ground-Water Flow Direction in Anisotropic Media: West Virginia
              Geological and Economic Survey (co-authored with Dr. Perry Rahn)
              2004


9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.




10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.


                                Course                                                            Semester   Class
                     Term/year number                 Course title                                  hrs       size
                     Fall/2005 CSC 314 Assembly Language                                          4          19
                     Fall/2006 CSC 314 Assembly Language                                          4          20
                     Sp/2007   CSC 314 Assembly Language                                          4          18




                                                                   49
11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:   10   %. Please give a brief description of
    your major research and scholarly activities:

 I have been studying the literature pertaining to, and experimenting with, the MMX instructions
 for the Pentium processor.


14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:          49   %. Percentage of this time
    allocated to the computer science program being evaluated:  100 %.




                                                                  50
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Penaloza, Manuel L., Professor, Tenured



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 Assistant Professor, 1989
 Associate Professor, 1994
 Professor, 2001



3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field             Institution                                   Date
                       B.S.       Electrical Eng.   University of New Mexico                      1974
                                  & Comp Sci.
                       M.S.       Electrical Eng.   University of New Mexico                      1975
                                  & Comp Sci.
                       Ph.D.      Comp. Sci.        Arizona State University                      1989


4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.




                                                                  51
 Not applicable




5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

    Midwest Instruction and Computing Symposium, 2003 - 2006.
    International Conference on Computer Applications in Industry and Engineering, 1999-
     2002.
    ―Invisible Barriers: Racism and Discrimination,‖ March 8, 2006, SDSM&T.
    ―Computer Ethics Workshop,‖ presented by Dr. Marion Ben-Jacob, September 15, 2005,
     SDSM&T.
    Teaching EC2000: Integrating Student Outcomes a-k into Engineering Courses. November
     22, 2002, SDSM&T.
    ―Writing Effective Learning Objectives and Outcome Statements.‖ April 16, 2002,
     SDSM&T.
    ―Overview of the Assessment Process: What does it all mean?‖ April 16, 2002
    ―Using Action Research To Assess Teaching Practice and Student Learning.‖ April 9
     2002, SDSM&T.



6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

 2004       Supervisor of a student team developing a software application for Innovative
            Systems Inc., Mitchell, SD.
 2000-01    Sabbatical at the Rapid City Regional Hospital, Rapid City, SD. Implementation of
            a claims processing data warehouse for the hospital.



                                                               52
7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

 2001        Enhancements of the data warehousing project implemented during the sabbatical at
             the Rapid City Regional Hospital, Rapid City, SD.



8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.

    Manuel Penaloza. ―Attribute Discretization using a Seed Bit in a Genetic Algorithm.
     Invited Paper to National Conference on Recent Advancements in Information Technology
     (NCRAIT ‗07), Coimbatore, India, February 9-10, 2007.
    Michael Waldron and Manuel Penaloza. "Genetic Algorithms as a Data Discretization
     Method." 38th Annual Midwest Instruction and Computing Symposium, April 8-9, 2005,
     Eau Claire, Wisconsin.
    Shana Fliginger, James Tang and Manuel Penaloza. ―Integrating Educational Resources
     and Curricula through Interactive Software: A Community-based Case Study.‖
     Proceedings of the 36th Annual Midwest Instruction and Computer Symposium (MICS),
     Duluth, MN, April 11-12, 2003.
    Knut-Edvart Ellingsen and Manuel Penaloza. ―A Genetic Algorithm Approach for Finding
     a Good Course Schedule.‖ Proceedings of the 36th Annual Midwest Instruction and
     Computer Symposium (MICS), Duluth, MN, April 11-12, 2003.
    Manuel Penaloza and Wen Lin. ―Fixing Erroneous Staging Records in a Data Warehouse
     Application.‖ Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Applications
     in Industry and Engineering (CAINE-2002). November 7-9, 2002. San Diego, California,
     pp. 69-72.
    Manuel Penaloza. ―Implementation of a Data Warehouse for Claims Processing.‖



                                                                   53
     Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computers and Their Applications.
     April 4-7, 2002. San Francisco, California, pp. 39-42.
    Manuel Penaloza, A. Logar, J. Johnson, and M. Boucher. "A Java Unit and Integration
     Testing Tool." Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computers and Their
     Applications. March 27-30, 2001. Seattle, Washington, pp. 349-352.
    Manuel Penaloza, A. Logar, J. Johnson, and M. Boucher. "A Java Unit and Integration
     Testing Tool." Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computers and Their
     Applications. March 27-30, 2001. Seattle, Washington, pp. 349-352.


9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 2006      Manuel Penaloza. Proposal submitted to the NSF BPC Program, titled ―BPC DP -
           Exposing American Indian Students in an Urban Community to the Computing
           Disciplines.‖ Not funded
 2005      Manuel Penaloza, Brian Hemmelman, and Sid Goss: Proposal submitted to the NSF
           BPC Program, titled ―BPC A - Enhancing Diversity in the Computing Disciplines at
           SDSM&T.‖ Not funded.


10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                     Course                                                       Semester   Class
                      Term/year      number                       Course title                      hrs      size




                                                                   54
                     Fall 2005     CSC 484      Database Management Systems                         3        16
                     Fall 2005     CSC 784      Database Design                                     3        15
                     Spr. 2006     CSC 461      Programming Languages                               3        13
                     Spr. 2006     CSC 317      Computer Organization and Architecture              4        18
                     Spr. 2006     CP 297       Cooperative Education                               3         1
                     Spr. 2006     TM-788       Master‘s Research Project                           3         1
                     Sum. 2006     CP 497       Cooperative Education                               3         1
                     Fall 2006     CP 497       Cooperative Education                               3         1
                     Fall 2006     CSC 484      Database Management Systems                         3        14
                     Fall 2006     CSC 772      Advanced Operating Systems                          3         6
                     Spr. 2007     CSC 317      Computer Organization and Architecture              4        12
                     Spr. 2007     CSC 461      Programming Languages                               4        19
                     Spr. 2007     CSC 788      Master‘s Research Project                           2         1


11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

          SQL Server Co-administrator                          0.5hr/wh
          Undergraduate advisor                                1hr/wk
          Co-Op coordinator and grading student reports        1hr/wk
          Committee assignments                                4hr/wk
          Other department duties                              1hr/wk
          Supervising Independent and Non-thesis students      1hr/wk

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:        5

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:   20   %. Please give a brief description of
    your major research and scholarly activities:




                                                                  55
 See 7, 9 and 10 above.



14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:   %. Percentage of this time
    allocated to the computer science program being evaluated:  100 %.




                                                              56
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Roger L. Schrader, Instructor, Non-tenure



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 Instructor, 7/99




3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree Field                 Institution                                   Date
                       B.S.   Interdisciplinary     SD School of Mines and Technology             1996
                              Science
                       M.S.   Computer              SD School of Mines and Technology             1999
                              Science




4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.




                                                                 57
 Not Applicable




5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

 Technology for Teaching and Learning 549 (2002)
 Technology for Teaching and Learning 547 (2003)
 Remote Installation Services (2003)
 Microsoft Dot Net Introduction (2004)
 Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges (2006)
 Midwest Instruction and Computing Symposium (2007)
 Micro Based System Design (2007)


6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

 Technology for Teaching and Learning 545(Summer 2002)
 Duties: Design and Lecture on upgrading from windows NT 4.0 to Windows 2K, included
 migration, security, backups, and user profiles.
 Technology for Teaching and Learning 549 (Summer 2003)
 Duties: Design and Lecture on Microsoft‘s Internet Information Server and Multimedia,
 included setup and security.

7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project




                                                                 58
       All Cats and Dogs Hospital – System administration for servers and workstations.
       Continental Service Incorporation – Software integration and System administration.



     8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.

       Most of my publications have been in the form of software and accompanying documentation.
       Foundation of Coaching – Web based search of MSWord and PDF documents.
       CD-Rom Application for the Council for the Advancement of Standards.
Penaloza and Schrader, ―An Extended Minute Paper Assessment Tool‖, submitted to the 18th
       International Conference on Computers and Their Applications, March 2003.


     9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

       Automated Class Exercise Grader
       Web Based Administration Suite
       Beowulf Cluster Process Monitor
       Remote installation for Linux

     10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
     prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
     Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                         Course                                                        Semester   Class
                          Term/year     number                      Course title                         hrs       size
                          Fall 2005     CSC150      Computer Science I                                 3          28
                          Fall 2005     CSC250      Computer Science II                                4          36




                                                                        59
                     Sprg 2006    CSC150      Computer Science I                                3            29
                     Sprg 2006    CSC250      Computer Science II                               4            23
                     Fall 2006    CSC250      Computer Science II                               4            20
                     Fall 2006    CSC250      Computer Science II                               4            17
                     Sprg 2007    CSC250      Computer Science II                               4            27
                     Sprg 2007    CSC291      Independent Studies                               1            2




11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:        9

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:     10     %. Please give a brief description
    of your major research and scholarly activities:

 Linux, Solaris and windows Security.
 Multimedia formats and streaming.


14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:         %. Percentage of this time allocated
    to the computer science program being evaluated:          %.

       Note: I am a full-time faculty member in the Math and Computer Science Department with one third release time for system
       administration.




                                                                  60
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Jianbin Wei, Assistant Professor, tenure-track



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 Assistant Professor, 8/2006




3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field           Institution                                     Date
                       B. S.      Comp Sci        Huazhong University of Sci and Tech, China      1997
                       M. S.      Comp Engg       Wayne State University                          2003
                       Ph. D.     Comp Engg       Wayne State University                          2006



4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.

 Not applicable




                                                                  61
5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science

 IEEE International Parallel & Distributed Processing Symposium
 USENIX Annual Technical Conference (2006)
 IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference (2005)
 IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference (2004)
 IEEE Intl. Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (2003)
 IEEE Int. Conference on Distributed Computing Systems (2003)



6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)

        Not applicable



7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

        Not applicable




8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.




                                                                   62
J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―eQoS: Provisioning of client-perceived end-to-end
QoS guarantees in Web servers‖. IEEE Transactions on Computers. 2006.

J. Wei, X. Zhou, and C.Z. Xu. ―Robust processing rate allocation for proportional
slowdown differentiation on Internet servers‖. IEEE Transactions on Computers, 2005.

J.Wei, C.Z. Xu, X. Zhou, and Q. Li. ―A Robust Packet Scheduling Algorithm for
Proportional Delay Differentiation Services‖. Elsevier Computer Communications
Journal. 2006.

J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―Consistent Proportional Delay Differentiation: A Fuzzy Control
Approach‖. Elsevier Computer Networks Journal. 2007

J. Wei, C.Z. Xu, and X. Zhou. ―Load balancing on the Internet‖. Book chapter in The
Internet Encyclopedia, edited by Hossein Bidgoli, vol. 2, pp. 499–514, John Wiley &
Sons, 2004.

C.Z. Xu, J. Wei, and Bojin Liu. ―Model Predictive Feedback Control for End-to-End
QoS Guarantees inWeb Servers‖. IEEE Computer magazine. 2007

X. Zhou, J. Wei, and C.Z. Xu. ―Resource allocation for session-based two-dimensional
service differentiation on e-commerce servers‖. IEEE Transactions on Parallel and
Distributed Systems. 2006.

X. Zhou, J. Wei, and C.Z. Xu. ―Quality-of-service differentiation and adaptation on the
Internet: A taxonomy‖. Journal of Network & Computer Applications. 2006.

J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―sMonitor: A non-intrusive client-perceived end-to-end
performance monitor of secured Internet services‖. In Proceedings of USENIX Annual
Technical Conference, 2006.




                                                        63
J.Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―A self-tuning fuzzy control approach for end-to-end QoS
guarantees in Web servers‖. In Proceedings of IEEE International Workshop on Quality
of Service (IWQoS), 2005.

J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―Consistent proportional delay differentiation: A fuzzy control
approach‖. In Proceedings of IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference
(Globecom), 2005.

J. Wei, C.Z. Xu, and X. Zhou. ―A robust packet scheduling algorithm for proportional
delay differentiation services‖. In Proceedings of IEEE Global Telecommunications
Conference (Globecom), 2004.

J. Wei, Q. Li, and C.Z. Xu. ―Virtuallength: A new packet scheduling algorithm for
proportional delay differentiation‖. In Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on
Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN), 2003.

J. Wei, C.Z. Xu, and X. Zhou. ―An integrated feedback control approach for
proportional slowdown differentiation on Internet servers‖. In Proceedings of IEEE
Conference on E-Commerce Technology (CEC), 2005.

J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―Design and implementation of a feedback controller for slowdown
differentiation on Internet servers‖. In Proceedings of International World Wide Web
Conference (WWW), 2005.

J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―A rule-based approach for consistent proportional delay
differentiation‖. In Proceedings of IFIP Networking, 2005.

J. Wei and C.Z. Xu. ―Feedback control approaches for client-perceived response time
guarantees in Web servers‖. In Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the North American
Fuzzy Information Processing Society (NAFIPS), 2005.




                                                        64
        X. Zhou, J. Wei, and C.Z. Xu. ―Modeling and analysis of 2D service differentiation on
        e-commerce servers‖. In Proceedings of IEEE International
        Conference on Distributed Computing Systems (ICDCS), 2004.

        X. Zhou, Y. Cai, J. Wei, and C.Z. Xu. ―A Robust Application-level Approach for
        Responsiveness Differentiation‖. In Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on
        Web Services (ICWS), 2005.

        X. Zhong, C.Z. Xu, M. Xu, and J. Wei. ―Optimal time-variant resource allocation for
        Internet servers with delay constraints‖. In Proceedings of IEEE Real-Time and
        Embedded Technology and Applications Symposium (RTAS), 2005.

        X. Zhou, J. Wei, and C.Z. Xu. ―Processing rate allocation for proportional slowdown
        differentiation on Internet servers‖. In Proceedings of IEEE International Parallel and
        Distributed Processing Symposium (IPDPS), 2004.


9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 Not applicable



10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                Course                                                            Semester   Class
                     Term/year number                          Course title                         hrs      size
                     Fall 2006 CSC 470         Software Engineering                                  3        18




                                                                   65
                     Fall 2006    CSC 440     Advanced Digital Systems                              4         15
                     Spr 2007     CSC 465     Senior Design Project                                 3         15
                     Spr 2007     CSC 456     Operating Systems                                     4         19




11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

       Not applicable

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:        0

13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:     30    %. Please give a brief description
    of your major research and scholarly activities:

        Work on and submit papers to international conference
        Work on and submit proposals to NSF


14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:        %. Percentage of this time allocated
    to the computer science program being evaluated:       100 %.



                                                                  66
67
1. Name, current academic rank, and tenure status

 Dr. John M. Weiss, Ph.D.
 Professor of Computer Science (tenured)



2. Date of original appointment to this faculty, followed by dates and ranks of advancement

 8/07- present Professor of Computer Science
               South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
 8/91- 07/06 Associate Professor of Computer Science
               South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
 8/84-5/91     Assistant Professor of Computer Science
               Virginia Commonwealth University


3. Degrees with fields, institutions, and dates

                       Degree     Field                                    Institution             Date
                       M.S.       Computer Science                         Vanderbilt University   1984
                       Ph.D.      Biochemistry                             Vanderbilt University   1980
                       B.A.       Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry    Yale University         1974



4. If you do not have a formal degree in computer science, describe any course work you may have taken, or other ways in which you
   have achieved competence in computer science; there is no necessity to repeat information here which is contained in later
   sections of this document.




                                                                 68
5. Conferences, workshops, and professional development programs in which you have participated in the last 5 years to improve
teaching and professional competence in computer science




                                                              69
6. Other related computing experience including teaching, industrial, governmental, etc. (Where, when, description and scope of
   duties)




7. Consulting—list agencies and dates, and briefly describe each project

 2003-2005
 Research consultant, software developer, and graduate student supervisor with Realtronics, Inc.
 on ground-penetrating radar project.


8. Principal publications during the last five years. Give in standard bibliographic format.




                                                                   70
     J.Weiss, J. Devine, A.Detwiler, ―Automated Counting Of Water Droplets In Cloud Chamber
     Images‖, Proceedings of the ISCA 22th International Conference on Computers and Their
     Applications (ISCA CATA-2007), pp.207-212, Mar 2007.

     A.Gervasi, J.Weiss, B.Askildsen, S.Thompson, “Advances In Human Target Detection Using Opaque
     Material Penetrating Radar Data”, Proceedings of the ISCA 20th International Conference on Computers and
     Their Applications, pp.202-207, Mar 2005.

     J.Weiss, C.Hartsel, B.Askildsen, S.Thompson, “Artificial Neural Network-Based Human Target Detection
     Using Noninvasive Penetrating Radar Data”, Proceedings of the ISCA 19th International Conference on
     Computers and Their Applications, pp. 233-236, Mar 2004.

     J.Weiss and R.Kishore, ―Ridge Detection Using Artificial Neural Networks‖, Proceedings of
     the 12th International Conference on Intelligent and Adaptive Systems and Software
     Engineering (IASSE-2003), pp.132-135, Jul 2003.
J.Weiss, ―Grayscale Thinning and Ridge Detection‖, Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer
     Applications in Industry and Engineering (CAINE-2002), pp.107-110, Nov 2002.

     J.Weiss, ―Grayscale Thinning‖, Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computers
     and Their Applications (CATA-2002), pp.86-89, Apr 2002.




                                                                                71
9. Other scholarly activity during the last 5 years: grants, sabbaticals, software development, etc.

 Grants
 11/06-9/07     Algorithm design, software development, and student supervision on $755K
                U.S. Army Research Labs grant: ―UAV-Deployed Penetrating Radar for
                Through-The-Wall Sensing‖. Co-PI: Dr. Dan Dolan.

 10/06-9/07     Algorithm design, software development, and student supervision on $250K
                U.S. Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC)
                grant: ―Unmanned Aerial Vehicle‖. PI: Dr. Dan Dolan.

 5/05-4/06      Algorithm design, software development, and student supervision on $250K
                U.S. Army Research Labs grant: ―Unmanned Aerial Vehicle‖. PI: Dr. Dan
                Dolan.

 6/04-present   Co-PI on $75K NSF-CCLI grant: “Application of artificial intelligence to enhance student
                learning of metallography”.
 9/04-9/05      Co-PI on $200K U.S. Army Research Labs grant: “Signal Processing Of Electromagnetic
                Signatures to Support Mobile & Stationary Target Detection From A Dismount Portable
                Sensor”.
 6/03-12/03     Co-PI on $75K NSF SBIR grant: ―Isolating, Locating and Tracking Target
                Anomalies in Ultra-Wideband Sensor Data.‖

 Software
 1/00-1/02      Project lead and software engineer on $100K Raytheon/EROS Data
                Center/SDSM&T collaboration (MODIS Reprojection Tool project). This effort
                won the NASA Space Act Award in 2001.

 Sabbatical
 Spring 2005




                                                                       72
10. Courses taught this and last academic year term-by-term. This year is the academic year in which this Self-Study report is
prepared; the last year was the year prior to this. If you were on sabbatical leave, please enter the information for the previous year.
Please list each section of the same course separately.

                                      Course                                                       Semester   Class
                      Term/year       number                         Course title                    hrs      size
                     Spring 2007    CSC447/547      Artificial Intelligence
                     Spring 2007    BME732          Medical Imaging
                     Fall 2006      CSC150          Computer Science I
                     Fall 2006      CSC421/521      Graphical User Interfaces
                     Spring 2006    CSC300          Data Structures
                     Spring 2006    CSC433/533      Computer Graphics
                     Fall 2005      CSC300          Data Structures
                     Fall 2005      CSC464/564      Image Processing



11. Other assigned duties performed during the academic year, with average hours per week. Indicate which, if any, carry extra
    compensation. If you are course coordinator for courses taught by other than full-time faculty, please indicate here which courses.

12. Number of students for which you serve as academic advisor:         12


13. Estimate the percentage of your time devoted to scholarly and/or research activities:     25     %. Please give a brief description
    of your major research and scholarly activities:

 Research subject areas include image processing, computer vision, pattern recognition, signal
 processing.

 Major research activities have recently focused on ground-penetrating radar applications. I am




                                                                   73
 currently working on a funded research project to mount a penetrating radar unit on an
 unmanned aerial vehicle, with the goal of detecting buried land mines and assisting in urban
 combat applications.


14. If you are not a full-time faculty member, state what percentage of full-time you work:                         %. Percentage of this time allocated
    to the computer science program being evaluated:          %.



IV. Curriculum

Intent: The curriculum is consistent with the program's documented objectives. It combines technical requirements with general education requirements
and electives to prepare students for a professional career in the computer field, for further study in computer science, and for functioning in modern society.
The technical requirements include up-to-date coverage of basic and advanced topics in computer science as well as an emphasis on science and
mathematics.

(Curriculum standards are specified in terms of semester hours of study. Thirty semester hours generally constitutes one year of full-
time study and is equivalent to 45 quarter-hours. A course or a specific part of a course can only be applied toward one standard.)


A. Title of Degree Program

Give the title of the degree program under review, as specified on the transcript and diploma.

  Transcript:       Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
  Diploma:          Bachelor of Science in Computer Science


B. Credit Hour Definition




                                                                              74
One semester hour normally means one hour of lecture or three hours of laboratory per week. One academic year normally represents
from twenty-eight to thirty weeks of classes, exclusive of final examinations. Please describe below if your definitions differ from
these.

  The semester hour is the credit hour unit at SDSM&T.




C. Prerequisite Flow Chart

Attach a flow chart showing the prerequisite structure of computer science courses required or allowed towards the major.




                                                                 75
Prerequisite Flowchart for Computer Science Major




                       76
77
                                           DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
                                                     CHECKLIST OF REQUIREMENTS
FOR STUDENTS DECLARING THEIR MAJOR FALL 2006 OR LATER



Name:

                                                                                                         Hrs
                                                              CHEM 112L Chemistry Lab            1
                                                              CHEM 114 General Chemistry II      3
                                            Hrs               PHYS 213L Physics L                1
ENGL 101 Freshmen English           3                         MATH 441 Engineering Statistics I 2
ENGL 279 Tech Comm I                3                         MATH 442 Engineering Statistics II 2
ENGL 289 Tech Comm II               3                         HUM 375 Computers in Society       3
PE                                  1                         CENG 244 Intro to Digital Systems  4
PE                                  1                         CSC 314 Assembly Language          4
MATH 123 Calculus I                 4                         CSC 317 Computer Org & Arch        4
MATH 125 Calculus II                4                         CSC 461 Programming Languages      4
MATH 225 Calculus III               4                         CSC 300 Data Structures            4
MATH 315 Linear Algebra             4                         CSC 372 Analysis of Algorithms     3
MATH 321 Differential Equations 4                             CSC 440 Digital Systems            4
CHEM 112 General Chemistry          3                         CSC 456 Operating Systems          4
PHYS 211 Physics I                  3                         CSC 470 Software Engineering       3
PHYS 213 Physics II                 3                         CSC 465 Senior Design              3
CSC 150 Computer Science I          3                         CSC 484 Database Management Sys 3
CSC 250 Computer Science II         4
CSC 251 Finite Structures           4                         Upper – level CSC elective           3/4
Arts / Humanities -- Social Science (16 minimum hrs total):   Upper – level CSC elective           3/4
 ** Arts/Humanities (6 min)       6                           Upper – level CSC elective           3/4
                                                              (Math 471 may be used as an elective, a
                                                              3 – credit co-op may be used for one CSC
 ** Social Sciences (6 min)      6                            elective)




A total of 30 credits of Humanities, Social Sciences, Art, and other disciplines are required. This may include all English classes,
Physical Education, and HUM 375.




                                                                                 78
** Check General Education requirements (e.g. different disciplines, cultural diversity)




                                                                   79
D. Course Requirements of Curriculum (term by term and year by year)

1. Required and elective courses. In the tables on the following pages, list the courses in the order in which they are normally taken in
the curriculum, classified in the appropriate categories. The data should clearly indicate how the program meets the Intent of the
Curriculum Category of the Criteria for Accrediting Computer Science Programs. These tables are designed for a semester calendar;
they may be easily altered for a quarter calendar.

2. Required courses. List courses by department abbreviation (Math, Chem, CS, etc.), number, title, and number of semester hours.
Apportion the semester hours for each course by category.

3. Elective courses. Designate these courses ―elective.‖ If an elective is restricted to a particular category, then tabulate the semester
hours in that category and indicate the category in the listing, e.g. ―elective—science.‖ In addition, be sure that you have supplied
information elsewhere in this document indicating how you ensure that students take the course in the specified category (e. g.
advisement, graduation check sheets, etc.). For free electives (i.e., those not restricted to a particular category), list the semester hours
under the heading ―Other.‖ Use footnotes for any listings that require further elaboration.

4. Individual courses may be split between or among curriculum areas if the course content justifies the split. For example, a discrete
mathematics course may have some of its semester hours under mathematics and some under computer science. In such cases, assign
semester hours to categories in multiples of one-half semester hour.




                                                                     80
                                                     Category (semester hours)




                                                                 Mathematics
                                                     Advanced.




                                                                                         Education
                                          Computer



                                                     Computer




                                                                                         General
                                          Science



                                                     Science




                                                                               Science




                                                                                                     Other
                                          Core
  Year                 Course
Semester       (Dept., Number, Title)

  First     ENGL 101 : Composition 1                                                       3
Semester    CHEM 112 : General Chem.                                           3
Freshman    CHEM 112L : Chem. 1 Lab                                            1
  Year      MATH 123 : Calculus 1                                 4
            CSC 150 : CS 1                   3
            Hum / SS elective                                                              3

            MATH 125 : Calculus 2                                 4
 Second     CHEM 114 : Chem 2                                                  3
Semester    CSC 250 : CS 2                   4
Freshman    CSC 251 : Finite Structures      4
  Year      Physical Education                                                             1

            MATH 225 : Calculus 3                                 4
   First    CSC 314 : Assembly               4
 Semester   CENG 244 : Digital Systems       4
Sophomore   Physical Education                                                             1
   Year     Hum / SS elective                                                              3

            ENGL 279 : Tech. Comm. 1                                                       3




                                                            81
  Second    CSC 317 : Comp. Org. Arch.   4
 Semester   CSC 300 : Data Structures    4
Sophomore   Hum / SS electives                                  6
   Year

SUBTOTALS                                27   0        12   7   20




                                                  82
                                                  Category (semester hours)




                                                           Mathematics




                                                                                   Education
                                          Advanced
                                          Computer
                                          Computer




                                                                                   General
                                          Science


                                          Science




                                                                         Science




                                                                                               Other
                                          Core
  Year               Course
Semester     (Dept., Number, Title)
           ENGL 289 : Tech Comm 2                                                    3
  First    MATH 321 : Diff. Eq.                             4
Semester   PHYS 211 : Physics 1                                          3
 Junior    CSC 372 : Algorithms                    3
  Year     CSC elective                            3

           MATH 315 : Linear Alg.                           4
 Second    MATH 441/442 : Prob./ Stat.                      4
Semester   CSC 461 : Prog. Lang.              4
 Junior    PHYS 213 : Physics 2                                          3
  Year     PHYS 213L : Physics Lab                                       1

           CSC 470 : Soft. Eng                     3
  First    CSC 440 : Adv. Digital                  4
Semester   CSC 484 : Database                      3
 Senior    CSC elective                            3
  Year     CSC elective                            3

           CSC 456 : Op. Systems                   4
 Second    CSC 465 : Senior Design                 3
Semester   HUM 375 : Comp in Society                                                 3




                                         83
  Senior    HUM / SS electives                            4
   Year

SUBTOTALS                              4   29   12    7   10
  TOTALS                              31   29   24   14   30




                                 84
General
Standard IV-1. The curriculum must include at least 40 semester hours of up-to-date study in computer science topics.


1. If it is not obvious from the above tables that the curriculum includes at least 40 semester hours (60 quarter hours) of computer
   science topics, please explain.


  The program requires 31 semester hours of core CSC plus 29 semester hours of advanced
  CSC, making a total of 60 semester hours of required computer science courses.


Standard IV-2. The curriculum must contain at least 30 semester hours of study in mathematics and science as specified below under Mathematics and Science.


2. If it is not obvious from the above tables that the curriculum includes at least 30 semester hours (45 quarter hours) of study in
   mathematics and science, please explain.


  The program requires 24 semester hours of mathematics plus 14 semester hours of science,
  making a total of 38 semester hours of mathematics and science. Note that all mathematics
  courses applied toward the degree are at the calculus level or higher. All required science
  courses apply towards degrees offered by those departments.



Standard IV-3. The curriculum must include at least 30 semester hours of study in humanities, social sciences, arts and other disciplines that serve to broaden the
background of the student.


3. If it is not obvious from the above tables that the curriculum includes at least 30 semester hours (45 quarter hours) of study in
   humanities, social sciences, arts, and other disciplines that serve to broaden the background of the student, please explain.




                                                                                85
  The curriculum includes 30 semester hours of study in humanities, social sciences, arts, and
  other disciplines that serve to broaden the background of the student. From the catalog
  requirements for the CSC degree (page 116 of the 2006-2007 catalog):
      ―Thirty (30) total hours in Humanities, Social Science, or other nontechnical disciplines
      that serve to broaden the background of the student. This may include all English classes,
      two (2) credits of Physical Education, and those courses used to meet requirement (1)
      above.‖ [Requirement (1) specifies 16 hours of Humanities and Social Science.]



Standard IV-4. The curriculum must be consistent with the documented objectives of the program.


Describe the consistency between the documented objectives of the program and the curriculum. How does the curriculum contribute
to the achievement of the documented objectives?

  Outcomes have been developed for all courses. A linking of course outcomes to program
  outcomes can be found in Appendix II. The curriculum is reviewed on an ongoing basis, with
  an intensive review done every two years as part of the Industrial Advisory Council meeting.


                                                                  Computer Science

Standard IV-5. All students must take a broad-based core of fundamental computer science material consisting of at least 16 semester hours.

4. If it is not obvious from the above tables that the curriculum includes a broad-based core of fundamental computer science
   material consisting of at least 16 semester hours (24 quarter hours), please explain.




                                                                            86
  31 semester hours of core CS coursework are required :
  CSC 150 (3) Computer Science I
  CSC 250 (4) Computer Science II
  CSC 251 (4) Finite Structures
  CSC 300 (4) Data Structures
  CSC 314 (4) Assembly Language
  CENG 244 (4) Intro to Digital Systems
  CSC 317 (4) Computer Organization and Architecture
  CSC 461 (4) Programming Language Concepts




Standard IV-6. The core materials must provide basic coverage of algorithms, data structures, software design, concepts of programming languages and computer
organization and architecture.


5. The core materials must provide basic coverage of the following five areas. Please indicate below the approximate number of
   semester hours in the core devoted to each topic. (This material can be gathered from your course descriptions, but it will ease the
   job for the visiting team if you do this in advance.)




                                                              Area                          Semester hours
                                        Algorithms                                                   6
                                        Software Design                                              4
                                        Computer Organization and Architecture                       7
                                        Data structures                                              4
                                        Concepts of Programming Languages                            6




                                                                             87
Standard IV-7. Theoretical foundations, problem analysis, and solution design must be stressed within the program‘s core materials.


6. The following areas must be stressed within the program‘s core materials. Indicate the course numbers of courses embodying a
   significant portion of these areas.


                Area                      Courses (Dept., Number)
    Theoretical Foundations               CENG 244, CSC 251, CSC 300, CSC 317, CSC 461
    Problem Analysis                      CSC 150, CENG 244, CSC 250, CSC 251, CSC 300,
                                          CSC 314, CSC 317, CSC 461
    Solution Design                       CSC 150, CENG 244, CSC 250, CSC 251, CSC 300,
                                          CSC 314, CSC 317, CSC 461



Standard IV-8. Students must be exposed to a variety of programming languages and systems and must become proficient in at least one higher-level language.


7. To what programming languages and operating systems are students exposed?


           Students write C++ programs in many courses throughout the Computer Science major.
           They are introduced to other languages such as Java, Scheme, UML, and scripting
           languages in CSC 461 Programming Language Concepts. In CSC 484 Database
           Management Systems students learn SQL, Visual Basic, and PHP. Elective courses
           such as CSC 421 GUI Programming, CSC 451 Artificial Intelligence, and CSC 410
           Parallel Computing may introduce specialized languages such as JavaScript, Lisp, Perl,
           Tcl/Tk, and Fortran 95.




                                                                               88
           Students use Microsoft Windows in their early programming courses (CSC 150, CS 1,
           and CSC 250, CS 2). CSC 314 Assembly Language and CSC 300 Data Structures
           require the use of Linux. Students study operating systems, especially Linux and
           UNIX, in CSC 456 Operating Systems. Other upper-level courses typically use
           Windows or Linux platforms for assignments, and many courses allow the student to
           choose the best platform for a given assignment.



8. In what higher-level language(s) do students become proficient?


      All students become proficient in C++, which is used in the majority of programming
      courses. Students also become proficient with mixing assembly language and C++ in the
      CSC 314 Assembly Language. Some students gain experience with other languages such
      as Lisp, Java, and Visual Basic, depending on the upper-level electives they select. Some
      students may become proficient in an additional language as a requirement of a senior
      design project.



