REPORT OF THE - Prince George's County_ Maryland by wanghonghx

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									        REPORT OF THE




       PRESENTED TO THE
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY COUNCIL

        FEBRUARY 2007
  BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE
HIGH STAKES TESTING REPORT


       February 2007
                   SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TO
            COUNTY COUNCIL CHAIR, HON. THOMAS E. DERNOGA
                AND VICE-CHAIR, HON. CAMILLE A. EXUM

      ALL THE MEMBERS OF THE PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY COUNCIL

            COMMITTEE CHAIR, HON. SAMUEL H. DEAN, DISTRICT 6

                  COMMITTEE VICE-CHAIR, JACOB A. ANDOH

ALL THE MEMBERS OF THE PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY COUNCIL’S BLUE RIBBON
                 COMMITTEE ON HIGH-STAKES TESTING

  RESIDENTS OF PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY AND OTHER MARYLAND COUNTIES WHO TESTIFIED OR
                           PROVIDED VERBAL OR WRITTEN INPUT

                SEVERAL EXPERTS WHO PRESENTED BEFORE THE COMMITTEE
              (OR OTHERWISE ASSISTED IN THE COMMITTEE’S DELIBERATIONS):

                  DR. SKIP SANDERS, ASSISTANT SUPT. OF EDUCATION, MSDE
                                  DR. GARY HEATH, MSDE
                               MR. KENNETH BERNSTEIN, ERHS
          DR. GAIL SUNDERMAN, LWVB, HARVARD UNIVERSITY CIVIL RIGHTS PROJECT
                          DR. RONALD WILLIAMS, PRESIDENT, PGCC
                             PROFESSOR WILLIAM KNIGHT, PGCC
                               MR. DARREN BROWN, CPGCPTA
                                MS. SHELLEY JALLOW, PGCPS
                          DR. WILLIAM HITE, CHIEF OF STAFF, PGCPS
                           DR. LEROY TOMPKINS, PGCPS (RETIRED)
                       MS. MO BLASKO, PARENT CONTRIBUTOR

 MR. HOWARD BURNETT, DEPUTY CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

              MRS. PATRICIA WHITE, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

 PRINCE GEORGE’S REGIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT GOVERNMENT (PGRASG).

MRS. DONNA J. DEAN, FACILITATOR/CO-CONVENOR, DISTRICT 6 COMMUNITY FORUMS
                                  ON HSA

        MS. DONNA BRADSHAW-PELOTE, AND MR. TROY BROCKETT, OFFICE OF
                         ACCOUNTABILITY/TESTING

  MRS. YVONNE CRAWFORD AND MR. WILLIAM BARNES, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S OFFICE,
                                REGION III

        REV. JOHN JENKINS, PASTOR, FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF GLENARDEN, MD




                                          i
       SPECIAL THANKS TO THE STAFF OF THE COMMITTEE:

      Sandra Eubanks, HEHS Committee Director, saeubanks@co.pg.md.us
             Gloria Hall, Administrative Aide, gchall@co.pg.md.us
         Edwin H. Brown, Committee Assistant ehbrown@co.pg.md.us
      Carmen Jackson-Brown, Legislative Officer, cnjbrown@co.pg.md.us
               Larry E. Cain, Staff Auditor, lecain1@co.pg.md.us

Prince George’s County Office of Information Technology and Communications


                             Reggie J. Stewart
                             Dwight L. Talley
                             Calvert R. Smith
                              Rick E. Brush

                          Committee Consultant:
                            Ms. Nycal Anthony
               President/CEO, Alliance for Quality Education
                          nanthony@aqe-inc.com




              COPIES OF THIS REPORT CAN BE OBTAINED FROM:

   HEALTH, EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES (HEHS) COMMITTEE
                 PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY COUNCIL
                 14741 GOVERNOR ODEN BOWIE DRIVE
                      UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
                              (301) 952-4525
    http://www.co.pg.md.us/Government/LegislativeBranch/CountyCouncil/




                                    ii
                               TABLE OF CONTENTS
    1. Blue Ribbon Committee
       1.1   Origin …………………………………………………………………..…..1
       1.2   Resolution CR-62-2006 ………………………………………………..…..2
       1.3   Committee Members Biographies …………………………………….…...4
    2. Executive Summary
       2.1 Preamble ……………………………………………………………………..13
       2.2 Summary ……………………………………………………………………..14
    3. Background ……………………………………………………………………….16
    4. Methodology ……………………………………………………………………...17
    5. Findings
       5.1   HSA Results ………………………………………………………………19
       5.2   Specific Findings ………………………………………………………….22
       5.3   Major Findings ……………………………………………………………31
       5.4   Legal Challenges to High Stakes Testing …………………………………41
       5.5   Economic ………………………………………………………………….49
       5.6   Public Safety & Welfare …………………………………………………..56
6   Recommendations
       6.1   Rationale …………………………………………………………………..57
       6.2   Research Basis …………………………………………………………….58
       6.3   Detailed Recommendations Chart …………………………………………61
7   Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………..71
8   Appendices

       A. Maryland HSA Fact Sheet ……………………………………………………A-2

       B. Maryland Graduation Requirements ………………………………………….A-3

       C. HSA Tables and Charts ……………………………………………………….A-5

       D. 2006 HSA Detailed Results ……………………………………………..…..A-95

       E. HSA Survey Report ………………………………………………………...A-130

References……………………………………………………………………………...A-182



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            MEMBERS OF THE PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY COUNCIL’S
             BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING




Hon. Samuel H. Dean, Committee Chairman & Ms. Sharon Howard, Education Liaison for
Councilman, District 6                    Hon. Councilman David Harrington, District 5

Mr. Jacob Andoh, Committee Vice-Chairman,            Ms. Carol Kilby, PGCEA
Co-Chair, MLK Education Coalition; Chair,
LACA Education Committee; Director, Ernest           Dr. Skip Sanders, Assistant State
Everett Just Foundation, Inc., (“For The             Superintendent, MSDE
Advancement of Science Among Minority                (Alternate: Dr. Gary Heath, Chief
Youth”)                                              Accountability Officer, MSDE)

Hon. Gwendolyn Britt, Senator, Maryland              Ms. Marsha Smith, NEA
Legislature                                          (Representing Dr. Reg Weaver, NEA
                                                     President)
Dr. Sylvester Conyers, Principal, ERHS,
(Representing Principals’ Union)                     Dr. Beatrice Tignor, Chairman, Board of
                                                     Education
Dr. John Deasy, Superintendent, PGCPS                (Alternate: Mr. Howard Stone, Vice Chair,
(Alternate: Dr. William Hite, Chief of Staff,        Board of Education)
PGCPS)
                                                     Dr. Leroy Tompkins, PGCPS (retired)
Dr. Walter Dozier, Office of the County
Executive                                            Mrs. Andrea Toney-Thomas, PCAB and
                                                     SECAC-PG
Hon. Carolyn J. B. Howard, Delegate & Chair,         (Alternate: Dr. Gail Voigt, SECAC-PG)
County Delegation to MD Legislature
                                                     Mrs. Charlotte Underwood, CPCGPTA
Dr. Donna Muncey, Acting Chief                       (Alternate: Ms. Catherine Taggart-Ross)
Accountability Officer, PGCPS




