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									               Walking for Pleasure
                                            Walk Leader’s training manual




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Contents

      Section 1:     Introduction
       1.1 Welcome to the Walking for Pleasure program     6
       1.2 Role of the volunteer Walk Leader               6

      Section 2:     Background of Walking for Pleasure
       2.1 What is Walking for Pleasure?                   8
       2.2 History                                         8
       2.3 The walking club                                8

      Section 3:     Why choose walking?
       3.1 Why walk?                                      10
       3.2 Health benefits                                10
       3.3 What stops people from walking?                10

      Section 4:     Setting up a club
       4.1 Setting up the club                            12
       4.2 Organising the club                            12
       4.3 Planning the walks                             12
       4.4 Grading of the walks                           13
       4.5 Procedures for running your club               14
       4.6 Promoting your club                            15
       4.7 Retaining club members                         15

      Section 5:     Roles and responsibilities
       5.1 Duty of care                                   18
       5.2 Walk Leader checklist                          18
       5.3 Substitute Walk Leaders                        19
       5.4 Including people with disabilities             20
       5.5 Caring for the environment                     20
       5.6 Child protection                               21


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                                                        Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Contents

 Section 6:        Health and safety procedures
  6.1 General safety for leaders and participants                                                    24
  6.2 Health of walkers                                                                              24
  6.3 Walking apparel and shoes                                                                      25
  6.4 Warm up and stretching exercises                                                               25
  6.5 Balance exercises – fall prevention                                                            29
  6.6 Checklist for good walking posture                                                             30

 Section 7:        Emergency procedures and first aid
  7.1 Injuries and emergency procedures                                                              32
  7.2 Basic first aid                                                                                32
  7.3 Injuries to limbs and bones                                                                    34
  7.4 Bites and stings                                                                               35
  7.5 Other medical conditions                                                                       37
      n   Unconsciousness                                                                            37
      n   Severe bleeding                                                                            37
      n   Shock                                                                                      37
      n   Spinal injury                                                                              37
      n   Diabetes                                                                                   38
      n   Asthma                                                                                     38
      n   Heart attack                                                                               39
      n   Stroke                                                                                     39
      n   Heat exhaustion                                                                            39
      n   Heat stroke                                                                                39
      n   Hypothermia                                                                                40
  7.6 Incident guidelines                                                                            41
  7.7 Procedure – if someone falls                                                                   42




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Contents

      Section 8:    Insurance                                                  44

      Section 9:    Useful contacts and acknowledgements
       9.1 Useful contacts                                                     46
       9.2 Acknowledgements                                                    47

      Section 10:   Appendices
       Appendix 1   Walker registration form                                   50
       Appendix 2   Club registration form                                     51
       Appendix 3   Walk Leader and Substitute Walk Leader registration form   52
       Appendix 4   Incident report form                                       53
       Appendix 5   Witness report form                                        54
       Appendix 6   Sample emergency procedures                                55
       Appendix 7   Walking for Pleasure attendance sheet                      56
       Appendix 8   Sample walking program                                     57
       Appendix 9   Sample media release                                       59
       Appendix 10 Walk Leader’s training declaration                          60

      Fact sheets
       Fact sheet 1 Walking for Pleasure information sheet                     61
       Fact sheet 2 Walker checklist fact sheet                                63




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Section 1


Introduction
  1.1   Welcome to the Walking for Pleasure program   6

  1.2   Role of the volunteer Walk Leader             6




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Introduction

1.1 Welcome to the Walking for Pleasure                           1.2 Role of the volunteer Walk Leader
    program
                                                                  A good Walk Leader is someone who:
      Thank you for your interest in becoming a Walk Leader
      for the Walking for Pleasure program. As a Walk Leader          n   Is friendly and easy to talk to
      you are an important and crucial part of the success of         n   Has a warm and welcoming approach
      the walking program.                                            n   Smiles!
      Your involvement as a volunteer in the program is greatly       n   Makes the walk feel like a fun, social occasion
      appreciated — without your support this program would           n   Is reliable and punctual
      not be possible.
                                                                      n   Is observant of hazards and people’s well-being
      Sport and Recreation provides support to walking clubs          n   Is experienced and competent across a range of walks
      by promoting, printing and distributing programs as well
                                                                      n   Is enthusiastic
      as providing a training manual for all Walk Leaders. This
                                                                      n   Knows basic first aid procedures
      training manual is designed to assist Walk Leaders and
      Substitute Walk Leaders with setting up and running a           n   Is familiar with the walking route and any alternatives
      walking club program.                                           n   Fills in appropriate paperwork
      All Walk Leaders and Substitute Walk Leaders are                n   Immediately informs Sport and Recreation
      required to read this manual and sign a training                    if any changes or problems occur.
      declaration, which should be sent to Sport and
                                                                  What does the Walk Leader do?
      Recreation. Upon receipt of your training declaration
      you will receive a Walk Leader certificate.                     n   Creates and writes the walk program
                                                                      n   Promotes the program in the community
                                                                      n   Conducts a preliminary walk
                                                                      n   Grades the walk
                                                                      n   Conducts the walk, including warm up and cool
                                                                          down exercises
                                                                      n   Provides program details and completed paperwork
                                                                          to Sport and Recreation.




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Section 2


Background of Walking for Pleasure
  2.1   What is Walking for Pleasure?   8

  2.2   History                         8

  2.3   The walking club                8




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Background of Walking for Pleasure

2.1 What is Walking for Pleasure?                               2.3 The walking club
      Walking for Pleasure is a program which promotes             A Walking for Pleasure club consists of adults from the
      walking as a fun, easy and social form of exercise that      local community who have a common interest in walking.
      is suitable for adults of all ages and abilities.            The club is run by members who are adults from the
                                                                   community who volunteer to assist. Club members decide
2.2 History                                                        their level of involvement – they may help organise and
      Walking for Pleasure began in 1984 as a joint program        lead walks or they may just join in on the walks.
      between the NSW Department of Health, the NSW                The Walk Leaders are volunteers and decide on the
      Premier’s Department, the Office of Aged Services            dates and times of the walks and are responsible for
      and Sport and Recreation. It was coordinated by the          the administrative procedures of the group. Sport and
      NSW Department of Health until the end of 1990.              Recreation provides support to those clubs who are
      In 1991, Sport and Recreation took over management           registered and follow the appropriate procedures set out
      of the program.                                              in this manual.




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Section 3


Why choose walking?
  3.1   Why walk?                         10

  3.2   Health benefits                   10

  3.3   What stops people from walking?   10




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Why choose walking?

3.1 Why walk?                                                           3.3 What stops people from walking?
         Walking is a great choice for exercise because it is:          Many factors can lead to people not walking as a form
         n   A moderate activity with many health benefits              of exercise. These may include:
         n   Fun                                                        n   Low self-esteem and confidence
         n   Inexpensive                                                n   Injury concerns
         n   Safe                                                       n   Safety concerns
         n   Good for the environment                                   n   Time constraints
         n   Flexible – it can be done at any time of day               n   Inadequate/unsafe footpaths
         n   An activity for all ages and abilities.                    n   Little or no opportunity
                                                                        n   Too competitive
3.2 Health benefits
                                                                        n   Negative attitudes towards sport and physical activity
         There are many health benefits to be gained through
                                                                        n   Lack of accessibility or transport
         participation in a walking program. It can:
                                                                        n   Medical conditions requiring modified activity
         n   Improve overall physical condition and mental
                                                                        n   Lack of information on current programs
             well-being, and increase ability to perform
             physical work                                              n   Lack of support and understanding from
                                                                            family members
         n   Increase longevity and reduce the risk of
             premature death                                            n   Road safety issues
         n   Increase joint range of motion or flexibility and reduce   n   Misinformed attitudes about older people
             pain from arthritis                                        n   Weather concerns — too hot, too cold, too wet,
         n   Increase mobility                                              too windy.
         n   Reduce the risk of falls and fractures
         n   Improve balance, muscle strength, bone strength,
             posture and coordination
         n   Improve sleep patterns
         n   Reduce levels of stress, anxiety and depression
         n   Decrease blood pressure
         n   Lessen the chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease
         n   Reduce risk of diseases such as cancer, stroke,
             diabetes and heart disease
         n   Help maintain or lose weight.
Walking also has a lower rate of injury than any other form
of exercise.




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Section 4


Setting up a club
  4.1   Setting up a walking club          12

  4.2   Organising the club                12

  4.3   Planning the walks                 12

  4.4   Grading of the walks               13

  4.5   Procedures for running your club   14

  4.6   Promoting your club                15

  4.7   Retaining club members             15




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Setting up a club

4.1 Setting up a walking club                                          4.3 Planning the walks
         Before setting up a walking club you should consider the
                                                                           When to go
         following questions:
                                                                           The group should decide how often they want to walk
         1. Does a similar club already exist in your area?
                                                                           and set a program according to the needs of the club
         2. Is the existing club active?                                   and the availability of the Walk Leader. It may be once a
         3. Will the existing club cater to your needs?                    month, once a fortnight or once a week.

         Find out about local walking clubs by contacting your:                Suggestion: Sit down with club members and plan
         n Regional office of Sport and Recreation                             a program that suits the majority. Remember you can
                                                                               organise a different walk each time — the choice is
         n Local council
                                                                               up to club members.
         n Community health centre or hospital.
                                                                           What time should we walk?
         If you are satisfied that you do not have a club in your
         area and you would like to start one, call a public meeting       The group may choose an early morning walk, a morning
         to form a walking club and promote it in your local paper.        walk with lunch at the end, a lunchtime walk, an afternoon
                                                                           or an evening walk.
         At the public meeting raise the following issues:
         n   Explain how the Walking for Pleasure program works                Tip 1
             and how a club would run
                                                                               It is important to avoid the hottest time of day, which is
         n   Emphasise that clubs are run by volunteers, with the              between 10am – 2pm Eastern Standard Time and
             support of Sport and Recreation, and that there are no            11am – 3pm Daylight Savings Time.
             fees and no obligation for members to attend all walks
                                                                               Tip 2
         n   Emphasise that the club is for social interaction and
             enjoyment as much as for exercise. As the name                    When walking, try and take your walk before meals or
             implies, walking should be for fun and pleasure!                  wait at least an hour after meals before commencing.

4.2 Organising the club                                                    Places to walk – choosing the best route
         Once the club has been formed you will need to organise           There are many places you can go on your walk.
         the club and move towards your first walk together.               These may include:

         Who will the members be?                                          n    Neighbouring suburbs and towns
                                                                           n    Shopping centres
         n   Walking for Pleasure generally attracts people
             aged over 50, but it is open to adults of all ages,           n    Local parks and gardens
             backgrounds and abilities.                                    n    National Parks.
         n   Each club must understand the needs of the                    Keep it simple, so that each route is easy to follow.
             membership and determine the types of walks the               Difficult routes can be frustrating and discourage people
             group will undertake.                                         from participating. When planning your walk always
                                                                           consider the needs of the group and new members you
                                                                           would like to attract.