Standard IV-9. All students must take at least 16 semester hours of advanced course work in computer science that provides breadth and builds on the core to
provide depth.


9. If it is not obvious from the tables above that students take at least 16 semester hours (24 quarter hours) of advanced computer
   science, please explain.


  Students are required to take an additional 29 semester hours of computer science that build
  upon the core. The curriculum includes 20 semester hours of required courses and nine
  semester hours of elective courses. Each of these courses has CSC 300 Data Structures as a



                                                                               89
 prerequisite except for CSC 440 Advanced Digital, which has CSC 317 Architecture as a
 prerequisite. The required courses are :
     CSC 372 (3) Analysis of Algorithms
     CSC 484 (3) Database Management Systems
     CSC 456 (4) Operating Systems
     CSC 440 (4) Advanced Digital Systems
     CSC 470 (3) Software Engineering
     CSC 456 (3) Senior Design

 The elective courses are :
    CSC 410 Parallel Computing
    CSC 421 Graphical User Interfaces
    CSC 433 Computer Graphics
    CSC 445 Theory of Computation
    CSC 447 Artificial Intelligence
    CSC 448 Machine Learning
    CSC 463 Data Communications
    CSC 464 Digital Image Processing
    CSC 492 Special Topics in Cryptography

     MATH 471 Numerical Analysis is also allowed as a CSC elective.

  Students may substitute a co-op experience for one three-credit elective. The requirements for
  co-op include a final report from the student and an evaluation from the employer as described
  at http://www.mcs.sdsmt.edu.
10. List below the advanced areas in which your students may study. Make clear by the use of ―and‖, ―or‖, and parentheses which
areas are required and which may be chosen from (e. g., A and two of (B or C or D)).




                                                              90
      Students must take advanced courses in algorithms, computer hardware, operating systems,
      database, and software engineering/senior design. These six courses add breadth to the
      curriculum as well as adding depth to the core areas. Likewise, the requirement of three
      elective courses listed above provides additional breadth and depth to the curriculum. The
      required courses CSC 470 Software Engineering and CSC 465 Senior Design form a senior
      capstone sequence.



                                                                Mathematics and Science

Standard IV-10. The curriculum must include at least 15 semester hours of mathematics.

11. If it is not obvious from the tables above that students take at least 15 semester hours (23 quarter hours) of mathematics beyond
pre-calculus, please explain.


  The degree requires 24 semester hours of mathematics. MATH 123, 125, 225 (Calculus 1, 2,
  3), MATH 231 (Differential Equations), MATH 315 (Linear Algebra), and MATH 441/442
  (Engineering Statistics) are required.



Standard IV-11. Course work in mathematics must include discrete mathematics, differential and integral calculus, and probability and statistics.


12. If it is not obvious from course titles in the above tables, then explain below which required courses contain discrete mathematics,
    differential and integral calculus, and probability and statistics.




                                                                               91
  MATH 123, 125, and 225 (Calculus 1, 2, 3) provide in-depth coverage of differential and
  integral calculus. MATH 441/442 Engineering Statistics provides coverage of both probability
  and statistics. Additional courses in MATH 315 Linear Algebra, and MATH 321 Differential
  Equations, add to the depth of coverage in these areas.
  In addition to the mathematics courses listed above, computer science majors are required to
  take a four-credit course, CSC 251 Finite Structures. This course covers topics in the
  mathematical foundations of computer science usually taught in courses entitled discrete
  mathematics. These topics include logic and proofs, combinatorics, sets, relations, functions,
  algorithm analysis, and elementary graph theory.



Standard IV-12. The curriculum must include at least 12 semester hours of science.


13. If it is not obvious from the tables above that students take at least 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of science, please explain.


  The curriculum requires 14 semester hours of science. Computer science majors take a full-
  year sequence in chemistry and a full-year sequence in physics. Both chemistry courses are
  taken by chemistry majors, and both physics courses are taken by physics majors. The physics
  sequence has a calculus prerequisite.



Standard IV-13. Course work in science must include the equivalent of a two-semester sequence in a laboratory science for science or engineering majors.


14. If it is not obvious from the tables above and from course descriptions and/or your catalog that the science requirement includes a
    full year (two-semester or three-quarter) sequence in a laboratory science for science and engineering majors, please explain.




                                                                              92
  The department determined a laboratory experience in both chemistry and physics is important
  for the curriculum. Thus, a full year of chemistry plus a lab and a full year of physics plus a
  lab are required. Students receive a full year of laboratory experience in conjunction with two
  year-long lecture sequences. This has been cited on previous visits as an acceptable alternate
  implementation of the requirement.


Standard IV-14. Science course work additional to that specified in Standard IV-13 must be in science courses or courses that enhance the student's ability to
apply the scientific method.



15. If it is not obvious from the tables above and from course descriptions and/or your catalog that the remainder of the science
requirement is met with science courses or courses that enhance the student‘s abilities in the application of the scientific method,
please explain. (Mathematics, statistics, and courses normally considered part of the computer science discipline should not be
included here).


  No additional science courses are required.



                                                                Additional Areas of Study
Standard IV-15. The oral communications skills of the student must be developed and applied in the program.

Standard IV-16. The written communications skills of the student must be developed and applied in the program.


16. Each student‘s oral and written communications skills must be developed and applied in the program, i.e., in courses required for
    the major. This information should be included in course descriptions; please give course numbers below.




                                                                                93
  Communications skills             Developed in                     Applied in
  Oral                              ENGL 101, ENGL 279,              CSC 470, CSC 465
                                    ENGL 289, HUM 375.               Many electives also have a
                                                                     required, graded oral
                                                                     presentation. In particular :
                                                                     CSC 410, CSC 421, CSC 433,
                                                                     CSC 464, CSC 492
  Written                           ENGL 101, ENGL 279,              CSC 250, CSC 300, CSC 317,
                                    ENGL 289, HUM 375                CSC 484, CSC 470, CSC 465
                                                                     Many electives also have a
                                                                     writing component. In
                                                                     particular : CSC 410, CSC 421,
                                                                     CSC 433, CSC 448, CSC 464


Standard IV-17. There must be sufficient coverage of social and ethical implications of computing to give students an understanding of a broad range of issues in
this area.


17. Social and ethical implications of computing must be covered in the program. This information should be included in course
    descriptions; please give course numbers below.

                              Covered in Course(s) (Dept., Number)
  Social and Ethical          Students are required to take HUM 375 (Computers in Society).
  Implications                This course examines the social impact of computers and the
                              social responsibilities of individuals. Although this is offered
                              under a humanities course number, it was developed
                              specifically to meet the needs of the Computer Science
                              program, and its primary target audience is computer science
                              majors.
                              CSC 470 (Software Engineering) covers a number of topics




                                                                               94
related to computer ethics, including software protection and
software reliability.
The ―ACM Code of Ethics‖ is discussed in CSC 250 (Computer
Science II) and a web link to it is placed on the course website.
Class time is used to explain in detail each of the points
described in the Code.
Departmental expectations with respect to ethics and a review
of the ACM Code of Ethics are repeated in CSC 300 (Data
Structures). Students are expected to be able to answer test
questions related to the ACM code.
The Computer Science program has policy documents on the
department website that cover academic integrity and classroom
conduct. These documents can be found at :
http://www.mcs.sdsmt.edu. These policies are discussed in
every class and, in some of the upper-level electives, ethical
issues are discussed as appropriate.
The SDSM&T Academic Integrity Policy (page 72 of the 2006-
2007 SDSM&T Catalog) is enforced throughout the Computer
Science curriculum. This policy stresses the importance of
submitting your own work and always giving credit where due.
Copying code and other forms of unethical behavior are not
tolerated. University policy allows for penalties ranging from
loss of credit on an assignment to expulsion, depending on the
severity of the violation. Student are afforded their due process
rights through the university appeals procedure.




                                         95
E. Course Descriptions

1. For each required or elective computer science course that can be counted in the curriculum being reviewed for accreditation,
include a two-page or three-page course outline at this point in the Self-Study. If your documentation does not exactly follow this
format, be sure that all of the requested information (if applicable) is present, and please in any case adhere to a common format for all
course descriptions.

Note that the outline format calls for information on the content of the course in the areas of algorithms, data structures, software
design, concepts of programming languages, computer organization and architecture. This is not intended to suggest that every course
must have some coverage of each of these topics. For a given course, please include the information from a listed area only if the
course has significant content in that specific area.




                                                                   96
CSC Courses and Enrollment Spring 2007

Course     Name                         Section   Professor        Number enrolled

CSC-105    Intro to Computers           M001      Manes                         16
CSC-105    Intro to Computers           M002      Loftberg                      18
CSC-150    CSC I                        M001      Manes                          9
CSC-150    CSC I                        M003      Manes                         27
CSC-150    CSC I                        M004      Manes                         28
CSC-150L   CSC I Lab                    M051      Manes                         16
CSC-150L   CSC I Lab                    M052      Manes                         16
CSC-150L   CSC I Lab                    M053      Manes                         17
CSC-150L   CSC I Lab                    M054      Manes                         16
CSC-210    Web Authoring                M001      Andersen                       6
CSC-250    CSC II                       M002      Schrader                      22
CSC-251    Finte Structures             M001      Logar                         21
CSC-291    Independent Study            M081      Schrader                       2
CSC-300    Data Structures              M001      Logar/Schrader                18
CSC-314    Assembly Language            M001      Opp                           14
CSC-314L   Assembly Language Lab        M051      Opp                           18
CSC-317    Comp. Organiz. & Arch.       M001      Penaloza                      11
CSC-317L   Comp. Organiz. & Arch. Lab   M051      Penaloza                      11
CSC-410    Parallel Computing           M001      McGough                       10
CSC-447    Artificial Intelligence      M001      Weiss                         25
CSC-456    Operating Systems            M001      Wei                           16
CSC-456L   Operating Systems Lab        M051      Wei                           16
CSC-461    Programming Languages        M001      Penaloza                      19
CSC-465    Senior Design Project        M001      Wei                           15
CSC-492    Cryptography                 M081      Corwin                        14
V.       Laboratories and Computing Facilities

     Intent: Laboratories and computing facilities are available, accessible, and adequately supported to
     enable students to complete their course work and to support faculty teaching needs and scholarly
     activities.

     In Section VI you will be asked to describe the planning and acquisition processes for
     laboratory equipment. Please do not repeat any of that information here; simply refer to
     that section, if necessary, to avoid duplication.

     A. Computing Facilities


     1. Describe the computing facilities used by students in the program. Indicate the types of
     software available in each category. Specify any limitations that impact the quality of the
     educational experience.

             Institutional computing facilities:


     Information Technology Services (ITS) provides and maintains over 100 machines in
     five classroom labs: Electrical Engineering, Civil/Mechanical Engineering,
     Mathematics/Computer Science, Chemistry/Chemical Engineering, and the Governor‘s
     Electronic Classroom (GEC) in the Classroom Building. These are equipped with basic
     office productivity software and Internet access, but also include additional software
     used in connection with curriculum in one or more academic departments. ITS makes the
     software as widely available as possible, taking into consideration licensing issues and
     compatibility with hardware and other software. Additional information is contained in
     ―Computer Labs at SDSM&T‖ at the end of Section V.


             Program computing facilities:

There are three laboratories in the McLaury building where the Computer Science program is
   centered. One of these, McLaury 304, will be equipped as a Tablet PC lab. This lab is
   used almost exclusively by Computer Science for scheduled lab classes, but it is also
   available for student use when classes are not in session. Another laboratory in McLaury
   215 contains 20 machines and is used exclusively for Computer Science classes. The
   Linux operating system is installed on these machines. The third laboratory is housed in
   McLaury 213. It is currently a UNIX-based workstation lab containing 12 SunRays
   connected to a 4-processor Enterprise 450 Sun server. The gigabit fiber-optic network
   supports a cluster which provides 10-gigaflop performance. In addition to commonly-
   used programming language environments and UNIX utilities, available in this lab are
   Sun development and cluster tools. This lab will also be used as a robotics lab starting
   fall 2007. All rooms are wired for network access, and all machines are connected to the
   network.

             Other computing facilities:
                                                         ii
   Additional PCs, purchased for specific research projects, are available to the graduate
   students working on those projects. These are high-end PCs with specialty software.


       2. Describe the computing facilities planning, acquisition, and maintenance processes
       and their adequacy. Include discussion of these topics for university-wide computing
       facilities available to all students (if used by your majors), your own laboratories and
       equipment (if applicable), and facilities controlled by other departments and/or
       schools (if used by your majors).

At the departmental level, equipment planning is based on the needs of current activities
    within the discipline of Computer Science. Such awareness is gained from faculty
    participation in various collaborative industrial research activities, sabbatical experiences,
    meetings held with the Industrial Advisory Council, attendance at professional meetings,
    etc. Equipment priorities depend on the perceived greatest shortfall in relation to the
    current state of the art.

   Institutionally, input is funneled from Department Chairs to their College Deans, who,
   acting in concert with other Deans and Directors, coordinated by Vice President
   Whitehead, formulate long-range planning and make acquisition decisions.
   Supplementary input is provided by the faculty senate and through the Strategic Planning
   process. A listing of institutional computer equipment inventories is attached at the end
   of Section V.

   Maintenance needs are coordinated and addressed centrally on the basis of requests to the
   ITS Help Desk described in section E below. Department-controlled labs are maintained
   by Mr. Schrader, the department system administrator.

   The institutional lab machines are being replaced on a three-year cycle. Microsoft
   software is kept up-to-date by generous, ongoing donations from SDSM&T alumni
   employed at Microsoft.


     3. Discuss how you assess the adequacy of your laboratory and computing support.


   Within the department, regular assessment of the adequacy of computing support takes
   place in department and computer science group meetings. The primary metric for
   assessing the adequacy of support is the time that elapses between a problem being
   reported and the problem being solved. When a student or faculty member is having
   computing problems, the department system administrator is contacted. Most problems
   are fixed within one or two days. Many are fixed immediately. Faculty and students
   have reported overall satisfaction with the amount of time required to resolve a
   computing problem.
   Additional support is available from the ITS Help Desk. When a problem is reported to
   the Help Desk, the problem is logged and assigned to an ITS employee who is

                                                  iii
responsible for fixing it. This employee then contacts the student/faculty member to
verify the problem and give an estimate of the time and date it should be fixed.

 4. Please attach any equipment replacement plans to this report.

During the 2007-08 academic year, the McLaury building will have gigabit switches
installed to replace the current 100 mb switches. This is expected to improve network
access speed.

The Linux lab located in the McLaury building will be upgraded during the summer of
2008. That lab is dedicated to computer science and serves multiple courses.

Due to the tablet PC program described in section B below, several general purpose labs
are being converted to classrooms and Tablet labs.


Standard V-1. Each student must have adequate and reasonable access to the systems needed for each
course.


B. Student Access

State the hours the various facilities are open. State whether students have access from
dormitories or off campus by direct access, modem, etc., and describe this access
quantitatively.

Every incoming freshman at SDSM&T is required to participate in the Tablet PC
Program. This assures that all students have a tablet PC to do required assignments.
Since the students lease the tablets from the university, site licenses make all university
software legally available to any tablet PC. A full-time ITS employee is dedicated to
handling problems with tablet PCs immediately during class hours. Students are advised
to keep backups at all times to allow the support person to simply swap tablets if a
problem cannot be solved immediately.

Two of the campus computer laboratories are accessible to students 24 hours a day.
Students have Internet access from their dormitory rooms. The computer lab in the
library is available until midnight, and the student union lab until 10 p.m. All other labs
are accessible throughout regular working hours.

The SDSM&T wireless network provides 24/7 network access to on-campus students
who are using university-owned Tablet PCs.

The SDSM&T open wireless network provides 24/7 access to the Internet, and limited
access to the campus network, for all wireless users on campus.

The Math/Computer Science department has four servers which provide 24/7 access for
students. The Linux lab can be accessed remotely from these servers. The Linux lab is
also directly accessible during regular work hours and evening hours when a student

                                                   iv
monitor is available.

Standard V-2. Documentation for hardware and software must be readily accessible to faculty and students.


C. Documentation

Describe documentation for hardware and software systems available to students and
faculty in the computer science program. Explain how students and faculty have
adequate and timely access to the documentation.

Documentation for all software is available from ITS, and most of it is available on-line.


Standard V-3. All faculty members must have access to adequate computing facilities for class preparation
and for scholarly activities.


D. Faculty Access

Describe the computing facilities available to faculty for class preparation and for
scholarly activities. Include specifics regarding resources in faculty offices.


Every faculty member has a networked computer in his/her office which allows access to
departmental and campus file servers. All Math and Computer Science faculty also have
a wireless-enabled tablet PC in addition to their desktop PC. Access to departmental
Linux machines is provided via the network from office and home.


Standard V-4. There must be adequate support personnel to install and maintain the
laboratories and computing facilities.

E. Support Personnel

1. What support personnel are available to install, maintain, and manage departmental
   hardware, software, and networks?

Mr. Roger Schrader, as described in E.3. below, provides primary departmental support.

ITS provides a walk-in Help Desk facility located in the Devereaux Library, in close
proximity to the computing labs on the lower floor. Help desk hours of operation during
the academic year are: Monday – Thursday 7:30 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.; Friday 7:30 a.m. – 4:50
p.m. During work hours, emergency or high-priority calls can be referred immediately
via cell phone to on-duty ITS personnel. For after hours and holiday emergencies, ITS
maintains a pager service at (605) 394-7834. ITS staff monitor the pager 24 hours per
day, 7 days per week. This number is available to everyone on campus.


                                                    v
The Help Desk staff is tasked with assisting students, faculty, and staff with questions or
inquiries related to information technology. Approximately 1.5 FTE from the ITS group
are assigned to direct Help Desk responsibilities, including supervision and training of
student employees, planning and execution of informal and formal training for the
campus, and actual Help Desk duty. Student employees provide the bulk of staffing
during the academic year. The Help Desk also is a focal point for maintenance of
informational web pages and FAQs (http://its.sdsmt.edu) that support customers in a
self-service mode. Student aides employed by ITS (Tech Fellows) provide assistance
with computing and networking in the residence halls. Faculty who use technology in the
classroom may also request a Tech Fellow. The Tech Fellow is then present in the
classroom to immediately handle problems that may arise during the delivery of the
course. This has been particularly helpful the first time an instructor uses WebCT,
tablets, and DyKnow.

2. Describe any limitations due to this level of support?

Computer support is more than adequate to meet departmental needs.

3. Are any faculty members expected to provide hardware, network, or software support?
If so, describe this expectation including how such expectations are addressed in
evaluation, tenure, promotion, and merit pay decisions, and indicate what, if any, released
time is awarded for this effort.

Mr. Roger Schrader provides system and network administration for the department. He
receives 33% release time, funded by ITS, to maintain the labs and faculty PCs. He is
also the department Web Master and manages a team of undergraduate students who
assist with website maintenance and routine system administration tasks.

Standard V-5. Instructional assistance must be provided for the laboratories and computing facilities.

F. Instructional Assistance

Describe the nature and extent of instructional assistance available to students in the
laboratories.

Attendance is required in structured laboratories of all CSC 150 (Computer Science I)
and CSC 314 (Assembly Language) students. Lab instructors are present throughout the
scheduled lab hours. These instructors also provide student help during regularly
scheduled office hours.




                                                     vi
                           Computer Labs at SDSM&T



Location                      Hours              Specs                 Special
                                                 9 Machines
Chemistry Lab                 7:30am - 4:30pm    1.6 GHz, 256M RAM,
Chemistry Building            and whenever the   15in Monitors, CD,
Room 208                      building is open   Windows XP Pro
                                                 HP 4100 Laser Printer
                                                 40 Machines
Civil / Mechanical Lab                           2.8 GHz, 512M RAM
Mechanical Engineering        7:30am - 4:30pm
                                                 17in Monitors ,       Can be
Building                      and whenever the
                                                 CDRW/DVDROM           reserved
3rd Floor / Room 310 / West   building is open
                                                 Windows XP Pro
side                                             HP LaserJet 4000
                                               8 Machines
Classroom Lab                 7:30am - 4:30pm 1.8 GHz, 256 M RAM,
Classroom Building (CB)       and whenever the 17in Monitors, CDRW
South side / Main floor       building is open Windows XP Pro
                                               HP 4100 Laser Printer
                                                 2 Machines
Connolly Hall                                    1.8GHz, 256 M RAM,
                                                                    Dorm resident
Connolly Hall                 24 hours/day       CDRW
                                                                    use only
3rd Floor/Left of stairs                         Windows XP Pro
                                                 HP 4050 Printer
Miners Shack Lab
(Cyber Cafe)                  Whenever
                                                 4 Machines
Surbeck Center                Surbeck Center
                                                 Sun machines
1st Floor / Miners Shack      is open
Dining area
                                              23 Machines
Electrical Engineering
                                              2.4 GHz, 512 M RAM,
Lab                          7:30am - 4:30pm 17in Monitors,
Electrical Engineering /                                               Can be
                             and whenever the CDRW/DVDROM
Physics Building (EE/P)                                                reserved
                             building is open Windows XP Pro
3rd Floor / Room 307 / North                  HP 42520 Laser
side                                          Printer
                                              9 Machines               Can be
Governor’s Classroom Available when 1.8GHz, 256 M RAM,                 reserved
CB 110                       not being used   17 inch monitors         Video
Basement level of Classroom for classes       CDRW                     conferencing
Building                                      Windows XP Pro           capabilities


                                        vii
                                                      23 Machines
Library Lab East                                      1.8 GHz, 256 M RAM,
Devereaux Library             M-Th - 7am – Midnight
                              F - 7am - 5pm           17in monitors,
Basement /                    Sat - Noon - 5pm        Window XP Pro
Turn right at bottom of       Sun - Noon–Midnight
                                                      HP 4250n Laser
basement stairs                                       Printer


McLaury Lab                   7:30am - 4:30pm Tablet PC Lab
McLaury Building                                                            Can be
                              and whenever the HP 4250n Laser
3rd Floor / Room 304 /        building is open Printer
                                                                            reserved
Middle of floor


                                                      8 Machines
Palmerton Hall Lab                                    1 GHz, 256 M RAM,
                                                                            Dorm
Palmerton Hall                                        15in Monitors, CDRW
                              24 hours /day                                 residents use
1st Floor (Main) / Straight                           Window XP Pro
                                                                            only
from main entrance                                    HP 4100TNLaser
                                                      Printer
                                                      35 rooms
Presentation                                          3GHz, 512 M RAM
                              Available when
Classrooms                                            18 inch monitors
                              building is open
All buildings                                         CDRW/DVDROM
                                                      Windows XP Pro
                                                      8 Machines
Surbeck Lab                   M-F - 7:30am -          2.8 GHz, 512 M RAM,
Surbeck Center                10pm                    17in Monitors,
Top Floor / Between           Sat & Sun -             CDRW/DVDROM,
bookstore & main entrance     10am - 10pm             Windows XP Pro
                                                      HP 4260 Laser Printer




                                           viii
                                              SDSM&T Central Servers
Servers
ARAISIS-7187         Physical Plant Building Management Server          Dell PowerEdge 2850               Windows Server 2003 SP1
                     Physical Plant Building Management Web
ARAWEB-7187          Server                                             Dell PowerEdge 750                Windows Server 2003 SP1
COYOTE               Print Server/Web Server                            IBM xSeries 225                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
DAISY                Scheduling                                         Dell Optiplex GX 240              Windows Server 2003 SP1
DEXTER               Foundation Server                                  Compaq Proliant ML350             Windows Server 2003 SP1
                                                                        Gateway E-1400, 850 MHz Pentium
FOGHORN              License Server                                     III                               Windows Server 2003 SP1
MSDNAA                                                                                                    Windows Server 2003 SP1
ODIE                 MSSNA                                              Gateway E-1400, 433 MHz Celeron   Windows 2000 Server SP4
PINKY                MS SQL Server                                      IBM xSeries 346                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
ROGUE                Backup                                             IBM eserver                       Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-CP01           Classroom Presenter (Dyknow)                       IBM xSeries 230                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-DOOR           Server of Virtual Servers/Door Controller Server   IBM xSeries 346                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-DR01                                                                                                Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-EX01           Exchange Server                                    IBM xSeries 230                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-KF01           KeyFile                                            IBM xSeries 346                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-TS01           Terminal Server for Admissions                     E-3400                            Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-VPN            VPN Dial in Server                                 Gateway E-3400                    Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-WEB1                                                              Gateway E9515                     Windows Server 2003 SP1
SPEEDY               Primary File Server                                IBM xSeries 232                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
STARGATE             Oracle Server                                      IBM eserver                       Windows Server 2003 SP1
WEBCT                WebCT                                              Gateway E Series E6000            Windows Server 2003 SP1
WINPRISM             Bookstore Order Server                             Dell PowerEdge 2600               Windows Server 2003 SP1

HARDROCK
SDSMT-LOG01          SQL Server                                         Dell PowerEdge 1550
SDSMT-NMS2           Network Monitoring Server                          IBM xSeries 235
BARNEY               HPC Production                                     IBM RS/6000
SILVER               Old Mail                                           IBM RISC System/6000 C20
ATTACHMATE
HARDROCK.SDSMT.EDU                                                      Dell Optiplex GX 240
Sylvan                                                                  IBM RS/6000 397
Silicone                                                                IBM Powerstation 360
EMAILSCANNER                                                            Dell Optiplex GX 240
ASTERISK             VoIP Box                                           Gateway E3600, Pentium 4
KRYPTON                                                                 Gateway 2000 NS 7000
NEWS-FEEDER                                                             Gateway 2000 NS 7000
SDSMT-NET-EXPLODER   PC Controller NetEnforcer                          IBM xSeries 306m
MOSFET               ECE VLS Design Machine                             SunFire V240
PERU STATE (NEW)                                                        Dell PowerEdge 2650
NERMAL               SunRay Terminal Server                             Sun Ultra Enterprise 450
NLANR                NLANR Remote Sensing Computer
KENNY                West River AG T1 Connection                        Cisco AS5200
GHAELE.CMYRU.COM     CMYRU Project                                      Cisco 2600
Codian               Multipoint Video Conferencing Unit                 MCU 4210

Virtual Servers
SDSMT-MIIS                                                                                                Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-SMS01                                                                                               Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-USC                                                                                                 Windows Server 2003 SP1

Domain Controllers
SDSMT-RHDC01                                                                                              Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-DC01           Active Directory(primary)/DHCP/DNS                 IBM xSeries 345                   Windows Server 2003 SP1
SDSMT-DC02           Active Directory/Radius/DNS                        IBM xSeries 345                   Windows Server 2003 SP1




                                                                ix
                        Math and Computer Science Central Servers

                                                         Servers
Athos             Sun Ray and Development                          Sun Enterprise 450, 2 GB Ram     Solaris 10
NFS1              File Server and Account Management               Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 2 GB Ram      Fedora Core 4
Services1         Database and Print Server                        Intel 1.8GHz, 512 MB Ram         Fedora Core 5
Mssql             Microsoft SQL Server                             Dual Core 3.2 GHz, 2 GB Ram      Windows 2003 SP1
Web               Department Web Server                            Intel 1.8GHz, 512 MB Ram         Fedora Core 5
Fresearch         Faculty Research Server                          Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 2 GB Ram      Fedora Core 5
Sresearch         Student Research Server                          Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 2 GB Ram      Fedora Core 5
Linux101          General Development Server/Remote Access         Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 1 GB Ram      Fedora Core 5
Linux102          General Development Server/Remote Access         Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 1 GB Ram      Fedora Core 5
Linux103          General Development Server/Remote Access         Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 1 GB Ram      Fedora Core 5
Linux104          General Development Server/Remote Access         Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz, 1 GB Ram      Fedora Core 5
Quad 1            Parallel Server                                  Quad Pentium 550 MHz, 1 GB Ram   Fedora Core 5
Quad 2            Parallel Server                                  Quad Pentium 550 MHz, 1 GB Ram   Fedora Core 5




                                                     Workstations
Linux01 through
Linux20           Linux Lab – General Use                          Pentium 2.8 GHz, 1 GB Ram        Fedora Core 5
MCS-Conf          Multimedia Station – Scanner, color laser        Pentium 3.0 GHz, 512 MB Ram      Windows XP SP2




   VII.     Institutional Facilities

   Intent: Institutional facilities, including the library, other electronic information retrieval systems,
   computer networks, classrooms, and offices, are adequate to support the objectives of the program.

   Standard VII-1. The library that serves the computer science program must be adequately staffed with
   professional librarians and support personnel.


   A. Library

   1. Library Staffing.

   Assess the staffing of the library (or libraries) that serves the computer science program.
      Is the number of professional librarians and support personnel adequate to support the
      program? Supply documentation if possible.




                                                              x
The Devereaux Library currently has ten full-time staff members and an additional two
   open positions. There are two librarians and eight support staff members. In addition,
   10-15 student workers are hired during the academic year to supplement the staffing of
   the library. This staff is adequate to serve the needs of the campus.
   The Mathematics and Computer Science department appoints a faculty member to serve
   as library liaison. Dr. Jeff McGough serves in this capacity. His responsibilities include
   collecting and prioritizing faculty requests and forwarding them to the library staff. He
   works closely with the librarians to ensure that collections, subscriptions, and services
   meet departmental needs.


  Standard VII-2. The library’s technical collection must include up-to-date textbooks,
  reference works, and publications of professional and research organizations such as the
  ACM and the IEEE Computer Society.

  2. Library Technical Collection

  Assess the adequacy of the library‘s technical collection and of the budget for
  subscriptions, as well as new acquisitions. The library must contain up-to-date textbooks,
  reference works, and publications of professional and research organizations, such as the
  ACM and the IEEE Computer Society. It should also contain representative trade
  journals. Supply documentation, if possible. Assess the process by which faculty may
  request the library to order books or subscriptions.

In the Devereaux Library‘s physical (paper) collection there are a number of journal titles
    with some variation of the word ―computer‖ in the title or description. There are
    approximately 150 electronic journal titles available through various online databases
    including EbscoHost, ProQuest and WilsonWeb‘s Applied Science and Technology
    Full-Text. The library has moved toward a more ―just in time‖ model for research
    journals to counterbalance the escalating costs of owning journals. With that in mind,
    the library has added two extremely powerful and extensive online indexes for the
    campus, Science Scitation Index (SSI) and EI Village2 (Compendex). A quick search of
    SSI on the term comput* gets 110,791 hits. That same search in Compendex nets
    1,930,972 hits. Thus, the library is providing research faculty and students with access
    to the citations and is providing the information through the Interlibrary Loan program.
There are approximately 13,000 books in the Devereaux Library with the word ―computer‖,
    or some variation of the word, in the title or description. In addition, there are
    approximately 500 more such books in the library‘s Federal Documents Collection.
    Most books in this area are current. The library tries to keep its computer-related
    holdings current because of the rapid evolution of computer technology. The Devereaux
    Library is also the only Patent and Trademark Depository Library in the state of South
    Dakota. This designation means that the library has a complete run of all patents in
    image format (most are on DVDs) and continues to receive new patents each week.
    Any cutting edge research in the computer science or computer engineering fields will
    be reflected in the patent collection.
The budget for the Computer Science program is determined as part of the overall materials
    budget for the campus. A base amount is given to each department across the board to

                                               xi
    ensure an adequate amount of funding. Over the past few years, the average annual
    amount allocated to each department was $3,000.
Subscriptions are handled differently. Each department may request new subscription
    materials, but most will be asked to substitute journals rather than simply add the new
    journal. The Mathematics and Computer Science department also maintains a library in
    its own building, as mentioned below. Additional IEEE and ACM titles are available
    there.
Any faculty or staff member may request library materials at any time. Every semester,
    each department assigns a liaison who works with library staff to order materials based
    on the amount allocated by the library for that department. The library also retains some
    dollars to fill gaps or deal with special requests.
Library materials may also be obtained through Interlibrary Loan. Devereaux Library
    belongs to MINITEX, a network based at the University of Minnesota. MINITEX
    provides access to materials throughout South Dakota, Minnesota, North Dakota,
    Wisconsin, and the University of Illinois. Devereaux Library also has reciprocal
    agreements with various libraries throughout the U.S. In addition, Devereaux Library
    has contracts with UMI Article Clearinghouse and the British Library Document Supply
    Centre for the delivery of articles. Anyone with a valid SDSM&T ID may submit an
    electronic Interlibrary Loan request.
In addition to the library holdings, the department maintains a library for student and faculty
    use. Current paper subscriptions include Communications of the ACM, IEEE
    Transactions on Neural Networks, Neural Networks, IEEE Spectrum, IEEE Computer,
    IEEE Software, Computing Surveys, ACM SIGPLAN Notices, and ACM Fortran
    Forum. Mathematical publications including the American Mathematical Monthly,
    SIAM Review (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics), The College
    Mathematics Journal, Mathematics Magazine, and others, are available for student use.
Many of the faculty have electronic access to digital collections. Students are also
    encouraged to become members of the student chapters of the ACM and IEEE, which
    provide access to the online portals at a greatly reduced price.