                                                iv
                          KEY TERMS AND ACRONYMS
                           (AS USED IN THIS REPORT)

AERA-American Educational Research Association
APA-American Psychological Association
ATOP-Alternative Teaching Opportunity Program
Alt-HSA-Alternative High School Assessments
Comp-HSA-Comparable High School Assessments
CEP-Center for Educational Policy
CPGCPTA-Council of Prince George’s County PTAs
FARMS-Free and Reduced Meals
HSA-High School Assessments
IEP-Individual Education Plan
LEP-Limited English Proficient
LEA-Local Education Agency
MABE-Maryland Association of Boards of Education
MEC-Maryland Education Coalition
MSBE-State Board of Education
MSDE-Maryland State Department of Education
MSTA-Maryland State Teachers Association
NCLB-No Child Left Behind
NCME-National Council on Measurement in Education
NEA- National Education Association
PGCPS-Prince Georges County Public Schools
PGC-Prince Georges County
PGCC-Prince Georges County Council
PGCEA-Prince Georges County Educators Association
PTA-Parent Teacher Association
VSC-Voluntary School Curriculum




                                           v
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


1. Blue Ribbon Committee
1.1 Origin
   Beginning with all students in the Maryland Public School System’s 2009 high school
   graduating class, the Maryland State Board of Education has mandated (subject to a
                   MSBE policy review which will occur in 2008) that:

     To receive a Maryland high school diploma and graduate from high school, each high
       school senior MUST either: (i) pass all 4 HSAs in Algebra, Biology, English and
    Government, or (ii) obtain a combined minimum score of 1602 on all 4 HSAs or (iii) use
                    AP/IB test scores as substitutes for one or more HSAs

The Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing was created by a Resolution of the Prince
George’s County Council to further examine the High School Assessments, their impact on the
students, and the economic health of Prince George’s County and to consider appropriate
recommendations relating thereto.

In 2004, the members of the State Board of Education voted to make the passing of the Maryland
HSAs as a high school graduation requirement starting with the class of 2009 (to affect students
who entered high school Grade 9 in the fall of 2005) and all students and classes thereafter. In
2008, the State Board of Education is slated to revisit this mandatory requirement to either make
revisions to it or leave it unchanged.

This report is submitted to the Prince George’s County Council not only to conclude the work of
the Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing but also to sound a call to arms to the people
and government of Prince George’s County and the State of Maryland, to address the issue of
youth who would be leaving our public schools after failing the HSAs and possessing no high
school diploma.

Some county (and state) youth may not pass the HSAs but we, as a people, would have failed
them if we do not act with great foresight and great resolve to address the needs of these
youth--our capable though uneducated, under-educated, and sometimes mis-educated
youth--because they could become a major, long-term liability come year 2009 and beyond, with
incrementally escalating consequences, educationally, politically, economically, and socially.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


1.2 Resolution CR-62-2006
          COUNTY COUNCIL OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
                          2006 Legislative Session

 Resolution No.                 CR-62-2006
 Proposed by                    Council Member Dean
                                Council Members Dean, Peters, Knots, Exum and
 Introduced by
                                Harrington
 Co-Sponsors
 Date of Introduction           July 11, 2006

                                         RESOLUTION

A RESOLUTION concerning Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing for the purpose of
amending CR-42-2006 and CR-48-2006 by further increasing the membership of the Blue
Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing.
WHEREAS, the Maryland State Department of Education governs the criteria for which
Maryland students must satisfy in order to receive a Maryland High School Diploma;
WHEREAS, High School Assessments developed by the Maryland Department of Education
tests students in four core subjects: English, Government, Algebra/Data Analysis, and Biology;
WHEREAS, COMAR 13A.03.02.09, mandates that high school students in the graduating class
of 2009 and thereafter, are required to earn a satisfactory score, as defined by subsection B.(3) of
the Regulation on the High School Assessments as a prerequisite to earning a Maryland High
School Diploma;
WHEREAS, the County Council desires to further examine the High School Assessments and
their impact on the students in the Prince George’s County Public Schools and consider
appropriate recommendations relating thereto; and
WHEREAS, Section 506 of the Charter provides that the Council may appoint, for designated
periods, one or more temporary advisory boards of citizens of the County who shall assist in the
consideration of County policies and programs.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the County Council of Prince George's County,
Maryland, that Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing is created and charged with the
responsibility to:
   1. Evaluate whether the High School Assessments meet standards of quality and validity;
   2. Analyze the one size fits all approach to high stakes testing methodology and its effect on
      the student population in the Prince George’s County Public Schools; and
   3. Determine whether there are practical alternatives to high stakes testing.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing shall
have a total of [13] 15 members comprised of:


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


   1. 1 member appointed by the County Executive;
   2. [3] 5 members appointed by the County Council, one of whom shall be designated as the
       Chairman;
   3. 1 member appointed by the Maryland State Department of Education;
   4. 1 member appointed by the Chair of the Prince George’s County Senate Delegation;
   5. 1 member appointed by the Chair of the Prince George’s County House Delegation;
   6. 2 members appointed by the Prince George’s County Public Schools;
   7. 1 member appointed by the National Education Association;
   8. 1 member appointed by the Prince George’s County Educator’s Association;
   9. 1 member appointed by the Association of Supervisory and Administrative School
       Personnel; and
   10. The Chairman of the Prince George’s County Board of Education or their designee.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing shall
present its recommendations to the County Council and the County Executive no later than
October 3, 2006.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Council Administrator shall provide appropriate staff
support to the Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing.

Adopted this 11th day of July, 2006.

                                             COUNTY COUNCIL OF PRINCE
                                             GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND



                                       BY:   _________________________________
                                              Thomas E. Dernoga
                                              Chairman
ATTEST:



______________________________
Redis C. Floyd
Clerk of the Council




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


1.3 Committee Member Biographies
Committee Chair, Samuel H. Dean was elected by an overwhelming margin (93% of the vote)
to his first four-year term on the Prince George's County Council to represent constituents’ areas
of South Bowie, Capitol Heights, District Heights, Forestville, Kettering, Largo, Mitchellville,
and Upper Marlboro. He served as Chairman of the Prince George’s County Council for the
2005 Legislative Year, and as Vice Chair of the Council for Legislative Year 2004.

Mr. Dean’s current committee assignments include serving as the Chairman of the Planning,
Zoning and Economic Development (PZED) Committee, a member of the Public Safety and
Fiscal Management (PSFM) Committee, the Council Representative to the Board of Education,
Co-Council Representative to the Economic Development Corporation Board of Directors, and a
Council Liaison to the General Assembly. Councilman Dean and his wife, Donna, sponsored
several forums to highlight the impact of the High School Assessment (HSA) Tests on students.
As a result, he proposed and his colleagues unanimously co-sponsored the establishment of a
Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing (CR-62-2006), to study alternatives to the
impact of such tests. Councilman Dean was appointed as Chairman of that Committee.