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                                                                  Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




    Preliminary walks by the Walk Leader
                                                                   Note: If there is a considerable difference in
    A preliminary walk of the prospective route must be
                                                                   the walking rates of the group you may need to
    undertaken (even if it is well-known) before any walk
                                                                   consider having two groups within the club to cater
    proceeds. This allows the Walk Leader to identify hazards
                                                                   for these differing levels. If differing walking rates
    so that injury risks can be minimised.
                                                                   are not considered, slower members may miss out
    As a Walk Leader you must take reasonable care to avoid        on rest or refreshment breaks. These walkers may
    acts, omissions or situations which you could reasonably       not return to the club for future walks if their needs
    foresee that are likely to injure members. Try to avoid        are not considered.
    tracks and trails which are particularly slippery, steep or
    uneven, or contain other foreseeable risks.
                                                                  The following grading scale will allow the Walk Leader
    Be aware that some people may not be confident                to provide information to the walkers on the difficulty
    crossing roads, or using pedestrian lights or pedestrian      of the walks.
    islands. It may be helpful to organise a practical session
    on pedestrian safety and road user awareness.
                                                                  Grading:

    You can choose the same route each time or a variety          Very easy         Suitable for walkers with wheelchairs
    of routes during the year. During the preliminary walk,                         and prams
    the Walk Leader should check on the location of toilets,      Easy              This walk has relatively gentle grades
    shade, first aid facilities, telephones, rest stops and                         and good surfaces
    water facilities.
                                                                  Medium            Mostly good surfaces on the walk, but
    The Walk Leader should also assess the grade of                                 some rough or steep sections
    the walk.
                                                                  Medium/hard       This walk includes rough and
4.4 Grading of the walks                                                            steep sections. Could require some
                                                                                    climbing over natural obstacles
    How far and how long?                                         Hard              A strenuous walk with steep
    As Walk Leader you will have to establish the length of                         ascents/descents over rough
    the walk and assess the time the group is likely to take                        terrain. Recommended for fit and/or
    to complete it. The time should be based on the slowest                         experienced walkers.
    member’s pace. The walk limitations are set by the
    capabilities of the group.

    General distance guides and walk grades

    Distance:
    500m – 1.5km Suitable for walkers that are very
                 young, beginners, frail elderly or have
                 limited mobility
    2.5 – 5km         A challenging walk for most groups,
                      depending on terrain and time available
    5km and over      Suitable for advanced walkers or
                      walkers with plenty of time.

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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




         Information to give to walkers                                     Note: Registrations run for a financial year, not a calendar
                                                                            year, and are valid from 1 July until 30 June the following
         As Walk Leader you must ensure all walkers know the
                                                                            year. Walking clubs will be sent an annual reminder on
         details of the walk, including the grade, starting and
                                                                            the time to register.
         finishing time, meeting point and facilities available. If it is
         a special walk, remind the walkers of the arrangements
         for refreshments or any extra money that they may need.             Tip: Keep an up-to-date list of all club members’
         Include these details in the program for new walkers that           contact details or a copy of each registration form.
         may come along.
         Other information that can be given to walkers includes:            Procedures for each walk
         n   Distance to be walked                                          1. All members need to sign the Attendance sheet
         n   Anticipated number of stops                                       (Appendix 7) before the walk commences.
         n   Anticipated walking time                                       2. The leaders are to be identified on the Attendance
         n   Number of stairs                                                  sheet (Appendix 7).
         n   Gradients                                                      3. Attendance sheets are to be collected after each walk
         n   Hazards.                                                          and forwarded to your local Sport and Recreation
                                                                               office. You can collate and send in attendance sheets
4.5 Procedures for running your club                                           every month. To save on administration and postage
                                                                               costs, reply paid envelopes are available from your
         Programs
                                                                               nearest Sport and Recreation office.
         Walking for Pleasure programs are updated once or
                                                                            4. If an injury is sustained during the walk, Walk Leaders
         twice a year and provided to Walk Leaders for distribution.
                                                                               must complete an Incident report form (Appendix 4)
         These programs must be submitted to Sport                             stating the details of the incident regardless of severity.
         and Recreation, no later than one month before                        Include a Witness report form (Appendix 5) and
         commencement of the first walk.                                       photos. Immediately forward all reports to Sport and
                                                                               Recreation with the Attendance sheet (Appendix 7). If
         Annual procedures
                                                                               a serious injury occurs, the Walk Leader should seek
         1. Register the club by completing the Club registration              appropriate medical care immediately and then inform
            form (See Appendix 2). Nominate two people, from                   Sport and Recreation.
            within the club, who are willing to be contact people
            for the club and take enquires from interested walkers.          Note: Leaders must also complete an Attendance sheet
            Send the completed form to Sport and Recreation.                 (Appendix 7) when completing a preliminary walk.
         2. Each walker needs to complete the Walker registration
            form (See Appendix 1). Complete this registration form
            when a new walker joins the club and send it to Sport
            and Recreation within a month of them joining.
         3. Each walk leader/ substitute leader needs to complete
            the Walk leader/ substitute leader registration form
            (See Appendix 3).




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                                                                       Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




4.6 Promoting your walking club                                    4.7 Retaining members at your club
   You can promote your club through word-of-mouth, local             n   To retain members, it is essential to cater for all
   advertising, media releases or brochures/flyers.                       abilities and to provide a friendly and enjoyable
                                                                          environment. A variety of walks is a good way to
   If walkers enjoy a fun, social activity they will tell their
                                                                          ensure there’s something for everyone.
   friends. This is one of the best forms of promotion.
   Encourage participants to bring a friend, even if they             n   Create an opportunity for members to meet new
   just come for a coffee in the first week. As a leader, you             people by conducting some walks out of town,
   should also tell people you know and new people you                    meeting with other Walking for Pleasure clubs.
   meet about the program.                                            n   Add variety by conducting theme walks, and invite
                                                                          an expert to come and talk about the garden, birds,
   Look for local promotional opportunities to promote
                                                                          wildlife, history or local architecture on your route.
   your club, including putting up posters at local shops or
   placing a brief article in a local club or school newsletter.      n   Make the walk a social occasion by having morning
   Local newspapers are also a great way to promote your                  tea, lunch or afternoon tea together as a group after
   club – you can advertise your meetings in the community                the walk. You could go to a café or bring a plate and
   calendar section, or arrange a photo opportunity and                   thermos and sit under a shady tree.
   invite a reporter along to see your club in action.                n   Have walks that cater for all ages and abilities so that
                                                                          as many people as possible can join in. These may
   It’s also a good idea to have flyers on hand to provide
                                                                          include a “walk with grandparents” day.
   to people who ask about the group when you’re
   leading walks.                                                     n   Make new members feel welcome by introducing
                                                                          them to other members. Use name tags for walkers
   You should also promote your club through your
                                                                          to help break down barriers and allow friendships to
   local council, Sport and Recreation and other
                                                                          develop quickly.
   community organisations.
                                                                      n   A newsletter is a good way to keep members informed
   Advertising through the local media                                    of walks and other snippets of interest about the club.
                                                                      n   Some clubs issue certificates to the walkers
   n   Local media such as radio, television and newspapers
                                                                          at the end of the special walks or for individual
       can be effective in recruiting new members.
                                                                          achievements. The certificates act as an
   n   A media release about your club can help get
                                                                          encouragement award for walkers.
       coverage for future meetings, and there is
                                                                      n   Have a number of people willing to be Walk Leaders,
       sometimes free advertising for meetings in the
                                                                          so that the responsibility is not always placed on the
       community events section.
                                                                          same people.
   n   Arrange a photo opportunity and invite a reporter
       along to see your club in action.
   n   A sample media release can be found in Appendix 9
       of this manual.




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Section 5


Roles and responsibilities
  5.1   Duty of care                         18

  5.2   Walk Leader checklist                18

  5.3   Substitute leaders                   19

  5.4   Including people with disabilities   20

  5.5   Caring for the environment           20

  5.6   Child protection                     21




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Roles and responsibilities

5.1 Duty of care                                                              Furthermore, the walker has to prove that your negligence
                                                                              was actually significant to their injury. Someone with
         What is duty of care?                                                lifelong chronic back pain would have difficulty proving
                                                                              that tripping over during the walk made a big difference
         An individual, group or organisation, undertaking an
                                                                              to their condition.
         activity, has a duty under law to make certain that all
         reasonable steps are undertaken to ensure the safety,
                                                                          5.2 Walk Leader checklist
         health and well-being of participants and others likely to
         be affected by the activity.                                         Initial planning

         Your responsibility in providing duty of care                        n   Setting the program – this should be set six months
                                                                                  in advance and a copy sent to your local Sport and
         Your duty of care extends to events and circumstances
                                                                                  Recreation office at least one month prior to program
         that are reasonably foreseeable.
                                                                                  commencement in order for printing to be completed.
         For example, someone is injured walking on a damaged
                                                                              n   Preliminary walk conducted – ensure you have
         footpath. Could this have been prevented? Were the
                                                                                  up-to-date knowledge of the walk.
         walkers advised of the potential hazards?
                                                                              n   Establish a cancellation procedure – understand
         What happens if things go wrong?                                         the steps to take if you have to cancel the walk for
                                                                                  any reason.
         Even with the best planning, mishaps can occur, but
         fortunately most will be minor and easily resolved.                  On the day of the walk
         However, if someone has suffered personal injury or loss             Before the walk:
         on a walk and is contemplating taking legal action, there
                                                                              n   Check the weather conditions and decide if the walk
         are hurdles a walker will have to overcome before the
                                                                                  will go ahead as planned
         matter can progress further:
                                                                              n   Follow the club’s cancellation procedure if you have to
         n   They need to establish that a duty of care existed                   cancel the walk. This may be that the walkers phone
             (advice, action, activities)                                         the Walk Leader at a certain time or an announcement
         n   The walker will have to prove that you were negligent.               on the local radio is made
             Hurting themselves isn’t enough proof to show that               n   Check that walkers wear appropriate clothing,
             you didn’t do what you were supposed to do                           footwear, a hat, sunglasses and sunscreen
         n   More importantly, the walker will have to be able to             n   Develop a Walk Leader’s pack to take with you. This
             prove that it was the failure on your part that directly             pack may include copies of registration forms, a first
             contributed to them hurting themselves. For example,                 aid kit, cancellation procedures, safety and emergency
             if someone tripped over a broken footpath because                    procedures, a route map, a mobile phone or coins for
             you chose to walk in a poorly lit area, it is not the same           a payphone, camera, attendance sheet and pen.
             as someone tripping on a footpath because they were
             running backwards to show off in front of their friends
             at the time.