  Standard VII-3. Systems for locating and obtaining electronic information must be
  available.

  3. Library Electronic Access

  Assess the library‘s systems for locating and obtaining electronic information.

   The Devereaux Library has developed methods that allow students to access information
   without physically being in the library building and, in some cases, from off campus.
   The South Dakota Library Network (SDLN) is available to all residents of the State of
   South Dakota. The Devereaux Library participates in the network, maintaining our
   online catalog on SDLN. Through SDLN, the library‘s patrons have access to books
   throughout the state and to search engines for specialized book searches. Some of the
   databases that are available through SDLN or through the State Library are: EbscoHost
   (Academic Search Premier; Business Source Premier; Regional Business News;
   MasterFILE Premier; EBSCO MegaFILE; Library, Information Science & Technology
   Abstracts; and Teacher Reference Center); ProQuest (Discovery; National Newspaper

                                               xii
 Abstracts; and Research Library); and InfoTrac (Gale Virtual Reference Library;
 Professional Collection; and Contemporary Authors). Some of the databases that are
 available on campus are: EI Village2 (Compendex); Knovel; Web of Science (Science
 Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; and Medline); and WilsonWeb (Applied
 Science and Technology Full-Text). This multitude of databases has provided access to
 several thousand new full-text journals for faculty, staff and students. To access the
 library go to: http://library.sdsmt.edu. Links for Resources or QuickLinks will point
 immediately to library holdings as well as online databases. Email help is available at
 libref@sdsmt.edu.

Standard VII-4. Classrooms must be adequately equipped for the courses taught.

B. Classroom Equipment

Describe the equipment typically available in classrooms where you teach your courses.
Assess its adequacy for the purpose.

 Most computer science courses are taught in the McLaury building. There are five
 multimedia classrooms in that building, each with computer projection equipment. At
 the present time, each room has a 3.2 GHz dual-core Pentium desktop system and a
 ceiling-mounted air projector. Each air projector is capable of accepting wireless
 signals, allowing the new Tablet PCs issued to the faculty to be taken from faculty
 offices directly to the classrooms. DyKnow software, which restricts student access to
 the Internet and other software during class, is installed on all Tablet PCs with
 monitoring capability available only on faculty PCs. This equipment is adequate to
 meet the needs of the department. The McLaury building is currently wired for 100
 Megabit/sec local area network access and 54 Megabit/sec wireless access. In summer
 2007, the local area network access is scheduled to be upgraded to 1 Gigabit/sec.


Standard VII-5. Faculty offices must be adequate to enable faculty members to meet their responsibilities to
students and for their professional needs.


C. Faculty Offices

Discuss and assess the adequacy of faculty offices.

Each faculty member has, at a minimum, a private office, a computer connected to the
campus network, a private phone, and appropriate office furniture and equipment. Many
faculty members have more than one computer. Offices are adequate for meeting
students and performing other professional duties.



VI. Institutional Support and Financial Resources

Intent: The institution’s support for the program and the financial resources available to the program
are sufficient to provide an environment in which the program can achieve its objectives. Support and

                                                    xiii
resources are sufficient to provide assurance that an accredited program will retain its strength
throughout the period of accreditation.

Standard VI-1. Support for faculty must be sufficient to enable the program to attract and
retain high-quality faculty capable of supporting the program’s objectives.

Standard VI-2. There must be sufficient support and financial resources to allow all faculty members to
attend national technical meetings with sufficient frequency to maintain competence as teachers and
scholars.

Standard VI-3. There must be support and recognition of scholarly activities.

A. Faculty Stability


1. Evidence of the long-term stability of a program is provided by its ability to both
attract and retain high quality faculty. Describe how your program does this. Some topics
the description might address are sabbatical and other leave programs, salaries, benefits,
teaching loads, support for and recognition of scholarly activity (including financial
support for attendance at professional meetings), departmental and institutional
ambiance, etc.

 The department has been relatively stable for many years. One faculty member left in
 2006 to accept a position at Idaho National Laboratory and another faculty member left
 in 2004 to get married. Two faculty members have retired in the past five years. No
 faculty member has left the department unhappy or disgruntled in decades. Factors that
 contribute to this stability are:
 1. A desirable mix of teaching and research activities. The computer science faculty
 regularly teach two courses per semester, which allows time to pursue research, direct
 graduate students and undergraduate research projects, and interact with industrial
 partners. Time is also available for senior faculty to participate in significant service
 activities. Many candidates appreciate the mix of professional activities the department
 provides.
 2. Competitive salaries. Although salaries are low by national standards, they are
 competitive in the region and are adequate given the cost of living in Rapid City.
 3. Environment. The region offers a quality of life not found in many locations, and the
 department provides a collegial work environment.
 4. Sabbatical opportunities. Faculty are permitted to apply for a one-semester sabbatical
 (full salary) or a one-year sabbatical (half salary). Many of the faculty have availed
 themselves of this opportunity. One faculty member took a sabbatical in Spring 2006 to
 pursue image processing research. Two others took sabbaticals to work at NASA in
 Huntsville. No one has been denied a sabbatical request in recent memory.
 5. Travel funds and support for scholarly activity. Any faculty member who is
 presenting at a conference is guaranteed travel support. The amount depends upon the
 number of such trips requested, but a minimum of $1250 per trip has been provided for
 the past five years. If funds are available, a faculty member may also request funding
 for a conference at which s/he is not presenting. In the past five years, no travel funding

                                                    xiv
 requests have been denied. Additional travel funds are often available to the faculty
 member from funded research. Other funding requests, such as software purchases,
 books, equipment, and grading support are also routinely approved. Lab fee and
 university support fee moneys are available to meet these needs.

 The same factors that have produced a stable faculty have also allowed us to continue to
 hire quality faculty. In addition, every attempt is made to give new faculty well-defined
 courses and assistance with their initial offering of a course. Although the department
 does not have designated startup funds, many new faculty are able to secure funding to
 initiate a research program from either the Vice President for Research or from faculty
 development grants. The department also provides any reasonable equipment requested
 by new faculty.


2. Give counts of the total number of faculty and the number of resignations, retirements,
and new hires for each of the last five years. Indicate whether there are significant
problems attracting and retaining faculty, and if so, the causes.

 There has been no significant trouble hiring new faculty members. Not all candidates
 are interested in the geographic location, and salaries are low by national standards,
 although they are competitive with similar institutions in the region. The department is
 also very concerned with finding the right ―fit‖ and prefers to keep a position open
 rather than hire a poor match for current needs.

   Year         Total Faculty    Resignations     Retirements    New Hires     Open Pos.
2002-2003            8.5              0                1            0             0
2003-2004            8.5              1                0            0             0
2004-2005            7.5              0                0            0             1
2005-2006             9               1                1            1             2
2006-2007            8.5              0                0            1             1

F. Faculty Professional Activities

Summarize the professional activities of your faculty, attendance at meetings, university
and professional honors won by individuals, etc. Just summarize here; details should
appear in individual faculty vitas.

 Below are approximate numbers for various categories. An attempt has been made to
 count a paper only once if it was co-authored by several members of the department.

 Number of journal papers (last 5 years): 11
 Number of conference papers (last 5 years): 32
 Number of conference presentations (last 5 years): 13
 Number of conferences attended (last 5 years): 25
 Number of patent disclosures (last 5 years): 1

                                            xv
 Number of grant proposals submitted (last 5 years): 27
 Grants funded (last 5 years): 13, $2.3M total value, $1M plus equipment to the
 department
 Awards:
     Campus Outstanding Professor Award: 2 [plus Roger Opp‘s two awards]
     Campus Outstanding Teaching Award: 1
     NASA Space Act Award in 2001


Standard VI-4. There must be office support consistent with the type of program, level of
scholarly activity, and needs of the faculty members.

G. Office Support

Describe the level and adequacy of office support. The description should address
secretarial support, office equipment, and the total group supported by this equipment and
staff.

 The department is allocated 1.5 secretaries who do work for both the computer science
 and mathematics faculty. In addition, workstudy students are available to render
 assistance to the office staff. In 2006-2007 the department had a serious shortage of
 secretarial help due to the prolonged illness of the full-time secretary. She has since
 resigned for health reasons. A search is currently underway to fill her position.

 We have been able to keep office equipment current, including a new copier, several
 high-speed networked laser printers, and upgrades to the computers in the office. Office
 supplies are readily available, and special requests are handled by the secretarial staff.


Standard VI-5. Adequate time must be assigned for the administration of the program.
H. Time for Administration

Describe the adequacy of the time assigned for the administration of the program.

 The department chair gets one course release time per semester. This would be
 inadequate were it not for the fact that the chair is often assigned courses that are less
 time-consuming to teach. With the release time and the course assignment, the chair‘s
 job is manageable. Also, the chair‘s job is a three-year rotation, so no one is required to
 perform these duties long term. Other faculty members assist the chair by performing
 various administrative duties.

Standard VI-6. Upper levels of administration must provide the program with the
resources and atmosphere to function effectively with the rest of the institution.


                                             xvi
I. Adequacy of Resources

Describe the adequacy of the resources and the atmosphere provided by the upper
administration for the program to function effectively with the rest of the institution.

 It would be difficult to imagine a more supportive atmosphere from the upper
 administration. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost is a former head
 of the Math/CS department who has a firm understanding of the resources necessary for
 a good Computer Science program.

 The institution has reorganized into two colleges, the College of Engineering led by
 Dean Duane Abata and the College of Science and Letters led by Dean Duane Hrncir.
 In recognition of the strong engineering orientation of the program, the College of
 Engineering is the degree-granting college for the CS degree. Curricular issues are
 referred to the Dean of Engineering. The Mathematics degree is granted by the College
 of Science and Letters, and the mathematics faculty logically fall into that college. Due
 to the cordial relations enjoyed by the department, the CS faculty elected to remain with
 their colleagues and report to the Dean of Science and Letters. Thus, the department is
 under the supervision of ―two masters‖, which some might consider a disadvantage. On
 the contrary, having both deans understand the program and provide insight and support
 from their respective points of view is a great strength.

 Resources to support higher education are limited in many states, and South Dakota is
 no exception. Declining enrollments in science and engineering have been keenly felt at
 this institution, due to its single focus in these areas. However, the state recognizes the
 importance of these programs to economic development and has continued to support
 SDSM&T through the recent decline in enrollments. Likewise, the administration at all
 levels has continued to provide the same level of support for computer science in spite
 of lower enrollments. The institution has taken the long view in its resource allocation
 strategy.

F. Leadership

Positive and constructive leadership at the college/school level and within the program‘s
department are especially important to the program‘s quality. Evaluate this leadership
and the interaction between these levels of administration.

 The department chair is appointed by the president with input from the faculty. No chair
 has ever been appointed over the objections of the department faculty. The chair is a
 rotating position, with a three-year term being standard. Although the chair may be
 either a computer science faculty member or a mathematics faculty member (or
 someone with responsibilities in both programs), the computer science program has
 always received strong support from the department chair. Two faculty members are
 selected to provide administrative assistance to the chair for the Mathematics program
 and Computer Science program. This provides a very flat management structure,
 allowing a large number of faculty members to participate in departmental governance.


                                            xvii
 The chair reports to both the Dean of the College of Science and Letters, for matters
 pertaining to all faculty and the Mathematics program, and to the Dean of the College of
 Engineering, for computer science curriculum matters. This strengthens the program,
 since both deans provide advice and support.

 The deans report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. Relations
 between every level are congenial, helpful, and collegial. A graphical representation of
 the leadership structure for the university is provided in Appendix I. Appendix III
 provides a condensed view of the leadership structures specific to the Computer Science
 program.

Standard VI-7. Resources must be provided to acquire and maintain laboratory facilities
that meet the needs of the program.

G. Laboratory and Computing Resources

Briefly describe the resources available for the program to acquire and maintain
laboratory facilities. Include information on how the institution determines the adequacy
of these resources.

 Laboratory and computing resources come from several sources. These include money
 allocated to the department for general expenditures (University Support Fee or USF),
 lab fee money generated by departmental courses, equipment supplied by Instructional
 Technology Services (ITS), and grants.

 The amount of money available from these sources has been sufficient to maintain the
 program. Lab fee money is dependent upon the number of credit hours of lab generated
 and can vary significantly. In 2004-2005, $22,000 was available to the department; in
 2005-2006, only $13,900 was available because a large class dropped its lab component;
 and in 2006-2007, due to a fee increase, the department was allocated $18,400 in lab fee
 money. However, lab fee money can be carried forward, which allows the department
 to plan for major purchases every few years while still performing routine repairs and
 replacements. When combined with USF and grant funds, the department typically has
 $15,000-$20,000 available each year for equipment. These funds are primarily used to
 update faculty machines, to maintain the Linux/Assembly lab, and to purchase
 specialized equipment. The institution is fortunate to have alumni at Microsoft who
 donate much of the software used in the program.

 ITS has provided equipment and support for the PC labs housed in ―our‖ building
 (McLaury) as well as in other buildings around campus. Beginning Fall 2007, three
 campus labs will be removed as both the freshman and sophomore classes participate in
 the Tablet PC program. The McLaury lab will be converted to a Tablet PC lab with six
 desktop machines available for use by students without tablets. This will not change the
 funding required by the department. Tablet PCs were provided for all computer science
 faculty members using non-departmental funds.

 Funding allocations are determined by the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost.

                                          xviii
    She allocates monies based on estimates of need provided by the Dean and the Chair of
    the department. However, if an estimate is flawed or unexpected circumstances arise,
    both the Vice President and the Dean have discretionary funds in reserve to address the
    situation. Budgets are reviewed annually to assess changing needs.


   Standard VI-8. Resources must be provided to support library and related information retrieval facilities
   that meet the needs of the program.


   H. Library Resources

   Briefly describe the resources available for the support of the library and related
   information retrieval facilities. Include information on how the institution determines the
   adequacy of these resources.


As noted in Section VII, the library acquisitions budget for the Computer Science program is
   determined as part of the overall materials budget for the campus. A base amount is
   given to each department to ensure an adequate amount of funding. Over the past few
   years, the average annual amount allocated to each department was $3,000. This is in
   addition to subscriptions, such as IEEE journals, that are used by multiple departments.
Any faculty or staff member may request library materials at any time. Every semester, each
   department assigns a liaison who works with library staff to order materials based on the
   amount allocated by the library for that department. The library also retains some funds
   to fill gaps or deal with special requests.
   The computer science faculty find the resources available for library acquisitions to be
   adequate. However, electronic access to additional full-text journals would be desirable.


   Standard VI-9. There must be evidence that the institutional support and financial
   resources will remain in place throughout the period of accreditation.

   I. Continuity of Institutional Support

   Discuss and show evidence of continuity of institutional support for the program in the
   past, and problems that have existed or are anticipated in this area, if any.

   Support for the program has been consistent. The two major areas of financial support
   are in faculty positions and administrative funds available to the department. As noted in
   Part A of this section, eight to nine faculty positions have been allocated to Computer
   Science for each of the past five years. Not all of the positions have been filled every
   year, including the 2006-2007 academic year. The department was unable to fill the open
   position in a search conducted in spring 2007 but will begin a new search in the fall.
   Thus, support is stable and anticipated to remain at current levels.

   Funding for administrative activities has also remained relatively stable. The major
   sources of funding for the department are the University Support Fee (USF), Lab fees,

                                                       xix
and GTA allocations. USF has been approximately $41,000 per year for the past five
years. These funds are used to support travel, purchase supplies for the office, and make
miscellaneous purchases. The amount of money available has been sufficient to maintain
the program. Departmental lab fees allocations vary between $13,000 and $22,000 per
year in recent years and have been adequate to fulfill all reasonable equipment requests.
Departmental GTA allocations have also been stable in the range $17,000 - $19,000 per
year. These funds are used to hire graduate students to assist in structured laboratories.

The present financial support is adequate to meet the departmental needs and is expected
to remain at current levels for the foreseeable future.

Appendix I-I. Information Relative to the Entire Institution
A. General Information

Institution    South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
Department     Mathematics and Computer Science
Street         501 East Saint Joseph Street
City           Rapid City
State          SD
Zip            57701
URL            www.sdsmt.edu

Name and Title of Chief Executive Officer of Campus (President, Chancellor, etc.)

            Dr. Charles C. Ruch                                President
                  (Name)                                        (Title)

B. Type of Control

Private, non-profit
Private, other
Federal
State                     X
Municipal
Other (specify)
Affiliation, if private

Check more than one, if necessary. If the above classifications do not properly apply to
the institution, please describe its type of control.

NA



C. Regional or Institutional Accreditation



                                            xx
Name the organizations by which the institution is now accredited, give dates of most
recent accreditation. Attach a copy of the most recent accreditation action by any
organization accrediting the institution or any of its computer-related programs.

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is accredited by the Higher Learning
Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities, the
most recent accreditation visit having taken place in 2006. The next HLC visit is
scheduled for 2016. The computer science program is currently accredited by the
Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. All engineering programs at the
South Dakota School of Mines and Technology are accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. with the exception of new programs in
environmental engineering and in mining engineering and management. We are awaiting
a decision in July 2007 on the environmental engineering program which was put
forward for accreditation in 2006-07. We anticipate putting the mining engineering and
management program forward for initial accreditation in 2008. The chemistry program is
accredited by the American Chemical Society. Copies of the most recent accreditation
actions follow this page

D. Enrollment

Total enrollment for the entire institution (FTE)     1752 FTE (Fall 2006)
Total faculty for the entire institution (FTE)        163 FTE

E. Funding Process

Describe the process for allocating institutional funds to the computer science program.

Budget requests are built by the central administration of SDSM&T with the help of the
deans and department chairs. This budget is presented and defended to the Board of
Regents of Higher Education for South Dakota and eventually to the Appropriations
Committee of the State Legislature. Each campus has an opportunity to charge approved
fees to cover critical areas. Capital assets follow a similar process of presentation.
When the Legislature has passed the Appropriations Bill, it is the responsibility of the
Board of Regents to allocate budgets to the separate schools according to the legislative
intent.
The instructional program budget is distributed on the SDSM&T campus by the Provost
and Vice President for Academic Affairs with the approval of the President of SDSM&T.
Funds are distributed on a college basis with each college dean having the authority to
reallocate funds within the college. When faculty positions become open, the Provost, in
consultation with the college deans determines whether the position should stay within
the college. The college dean has the authority to reallocate positions within the college.
An institutional Budget Advisory Committee annually considers requests from
departments and divisions for use of any incremental institutional funds that may become
available, and recommends priorities should budget reductions become necessary. The
Committee‘s recommendations are forwarded to the President for his consideration. As
with all tax-assisted institutions, a good deal of accountability is prescribed. About one-
                                            xxi
third of the budget of state higher education in general comes from state taxes, with the
remainder coming from student tuition and fees, gifts, and research activity.


J. Promotion and Faculty Tenure

Summarize the promotion and tenure system and the system for merit salary adjustments.
(Give an overview of actual practice; do not reproduce an entire section from the faculty
handbook.)

To be eligible for promotion, the faculty member must meet the minimum rank
qualifications set forth in the Agreement between the South Dakota Board of Regents and
the Council of Higher Education, an affiliate of the South Dakota Education Association.
These specify educational experience and years of experience required for each rank. In
addition to the minimum promotion criteria, faculty must meet institutional and
departmental standards for promotion and tenure. In practice, this means that to be
considered for promotion a faculty member must excel in at least one of the areas of (1)
teaching, (2) research, scholarship and/or creative endeavor, and (3) service. Normally,
strength is also expected in one or two secondary areas.
Faculty members who wish to be considered for promotion must notify their department
chair in writing no later than October 5. It is the responsibility of the faculty member to
prepare and submit all favorable documentation that he or she wants considered in the
decision and to submit this with the request for consideration. This documentation,
together with the recommendation of the department chair and the dean, is then
forwarded to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs by November 5.
Faculty members are considered for tenure in their sixth year of tenure-track service, and
must have achieved the rank of Associate Professor to be granted tenure. The procedures
for tenure application are the same as those for promotion described above. Faculty who
do not apply for or who are not granted tenure must be given notice of non-renewal of
their tenure-track contract. The contract between the Board of Regents and the Council
on Higher Education requires that unsuccessful applicants for tenure be granted one
additional term contract following the decision not to award tenure.
The Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs then makes these materials
available to the institutional Promotion and Tenure Committee. By contract, Promotion
and Tenure Committee must consist of equal numbers of members elected by the faculty
and members appointed by the President. With the recent reorganization into two
colleges, the Faculty Senate is currently formulating recommendations concerning the
promotion and tenure process and the structure of the committee.
The Promotion and Tenure Committee reviews all materials and has access to the faculty
member‘s personnel file. The committee consults with the faculty member and other
appropriate individuals as it sees fit. By January 15, the Committee forwards all
information, together with its recommendation, to the President who then forwards his
recommendation for or against promotion to the Board of Regents.
Distribution of salary monies appropriated by the Legislature is negotiated by the Board
of Regents and the Council on Higher Education. The allocation of salary increases for

                                            xxii
the past four years has been based on market (25% of funds), performance (60% of
funds), and institutional priorities (15%), with specific formulas for this allocation
specified in the negotiated agreement. During the annual performance evaluation,
department chairs must indicate whether, in their estimation, the faculty member has met,
fallen short of, or exceeded expectations in teaching, in scholarship, and in service. Each
college dean uses this information to determine a merit category for college faculty
members in each of the three areas. This categorization is then used in the allocation
formula for performance. For the past two years, SDSM&T has identified ―First year
programs and/or stimulating scholarly activities‖ as its institutional priority.




                                           xxiii
xxiv
xxv
Appendix I-II. General Information on the Unit Responsible for the Computer
Science Program

If you are having more than one program evaluated, particularly if the programs are on
separate campuses, the answers to these questions may vary from one program to
another. If this is the case, please use separate copies of this section for each program,
and clearly delineate which program is being described.

A. Computer Science Program Unit

 Name Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
 URL  http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/sdsmt/department/math


If the computer science program unit is not a department reporting to an administrative
officer (e.g., Dean of College of Arts and Sciences) who in turn reports to president,
provost, or equivalent executive officer, describe the unit.

 NA




B.     Administrative Head

         Dr. Roger Johnson FY07                   Chair, Department of Mathematics and
          (Dr. Kyle Riley FY08)                             Computer Science
                 (Name)                                          (Title)

C. Organization Chart

Attach an organization chart showing how the unit fits into the administrative structure of
the institution.




                                           xxvi
  South Dakota                                      Dr. Charles Ruch,
 School of Mines                                        President
 and Technology
                                   Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
 Academic Affairs
                                               Dr. Karen L. Whitehead


Associate Vice         Dean of             Dean of Science         Dean of Graduate          Information             Devereaux
  President          Engineering               & Letters               Education         Technology Services          Library
Dr. Kate Alley        Dr. Duane            Dr. Duane Hrncir        Dr. Alvis Lisenbee,        Mr. Bryan              Ms. Patricia
                        Abata                                            Interim         Schumacher, Director         Andersen

                         Chemical &
                          Biological            Atmospheric
    Academic &
                         Engineering             Sciences
    Enrollment
                          Dr. David              Dr. Mark
      Services
                         Dixon, Chair            Hjelmfelt,
   Ms. Barb Dolan
                                                   Chair

                            Civil &
                         Environmental           Chemistry
     Women in                                     Dr. Dan
     Science &            Engineering
                           Dr. Scott           Heglund, Chair
    Engineering
  Ms. Royia Decker       Kenner, Chair

                                                 Humanities
                         Electrical &           Dr. Rod Rice,
                          Computer                  Chair
                         Engineering
                          Dr. Brian
                         Hemmelman,
                                                  Military
                            Chair
                                                  Science
                                                  Maj. Jon
                          Geology &             Hansen, Chair
                          Geological
                         Engineering
                         Dr. Maribeth          Mathematics &
                         Price, Chair            Computer
                                                   Science
                                               Dr. Kyle Riley,
                           Industrial               Chair
                          Engineering
                           Dr. Stuart
                         Kellogg, Chair           Physical
                                                 Education
                          Mechanical              Ms. Barb
                          Engineering            Felderman,
                           Dr. Mike                 Chair
                          Langerman,
                            Chair
                                                   Physics
                          Materials &             Dr. Andre
                         Metallurgical         Petukhov, Chair
                          Engineering
                         Dr. Jon Kellar,       Social Sciences
                              Chair              Dr. Roger
                                                 Dendinger,
                            Mining                  Chair
                         Engineering &
                          Management
                           Mr. Shashi            Museum of
                          Kanth, Chair            Geology


                            Center for
                            Advanced
                         Manufacturing
                           Production
                        Dr. Dan Dolan &
                          Dr. Michael
                        Batchelder, Co-
                            Directors                                                                 Revised May 2007




                                                           xxvii
  D. Computer-Related Undergraduate Degree Programs
  List all undergraduate computer-related degree programs offered by the institution,
  beginning with the program(s) being evaluated.

                        Years          Degree                               If accredited, by
  Program Title        Required       Awarded        Administrative Unit         whom
Computer Science          4             B.S.        Department of           CAC of ABET
                                                    Mathematics and
                                                    Compute Science
Computer Engr.             4            B.S.        Department of           EAC of ABET
                                                    Electrical and
                                                    Computer Engineering

  Are these programs adequately differentiated in all university information? Explain how.

   Separate catalog descriptions are provided for the two programs. Each program has its
   own fact sheet that is used by the Admissions Office when discussing programs with
   prospective students at College Fairs and on campus visits.




                                           xxviii
Appendix I-III. Finances

A. Finances Related to the Computer Science Program(s)
For the computer science program, indicate below the funds expended during the fiscal
year immediately preceding the visit 1.

                                                            Institutional           Non-recurring or
                                                               Funds*                Outside Funds
  Administrative Salaries                                 $19,265
  Faculty Salaries                                        $1,223,225
  Non-teaching Professionals' Salaries2                   0
  Support Personnel Salaries & Wages                      $14,588
          Secretarial
          Technician                                      0
          Other (undergraduate students)                  $5,728
  Graduate Students                                       $45,046                 $9,877

  Operating Expenditures                                  $20,009                 $7,778
  (Excluding research operations and travel)
  Capital Equipment Expenditure:
  (Including value of allocated time for
  teaching and research):
           Teaching
           Research
  Computer Expenditures: (total, including
  value of allocated computer time for
  teaching and research)
           Hardware                                       $18,187
           Software                                       **                      $110,000
           Allocated time                                 **
  Travel Expenditures (non-research funds)                $3,552                  $200
  Scholarship Awards (if administered by                                          $8,450
  the Computer Science Program Unit)
  Library (if administered by Computer
  Science Program Unit)
  Research (if separately budgeted)                       $2,611
  Other (specify)
  Total                                                   1,341,871
 *Since the computer science program is part of an integrated department, it is difficult to separate out
   expenditures for it alone. The amounts included here include only those expenditures funded through
   the departmental accounts. Since we are in the process of migrating to a new finance system (Banner),
   it has been difficult to identify expenditures from other institutional accounts that tie to the computer
   science program. We hope to have done so by the time of the visit.
 **Campus computing resources are networked and supported by Information Technology Services (ITS).
   ITS provides technical support for faculty equipment and computer labs. Networked resources,
   including internet access and Internet2 access, are available to all students and faculty. The ITS budget
   for FY07 was $1,836,927


                                                   xxix
B. Operating and Computing Expenditures for the Five Fiscal Years Immediately
          Preceding that Reported in III A

1. Operating expenses for the computer science program unit.

     Fiscal Year           FY06        FY05         FY04        FY03         FY02
     Institutional Funds   $24,847     $25,426      $32,232     $23,869      $25,550
     Outside Funds         $2,363      $1,080       $2,525      $939         $630

2. Computer hardware/software capital expenditures (excluding equipment used
primarily for research) for the computer science program unit.

     Fiscal Year           FY06        FY05         FY04        FY03         FY02
     Institutional Funds   $36,742     $7,397       $5,415      $4,472       $13,627
     Outside Funds         $110,000

C.    Additional Funding

If additional funds, other than those listed in Table A above, are available to faculty to
support scholarly activities such as travel to technical meetings, e.g., consulting support,
give the number of faculty for whom this type of support is appropriate and an estimate
of the amount of support available.

 From 2002-2005 approximately $90,000 annually was available to support requested
 faculty development activities. The majority of these monies came through a grant from
 the Bush Foundation and were allocated by an institutional Faculty Development
 Committee that considered individual faculty proposals on an ongoing basis. Activities
 supported ranged from travel support to attend professional meetings to bringing
 presenters to campus.
 Currently $15,000 in faculty development money is funded institutionally and has been
 allocated out to departments for their use. In FY07 $3,461 in faculty development funds
 were spent by the Mathematics and Computer Science Department, of which $2,391
 went to computer science faculty members.
 The Vice President for Research considers requests for travel support for activities
 related to development of research agendas.




                                            xxx
Appendix I-IV. Computer Science Program Personnel and Policies Towards
Consulting, Professional Development, and Recruiting

A. Term of Appointment of Administrative Head

         9 month    X         12 Month                 Other (specify)

B. Number of Personnel Associated with Program

                                                                  Part Time
                                               Full-time                                Total
                                               Number          Number       FTE         FTE
  Faculty                                  8               1             .50          8.50
  Non-teaching Professionals
  Administrative                                           1             .30
  Computer Lab Personnel:
          Professionals
          Technicians
  Secretarial, Accounting, etc.            1                                          1.00
  Graduate Teaching Assistants                             9             4.01         4.01
  Graduate Research Assistants                             1             .62          .62
  Graduate Students (Fall 2006)            91                                         91
  Undergraduate Students (Fall 2006)       15                                         15


C. Policies

Provide a brief description to give an overview.

1. Describe policy toward private consulting work, sponsored research projects, and
   extra compensation.

  Private Consulting Work
  Policy on private consulting work is defined in the collective bargaining agreement,
  Section IX, Article 9.5. This policy deals with private consulting which requires the
  faculty member’s absence from duties and limits such time to a maximum of four (4)
  days per month with an accumulated maximum of six (6) days during the contract
  period. Such work must be related to the faculty member’s duties.
  The faculty member who receives release time for private consulting work must
  receive prior written approval from the President and must file a report with the
  President after the work is completed.
  Sponsored Research Projects.
  Sponsored research participation is strongly encouraged. Faculty members
  participating in sponsored research do not receive extra compensation during the

                                           xxxi
  academic year, but those who continue such research on a full-time basis during the
  summer may receive compensation equal to one-ninth of the academic year salary
  for each month worked during the summer. Faculty members who have funding for
  sponsored research during the academic year are relieved of a proportionate part of
  their teaching load.

  Extra Compensation
  Faculty members who voluntarily teach overloads receive overload pay as do faculty
  who teach summer courses. The established rate for such efforts is 7% of the nine-
  month base salary per three-credit course. It is rare that computer science faculty
  offer to teach overloads, and there has not been the need to ask them to do so.




2. State the standard teaching, administrative, research, and other loads on the faculty, in
   general terms.

 The nominal teaching load under the union contract is 12 credit hours per semester.
 However, contract language is flexible and the practice within the department is to
 keep teaching assignments to two or three courses per semester with a maximum of
 two preparations whenever possible.
 Tenure-track and tenured faculty are expected to serve on departmental and campus
 committees. Committee assignments for AY 2006-07 are detailed in the faculty
 resumes in the self-study. The department has committees for both the undergraduate
 and the graduate computer science programs, and each computer science faculty
 member is assigned to one of these. These committees are given responsibility for
 curriculum, make recommendations on the allocation of departmental resources, and
 advise the department chair on any other matters concerning the program.
 Faculty members are expected to pursue research and scholarly activity appropriate to
 their interests and the goals of the department and institution.
 Each semester, the department chair meets individually with faculty members to
 discuss their professional objectives in teaching, research, and service. The
 proportion of effort in each area varies with the individual, with teaching typically
 accounting for 60%-75% of effort for computer science faculty members.




3. Describe policies and procedures for recruiting faculty for the computer science
   program. Describe any barriers to hiring the appropriate faculty.

 When faculty positions become vacant, a search committee is constituted to conduct a
 national search. Advertisements are placed in appropriate professional journals, and
 position announcements are sent to other colleges and universities as well as to the
 South Dakota Job Service. The personnel department maintains a manual detailing

                                           xxxii
specific search procedures and this will be available to the team if they wish to review
it.
While every effort is made to bring in new faculty at salary levels close to the average
for rank and discipline as indicated by the Faculty Salary Survey by Discipline
conducted annually by Oklahoma State University, the national shortage of computer
science Ph.D.s coupled with the geographic isolation of SDSM&T present challenges in
filling positions.




                                         xxxiii
Appendix I-V. Computer Science Program Enrollment and Degree Data

If you are having more than one program evaluated, particularly if the programs are on
separate campuses, the answers to these questions may vary from one program to
another. If this is the case, please use separate copies of this section for each program,
and clearly delineate which program is being described.

   Give below enrollment figures for the first term of the current and five previous
   academic years and the number of undergraduate and graduate degrees conferred.
   (The current year is the year in which this report is being prepared.) List data
   beginning with the most recent year first. If part-time students are involved, give the
   number as FTE/actual number, e.g., 10/40.