Councilman Dean is a retired Federal Government Senior Human Resources Manager, and
served 10 years in the U. S. Air Force. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Management
and Technology from the University of Maryland, University College, College Park.

Mr. Dean is the Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the historic, 140-year-old Vermont
Avenue Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. He was a civic leader and activist in many
Council-related areas for 12 years prior to becoming an elected official.

Councilman Dean is a native of Chicago, Illinois. He has been a resident of Prince George's
County since 1975. Councilman Dean and his wife have two children, and two grandchildren.

Committee Vice-Chair, Jacob Andoh, MS, MPH, CPM is a Biomedical Engineer, Information
Technology Program Manager, and Public Health Researcher. He is also a Certified Public
Manager, Certified IT Professional, member of the National Society of Black Engineers-AEDC,
Adjunct Assistant Professor at University of Maryland-University College in Adelphi, Maryland
and also at Howard University’s Graduate School of Social Work in Washington where he teaches
Health Information Systems Management, Data Analysis, Computer methods, and Public Health.
He served on the PGC Task Force on High School Capacity Alternatives (2004) and currently
serves on the Prince George’s County Council’s Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing
(2006). He is a member of the Transforming Government Advisory Board (TGAB), the DC
Certified Public Managers Association (DCCPMA), the American Planning Association (APA) and
the American Public Health Association (APHA).

In the civic arena, he is recipient of the “Men Who Make a Difference” Award (1998), PGCPS
Volunteer of the Year Award (2001), Delta Sigma Theta chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority,
Inc.’s “Village Keeper Award” (2002), and Exemplary Citizen Award (2004) from the Lake Arbor
Foundation, Inc., Lake Arbor Civic Association and the Ernest Everett Just Foundation, Inc. He is
Chairperson of the Lake Arbor Civic Association’s Education Committee, Director of the Ernest
Everett Just Foundation, Inc. (“for the Advancement of Science Among Minority Youth”), founding


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


member of the Mitchellville-Largo-Kettering (MLK) Education Coalition, member of the Parents
Alliance for Education, member of the Walk-Through-Life Mentoring Program for adolescents in
Southeast Washington, and a Volunteer Mathematics and Science Tutor for high school and college
students. He is a founding member of the Association for the Advancement of African People
(AAAP) and a member of the Africa Solidarity Council (ASC).

He is co-author with Mr. Samuel H. Dean of the Central Prince George’s County study entitled
“Community Survey of Education and Schools, 1998,” co-author with Dr. Phil Vernon and Beverly
Paisley of “Elderly Surgical Use rates in New York State, 1984” co-author with Dr. Samuel
Ndubuisi of “Black-White Differentials in Prostate Cancer Morbidity and Mortality in DC, 1985-
1992” and sole author of several research studies including the “District of Columbia Primary Care
(DCPC) Study, 1985-2005: An Analytic Study of the Need and Demand for Primary Health Care”
and “Profiles of Alternate Care Patients in New York State, 1984.”

He is an avid writer and reader, with primary literary interests in ancient history, world religions,
African history, Science and Mathematics Education, and Minority Achievement and Excellence in
Academics. He is married to Joan Wright-Andoh and they have two sons, Kwesi Richard and Kofi
John, currently in Prince George’s Public schools.

Senator Gwendolyn Britt, representing District 47 in Prince George’s County Maryland, has
been a member of the Maryland State Senate since January 2003. She serves on the Education,
Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, and the Joint Committee on Administrative,
Executive and Legislative Review.

Senator Britt serves on various commissions and task forces including: State Advisory Council
on Hepatitis C, Maryland Commission on Disabilities, Task Force to Study the Impact of
Autoimmune Disease in Maryland, Task Force to Implement Holocaust, Genocide, Human
Rights and Tolerance Education, Task Force to Convene a Summit on Civic Literacy in
Maryland, and Task Force on School Safety.

Senator Britt was elected Secretary of the Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland in 2006, and
2nd Vice-President of Women Legislators of Maryland. She has been a member of the National
Conference of State Legislatures since 2003.

Senator Britt is a graduate of Bowie State University, with a Bachelor of Science degree in
Political Science. She has a Human Resources and Personnel Management background from
AT&T and Giant Food Inc. Senator Britt’s numerous awards include: Legislator of the Year,
Maryland Speech-Language Hearing Association, Outstanding Service Award – National
Coalition of 100 Black Women, Prince George’s County Chapter, Outstanding Service and
Leadership Award – Prince Georges’s County Educators’ Association and Prince George’s
County Municipal League.

Sylvester Conyers is now in his seventh year as Principal of Eleanor Roosevelt High School in
Greenbelt, Maryland. For the second year, he was elected as President of the High School
Principals’ Association for Prince George’s County Public Schools.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Mr. Conyers was born in Harlem in New York City and is a graduate of the New York City
Public School System. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology from Columbia
University. Mr. Conyers received his Masters degree in Administration and Supervision from
Bowie State University. He is currently working on completing his doctorate in educational
leadership from Nova Southwestern University.

Mr. Conyers teaching career started at DeMatha Catholic High School where he taught Biology,
Chemistry, Physics, Algebra, and Geometry as well as serving as Science Department
Chairperson. He was also a member of the DeMatha Executive Council.

Mr. Conyers came to Eleanor Roosevelt High School as a teacher and was quickly appointed to
the position of Coordinator and Assistant Principal. In 1997, Mr. Conyers was appointed
Principal of Benjamin Stoddert Middle School until 2000 when he returned to Eleanor Roosevelt
High School as Principal.

Dr. John Deasy, CEO, PGCPS
John Deasy is Chief Executive Officer of Prince George’s County Public Schools, Maryland’s
second largest school system and the nation’s 18th largest district. He leads an organization that
offers more than 133,000 children an innovative, technology-infused curriculum that has
produced significant academic gains.

Additionally, PGCPS provides a wide range of “FOCUS” programs, extended learning
opportunities, and support for special needs students, creating an environment in which all
students are able to obtain a quality education. This diverse, urban school system serves children
from 148 countries, speaking 140 different languages. More than 97,000 students are transported
safely to and from school each day, and nutritious meals are prepared for 75,000 children daily.

       Dr. Deasy has five core beliefs:

       1. Children are our business and they come first;
       2. Parents are our partners;
       3. Victory is in the classroom;
       4. Continuous improvement in teaching, leadership and accountability is the key to our
          success; and
       5. Every member of this community shares the responsibility for successful schools.

The Prince George’s County Board of Education unanimously approved his selection as schools
chief on March 2, 2006. His effective start date was May 1, 2006.

As Superintendent of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District in California, he led a
diverse student population. During his tenure, Dr. Deasy led district-wide reforms aimed at a
highly focused set of strategies on the improvement of teaching and learning.

These successful reforms have resulted in dramatic improvement of student achievement for all
categories of students and the closing of the achievement gap. All Title 1 schools are reporting
historically high student achievement and resulting in numerous national and state awards. In
addition, both in Santa Monica and elsewhere where Dr. Deasy has been a leader, he has led the

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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


development of standards-based administrator and teacher evaluation models, pay-for-
performance, staff development and leadership training, development of a data-driven system for
decision-making and implementation of research-based whole school reform initiatives. Most
notably has been the redesign of large high schools into small learning communities.