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                                                                    Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




At the start of the walk:                                          At the end of the walk:
n   Welcome the walkers and introduce new walkers                  n    Count all participants
    to the group                                                   n    Conduct a cool down session
n   Introduce yourself and the other Walk Leaders to               n    If any injuries occur during the walk, complete an
    the group                                                           Incident and Witness report forms (Appendix 4 and 5),
n   Ask everyone to sign the Attendance sheet                           take photos and send these to Sport and Recreation
    (Appendix 7)
                                                                   n    Collect any Walker registration forms (Appendix 1)
n   Ask new walkers to complete the Walker registration                 and Attendance sheets (Appendix 7) and send to
    form (Appendix 1)                                                   Sport and Recreation.
n   Check that all walkers have appropriate clothing,
    footwear, water and sun protection                          5.3 Substitute Walk Leaders
n   Ask the group if there are any new injuries or health          All Walk Leaders must have read the Walk Leader’s
    conditions that you should be aware of                         training manual and signed the training declaration before
n   If a walker is unwell they should not walk. Ask them to        taking the walk.
    come to another walk when they are fully recovered             If you are unable to lead a walk, try and arrange a
n   Check you have the first aid kit                               Substitute Walk Leader to fill your role. Make sure that
n   Read out the safety and emergency procedures                   this person is a trained Walk Leader, not just a fill in.
n   Explain the route to the participants, including rest          On each walk there should be a minimum of two Walk
    stops, facilities and hazards                                  Leaders. The first Walk Leader leads and organises the
n   Conduct a warm up session                                      walk. The second Walk Leader is responsible for staying
                                                                   at the back of the group and ensuring the participants are
n   Count the participants.
                                                                   kept between both leaders.
On the walk:
n   Watch out for hazards, particularly those that are                 Please note: Substitute Walk Leaders must be
    unexpected, and inform other walkers                               registered with Sport and Recreation. In the absence of
                                                                       a registered, qualified Walk Leader the
n   If the route crosses a busy street, make sure all
                                                                       group must not embark on the Walking for Pleasure
    walkers understand how to cross safely
                                                                       walk. Walk Leader and Substitute Walk Leader
n   If there is an accident or injury, keep participants calm
                                                                       registration forms can be found in Appendix 3
    and follow the emergency procedures (Appendix 6)
                                                                       of this manual.
n   Ensure that the pace you set is acceptable to
    all members
n   Allow for water breaks or rest stops
n   Remind walkers to stay together and always have a
    leader at the front and back of the group
n   During long walks, participant numbers should be
    checked to ensure no one is missing.




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




5.4 Including people with disabilities                                    5.5 Caring for the environment
         Like everyone, people with disabilities may want and                 It is important that we try to minimise our impact on
         expect to participate in physical activity with their friends,       the environment by walking on designated tracks and
         families or carers. Below are various points you should              not leaving any rubbish behind. Inform walkers on
         consider as a Walk Leader to include people with a                   hazards that they may encounter, such as wildlife
         disability in your group.                                            (particularly snakes and spiders), and how to take a
                                                                              common sense approach.
         n   Know who will participate beforehand: what are their
             needs? Don’t assume – if you are unsure, check with              Walkers should remember that if they encounter snakes
             them or their carer                                              or other wildlife they should stay still and alert the Walk
                                                                              Leaders. Always remember that wildlife will usually be
         n   Walk the route beforehand so you are aware of                    more afraid of us and will usually move on in time.
             available facilities, potential obstacles and suitable
                                                                              If your walk takes you through a National Park, you
             alternatives. Potential obstacles may include:
                                                                              must comply with the rules and guidelines published
             – Overhanging branches, glare, reflective surfaces,
                                                                              by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service
               noisy environments
                                                                              (see www.environment.nsw.gov.au)
             – Trip hazards – uneven surfaces, berries,
               twigs, steps
             – Steep gradients – routes should be no steeper                  Tips for caring for the environment:
               than 1:14                                                      n   Large groups should not walk in sensitive areas
             – Narrow pathways and aisles                                     n   Respect the flora and fauna
             – If it is an indoor walk, loose and slippery surfaces           n   Keep noise to a minimum
               may limit the ability of wheelchair users to access
                                                                              n   Stay on established tracks where possible
               the route.
                                                                              n   Spread out when off track in open country
         n   Incorporate the following considerations into your walk
                                                                              n   Dispose of rubbish in bins provided or take it home
             route to make it more accessible for a person with a
                                                                                  with you.
             disability, as well as the group as a whole:
             – Continuous accessible paths of travel at least 1m
               wide (1.2m preferred).
             – Rest stops, eating stops, shade and unisex
               accessible toilets
             – Well-lit routes clearly signposted and protected
               from the weather
             – Routes with ground surface tactile indicators,
               colour contrasted edges, steps and changes
               in levels.




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5.6 Child protection                                            sport and recreation activities and their responsibilities in
                                                                relation to the new legislation.
    Sport and Recreation is committed to providing a safe
    environment for children and young people who take part     Members of organisations who enter into agreements
    in sporting and recreation activities.                      with Sport and Recreation, where their position or
                                                                the provision of services under the auspices of the
    To achieve this aim, Sport and Recreation promotes
                                                                agreement involves direct unsupervised contact with
    the principles and responsibilities of child protection
                                                                children, will be required to undergo the Working
    among all paid, voluntary, permanent or casual staff as
                                                                With Children Check. Organisations must prove their
    well as administrators and coaches involved in sport and
                                                                compliance with the requirements of the legislation by:
    recreation.
                                                                n   Registering through the relevant Approved
    The Child Protection (Prohibited Employment) Act 1998           Screening Agency to obtain a Commission for
    prohibits convicted sex offenders from working with             Children and Young People (CCYP) Employer ID
    children and requires a comprehensive screening process         number for
    to be undertaken on all recommended applicants for child        the purposes of conducting the Working With
    related employment. The Commission for Children and             Children Check
    Young People Act 1998 enables Sport and Recreation
    to make these checks. Under the Child Protection            n   Ensuring all members and staff meet their
    (Offenders Registration) Act 2000, all registrable sex          responsibilities under the new legislation.
    offenders are also prohibited persons.                      Sport and Recreation will observe privacy and treat all
    Accordingly, organisations which enter into agreements      information gained with the utmost confidentiality.
    with Sport and Recreation involving children will be        If you are in any doubt as to your obligations under
    expected to develop and implement a child protection        child protection legislation please call 1300 366 407
    policy that assists its members in understanding how to     for advice.
    provide a safe environment for children to participate in




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Section 6


Health and safety procedures
  6.1   General safety for leaders and participants   24

  6.2   Health of walkers                             24

  6.3   Walking apparel and shoes                     25

  6.4   Warm up, cool down and stretching exercises   25

  6.5   Balance exercises – fall prevention           29

  6.6   Checklist for good walking posture            30




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Health and safety procedures
6.1 General safety for leaders and walkers                                  n   Encourage participants to buddy up with others of
                                                                                similar walking pace. This can be highly beneficial for
         Physiological changes to the human body do take place
                                                                                members with lower levels of fitness who need to take
         with ageing and these need to be considered when
                                                                                rest breaks or short cuts
         undertaking physical activity.
                                                                            n   Take a mobile phone with you or know the location of
         Before commencing the walking program, walkers should
                                                                                the nearest public phone
         consult their GP for advice, particularly if they have been
         inactive or have an existing medical condition.                    n   Always carry a first aid kit (which you are qualified
         All walkers should remember to:                                        to use).

         n   Start walking gradually                                    6.2 Health of the walkers
         n   Always warm up, stretch and cool down, including
                                                                            n   It is recommended that each walker consult their local
             balance exercises
                                                                                GP before taking up any form of exercise.
         n   Drink plenty of water before, during and after
                                                                            n   At all times, Walk Leaders should consider the health
             physical activity
                                                                                and fitness level, age and any disabilities of the
         n   Avoid participating if they are unwell or injured                  walkers. Your assessment of possible risks should
         n   Wait at least 1 hour after a meal before commencing                be based upon the capabilities of the most “at risk”
             physical activity                                                  person in the group.
         n   Protect themselves from the sun on outdoor                     n   Check the location of toilet facilities and places to
             walks with appropriate clothing, sunglasses, a hat                 rest.
             and sunscreen                                                  n   It’s unreasonable to expect the Walk Leaders to
         n   Avoid walking in the hottest part of the day                       conduct a physical and mental check of all walkers
         n   Be aware of their environment when walking:                        on the day of the walk. It is reasonable to expect
             – For outdoor walkers, watch out for busy roads,                   that the Walk Leader would not conduct a “hard”
               oncoming traffic, other walkers, dual path users on              walk for walkers who are not capable of this level.
               bikes and rollerblades, dangerous native wildlife                Walkers should not be put at risk by participating. Walk
               (snakes etc.)                                                    Leaders are expected to take reasonable care.

             – For shopping centre walkers, watch out for                   n   Each walker needs to take personal responsibility
               cleaners and slippery floors, trolleys, shop displays            for their well-being by not walking if they are
               in different locations, signs                                    unwell and informing the Walk Leader of any injury
                                                                                or health condition that may prevent them from
         n   Stop exercising if they experience chest pain,
                                                                                exercising safely.
             discomfort or pressure, dizziness, light-headedness
             or nausea, and seek medical attention
         n   Be realistic about their abilities and fitness level,
             to set gradual goals and gradually build up their levels
             of walking.

         Walk Leaders should:
         n   Be aware of your group’s progress and ensure all
             participants complete the walk or inform you if they
             are leaving the walk before it concludes.



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6.3 Walking apparel and shoes                                      6.4 Warm up and stretching exercises
   Shoes                                                              Warm up exercises
   The most important piece of walking equipment is                   Before you undertake stretches and physical activity you
   a pair of sturdy, comfortable, lightweight walking                 need to warm up your body. This will increase the heat
   shoes. If your feet feel good you will walk well and               through your muscles and reduce the risk of tearing
   continue walking.                                                  or straining muscles and tendons. Warm up exercises
   When choosing the right walking shoes, check for:                  (lasting 10–15 minutes) may include:
                                                                      n Slow walk – change length of stride (normal – small –
   n   Shoes with a tough outer layer of rubber and a soft
                                                                          large)
       mid-sole that runs the full length of the sole
                                                                      n   Step – pause – step, repeat
   n   Uppers made of high-quality, breathable material,
                                                                      n   Walk side on
       such as leather and/or nylon mesh
                                                                      n   Grapevine
   n   Fastenings – lace up shoes are preferable. Shoes
       need to be fastened by elastic, Velcro or laces                n   Walk in a box formation.
   n   Collar – comfortable padded heel collar                        These exercises will:
   n   Heel – a firm heel that is slightly raised and holds your      n   Increase the heart rate
       foot well for stability
                                                                      n   Increase the respiration rate
   n   Substantial arch supports
                                                                      n   Distribute blood to where it is needed eg. leg muscles
   n   Entire shoe should be designed to absorb shock
                                                                      n   Increase body temperature, making it easier for
   n   Toe box – your toes should be able to spread freely                muscles and tendons to stretch.
       and not feel squashed or tight
   n   Sole – designed specifically to enhance smooth heel            Stretching exercises
       to toe motion.                                                 Stretching after warm up exercises will:
                                                                      n   Increase flexibility
   Clothing
                                                                      n   Reduce muscle tension
   n   It is important to wear light, loose layers of
                                                                      n   Reduce the risk of muscle or tendon injuries.
       comfortable clothing, covering as much skin as
       possible, especially in the summer months.                      There are eight general rules for safe stretching:
   n   Comfortable, well-fitting socks (usually cotton blend is       1. Warm up before stretching
       best) will help walkers avoid sore or blistered feet.
                                                                      2. Stretch before and after you exercise
   n   Walkers should also wear a hat, sunglasses and
                                                                      3. Stretch alternate muscle groups
       sunscreen when walking in the outdoors.
                                                                      4. Stretch slowly and gently, never bounce or
                                                                         stretch rapidly
                                                                      5. Stretches should be held for a minimum of
                                                                         15 – 20 seconds
                                                                      6. Stretch to the point of tension – never pain
                                                                      7. Do not hold your breath when stretching – breathing
                                                                         should be slow and easy
                                                                      8. Stretch all major muscle groups and make sure each
                                                                         stretch is performed on both limbs.
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         Standing calf stretch
         n   Stand with both feet pointing forward, front knee bent and back leg straight,
             and hands on hips
         n   Press the heel of the back leg into floor and gently push down until a gentle
             stretch is felt in lower calf muscle
         n   Keep back straight and head and shoulders lifted
         n   Try to increase the length of the stride while keeping your back foot flat
         n   Alternate leg
         n   Hold for 20 seconds
         n   Do not bounce
         n   Do not force a stretch.