Institution as a Whole

                          Enrollment                     Total   Total           Degree
    AY        1st     2nd    3rd      4th         5th     UG     Grad      BS      MS        PhD
  06-07      473     376    279      436                1870     254     227      66         7
  05-06      595     387    317      425                2057     256     246      78         8
  04-05      657     351    306      440                2042     303     249      95         9
  03-04      729     403    352      436                2112     342     234      104        7
  02-03      731     401    326      455                2094     353     264      111        6
  01-02      704     402    328      432                2075     349     256      80         5

Unit offering Computer Science Program(s)—give total enrollment even if not all
students are in the program for which accreditation is requested.

                          Enrollment                     Total   Total           Degree
    AY        1st     2nd    3rd      4th         5th     UG     Grad      BS       MS       PhD
  06-07      34      18     15       24                 91       15      15       5          N/A
  05-06      31      21     15       33                 100      17      20       4          N/A
  04-05      33      18     23       41                 115      16      24       6          N/A
  03-04      46      24     31       40                 141      31      20       20         N/A
  02-03      50      33     30       33                 146      49      16       13         N/A
  01-02      65      30     27       32                 154      40      19       5          N/A

If the unit offering the Computer Science Program(s) offers more than one degree, please
complete an additional table for each program for which accreditation is requested:

Program      NA




                                          xxxiv
Appendix I-VI.     Admission Requirements

A. Admission of Students

1. Describe the criteria and procedures used for admitting students to the computer
science program(s).


 The admission requirements for the computer science program are the same as those
 for the institution as a whole. Students must meet the minimum requirements
 established by the South Dakota Board of Regents as well as, beginning in fall 2006,
 additional requirements established by the institution.
 Board of Regents Requirements
 Students under 24 years of age must have completed minimum high school
 coursework with an average grade of “C” or have demonstrated competencies
 through ACT subscores or AP tests. In addition, one of the following must hold: rank
 in the top 60% of their high school graduating class, or obtain ACT composite score
 of 18 or above, or obtain a high school GPA of at least 2.6 on a 4.0 scale.

 Minimum high school coursework includes
  Four years of English
  Three years of advanced mathematics
  Three years of laboratory science
  Three years of social studies
  Coursework addressing computer technology literacy skills and competencies
  One year of fine arts (effective Fall 2005)

 Students 24 years of age or older or who are transferring in more than 24 credit hours
 are admitted at the discretion of the institution.
 Additional SDSMT Requirements
 Students who appear prepared to take calculus as demonstrated by ACT composite and
 math scores of at least 25 and/or high school GPA of 3.5 with four years of mathematics
 are admitted automatically. Students who obtain an ACT composite or ACT math
 subscore of at least 21 or have a high school GPA of at least 2.75 are considered on an
 individual basis by the institution‘s Admissions Committee.


2. Describe procedures, including the evaluation of transfer credits, for students admitted
to the program as transfer students.

       a. From within the institution

 A student who changes majors within the institution is assigned an advisor within the
 department who determines which courses already taken apply toward the computer
 science major. Since there is little duplication of courses within the institution, the
 student typically will be required to take all courses explicitly required by the computer
 science program. In the case of students who have previously begun an electrical

                                           xxxv
 engineering major or computer engineering major, there is occasionally a determination
 that digital hardware courses taken in that department may be substituted for required
 computer science courses. Such decisions are documented by memoranda to the
 Registrar.

       b. From another institution

 Preceding matriculation of the transfer student at SDSM&T, the Registrar reviews the
 transcripts of new transfer students and indicates courses outside the major which appear
 to be eligible to meet system general education requirements. Decisions regarding
 system general education requirements are made by the Vice President for Academic
 Affairs in consultation with the appropriate departments.
 The annotated transcripts, together with transfer credit transmittal forms, are then sent to
 the department. The department has designated faculty members who review transcripts,
 course descriptions, and any other material the student may wish to present to determine
 whether courses taken elsewhere correspond with required courses in our curriculum.
 Following this review, a recommendation is made to the registrar regarding equivalency
 of transfer credits. In cases where there is substantive, but not total, correspondence of
 courses, the student is required to register for a special topics course and, under the
 guidance of a faculty member, cover the missing components of the course.
 All prior post secondary courses are transcripted on the SDSMT transcript regardless of
 their equivalency to SDSMT degree requirements.


3. Explain the policy of the institution in admitting students with conditions and state
how the conditions must be made up.

 A student who meets the ACT composite score or high school rank condition for
 admission but fails to meet high school course requirements in one area may be admitted
 provisionally. This occurs most frequently with respect to the fine arts requirement.
 The student will then be required to meet the admission requirements by satisfactorily
 completing appropriate college courses of an equivalent type in that area for credit.
 These credits will not be included toward graduation from SDSM&T unless the credits
 are earned during the student‘s first semester in college with a grade of C or better.


4. Describe the general policy and methods of the unit offering computer science
program(s) in regard to admission with advanced standing.

 We accept the CLEP and AP exams. These are most commonly requested in areas of
 English, humanities and social sciences, and, less frequently, in calculus. Students are
 admitted with advanced standing typically through the transfer of credit from other
 institutions as described in the response to question 2 above.




                                           xxxvi
   5.   Describe any special admission requirements for entry into the "upper division"
        in the computer science program(s).

Students are admitted into the computer science program as freshmen and there is no
formal ―upper division‖ designation. Students are classified as juniors upon completion
of 64 credit hours and as seniors upon completion of 96 credit hours. Students are free
to enroll in upper-level courses, i.e., courses numbered above 300, upon completion of
the published prerequisites for those courses.

Appendix II. Computer Science Program Assessment Plan




  Computer Science Program

                   Assessment Plan


                            Latest revision: April 25, 2007




                                        xxxvii
                                 Table of Contents

I. Overview of the Assessment Process

II. Mission Statements
        a. Institutional Mission
        b. Computer Science Mission
        c. Statement of Core Values
        d. Mapping the Computer Science Mission to the Institutional Mission

III. Program Objectives and Outcomes
        a. Program Objectives
        b. Mapping Objectives to Institutional Mission
        c. Program Outcomes
        d. Mapping Program Outcomes to Objectives
        e. Mapping Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes

IV. Data Collection
       a. The Instruments
       b. Reviewing the Data
       c. Additional Data Collected
       d. Mapping Instruments to Outcomes and Objectives

V. Changes Motivated by Assessment
      a. Changes in past five years
      b. Changes in-progress for 2007-2008

VI. Evaluation of the Assessment Plan

VII. Additional Information




                                        xxxviii
I. Overview of the assessment process
The departmental assessment process is modeled on the institutional assessment process
defined for all EAC accredited program. It is a variation of the ―double loop‖ structure
described in many publications. All activities occur within the framework defined by the
institutional mission and the departmental mission. This yearly cycle of continuous
improvement is illustrated below.




   Periodic review                     1. Determine                Feedback
    of assessment                         program                   to/from
       process                          objectives                constituents



                                          2. Identify
                                            desired
      5. Implement                        outcomes
        responses                                                       3. Select
                                                                      measurement
                                                                      instruments

                              4b.                        4a.
                            Evaluate                    Collect
                              data                       data




 7. Determine educational objectives with feedback from constituents.
 8. Determine outcomes required to achieve objectives.
 9. Select measurement instruments/data-collection methods to provide evidence of the
    degree to which objectives and outcomes are met. Select a mix of direct and
    indirect measures. Identify course outcomes that support program outcomes, and
    devise the means of measuring them within the context of the course.
 10. Collect and evaluate the data.
 11. Identify areas for improvement and establish benchmarks for monitoring progress
     toward improvement goals.
 12. Periodically review the assessment process as a whole by evaluating the effective
     completion of steps 1-5 described above.

Each piece of the process is described in greater detail below.

II. Mission Statements

                                             xxxix
All program activities, including assessment, must be in accord with the institutional
mission, vision and goals.


A. Institutional Mission, Vision, and Goal

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology serves the people of South Dakota as
their technological university. Its mission is to provide a well-rounded education that
prepares students for leadership roles in engineering and science; to advance the state of
knowledge and application of this knowledge through research and scholarship; and to
benefit the state, regions, and nation through collaborative efforts in education and
economic                                                                    development.

The School of Mines is dedicated to being a leader in 21st Century education that reflects
a belief in the role of engineers and scientists as crucial to the advancement of society.
Our vision is to be recognized as a premiere technological university in the United States.

Most immediately, our goal is to be recognized as the university of choice for
engineering and science within South Dakota and among our peer group of specialized
engineering and science universities.


B. Computer Science Program Mission Statement

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science upholds and strengthens the
mission of SDSM&T by providing excellence in instruction, innovation in research and
scholarship, and service to the university, the profession, and the public. The primary
goal of the Computer Science program is to prepare the graduate to enter a rapidly-
changing field as a competent computer scientist. We expect our graduates to be capable
in all phases of software development, possess a firm understanding of hardware
technologies, have the strong mathematical background necessary for scientific
computing, and be sufficiently well versed in general theory to allow growth within the
discipline as it advances. Graduates of our program are also prepared to assume
leadership roles by possessing good communication skills, the ability to work effectively
as team members, and an appreciation for their social and ethical responsibility in a
global setting. The department is strongly committed to supporting its faculty in their
research efforts, which yield state-of-the-art instruction in the classroom as well as the
acquisition and dissemination of knowledge in the dynamic field of Computer Science.


C. Statement of Core Values

Departmental strategic planning activities provide a structure for the self-examination of
current practices in the department and provide a mechanism for identifying the direction
in which the department believes it should be going. As a starting point to those
activities, the faculty agreed upon a statement of core values which define who we are
and why we are here.

                                             xl
(a) QUALITY. The faculty is dedicated to providing a quality learning experience for
our students and all that implies. First, it requires excellence in the classroom – in
content, delivery, and motivational factors. It includes quality interactions with our
students outside of the classroom. It means creating an environment in which student
feel welcome, comfortable, receptive to new ideas, and cared for. Ideally, the
department wants to foster a sense of community among the students.

The faculty strive to do more than impart information to the students. Every member of
the department is here because of a love of teaching, an excitement about his or her
discipline, and an enthusiasm for imparting the excitement and beauty of the discipline to
the next generation of explorers. Students often comment that this department has the
best faculty. It is likely that the perceived differences have little to do with professional
competence or technique and much to do with the excitement, the spark, that the faculty
bring to a class.

A quality education comes from a quality faculty and the department is committed to
providing support for faculty to enable them to do their best. It also implies careful
hiring so that the department management philosophy of ―hire good people and get out of
their way‖ can be implemented. The collegial atmosphere in the department is one of its
greatest assets and must be maintained at all costs.

(b) CURRENCY. The department is keenly aware of its responsibility to the students,
the university, and the citizens of the state. An important part of that responsibility is to
provide a current education that will enable the graduate to be successful throughout his
or her life. This includes providing a strong foundation, teaching the latest developments,
working with other departments to define our service role, and understanding the
significant trends in mathematics education. To these ends, the department devotes
considerable effort to the constant re-examination of the curriculum.

(c) FAIRNESS. This is a value that is hard to describe but is one of the unspoken
constants in the department. It also one of the department‘s greatest strengths. Every
faculty member is dedicated to being fair and impartial in the treatment of students,
whether in grading, providing extra help, awarding scholarship monies, or
accommodating special requests.

(d) RESPECT. The faculty, without exception, are strong role models for the academic
ideal of respect for differing viewpoints and appreciation of diversity. All students feel
welcome in the department. The faculty particularly enjoy their interactions with the
international students.

Within the framework of these shared values, the faculty work as individuals, and as a
cohesive unit, to deliver the Computer Science major and to fulfill our service role to the
university.


D. Mapping the Departmental Mission to The Institutional Mission

                                             xli
   Institutional Mission              Good
                                      communication              strong
                                      skills                     technical
 to provide a well-rounded                                       skills
 education that prepares
 students for leadership
 roles in engineering and
 science
                                                             ability to work
                                                             in teams
                              social, ethical
                              responsibility in
                              a global setting


                                                                 support     for
                                                                 faculty
to advance the state of                                          research and
knowledge              and                                       publication
application     of     this          produce
knowledge          through           graduates capable
                                     of advancing the
research and scholarship
                                     field




                                                      dissemination
                                                      of advances in
                                                      teaching

and to benefit the state,
regions,     and     nation                                      support for
through       collaborative                                      faculty
efforts in education                                             research
and               economic
development.
                                                    Computer Science Mission




                              xlii
III. Program Objectives and Outcomes

This section provides a list of the objectives and outcomes for the computer science
program as well as a mapping from the program objectives to the institutional mission, a
mapping from the program outcomes to the program objectives, and a mapping of course
outcomes to program outcomes. Only a summary of the course outcomes mappings is
provided below. The full list of outcomes for each required and elective computer
science course, along with the mapping of each course outcome to a program outcome, is
provided at the end of this document.


A. Computer Science Program Objectives

The objectives describe the expected accomplishments of graduates of the program
approximately three to five years after graduation.

1. Graduates who have entered industry will have demonstrated a mastery of their field.

2. Graduates who continued their education beyond the bachelor‘s level will have the
necessary background to successfully complete advanced degrees.

3. Graduates will have demonstrated their ability to assume leadership roles through
career advancement or by assuming responsibilities beyond those expected of entry-level
positions.

4. Graduates will be involved in their profession and make contributions to the field of
computer science.

5. Graduates will have the requisite foundation for life-long learning and will possess the
skills to adapt and thrive in the rapidly-changing field of computer science.




                                           xliii
B. Mapping the Departmental Objectives to The Institutional Mission




                                   Institutional Mission




     to provide a well-                     to advance the state       to benefit the state,
     rounded education that                 of knowledge and           region,     and     nation
     prepares students for                  application of this        through      collaborative
     leadership roles in                    knowledge through          efforts in education
     engineering       and                  research        and        and             economic
     science                                scholarship                development




                                                                                  graduates will be
                                                                                  able to adapt and
                                                 graduates will
       graduates will                                                                thrive in a
                                                  successfully
         possess a                                                                rapidly-changing
                                                    complete
       mastery of the                                                                    field
                                                graduate degrees
           field



                                                                     graduates will
                          graduates will                                 make
                            be able to                              contributions to
                             assume                                   the field of
                         leadership roles                          computer science




                                  Computer Science Objectives




                                                   xliv
C. Computer Science Program Outcomes

The outcomes describe what students in the program are expected to know and be able to
do upon graduation with a degree in Computer Science from SDSM&T. The focus of the
program is on preparing graduates for software development careers that emphasize
scientific computing. The program outcomes reflect the scientific-computing emphasis
that distinguishes the program in the state system of higher education. In addition, the
program prepares students for a wide variety careers by emphasizing communication,
teamwork, and ethics, and by exploring the global and societal impacts of innovation and
technological advancement.

At the time of graduation, all students will:
   13. have a strong foundation in the software development process;
   14. be able to read and write program code in a variety of programming languages
       and have extensive experience with at least one high-level language;
   15. have experience in programming for and using a variety of computer operating
       systems;
   16. possess problem-solving and algorithm-development skills;
   17. have a strong understanding of the theoretical foundations of computing;
   18. have a strong background in computer hardware;
   19. possess an extensive background in computer-related mathematics;
   20. have an appreciation of the scientific method;
   21. have developed and practiced effective communication skills;
   22. have experience working in teams;
   23. understand and respect the professional standards of ethics expected of a
       computer scientist;
   24. have an appreciation for the societal/global impact of computing.




                                                xlv
D. Mapping Computer Science Program Outcomes to Objectives

                   1     Graduates    2     Graduates    3      Graduates    4 Graduates       5 Graduates will
                   who         have   who continued      will         have   will         be   have           the
                   entered            their education    demonstrated        involved in       requisite
                   industry will      beyond       the   their ability to    their             foundation     for
                   have               bachelor‘s         assume              profession        life-long learning
                   demonstrated a     level will have    leadership roles    and       make    and will possess
                   mastery       of   the necessary      through career      contributions     the skills to
                   their field        background to      advancement or      to the field of   adapt and thrive
                                      successfully       by     assuming     computer          in the rapidly-
                                      complete           responsibilities    science           changing field of
                                      advanced           beyond      those                     computer science
                                      degrees            expected       of
                                                         entry-level
                                                         positions
1 have a strong
foundation in
the     software          *                  *                                     *
development
process
2 be able to
read and write
program code in
a variety of
programming
languages and             *                  *
have extensive
experience with
at least one
high-level
language
3           have
experience in
programming
for and using a
                          *                  *
variety       of
computer
operating
systems
4        possess
problem solving
and algorithm             *                  *                                     *                   *
development
skills
5 have a strong
understanding
of           the
                          *                  *                                     *                   *
theoretical
foundations of
computing
6 have a strong
background in
                          *                  *                                     *                   *
computer
hardware

                                                     xlvi
7 possess an
extensive
background in
                     *               *   *
computer-
related
mathematics
8      have an
appreciation of
                                     *   *
the     scientific
method
9           have
developed and
practiced
                                 *   *
effective
communication
skills
10          have
experience
                                 *   *
working         in
teams
11 understand
and respect the
professional
standards       of               *       *
ethics expected
of a computer
scientist
12      have an
appreciation for
the      societal/               *   *   *
global impact of
computing




                         xlvii
E. Mapping Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes

This chart summarizes how the course outcomes support the program outcomes. The full
mapping for individual course outcomes to program outcomes is provided at the end of
this document. This chart is useful to the department as a mechanism for measuring:
1. that every program outcome is mapped to, and
2. that courses provide sufficient coverage of each program outcome
Elective courses are marked in blue, required courses in black.


                                        Program Outcomes
            1      2      3      4     5        6    7      8      9     10      11    12
Course
150         x                    x                                               x
250         x      x             x
251                              x     x        x    x
300         x      x      x      x     x                           x      x
314         x      x      x      x     x        x    x
317                              x     x        x
372         x      x             x     x             x
410         x      x      x      x     x        x    x      x      x      x      x     x
421         x      x      x      x     x                           x      x      x     x
433         x      x      x      x     x        x    x             x      x      x
440                              x     x        x
445                                    x
447         x      x      x      x     x             x             x      x      x
448         x                    x     x             x      x             x      x     x
456                x      x      x     x        x
461                x      x      x     x                                  x      x
463                                    x        x           x
464         x      x      x      x     x        x    x             x      x      x
465         x      x      x      x                                 x      x      x     x
470         x      x      x      x     x                           x      x
484         x      x      x      x     x                                               x
492                              x                          x
Required     8     9      7     13     10       5    3      0      3      4      3     2
Electives    6     5      5      7      8       4    5      4      5      6      6     3
Total       14    14     12     20     18       9    8      4      8     10      9     5




                                       xlviii
Evaluation
The summary chart given above is used by the department at the intensive curriculum
review held every two years. The department has identified a niche in scientific
computing which implies a strong emphasis on mathematics and theory, and a significant
hardware component in addition to software development skills. The chart shows that the
emphasis on mathematics is applied throughout the computer science courses, not just in
the 24 credits of required mathematics courses. Three required courses have significant
mathematics content as do five of the elective offerings. In addition, five required
courses stress hardware and four electives do likewise. Teamwork, communication
skills, ethics, and globalization are all covered in required courses and reinforced in the
electives. Theory and problem solving are stressed in both the required courses and the
electives. One apparent anomaly is the lack of application of the scientific method in the
required courses. This chart only catalogues computer science courses and does not
consider the calculus-based physics sequence or the one-year sequence in chemistry, with
accompanying laboratories, in which the scientific method is covered intensively.
Similarly, the course in Computers in Society provides additional coverage of topics in
ethics and globalization to complement the coverage provided in computer science
courses.

Result of last Review
Prior to the 2004 focused curriculum review, less emphasis was placed on integration of
oral and written communication within computer science courses. Corrective action was
taken as a result of that review. During the 2006 review, a need for emphasizing other
―soft‖ skills, in particular, teamwork, ethics, and globalization, was identified. As the
above indicates, coverage of these topics has been expanded throughout the curriculum.

Open Issues
The department continues to struggle with an effective mechanism and forum for
presenting issues related to global development of software and global impacts of
technology in general.




                                           xlix
IV. Data Collection
A. The Instruments

The department has identified twelve data-collection instruments which are the
centerpiece of the assessment process. These twelve are not the only data-collection
instruments used in the department. The primary instruments are described below, and a
list of additional data-collection mechanisms is provided at the end.

1. MFAT
       Type of measurement – Objective
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of analysis – Every three years (Although results are reviewed every
       year, action is not taken as a result of any one year‘s results.)
       How collected and from whom – The exam is given as part of the Senior Design
       course. All students enrolled in Senior Design are required to take it, and a
       portion of the grade is based on the student‘s performance.
       Benchmarks – The exam provides feedback in three areas
              Programming fundamentals
              Computer organization, architecture, operating systems
              Algorithms, theory, computer math

       (a) Programming fundamentals – While we believe our students receive a solid
       foundation in programming, other schools also provide similar rigor. Thus, our
       benchmark is to be above average in this category and strive to achieve the 80%
       mark on the departmental composite score.
       (b) Hardware and OS – We believe our students should be above the national
       average in this category. Our benchmark is 70%, and we will strive for the 80%
       mark.
       (c) Theory and math – We believe our students should be above average in
       algorithms and mathematics but average in theory. Our benchmark is to be above
       average, and our goal is to achieve the 75% mark.

       [Note that the older version of this exam gave feedback in four areas:
       Programming Methodology, Software Systems, Computer Organization and
       Design, and Theory and Mathematics.]


2. Alumni Surveys
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: The survey contains both
       subjective questions (―My degree prepared me well for my job‖) and objective
       questions (―Advanced degrees earned‖).

                                              l
       Frequency of collection – Every five years
       Frequency of analysis – Every five years
       How collected and from whom – Paper copies of the survey are mailed to alumni.
       The Alumni Office maintains a database of addresses and generates mailing labels
       to assist with this effort.
       Benchmarks – At least 85% of respondents report possessing a mastery of their
       field (Questions 10 and 11 map to Objective 1). At least 85% of respondents
       report having the skills to adapt and thrive in the changing environment (Question
       13 maps to Objective 5). Graduates have been able to earn advanced degrees.
       Benchmarking a number of students who earn advanced degrees is impractical,
       given the number of variables that affect matriculation into and graduation from
       graduate school.

3. Student Course Evaluations
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective. Objective questions gather
       information on leadership positions held and team involvement. Subjective
       questions ask for feedback on level of preparation in the soft skills. Students are
       asked to respond to their level of preparation in communication skills, team work,
       ethics, and globalization. Each response is subjective, but the trend of replies
       taken over all classes over time provides an objective measurement of student
       confidence in their abilities in this areas and, perhaps more importantly, in the
       changes in this level of confidence over time.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of evaluation – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Data is gathered as part of the course-evaluation
       process in every class. Computer Science majors at all levels are asked to answer
       the basic questions and extra questions are provided for graduating seniors. The
       questions are provided at the end of this document.
       Benchmarks – As noted below, the benchmark for competitive team involvement
       is approximately 15% of the students (roughly 15-20 students per year). No
       benchmark is set for students holding leadership positions, but the number is
       monitored to provide evidence that students are preparing to assume leadership
       roles in industry. This survey is a new instrument for the department. When
       sufficient data has been collected, the benchmark will be to demonstrate an
       increase in student confidence in their abilities in communication, teaming, and
       ethics from freshman year to senior year.

4. Senior Exit Interviews
       Type of measurement – Subjective: Seniors are asked to identify strengths and
       weaknesses of the existing program and to suggest improvements.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of analysis – Every year

                                            li
       How collected and from whom – Small Group Instruction Diagnostic (SGID) for
       graduating seniors. Seniors meet with the campus Assessment Officer (Dr. Kate
       Alley) and do a group assessment using the SGID process.
       Benchmarks – Not applicable

5. Industrial Advisory Council
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: Objective feedback is provided by
       the participants through statistics on the numbers and types of jobs our alumni
       have in different sectors of the industry. Subjective feedback is provided on how
       well prepared graduates are to enter the workforce.
       Frequency of collection – Every two years
       Frequency of review – Every two years
       How collected and from whom – Alumni come to campus for intensive sessions
       focusing on curriculum, student preparation, and other issues identified for a
       given meeting. Representatives are chosen from diverse companies and diverse
       market segments within the industry (defense, networking, algorithm
       development, database-driven, hardware-driven, etc.).
       Benchmarks – At each meeting the council is asked to identify the next big
       change taking shape in the industry and to define how well SDSM&T is
       positioned to take advantage of the coming changes. The benchmark is to receive
       a ―passing‖ score on this question. That is, the curriculum is evolving in the right
       direction, and only minor course corrections are required to keep the program on
       track to address developing needs in industry.

6. Course-Embedded Assessments
       Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of review – Every two years in conjunction with the focused
       curriculum review
       How collected and from whom – Data is collected by faculty members teaching
       the courses selected for the embedded assessments. The entire faculty reviews the
       work products of the students to determine if the desired outcomes are being
       achieved across the curriculum. For example, communication skills are integrated
       in freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior courses. The faculty review writing
       samples from those courses and determine whether sufficient coverage is
       provided to achieve the outcome of students having the ability to communicate
       effectively. Writing rubrics assist with this process.
       Benchmarks – Students show improvement throughout the curriculum in three of
       the areas: communication, ethics, and teamwork. Students are expected to be
       exposed to globalization in the curriculum, but no benchmark has been set.




                                            lii
      This assessment consists of faculty evaluation of student growth in soft skills.
      The student surveys listed above measure the student’s perception of his or her
      growth in these areas.

7. Focused Curriculum Review
      Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: Objective evidence is provided in
      the mappings. The coverage of program outcomes in courses, the currency of
      material covered in each course, and the distribution of topics covered are
      important objective measures of the appropriateness of the curriculum to the
      program‘s stated objectives and outcomes. The focused curriculum review is
      done every two years in preparation for the Industrial Advisory Council meeting.
      As part of the IAC meeting, the participants provide feedback on the focused
      curriculum review. Subjective information is provided through discussions about
      the appropriate placement of material in the curriculum and best practices for
      covering key topics.
      Frequency of collection – Every two years
      Frequency of review – Every two years.
      How collected and from whom – The curriculum data is compiled and reviewed
      by the faculty.
      Benchmarks – All course outcomes must map to program outcomes. All program
      outcomes must be supported by appropriate course outcomes.

8. Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
      Type of measurement – Objective
      Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every year
      How collected and from whom – The computer science faculty review database
      information provided by the Alumni Association on the career paths of students
      who have graduated in the past ten years. The Outstanding Recent Graduate
      Award recognizes a graduate who has a record of high achievement in his or her
      profession. The faculty review the data and select a nominee. The award is a side
      benefit of the process, however. The true value in selecting a nominee for this
      campus award is the review of graduate achievements. This process provides data
      to assess objectives 1 – 4.
      Benchmarks – The goal is to have a computer science student selected as a top
      achiever each year. The benchmark is to have a graduate selected for this award
      once every three years.

9. Student Competition Involvement
      Type of measurement – Objective: Faculty track the number of students involved
      in competition teams. This includes interdisciplinary teams under the Center of
      Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing and Production (CAMP), such as the

                                         liii
      Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Team, and computer science teams such as the ACM
      Programming Team.
       Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every year
      How collected and from whom – Team-project advisors and student participants
      provide the data.
      Benchmarks – The institution has a strong team-project orientation. The goal is to
      give all students the opportunity to work on a competitive team. However, many
      students do not have the time or inclination to work on such teams. The
      benchmark is to have approximately 15% of the students involved in a team
      competition. That is typically 15 – 20 students per year.

10. Co-op Reports
      Type of measurement – Objective/Subjective: Co-op has been identified as an
      important educational experience, and students are encouraged to participate. The
      number of students who are offered (and accept) co-ops is an objective measure
      of the employability of our students. Employers are asked to complete a survey
      which also provides a subjective measure of the technical abilities,
      communication skills, and other attributes of students who have not yet completed
      the program.
      Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every year
      How collected and from whom – Career Planning provides data on the number of
      co-ops offered. Dr. Penaloza, the co-op coordinator, performs an assessment of
      the employer surveys.
      Benchmarks – The goal is for every student to have the opportunity to participate
      in a co-op. The benchmark is for at least 30% of graduates to have done a co-op.

11. Undergraduate Research Involvement
      Type of measurement – Objective: The faculty track the number of students
      involved in undergraduate research each year.
      Frequency of collection – Every year
      Frequency of review – Every year
      How collected and from whom – Collected from faculty members who direct
      undergraduate research
      Benchmarks – The goal is for all students to have the opportunity to participate in
      undergraduate research to encourage them to pursue graduate school. The
      benchmark is to have at least as many students participate in undergraduate
      research as continue to graduate school each year - approximately 10% of the
      graduating class.


                                          liv
12. Placement rates/Starting salaries
       Type of measurement – Objective
       Frequency of collection – Every year
       Frequency of review – Every year
       How collected and from whom – Collected by the Career Planning Office
       Benchmarks – The goal is full employment with a competitive salary. Given that
       some students choose to work in a small South Dakota town, a realistic
       benchmark is 85% placement in computer science positions. The average salary
       is separated into ―within South Dakota‖ and ―outside of South Dakota‖. The
       benchmark is that the average salary for students leaving South Dakota will be
       comparable to the national average, and the salary for students staying in South
       Dakota will be 80% of the national average.




                                          lv
B. Reviewing the Data

All computer science faculty participate in the computer science curriculum committee.
That committee is the primary mechanism for discussing all matters related to
assessment. Each April and September, the committee designates a meeting to discuss
assessment data and to decide if actions are warranted on the basis of the data collected.
Not all data is reviewed every year and not all of the annually collected data is ready at
the same point in the semester. For example, the MFAT is taken late in the spring, but
the normalized results are not known until late in the summer. Similarly, the alumni
surveys are done during the summer and reviewed in the fall. Initial placement data is
available in the spring but updated numbers are available in the fall. A focused
curriculum review occurs in conjunction with every industrial Advisory Council meeting.
Co-ops are generally done during the spring and summer. Hence the co-op reports are
reviewed in the fall. The co-op coordinator reviews all co-op reports immediately upon
receiving them, but the computer science curriculum committee as a whole reviews them
every two years due to the small number available per semester. The data review
timetable since 2002 is summarized below. Note: FCR = Focused Curriculum Review
and CEA = Course-embedded Assessments

     Spring                                         Fall
2002 Senior exit interviews                         MFAT
     Industrial Advisory Council                    Placement/salary updates
     FCR
     Initial placement/salary data
     Student Competition Involvement
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations
     Co-op Reports

2003 Senior exit interviews                         MFAT
     Initial placement/salary data                  Placement/salary updates
     Student Competition Involvement                Co-op Report review
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations

2004 Senior exit interviews                         MFAT
     Industrial Advisory Council                    Placement/salary updates
     FCR/CEA Review*
     Initial placement/salary data
     Student Competition Involvement
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations
     Co-op Reports

2005 Senior exit interviews                         MFAT
     Initial placement/salary data                  Placement/salary updates
     Student Competition Involvement                Co-op Report review

                                           lvi
       Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
       Student Course Evaluations

2006 Senior exit interviews                   Alumni Survey results
     Industrial Advisory Council              MFAT
     FCR/CEA Review**                         Placement/salary updates
     Initial placement/salary data            Meta-assessment Review
     Student Competition Involvement
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations
     Co-op Reports
     Undergraduate Research Involvement

2007 Senior exit interviews                   MFAT
     Initial placement/salary data            Placement/salary updates
     Student Surveys*                         Co-op Report review
     Student Competition Involvement          ABET Review
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations
     Co-op Reports
     Undergraduate Research Involvement

2008 Senior exit interviews                   MFAT
     Industrial Advisory Council              Placement/salary updates
     FCR/CEA Review
     Initial placement/salary data
     Student Competition Involvement
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations
     Co-op Reports
     Undergraduate Research Involvement

2009 Senior exit interviews                   MFAT
     Initial placement/salary data            Placement/salary updates
     Student Surveys
     Student Competition Involvement
     Outstanding Recent Graduate Awards
     Student Course Evaluations
     Co-op Reports
     Undergraduate Research Involvement

* First use of this instrument
** Modified


C. Additional Data Collected


                                       lvii
The program gathers or has access to additional data which, while not a formal part of the
assessment plan, is often useful for understanding specific issues or understanding larger
trends within the university.
1. CAAP Exam
2. NSSE – National Survey of Student Engagement
3. Surveys of faculty from other departments
4. Academic Integrity Violation data
5. Retention statistics in CS150
6. One-time surveys
       – In 2007, a survey of women in the department was conducted to help the
       department understand why women choose our program.




                                           lviii
V. Changes Motivated by Assessment
A. Changes Made in the Past Five Years

The following is a list of significant changes made to the program as a result of the
assessment process. The problem is described; the assessment instrument that identified
the problem is given; and the actions taken as a result (as well as an evaluation of those
actions, where applicable) are also provided.