All of these successes were possible because of strong partnerships he developed with parents,
the community, the business community, the faith-based community and the State, Federal, and
local elected leaders. Having begun his work when the district was posting a multi-million dollar
operating surplus,, which is just one indicator of the accomplishments achieved through a highly
collaborative style of leadership.

Prior to this role, he served as Superintendent of the Coventry Public Schools in Rhode Island for
five years. Dr. Deasy also served as a high school sports, and served as an assistant high school
principal in New York.

He has and continues to be a faculty member in university doctoral programs in several states.
He earned a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Chemistry Education and a Master of Arts in
Education Administration from Providence College, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Education
from the University of Louisville.

Dr. Deasy is a Broad Fellow, has been a Annenberg Fellow, State Superintendent of the Year, a
presenter at numerous State and National conferences, a consultant to school districts
undertaking high school reform and district-wide systemic improvement initiatives, and serves
on numerous boards including Operation Public Education at the University of Pennsylvania and
The Change Leadership Group at Harvard. He works for many community and national
organizations as community service, including the National Diabetes Association and his local
parish. He is the author of numerous articles and research papers.

Dr Deasy is married and has three children. Mrs. Deasy, a nurse practitioner and program
manager in a diabetes clinic, is the author of Prevention and Education of Diabetes in the
African-American Community.

Dr. Walter L. Dozier is the Prince George's County Government Education Liaison and the
Special Assistant to the County’s Chief Administrative Officer, Dr. Jacqueline F. Brown.

He is responsible for operationalizing County Executive Jack Johnson’s education agenda. He
plans and coordinates the County Executive’s Education Summits on Parental and Family
Involvement and represents Mr. Johnson at various events throughout the Metro Washington
Region. Dr. Dozier is responsible for education policy formation for the Johnson Administration
and is the senior producer of the County Executive’s television program “Keeping It Livable.”

Born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, he earned a Bachelor’s of Business Administration from
Western Illinois University, a Master’s of Arts in Mass Communications from the University of
Illinois-Chicago and a Doctorate in Applied Anthropology from the University of South Florida.
He spent more than 10 years writing about cultural, socio-economic and education issues as a
print journalist before joining the Johnson Administration.


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           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Ms. Sharon Howard has been a resident of Prince George’s County since 1992. Since moving
into the county, she had been a volunteer working as a children and community advocate. She
has served on a number of committees and organizations in Prince George’s County and the
Prince George’s County Public Schools.

Ms. Howard’s background for 20 years has been in Marketing and the Real Estate Industry:
Licensed in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Ohio, and Maryland (GRI).

Ms. Howard has volunteered as a Girl Scout Leader in Ohio and Maryland. A Double Dutch
Coach for the Maryland State Double Dutch League, for the Ardmore and Glenarden
Community Centers (MNCPPC). She has served as the PTA and PTSA President and Vice
President in Ardmore Elementary School, DuVal High School, and Charles H. Flowers High
School (1994-2003). She has served as delegate to the Prince George’s County Council of
PTA’s.

In 2001, Ms. Howard developed a social manners etiquette curriculum to teach young girls and
boys, social manners at the Wayne Curry Sports and Learning Complex in Landover, Md. She
also introduced her curriculum in workshops for the preparation of the Turner Memorial AME
Church Debutante Ball located in Chillum, Md., the Ardmore Recreation Council located in
Springdale, Md. and the Children’s Treasures Resource Center located in Bowie, Md.

Ms. Howard has served on the Board of Directors of her homeowners association; Vista Estates
East Community Association, in Mitchellville, Md. for eight years; four years as President.

Ms. Howard is currently working with the Prince George’s County Council in Upper Marlboro
as the Education/Community Liaison to the Honorable Council Member David C. Harrington,
District 5. She has recently joined the Lobbying/Consultant Firm of G.S. Proctor and Associates
in Annapolis, Md.

Ms. Howard has two daughters who attended the Prince George’s County Schools; Kimberly, 22
years old, a graduate of DuVal High School (2002) GPA 4.17. She attended Johnson C. Smith
University in Charlotte, North Carolina and graduated Magna Cum Laude in 2006. Brittany
Howard age 17, Honor Roll Senior, graduating a year early with a GPA 3.69 from Charles H.
Flowers High School in 2006.

Ms. Howard is an active member of the NAACP Prince George’s Chapter and a member of the
League of Women Voters.

Ms. Carol Kilby, PGCEA
Carol Kilby is president of the Prince George’s County Educators” Association. She has been a
teacher in this county since 1970. Her whole classroom career was at Suitland High School
where she was an English teacher. Ms Kilby believes in teachers and the public education
system. It is the door to the future, the great leveler. Teaching is the most noble of all
professions and she has been very proud to be able to serve the teachers of the county and help
improve the quality of their lives. Carol was born and raised in rural Ohio, forming her values
from working on a farm. They have always stood her in good stead. She graduated from Kent
State University with a degree in Spanish in 1968, then continued on to get a Master’s in


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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


American Literature. Serving on the High Stakes Blue Ribbon Commission has been a
fascinating experience.

Dr. Skip Sanders, Assistant State Superintendent, MSDE

CURRENT POSITION:
     Deputy State Superintendent of Schools (February 1994-Present)

RESPONSIBILITIES:
     Assist State Superintendent of Schools in discharge of administrative responsibilities for the
     Maryland State Department of Education, including: personnel, budget, data and information
     management, and licensing areas.

PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE:
     Assistant State Superintendent in Certification and Accreditation, Maryland State Department of
     Education (1988-1994)
     Administrative Assistant to the State Superintendent and State Board of Education (1985-1988)
     Coordinator of the Maryland Professional Development Academy (a statewide training program
     for school principals, 1982-1985)
     Specialist in Instructional Television (1980-1982)
     English Department Chair, Forest Park High School (1977-1980)
     English Teacher, Forest Park High School (1975-1977)

OTHER ACTIVITIES:
    • A national consultant on multicultural education issues
    • Recording artist on 15 albums of liturgical and children’s values music for World Library
       Publication, with appearances in 43 states and Germany
    • Member of the Baltimore Workforce Investment Board since 1986; chair of its Youth Council
       since 1999

EDUCATION:
     Ed.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1980;
                 -


     S.T.L. St. Mary’s Seminary and University, 1969;
                     -


     B.A. (Philosophy) St. Mary’s Seminary and University, 1964
             -




PERSONAL:
    • Married to Pamela Sanders and the father of a daughter, Candace, and a son, Justin
    • Interests include completing a novel and writing in general, music appreciation, theater, and
      mentoring.

Ms. Marsha Smith, NEA (representing Dr. Reg Weaver, NEA President)

Marsha Smith of Olney, Md., a third generation educator who has spent 33 years championing
the cause of public education, says she became a teacher to work with students and change the
future.