         Lower calf stretch
         n   Stand with both feet pointing straight ahead, heels touching the ground
         n   Bend both knees forward and slowly lean forward
         n   Alternate leg
         n   Hold for 20 seconds
         n   Do not bounce
         n   Do not force a stretch.

         Shin stretch
         n   Stand with both feet pointing straight ahead
         n   Support your body with the aid of a tree, or something similar, and bend both knees
         n   Keeping the front heel on the ground and the back leg resting on the toe, lean forward
         n   Alternate leg
         n   Hold for 20 seconds
         n   Do not bounce
         n   Do not force a stretch.




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Quadricep stretch
n    Stand with one foot in your hand and draw your knee and hip back as far
     as possible towards the buttocks – you may need to support yourself with the aid
     of a partner or chair
n    Alternate leg
n    Hold for 20 seconds
n    Do not bounce
n    Do not force a stretch.




Hip extension
n    Stand with both feet pointing straight ahead
n    With one hand resting on a chair/bench for support, slowly lower
     your hips towards the floor until resting on one knee
n    Keep back straight and lean forward
n    Alternate leg
n    Hold for 20 seconds
n    Do not bounce
n    Do not force a stretch.


    Note: Participants who have knee problems or who have had
    knee surgery may find this stretch difficult and are advised to avoid it.


Seated hamstring stretch
n    Keep a proper curve in the lower back
n    Bend one foot upward as you straighten your knee
n    Feel the stretch at the back of your thigh
n    Repeat the stretch with the other leg
n    Do not allow your lower back to lose its curve
n    Hold for 20 seconds
n    Do not bounce
n    Do not force a stretch.




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         Standing hamstring stretch
         n   Place one heel on a low step or bench. Keeping your knee and
             back straight, bend your upper body forwards from your hips
         n   You should feel the stretch behind your knee.




         Standing Achilles tendon stretch
         n   Standing with one leg slightly behind the other, push your heels down while
             bending your knees.




         Standing hip adductor stretch
         n   Standing with your legs astride and straight, bend one leg
             and put your hands just above your knee
         n   Bend your leg even more and put more weight on it
         n   You should feel the stretch on the inside thigh of your straight leg.




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6.5 Balance exercises – fall prevention                             n    Bring feet closer together, eyes open, repeat
                                                                         hand movements
    These exercises have been approved as suitable activities
    for balance improvement by a qualified physiotherapist.         n    Close eyes and repeat
                                                                    n    Bring feet completely together and repeat with eyes
    The following balance activities will assist participants to:
                                                                         open and then closed.
    1. Reduce falls
                                                                    Introduce a mirroring activity, with each person standing
    2. Reduce injuries                                              facing a partner. One person moves their hands slowly
    3. Increase confidence.                                         and the other one follows (mirrors) them. With eyes
    These activities can be performed at any time, and              closed, touch hands.
    participants should be encouraged to complete
    these activities daily. The more you practice, the better       Activity 2
    the outcome.                                                    n    Stand on one foot, body upright, eyes open, head
    As part of the walk program it is suggested that a warm              up (a lot of people will have difficulty with this)
    up is undertaken before the activities are attempted.           n    Outstretch your arms to the side to aid balance
                                                                    n    Bring your arms down by your side
                                                                    n    With eyes closed, arms outstretched to the side
    Please note:
                                                                    n    With eyes closed, arms down by your side
    n   If participants feel unwell or experience pain when
                                                                    n    Repeat above and move hands in different directions
        they participate in any activity they should stop
                                                                         slowly (like Tai Chi).
        immediately and seek medical attention
                                                                    Introduce a mirroring activity, with each person standing
    n   All the activities should be performed on a flat surface.
                                                                    facing a partner. One person moves their hands slowly
        Instruct participants to open their eyes if they start to
                                                                    and the other one follows (mirrors) them. With eyes
        fall. This may sound ridiculous but people do forget
                                                                    closed, touch hands.
    n   Walk Leaders should understand that participants
        will be at different ability levels. As such, they should       Note: As this is a more challenging balance exercise,
        be prepared to offer different levels of activities. The        participants are advised that it may be a good idea
        examples below are set out from the easiest to the              to begin with their eyes open while doing it and/or
        more difficult. Inform participants only to perform             perform the exercise next to a chair, table, wall which
        activities they feel comfortable with                           they can lean on for support if they become unsteady.
    n   It is worth doing activities in pairs, where one does the       Alternatively, the exercise can be performed with a
        activities and the other provides support and feedback.         supporting partner to minimise the risk of falling.
        This allows for positive social contact and confidence
        when performing the activities.                             Activity 3
                                                                    To increase the challenge and variety of the above
    Activity 1                                                      activities, include partner activities like catching balloons
                                                                    or balls etc.
    n   Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, feet forward,
        body upright, eyes open, head up
    n   Move hands in different directions slowly (like Tai Chi)
    n   Close eyes and repeat


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6.6 Checklist for good walking posture                                Leg action
                                                                      The length of each stride should be comfortable and
         Head                                                         efficient. Stride length will vary amongst individuals and
         The head should be centred, in line with the spine and       will depend on leg length, hamstring tightness and the
         held in a natural position. The chin should be parallel      rotation of the hips.
         with the floor. Eyes should be looking forward (paying
         attention to the area about 2–3 metres ahead).               Foot placement
                                                                      With each stride the heel touches the ground first; the
         Shoulders                                                    forefoot and the toes are raised toward the shins. The
         The shoulders need to be down and back and not               forefoot is then lowered to the ground with control (avoid
         rounded, however they do need to be relaxed.                 pounding or slapping). The foot rolls from heel to toe. The
                                                                      faster the rear leg is brought forward, the faster the rate
         Chest                                                        of walking (stride frequency).
         The chest should be lifted and expanded.

         Arm action
         The arm swing should be natural and comfortable. The
         forward swing should be relaxed and close to the side
         of the body. It is important that the arm swing should not
         cross the centre of the body.




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Section 7


Emergency procedures and first aid
  7.1    Injuries and emergency procedures                                   32

  7.2    Basic first aid                                                     32

  7.3    Injury to limbs and bones                                           34

  7.4    Bites and stings                                                    35

  7.5    Basic first aid                                                     37
         n   Unconsciousness                                                 37
         n   Severe bleeding                                                 37
         n   Shock                                                           37
         n   Spinal injury                                                   37
         n   Diabetes                                                        38
         n   Asthma                                                          38
         n   Heart attack                                                    39
         n   Stroke                                                          39
         n   Heat exhaustion                                                 39
         n   Heat stroke                                                     39
         n   Hypothermia                                                     40

  7.6    Incident guidelines                                                 41

  7.7    Procedure – if someone falls                                        42

  Note: This section is for reference only. It does not constitute training in first aid.
  It is recommended that all Walk Leaders complete a first aid course – see page 46
  for providers.




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7.1 Injuries and emergency procedures                                       B. Send for the appropriate professional help if required
                                                                               by telephoning the emergency telephone number 000
         Each club should devise their own emergency procedures
                                                                               (from a mobile phone you can also use “112”) and
         to assist them in the case of the accident or injury
                                                                               stating the:
         (see Appendix 6 for a sample of emergency procedures).
         Each Walk Leader should carry a copy on the walk.                     –    Urgency and type of situation
                                                                               –    Location
         A basic first aid kit should be carried by all leaders. The
         contents of the first aid kit should reflect the first aid skill      –    Number of casualties and types of injuries.
         and expertise of the Walk Leader, and should be easy to
                                                                            (2) Keep the casualty alive
         carry around the waist or in a backpack
                                                                            The immediate action for all causalities is to keep
         Training can be received from the first aid providers listed
                                                                            the casualty alive. The Walk Leader should follow the
         in the Useful Contacts on page 46.
                                                                            DRABCD action plan first and tend to other injuries
7.2 Basic first aid                                                         following the plan.

         The aims of first aid are to:
         n   Promote a safe environment
         n   Preserve life
         n   Prevent injury or illness from becoming worse
         n   Help promote recovery
         n   Protect the unconscious
         n   Reassure the ill or injured.

         The priorities of first aid:

         (1) As a Walk Leader you should take control of
         the situation
         Assess the situation from observations and statements
         of bystanders.
         A. Protect yourself, bystanders and the casualties
            from danger:
             –    Remove the danger from the casualty, if possible
             –    Move the casualty away from the danger,
                  if possible
             –    Keep clear of the danger in cases of fire, gas
                  and electricity.




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DRABCD action plan


                                                                  To yourself

   D
                                                              n

             Danger           Check for danger                n   To bystanders
                                                              n   To the casualty


                                                              n   Shout “are you ok?”
                              Check for response              n   Squeeze the casualty’s shoulders


   R         Response
                              Call for help
                                                              Ask a bystander to phone “000” for
                                                              an ambulance


                                                              Check and clear the mouth


   A
                              Check and clear                 and airways

             Airways                                          n   Are they conscious?
                                                              n   Are they breathing?
                              Check for signs of life
                                                              n   Are they moving?

                                                              Give two rescue breaths into

   B
                              No signs of life
                                                              their mouth
             Breathing
                              Signs of life                   Place casualty in recovery position



                              No immediate signs of           1. 30 chest compressions at a rate


   C         Compression      life – commence CPR
                                                                 of 100 per minute followed by two
                                                                 rescue breaths
                                                              2. Compress the chest to approx ⅓⅓
                                                                 depth of chest
                                                              3. Continue until signs of life return




   D         Defibrillation   Early defibrillation
                                                              If a defibrillator is available attach
                                                              as soon as possible and follow
                                                              the prompts




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7. 3 Injuries to limbs and bones                                              Fractures and dislocations

         Injuries to bones, joints and ligaments may be recognised by:        n   Control severe bleeding and cover the wounds.
         n   Swelling                                                         n   Protect, support and elevate the injured part with soft
         n   Deformity                                                            padding, suitable splinting and bandages.

         n   Bruising                                                         n   Seek medical attention as soon as possible.

         n   Loss of movement.                                                Sprains and strains
         These injuries should be managed as soon as possible.                Manage by following the RICER action plan.
         Try not to move the casualty, unless they are in danger. If
         movement is necessary, steady and support the injured
         part. Remember to follow the DRABCD action plan.