1. Increasing hardware support and programming help available to students.
   How identified:
   Industrial Advisory Council, Focused Curriculum Review, Senior Survey, Student Opinion
   Surveys
   Actions taken:
   (a) Roger Schrader was hired in 2000 to perform system administration for the
   department and to teach freshman programming courses. In addition to administering
   the department‘s computers, Roger became a resource for fixing student computer
   problems. He also provides evening and weekend help to students in CS1 and CS2.
   (b) InstallFest. The Student Chapter of the ACM, in conjunction with the SDSM&T
   Linux Users Group, offers free computer configuration help on a Saturday at the
   beginning of each semester. Students use this opportunity to partition their hard
   drives and install Linux, install software available through the Microsoft Academic
   Alliance, and take advantage of the hardware-trouble-shooting expertise available.
   (c) Additional lab hours with graduate student support. The departmental labs are
   staffed by a graduate-student four nights each week, providing help until 9PM
   Monday through Thursday.
   Evaluation: There are two indicators that the additional programming support has
   made an impact on this area: the number of students who utilize this help, and the
   ease of the transition to Linux in Data Structures. Conservatively, half of the students
   in CS1 and CS2 avail themselves of the additional help, and students report great
   satisfaction with the programming help available to them. Data Structures faculty
   report fewer start-up difficulties and greater student satisfaction with the switch to
   Linux.


2. Increasing the application of oral and written communication skills in computer
science courses.
   How identified: course-embedded assessment, co-op reports, course evaluation,
   Industrial Advisory Council
   Actions taken:
   (a) A writing requirement was added to Data Structures in 2005.
   (b) Rubrics for evaluating oral and written student work were added to Senior Design.

                                           lix
   (c) Almost all electives incorporate either a paper or a presentation as a requirement
   of the course. Students are required to take three electives which provide additional
   opportunities to apply communications skills in computer science courses.

3. Increasing global awareness
   How identified: Approximately 90% of SDSM&T undergraduates are from South
   Dakota or contiguous states, making global awareness an important topic in the
   curriculum. The Board of Regents, NSSE, consultation with our institutional
   Academic Advisory Board and our departmental Industrial Advisory Council helped
   to identify this need.
   Actions taken:
   (a) Globalization is included as a topic in Senior Design as of fall 2005.
   (b) The institution is increasing study-abroad opportunities for students. The
   university has a long-standing student exchange program with Telemark and other
   universities in Norway, Germany, and Denmark. Memoranda of Understanding are
   in place with universities in India, Mongolia, China, Poland, Bangladesh, South
   Korea, Turkey and Serbia, increasing opportunities for study abroad.
   (c) Cultural differences in interface design are discussed in the GUI course.
   (d) Lecturers from industry visit classrooms to discuss the challenges of working on
   distributed, cross-cultural teams.
   (e) Globalization is included in HUM 375 Computers in Society.
   Evaluation: The faculty are still struggling with the most effective way to help
   students understand the expectations of employers in a global economy. The above
   changes are a positive step but may not be the full solution.

4. Increasing ethics coverage in required courses
   How identified:    academic integrity violations, course-embedded assessments, and
   student surveys
   Faculty observed a small but troubling increase in academic integrity violations
   between 2003 and 2006. At least one student was investigated by the FBI for alleged
   file sharing of copyrighted material. In the same time frame, several high-profile
   articles related to copyright infringement on the web (Napster) appeared in the media.
   All of the above suggested that more attention should be focused on ethical issues.
   Actions taken: The faculty voted to increase the coverage of ethics throughout the
   curriculum. As a result, the following additions have been made:
   (a) CS1 (freshman course) introduces the SDSM&T Computer Science Program
   Academic Integrity Policy and the ACM Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct.
   (b) CS2 (freshman/sophomore course) reinforces the institutional code of conduct.
   Students are tested on the institutional code and the ACM code of conduct.
   (c) Data Structures (sophomore/junior course) requires an essay that addresses
   ―situational ethics‖.
                                            lx
   (d) Ethics is now a required part of Software Engineering (senior course).
   (e) CS students attended a campus-wide ethics workshop in 2005. They received a
   tutorial on ethics which has been incorporated in Software Engineering.
   Evaluation: No academic integrity violations were reported in 2006-2007. A longer
   record will be needed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of this change.

5. Increase experience with object-oriented programming
   How identified: Industrial Advisory Council, Focused Curriculum Review
   Actions taken:
   (a) Coverage of trees was moved from CS2 to Data Structures to make room in CS2
   for an earlier introduction to objects.
   (b) Object-oriented programming coverage was increased in Data Structures..
   (c) Object-oriented concepts and Unified Modeling Language (UML) were added to
   Programming Languages. This required the addition of one extra credit hour to that
   course.

6. CS1 was not serving the needs of all constituents
   How identified: Focused Curriculum Review, with input from the Computer
   Engineering Curriculum Committee. One of the department‘s curriculum-assessment
   mechanisms for shared courses is surveying faculty members in other departments
   about student preparation in subsequent courses. CS1 is one such course. CS2, Data
   Structures, Finite Structures, Assembly Language, Software Engineering, and
   Operating Systems must also satisfy external constraints. The Computer Engineering
   Curriculum Committee, with the concurrence of the other departments that require
   CS1, brought forth concerns about missing content in that course. In particular,
   students who use embedded processors and micro-controllers need exposure to tools
   other than the Visual Studio development environment.
   Actions taken:     In response, the following material was added to the first
   programming course.
   (a) coverage of ANSI C
   (b) introduction to hardware components
   (c) command-line usage
   (d) additional debugging lab
   Evaluation: Subsequent faculty feedback indicates a high degree of satisfaction with
   the additions.

7. Students need more experience working on teams
   How identified: Student course evaluations, competition team advisor feedback.
   Previously, the only courses with a requirement for student teamwork were Software
   Engineering and Senior Design. The faculty reviewed the assessment data on this
   topic and agreed to incorporate teamwork throughout the curriculum.
                                            lxi
   Actions taken:
   (a) CS2 (freshman/sophomore course) requires at least one team assignment and
   teammate evaluation.
   (b) Data Structures (sophomore/junior course) requires two team assignments and
   requires students to convey their expectations to their teammates in writing before the
   assignments begin. Written teammate evaluation is required.
   (c) The capstone sequence of Software Engineering and Senior Design (senior
   courses) has been enhanced to better model teamwork in industry.
   (d) Other courses, including most electives, may require team projects. For example,
   team activities are typically assigned in Computer Organization and Architecture,
   Image Processing, and Programming Languages. Samples of those assignments are
   included in the course displays.
   (e) Student were encouraged to participate in interdisciplinary teams, particularly the
   student competition teams under CAMP. The number of students participating in
   competitive team activities has increased since 2003.

8. Elective-offering adjustments
   How identified: Focused curriculum review, MFAT, Industrial Advisory Council
   Actions taken:
   (a) Computer security was identified as an important emerging discipline during the
   Industrial Advisory Council discussions. A subsequent curriculum review identified
   two logical places to include this material in the curriculum: computer security
   coverage was added to the cryptography elective, and additional computer security
   material was added to operating systems.
   (b) Advanced Artificial Intelligence was redesigned as Machine Learning with the
   addition of topics such as evolutionary algorithms; ant colony, swarm, and agent-
   based approaches; cellular automata, patterns and growth; and artificial immune
   systems.
   (c) GUI was originally two courses: GUI Design and GUI Programming. In
   response to curriculum review and feedback from the Industrial Advisory Council,
   these two courses were merged into a single GUI elective.

9. Introduce software engineering concepts earlier in the curriculum
   How identified: Focused curriculum review, Industrial Advisory Council
   Actions taken:
   (a) The software lifecycle model is introduced in CS2. Students write a testing
   document in conjunction with a programming assignment.
   (b) Additional coverage of the software lifecycle is presented in Data Structures.
   Students write a testing document and/or a design document.
   (c) More discussion of testing was added to Analysis of Algorithms. Students write a
   testing document in conjunction with a programming assignment.
                                           lxii
B. Changes In-Progress for 2007-2008

1. Institutional assessments indicate a need for greater integration of technology into the
classroom.
   How identified: Institutional strategic planning sessions
   Actions taken: Starting in the Fall of 2006, all freshmen were required to lease a
   Tablet PC. This allows students to participate in active learning during class hours
   and provides a consistent platform for computing resources. The tablets are pre-
   loaded with much of the software the CS student will need. Students receive prompt
   hardware and software support during business hours. Tablets are used in some CS1
   sections.
   Evaluation: An initial assessment of the impact of the new Tablet PC program was
   done in 2006-2007. This report should be available when the ABET team is on
   campus in the fall.

2. Declining enrollments indicate a need for a more attractive first course in
programming.
   How identified: CS major enrollment statistics, student opinion surveys from CS1,
   completion rates in CS1
   Actions taken:
   A section of CS1 will use robotics as an aid to learning programming concepts.
   Course development is funded by a grant from NASA. A second section of CS1 will
   experiment with the Alice programming environment. Both experiments will be
   evaluated before the start of the fall semester in 2008.
   Evaluation: Not yet implemented.




                                           lxiii
VI. Evaluation of the Assessment Plan
The assessment process used by the department must itself be assessed periodically. This
meta-assessment process in undertaken every five years. The length of time between
reviews is motivated by the reality that assessment instruments must be used and data
must be gathered for a number of years before their usefulness can accurately be
determined. This process is completed in the Fall with the last such review occurring in
September 2006.

Items that are covered during the meta-assessment review:
1. Have the objectives of the department changed?
2. Have the outcomes of the department changed?
3. Do the instruments measure what we need them to measure?
4. Do we have the right set of instruments?
       - Could we gather the same data with fewer instruments?
       - Is there an objective way of gathering current subjective data?
       - Do we gather sufficient data from all our constituencies?
5. Do we still believe the established benchmarks are appropriate?
6. Did previously defined actions generate the desired improvement?

The 2006 review resulted in the following actions:
1. The intent of the objectives was not changed but the language was clarified.
2. The intent of the outcomes was not changed but more general wording replaced
specific instances. For example, ―multiple operating systems‖ replaced ―Windows and
Linux‖.
3. A new instrument was added for 2007 – student surveys to gather information about
competition involvement and leadership roles in student activities. One instrument was
dropped as a primary data instrument – the CAAP exam.
4. The Alumni Survey is a good tool but the questions need to be refined to more clearly
address program objectives. (In Progress.)
5. Previously, the Industrial Advisory Council met every year. A review of the data
from those meetings indicated that many changes required multiple years to implement
and, thus, it would be more appropriate to gather input from the IAC, and report back to
industry about program evolution, every other year.




                                              lxiv
VII. Additional Information
(1) CAAP Examination Description

CAAP Instruments
CAAP has been designed to assess academic skills in the areas of:
     Writing (Objective /Essay)
     Reading
     Mathematics
     Science Reasoning
     Critical Thinking

CAAP items are drawn from general education college materials in humanities, sciences
(social and natural), and mathematics.

Uses of CAAP
   1. Documenting Levels of Proficiency. In conjunction with other indicators, such
       as course performance and courses taken, CAAP scores yield evidence of
       acceptable levels of academic skills established by the faculty for the areas
       covered.
   2. Indicating Change (from one educational point to another). CAAP can be used
       as a pretest to establish a baseline of performance at entry and then as a post-test
       at the completion of relevant core general education courses. The differences
       between the two scores may be viewed as the change that occurs during the
       course of the program. This is for group change only. This use may have
       limitations due to sampling methods, sampling size, and student motivation.
   3. Comparing Local Performance with that of Other Populations. CAAP user
       norms may be helpful to institutions in determining how their students as a group
       compare with students at the same levels attending similar types of institutions
       across the nation.
   4. Establishing Eligibility Requirements. CAAP may be useful in establishing
       readiness to take specific advanced courses or to graduate. ACT urges institutions
       considering this use to include at least one or two other readiness indicators (e.g.,
       course grades, GPA).




                                             lxv
(2) SGID Description

This hypertext document has been created by the Center for Teaching Excellence. It is
intended to provide only a very brief introduction to an important subject.

I. OVERVIEW
   Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) is a constructive, course-specific
   way of securing student feedback by conducting small discussion groups within
   the class. Currently used on college campuses throughout the country, SGID is a
   process through which instructors can receive feedback from students at any time
   during a course, and it only requires a few minutes of class time. Often conducted
   at midterm, SGID information can be used to make adjustments that may
   facilitate student learning during the course. Because students see that their input
   is taken seriously, this process has also been found significantly to increase
   student motivation.
II. THE GENERAL PROCESS
   Students are typically clustered in groups of 3-7 and asked as many as four
   questions. The students are often required to agree on a single answer to each
   question.
   For example, one might ask these three questions:
       5. When this class/program/workshop is offered again, what one element
          should remain essentially the same because it worked so well?
       6. What one element should be dropped or altered?
       7. What one element should be added?
III. THE ADVANTAGES OF THE SGID TECHNIQUE
       1. Feedback occurs at two levels: within groups and between groups.
       2. The process is accomplished quickly.
       3. The answers generated are almost always noteworthy since several
          persons must agree.
       4. Because an SGID provides more reflective feedback, the information is
          qualitatively different than that secured in end-of-the-semester ratings.

       5. Students feel that their voices have been heard. Faculty developers have
          noted that students often feel ―powerless,‖ and are more willing to work
          with a professor if they believe their needs are of concern to the professor.
          Thus, the SGID process by itself seems to have beneficial effects, even
          before the instructor makes changes based on the feedback from the SGID.




                                           lxvi
(3) Major Field Achievement Test Description : from http://www.ets.org
The Major Field Tests are innovative undergraduate and MBA outcomes assessments designed
to measure the basic student learning outcomes in a major field of study. Test results enable
academic departments to refine and improve curriculum development, gauge the progress of
students compared to others in the program and those in similar programs at schools
throughout the country.

Available in online and paper-and-pencil formats, the Major Field Tests go beyond the
measurement of factual knowledge; they improve student achievement by helping to evaluate
their ability to:


       Analyze and solve problems

       Understand relationships

       Interpret material
Major Field Tests provide valuable information that can improve programs by:


       Meeting External Requirements: MFTs provide reliable documentation of
       performance for accreditation, strategic planning and performance-based funding.

       Benchmarking and Trend Analysis: Educational measurement facilitates the
       comparison of scores to document student achievement and program effectiveness,
       and demonstrate program improvement over time.

       Developing and Improving Curricula: A variety of score reports allow for detailed
       curriculum development, review and evaluation.

       Assessing Student Achievement: Faculty and administrators can assess the level of
       student achievement within a field of study compared to that of other students in their
       program and to the national comparative data.
The tests are designed to assess the knowledge expected of students at the conclusion of a
major in the specific subject area. The test is often given in a Capstone course or in the last
semester of study as part of a graduation requirement to document proficiency in the specific
area of study.



Appendix III. Sample Assessment Data/Documentation


1. Management Structure for the Computer Science Program

2. Statement Concerning Faculty Activities (Board of Regents)

3. Faculty Evaluation template

4. Student Opinion Survey sample

5. Major Field Achievement Test Summary

6. Alumni Survey Summaries


                                             lxvii
7. 2006 IAC Presentation

8. Student Participation in Competitive Teams

9. Supplemental Course Evaluation Questions




                                         lxviii
1. Management Structure for the Computer Science Program


                                    Dr. Charles Ruch
                                        President




               Dr. Karen Whitehead
                  VPAA/Provost




                                    VP/Dean        VP of U.    VP of     VP     of
                                    of students    Relations   Finance   Research




   Dr. Duane Abata           Dr. Duane Hrncir
   Dean, College of           Dean, College of
     Engineering             Science and Letters
    (CS program)                (CS faculty)



                   Dr. Kyle Riley
                   Chair, Math/CS



     CS program               Math program
      assistant                 assistant




                                          lxix
2. Statement Concerning Faculty Activities (Board of Regents)
All faculty will be significantly active in the broad areas of teaching, scholarship,
and service. The qualitative and quantitative expectations for activity in each area
depend broadly on the mission of the university, the faculty unit member's
discipline and its role within the university, and on specific past and present
assignments of individual faculty responsibility. Given the relationship between
the expectations for individual activity and the mission of a person's university,
department, discipline, and assignments, a variety of activities may warrant
recognition in each area.

Institutional Selection of Activities

The universities have substantial autonomy to select and determine the relative
importance of various activities in the areas of teaching, scholarship and creative
activity and service.

Faculty unit members have a legitimate interest in knowing which professional
activities are to be recognized and their university's determinations of the relative
importance of the recognized activities. To that end:

       each university shall select the teaching, scholarship, and service
       activities, consistent with those activities and principles identified
       herein, that are to be recognized in the evaluation and promotion
       processes;

       each university shall determine the relative importance of the three
       areas of professional activity and the relative importance of
       selected activities within each category;

       the university's selections shall be consistent with the mission and
       programs of the university as approved by the Board;

       the selection of activities and the relative importance of the
       activities may vary within a university, and across the system;


                                          lxx
       the university's selections shall be consistent with the guarantee of
       academic freedom as provided to faculty unit members in Article
       XIV;

       the university's selection of activities and determinations of relative
       importance shall be disclosed in writing to each faculty unit member
       as soon as possible, but not later than the end of May 1993.

The parties recognize that it may be necessary from time to time to review and to
revise institutional priorities. It is expected that the modification of institutional
statements shall not result in the change in expectations of a faculty unit member
during the then-current annual evaluation cycle.


Agreement to Recognize Other Activities

As provided in Article XI, faculty unit members and their department heads may
agree that other specific activities shall be considered teaching, scholarship, or
service contributions and that significant performance will be recognized,
provided that such specified activities are consistent with the policy goals stated
in this appendix and university statements implementing them.

To warrant recognition, other specific activities must be justified in terms of the
mission of the university, the role or mission of the faculty unit member's
department or discipline or the faculty unit member's specific assignment as
agreed to by the faculty unit member and the department head. Provision for
agreement to recognize other activities is intended to permit the modification of
institutional statements where warranted by unique circumstances.

Evaluation Process

Faculty unit members have a responsibility to provide a rationale as to why an
activity is a significant accomplishment or to explain what level of performance
has been demonstrated.




                                           lxxi
An activity that is not clearly included in the institutional statement of recognized
activities or an individual agreement must be justified in terms of the mission of
the university, the role or mission of the faculty unit member's department or
discipline or the faculty unit member's specific assignment as determined
pursuant to Article XI. The faculty unit member shall be responsible for providing
such justification.

Teaching, Scholarship, and Service Activities

A. Teaching

A fundamental mission of a university is to provide opportunities for learning and
academic achievement. Related to this mission is the professional evaluation of
student achievement according to standards of the discipline and university.
Thus, all faculty unit members with teaching assignments are expected to

       demonstrate competence in teaching and in evaluation of student
       performance;

       offer consistently challenging and current courses that afford
       students opportunities to learn the information, methods of inquiry,
       and professional skills identified in the course descriptions and
       relevant departmental or program mission statements;

       instruct and evaluate at levels meeting or exceeding university
       standards for the discipline ;

       incorporate scholarly activities or findings into their teaching on a
       regular basis;

       make available opportunities for students to learn of the primary
       sources of information associated with the area of study;

       provide students with information about course objectives, content,
       activities, and performance expectations;



                                         lxxii
       be regularly available for out-of-class consultation with students;

       review and revise periodically course content, classroom activities,
       out-of-class assignments, and evaluation procedures to be
       consistent with national expectations concerning content and
       quality;

       require all students engaged in course activities to make active use
       of advanced technological resources employed by professional
       practitioners in the discipline, including information processing and
       communications technologies, to the extent that such technological
       resources are available to the employing institution and appropriate
       to the course level;

       participate actively in university efforts to implement assessment
       policies and procedures;

       be conscientious in advising students assigned to them with
       respect to the requirements of academic programs and the
       selection of electives consistent with the students' goals (the
       student's responsibility for degree and program requirements is
       understood); and

       adhere to the university's standards and procedures for ensuring
       academic integrity.

Teaching includes the following or similar activities, the recognition and
importance of which will vary depending upon the mission of the university, the
role of a discipline within the university's functions and the individual faculty unit
member's assignment:

              Teaching undergraduate courses;
              advising undergraduate students;
              teaching graduate courses;
              advising graduate students;

                                         lxxiii
             developing and teaching new undergraduate courses;
             developing and teaching new graduate courses;
             developing, supervising, and evaluating internships;
             teaching courses in the honors program;
             teaching continuing education courses for academic
             credit;
             teaching continuing education unit courses;
             conducting noncredit workshops, institutes, and
             seminars on campus;
             conducting noncredit workshops, institutes, and
             seminars off-campus;
             teaching televised courses;
             guiding and evaluating undergraduate individual
             study;
             guiding and evaluating undergraduate project papers;
             guiding and evaluating graduate project papers;
             guiding and evaluating theses;
             guiding and evaluating dissertations;
             serving on graduate committees;
             experimenting with instructional methods and
             techniques;
             developing assessment policies and procedures;
             preparing proposals for curricular change; and
             sponsoring field trips that provide meaningful learning
             experiences for students.

B. Scholarship and Creative Activity

The mission of a university requires of each faculty unit member a serious
commitment to scholarship. Scholarship, broadly defined, is a prerequisite for
competent and current teaching, contributes to the expansion of knowledge and
the development of the arts, and enhances the services provided to the public.

                                       lxxiv
Each faculty unit member is expected to continue learning in his or her discipline
through appropriate journals and books and to participate in the discipline's
professional deliberation.

The product of scholarly activity may take a variety of forms, but it cannot be only
for the classroom or take place only in the classroom; it must involve the
presentation of one's ideas and works to one's professional peers or the learned
public for debate and judgment. Such presentations may occur in a variety of
settings, but to be worthy of recognition it is expected at a minimum that a faculty
unit member initiate a proposal to present or be invited to present and that the
proposal be accepted for outside presentation to a learned audience.

The recognition and importance of the different forms and presentations of
scholarship will vary depending upon the mission of the university, the role of a
discipline within the university's functions and the individual faculty unit member's
assignment. Thus, although scholarship and creative activity includes the
following and similar activities, not all of these need be recognized or judged to
be important or sufficient for each faculty unit member:

publication of the results of research, scholarship, and creative endeavor in
scholarly journals and books, textbooks, chapters in professional books,
abstracts, book reviews;
publication of poems, novels, plays, musical compositions, etc.;
exhibition of works of art;
musical performance;
delivery of invited lectures, papers, speeches, or presentations at other
universities, professional meetings, conventions, and conferences;
creative application of existing technologies;
patents on inventions;
application for patents;
application for research or development grants;
presentations of recognized original works to colleagues or the campus


                                        lxxv
community;
national recognition as an expert in a field related to the faculty unit member's
professional responsibilities;
contribution as a co-author or co-presenter of one's own research results to joint
research projects involving other professionals.

C. Service

Scholars have special insights and abilities to contribute to the deliberative
processes through which universities, professions and society as a whole
respond to their changing circumstances. The public support for the universities
gives rise to significant service responsibilities to the state and society. By
tradition, the professorate has contributed to meeting such expectations of public
service and has assisted in the governance and operation of universities and of
professional groups.

There are three aspects of service:

Service to the department, college or school, or institution;
service to the profession or discipline; and
service to the community, state, region, nation, or international community.

A variety of activities are classified as service. The needs of the institution and
the expertise of faculty unit members may require that faculty unit members
concentrate efforts in certain service areas to the exclusion of activity in other
service areas.

The recognition and importance of the different forms of service will vary
depending upon the mission of the university, the role of a discipline within the
university's functions and the individual faculty unit member's assignment. Thus,
although service includes the following and similar activities, not all of these need
be recognized or judged to be important or sufficient for each faculty unit
member.

1. Service to the Institution

                                         lxxvi
All faculty unit members are expected to be willing to participate in the academic
governance of their universities, to contribute to the work of departmental
committees or task forces, and to participate in searches for new members for
the department.

Service to the institution also includes the following or similar activities:
significant work for departmental, school, college and university committees;
service on the academic senate and its committees;
significant responsibilities relating to the academic or support services of the
university community;
contributions to the development of library or other learning resources;
institutional studies or reports such as those required by accrediting
organizations;
coordination, advisement and supervision of student organizations or student
activities; and
participation in institutionally-sponsored student support activities.

2. Service to the Discipline or Profession

Service to the discipline or profession includes the following or similar activities:
significant contributions as an officer of local, regional, national, or international
professional associations;
participation in meetings, conferences and conventions of professional
associations;
editing professional journals;
evaluating manuscripts that have been submitted to a journal;
reviewing proposals for textbooks in one's field of specialization for publishers;
serving as an organizer or session chairperson of a meeting of a local, regional,
national, or international professional association;
supporting special projects, including academic institutes or workshops.

3. Service to the Community, State, Region, Nation and World



                                          lxxvii
The mission statements adopted by the Board of Regents direct each university
to perform public service. Significant faculty activity that contributes to the
institution's performance of its service mission includes the following or similar
activities:

Discipline-related service to the community, state, region, nation or international
community;
institutes, short courses, seminars, and workshops related to the faculty unit
member's discipline;
consultation related to the faculty unit member's discipline;
service as the designated representative of the university;
professional practice involving the exercise of independent




                                         lxxviii
3. Faculty Evaluation template


                  PROFESSIONAL STAFF EVALUATION FORM

  1. Evaluation for:
          a. Annual Review
          b. Promotion
          c. Tenure
          d. Promotion and Tenure

  2. Covering the calendar year:

                                       PART A
               TO BE COMPLETED BY FACULTY UNIT MEMBER

  3. Background information:
     Name:
     Department:
     Date:
     Academic rank:                                          and date granted:

       Degrees in reverse chronological order:

       Additional academic or professional education :

       Professional experience:

  4. Expectations, consistent with institutional policies and subject to the concurrence
     of the dean and vice president, for faculty unit member performance with respect
     to teaching and academic advising, research, scholarship and creative activity, and
     service during the evaluation period as per comment of department head pursuant
     to Section 11.1(2).

  5. Describe your major assigned responsibilities during the evaluation period.

  6. Describe your major performance objectives during the current evaluation period.

  7.




                                         lxxix
       a. List your significant contributions to teaching or cooperative extension
          activities. (Appendix G of the BOR-COHE agreement contains a sample
          list.)
       b. List your significant contributions to academic advisement.

8. List your significant contributions in research, scholarship or creative activity.
   (Appendix G of the BOR-COHE agreement contains a sample list.)

9.
       a. List your significant contributions to the university. (Appendix G of the
          BOR-COHE agreement contains a sample list.)
       b. List your significant contributions to your discipline or profession.
          (Appendix G of the BOR-COHE agreement contains a sample list.)
       c. List your significant contributions to the community-at-large. (Appendix
          G of the BOR-COHE agreement contains a sample list.)

           10. . Proposed major performance objectives for the next evaluation period.


                                        PART B


     TO BE COMPLETED BY IMMEDIATE ADMINISTRATIVE SUPERVISOR

11. . Professional performance:

       a. Indicate your assessment of the faculty unit member's performance by
          explaining whether, consistent with contemporary standards of the
          institution, the faculty unit member exceeded, achieved or fell short of the
          level of performance reasonably expected in a(n) ________________
          (indicate rank) with like tenure status and comparable professional
          responsibilities and resources. The explanation must indicate the
          consideration given to rank, experience and tenure status, professional
          responsibilities and resources. Separate ratings must be given for teaching,
          including separate mention of academic advisement, research and service
          responsibilities. In each instance, based on the information supplied by
          the faculty unit member, the supervisor must identify the specific
          activities, or lack thereof, that warrant the rating.
       b. For all faculty unit members who serve on tenure track contracts or who
          hold rank below that of professor, comment about progress towards
          achieving the levels of performance that, in keeping with institutional
          standards, justify a recommendation for promotion to a more senior rank

                                        lxxx
              or award of tenure. Comments must address each area of professional
              responsibility.
          c. Where appropriate, include recommendations for augmentation monies
             and contract renewal.
          d. Response to the faculty unit member's major performance objectives for
             the next evaluation period?

Signature of Supervisor: __________________________

Date: ________________________________



   12. . I have received these comments and ratings from my immediate supervisor. I
       understand that I have the right to respond to these comments and ratings in
       writing or to call upon a peer group to review the evaluation, provided that notice
       of such intent is given to the department head within five (5) working days after
       receipt of this document.

Signature of Faculty Unit Member: _____________________________

Date: ____________________________________

   13. . I should like to add:

Signature of Faculty Unit Member: ____________________________

Date: ___________________________________

   14. . I have reviewed these comments and ratings. I should like to add:

______________________________________________

Signature of Dean or Vice President for Academic Affairs

Date: __________________________________




                                          lxxxi
4. Student Opinion Survey sample




                                   lxxxii
lxxxiii
5. Major Field Achievement Test Summary

       The table below gives the national percentile ranks for SDSM&T students taking
       the Major Field Achievement Test since 1995. Note that the 1997 results are
       missing but should be available in time for the visit in October 2001. Also, the
       test changed in 1996, and it is not clear that the percentile rankings in 1996 are
       correct since the interpretation guide sent with the 1996 tests was dated 1995.


                               2006      2005       2004   2003      2002     2001


            Mean Score           95       80         90      90       85       85


           Programming
           Fundamentals          95       85         75      85     67/96* 77/91*


            Computer
         Organization and        90       85         90      70       71       65
             Design


        Algorithms, Theory,
         and Mathematics         95       70         80      90       79       69


* Before 2003, scores were given for ―Programming Methodology‖ and ―Software
Systems‖ instead of ―Programming Fundamentals‖. Those two scores are given, in that
order, for 2001 and 2002.

The mean score is the percentile rank of the institutional mean score, that is the average
score for all students taking the test at this institution. It is not the average of the four
categories.




                                           lxxxiv
6. Alumni Survey Summaries
Question 5

If you are currently employed in the computer field, check off the items that most closely
describe the primary focus of the company/entity you work for:

                     Item                                      Percentage
                                                    1996          2001           2006
Accounting                                           3.8           2.1             -
Aerospace                                           10.2           5.6           10.4
Banking and Insurance                                4.5           4.9             -
Computer Hardware Manufacturing                      3.8           6.9            6.3
Computer        Service   (installation    and
maintenance of hardware and/or software)             8.3            9.0           4.2
Computer Sales and Marketing                         1.3            3.5            -
Consulting                                            -              -           18.8
Defense                                               -              -            8.3
Education                                            5.1            2.8           8.3
Engineering ( other than Aerospace)                  9.6            6.3          10.4
Entertainment                                        1.3            1.4            -
Finance                                               -              -            2.1
Government                                           7.6            3.5           8.3
Management                                            -              -            2.1
Medical                                               -              -            2.1
Military                                             5.1            4.9            -
Publishing                                           0.6            0.0            -
Retail (other than computer related products)        1.3            1.4            -
Software Engineering                                20.4           25.7          47.9
Telecommunications                                   7.0            9.0          16.7
Other                                               10.2           13.0            -

Others specified:

       2006:
               Agriculture
               Games
               Traffic Management
               Security
               Energy
               Semiconductor / Storage
               Insurance
               Events management with web-based registration plus data management




                                          lxxxv
Question 6 [Previously Question 7]

In which of the following computer application areas have you had significant work
experience?

         Computer Application Areas                         Percentage
                                                    1996       2001      2006
  Administrative Data Processing                     2.4        1.6       4.2
  Artificial Intelligence                            1.0        0.5       6.3
  Client-Server Processing                           9.5        9.6      45.8
  Compilers                                          3.4        2.1       6.3
  Computer Aided Engineering                         2.4        0.3       0.0
  Computer Graphics                                  3.1        1.8       4.2
  Computer Hardware / Architecture                    -          -       14.6
  Computer System Implementation                     7.1        3.9      18.8
  Database Systems                                  10.5       10.2      47.9
  Design of Digital Computers                        2.7        0.5       2.1
  Distributed Processing                              -         3.1      10.4
  GUI Programming                                     -         8.6      43.8
  Image Processing                                   2.7        1.3       6.3
  Internet Applications Development                   -          -       27.1
  Multimedia                                         2.4        1.6       8.3
  Networks                                           7.8         -         -
  Networking and Communications                       -         8.3      37.5
  Numerical Computation                              1.7        1.6       8.3
  Operating Systems                                  5.8        4.2      18.8
  Parallel and/or Distributed Processing             6.1         -         -
  Parallel Processing                                 -         1.6       8.3
  Project Management                                  -          -       45.8
  Real Time Programming                             11.2        7.6      33.3
  Security                                            -          -       20.8
  Simulation and Modeling                            3.7        4.7      12.5
  Software Engineering                              14.3       13.8        -
  Software Design / Development                       -          -       87.5
  Software Testing                                    -          -       54.2
  System Administration                               -          -       25.0
  Web Applications                                    -         4.9      31.3
  Other                                              2.0        2.7

Others specified:
       2006:
               Database Administration
               Security Engineering / Penetration Testing
               System Engineering & Embedded Systems


Question 10 [Previously Question 12]

                                           lxxxvi
The Computer Science program at SDSM&T prepared me well for my current job.