“With my skills and my experience, I’ll be able to make a difference,’’ says Smith, a member of
the    National      Education        Association       (NEA)        Executive       Committee.



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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Smith, a health and physical education teacher and team leader at Earle B. Wood Middle School
in Rockville, Md., began serving on the Executive Committee in 2002. On Sept. 1, 2005, she
began her second term.

Teaching is part of her family heritage. Her grandmother, mother and father were educators.
Smith’s husband, Reynauld, teaches at Eastern High School in Washington, D.C. and her son,
Husan, is a special education instructional assistant in the Montgomery County (Md.) school
system. “Education is not just a profession to me. It’s in my blood and in my soul,’’ says Smith.

Eldest daughter in a military family, she calls herself “an Army Brat.” Smith has lived overseas
in Germany and Japan as well as in states from Kansas to Alabama, New Jersey to Maryland. “I
learned so much growing up and moving with my family. First, I learned “home” is where your
family is. I have a very close family that supports each other; Second, I learned to make friends
and still have friends that go back many years; Third, I learned to accept people as individuals,
don’t stereotype or make hasty assumptions. Each person has their own special qualities. Fourth,
I learned to pick up languages easily which has been a skill that I use today; Finally, I learned to
set goals for myself and work hard to achieve them.”

When talking about her NEA work, Smith says, “I am dedicated to working for the professional
and economic future of education professionals and ensuring the basic right that every student
has to a great public school. The world is changing and this gives NEA and our members, the
opportunity to engage and create enthusiasm about quality education.”

Smith, born in Fort Benning, Ga., is a graduate of Tuskegee University and a member of the Phi
Delta Kappa and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sororities. She joined her first NEA chapter 32 years ago
and has been active in state affiliates in New Jersey, Texas and Maryland. Her commitment
extends beyond the classroom. Smith has been a consultant on teenage health issues and school
health care systems. She is past Chair of Maryland’s Professional Standards Board and has
served on NEA’s Board of Directors. She has been a delegate to Education International.

The NEA Executive Committee, the governing body for the 2.8 million-member organization,
consists of nine members – three executive officers and six others elected at large.

Beatrice P. Tignor, Ed.D. was appointed as a Member and Chair to the Prince George’s County
Board of Education by former Maryland State Governor Parris N. Glendening and former
County Executive Wayne K. Curry on June 1, 2002. On June 21, 2004, she was re-elected to
serve as Chair to the Board of Education, effective July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2006.

Dr. Tignor is currently the Director of the Montgomery County Office of Procurement, is a
graduate of George Washington University, and has worked as an elementary classroom teacher,
a professor in higher education, and a senator and delegate in the Maryland General Assembly.

Bea Tignor’s commitment to her profession and her community has earned her many service
awards. To name a few: Educator of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Presidential Award,
Prince Georgian of the Year, Soroptimist Award, and most recently, the Seagram’s National
Award for Meritorious Service.


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Her community services include: Democratic National Committeewoman, Board Member of the
Association of Retarded Citizens, American Red Cross, Samaritans, and the Benjamin Mays
Research Center.

Dr. Tignor currently serves on the Governor’s Task Force on Care First; and is a former member
of the Prince George’s Community College Board of Trustees. She was also Chair of the Prince
George’s County Management Oversight Panel for Education.

As Director of Procurement in Montgomery County for eight years, she is responsible for the
procurement of over $600 million in goods, services, and construction. She is a member of the
Maryland Public Purchasing Association, past President of the Interagency Procurement
Coordinating Committee, and heads a successful minority business program awarding between
20 to 23 percent of the dollars to minority businesses.

Charlotte Underwood formerly served as PTSA President at G. James Gholson Middle School
in Prince George’s County. She also served two years as a District Representative with the
Council of Prince George’s County PTAs. Currently, Charlotte serves as Membership Chair for
Maryland PTA and President of the Kentland Civic Association.

Previously, Charlotte worked for 11 years with a national, nonprofit community development
organization. However, she resigned in May 2006 to become more involved with children’s
education in Prince George’s County. Currently, Charlotte works as a substitute teacher in
Prince George’s County while seeking full-time work.

Charlotte is a proud 2004 graduate of the Maryland Parent Leadership Institute, a Family Works
program that trains parents to effectively advocate on behalf of children. She actively pursues
opportunities to work on behalf of children and parents. She has worked with several focus
groups and has managed community and school-related projects that have raised awareness of
the challenges facing children in Prince George’s County. Charlotte, a single parent, has three
children — two daughters who are married with children of their own; and a teenage son.

Delegate Carolyn J. B. Howard has been a Member of the House of Delegates from 1988-90,
and since March 7, 1991. Deputy Speaker Pro Tem, 2007-. Member, Ways and Means
Committee, 1993- (education subcommittee, 1994; chair, housing & social issues subcommittee,
1995-96; chair, transportation subcommittee, 1997-); Joint Audit Committee (formerly Joint
Budget and Audit Committee), 1993-; Legislative Policy Committee, 2007-; Rules and
Executive Nominations Committee, 2007-. Member, Constitutional and Administrative Law
Committee, 1991-92; Joint Legislative Work Group on Community College Financing, 1994-95.
House Co-Chair, Joint Task Force on Payment Schedule of Property Taxes, 1995. Deputy
Majority Whip, 1995-99. Member, Special Joint Committee on Competitive Taxation and
Economic Development, 1996-97; Special Committee on School Enrollment Management,
1996-97; Special Committee on Rail Mergers, 1997; Speaker's Advisory Committee on
Legislative Redistricting, 2001-02; Joint Committee on the Selection of the State Treasurer,
2002, 2003, 2007. Chair, Prince George's County Delegation, 2003-06 (member, county affairs
committee). Member, Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland (formerly Maryland Legislative
Black Caucus), 1988- (chair, 1998-2000; member, redistricting committee, 2000-); Women
Legislators of Maryland, 1991- (2nd vice-chair, 1996-97; treasurer, 2000-01; 2nd vice-president,


                                             - 11 -
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


2001-02; 1st vice-president, 2003-04). Chair, House Democratic Caucus, 1999-. Member,
Maryland Veterans Caucus, 2005-. Member, National Conference of State Legislatures
(education committee). Director, District 3, National Black Caucus of State Legislators (special
assistant to President).  Member, Professional Standards and Teacher Education Advisory
Board, State Board of Education, 1986-87; Local Health Services Funding Review Committee,
1993; Maryland Comprehensive Transit Plan Transit Advisory Panel, 1998-99; Commission on
Education Finance, Equity, and Excellence, 1999-2002; Transit Policy Panel, 2000; Virginia-
Maryland-District of Columbia Joint Legislative Commission on Interstate Transportation, 2000-
03.