RICER action plan




         R               Rest                                Rest the limb in the most comfortable position




             I
                                                             An ice pack covered in cloth or cold compress should be applied to the
                         Ice                                 injured site. It should not be applied directly to the skin. Apply the pack/
                                                             compress for 10 -20 minutes every two hours




         C
                                                             A compression bandage should be applied to the injured area. The
                         Compression                         bandage should not be so tight that it impedes circulation beyond
                                                             the injured site




         E               Elevation                           Elevate the affected limb




         R               Referral                            If you are at all unsure of the extent of the injury, seek medical advice.




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7.4 Bites and stings                                               Firstly,

    Australia has many animal and insect species that bite or      n   Follow the DRABCD action plan on page 33
    sting. The following is advice on basic first aid procedures       – rest and reassure the casualty
    only. In all instances it is important to seek proper          n   Apply the following management plan according
    medical treatment.                                                 to symptoms
                                                                   n   Do not attempt to suck out the venom
                                                                   n   Resuscitate if necessary.




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  Animal/insect          Recognition/symptoms                                        Management

  Snakes                 n   History of sightings in the area                        n   Do not wash the wound
                         n   Puncture mark(s) or scratches                           n   Immediately place a firm pressure on
                         n   Headache                                                    the wound
                         n   Nausea, vomiting                                        n   Apply pressure immobilisation
                         n   Abdominal pain                                          n   Keep the casualty at rest and
                         n   Visual problems                                             reassure them
                         n   Difficulty in speaking, swallowing or breathing         n   Call an ambulance
                         n   Limb weakness, paralysis or pain
                         n   Difficulty in breathing, breathing stops
                         n   Pain at bite site                                       n   Do not wash the wound
  Funnel-web
                         n   Tingling around the mouth                               n   Immediately place a firm pressure
  spider                     Heavy production of saliva
                         n                                                               on the wound
                         n   Profuse sweating                                        n   Apply pressure immobilisation
                         n   Abdominal pain                                          n   Keep the casualty at rest and
                         n   Muscular twitching                                          reassure them
                         n   Confusion                                               n   Call an ambulance
                         n   Coma
                         n   Breathing difficulty
                         n   Immediate pain at bite site, which becomes hot,             Reassure the casualty
  Red-back,                                                                          n
                             red and swollen                                         n   Apply an ice pack for pain relief
  White-tailed or            Pain increases and spreads
                         n                                                           n   Call an ambulance
  Brown-recluse          n   Profuse sweating, especially at bite site
  spiders                n   Nausea and vomiting
                         n   Abdominal pain
                         n   Swollen and tender glands near affected limb
                         n   Local irritation                                        n   Locate the tick(s) by carefully checking
  Ticks                      Lethargy, muscle weakness
                         n                                                               the whole body of the casualty
                         n   Visual disturbances                                     n   Carefully remove the tick
                         n   Difficulty swallowing, wheezing, difficulty breathing   n   Apply an antiseptic to the wound
                                                                                     n   Seek medical advice
                                                                                         Remove the sting by scraping sideways
  Bee, wasp,             n History of sightings in the area                          n

                         n Intense local pain                                            with a sharp edge, taking care not to
  scorpion and
                         n Local redness and swelling                                    squeeze the venom sac
  ant stings                                                                             Apply an ice pack for pain relief
                         And in allergic persons:                                    n

                         n Itchy rash                                                If the casualty is allergic:
                         n Puffy eyelids, facial and limb swelling                   n Apply a pressure immobilisation
                         n Wheezing and difficulty in breathing                          bandage and seek urgent medical
                         n Nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea                                 attention
                         n Collapse


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7.5 Other medical conditions

Medical condition     Symptoms                                     Management

Unconsciousness       Not responding to voice and touch            n Assess the level of consciousness
                                                                     by the casualty’s response to voice and touch
                                                                   n Follow DRABCD action plan on page 33

                                                                   n Place the unconscious casualty on their side in

                                                                     the recovery position
                                                                   n Ensure there is a clear airway

                                                                   n Ensure a supply of fresh air

                                                                   n Loosen tight clothing around the neck and waist

                                                                   DO NOT attempt to give drinks
                                                                   n Look for and treat other injuries

                                                                   Seek medical attention

Severe bleeding       Bright red blood pouring or spurting         n   Follow the DRABCD action plan on page 33
                      from a wound                                 n   Apply direct pressure on the wound and
                                                                       surrounding skin (unless an embedded object
                                                                       is present)
                                                                   n   Apply a pad over wound and secure dressing
                                                                   n   Elevate the affected part where possible
                                                                   n   Keep the casualty still and reassure them
                                                                   n   Monitor vital signs and treat for shock if required

Shock                 n   Pale, cold, clammy skin                  n   Position the casualty laying down
                      n   Rapid or weak pulse                      n   Treat the cause if possible
                      n   Rapid shallow breathing                  n   Monitor the casualty’s vital signs
                      n   Thirst                                   n   Comfort and reassure the casualty
                      n   Dizziness                                n   Provide supplementary oxygen if available
                      n   Nausea                                   n   Maintain body temperature
                      n   Vomiting                                 n   Record the casualty’s vital signs regularly
                      n   Altered responsiveness                   Seek medical attention.
                      n   Weakness or collapse

Spinal injury         n   Pain at or below site of injury          n   Follow the DRABCD action plan on page 33
                      n   Loss of ability to move body or limbs    n   Instruct the casualty not to attempt to move
                          (particularly fingers and toes)          n   DO NOT move the casualty until medical
                                                                       assistance arrives, except in dangerous situations
                                                                   n   If the casualty has to be moved because of
                                                                       danger, ensure adequate support of their head
                                                                       and neck during the move
                                                                   Seek medical attention immediately




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 Medical condition         Symptoms                                    Management
 Diabetes –                 n   Weak, dizzy or light-headed            If responsive, cooperative and able to swallow:
 hypoglycaemia              n   Confused, disorientated                n   Give them a sweet drink, sweet or chocolate
 (low sugar levels)         n   May appear drunk                       n Seek medical assistance
                            n   May be aggressive
                                                                       If responsive:
                            n   Cold, pale, moist skin                 n Seek urgent medical assistance
                            n   Rapid pulse                            n Provide supplementary oxygen if available
                            n   Shallow breathing
                            n   Altered responsiveness
                            Seek medical attention immediately.




 Diabetes –                 n   Drowsiness                             If responsive:
 hyperglycaemia             n   Thirst                                 n Seek medical advice

 (high sugar levels)        n   Breath has a fruity smell (like nail
                                                                       If unresponsive:
                                polish remover)
                                                                       n   Seek urgent medical assistance
                            n   Increased urine output
                                                                       n Provide supplementary oxygen if available
                            n   Altered responsiveness

  Asthma                    n   Cough                                  If responsive:
                            n   Tightness of chest                     n In a severe attack, call an ambulance immediately
                            n   Rapid breathing                        n Reassure the casualty and assist them into a
                            n   Wheezing                                   position of comfort. They often prefer to have upper
                            n   Rapid pulse                                body upright
                            n   Pale                                   n Four puffs of a blue/grey reliever should be taken
                            n   Distressed, anxious                        every four minutes
                            n   Fighting for breath                    n If no reliever medication is available or the
                            n   Inspiratory and expiratory wheeze          casualty is unable to take the reliever or there
                            n   Exhaustion                                 is no immediate improvement within four
                            n   Altered responsiveness                     minutes of initial administration of reliever, call an
                            n   Cyanosis (blueness)                        ambulance immediately
                            n   Difficulty/unable to speak             n Even if medication appears to be effective,

                                                                           medical advice should be sought
                                                                       If unresponsive:
                                                                       n   Seek urgent medical assistance




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                                                                Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Medical condition   Symptoms                                     Management

Heart attack        n   Chest pain or tightness (often           n   Call an ambulance and seek urgent medical
                        described as heavy, dull or crushing)        assistance
                        that may radiate to neck, jaw,           n   Assist the person into a position of comfort
                        shoulders or arms                        n   Rest and reassure them (do not allow the person
                    n   Nausea or vomiting                           to move around)
                    n   Shortness of breath                      n   Loosen any tight clothing
                    n   Pale, cold and sweaty skin               n   If the casualty has their own medication, assist
                    n   May appear distressed                        them to take it
                                                                 n   Provide supplementary oxygen if available
                                                                 n   Be prepared for possible sudden unresponsiveness

Stroke              n   Loss of or difficulty with speech        n   Call an ambulance and seek urgent medical
                    n   Weakness or paralysis on one or both         assistance
                        sides of the body                        n   Reassure the casualty
                    n   Drooping of one side of the mouth        n   Place them in a position of comfort
                    n   Confusion                                n   Loosen any tight clothing
                    n   Headache                                 n   Provide supplementary oxygen if available
                    n   Incontinence
                    n   Unequally-sized pupils
                    n   Altered responsiveness or
                        unresponsive

Heat exhaustion     n   Weak or rapid pulse                      n   Lay the casualty down in the shade and protect
                    n   Profuse sweating                             them from the environment
                    n   Nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea            n   Provide sips of cool fluids
                    n   Headache or dizziness                    n   Cool the casualty’s body
                    n   Muscle cramps                            n   Seek medical advice
                    n   Thirst
                    n   Flushed or pale skin

Heat stroke         n   Dry, red and hot skin                    n   Seek urgent medical assistance
                    n   Sweating stops/no sweating               n   Lay the casualty down
                    n   Rapid, strong pulse which may later      n   Cool the casualty’s body rapidly. Wetting the
                        become slow                                  person with cold water and fanning them will
                    n   Convulsions                                  increase evaporative heat loss. Ice/cold packs
                    n   Altered responsiveness                       can be placed under the armpits, in the groin and
                    n   Unresponsiveness                             around the neck
                                                                 n   Monitor the casualty’s vital signs
                                                                 n   Provide sips of cool water if the casualty is
                                                                     responsive and can swallow
                                                                 n   Provide supplementary oxygen if available



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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




 Medical condition         Symptoms                                    Management
 Hypothermia                Mild                                       Mild
                            n   Shivering                              n Change into dry clothes if possible

                            n   Pale, cool skin                        n   Protect the casualty from the elements
                            n   Poor coordination                      n   Provide warm, sweet drinks (no alcohol
                            n   Slurred speech                             or caffeine)
                            n   Usually responsive, but with apathy
                                                                       n   Seek medical advice if the casualty does not
                                and slow thinking
                                                                           improve rapidly
                            Moderate
                                                                       Moderate to severe
                            n   Most shivering ceases
                                                                       If responsive:
                            n   Increasing muscle rigidity
                            n   Consciousness clouded                  n   Seek urgent medical assistance
                            n   Pulse and respiration slow and         n   Handle the casualty gently
                                difficult to detect                    n   Lay the casualty down flat
                                                                       n   Insulate them from the environment
                            Severe
                                                                       n   Wrap the casualty with dry blankets and clothing
                            n   Progressive loss of responsiveness     n   Monitor the victims vital signs
                            n   Heartbeat irregularities may develop   n   Provide warm, sweet drinks if the casualty is stable
                            n   Pupils fixed and dilated                   and can swallow
                            n   May appear dead                        n   Do not rub or massage the casualty
                                                                       n   Do not give alcoholic or caffeinated drinks
                                                                       n   Do not expose the casualty to excessive heat
                                                                           (eg. fire, heater)

                                                                       If unresponsive,
                                                                       n Seek urgent medical assistance

                                                                       n Follow the DRABCD action plan on page 33

                                                                       n Handle the casualty gently

                                                                       n Lay the casualty down flat

                                                                       n Insulate them from the environment

                                                                       n Provide oxygen (preferably warmed) if available




| 40 |
7.6 Incident guidelines                                             n   If medical assistance is required, do not attempt
                                                                        to move the person unless they are in danger. Keep
    n   Know the locations of public telephones
                                                                        them safe, warm and away from harm. Ensure
        and/or carry a mobile phone with you for
                                                                        someone remains with the injured person and call
        emergency situations.
                                                                        for medical assistance.
    n   It is recommended that you attend basic first aid
                                                                    n   If medical assistance is not required, encourage the
        training. First aid providers are listed on page 46.
                                                                        person to relax and recover in a safe place and to
    n   In the unlikely event of an accident resulting in injury        seek follow-up medical attention if necessary.
        to a walker, ensure that you remain calm, assess the
                                                                    Complete the Incident report form (Appendix 4), Witness
        situation and ensure that the injured person and other
                                                                    report form (Appendix 5) and attach photos and send to
        walkers are not in further danger. Follow basic first aid
                                                                    your local Sport and Recreation office. Inform Sport and
        principles of the DRABCD action plan on page 33.
                                                                    Recreation of the incident as soon as possible.