                  Opinion                                 Percentage
                                                   1996      2001       2006
 Strongly Disagree                                  0.0       0.0        0.0
 Disagree                                          10.3       6.3        2.1
 No Opinion                                         5.7       5.1        2.1
 Agree                                             64.4      59.5       63.8
 Strongly Agree                                    19.5      29.1       31.9

Question 11 [Previously Question 13]

The required courses in the Computer Science program at SDSM&T provide a
comprehensive and useful education in the computer field.

                     Opinion                              Percentage
                                                   1996     2001        2006
 Strongly Disagree                                  0.0      0.0         0.0
 Disagree                                           5.7      7.6         4.4
 No Opinion                                         8.0      5.1         2.2
 Agree                                             67.8     54.4        62.2
 Strongly Agree                                    18.4     32.9        31.1


Question 12   [Previously Question 14]

My job requires that I continue to learn new computing techniques, beyond those I
studied in my SDSM&T Computer Science program.

                     Opinion                              Percentage
                                                   1996      2001       2006
 Strongly Disagree                                  1.1       0.0        0.0
 Disagree                                           2.3       0.0        8.5
 No Opinion                                         2.3       1.3        0.0
 Agree                                             32.2      30.0       42.6
 Strongly Agree                                    62.1      68.7       48.9


Question 13   [Previously Question 15]

My SDSM&T Computer Science program gave me the background that allows me to
learn the new computing techniques I need for my job.

                  Opinion                                 Percentage
                                                   1996      2001       2006

                                         lxxxvii
 Strongly Disagree                                    0        1.3        0.0
 Disagree                                             0        0.0        0.0
 No Opinion                                          8.0       2.5        8.7
 Agree                                              52.9      45.6       41.3
 Strongly Agree                                     39.1      50.6       50.0


Question 14   [Previously Question 16]

The computing facilities at SDSM&T were adequate to meet the needs of the Computer
Science program.

                 Opinion                                   Percentage
                                                    1996     2001       2006
Strongly Disagree                                    5.7      6.3        2.1
Disagree                                            39.1     17.7       14.9
No Opinion                                           9.2     17.7        4.3
Agree                                               37.9     48.1       59.6
Strongly Agree                                       8.0     10.2       19.1



Question 15   [Previously Question 17]

The mathematics and theoretical computer science courses at SDSM&T have proven to
be important and useful in my computing work.

                 Opinion                                   Percentage
                                                    1996     2001       2006
Strongly Disagree                                    5.7       1.3       0.0
Disagree                                            13.8      17.7      14.9
No Opinion                                          16.1       8.9      10.6
Agree                                               50.6      53.2      48.9
Strongly Agree                                      13.8      18.9      25.5

Question 16

The hardware-related courses at SDSM&T have proven useful in my computing work.

                              Opinion                      Percentage
                                                              2006
              Strongly Disagree                                2.1
              Disagree                                        10.6
              No Opinion                                      25.5
              Agree                                           40.4
              Strongly Agree                                  21.3


                                         lxxxviii
Improvement Suggestions by Alumni:

      1996:
              Networking
              GUI
              Parallel and distributed systems
              Real-Time applications
              Cross platform software (e.g., X-Windows)
              More personal PC experience (as opposed to a mainframe)
              More UNIX experience
              Object-oriented programming in C++

      2001:
              Better understanding of business
              More team projects
              Increase database coverage
              More networking
              Real-time applications

      2006:
              Projects that require maintenance or improvement of existing code
              Courses on: web application development, computer security, client
              server, project management, business management, software testing




                                        lxxxix
7. 2006 IAC Presentation


SOUTH DAKOTA




M
SCHOOL OF MINES
                 Computer Science

& TECHNOLOGY




         Industrial Advisory
           Council Report


                           April 2006


                               xc
                          Mark Ingalls
K. Assurant Solutions




Tim Jacobson
           SUN Microsystems

                         David Kasper
                        Rockwell Collins

                          Troy McVay
                             SAIC

                      Patrick Rich
                 Innovative Systems, LLC

                         Nick Rogness
                         Golden West

                        Michelle Wanttie
                        Rockwell Collins




                               xci
Agenda


Session I Curriculum Review & Technology Review - Undergraduate
   8. What is missing from our curriculum?
   9. What aspects need more coverage?
   10.What should the science requirement be?
   11.What aspects need less time or should be removed?
   12.What is the required skill set?
   6. What are your thoughts on the use of Tablet PC's in the
      classroom?
   7. What about the needs and uses for computing labs?
   8. What operating systems, platforms and software systems
      should be presented?

Session II    Curriculum Review & Technology Review - Graduate
Program
    What does management expect from an MS level employee?
    What is the skill set at this level?
   9. What about the needs and uses for computing labs?
   10.What operating systems, platforms and software systems
      should be presented?

Session III Outsourcing and recruiting issues (recruiting for diversity) &
International experiences
    How bad is outsourcing?
    What should we address perceptions of the effects of
      outsourcing?
    How and who should we recruit?
    How can we recruit minorities and women?
    What should international experience be?
    How can we prepare students for international issues?


Session IV Assessment
    Do we assess the right stuff?
    How could we more effectively use the assessment
      information?

                                   xcii
Session V Where is Computer Science going?
    What are the industry trends?
    What is your vision for the future?
    Where should we be headed?




                 Initial Remarks
     Very good education
     Solid foundation and useful curriculum
     Learned to do the “hard stuff”
     Still an unknown entity




Curriculum Review
   Communication skills need to be included in
      programming course work
   Design and develop a releasable project
   Curriculum does not have specialty tracks
   Students should not be solely reliant on tools
   Science requirement should be more flexible
   Students need to understand the business of software



                                xciii
 Encourage students from other departments to look at
  MS CSC
 Strong math core is key to success
 Emphasize a heterogeneous programming environment
  (Windows, Linux, etc)



 Outsourcing/International
 Businesses that outsource tend to keep design and
  intellectual property in house while coding and testing
  is sent offshore
 Mines needs to emphasize their placement percentage
  more
 Students need to get more international exposure
 Jobs are available for graduates that have other skills in
  addition to excellent programming skills




Assessment                                Process
Review
                           xciv
  Student Opinion Survey is too little, too late
  More frequent, less formal feedback to instructor allows
     for minor course corrections
  Could establish a course content review process using
     alumni
  Annual review for faculty is not as frequent as we see
     in industry
    Should periodically assess the resources available to
     Faculty and Students to ensure adequacy




Where is Computer Science
going?
  More code generation tools in use
  More automation used in production
  More versatile skill set expected by employers
  Ability to generate reusable / extendable frameworks
  New hardware architectures are coming out faster
  Self-monitoring / Self-Healing software and systems

                             xcv
Call to Action
  Emphasize communication and software engineering
   principles earlier in the curriculum
  Leverage outsourcing to your advantage
  Utilize shorter feedback loop between students and
   faculty
  Encourage students to accumulate relevant job
   experience prior to graduation
  Reinforce core competencies




                           xcvi
Notes


Curriculum & Technology Review

Courses need to emphasize communication skills as much as programming skills
and incorporate them earlier. If you have good ideas, but cannot communicate
them, they will go unheard. Items such as status reports, design documents, and
test plans are the norm in industry, but are absent from the current curriculum.

Working on existing code written by someone else more accurately reflects what you will be doing in
industry. Learning to use such items as source control, makefile driven builds, and command line
compilers is and integral part of being a software professional. Participating in an ongoing,
releasable software project will give the students exposure to all of these items. Something along the
lines of UW IMAP http://www.washington.edu/imap/ projects like this not only give the
students valuable experience, but can provide notoriety for the institution as well.

Sometimes, difficult choices have to be made when producing software where
you are weighing business needs against technology. Technology without return
on investment is not implemented.

Other departments may be a more fertile ground for finding graduate students.
It could be pitched as a way to the students more marketable to potential
employers. An engineering undergrad with a Computer Science grad is a
powerful combination.

The core competencies that the department instills should be: Math, Hardware,
Algorithms, Database, and Software Engineering processes. A business soft
skills (social science?) elective is worth pursuing.




Outsourcing / International Issues

                                                 xcvii
Different companies approach outsourcing for different reasons. There are still
computer science jobs available in the US, but they are “higher up the stack” than
the typical programming job. Students need other skills in addition to excellent
programming skills to remain competitive and employable. Code monkeys can
be easily replaced.

Mines has a great placement rate, this needs to be marketed more. You can
really emphasize the starting salary for Computer Science graduates. In
addition, the starting salary for computer scientists and engineers could be
placed on the recruiting postcard that is sent out in lieu of putting the average
starting salary on them.

Project groups should be assigned by the instructors to ensure that a wide range
of working relationships can be established. Encourage students to take part in
any international exchange programs that are available to them. Participating in
online development projects such as those hosted at source forge may give the
students the chance to work and talk with software professionals in other
countries.




Where is Computer Science going?

Employers expect a more well rounded software professional than in the past.
Students will be expected to have a wide array of soft business skills to augment
the technical skills they have.

Students need to be kept abreast of the latest hardware and software
architectures that are available to industry today. They need not have them
available to them for use, but should be aware that they exist and how they may
impact their career.




                                      xcviii
8. Student Participation in Competitive Teams


                                 Team Participation

  35

  30

  25

  20
                                                                 Team Participation
  15

  10

   5

   0
        2001    2002   2003    2004    2005     2006   2007


The actual number of students participating in teams decreased in 2007, but the smaller
senior/junior classes are a significant factor in that decrease.

Teams include :
      Aero Design Team
      Programming Team
      Robotics Team
      UAV Team
      Mini-baja Team

In addition to the team honors listed on the next page, the Programming Team, was
invited to the ACM World Finals in 2004 (Prague) and in 2006 (San Antonio). World
Finals bids are determined by performance in the regional competitions.




                                         xcix
                 CAMP Team Competition Results from 2001 to 2006

   Team          Competition        2001           2002               2003            2004            2005          2006

   Mini-Baja -                        6th
                 West                               22nd               22nd            8th             76th
   senior                        (out of 127)                                                                        7th
                 Regional                       (out of 100)       (out of 100)    (out of 94)     (out of 131)
   team                            top 5%

                                     13th                             83rd
   Mini-Baja -   West                               30th                                              115th
                                 (out of 127)                        (out of           NA
   junior team   Regional                       (out of 100)                                       (out of 131)
                                   top 10%                           100+)

                                     59th           42nd               49th            74th            84th
   Mini-Indy     International
                                 (out of 125)   (out of 126)       (out of 125)    (out of 134)    (out of 123)

                                                  Formula                            Formula
                                                    Sun                                Sun
   Solar Car     International       NA             2nd                NA               4th            NA
                                                Grand Prix                         Grand Prix
                                                Stock Class                        Stock Class

                                      5th
   Concrete
                 National        (out of 200)       7th                NA              NA              NA
   Canoe
                                  top 2.5%

   Concrete                                                                                           2nd
                 Regional            1st            1st             1st or 2nd         2nd                           1st
   Canoe                                                                                           (out of 12)

                                                                                    6th Overall
   Human                                            3rd            5th Overall
                                                                                   (out of 25+)       16th
   Powered       National            11th       (out of 40)        2nd Single                                     6th Design
                                                                                    4th Single     (out of 25)
   Vehicle -                                      top 8%           Rider Utility
                                                                                   Rider Utility

                                    12th           14th               12th             17th            1st
   SAE Aero      National                                                                                            1st
                                 (out of 37)    (out of 30)        (out of 39)      (out of 37)    (out of 39)
   IEEE                                                                1st
                                     3rd            2nd                                3rd             2nd
   Robotics -    Regional                                            (out of                                         7th
                                 (out of 19)     (out of 33)                        (out of 40)    (out of 26)
   team 1                                                            37/33)
   Steel                                                                               4th
                 Regional            >3             >3                  >3                             DQ            DQ
   Bridge                                                                          (out of 10)
   UAV           International       NA             NA                 NA                                            1st
                                                                                     4thCar
   ChemE Car     Regional            1st            5th              1st Car                        1st poster       DQ
                                                                                   2nd poster

   ChemE Car     National                                            4th Car


*Concrete canoe number of entrants in nationals is comprised of the first place team from
each region, generally between 18 and 25. Each region usually has between 15 and 20
competitors.

** Only the first three places in Steel Bridge advance to national competition.




                                                               c
9. Supplemental Course Evaluation Questions


                     Supplementary Questions for CS majors
As you know, we are preparing for our accreditation visit in the Fall. As part of our
assessment process, we would like to collect some information about how wonderful you
all are (and you are). Would you please answer the following questions to help us out?
Thank you for participating.

I am a (circle one): Freshman         Sophomore        Junior        Senior

1. What team projects have you participated in? Do not include projects for classes
unless you are on a senior design project that is being done for a ―customer‖ (e.g.
building a web database for a charity). DO include teams like the UAV team, robotics,
HPV, programming team etc. Please list your participation on these teams by year.

2. What leadership roles have you held? Include leadership roles on the team projects
listed above. Again, please list these by year.


Note that there are extra questions at the end of the IDEA form (the student opinion
survey) . Please answer the following questions using those extra lines on the form.

50. My ability to work in teams has been enhanced by my computer science courses.

51. I have acquired a better understanding of the ethical standards required of the
profession in my computer science classes.

52. I have acquired a better understanding of the global and societal impacts of
technology in my computer science courses.

53. The computing facilities available to me on campus were generally adequate to
complete my assignments.

IF YOU ARE A SENIOR, please answer the following additional questions.

54. My computer science degree has prepared me to assume leadership roles in my job.

55. I have the technical skills necessary to be successful in industry or graduate school.

56. My education will enable me to adapt to the rapidly-changing field of computer
science.

                                    THANK YOU!!
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION
                                             ci
Dept.,          CSC 150       Course                Computer Science I
Number                        Title
Semester        3             Course                Val Manes
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):         http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/csc150

Current Catalog Description

Prerequisite and corequisite: MATH 123. An introduction to computer programming.
Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts.
Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays.


Textbook

Starting Out With C++, From Control Structures through Objects, 5th Ed. Tony Gaddis,
2007, Addison Wesley



References

None




Course Goals

This course introduces the fundamentals of computer programming, emphasizing logical
development of solutions and correct use of a programming language.




Prerequisites by Topic

Algebra




                                              cii
Major Topics Covered in the Course

Data Types, Variables and Simple I/O, Assignment statements, Conditional Execution
(if…else, Logical operators and switch), Iteration (while, do…while and for loops),
Functions, Single and Multiple Dimensioned Arrays, Strings, Simple Search and Sort
algorithms.


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

8 structured laboratory sessions, 2 hours each, with 4 additional enhancement labs.
3 major program assignments, 4 weeks each



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms        1                            Data Structures
Software          1                            Prog.              1
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __0___ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically ___n/a__ pages and to
   make __0___ oral presentations of typically __n/a___ minute‘s duration. Include
   only material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    The Departmental Academic Integrity policy is discussed, to include the permissible
    and impermissible use of outside code and proper attribution, when used. ( ½ hour)
    No testing on this material in this course.




                                            ciii
Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    No significant theoretical material is covered in this course




Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Students learn how to break down a problem into simpler components.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students learn to design programs by selecting appropriate control structures,
    breaking programs into functions of appropriate size and complexity.




                                            civ
                               COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,          CSC 250       Course               Computer Science II
Number                        Title
Semester        4 credit      Course               Roger Schrader
hours           hours         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

Prerequisite: CSC 150 or CENG 241 or equivalent or permission of instructor. This
course provides an introduction to structured programming principles. It includes
fundamental computer science concepts, such as recursion, sorting, dynamic memory
allocation, linked lists and trees.


Textbook

Data Abstraction and Problem Solving with                   C++:         Walls   and   Mirrors,
Frank M. Carrano, Addison Wesley, 5th edition, 2006.



References

None




Course Goals

CSC 250 is the second course in a four-semester sequence designed to teach students the
fundamentals of problem solving on the computer. This sequence provides students with
skills required for computer programming, algorithm development, and software
development, as well as proficiency in a high-level programming language (C++). The
primary goal of this course is to introduce students to a wide variety of fundamental
elementary data structures and associated algorithms. The course material provides a
foundation for virtually all upper-level computer science courses.




                                              cv
Prerequisites by Topic

Fundamentals of C++ including: Data Types, Variables and Simple I/O, Assignment
statements, Conditional execution – if, Logical operators, Switch, Iteration – while, do
while, for loop, Functions, Arrays, Classes & Objects


Major Topics Covered in the Course

Review of C++, Principles of Software Engineering, Recursion, Data Abstraction,
Linked Lists, Stacks, Queues, Simulations, and Class Relationships / Inheritance.



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Four programming assignments, 3 to 4 weeks each.




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms        1                            Data Structures
Software          2                            Prog.              1
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __3___ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __2-3___ pages and to
   make __0___ oral presentations of typically __0___ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?




                                            cvi
    I have two test essay questions that involve software ethics and teamwork. The
    questions require students to research aspects of each. About one week is spent on
    software ethics and teamwork.



Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    None.




Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

       Students continue to learn how to analyze problems for computer solutions
       including object oriented analysis. An incremental approach to analysis is
       stressed using problems that do not lend themselves to brute force solution.



Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

       Students learn how to design C++ programs using classes including object
       oriented design. An incremental approach to design is stressed using problems
       that do not lend themselves to brute force solution.




                                          cvii
                               COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC 251      Course             Finite Structures
Number                    Title
Semester     4            Course             Dr. Antonette Logar
hours                     Coordinator
                          URL (if any):      http://www.sdsmt.edu (search for Logar)

Current Catalog Description

CSC 251 FINITE STRUCTURES (4-0) 4 credits. Prerequisite: CSC 150. Selected topics
from Boolean algebra, set theory, congruences, equivalence relations, complexity, graph
theory, combinatorics, induction, difference equations, and logic.


Textbook

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, 6th edition, Rosen, McGraw Hill publishers.
The text is available at the Tech Bookstore.


References

None


Course Goals

Course Goals. The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the
mathematical foundations of computer science. The material will provide the necessary
preparation for successful study of upper level computer science topics such as data
structures and analysis of algorithms. The course also facilitates life-long learning in
computer science by providing the student with foundational material that continues to be
applicable even as the discipline rapidly evolves.

Student Outcomes. A student who successfully completes this course should, at a
minimum, be able to :
1. be able to translate between symbolic logic and English, including quantifiers
2. be able to determine if two logical expressions are equivalent
3. be able to design a minimized combinational Boolean circuit from a description
4. know the fundamental definitions of sets, set operators, and set identities
5. know the properties of functions
6. be able to evaluate single and double summations
7. know the formal definition of Big O and how to apply it to analyze algorithms
8. know the definitions and formulas needed for public key encryption

                                          cviii
9. be able to perform fundamental matrix operations such as addition, subtraction, and
multiplication, and know the basic properties of matrices (commutative, distributive,
associative)
10. be able to construct a direct proof, an indirect proof, a proof by contradiction, and a
proof by induction
11. know how to apply basic counting techniques : the sum and product rules, inclusion-
exclusion, and the pigeonhole principle
12. be able to apply advanced counting techniques such as computing combinations and
permutations
13. be able to compute discrete probabilities
14. be able to solve recurrence relations with various techniques
15. know the fundamental graph and tree definitions and theorems
16. know how to represent a tree and a graph in a computer
17. be able to apply graph search and analysis algorithms
18. be able to apply tree traversal and search algorithms
19. be able to create a Huffman tree for code compression
20. be able to build a minimal spanning tree



Prerequisites by Topic

Official Prerequisites : The prerequisites for the course is CSC 150 (C++ programming),
which in turn implies a prerequisite of Calculus I. Concurrent enrollment in CSC 250
(CS 2) is optimal from the perspective of both CSC251 and CSC250.

Students are expected to be able to :
1. write C++ programs and to follow C++ implementations of algorithms discussed in
class
2. take derivatives, compute limits, and do basic integration.
3. Basic mathematical concepts :
        Cartesian coordinates
        Linear and quadratic equations
        Systems of linear equations
        Inequalities
        Logarithms



Major Topics Covered in the Course

                                   Outline of Topics

The following is intended to be an approximate guide to the topics we will cover and the
amount of time that will be devoted to each topic. The topics or the time on each may
vary slightly to accommodate the class but the exams will be given when scheduled.



                                            cix
Week               Topic                                     Text

1      1/17   Introduction
       1/18   Logic                                           1.1
       1/19   Logic cont.
2      1/22   Propositional Equivalences                       1.2
       1/24   Predicates and quantifiers                       1.3
       1/25   Predicates and quantifiers cont.
              Last day to drop with a refund
       1/26   Nested quantifiers                               1.4
3      1/29   Sets                                             2.1
       1/31   Set operations                                   2.2
       2/1    Boolean functions                                11.1
       2/2    Representing Boolean functions                   11.2
4      2/5    Logic gates                                      11.3
       2/7    Minimization of circuits                         11.4
       2/8    Minimization of circuits cont.
       2/9    Review for Test I
5      2/12   Test I
       2/14   Functions                                        2.3
       2/15   Functions cont.
       2/16   Sequences and summations                         2.4
6      2/19   President’s Day Holiday
       2/21   Algorithms and the growth of functions           3.1, 3.2
       2/22   Algorithms and Complexity                        3.3
       2/23   Applications of number theory                    3.7

7      2/26   Overview of matrices                             3.8
       2/28   Methods of proof                                 1.5
       3/1    Proof strategy                           1.6
       3/2    Proof strategies cont.                           1.7


8      3/5 – 3/9       Spring Break

9      3/12   Mathematical induction                           4.1
       3/14       "
       3/15   The basics of counting                           5.1
       3/16   The pigeonhole principle                         5.2

10     3/19   Permutations and combinations                    5.3
       3/21   Binomial coefficients                            5.4
       3/22   Discrete probability                             6.1
       3/23   Review for Test II

                                          cx
 11    3/26   Test II
       3/28   Discrete Probability cont.
       3/29   Inclusion/Exclusion                         7.5
       3/30   Recurrence relations                        7.1

 12    4/2    Recurrence relations cont.
       4/4    Solving recurrence relations                7.2
       4/5    Introduction to graphs and terminology      9.1, 9.2
       4/6    Easter Holiday

 13    4/9    Easter Holiday
       4/10   Last Day to Withdraw
       4/11   Representing graphs                         9.3
       4/12   Connectivity                                9.4
       4/13   Euler and Hamilton Paths                    9.5

 14    4/16   Shortest path problems                      9.6
       4/18   Introduction to trees                       10.1
       4/19   Applications of trees cont.                 10.2
       4/20   Review for Test III

 15    4/23   Test III
       4/25   Applications of trees cont.
       4/26   Tree traversal                              10.3
              4/27 Tree traversal cont.

 16    4/30   Spanning trees                              10.4
       5/2    Minimal spanning trees                      10.5
       5/3    Review for Final
       5/4    Review for Final

FINAL EXAMINATION [Cumulative] – Friday, May 11, 9:00 – 10:50 PM in M306



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

None




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area             Core        Advanced         Area      Core         Advanced

                                            cxi
Algorithms        1                             Data Structures   1
Software                                        Prog.
Design                                          Languages
Comp. Arch.                                     Theory            2


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least ___0__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __0___ pages and to
   make _0___ oral presentations of typically __0___ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    None




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    1.      Foundations
            (a) Logic (7 hours)
            (b) Set theory (2 hours)
            (c) Functions (2 hours)
            (d) Sequences and summations (2 hours)
            (e) Complexity of algorithms (3 hours)
            (f) Matrices (2 hours)
            (g) Methods of proof (5 hours)

    2.      Counting and discrete probability (7 hours)

    3.      Recurrence relations (3 hours)

    4.      Graph theory
            (a) Terminology and applications (2 hours)
            (a) Path and circuits (2 hours)
            (b) Shortest path algorithm (1 hours)

                                             cxii
    5.     Trees
           (a) Tree terminology and applications (3 hours)
           (b) Binary search trees (1 hour)
           (c) Spanning trees and traversals (3 hours)

    6.     Boolean algebra and combinational circuits (5 hours)



Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    An introduction to analysis of algorithms is covered. Students are exposed to
    analysis of search, graph, and tree algorithms.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    There are no programming projects in this course.




                                          cxiii
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,           CSC 300      Course           Data Structures
Number                        Title
Semester         4            Course           Dr. Antonette Logar
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):    http://www.sdsmt.edu
                                               Search for Logar, Select CSC 300

Current Catalog Description

CSC 300 DATA STRUCTURES (4-0) 4 credits. Prerequisite: CSC 250 and CSC 251. A
systematic study of data structures and the accompanying algorithms used in computing
problems; structure and use of storage; methods of representing data; techniques for
implementing data structures; linear lists; stacks; queues; trees and tree traversal; linked
lists; and other structures.



Textbook

Data Structures & Algorithm Analysis in C++, 3rd edition, Mark Allen Weiss, Addison
Wesley Publishers, 2006



References

Assigned as needed.



Course Goals

Course Goals. CSC 300 is the third course in a four-semester sequence designed to
teach students the fundamentals of problem solving on the computer. This sequence
provides students with skills required for computer programming, algorithm
development, algorithm analysis, and software development, as well as proficiency in a
high-level programming language (C++). The primary goal of this course is to introduce
students to a wide variety of fundamental data structures and associated algorithms. The
course material provides a foundation for virtually all upper-level computer science
courses.

Student Outcomes. A student who successfully completes this course should, at a
minimum :

                                            cxiv
1. possess intermediate level problem solving and algorithm development skills on the
computer.
2. be able to analyze algorithms using big-Oh notation
3. understand the fundamental data structures such as lists, trees, heaps, and graphs
4. understand the fundamental algorithms such as searching, sorting, and hashing
5. possess increased fluency in the high-level programming language C++
6. be able to write programs using both procedural and object oriented paradigms
7. be able to use the Linux operating system for software development
8. be able to explain the software development process
9. gain experience working in teams



Prerequisites by Topic

C++ programming essentials – loops, strings, functions, arrays, files
Linked lists
Recursion
Elementary analysis of algorithms
Basic object-oriented design and programming
Mathematical foundations in trees, graphs, lists
Recurrence relations



Major Topics Covered in the Course

                                  Summary of Topics

The following is intended to be an approximate guide to the topics we will cover and the
amount of time that will be devoted to each topic. The topics or the time on each may
vary slightly to accommodate the class but the exams will be given when scheduled.

Week           Topic                                      Text

  1    1/17    Introduction
       1/18    Introduction to Linux
       1/19    Introduction to Linux cont.
  2    1/22    Arrays and matrices
               Program #1 Assigned
       1/24    Analysis of Algorithms
       1/25    Analysis of Algorithms                               2.1 – 2.3
               Last day to drop with a refund
       1/26    Analysis of algorithms cont                          2.4

  3    1/29    Strings and STL

                                             cxv
     1/31   Lists                                       3.1 – 3.5
     2/1    Lists cont.
     2/2    Stacks                                      3.6
4    2/5    Queues                                3.7
     2/7    Introduction to trees, binary trees         4.1, 4.2
     2/8    Binary search trees                         4.3
     2/9    AVL Trees                                   4.4
     2/11   Program #1 Due by Midnight
5    2/12   AVL Trees cont.
            Program #2 Assigned
     2/14   Tree traversals revisited                   4.6
     2/15   Tree traversals cont.
     2/16   Review for Test 1

6    2/19   President’s Day Holiday
     2/21   Test 1
     2/22   2-3-4 trees                                 4.7
     2/23   2-3-4 trees continued

7    2/26   B-trees                                     4.7
     2/28   B-trees cont.
     3/1    Red-Black trees                             12.2
     3/2    Red-Black trees cont.                       12.2

8    3/5 – 3/9     Spring Break

9    3/12   Introduction to Hashing                     5.1, 5.2
     3/14   Hashing cont.                               5.3, 5.4
     3/15   Introduction to Heaps                       6.1, 6.2
     3/16   Heaps                                       6.3
     3/18   Program #2 Due by Midnight

10   3/19   Review n2 sorts                             7.1, 7.2, 7.3
            Program #3 Assigned
     3/21   Review n2 sorts cont.
     3/22   Heapsort                                    7.5
     3/23   Mergesort                                   7.6

11   3/26   Quicksort                                   7.7
     3/28   Bucket sort and Radix sort                  7.10
     3/29   Radix sort cont.
     3/30   Review for Test 2

12   4/2    Test 2
     4/4    Disjoint Set ADT (Union/Find)               8.1, 8.2, 8.3
     4/5    Union/Find cont.                            8.4,       8.5,   8.6

                                         cxvi
       4/6    Easter Holiday

 13    4/9    Easter Holiday
       4/10   Last Day to Withdraw
       4/11   Introduction to graphs and the topological sort     9.1, 9.2
       4/12   Graph traversals : depth first, breadth-first
       4/13   Shortest-Path algorithms                            9.3
       4/15   Program #3 Due by Midnight

 14    4/16   Shortest-Path algorithms cont.
              Program #4 Assigned
       4/18   Minimal spanning trees                              9.5
       4/19   Minimal spanning trees cont.
       4/20   Applications of Depth-first search                  9.6

 15    4/23   Other graph algorithms
       4/25   Backtracking Revisited                              10.5
       4/26   Introduction to NP-Completeness                     9.7
       4/27   Review for Test 3

 16    4/30   Test 3
       5/2    Dynamic programming Revisited                       10.3
       5/3    Dynamic Programming cont.

       5/4    Review for Final.
              Program #4 Due by Midnight



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Varies by semester. The typical configuration is 4 assignments : two individual and two
team assignments. In Fall 2006 we experimented with more, smaller assignments and
had 3 individual and 3 team assignments. Student feedback indicated the larger
assignments were more favorably received. Thus, the typical laboratory schedule is :
   Program 1 – Individual, 2 weeks
   Program 2 – Team, 4 weeks
   Program 3 – Individual, 3 weeks
   Program 4 – Team, 4 weeks




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area             Core        Advanced        Area               Core         Advanced


                                          cxvii
Algorithms         1                           Data Structures    3
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __3___ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __2___ pages and to
   make __0___ oral presentations of typically ___0__ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    The code of conduct for the department and the ACM Code of Conduct are studied
    in class. Students are required to write an essay on an ethical question at the
    beginning of the semester to set the tone for the course.



Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    Approximately 11 hours of theory is done in this course interwoven with the data
    structures and algorithms material. Topics covered include :
    - detailed analysis of algorithms lectures (3 hours)
    - analysis of tree algorithms (2 hours)
    - hashing and binary search analysis (1 hours)
    - theoretical results related to sorting, including proofs of Big O bounds (3 hours)
        In particular, mergesort, quicksort, B-tree, and heap sort analyses. General
        theoretical results about sorting are also covered.
    - theoretical results related to graph algorithms and complexity, particularly NP
    completeness (2 hours)


Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

                                           cxviii
    Analysis is minimal in this course since particular data structures are required for the
    laboratory assignments. Proper selection of algorithms and data structures is
    discussed as part of the programming assignment, but the instructor make the final
    decision on the best way to solve the problem.


Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students are required to write an efficient solution to the laboratory assignments
    within the framework required for the assignment. Code structure, proper data
    structure usage, and efficiency are graded in the assignments. Code documentation
    is also graded.




                                           cxix
                              COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,   CSC      Course          Assembly Language
Number 314        Title
Semester 4        Course          R. Opp
hours             Coordinator
                  URL (if any):   http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/sdsmt/directory/courses/200
                                  7sp/csc314/314LM001

Current Catalog Description

(2-2) 4 credits. Prerequisite: CSC 250. A thorough introduction to assembly language
programming and processor architecture. A study of low-level programming techniques,
and the layout of a typical computer. The student will gain insight into the memory
layout, registers, run-time stack, and global data segment of a running program. This
course is cross listed with CENG 314/314L. Graduation credit will not be allowed for
both this course and CENG 314/314L.


Textbook

―Linux Assembly Language Programming‖ by Bob Neveln (optional)




References




                                           cxx
Course Goals




To learn how numerical values are internally represented

To learn how the PC architecture expedites its performance

To learn how information enters and exits the PC

To learn how branching is implemented

To learn how subprograms are implemented

To learn about Boolean operations

To learn how arrays are implemented

To learn about the special-purpose string operations

To learn how interrupts are implemented

To learn how assembly functions can be called from C

Learn the macro mechanism

Learn how recursion works

Learn how the coprocessor works

Learn how to write machine code


Prerequisites by Topic

Binary arithmetic, Boolean operations, Arrays, Pointers, Strings, High-level looping and
decision-making      constructs, Recursion, Floating-point computations, C/C++
programming.


Major Topics Covered in the Course

Number representations (1 lecture), PC architecture (1 lecture),input/output (2 lectures),
addressing modes (2 lectures), branching(1 lecture), modularity (1 lecture), bit
manipulations (1 lecture), arrays (3 lectures), string operations (2 lectures), interrupts (2
lectures), mixed-language programs (1 lecture), macros (1 lecture), recursion (2 lectures),

                                            cxxi
floating-point coprocessor (4 lectures), machine language (3 lectures).




Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Input/Output (1 week), Arrays (2 weeks), Functions (2 weeks), Recursion (2 weeks),
String operations (1 week), Graphics (1 week), Interrupts/TSRs (3 weeks), Real-number
coprocessing (3 weeks).