Born in DeLand, Florida. Florida A & M University, B.S. (home economics & education);
Bowie State College, M.Ed. Director, Department of Federal Programs, Prince George's County
Public Schools, 2000-; Supervisor, Title 1 Program, Prince George's County Public Schools,
1988-2000. [Title 1 Program is designed to improve teaching of and learning by children in
"high poverty" schools.] Principal, Prince George's County Public Schools, 1981-88. Member,
Prince George's County Democratic Central Committee, 1982-88. Delegate, Democratic Party
National Convention, 1984, 1992, 2000, 2004. Member, National and Maryland State
Associations of Elementary School Principals; Association of School-Based Administrators;
National Education Association; Maryland State Teachers Association; Delta Sigma Sorority.
Life member, National Council of Negro Women. Life member, Business and Professional
Women's Club. Treasurer, National Alumni Association, Florida A & M University, 1986-
(president, local chapter, 1988-93). Outstanding Service in Politics, Prince George's County
Educators Association, 1983. Distinguished Alumna, National Association for Equal
Opportunity, 1983, 1988. Outstanding Service in Local Community, Outstanding Service,
Northeast Region, Alumni Association, Florida A & M University, 1985-87. Counselors
Advocate Award, Maryland Association for Counseling and Development, 1988. Maryland's
Top 100 Women, Daily Record, 2003. Outstanding Leadership Award, Prince George's County
Educators' Association, 2004. Honorary doctorate, Soujourner-Douglass College, 2004. Married;
three children.

Gail Voigt is currently Chair of the Prince George’s County Special Education Advisory
Committee (SECAC-PG) whose purpose is to help improve Special Education services in the
County by advising and making recommendations to the Prince George’s County School
System. SECAC organizations are recognized by the State of Maryland COMAR Regulations.
Gail has been a member of the SECAC-PG for 4 years and is a past Vice-President. Gail also is
the President of the Prince George’s County Learning Disabilities Association and a past
member of CHADD, Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Gail Voigt was born and raised in Greenbelt, Maryland and attended Prince George’s County
Public Schools. She is a 1971 graduate of Parkdale High School and currently works as a
Computer Software Test Lead, has a BA from Beloit College and BS from University College,
University of Maryland.

Other Biographies Unavailable




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


2. Executive Summary

2.1 Preamble

This report is the result of the synthesis of data and information from several sources. The
members of the Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing heard expert testimonies from
several persons and organizations, and obtained and reviewed data from sources including local
and national education research organizations, the Maryland State Department of Education and
the Prince George’s County Public Schools. Committee members heard, received, and
considered citizen input and testimonies given at Committee meetings and at a specially-
convened public forum. The committee also engaged in deliberative discussions and weighed
several strategy options and recommendations.

The purpose of this report is to make recommendations which will highlight and address what
can and must be done by the government and people of Prince George’s County, Maryland, to
mitigate some of the anticipated negative impacts that may occur in Prince George’s County as a
result of the implementation of the Maryland High School Assessments (HSA) as a graduation
requirement.

In 2008, the State Board of Education is slated to revisit this mandatory requirement to either
make revisions to it or leave it unchanged. In 2004, the members of the State Board of Education
had voted to make the passing of the Maryland HSAs as a high school graduation requirement
starting with the class of 2009 - to affect students who entered high school Grade 9 in the fall of
2005 - and all students and classes thereafter.

It is the considered opinion of members of the Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing
that regardless of the action or actions that the State Board of Education may or may not make in
2008, there exists in Prince George’s County, today and for the foreseeable future, a situation
which warrants the attention of all county residents, parents, schools, organizations, government
and businesses.

If, beginning in 2009, additional hundreds or thousands of students leave our county public high
schools without high school diplomas and enter society, then some anticipated, some
unanticipated and some undesirable consequences are certain to follow.

Urgent action must be undertaken by our leaders and all stakeholders in the county’s public
schools and education system, to address the future of our students and to put our county on a
solid basis for economic, social and educational progress, now and many years to come.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


2.2 Summary

As Prince George’s County Council plans to address key legislative issues and trends shaping the
future of Prince Georges County and its residents, special attention is being placed on the critical
issue of high school education. Specifically, the Council has focused its examination on the
potential impact of the impending decision to institutionalize the Maryland High School
Assessments (HSA) by the State Board of Education. This document represents the results of a
comprehensive review by a Blue Ribbon Committee, of the potential impact of HSAs on the
welfare of Prince George County students and residents.

In 2003, Maryland led the nation in developing a model accountability program for districts,
schools, teachers and students, the most significant of which was the development of a high
school assessment test. When such accountability is associated with serious consequences such
as withholding a high school diploma, the tests are termed high-stakes (American Education
Research Association, 2000). Additionally, when high-stakes testing programs are implemented
in circumstances where educational resources are inadequate or where tests lack sufficient
reliability and validity for their intended purposes, there is potential for serious harm.

Since the inception of HSAs, a large divide has developed over whether these programs are in
the best interest of school students. Published research has generally not supported the contention
that accountability policies result in a decrease in the achievement gaps related to race and SES
(Borman et al., 2004; Lee & Wong, 2004). Considering the cost and potential unintended
negative consequences being identified in the research, high-stakes testing policies seem to
provide a questionable means of improving student learning.

The Blue Ribbon Committee’s overall recommendation to the Council is to endorse Maryland
HSAs that meet the following conditions defined by American Education Research Association
(AERA) as essential to sound implementation of high-stakes educational testing programs:

   Protection Against High-Stakes Decisions Based on a Single Test
   Adequate Resources and Opportunity to Learn
   Validation for Each Separate Intended Use
   Full Disclosure of Likely Negative Consequences of High-Stakes Testing Programs
   Alignment Between the Test and the Curriculum
   Validity of Passing Scores and Achievement Levels
   Opportunities for Meaningful Remediation for Examinees Who Fail High-Stakes Tests
   Appropriate Attention to Language Differences Among Examinees
   Appropriate Attention to Students with Disabilities
   Careful Adherence to Explicit Rules for Determining Which Students Are to be Tested
   Sufficient Reliability for Each Intended Use
   Ongoing Evaluation of Intended and Unintended Effects of High-Stakes Testing


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


The Blue Ribbon Committee also finds that the existing accountability system is not designed to
account for other key factors highly related to academic achievement (e.g. family income, parent
education levels and ethnicity). Thus, having educational policies that lead to higher academic
achievement (e.g. standards and curriculum) is not being disputed, however, institutionalizing a
general education reform effort focused almost exclusively on testing is not endorsed. As such,
it is recommended that the review of Maryland’s HSA program be extended to allow additional
opportunity for strengthening its design and thorough examination of its long-term impact.
Specific HSA recommendations are represented in this report.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


3. Background
The most recent iteration of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education (ESEA) Act, the No
Child Left Behind law was signed into law in 2002 and requires Congressional reauthorization in
2007. Currently every state has created testing programs to meet the 2002 No Child Left Behind
(NCLB) federal mandate for accountability. The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law was
intended to close achievement gaps and ensure that every public school student is proficient in
reading and math by 2013-14. As currently crafted, the NCLB mandates annual tests for students
and puts in place a series of punitive actions for schools and districts that do not meet annual
targets for student achievement.