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Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




7.7 Procedure if someone falls – follow DRABCD action plan on page 33



                 Yes,
         there is a response                            Check for                                                     No response


                                                        response
   Tell the person to keep                          touch and shout ‘Are you okay?’
    calm and remain still




                   Does the person have any injuries/pain?                                      Call 000 for an
                                                                                                 ambulance
           MINOR PAIN                                 MAJOR PAIN


   Are there any minor                                If in any doubt
                                                                                        Make person as comfortable as possible:
   injuries, such as:                                of extent of any
                                                    injury always treat                 n   Reassure them
   n     Slight swelling?
                                                       as a fracture                    n   Control bleeding and cover wounds
   n     Tenderness at site?
                                                                                        n   Ask them not to move the injured limb
   n     Bleeding?
   n     Pain but not severe?                                                           n   Immobilise if fractured
                                                                                        n   Watch for signs of loss of circulation




  Make decision to get the
     person up slowly                           Are there major injuries:
                                                n   Possible break or fracture?
                                                n   Swelling?
                                                n   Severe pain?
  Let person know to rest                       n   Difficult or impossible normal movement?
  and take time to recover                      n   Deformity or abnormal mobility?
                                                n   Tenderness?
                                                n   Discoloration and bruising?

           If pain persists
             see a doctor




| 42 |
Section 8


Insurance
  8.1   Insurance   44




                         | 43 |
Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Insurance
8.1 Insurance                                                         Participants’ insurance cover
                                                                      Sport and Recreation does NOT provide insurance cover
         Volunteer Walk Leaders’ insurance cover
                                                                      to participants. Participants are recommended to take out
         during walks
                                                                      their own personal accident insurance.
         The Walk Leader is covered by Sport and Recreation’s
         public liability insurance.                                  Walkers participate at their own risk

         In addition, all volunteer Walk Leaders are covered for      Explain to participants that although Sport and Recreation
         death or bodily injury in accordance with and equivalent     and its service providers attempt to minimise any risk
         to the benefits payable under the Workers’ Compensation      of personal injury within practical boundaries, accidents
         Act 1987 (as amended) and the Workplace Injury               do happen and all physical activities carry the risk of
         Management and Workers Compensation Act 1998.                personal injury.

         If you suffer an accident during a preliminary walk, Sport   Walk Leaders have been trained to minimise any risk
         and Recreation must be satisfied that you were actively      associated with walking, however, accidents may occur.
         engaged in voluntary work at the time of the accident.       Walkers participate at their own risk. Sport and
         You must complete an Attendance sheet (Appendix 7)           Recreation accepts no responsibility for injuries incurred
         for preliminary walks and send it to Sport and Recreation    before, during or after the Walking for Pleasure program.
         prior to commencing your preliminary walk.                   It is recommended that participants obtain their own
         Please note that Sport and Recreation takes no               personal insurance cover.
         responsibility for your personal belongings. Please be
         security conscious and ensure that all your belongings
         are kept in a safe place.




| 44 |
Section 9


Useful contacts and
acknowledgements
  9.1   Useful contacts    46

  9.2   Acknowledgements   47




                                | 45 |
Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Useful contacts
9.1 Useful contacts

    Name of organisation                             Contact number        Website

Confederation of Bush Walking Clubs (NSW)            n/a                   www.bushwalking.org.au

NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service              13 15 55              www.environment.nsw.gov.au

Sport and Recreation                                 13 13 02              www.dsr.nsw.gov.au

NSW Heart Foundation                                 (02) 9219 2444        www.heartfoundation.org.au

Pedestrian Council of Australia                      (02) 9968 4544        www.walk.com.au

Land information Centre – map sales                  13000 LANDS           www.lands.nsw.gov.au

Australian Sports Commission                         (02) 6214 1111        www.ausport.gov.au

NSW Health                                           (02) 9391 9000        www.health.nsw.gov.au




The following organisations provide recognised first aid and CPR courses

    Name of organisation                             Contact number        Website

NSW Royal Life Saving                                (02) 9634 3700        www.royalnsw.com.au

Surf Lifesaving NSW                                  (02) 9984 7188        www.surflifesaving.com.au

St Johns Ambulance                                   13 13 02              www.stjohn.org.au

Australian Red Cross                                 1300 360 455          www.redcross.org.au

TAFE NSW                                             (02) 9229 4111        www.tafensw.edu.au




| 46 |
                                                                     Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Acknowledgements
9.2 Acknowledgements
   Department of Sport and Recreation WA and Injury Control Council of Australia, Walk Friendly Walk Leader
   Training Manual, 2004

   Department of Planning and Infrastructure WA, Walk there today, 2006–2007

   Sport and Recreation, Walking the Active Choice – A Manual for Walk Leaders, 2000

   NSW Heart Foundation, Just Walk it Coordinator Pack

   St John Ambulance Australia, How to manage an incident requiring First Aid,1991

   Royal Life Saving, Australia First Aid and Emergency Care, 1998




                                                                                                                     | 47 |
| 48 |
Section 10


Appendices and fact sheets
 Appendix 1     Walker registration form                 50

 Appendix 2     Club registration form                   51

 Appendix 3     Walk Leader and Substitute Walk Leader
                registration form                        52

 Appendix 4     Incident report form                     53

 Appendix 5     Witness report form                      54

 Appendix 6     Sample emergency procedures              55

 Appendix 7     Walking for Pleasure attendance sheet    56

 Appendix 8     Sample walking program                   57

 Appendix 9     Sample media release                     59

 Appendix 10    Walk Leader’s training declaration       60



 Fact sheet 1   Walking for Pleasure information sheet   61

 Fact sheet 2   Walker checklist fact sheet              63




                                                              | 49 |
Walking for Pleasure
Walker annual registration form

 Personal details
Name                                                                                                           Date of birth
                                                                                                                       /       /                 Male      Female
Address                                                                                                        Phone
                                                                                                                Home

                                                                     Postcode                                   Work/mobile
Email


Name of walking club



 Emergency contact details
Name                                                                                                          Relationship to participant


Address                                                                                                        Phone
                                                                                                                Home

                                                                     Postcode                                   Work/mobile

 Medical information/pre-exercise questionnaire
Do you suffer from or have you had any of the following, which may affect your ability to walk?
    Chest pains       Heart disease        High blood pressure        Back trouble or slipped disc       Epilepsy, fits or blackouts      Joint pains or arthritis
    Diabetes       Recently recovered from illness or an operation         Any allergic condition (including food allergies)
    Asthma (please include asthma plan) or bronchitis
                                                              If yes to one or more please give details (attach sheet if required)
Medicare number
                                     Position number
                                    on Medicare card
Health care card number
                                                        Do you have ambulance cover?                           Do you currently exercise?   Yes            No
                                                           Yes      No                                         Intensity      Hard       Moderate           Light

Pensioner health benefits card                         Private health insurance fund                           How often?


Pharmaceutical benefits concession card                Number                                                  How often?



 Risk waiver                                                                       Privacy statement
                                                                                   Sport and Recreation and the walking club will collect and store information
I wish to register as part of the above mentioned Walking for Pleasure club.       you voluntarily provide to enable processing of registrations
In the case of an emergency, I authorise the Walk Leaders, where it                for walking programs. The information will be provided to the Walk Leaders
impracticable to communicate with me, to arrange for me to receive such            of the program and their supervisors, where necessary and you consent to
medical or surgical treatment as may be deemed necessary. I also undertake         this disclosure.
to pay or reimburse costs which maybe incurred for medical attention,              If you have been asked for information regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait
ambulance transport and drugs while I am registered as part of this club.          Islander descent and cultural background, this information is voluntary and
I understand that although Sport and Recreation and the walking club attempt       is being compiled for statistical purposes only. Any information provided by
to minimise any risk of personal injury within practical boundaries, accidents     you will be stored on a database that will only be accessed by authorised
do happen and that all physical activities carry the risk of personal injury.      personnel and is subject to privacy restrictions. The information will only be
I acknowledge that there is an inherent risk of personal injury in physical        used for the purpose for which it is collated.
activities that will be undertaken as part of the walking club program             Any information provided by you to Sport and Recreation and the walking club
I understand that I participate in the walking program at my own risk and that     can be accessed by you during standard office hours and updated by writing
my local GP should be contacted before starting any form of exercise.              to us or by contacting us on 13 13 02.

Full name



Signature                                             Date
                                                              /       /




| 50 |
Walking for Pleasure
Club registration form – Return this form annually to your local Sport and Recreation office

 Club details
Club Name


Address


                                                                                                                    Postcode



 Contact details
Please identify two (2) contact people from within your club who are willing to act as club contact people with Sport and Recreation and take enquiries
from interested walkers.

Contact One
Name


Address


                                                                                                                    Postcode
Email                                                                                                   Phone

                                                                                                         Home
Signature                                                                  Date
                                                                                   /      /              Work/mobile


Contact Two
Name


Address


                                                                                                                    Postcode
Email                                                                                                   Phone

                                                                                                         Home
Signature                                                                  Date
                                                                                   /      /              Work/mobile




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
                                                                                                                                                   | 51 |
Walking for Pleasure
Walk Leader and Substitute Walk Leader annual registration form
All Walk Leaders, including Substitute Walk Leaders, must be registered with Sport and Recreation. In the absence of registered, qualified Walk Leaders,
the group cannot embark on the Walking for Pleasure walk.