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms        1                            Data Structures
Software          0.5                          Prog.              1
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.       1.5


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least _____ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _____ pages and to make
   _____ oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.


                                           cxxii
Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    As new computer topics are introduced, laboratory projects are assigned to exploit
    these new frontiers. The projects typically feature significant problems, which are
    analyzed in class to expedite their fulfillment in lab; these include issues such as
    conversions from ASCII to binary and vice versa, multi-precision, sorting,
    searching, matrix operations, graphics, Newton‘s method, Simpson‘s Rule, infinite
    series, and determinants.


Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Considerable time and effort is devoted to the logistics of implementing a solution to
    a problem. This includes the selection and design of program components, such as
    the choice of subprograms, their arguments and return values. It also includes the
    selection of appropriate looping and decision-making constructs.




                                          cxxiii
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC 317     Course           Computer Organization and Architecture
Number                   Title
Semester     4           Course           Manuel Penaloza
hours                    Coordinator
                         URL (if any):    http://www.hpcnet.org/sdsmt/directory/course
                                          s/2007sp/csc317/317LM001

Current Catalog Description

A course in computer organization with emphasis on the hierarchical structure of
computer systems. Covers such topics as: components of computer systems and their
configuration, design of basic digital circuits, the microprogram level, the conventional
machine level, the operating system level, assembly language, addressing modes,
interpreters/translators, computer arithmetic.


Textbook

Linda Null and Julia Lobur. The Essentials of Computer Organization and Architecture,
2nd edition, Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2006.



References

   1. William Stallings. Computer Organization and Architecture, Sixth edition,
      Prentice Hall, 2003.
   2. John P. Hayes. Computer Architecture and Organization. Third edition, McGraw
      Hill.



Course Goals

The purpose of the course is to analyze the characteristics (architecture) and the
implementation (organization) of a computer system, and the CPU in particular. To
provide a comprehensive and an in-depth understanding of the interaction between
software and hardware.




                                          cxxiv
Prerequisites by Topic

Assembly language, digital systems, and C++ programming languages




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Evolution of computer architecture, CPU organization, computer performance, computer
arithmetic, instruction set architecture, addressing modes, RISC and CISC systems,
hardwired and micro-programmed control units, computer buses, input and output
devices, interaction of a computer hardware with an operating system, memory
hierarchy, error detection and correction, and pipelining.


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Usually two or three programming projects which consists in simulating a simple
computer architecture. Each project takes about three weeks to complete.



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software          0.5                          Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.       3.5


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least _2__ written reports (not including exams,
   tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __7__ pages and to make __0__
   oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
   graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
   completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

                                           cxxv
    None.




Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    CPU organization (2 hours), computer performance (2 hours), instruction set
    architecture (3 hours), addressing modes (2 hours), hardwired and micro-
    programmed control units (3 hours), computer arithmetic (5 hours), memory
    hierarchy (3 hours), error detection and correction (2 hours), and pipelining (1 hour).


Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Students must analyze different CPU architectures and the assigned programming
    projects. Then, they must analyze what are the adequate data structures needed to
    simulate the computer architecture assigned for the project.



Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students must design the solution of the programming projects.




                                          cxxvi
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,         CSC       Course             Analysis of Algorithms
Number         372       Title
Semester       3         Course             Dr. Corwin
hours                    Coordinator
                         URL (if any):      http://www.mcs.sdsmt.edu/ecorwin/algorithms/

Current Catalog Description

Prerequisites: CSC 300 (Data Structures) and MATH 125 (Calculus II). Design and
analysis of algorithms for numeric and nonnumeric problems, general problem-solving
approaches, theory of computation. Topics will be selected from searching, sorting, graph
algorithms, numerical algorithms, geometric algorithms, cryptography, and parallel
algorithms.


Textbook

Introduction to Algorithms, 2nd edition, Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, and Stein, McGraw-
Hill, 2001



References

none




Course Goals

This course reinforces and extends the material in CSC 300, Data Structures. Students
learn how to perform analyses of complex algorithms while learning more about data
structures, such as graphs and trees, and algorithms for dealing with them.



Prerequisites by Topic

1.     C++ programming
2.     Data structures
3.     Differential and integral calculus



                                             cxxvii
Major Topics Covered in the Course

Analysis of algorithms, searching, sorting, graph algorithms, numerical algorithms,
geometric algorithms, and cryptography



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

There are about three assignments each of which are given three or four weeks.




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms        2                            Data Structures    1
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least 0 written reports (not including exams,
   tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically      pages and to make 0 oral
   presentations of typically      minute‘s duration. Include only material that is graded
   for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
   completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    none




                                           cxxviii
Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

       The theoretical foundations of analysis of algorithms will be covered. Also, some
       of the algorithms discussed will require some theoretical background.

       Topics included and estimate of time:

              Big-Oh and recurrence relations – two hours
              Proving correctness and run-time of algorithms – many hours, at least ten
              Theory behind the FFT – two hours
              Number theory – three hours



Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    This course focuses on analysis. Students analyze problems from various fields in
    Computer Science.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students design solutions to many problems.         Several of these are done in
    assignments.




                                          cxxix
                                      COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,         CSC 410       Course             Parallel Computing
Number                       Title
Semester       4             Course             Jeff McGough
hours                        Coordinator
                             URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

CSC 410/510 PARALLEL COMPUTING (3-0) 3 credits.
Prerequisite: CSC 456. The fundamental ideas and issues involved in programming and
using parallel computers. A survey of modern architectures and operating systems.
Parallel programming applications in business, economic modeling, and science.
SDSM&T emphasis scientific applications. Students enrolled in CSC 510 will be held to
a higher standard than those enrolled in CSC 410.


Textbook

Parallel Programming, 2nd ed, Wilkinson & Allen, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0131405632,
   2005.



References

   Parallel Programming with MPI, Pacheco
   FORTRAN 90/95 explained, Metcalf & Reid
   In Search of Clusters, Pfister
   Parallel Computing, Grama, Gupta, Karypis & Kumar
   Programming with Threads, Kleiman, Shah & Smaalders
   Foundations of Multithreaded, Parallel and Distributed Programming, Andrews
   Scalable Parallel Computing, Hwang & Xu
   Fundamentals of Parallel Processing, Jordan & Alaghband
   High Performance Computing, Dowd & Severance



Course Goals

            The student will be introduced to the primary parallel computing
                   architectures and gain an understanding of the main programming
                   models. A thorough understanding of the message passing model and
                   an introduction to the shared memory models will follow. The
                   student will gain experience in programming tools and solution

                                                 cxxx
                 methods in the main programming models. Finally, the student will
                 become experienced in parallel algorithm development and
                 performance analysis.



Prerequisites by Topic

C/C++, Data structures and algorithms, familiarity with operating systems and computer
architecture.



Major Topics Covered in the Course

Parallel computing and grand challenge problems, parallel computing platforms and
models, standard interconnection networks and topologies, MPI based parallel
programs, function, domain and task decompositions, parallel algorithm design
approaches, load balanced programs using static and dynamic parallelism, divide
and conquer, pipeline, synchronized approaches, parallel program performance,
scalability and performance metrics, standard parallel algorithms for matrix
manipulations, linear systems and sorting


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Program 1: Parallel Fortran on Solaris – matrix multiply (two weeks)
Program 2: MPI workpool solution to compute the Mandelbrot set (two weeks)
Program 3: MPI Parallel Linear Solver (three weeks)
Program 4: Group project, topic selected (three weeks)


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core       Advanced       Area               Core       Advanced
Algorithms        1.5                       Data Structures    0.5
Software          0.5                       Prog.              0.25
Design                                      Languages
Comp. Arch.       0.5


Oral and Written Communications

  Every student is required to submit at least __4__ written reports (not including
  exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _2-5_ pages and to make
  ___1__ oral presentations of typically __10___ minute‘s duration. Include only
  material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
  technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

                                         cxxxi
   Social and Ethical Issues

       Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
       covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
       ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
       test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

Not addressed.




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

         Parallelism & concurrency (3 hrs)
         Decomposition (3 hrs)




   Problem Analysis

       Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

         System performance modeling,
         Parallel Algorithm Analysis,
         Problem decomposition and allocation,
         Example large scale problems (N Body Problem, Heat Flow Calculations, etc)


   Solution Design

       Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

         Design and code four programs.




                                               cxxxii
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept., Number       CSC 421/521        Course Title               Graphical User Interfaces
Semester hours      3                  Course Coordinator         Dr. John M. Weiss
                                       URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

(3-0) 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSC 300. This introductory course in graphical user interface (GUI)
concepts will cover graphical user interface elements and style, events, component and object
oriented user interface models, and graphical application programming issues. Topics will be
covered in the context of common graphical user interface environments and programming
languages. Possible topics include current GUI development languages such as Java, Web interfaces,
GUI design principles and standards, and the role of the GUI in the overall application. Students
enrolling in CSC 521 will be held to a higher standard than those enrolling in CSC 421.



Textbook

Programming the World Wide Web, 3rd ed. (Sebesta, 2005)
About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design (Cooper & Reimann, 2003)


References

Various online references for XHTML, XML, JavaScript, Java, Perl, etc.




                                              cxxxiii
Course Goals


Objectives
The primary objective of this course is to give the student an introduction to the theory and practice
of graphical user interface concepts. From a theoretical standpoint, we will discuss topics such as
basic GUI principles, human-computer interaction, and usability guidelines. From a practical
standpoint, we will cover Web interface design using HTML and XML, GUI programming in Java
using Swing classes, and client-server programming with Java applets and servlets.



Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will obtain the following outcomes:
 understanding of fundamental graphical user interface concepts
 experience writing Web interfaces with XHTML
 experience performing Web computation using JavaScript
 experience using the data-description capabilities of XML
 experience writing Java programs
 experience writing application GUIs using Java Swing classes
 experience writing client-server programs using Java applets and servlets
 greater understanding of the software development process
 experience working in teams on software projects


Prerequisites by Topic

CSC 421/521 is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate computer science course,
comprising an introduction to the study of graphical user interface concepts. Prior
exposure to GUI programming is not required, but the student should have a strong
background in computer science, including a programming course in data structures.


Major Topics Covered in the Course

1.   Fundamental GUI design principles.
2.   Web interfaces: XHTML.
3.   Web programming: JavaScript.
4.   Data description: XML.
5.   GUI programming: Java Swing classes.
6.   Client-server programming: Java applets and servlets.


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

1. Web GUI project                                          (4 weeks)
2. Java GUI project                                         (4 weeks)
3. Client-server project                                    (4 weeks)

                                                cxxxiv
Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area               Core        Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software                       1               Prog.                          2
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __2__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __2__ pages and to make
   __2__ oral presentations of typically __5__ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    The importance of good user interface design (and the societal cost of poor design)
    was emphasized throughout the course. Students were graded on their understanding
    of the theory and practice of GUI design, both in programming assignments and on
    exams.


Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    Theoretical aspects of design were discussed at several points in the course, and one
    of the two textbooks focused largely on design issues. In addition to design, some
    aspects of programming language theory were covered, along with client-server
    interactions in Web programming. Class time was split more-or-less evenly between
    theory and applications.


Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

                                           cxxxv
    Analysis of GUI design was integral to the entire course. For example, CSC421/521
    students were asked to analyze and redesign portions of the departmental Website in
    two of their assignments.



Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Again, interface design was a central theme throughout the course. Students were
    asked to design Web GUIs, application software GUIs, and client-server programs in
    their assignments.




                                        cxxxvi
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept., Number       CSC 433/533       Course Title               Computer Graphics
Semester hours      3                 Course Coordinator         Dr. John M. Weiss
                                      URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

(3-0) 3 credits. Prerequisites CSC 300 and MATH 225. Graphical programming concepts. Display
media and device characteristics. Point, line, and circle plotting. Coordinate systems and
transformations. Polygon clipping and filling. Spline methods, hidden surface elimination, and
shading.



Textbook

Computer Graphics with OpenGL, 3rd ed. (Hearn and Baker, Prentice Hall, 2004)



References

Online references to advanced OpenGL topics.




                                             cxxxvii
Course Goals


Objectives
The primary objective of this course is to give the student an introduction to the theory
and practice of computer graphics. The basics of computer graphics hardware and
software will be presented, along with a survey of advanced methods.


Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will obtain the following outcomes:
 gain understanding of computer graphics hardware
 gain working knowledge of fundamental computer graphics software
 understand and implement simple parametric curves (points, lines, polygons, ellipses)
 understand and implement more complex curves (splines, Bezier curves, fractals)
 understand and implement region fill techniques (flood fill, scanline fill, polygon fill)
 understand and implement the 2-D viewing pipeline (geometric transformations,
   windows, viewpoints, clipping)
 understand 3-D viewing pipeline (hidden lines and surfaces, transformations,
   projections, clipping)
 understand color models, lighting models, shading, ray tracing
 understand the fundamentals of animation
 gain experience writing OpenGL programs
 gain greater understanding of the software development process
 gain experience working in teams


Prerequisites by Topic

CSC 433/533 is an upper-level Computer Science elective course. Success in this class requires the
programming maturity that comes from significant prior computer programming coursework
(including a class in Data Structures). Students must have experience in writing substantial computer
programs, with a working knowledge of recursion, pointers, dynamic memory management,
fundamental data structures and algorithms, and object-oriented programming (including class
inheritance) in C++.

Computer Graphics is a mathematically-intensive area of Computer Science. Students should have a
solid mathematics background, including college algebra, trigonometry, vector and matrix
manipulation, and calculus through partial derivatives and multiple integrals.




                                              cxxxviii
Major Topics Covered in the Course

7. Introduction to computer graphics hardware and software
8. Graphics primitives: points, lines, polygons, simple curves
9. Region fill algorithms
10. 2-D viewing: coordinate systems, geometric transformations, clipping
11. Complex curves: splines, Bezier curves, fractals
12. 3-D viewing: object representations, geometric transformations, projections
13. Hidden-line and hidden-surface algorithms
14. Light sources, shading, ray tracing
15. Color models
16. Animation


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

4. 3 programming assignments (3-4 weeks each)
5. one group project in computer graphics (4 weeks)



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                     2               Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.                          1
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __1__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __5__ pages and to make
   __1__ oral presentations of typically __15__ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?




                                           cxxxix
    Relatively little time is devoted to social and ethical issues in this course.




Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    Much of the class time is devoted to theoretical concepts in computer graphics,
    including the mathematics of many graphics operations: parametric curves, splines,
    fractal geometry, area fills, geometric transformations in 2-D and 3-D, projections,
    lighting models, shading models, rendering surfaces, color theory, the viewing
    pipeline, etc.


Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Students analyze a wide variety of graphical operations with respect to time and
    space complexity issues.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students design C++ programs to solve a variety of computer graphics problems,
    including a group project of their choosing.




                                             cxl
                                          COURSE DESCRIPTION

       Dept.,       CSC          Course           Advanced Digital Systems
       Number       440/440L     Title
       Semester     4            Course           Jianbin Wei
       hours                     Coordinator
                                 URL (if any):

       Current Catalog Description

       Memory and disk systems, bus and I/0 systems, parallel processing. Applications of
       digital systems in real-time processing.



       Textbook

       Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach. John Hennessy and David Patterson.
         Elsevier. Third edition, 2002.



       References

           1. Parallel Computer Architecture, Culler and Singh, Morgan Kaufmann, 1998




       Course Goals

       Computer architecture (advanced digital systems) is the art and science of selecting and
       interconnecting hardware components to build a computer that satisfies desired
       constraints, such as performance, function, power, and cost goals. This course is to
       quantitatively and qualitatively examine design trade-offs. We will learn, for example,
       how processors execute many instructions concurrently and how today’s
       supercomputers are built by using large number of microprocessors. The goal of this
       course is to help students develop competence in analysis, design, and evaluation of
       new technologies in computer architecture. This course serves students in two ways.
       For those who will continue in computer architecture, it lays foundation of state-of-the-art
       techniques implemented in current and future high-performance microprocessors and
       multiprocessors. It helps the students develop understanding of engineering
trade-offs in the design of computers. For those students not continuing in computer
       architecture, it helps them to gain understanding of fundamental architectural
       principles and the techniques in today’s computers and their interplay with software.



                                                   cxli
Prerequisites by Topic

Computer organization and architecture, assembly languages




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Performance/Power/Cost, PPC and ISA, MIPS, Pipeline, Cache, Virtual memory,
Symmetric multiprocessor, Cache coherence, Scalable multiprocessor, Network
topology and media, routing and flow control, Cluster


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced         Area              Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                      Data Structures
Software                                        Prog.
Design                                          Languages
Comp. Arch.       3            1


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __0__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __ pages and to make
   ___0__ oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?



                                            cxlii
Ethical and social issues relating to computer architectures are covered in general discussions and with respect
     to computer system security. Students are not directly graded on their understanding of ethical topics in
     this course.




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

         MIPS (6 hours), Pipeline basic and hazard (5 hours), Cache coherence (5 hours),
         Cache synchronization (4 hours), Symmetric multiprocessor (4 hours)




   Problem Analysis

       Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

         Students are required to analyze computer architecture problems and computer
         designs, including identifying performance bottlenecks, their solutions and the
         strengths and weaknesses of the solutions.



   Solution Design

       Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

             Students must learn the design issues of various parts of a computer system,
             including instruction sets, memory architecture, cache, storage, and
             communications between computers.




                                                        cxliii
                               COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC    Course         Theory of Computation
Number       445    Title
Semester     3      Course         Dr. Corwin
hours               Coordinator
                    URL (if        www.mcs.sdsmt.edu/ecorwin/theory_of_computation/
                    any):

Current Catalog Description

Prerequisite: CSC 251 (Discrete Structures). Introduction to a series of models for
computation and their relationship to formal languages that are useful in the definition of
programming languages along with a look at the theoretical limits of computers. Topics
include finite and pushdown automata, Turing machines, grammars, decidability and
computational complexity. Students enrolling in CSC 545 will be held to a higher
standard than those enrolling in CSC 445.


Textbook

Theory of Computation: Formal Languages, Automata, and Complexity, J. Glenn
Brookshear, Benjamin Cummings, 1989



References

none




Course Goals

To give the student an appreciation of the fundamental theory underlying computer
science.




                                           cxliv
Prerequisites by Topic

       1.     Set theory
       2.     Functions
       3.     Logic
       4.     Induction
       5.     Recursion



Major Topics Covered in the Course

       1.     Set Theory and Grammars
       2.     Finite Automata and Regular Languages
       3.     Pushdown Automata and Context-Free Languages
       4.     Turing Machines and Phrase-Structure Languages
       5.     Computability
       6.     Complexity



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

none




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core       Advanced       Area              Core       Advanced
Algorithms                                  Data Structures
Software                                    Prog.
Design                                      Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

  Every student is required to submit at least 0 written reports (not including exams,
  tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically 0 pages and to make 0
  oral presentations of typically 0 minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
  graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
  completeness, and accuracy.




                                         cxlv
Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    none




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

       This course is essentially all theoretical material. Approximate coverage is given
       below.

            1.      Set Theory and Grammars (3 hours)
            2.      Finite Automata and Regular Languages (10 hours)
            3.      Pushdown Automata and Context-Free Languages (10 hours)
            4.      Turing Machines and Phrase-Structure Languages (10 hours)
            5.      Computability (4 hours)
            6.      Complexity (5 hours)


Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Students learn what aspects of a problem might make it solvable using different
    computational systems.




Solution Design

   Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students design solutions to problems using various computational systems.




                                           cxlvi
                                   COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept., Number        CSC 447/547        Course Title                Artificial Intelligence
Semester hours       3                  Course Coordinator          Dr. John M. Weiss
                                        URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

(3-0) 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSC 300. Concepts in Artificial Intelligence: programming in languages
such as Prolog or LISP; knowledge representation; search algorithms.




Textbook

Artificial Intelligence Illuminated (Coppin, 2004)



References

Online references to Lisp, including a large Lisp tutorial/reference manual written by the
instructor of the course.




                                                cxlvii
Course Goals


Objectives
The primary objective of this course is to give the student an introduction to the theory
and practice of artificial intelligence. From a theoretical standpoint, we will discuss
topics such as AI knowledge representations and AI problem solving approaches. From a
practical standpoint, we will consider low-level problem solving approaches (such as
artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms) and as well as the high-level symbolic
approach based upon state space search. Knowledge representation schemes and
inference mechanisms will focus upon use of predicate logic and its variations
(probabilistic reasoning, fuzzy logic, etc.), discussed primarily in the context of expert
systems. An important AI programming language (Lisp) will be introduced.


Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will obtain the following outcomes:
 basic understanding of artificial intelligence, including an appreciation of the central
   issues and problems of the field
 understanding of low-level AI problem solving approaches based upon artificial
   neural networks and genetic algorithms
 understanding of high-level AI problem solving approaches based upon state space
   search, including exhaustive search techniques (depth-first search and breadth-first
   search) and heuristic search techniques (hill climbing, A*)
 understanding of the fundamental AI approach to game playing (minimax with alpha-
   beta pruning)
 understanding of major AI knowledge representations (semantic nets and frames) and
   inference mechanisms (predicate logic, probabilistic reasoning, fuzzy logic)
 understanding of rule-based expert system design
 experience writing programs with the dominant AI language (Lisp)
 greater understanding of the software development process
 experience working in teams


Prerequisites by Topic

CSC 447/547 is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate computer science course,
comprising an introduction to the study of artificial intelligence. Prior exposure to AI and
the Lisp programming language is not required, but the student should have a strong
background in computer science, including a programming course in data structures.




                                           cxlviii
Major Topics Covered in the Course

17. Fundamentals of Lisp programming.
18. Knowledge representations: semantic nets, inheritance, frames.
19. Low-level problem-solving: artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms.
20. High-level problem-solving: state space approach (exhaustive search, heuristic
    search).
21. Game playing and minimax.
22. Inference: predicate logic, probabilistic reasoning, fuzzy logic.
23. Rule-based expert systems.
24. Advanced topics (learning, planning, intelligent agents, artificial life).


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

4 Lisp programming assignments (3-4 weeks each)




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                     2               Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.                          1
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least ____ written reports (not including exams,
   tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically ____ pages and to make ____
   oral presentations of typically ____ minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
   graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
   completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?




                                           cxlix
    Social and ethical implications of AI are discussed in several lectures, primarily at
    the beginning of the semester. Oral participation by students is encouraged.
    Assigned readings in the textbook, along with outside sources (such as Bill Joy‘s
    ―Does the future need us?‖ article in Wired magazine) serve to reinforce these
    concepts. Students may be graded on their understanding of these concepts on exam
    questions.


Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    Many theoretical AI concepts are presented in CSC447/547, including the state
    space approach to problem solving, exhaustive and heuristic search methods, a
    variety of systems of logical reasoning (propositional logic, predicate logic, fuzzy
    logic, inexact reasoning), artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms and other
    evolutionary strategies, etc. Some programming language theory is also presented in
    the discussion of Lisp (functional programming paradigm).


Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Students analyze a variety of AI problems, considering combinatorial explosion,
    time-space tradeoffs, different heuristic approaches, etc.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students design and implement four Lisp programs, each designed to solve a classic
    AI problem (search, game playing, ANNs or Gas, expert systems, etc.).




                                           cl
                                         COURSE DESCRIPTION

       Dept.,       CSC 448     Course           Machine Learning
       Number                   Title
       Semester     3           Course           Jeff McGough
       hours                    Coordinator
                                URL (if any):

       Current Catalog Description

       Prerequisite: CSC 300. A systematic study of the theory and algorithms that constitute
       machine learning. It covers learning based on examples including genetic algorithms,
       case-based reasoning, decision trees, and Bayesian methods. Students enrolled in CSC
       548 will be held to a higher standard than those enrolled in CSC 448.


       Textbook

       2005 – None. Text by T. Mitchell would be the typical selection.




       References

       Machine Learning, T. Mitchell
       Course Pack Provided [collection of important or expository papers in electronic
       form.]



       Course Goals

The primary objective of this course is to give the student an introduction to the theory and
       practice of Machine Learning. We will survey the fields of Soft Computing,
       specifically biologically motivated computing, natural computing and Fuzzy logic;
       Knowledge based reasoning; Decision trees and Bayesian methods. Students will be
       exposed to both the theoretical foundations and practical applications. The course will
       introduce evolutionary algorithms, artificial neural networks, artificial immune
       systems, fuzzy logic, Bayesian approaches as well as some knowledge based methods.


       Prerequisites by Topic

       Data Structures



                                                   cli
Major Topics Covered in the Course

  1. Machine Learning introduction
  2. Darwin and natural evolution
  3. Evolutionary algorithms
  4. Neurons and the brain
  5. Artificial neural networks
  6. Insect colonies
  7. Ant colony computing, swarm and agent based approaches
  8. Plants and Fractals
  9. Patterns and growth extensions to evolutionary systems
 10. Immune systems
 11. Artificial immune systems
 12. The issues in complexity and dynamics
 13. Fuzzy Logic
 14. Fuzzy systems
 15. Statistical/Bayesian methods
 16. Case-based reasoning
 17. Decision trees


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Three programs (three weeks) and a final project (four weeks).




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core        Advanced        Area               Core   Advanced
Algorithms        2                           Data Structures
Software          1                           Prog.
Design                                        Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __4__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _5_ pages and to make
   ___0__ oral presentations of typically __0___ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues


                                           clii
       Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
       covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
       ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
       test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

Evolution and Evolutionary Computing (three weeks)
Artificial Neural Networks and Computational Intelligence (week)
Swarms, agents and artificial life (two weeks)




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

   Evolution and Evolutionary Computing (three weeks)
   Artificial Neural Networks and Computational Intelligence (week)
         Swarms and agents (two weeks)
         Artificial Immune Systems (week)
         Complexity, Dynamical Systems and Automata (week)



   Problem Analysis

       Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

         Optimization and Evolutionary Algorithms
         Pattern recognition, Neural Networks and Immune Systems
         Dynamical Systems



   Solution Design

       Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

         Design and program algorithms to solve optimization (optimal structures and
         optimal paths), pattern recognition problems.




                                                     cliii
                                   COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC          Course            Operating Systems
Number       456/456L     Title
Semester     4            Course            Jianbin Wei
hours                     Coordinator
                          URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

A study of the functions and structures associated with operating systems with respect to
process management, memory management, auxiliary storage management, and
processor management. Topics include concurrent and distributed computing, deadlock,
real and virtual memory, job and processor scheduling, security and protection.


Textbook

A. Silberschatz, P. B. Galvin, and G. Gagne. Operating System Concept. Wiley. 7th
edition, 2005.



References

   Advanced Linux Programming, Mitchell, Oldham and Samuel, New Riders, 2001




Course Goals

           The first objective is to gain an understanding of what an operating system
                   does, how it is designed and how it is implemented. The main
                   concepts of the process abstraction, virtual memory, file systems will
                   be treated in detail. This course describes the critical layer between
                   the underlying hardware and the user applications; for which a
                   thorough understanding is required for software design. A typical
                   student in this class will be graduating at the end of the academic year
                   and entering the job market soon after. This course also aims at
                   transitioning students to the profession. Students will be treated
                   somewhat like students and somewhat like junior employees of a
                   corporation. This means that not all assignments will be as detailed
                   as they are in lower-level classes. You will be expected to ask
                   questions and give your input in the projects; expected to do
                   independent research and resolve incomplete specifications.

                                             cliv
Prerequisites by Topic

Assembly language




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Processes, threads, CPU scheduling, process synchronization, deadlock, memory,
virtual memory, file system, storage, I/O systems, protection and security, distributed
systems, distributed file systems, real-time systems, multimedia systems


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Three projects are assigned in this course, each of which takes 2 weeks to complete.
Project 1: Design and implement a file copy utility
Project 2: Implement CPU scheduling simulator for scheduling comparison
Project 3: Design a memory mapped file system to the shell library.


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms        2                            Data Structures    0.5
Software          1                            Prog.              0.5
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __3__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _2_ pages and to make
   ___2__ oral presentations of typically __10___ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?
                                            clv
Ethical and social issues relating to database systems are covered in general discussions and with respect to
     operating system protection and security. Students are not directly graded on their understanding of
     ethical topics in this course.




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

         Processes, threads, and CPU scheduling (10 hours), process synchronization and
         deadlock (4 hours), memory (4 hours), file system, storage, and I/O systems (10
         hours), protection and security (4 hours), distributed systems, distributed file
         systems, real-time systems, multimedia systems (6 hours)


   Problem Analysis

       Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

             Students are required to analyze operating system design and implementation
             problems, including CPU scheduling, process synchronization, memory
             management systems, file systems, security and protection



   Solution Design

       Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

             Students must design and implement several operating systems programs. For
             example, the latest offering of the course required a file copy utility, a CPU
             scheduling simulator, and a memory-mapped file system.




                                                        clvi
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC 461     Course            Programming Languages
Number                   Title
Semester     4           Course            Manuel Penaloza
hours                    Coordinator
                         URL (if any):     http://www.hpcnet.org/sdsmt/directory/courses/200
                                           7sp/csc461M001

Current Catalog Description

This course consists of two parts. The first part introduces how programming languages
are designed, including an introduction to the concepts of parsing and compiling. Issues
related to implementation such as type checking, binding, and memory management are
discussed. Secondly, the course will survey the spectrum of programming languages
paradigms, including traditional imperative, object oriented, functional, and logic
languages.


Textbook

Robert Sebesta, Concepts of Programming Language, 7th ed., Addison Wesley.




References

   1. Joseph Schmuller. SAMS Teach Yourself UML in 24 Hours. SAMS Publishing,
      2nd edition, 2002.
   2. Perdita Stevens and Rob Pooley. Using UML, Software Engineering with Objects
      and Components, 2nd edition, Addison Wesley, 2006.



Course Goals

The goal of this course is to give the student an introduction to the theory and practice of
programming languages. From a theoretical standpoint, we will discuss topics such as
formal languages, programming paradigms, data abstraction, control mechanisms,
binding and scope, typing, and parameter passing. From a practical standpoint, we will
consider prototypical examples of different programming language paradigms, including
imperative (C, Fortran, Pascal), scripting (PHP, Perl), concurrent (Ada, Java), object
oriented (C++, Java, Smalltalk), and functional (LISP, Scheme).



                                            clvii
Prerequisites by Topic

C++ programming, assembly languages, and data structures.




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Formal languages, programming paradigms (scripting, object oriented, imperative,
concurrent, functional), data abstraction, UML notation, control mechanisms, naming,
binding, scoping, parameter passing, exception handling, and concurrency.



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Typically, there are three to four programming assignments, with three to four weeks for
each. The projects may vary by semester, but three distinct programming paradigms are
selected (e.g., functional, scripting, and object oriented).


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms        1                            Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.              3
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __0__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __0__ pages and to make
   __0__ oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

                                           clviii
    None.




Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

 Formal languages (6 hours), programming paradigms (6 hours), data abstraction (2
    hours), control mechanisms (3 hours), binding and scope (3 hours), parameter
    passing (1 hour), naming and typing (3 hours), UML notation (3 hours), exception
    handling (1 hour) and concurrency (1 hour).



Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Programming assignments are designed to give students some experience with
       different types of languages. Students must analyze the assigned programming
       problem in the context of the assigned language.



Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

 Students must design solutions to programming problems in the context of the assigned
    programming languages.




                                          clix
                               COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,         CSC 463     Course         DATA COMMUNICATIONS
Number                     Title
Semester       3-1 (4)     Course         Harold Carda
hours                      Coordinator
                           URL (if        http://www.mcs.sdsmt.edu/~hcarda/463/
                           any):

Current Catalog Description

CSC 463/463L/563/563L DATA COMMUNICATIONS
(3-1) 4 credits. Prerequisites: CSC 250 and CENG 244 or permission of instructor. This
course provides an introduction to digital communications concepts, characteristics of
signals and transfer media, multiplexing, error control, circuit and packet switching,
multi-access techniques, A/D and D/A conversion, local and wide area networks and
internets. Graduation credit will not be allowed for both this course and CENG 444. This
course will provide a two-hour lab experience. Students enrolled in CSC 563/563L will
be held to a higher standard than those enrolling in CSC 463/463L.



Textbook

Communications and Networks – Garcia and Widjaja - 2nd edition - McGraw Hill




References

Digital Communications – Bernard Sklar 2nd edition – McGraw Hill
Data Communications and Networking Behrouz A. Forouzan 4th edition – McGraw Hill




Course Goals

                                           clx
   1. understand limiting factors in communications

   2. understand the OSI model and describe the layer’ s functionality

   3. choose a communications system that best fits an application
   4. choose the best means of connection and transfer mechanism
   5. implement standard error detection and compression
   6. choose and implement an appropriate communications protocol
   7. understand and implement standard local area networks
   8. understand and implement internets
   9. understand and implement network sharing using multiplexing and multiple
      access




Prerequisites by Topic

CSC 250 –Computer Science II – Programming, algorithms and data structures
CENG 244 – Introduction to Digital Logic



Major Topics Covered in the Course

OSI seven layer model, basic communications system, connection alternatives, basic
communications model, A/D and D/A conversion, transfer media and signal types,
Fourier analysis and bandwidth limitations and requirements, error detection and
correction, modems and compression, multiplexing and multiple access, communications
protocols and standards, local area networks, network addressing and internets, TCP/IP
and the Internet, sockets and HTTP, wireless, wired, and optical fiber communications




                                           clxi
Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)


PROJECT ONE – One week

The project consists of downloading, modifying, compiling and running a TCP and UDP
echo server and echo client socket software using remote Linux boxes.
Modifications: The client software is modified to prompt for an input message. The
server software is modified to display the incoming IP address and will display the
message. After receiving the message, the client prompts for a new message.