This is an era of strong support for public policies that use high-stakes tests to change the
behavior of teachers and students in desirable ways. In recent decades, test scores have come to
dominate the discourse about schools and their accomplishments. Families now make important
decisions, such as where to live, based on the scores from these tests. This occurs because real
estate agents use school test scores to rate neighborhood quality and this affects property values.
(Haladyna, Nolen, & Haas, 1991) Test scores have been shown to affect housing prices, resulting
in a difference of about $9,000 between homes in grade "A" or grade "B" neighborhoods. (Figlio
& Lucas, 2000) At the national and state levels, test scores are now commonly used to evaluate
programs and allocate educational resources. Millions of dollars now hinge on the tested
performance of students in educational and social programs.




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           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


4. Methodology
The Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing worked for five months and used various
approaches to gather data and complete this report. This Committee was created by Resolution
of the Prince George’s County Council to examine the High School Assessments, their impact on
the students, and to consider appropriate recommendations relating thereto. Specifically, the
Committee was charged:

   •   To evaluate whether the high school assessments meet standards of quality and
       validity,

   •   To analyze the one size fits all approach to high stakes testing methodology and
       its effect on the student population in Prince George's County; and

   •   To determine whether there are practical alternatives to high stakes testing.

The Committee used several approaches to perform its work. They include:

   1. Obtaining oral and written briefings from various experts in economics, education
      and policy analysis;

   2. Reviewing published data from the Maryland State Department of Education
      (MSDE) on students’ and schools’ HSA test results from 2002 to 2005 (when
      passing the HSAs was not a requirement for receiving a Maryland high school
      diploma) and for 2006 (when passing the HSAs was a requirement for receiving a
      Maryland high school diploma);

   3. Reviewing published materials from the Maryland State Board of Education and
      MSDE on HSAs, their requirements, design, implementation, etc.;

   4. Soliciting views and suggestions from leaders and members of the Prince
      George’s County Council specifically: Vice-Chair, Hon. Camille A. Exum, Hon.
      David Harrington (District 5) and Hon. Tony Knotts (District 8);

   5. Providing opportunities for residents and the general public to present to the
      Committee during public comment periods at Committee meetings;

   6. Providing additional opportunities via the Internet, emails, and online
      communications, for residents and the general public to submit feedback to the
      Chair and members.

   7. Holding a special Public Forum to receive oral and written testimonies from
      members of the public on the issues under consideration;

   8. Gathering data on opinions of parents, residents and other stakeholders by
      developing and administering, online and offline, a Community Survey on HSA
      Attitudes, Alternatives and Knowledge;


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        REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


9. Organizing and having member deliberations via work-sessions for committee
   members only;

10. Using various sources of data and information on high stakes high school exit
    exams in Maryland and other states, including: Committee meeting minutes,
    written and oral presentations by experts, research articles, journals, magazine,
    and newspaper reports, HSA Community Survey, and other feedback from
    residents and Committee member deliberations and contributions;

11. Studying the findings and recommendations in the report (“Hidden Costs of High
    Stakes Exams”) published in 2004 by the nationally respected Center For
    Education Policy (CEP) located in Washington DC;

12. Attending a meeting of the leaders and members of the Prince Georges Regional
    Association of Student Governments (PGRASG) at Eleanor Roosevelt High
    School on October 11, 2006 and obtaining their input and feedback on behalf of
    county students;

13. Using information on evaluation forms which were completed by attendees at two
    HSA Community Forums held by Committee Chair, Hon. Samuel H. Dean,
    Councilman, District 6, in cooperation with PGCPS Region III for parents and
    community residents at two county high schools (Forestville Military High School
    and Largo High School) in April 2006, and using evaluation data from a third
    HSA Forum held for religious leaders and pastors in May 2006 at the First Baptist
    Church of Glenarden, Glenarden, MD; and

14. Using the services of an outside Consultant to assist the Committee by working to
    facilitate logistics and report writing and production.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


5. FINDINGS
5.1 HSA Results
The 2006 HSA results for Prince George’s County public high schools vary from school-to-
school. However, in 2006, on average, for all county high school students as a whole, slightly
less than half of the students who took the HSAs met the state’s HSA requirement by meeting
the set minimum pass score on three (Algebra, Biology, English) of the four required subjects.

The following charts report the county average pass rates were as follows; Algebra - 46.1%,
Biology - 46.1%, Government - 55.5%, and English - 45.9%. Slightly more than half of all
students (55.5 percent) in 2006 passed the Government HSA. Stated in a different but factual
manner, slightly more than about half of all county students are in danger of not passing the tests
and not receiving a diploma in 2009. (See table S-1 below).




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  REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING




                     Prince George’s County Public High Schools


                                                           LA U R E L H I G H S C H O O L




                                        HIG H P O INT HIG H S C H O O L




                                      E L E A N O R R O O S E V E LT H I G H S C H O O L
                                                                                 DU V A L H IG H S C H O O L




                                           P A R K D A L E H IG H S C H O O L
                                                                                                                     B O W IE H I G H S C H O O L
           N O R T H W E S T E R N H IG H S C H O O L




                             B L A D E N S B U R G H IG H S C H O O L

                                                                                      F L O W E R S H IG H S C H O O L



                                      F A I R M O N T H E IG H T S H I G H S C H O O L



                                                 C E N T R A L H IG H S C H O O L


                                                                                                           LA R G O H I G H S C H O O L
                                         S U IT L A N D H I G H S C H O O L




                                           F O R E S T V I L L E H IG H S C H O O L
           P O T O M A C H IG H S C H O O L


                             C R O S S LA N D H I G H S C H O O L



                                                                                          FR E D E RIC K D O U G L A S S H IG H S C H O O L
O X O N H IL L H I G H S C H O O L


                                           S U R R A T T S V IL L E H I G H S C H O O L




     FR IE N D L Y H IG H S C H O O L




                                                G W Y N N P A R K H IG H S C H O O L




                      P e rc e n t P a s s
                              0 - 20%
                              20 - 40%
                              40 - 60%
                              60 - 80%
                              80 - 100%




                                                                              - 20 -
                                   REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING




  Percent of Students Who Passed the Maryland High School Assessments
                  By High School and Subject Area, 2006


                                 AU E IG C O L
                                L R LH HS H O                                                               L U E H HS H O
                                                                                                             A R L IG C O L                                                                    A R L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                              L U E H HS H O                                                              A R L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         L U E H HS H O




                       IG O T IG C O L
                      H HP IN H HS H O                                                             H HP IN H HS H O
                                                                                                    IG O T IG C O L                                                                 IG O T IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                   H HP IN H HS H O                                                              IG O T IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                H HP IN H HS H O




                       L A O O S V T IG C O L
                      E E N RR O E EL H HS H O                                                     E E N RR O E E TH HS H O
                                                                                                    L A O O S V L IG C O L                                                          L A O O S V L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                   E E N RR O E E TH HS H O                                                      L A O O S V L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                E E N RR O E E TH HS H O

                                             U L IG C O L
                                            D VA H HS H O                                                                D V LH HS H O
                                                                                                                          U A IG C O L                                                                     U A IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                          D V LH HS H O                                                                U A IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      D V LH HS H O