 Personal details
Name                                                                                                               Date of birth
                                                                                                                           /       /
Address                                                                                                            Phone                             Male      Female
                                                                                                                    Home

                                                                      Postcode                                      Work/mobile
Email


Name of walking club



 Emergency contact details
Name                                                                                                              Relationship to participant


Address                                                                                                            Phone
                                                                                                                    Home

                                                                      Postcode                                      Work/mobile

 Medical information/pre-exercise questionnaire
Do you suffer from or have you had any of the following, which may affect your ability to walk?
    Chest pains       Heart disease         High blood pressure         Back trouble or slipped disc         Epilepsy, fits or blackouts      Joint pains or arthritis
    Diabetes       Recently recovered from illness or an operation             Any allergic condition (including food allergies)
    Asthma (please include asthma plan) or bronchitis
                                                                If yes to one or more please give details (attach sheet if required)
Medicare number
                                      Position number
                                     on Medicare card
Health care card number
                                                         Do you have ambulance cover?                              Do you currently exercise?   Yes            No
                                                             Yes       No                                          Intensity      Hard       Moderate           Light
Pensioner health benefits card                           Private health insurance fund                             How often?


Pharmaceutical benefits concession card                  Number                                                    How often?



 Risk waiver                                                                           Privacy statement
                                                                                       Sport and Recreation and the walking club will collect and store information
I wish to register as part of the above mentioned Walking for Pleasure club.           you voluntarily provide to enable processing of registrations
In the case of an emergency, I authorise the Walk Leaders, where it                    for walking programs. The information will be provided to the Walk Leaders
impracticable to communicate with me, to arrange for me to receive such                of the program and their supervisors, where necessary and you consent to
medical or surgical treatment as may be deemed necessary. I also undertake             this disclosure.
to pay or reimburse costs which maybe incurred for medical attention,                  If you have been asked for information regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait
ambulance transport and drugs while I am registered as part of this club.              Islander descent and cultural background, this information is voluntary and
I understand that although Sport and Recreation and the walking club attempt           is being compiled for statistical purposes only. Any information provided by
to minimise any risk of personal injury within practical boundaries, accidents         you will be stored on a database that will only be accessed by authorised
do happen and that all physical activities carry the risk of personal injury.          personnel and is subject to privacy restrictions. The information will only be
I acknowledge that there is an inherent risk of personal injury in physical            used for the purpose for which it is collated.
activities that will be undertaken as part of the walking club program                 Any information provided by you to Sport and Recreation and the walking club
I understand that I participate in the walking program at my own risk and that         can be accessed by you during standard office hours and updated by writing
my local GP should be contacted before starting any form of exercise.                  to us or by contacting us on 13 13 02.

Full name



Signature                                              Date
                                                               /       /




| 52 |
Walking for Pleasure
Incident report form
    Club details
Walking club name


Walk Leader’s name


Address                                                                                   Phone
                                                                                          Home

                                                                Postcode                  Work/mobile

    Incident details
Name of casualty


Date of incident                            Place of incident                                     Time of incident


Description of incident1




Action taken by leader




                                                     Name of doctor/hospital
Was medical attention sought?         Yes       No

Action taken by medical assistance (eg. GP, ambulance) Please describe




If a hazard, has the local council or management organisation been informed?   Yes   No
Indicate who was informed of the hazard?




Further action required?        Yes     No
If yes, what action is required?




Signature                                                                                 Date




Please notify Sport and Recreation immediately by phone
Fax form to Sport and Recreation


1
    Please attach photographs




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
                                                                                                                     | 53 |
Walking for Pleasure
Witness report form

 Details
Walking club name


Walk Leader’s name


Name of casualty



 Witness details
Name of witness


Address                                                           Phone
                                                                  Home

                                                       Postcode   Work/mobile

 Incident details
Date of incident                   Place of incident                      Time of incident


Description of incident




Action taken by leader




Signature of witness                                              Date




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
| 54 |
                                                                   Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Sample emergency procedures
Sample emergency procedures                                    Minor injury
    This is a sample of an emergency procedure that your           1. Make contact with the closest Walk Leader, either by:
    group may be able to use to write your own.                       n  Calling out
    The emergency procedure should be carried out                     n  Sending two walkers to get them
    by the Walk Leaders in the case of an injury.
                                                                   2. Assess the injured person
Severe injury                                                      3. If the injured person needs to see a doctor, choose
                                                                      two walkers to go with them and get the nearest car to
    1. Make contact with the closest Walk Leader, either by:
                                                                      take the injured to a doctor
       n Calling out
                                                                   4. If the injured person does not need to go to a doctor,
       n Sending two walkers to get them
                                                                      stay with them until they are ready to continue. Provide
    2. Assess the injured person                                      them with appropriate first aid kit items
    3. Reassure the injured person and rest of the group           5. Write an incident report, get witness statements
    4. Call an ambulance, either by mobile phone or nearest           and photos.
       phone. Know status of injured person and your
       location so the ambulance can find you
    5. Cover person with a coat or a space blanket
    6. Stick together as a group
    7. Choose someone to go with the injured person to the
       hospital
    8. Write an incident report, get witness statements
       and photos.




                                                                                                                          | 55 |
| 56 |
         Walking for Pleasure attendance sheet
         (Must be completed by ALL walkers at each walk)
         Walk                                                                          Walk date                                 Club


         Walk Leaders                                                                                                            Start                                                        Finish


         Your signature below demonstrates your acknowledgment and agreement to the following waiver. I attest that I am physically fit and agree to follow the route set by the Walk Leader with due care and consideration of other
         pedestrians and road users. As a participant in the Walking for Pleasure Program, I hereby release the Sport and Recreation, its employees, agents and contractors, and will not hold them liable for any injury incurred during or as a
         result of my participation in this walk.

             No      Walker’s name (please print)                                Signature                                     Emergency contact name and number                                                 Start time         Finish time




                                                  Total number of walk participants on this day                      On completion forward to your local Regional Office at the end of every month.
                                                 Walking for Pleasure

Tamworth Happy                                   Walking is good for you
Wanderers Club                                   An active way of life is important to us all. It just takes at least 30-minutes
We meet regularly at Bicentennial Park from
8am for 30 and 60 minute walks. See over         of moderate physical activity every day to help you to feel more confident,
for details of all our upcoming walks.           control your weight, have healthier blood cholesterol, lower blood pressure
                                                 and stronger bones.

Taking part                                      Walking is great for general fitness, as well as being a safe, cheap and convenient
Walk at a pace that suits you                    way to exercise.
When participating in a Walking for Pleasure
program, walk at a pace that is comfortable
for you and stay behind the guide. If you        About Walking for Pleasure clubs
become tired, stop and rest. If you leave        Walking on your own is good exercise, but walking with friends is social and
the walk, notify the guide first.
                                                 enjoyable. Walking for Pleasure is a Sport and Recreation program which promotes
                                                 regular walking with a group.
Walk levels                                      There are Walking for Pleasure clubs all around NSW that walk regularly in places
Very Easy                                        such as National Parks, places of historical interest, beaches and your local area.
    Suitable for wheelchairs and prams.
                                                 Anyone is welcome to take part in Walking for Pleasure and it’s free to join.
Easy
    Relatively gentle grades and good
                                                 Going away from home and still like to walk?
    surfaces. Suited to most people.
                                                 Sport and Recreation has Walking for Pleasure groups all over NSW.
Medium
    Includes rough or steep sections. Could      Call us for more information.
    require some climbing over natural
    obstacles.
                                                 Conditions
Hard                                             Participants are advised that it is a condition of their participation in any Walking for
    Strenuous walks involving steep ascents
    or descents over rougher terrain. Suited     Pleasure activity that they do so at their own risk. Sport and Recreation and any
    to fit and experienced walkers.              activity leaders or coordinators do not accept any responsibility for any loss, damage
                                                 or injury to any participant howsoever such loss, damage or injury may arise or be
                                                 caused. Walkers should consult their GP before commencing any form of physical
What to wear                                     activity.
n   Light, loose and comfortable clothing
    Flat and well cushioned shoes
n

n   Broad brimmed hat and sunglasses
                                                 Stay active
n   SPF 30+ sunscreen.                           Sport and Recreation runs other programs to help you stay active, including golf lessons,
                                                 aquafitness and holidays at our sport and recreation centres. Call us for more information.
                                                 For deaf, hearing or speech impaired people only, TTY (02) 9006 3701.
What to bring
n   Lightweight back pack
n   Water
n   Wet weather gear.



Wet weather
Walks may be cancelled if the weather is poor.
If in doubt, contact the Walk Leaders listed.


For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
                                                                                                                                       | 57 |
Upcoming walks 2008 – Tamworth Happy Wanderers Club
Date                 Day                    Destination and return        Walk condition     Contact person and number
20 Mar               Thursday               Mystery                    Easy                 Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
23 Mar               Sunday                 Hockey Fields              Easy                 Peata Hoban                 XXXX   XXXX
25 Mar               Tuesday                Gipps Street               Medium               Molly Burke                 XXXX   XXXX
27 Mar               Thursday               Anzac Park                 Easy                 Judy Lewis                  XXXX   XXXX
30 Mar               Sunday                 * Lions Park               Easy                 Janet Chandler              XXXX   XXXX
1 Apr                Tuesday                Mystery                    Medium               Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
3 Apr                Thursday               Hockey Fields              Easy                 Judy Lewis                  XXXX   XXXX
6 Apr                Sunday                 The Heights                Easy                 Daphne Johnston             XXXX   XXXX
8 Apr                Tuesday                Mystery                    Easy                 Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
10 Apr               Thursday               BMX                        Easy                 Marie Trinder               XXXX   XXXX
13 Apr               Sunday                 Heritage                   Easy                 Norma Connors               XXXX   XXXX
15 Apr               Tuesday                Southgate                  Easy                 Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
17 Apr               Thursday               Treloar Park               Medium               Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
20 Apr               Sunday                 Walking Track              Easy                 Peata Hoban                 XXXX   XXXX
22 Apr               Tuesday                Shopping World             Easy                 Judy Lewis                  XXXX   XXXX
24 Apr               Thursday               King George Avenue         Easy                 Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
27 Apr               Sunday                 Bridge Street              Easy                 Daphne Johnston             XXXX   XXXX
29 Apr               Tuesday                Mystery                    Easy                 Judy Lewis                  XXXX   XXXX
1 May                Thursday               Treloar Park               Easy                 Marie Trinder               XXXX   XXXX
4 May                Sunday                 * Anzac Park               Easy                 Janet Chandler              XXXX   XXXX
6 May                Tuesday                Mystery                    Easy                 Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
8 May                Thursday               Walking Track              Easy                 Molly Burke                 XXXX   XXXX
11 May               Sunday                 * Viaduct Park             Easy                 Norma Connors               XXXX   XXXX
13 May               Tuesday                Hockey Fields              Easy                 Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
15 May               Thursday               Gipps Street               Medium               Molly Burke                 XXXX   XXXX
18 May               Sunday                 * Macca’s Marius Street    Medium               Peata Hoban                 XXXX   XXXX
20 May               Tuesday                Mystery                    Easy                 Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
22 May               Thursday               Anzac Park                 Easy                 Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
25 May               Sunday                 * Golf Club                Easy                 Daphne Johnston             XXXX   XXXX
27 May               Tuesday                Walking Track              Easy                 Molly Burke                 XXXX   XXXX
29 May               Thursday               Anzac Park                 Medium               Judy Lewis                  XXXX   XXXX
1 Jun                Sunday                 Heritage                   Easy                 Janet Chandler              XXXX   XXXX
3 Jun                Tuesday                Mystery                    Easy                 Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
5 Jun                Thursday               Southgate                  Easy                 Marie Trinder               XXXX   XXXX
8 Jun                Sunday                 * Macca’s Marius Street    Medium               Norma Connors               XXXX   XXXX
10 Jun               Tuesday                Mystery                    Easy                 Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
12 Jun               Thursday               Treloar Park               Easy                 Molly Burke                 XXXX   XXXX
15 Jun               Sunday                 * Allawah Street           Easy                 Peata Hoban                 XXXX   XXXX
17 Jun               Tuesday                King George Avenue         Easy                 Judith Jeffrey              XXXX   XXXX
19 Jun               Thursday               Shopping world             Easy                 Molly Burke                 XXXX   XXXX
22 Jun               Sunday                 * Nazareth House           Easy                 Daphne Johnston             XXXX   XXXX
24 Jun               Tuesday                Walking Track              Easy                 Marie Trinder               XXXX   XXXX
26 Jun               Thursday               Mystery                    Easy                 Ros Elliott                 XXXX   XXXX
29 Jun               Sunday                 Longyard                   Easy                 Janet Chandler              XXXX   XXXX
* Meet at Bicentennial Park and then drive to destination. Please note slower/easier walks are available on all days.
In the event of wet weather a walk will be conducted around the CBD.
Please note: Walks start at 8am.