PROJECT TWO – Two weeks

The project uses the Systemview simulation software to model a Fourier series synthesis
of a sawtooth signal, displaying results using an increasing number of terms.

PROJECT THREE – Two weeks

The project is to use the Systemview simulation software to model the transmitter and
receiver of an amplitude modulation communications system. A digital signal is the
source modulated on an analog carrier signal. The channel is modeled using a Gaussian
noise source. A display of the transmitted and demodulated received signal, along with
their FFT‘s are used to evaluate the results.



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area             Core        Advanced        Area              Core       Advanced
Algorithms       1                           Data Structures
Software                                     Prog.
Design                                       Languages
Comp. Arch.      2           1




Oral and Written Communications

  Every student is required to submit at least ___0__ written reports (not including
  exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __0___ pages and to
  make ___0__ oral presentations of typically ___0__ minute‘s duration. Include only
  material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
  technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

                                         clxii
Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    None




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    Fourier analysis of signals – 4 days
    Error detection and correction – 4 days
    Compression coding – 4 days



Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Analyzing characteristics of different: signal types, transfer media and data
    encodings that best suit an application




Solution Design

   Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Filter design and modeling of an ASK communications system




                                           clxiii
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept., Number       CSC 464/564        Course Title               Image Processing
Semester hours      3                  Course Coordinator         Dr. John M. Weiss
                                       URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

(3-0) 3 credits. Prerequisites: CSC 300 and MATH 125. Introduction to digital image processing and
computer vision, including image digitization and display, image enhancement and restoration,
frequency domain techniques using the Fourier transform, image encoding, segmentation, and
feature detection.



Textbook

Digital Image Processing, 2nd ed. (Gonzalez and Woods, Prentice-Hall, 2002)



References

Online references to image processing software developed and maintained by the author.
ImageLib uses wxwidgets as a GUI framework, and permits students to easily write
image processing applications in C++.




                                               clxiv
Course Goals


Objectives
        CSC 464/564 is an upper-level elective undergraduate/graduate student course in the computer
        science major, designed to teach students the fundamentals of digital image processing on the
        computer. The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to basic principles of
        digital images, image data structures, and image processing algorithms.



Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students will obtain the following outcomes:
 understanding of digital image fundamentals
 understanding of image digitization
 understanding of image display hardware and software
 ability to understand and apply image enhancement and restoration techniques
 understanding of image encoding techniques
 understanding of image segmentation approaches
 introduction to pattern recognition and feature detection approaches
 ability to apply image processing techniques in both the spatial and frequency
(Fourier) domains
 ability to write image processing programs in a high-level language such as C++
 ability to use the Linux operating system for software development
 experience working in teams
 experience in technical communication


Prerequisites by Topic

Students taking CSC464/564 should have a firm grounding in C/C++ programming,
including a course in data structures. Students should also have a solid mathematics
background, with at least a year of calculus. Although there is some discussion of
programming topics, the lectures concentrate largely on image processing topics.


Major Topics Covered in the Course

25. image digitization and display
26. image enhancement and restoration
27. image encoding
28. image segmentation and feature detection




                                                  clxv
Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

6. point processes project                            (4 weeks)
7. neighborhood processes project                     (4 weeks)
8. group image processing project                     (6 weeks)


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced         Area                Core        Advanced
Algorithms                     2                Data Structures
Software                       1                Prog.
Design                                          Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __1__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __10__ pages and to
   make __1__ oral presentations of typically __15__ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    Relatively little time is devoted to social and ethical issues in this course.




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    Much of the class time is devoted to theoretical concepts in image processing,
    including the mathematics of many image processing operations, edge operators,
    geometric transforms, the Fourier transform, convolution and correlation, sampling
    theory, coding theory, etc.


                                            clxvi
Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Students analyze a wide variety of image processing operations with respect to time
    and space complexity issues.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Students design C++ programs to solve a wide variety of image processing
    problems, including a group project of their choosing.




                                         clxvii
                                   COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC 465      Course          Senior Design Project
Number                    Title
Semester     3            Course          Jianbin Wei
hours                     Coordinator
                          URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

Normally open only to Computer Science majors in their senior year. This is a team
project design course. The course covers topics of current interest in computer science.



Textbook

N/A




References




Course Goals

           The goals are (1) Understand team mechanics; (2) Understand the tasks
                 involved in a software development process; (3) Understand the
                 application of testing techniques in the development of a software
                 product; (4) Reinforce the understanding of the different phases of
                 software development.


Prerequisites by Topic

Software engineering




Major Topics Covered in the Course

                                          clxviii
    Software debugging techniques; global awareness; document preparation on different
    stages of a software projects



   Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)




   Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

   Area                   Core           Advanced           Area                   Core          Advanced
   Algorithms                                               Data Structures
   Software               2              1                  Prog.
   Design                                                   Languages
   Comp. Arch.


   Oral and Written Communications

       Every student is required to submit at least __5__ written reports (not including
       exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _15_ pages and to make
       ___2__ oral presentations of typically __15___ minute‘s duration. Include only
       material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
       technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

   Social and Ethical Issues

       Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
       covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
       ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
       test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

Ethical and social issues relating to database systems are covered in general discussions and with respect to
     software security. Students are not directly graded on their understanding of ethical topics in this course.




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

                                                        clxix
    Software complexity and debugging techniques (3 hours), globalization awareness
    (2 hours)




Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

       Students are required to analyze software implementation and test problems,
       including software complexity and software debugging techniques.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

       Students must design and implement the software project, prepare requirement
       specification, design document, implementation document, and test plan.




                                         clxx
                                  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC 470     Course           Software Engineering
Number                   Title
Semester     4           Course           Jianbin Wei
hours                    Coordinator
                         URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

An introduction to the software engineering process, including lifecycle phases, problem
analysis, specification, project estimation and resource estimation, design,
implementation, testing/maintenance, and project management. In particular, software
validation and verification as well as scheduling and schedule assessment techniques will
be discussed.


Textbook

Project-Based Software Engineering. Evelyn Stiller and Cathie LeBlanc. Addison-
   Wesley. First edition, 2002.



References

   2. Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s approach. R. Pressman. Mc-Graw
      Hill, 6th edition, 2004.
   3. UML Distilled. Martin Fowler. 2nd edition, Addison-Wesley, 2000.



Course Goals

This course provides students with skills necessary for the development of software
engineering applications. It covers techniques that are used in the different phases of a
software life cycle. The classical structured and object-oriented methodologies for the
development of software applications are introduced in this course.




                                           clxxi
Prerequisites by Topic

Data structures




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Software requirements, structured analysis, data flow and data models; Requirements
specification, validation and management; Object models; Architectural design; User
interface design; Implementation issues;


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software          2            1               Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __3__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _10_ pages and to make
   ___1__ oral presentations of typically ___12__ minute‘s duration. Include only
   material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
   technical content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?




                                           clxxii
Ethical and social issues relating to software engineering are covered in general discussions and with respect to
     software reliability. Students are not directly graded on their understanding of ethical topics in this
     course.




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

         Requirement analysis and specification (5 hours); object model and architectural
         design (6 hours); User interface design (4 hours); Implementation issues (3 hours);
         UML (4 hours)



   Problem Analysis

       Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

         Students are required to analyze software design and implementations problems,
         including design requirement specification, model and software architectural design,
         implementation and test plan.



   Solution Design

       Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

             Students must learn the design and implementation issues of various parts of a
             software project, including requirement specification, software modeling, and
             user-interface design, and test plan.




                                                       clxxiii
                                   COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC 484      Course           Database Management Systems
Number                    Title
Semester     3            Course           Manuel Penaloza
hours                     Coordinator
                          URL (if any):    http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/sdsmt/directory/cours
                                           es/2006fa/csc484001

Current Catalog Description

The study of formalized database design. This course will focus on relational model
design and the use of SQL. Students will use a modern relational database to implement
designs and learn the basics of data management


Textbook

Database systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation, and Management,
   Thomas Connolly and Carolyn Begg, fourth edition, Addison Wesley, 2005.



References

   4. Murach’s SQL for SQL Server by Bryan Syverson, 2002, Mike Murach &
      Associates, Inc. ISBN: 1-890774-16-2
   5. Fundamentals of Database Systems by Elmasri/Navathe, 5th edition. Addison
      Wesley, 2007.


Course Goals

           The purpose of this course is to provide fundamental concepts about database
                  systems, the process of designing them, the use of data management
                  systems, and the emergence of new technologies that use databases
                  systems. Database concepts addresses similar issues to other areas of
                  computer sciences, such as, operating systems, languages, artificial
                  intelligence, parallel systems. The instructor expects active
                  participation of students in cooperative class activities. During these
                  activities, students will be placed in groups and perform tasks as a
                  group. Students are expected to learn together and help each other
                  during these activities. Students not present during a class activity
                  will be assigned a zero.




                                           clxxiv
Prerequisites by Topic

C++ programming, finite structures, and data structures




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Database management system fundamentals, database design, relational algebra,
relational calculus, SQL, Microsoft SQL Server, ADO concepts, query evaluation and
optimization, transaction processing, concurrency control, recovery, security, PHP
scripting language, and dynamic web pages.



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Three projects are assigned in this course, each of which takes three weeks to complete.
Project 1: Design, population, and query of a database
Project 2: Access to a database using ADO.NET and Visual Basic
Project 3: Manipulation of a MySQL database from the web using PHP


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures    0.5
Software          2                            Prog.              0.5
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __2__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _7_ pages and to make
   ___0__ oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

                                           clxxv
Ethical and social issues relating to database systems are covered in general discussions and with respect to
     database security. Students are not directly graded on their understanding of ethical topics in this course.




   Theoretical Content

       Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
       such coverage.

         Relational algebra and calculus (4 hours), normalization (5 hours), query
         optimization (3), ADO concepts (1 hour), transaction processing (5 hours), and
         concurrency control (3 hours).



   Problem Analysis

       Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

             Students are required to analyze database management problems and database
             designs, including identifying entities, their properties (attributes), constraints and
             relationships.



   Solution Design

       Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

             Students must design a database and software applications and implement them
             with programming and query languages in a commercial database system.




                                                       clxxvi
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,       CSC    Course           Topics – Cryptography
Number       492    Title
Semester     3      Course           Dr. Corwin
hours               Coordinator
                    URL (if any):    www.mcs.sdsmt.edu/ecorwin/cryptography/


Current Catalog Description

1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Includes current topics, advanced
topics, and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field.
Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts
may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students with significant
one-on-one student/teacher involvement. May be repeated to a total of three (3) credit
hours.

[The topic for this course is an introduction to cryptography.]


Textbook

Introduction to Cryptography with Coding Theory, Trappe and Washington, Prentice
Hall, Second Edition, 2006



References

none




Course Goals

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students the area of cryptography, an
important current topic in computer science.




                                           clxxvii
Prerequisites by Topic

       1.     Proof techniques
       2.     Elementary group theory
       3.     Elementary ring theory
       4.     Elementary field theory
       5.     Programming at a CS 2 level



Major Topics Covered in the Course

       1.     Classical cryptosystems
       2.     Number theory
       3.     DES
       4.     AES / Rijndael
       5.     RSA
       6.     Discrete logarithms



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Two or three assignments will include writing programs. These are relatively short
programs but may require some thought. About three weeks is given for an assignment.



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core       Advanced        Area              Core      Advanced
Algorithms                                   Data Structures
Software                                     Prog.
Design                                       Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

  Every student is required to submit at least 0 written reports (not including exams,
  tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically 0 pages and to make 1
  oral presentations of typically     25 (shared) minute‘s duration. Include only
  material that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for
  technical content, completeness, and accuracy.




                                        clxxviii
Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    Some aspects of cryptography relate to social and ethical issues, but not enough time
    is spent on these areas to make a claim of significant coverage.




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

       Much of this course is theoretical material, mainly topics in number theory.
       Approximate coverage is given below.

            1.      Number theory – 10 hours


Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    none




Solution Design

   Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    none




                                           clxxix
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,           Math 123     Course                Calculus I
Number                        Title
Semester         4            Course                Prof. Laura Geary
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):         http://www.sdsmt.edu
                                                    Search for Geary, then Math 123

Current Catalog Description

  Prerequisite: Math 115 with a minimum grade of ―C‖ or appropriate mathematics
  placement or permission of instructor. Students who are initially placed into Math 102
  or below must complete Math 102 and Math 120 with grades of ―C‖ or better before
  enrolling in Math 123. Students who are placed in Math 120 should consult their
  advisor to determine whether their placement score was sufficiently high to allow
  concurrent registration in Math 123. Topics include: the study of limits, continuity,
  derivatives, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, the definite and indefinite
  integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus.


Textbook

  Calculus, 8th edition, Larson, Hostetler, Edwards, Houghton Mifflin, 2006.



References

None


Course Goals

   Analytical Skills: These are skills all students will be able to demonstrate by hand.
   Evaluate limits, calculate derivatives using power rule, product rule, quotient rule, and
   chain rule, find and test relative extrema, use integration rules including the power
   rule, antiderivatives of sine and cosine, definite and indefinite integrals, integration by
   substitution, set up and calculate areas bounded between curves set up and calculate
   volume of solids of revolution.

   Maple Skills: These are skills students will be able to demonstrate on the computer
   algebra system Maple.
   Use the worksheet mode to enter and evaluate arithmetic or algebraic expressions, plot
   in 2 dimensions, solve equations using solve and fsolve, name an expression, define a
   function, articulate the differences between Maple expressions and functions.

                                            clxxx
Prerequisites by Topic

   Trigonometry and Algebra.




Major Topics Covered in the Course


       Limits
       Graphical, numerical, analytical
       Continuity
       Infinite Limits

   Differentiation
    Power rule, chain rule, product and quotient rules
    Implicit differentiation
    Higher order derivatives

   Applications of differentiation
    Velocity and acceleration
    Curve sketching
    Optimization

   Integration
    Power rule
    Integration by substitution
    Riemann sums
    Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
    Numerical Integration

   Applications of integration
    Area between curves
    Volume of surfaces of revolution



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Laboratory projects vary with instructor.




                                            clxxxi
Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __0___ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _____ pages and to make
   ___0__ oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    None




Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

       Limits (4 hours)
       Differentiation (8 hours)
       Applications of differentiation (9 hours)
       Integration (8 hours)
       Applications of integration (6 hours)
       Maple use (6 hours)




                                           clxxxii
Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

       Students are required to apply analytical calculus methods in solving application
       problems. Applications include topics of area, volume, optimization, and rates of
       change.



Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    None




                                        clxxxiii
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,           MATH         Course            Calculus II
Number           125          Title
Semester         4 credit     Course
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

Calculus II is a continuation of the study of calculus, including the study of sequences,
series, polar coordinates, parametric equations, techniques of integration, applications of
integration, indeterminate forms, and improper integrals.



Textbook

Calculus (eighth edition), by Larson, Hostetler, and Edwards. (Houghton Mifflin)




References

Official learning goals and outcomes can be found at:
http://www.hpcnet.org/math_assessment/course_objectives




Course Goals

This course is intended for students majoring in mathematics, physics, chemistry,
engineering and related fields. It has four main objectives:

(1) The student will continue to learn differentiation and integration techniques, building
on the skills learned in Calculus I.

(2) The student will learn basic concepts dealing with infinite sequences and series.

(3) The student will learn how to work with parametric equations and polar coordinates.

(4) The student will learn basic operational proficiency with the Maple computer algebra
system to aid in the understanding of the previous three objectives.



                                          clxxxiv
Prerequisites by Topic

College algebra and Trigonometry

Limits

Differential calculus: computation and applications of derivative

Basic integral calculus: computation of basic antiderivatives using substitution and
definite integrals using the Fundamental Theorem, computation of areas and volumes



Major Topics Covered in the Course

A student who successfully completes this course should, at a minimum, be able to:

1. differentiate exponential and logarithmic functions and integrate the corresponding
functions

2. differentiate inverse trigonometric functions and integrate the corresponding functions

3. appropriately use various integration techniques, including integration by parts and
partial fractions

4. evaluate limits of infinite sequences, including how and when to use L'Hospital's Rule

5. evaluate improper integrals

6. recognize common infinite series, including the geometric and harmonic series

7. appropriately use various tests for convergence of infinite series, including the Ratio
Test, the Alternating Series Test, and Comparison Tests

8. determine the interval of convergence for a power series

9. use infinite series such as the Taylor Series or Fourier Series to approximate functions

10. convert between rectangular and parametric form, graph parametric curves, find
derivatives, and do other calculus applications using parametric equations

11. convert between rectangular and polar coordinates, graph polar curves, and do
calculus applications using polar coordinates

In addition, the student should be able to perform the following actions using the Maple

                                           clxxxv
computer algebra system:

1. Students will be able to use the Worksheet Mode to enter and evaluate arithmetic or
algebraic expressions.

2. Students will be able to do a 2D plot of a function in Maple, including parametric and
polar plots.

3. Students will be able to solve an equation (using both solve and fsolve).

4. Students will be able to name an expression, define a function, and explain the
difference between expressions and functions.

5. Students will be able to use the calculus operations of limits, differentiation, and
integration in Maple.



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

A number of Maple labs are given, although the number and content vary with the
instructor. Each lab, however, usually requires about a week of work, and focuses on
mastering the basic syntax of Maple in the context of more computationally intense (i.e.
"real world") applications.




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core        Advanced       Area               Core       Advanced
Algorithms        N/A         N/A            Data Structures    N/A        N/A
Software          N/A         N/A            Prog.              N/A        N/A
Design                                       Languages
Comp. Arch.       N/A         N/A


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __0__ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __0__ pages and to make
   __0__ oral presentations of typically __0__ minute‘s duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues


                                         clxxxvi
  Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
  covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
  ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
  test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    N/A




Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    Though the first half of the course is largely mechanical, focusing on the calculus of
    transcendental functions (such as exponential, logarithms, and inverse trigonometric
    functions) and advance integration techniques, the latter half of the course includes
    some theoretical content. The theory of infinite sequences and series, and their
    utility in approximating functions, is introduced and explored in some detail,
    including such numerical analysis concepts as Taylor's Remainder Theorem.
    Considerable time is spent these concepts from first principles, and typically 4
    weeks are devoted to this topic. Similarly, the calculus theory of parametric and
    polar descriptions of functions (and their consequence differentiation and integration
    concepts) is introduced in Math 125. Though the deeper theoretical aspects of this
    topic are left to Calculus III, approximately 3 weeks is dedicated to parametric and
    polar calculus.



Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    All MATH 125 courses utilize the Maple computer algebra system to both
    familiarize students with such symbolic software and to expose them to nontrivial
    applications of the subject material. All MATH 125 courses include a number of
    "Maple labs" that present students with computationally intensive or numerically
    difficult problems drawn from mathematical, programming, and engineering
    applications. The emphasis is placed on empirical and/or problem solving
    techniques rather than on straight mechanical computations.



Solution Design


                                         clxxxvii
Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.




                                     clxxxviii
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,           Math 225      Course                Calculus III
Number                         Title
Semester         4             Course                Prof. Donald Teets
hours                          Coordinator
                               URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

Math 225 Calculus III
(4-0) 4 Credits. Prerequisite: Math 125 completed with a grade of ―C.‖ A continuation
of the study of calculus, including an introduction to vectors, vector calculus, partial
derivatives, and multiple integrals.


Textbook

Calculus, by R. Larson, R. Hostetler, and B. Edwards, 8th edition. Houghton Mifflin,
Boston, 2006.



References




Course Goals

Objective #1: The student will learn the basic tools and methods of multivariate calculus.
Objective #2: The student will understand applications of multivariate calculus.




Prerequisites by Topic

Limits, differentiation and integration of single variable functions, including applications.
See course descriptions for Math 123 (Calculus I) and Math 125 (Calculus II) for details.




                                           clxxxix
Major Topics Covered in the Course

Basic vector operations; lines and planes in space; differentiation and integration of
vector valued functions; applications to position, velocity, and acceleration; functions of
several variables; partial derivatives, including gradients and chain rules; unconstrained
and constrained optimization; iterated integrals, including integrals in polar, cylindrical,
and spherical coordinates; vector fields; line integrals; vector integral theorems.


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least _____ written reports (not including
   exams, tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _____ pages and to make
   _____ oral presentations of typically _____ minutes duration. Include only material
   that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
   content, completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?




Theoretical Content

                                            cxc
  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    Vectors and vector products (9 days)
    Differentiation and integration of vector valued functions (9 days)
    Differentiation of multivariable functions (13 days)
    Integration of multivariable functions (11 days)
    Vector fields and line integrals (8 days)


Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Problem solving is expected on a daily basis.




Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.




                                          cxci
COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,          Math 315      Course              Linear Algebra
Number                        Title
Semester        4             Course              Karen Braman
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description


Theory and applications of systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector
spaces, linear transformations and applications.


Textbook

Linear Algebra and Its Applications, Fourth Edition
Gilbert Strang
Thomson Brooks/Cole, 2006


References


None.




Course Goals

To enable the student to perform basic matrix computations, solve systems of linear
equations, and understand the theory of systems of equations in the context of vector
spaces.



Prerequisites by Topic

Fundamentals of solving systems of equations
Vector algebra
Basic matrix ideas
Elementary ideas from differential equations


Major Topics Covered in the Course


                                          cxcii
Matrices and Gaussian elimination
       The geometry of linear equations
       Gaussian elimination
       Matrix notation and matrix multiplication
       LU factorization
       Inverses and transposes
       Applications
Vector Spaces and linear equations
       Vector spaces and subspaces
       Solving m equations in n unknowns
       Linear independence, basis, and dimension
       Linear transformations
Orthogonality
       Inner products
       Least squares
       Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization
Determinants
       Properties of the determinant
       Formulas for the determinant
       Applications of determinants
Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors
       Definitions and fundamental computations
       Diagonalization
       Applications to differential equations



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)


Laboratory projects vary with instructor.



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core        Advanced          Area              Core   Advanced
Algorithms                                      Data Structures
Software                                        Prog.
Design                                          Languages
Comp. Arch.




                                            cxciii
Oral and Written Communications

Every student is required to submit at least __0___ written reports (not including exams,
tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _____ pages and to make __0___
oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what ways
are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g., test
questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?


    None




Theoretical Content

Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to such
coverage.


    This course is essentially all theoretical material.




Problem Analysis

Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.


    None




                                            cxciv
Solution Design

Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.


    None




                                          cxcv
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,           Math 321     Course               Differential Equations
Number                        Title
Semester         4            Course               Kyle Riley
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if any):

Current Catalog Description

Prerequisite: MATH 125 with a minimum grade of ―C.‖ Selected topics from ordinary
differential equations including development and applications of first order, higher order
linear and systems of linear equations, general solutions and solutions to initial-value
problems using matrices. Additional topics may include Laplace transforms and power
series solutions. MATH 225 and 321 may be taken concurrently or in either order. In
addition to analytical methods this course will also provide an introduction to numerical
solution techniques.


Textbook

Text will vary with instructor, but a common choice is Differential Equations with
Boundary-Value Problems (6ed), Zill and Cullen, Brooks/Cole, 2005.



References

None.


Course Goals

Students are assessed on their ability to analytically solve ordinary differential equations
and linear systems of differential equations. A major portion of the course is devoted to
the solution of problems as they arise in science and engineering applications.


Prerequisites by Topic


  Integration, Differentiation, and Taylor Series.




                                           cxcvi
Major Topics Covered in the Course

Analytical Methods for solving differential equations, for example: separation of
variables, integration factors, and Laplace Transforms.

Qualitative Methods for solving differential equations, for example: directional fields,
and phase planes.

Solutions of linear systems and basic matrix theory, for example: matrix operations,
Gauss-Jordan method, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.

Solutions to linear systems of differential equations.

Introduction to numerical methods, for example: Euler, and Runge-Kutta methods.


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Laboratory projects vary with instructor. Use of technology is often used for the
construction of directional fields and to demonstrate the use of numerical methods.



Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core         Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least _0__ written reports (not including exams,
   tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _0__ pages and to make _0__
   oral presentations of typically __0_ minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
   graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
   completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?


                                           cxcvii
    None.


Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

       Existence and Uniqueness Theorems are the essential theoretical items covered
       along with the theory associated with Laplace Transforms. The time devoted on
       these subjects will vary with instructor.



Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

       The main purpose of the course is to solve applications from engineering and
       science. Applications often include: electrical circuits, mechanical vibration,
       predator-prey models, chemical mixing problems, compartment models, and
       physical motion. Analysis skills typically involve verifying a solution satisfies
       the differential equations, and interpreting numerical results in the context of the
       physical problem.



Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    None.




                                          cxcviii
                                COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,         Math 441     Course            Engineering Statistics I
Number                      Title
Semester       2 credits    Course            Roger W. Johnson
hours                       Coordinator
                            URL (if any):     http://www.mcs.sdsmt.edu/rwjohnso/html/
                                              m441s07.html

Current Catalog Description

An introduction to the core ideas in probability and statistics. Computation of
probabilities using, for instance, counting techniques and Bayes' rule. Introduction to
discrete and continuous random variables, joint and conditional distributions, expectation,
variance and correlation, random sampling from populations, hypothesis tests and
confidence intervals, and least squares. This course is the first in a sequence of two two-
credit mini-courses in probability and statistics offered in a single term, the second being
Math 442.


Textbook


Probability and Statistics: For Engineering and the Sciences, 6th edition, by Jay Devore



References


Student's Solutions Manual for Devore's Probability and Statistics for Engineering and
the Sciences, 6th edition, by Julie Seely


Course Goals

At the conclusion of the course:
     Students will be able to use proper probability and statistics language and notation
     Students will be able to compute probabilities in a number of standard and non-
        standard situations
     Students will understand the logic of a hypothesis test and conduct a large-sample
        test on a mean
     Students will be able, with appropriate software, to fit and use the least squares
        line to data


                                            cxcix
Prerequisites by Topic

Math 225 Calculus III




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Probability calculation, discrete and continuous random variables, introduction to
hypothesis testing, introduction to least squares



Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Vary from year to year. For the 2007 offering: Download the (free) ―R‖ statistical
package at http://www.r-project.org/, get comfortable with the software, and then write
two chapters – one on standard graphical statistical displays, and one from a list
(arithmetic, standard functions, numerical statistical summaries, density function
calculations, random sampling). About 4 weeks were allowed for the student groups of 2-
3 individuals to complete this project.


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core       Advanced           Area              Core     Advanced
Algorithms                                      Data Structures
Software                                        Prog.
Design                                          Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

  Every student is required to submit at least __1__ written report (not including exams,
  tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically _10_ pages and to make __0___
  oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
  graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
  completeness, and accuracy.




                                           cc
Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    Student groups working on the two ―R‖ chapters listed above were asked to
    appropriately cite any use of materials in their write-ups (e.g. reference R materials
    available on the web)



Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    Probability calculation rules (about 3 weeks of class)




Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    A major focus of the class is computing probability estimates. To this end students
    need to correctly categorize the problem they are dealing with. In particular, is the
    random variable of interest discrete or continuous? If discrete, do one of the standard
    discrete models (e.g. geometric, binomial, hypergeometric) apply? If continuous, do
    one of the standard continuous models (e.g. exponential, normal) apply?


Solution Design

   Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    No design experiences per se.




                                            cci
                               COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,         Math 442    Course          Engineering Statistics II
Number                     Title
Semester       2 credits   Course          Roger W. Johnson
hours                      Coordinator
                           URL (if         http://www.mcs.sdsmt.edu/rwjohnso/html/
                           any):           m441s07.html

Current Catalog Description

Math 442: In part, covers topics from Math 441 in more depth including additional
standard distributions used to model real-world phenomena, additional standard
hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Other topics include building multiple
regression models, parameter estimation, and reliability. Selected non-parametric and
computer-intensive methods may also be covered. This course is the second in a sequence
of two two-credit mini-courses in probability and statistics offered in a single term, the
first being Math 441.


Textbook


Probability and Statistics: For Engineering and the Sciences, 6th edition, by Jay Devore



References


Student's Solutions Manual for Devore's Probability and Statistics for Engineering and
the Sciences, 6th edition, by Julie Seely


Course Goals

At the conclusion of the course:
     Students will understand the logic of a hypothesis test and conduct tests on means
        and proportions
     Students will be able to estimate parameters using point and interval estimates
     Students will be able, with appropriate software, to fit and use regression models




                                           ccii
Prerequisites by Topic

Math 441: Engineering Statistics I




Major Topics Covered in the Course

Hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, parameter estimation, and multiple regression




Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Vary from year to year. For the 2007 offering: Write two chapters – one on basic
hypothesis tests (e.g. t-test on a mean), and one on least squares/regression. About 3
weeks will be allowed for the student groups of 2-3 individuals per chapter.


Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area              Core        Advanced         Area              Core       Advanced
Algorithms                                     Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

  Every student is required to submit at least __1__ written report (not including exams,
  tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __10__ pages and to make
  __0__ oral presentations of typically _____ minute‘s duration. Include only material
  that is graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical
  content, completeness, and accuracy.




                                           cciii
Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

    Student groups working on the two ―R‖ chapters listed above were asked to
    appropriately cite any use of materials in their write-ups (e.g. reference R materials
    they used from the web)



Theoretical Content

   Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
   such coverage.

    Derivation of least squares estimates of coefficients in a linear model (about 3 class
    periods)




Problem Analysis

   Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    When conducting hypothesis tests or constructing confidence intervals:
       Correct problem identification (e.g. two independent sample test on means or
          a paired sample test on a mean difference)
       Interpretation of results (conclusion about which hypothesis is supported from
          the test statistic and/or the p-value, width of the confidence interval)
    When building a regression model:
       Use of residual plots to check for lack of model fit
       Assessing quality of model fit using standard measures (e.g. R-squared,
          adjusted R-squared, standard error of regression, PRESS)




                                            cciv
Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    No design experiences per se.




                                         ccv
                               COURSE DESCRIPTION

Dept.,          Math 471      Course           Numerical Analysis I
Number                        Title
Semester        3             Course           Dr. Kyle Riley
hours                         Coordinator
                              URL (if
                              any):

Current Catalog Description

Prerequisite: MATH 373 or CSC 372. Analysis of rounding errors, numerical solutions of
nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation, numerical integration, interpolation and
approximation, numerical methods for solving linear systems.


Textbook

Numerical Analysis, 8th edition, Burden and Faires, Brooks/Cole, 2005.




References

None




Course Goals

Introductory course in Numerical Analysis. The goal is to provide the student with the
fundamentals of numerical methods and an introduction to scientific computing. Some
topics that will be covered are: machine arithmetic, interpolation, solutions to linear
systems, iterative methods, numerical differentiation, and numerical integration.


Prerequisites by Topic

  Topics from calculus, differential equations, and introduction to numerical methods
  are utilized. It is also necessary for students to have very basic programming skill in
  order to start this course.



                                            ccvi
Major Topics Covered in the Course

   Interpolation
   Nonlinear Equations
   Numerical Differentiation and Integration
   Numerical Solutions to Ordinary Differential Equations
   Solution of Linear Systems
   Estimation of Eigenvalues


Laboratory projects (specify number of weeks on each)

Lab projects will vary with instructor.




Estimate Curriculum Category Content (Semester hours)

Area               Core        Advanced        Area               Core        Advanced
Algorithms                     1               Data Structures
Software                                       Prog.
Design                                         Languages
Comp. Arch.


Oral and Written Communications

   Every student is required to submit at least __1_ written reports (not including exams,
   tests, quizzes, or commented programs) of typically __5_ pages and to make __0__
   oral presentations of typically __0__ minute‘s duration. Include only material that is
   graded for grammar, spelling, style, and so forth, as well as for technical content,
   completeness, and accuracy.

Social and Ethical Issues

   Please list the topics that address the social and ethical implications of computing
   covered in all course sections. Estimate the class time spent on each topic. In what
   ways are the students in this course graded on their understanding of these topics (e.g.,
   test questions, essays, oral presentations, and so forth)?

     None.




                                           ccvii
Theoretical Content

  Please list the types of theoretical material covered, and estimate the time devoted to
  such coverage.

    A large portion of this course is theoretical in nature with mathematical analysis of
    convergence and error estimation being primary drivers of the course.




Problem Analysis

  Please describe the analysis experiences common to all course sections.

    Analysis often centers on the derivation of error bounds estimates. The Taylor
    Polynomial Theorem is a reoccurring theme that is used to generate a variety of
    theoretical results. Students are often asked to apply numerical methods to
    approximate solutions to posed problems and then follow up with an error analysis.


Solution Design

  Please describe the design experiences common to all course sections.

    Solution design is seen in the context of implementing numerical algorithms in the
    classroom examples and assigned projects.




                                         ccviii

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags:
Stats:
views:81
posted:7/28/2011
language:English
pages:329