For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
| 58 |
                                                         Walking for Pleasure – Walk Leader’s training manual




Sample media release
 Walking for Pleasure in Grenfell

 A Walking for Pleasure group has been formed in Grenfell and will commence their first walk on
 22 August 2007.

 Walking for Pleasure is a program of Sport and Recreation and is designed to increase activity levels
 and promote socialisation amongst older adults.

 Research has found that 30 minutes of moderate activity on most days of the week will lead to a
 healthier and more active lifestyle.

 Grenfell Walk Leader, Julie Who, said the walk will cater for most members of the community and is
 graded as “easy”.

 “Walking is a fun, inexpensive form of exercise and is a great way to meet people,” Ms Who said.

 “The walk will be 3km in length and will take in many sites of our beautiful town,” Ms Who said.

 The walking group will meet every Wednesday, commencing at the corner of March and Edwards
 Streets, Grenfell, at 9.00am.

 Everyone is invited to participate in these walks.




 For further information contact
 Julie Who
 Grenfell Walking Club
 Phone (02) 5555 5555.




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Walking for Pleasure
Walk Leader’s training declaration
 Personal Details
Name                                                                                                               Date of birth
                                                                                                                            /       /                 Male      Female
Address                                                                                                            Phone
                                                                                                                    Home

                                                                       Postcode                                     Work/mobile
Email


Name of walking club




 Privacy statement
Sport and Recreation and the walking club will collect and store information you voluntarily provide to enable processing of registrations for walking programs. The
information will be provided to the Walk Leaders of the program and their supervisors, where necessary and you consent to this disclosure.
If you have been asked for information regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent and cultural background, this information is voluntary and is being
compiled for statistical purposes only. Any information provided by you will be stored on a database that will only be accessed by authorised personnel and is subject
to privacy restrictions. The information will only be used for the purpose for which it is collated.
Any information provided by you to Sport and Recreation and the walking club can be accessed by you and updated during standard office hours by contacting us on
13 13 02 or by writing to your Regional Office.


 Training declaration
I have read and understood the Walking for Pleasure Walk Leader’s training manual provided to me as part of the Walking for Pleasure program to which I have
registered. I also understand that as a Walk Leader I am a volunteer and that the contents of the Walking for Pleasure Walk Leader’s training manual only applies to
the Sport and Recreation’s Walking for Pleasure program.
I undertake that I will abide by all of the policies and procedures contained in the Walking for Pleasure Walk Leader’s training manual together with any directions
provided by representatives of the NSW Department of the Arts, Sport and Recreation.
Signature                                                                                                          Date




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
| 60 |
                                      Walking for Pleasure
                                      information sheet

                                      Walking for Pleasure (WFP) is a program of Sport and Recreation.
                                      It promotes regular walking as a fun, easy and social form of
                                      exercise that is suitable for adults of all ages.
                                      A WFP club consists of adults from the local community who have a common interest in
                                      walking. The club is run by its members and adults from the community who may volunteer
                                      to assist.
                                      Sport and Recreation provides administrative support to those clubs that are registered and
                                      follow the scheduled procedures. It is recommended that before starting any physical activity
                                      program, such as walking, that you consult your local GP.
                                      Walking shoes and clothes
                                      The most important piece of walking equipment is a pair of sturdy, comfortable, lightweight
                                      walking shoes. Comfortable, well-fitting socks (usually a cotton blend is best) will help you
                                      avoid sore or blistered feet.
                                      It is important also to wear light, loose layers of comfortable clothes, covering as much skin
                                      as possible, especially in the summer months. Walkers should also wear a hat, sunglasses
                                      and sunscreen.
                                      Why be active?
                                      One of the best ways of living a long and healthy life is through regular exercise.
                                      Regular physical activity helps to reduce the effects of ageing such as limited mobility,
                                      balance, flexibility and muscle strength. It also decreases the risk of heart problems and
                                      osteoporosis.
                                      Research shows that older adults with active lifestyles are often as healthy as less active
                                      people aged 15 years younger.
                                      Participating in a walking group has many benefits – it provides:
                                      Motivation to walk        – It is much easier to get motivated and walk regularly when you
                                                                  have to meet someone to go for a walk.
                                      A social activity         – You are able to chat with other people while walking.
                                      Safety in numbers         – Many people do not feel safe walking on their own, as they may
                                                                  be afraid of dogs or concerned about falling.
                                      An organised activity     – Many people prefer to have a set organised physical activity,
                                                                  rather than creating their own.
                                      New people to meet        – WFP clubs provide a great network of participants with similar
                                                                  interests and provide people with a chance to meet others.
                                      BEST OF ALL – IT’S FREE!




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
                                                                                                                                   | 61 |
                                      Walking for Pleasure information sheet


                                      Participants’ insurance cover
                                      Sport and Recreation does NOT provide insurance cover to participants. Participants are
                                      recommended to take out their own personal accident insurance.
                                      Risk waiver
                                      Please note that although Sport and Recreation and its service providers attempt to
                                      minimise any risk of personal injury within practical boundaries, accidents do happen and all
                                      physical activities carry the risk of personal injury.
                                      Walk Leaders have been trained to minimise the risks associated with walking, however,
                                      accidents may occur. By participating in the Walking for Pleasure program walkers
                                      acknowledge that there is an inherent risk in physical activities that will be undertaken
                                      as part of the program and they accept that they participate at their own risk. Sport and
                                      Recreation accepts no liability whatsoever for injuries suffered in connection with or as a
                                      result of the Walking for Pleasure program. It is recommended that participants obtain their
                                      own personal insurance cover.
                                      First aid
                                      Walk Leaders are encouraged to gain first aid training and only carry a first aid kit that
                                      reflects their expertise.
                                      For more information contact Sport and Recreation on 13 13 02 or visit
                                      www.dsr.nsw.gov.au




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
| 62 |
                                      Walker checklist

                                      Getting started as a participant
                                      Before starting any form of exercise you should consult your doctor, particularly if you:
                                      	     n	   Smoke
                                      	     n	   Experience chest problems eg. asthma or bronchitis
                                      	     n	   Are overweight
                                      	     n	   Have back trouble or a slipped disc
                                      	     n	   Have not been exercising during the last six months
                                      	     n	   Have high blood pressure
                                      	     n	   Have heart disease or a history of chest pain
                                      	     n	   Have diabetes
                                      	     n	   Have recently recovered from an illness or operation
                                      	     n	   Are worried that exercise may affect any other aspect of your health.
                                      On the day of the walk
                                      	     n	   If you are not well, do not go on the walk. Wait until you have recovered.
                                      	     n	   If you had intended to go on the walk but can’t, let the Walk Leader know.
                                      	     n	   Wear appropriate clothing, footwear, hat, sunglasses and sunscreen.
                                      	     n	   Bring your own water to drink.
                                      	     n	   Do not bring valuables to the walk.
                                      	     n	   Bring only as much money as you will need.
                                      	     n	   If a special walk has been arranged, bring food or refreshments.
                                      	     n	   Arrive in plenty of time to allow for warm up and stretching.
                                      At the start of the walk
                                      	     n	   Sign the attendance sheet.
                                      	     n	   If you are a new walker, complete the registration form.
                                      	     n	   Warm up your muscles and do stretching exercises.
                                      	     n	   Carry your own water bottle.
                                      	     n	 Listen
                                               	       to the instructions of the Walk Leader about the route and emergency
                                                 procedures.
                                      On the walk
                                      	     n	   Walk at the pace that suits you.
                                      	     n	   Drink plenty of water during the walk, particularly in hot weather.
                                      	     n	   Stay with the group. Don’t go off alone or stray from the route.
                                      	     n	   If feeling unwell during the walk, slow down and inform the Walk Leader.
                                      	     n	   Talk to other walkers.
                                      	     n	   Enjoy yourself.




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
                                                                                                                                  | 63 |
                                      Walker checklist
                                      At the end of the walk
                                      	     n	   Cool down and stretch.
                                      	     n	 Inform
                                               	       the leader of any injuries sustained during the walk and, if needed, help them
                                                 to complete the report.
                                      	     n	   Provide feedback to the Walk Leader.
                                      	     n	   Do not leave until a head count has been done.
                                      	     n	   Find out the details of the next walk so you can be active again.
                                      What to wear
                                      Shoes
                                      The most important piece of walking equipment is a pair of sturdy, comfortable, lightweight
                                      walking shoes. If your feet feel good you will walk well and continue walking. When
                                      choosing the right walking shoes, check for:
                                      	     n	 Shoes
                                               	        with a tough outer layer of rubber and a soft mid-sole that runs the full
                                                 length of the sole
                                      	     n	   Uppers of high quality, breathable material, such as leather and/or nylon mesh
                                      	     n	 Fastenings:
                                               	              Lace up shoes are preferable. Shoes need to be fastened by elastic,
                                                 Velcro or laces
                                      	     n	   Collar: Comfortable padded heel collar
                                      	     n	   Heel: A firm heel that is slightly raised and holds your foot well for stability
                                      	     n	   Substantial arch supports
                                      	     n	   Entire shoe should be designed to absorb shock
                                      	     n	   Toe box: Your toes should be able to spread freely and not feel squashed or tight
                                      	     n	   Sole: Designed specifically to enhance smooth heel to toe motion.
                                      Clothing
                                      	     n	 It
                                               	   is important to wear light, loose layers of comfortable clothing, covering as much
                                                 skin as possible, especially in the summer months.
                                      	     n	 Comfortable,
                                               	                well-fitting socks (usually cotton blend is best) will help walkers avoid
                                                 sore or blistered feet.
                                      	     n	 Walkers
                                               	         should also wear a hat, sunglasses and sunscreen when walking in
                                                 the outdoors.




For more information
call 13 13 02 or visit www.dsr.nsw.gov.au
| 64 |

								
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