                         A K A E IG C O L
                        P R D L H HS H O                                                             P R D L H HS H O
                                                                                                      A K A E IG C O L                                                                 A K A E IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                      P R D L H HS H O                                                             A K A E IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  P R D L H HS H O
                                                               O IE IG C O L
                                                              B W H HS H O                                                               B W H HS H O
                                                                                                                                          O IE IG C O L                                                                     O IE IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           B W H HS H O                                                                O IE IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      B W H HS H O
        O T W S E N IG H O
       N R H E T R H HSC O L                                                        N R W S E NH HSC O L
                                                                                     O TH E T R IG H O                                                                O TH E T R IG H O
                                                                                                                                                                     N R W S E NH HSC O L                                                         O TH E T R IG H O
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 N R W S E NH HSC O L




                 L D N B R IG C O L
                B A E S U GH HS H O                                                          B A E S U GH HSC O L
                                                                                              L D N B R IG H O                                                                 L D N B R IG H O
                                                                                                                                                                              B A E S U GH HSC O L                                                         L D N B R IG H O
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          B A E S U GH HSC O L

                                                L W R IG C O L
                                               F O E SH HS H O                                                            F O E SH HS H O
                                                                                                                           L W R IG C O L                                                                    L W R IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                            F O E SH HS H O                                                             L W R IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       F O E SH HS H O



                       A M N E H S IG C O L
                      F IR O TH IG T H HS H O                                                      F IR O TH IG T H HS H O
                                                                                                    A M N E H S IG C O L                                                            A M N E H S IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                   F IR O TH IG T H HS H O                                                       A M N E H S IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                F IR O TH IG T H HS H O



                            EN R L IG C O L
                           C T A H HS H O                                                              C T A H HS H O
                                                                                                        EN R L IG C O L                                                                   EN R L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                         C T A H HS H O                                                              EN R L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    C T A H HS H O


                                                          L R OH HS H O
                                                           A G IG C O L                                                              L R OH HS H O
                                                                                                                                      A G IG C O L                                                                      A G IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       L R OH HS H O                                                               A G IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  L R OH HS H O
                        S IT A DH HS H O
                         U L N IG C O L                                                             S IT A DH HS H O
                                                                                                     U L N IG C O L                                                                    U L N IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                      S IT A DH HS H O                                                            U L N IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 S IT A DH HS H O




                        F R S V L H HS H O
                         O E T IL E IG C O L                                                        F R S IL EH HS H O
                                                                                                     O E TV L IG C O L                                                                 O E TV L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                      F R S IL EH HS H O                                                          O E TV L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 F R S IL EH HS H O

        P TO A H HS H O
         O M C IG C O L                                                             P T M CH HS H O
                                                                                     O O A IG C O L                                                                   O O A IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                     P T M CH HS H O                                                              O O A IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 P T M CH HS H O


                C O S A DH HS H O
                 R S L N IG C O L                                                            C O SL DH HS H O
                                                                                              R S AN IG C O L                                                                 R S AN IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                             C O SL DH HS H O                                                              R S AN IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          C O SL DH HS H O



                                                  F E E IC D U L S H HS H O
                                                   R D R K O G A S IG C O L                                                  F E E IC D U L S H HS H O
                                                                                                                              R D R K O G A S IG C O L                                                          R D R K O G A S IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                               F E E IC D U L S H HS H O                                                   R D R K O G A S IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          F E E IC D U L S H HS H O
   O O H LH HS H O
    X N IL IG C O L                                                            O O H H HS H O
                                                                                X N ILL IG C O L                                                                X N ILL IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                               O O H H HS H O                                                                X N ILL IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            O O H H HS H O


                         S R A T V L H HS H O
                          U R T S IL E IG C O L                                                      S R A T VIL EH HS H O
                                                                                                      U R T S L IG C O L                                                                U R T S L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                       S R A T VIL EH HS H O                                                       U R T S L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  S R A T VIL EH HS H O




     F IE D YH HS H O
      R N L IG C O L                                                             F IE D YH HS H O
                                                                                  R N L IG C O L                                                                    R N L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                   F IE D YH HS H O                                                            R N L IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              F IE D YH HS H O




                           G Y NP KH HS H O
                            W N AR IG C O L                                                            G Y NP R H HS H O
                                                                                                        W N A K IG C O L                                                                  W N A K IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                         G Y NP R H HS H O                                                           W N A K IG C O L
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    G Y NP R H HS H O




             P rce t P ss
              e n a                                                                      P rce t P ss
                                                                                          e n a                                                                            e n a
                                                                                                                                                                          P rce t P ss                                                                 e n a
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      P rce t P ss
                  0- 20%                                                                      0- 20%                                                                           0- 20%                                                                      0- 20%
                  2 - 40
                   0 %                                                                        2 - 40
                                                                                               0 %                                                                              0 %
                                                                                                                                                                               2 - 40                                                                       0 %
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           2 - 40
                  4 - 60
                   0 %                                                                        4 - 60
                                                                                               0 %                                                                              0 %
                                                                                                                                                                               4 - 60                                                                       0 %
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           4 - 60
                  6 - 80
                   0 %                                                                        6 - 80
                                                                                               0 %                                                                              0 %
                                                                                                                                                                               6 - 80                                                                       0 %
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           6 - 80
                  8 - 10 %
                   0 0                                                                        8 - 10 %
                                                                                               0 0                                                                              0 0
                                                                                                                                                                               8 - 10 %                                                                     0 0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           8 - 10 %




                           Algebra                                                                       Biology                                                            Government                                                                                English 10


Source: HSA Results, 2006, MSDE;
High school boundaries courtesy of Planning Department, MNC-PPC, October 2006.




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


5.2 SPECIFIC FINDINGS
Finding #1

Topic: Accelerating the HSA review date

● The promise and potential of Prince George’s County youth to succeed in school and to
  participate in the economic vitality of the county is greater than any perceived HSA crisis.
  We must concentrate our efforts on boosting the promise and minimizing the crisis. To boost
  the promise, our County and our students need more time to reach the higher standards being
  established by the County and State.

Finding #2

Topic: Building dedicated housing to aid and reward existing teachers and to attract future
highly qualified K-12 teachers

● Quite possibly, the funding, developing and building of multi-family and single-family homes
  and apartments for current and future County teachers could be the single most important
  action that the Prince George’s County Government and resident businesses can do today.
  This action would contribute substantially to (i) improving our education and schools, and
  (ii) dramatically and positively affecting the welfare of our County youth while they are in
  school and when they are out-of-school.

Finding #3

Topic: Creation of a County Department of Youth Services

●   There is a need to combine existing functions and school-based and non-school-based
    operating services assisting county youth. County-based out-of-school resources co-managed
    and combined with in-school resources for student supports and verifiable commitments
    from communities, organizations and county businesses can and will succeed in boosting
    youth welfare in Prince George’s County.

● Across this country - every single day – many public school students, including minority
  children and other economically disadvantaged student groups are being taught to high levels
  and are achieving at high levels. County services can support school services to service all
  youth in need in all communities in this County.

Finding #4

Topic: County-specific, short-term/long-term education and schools improvements

● Student academic failings are highlighted while the links between academic achievement and
  resources equity have not been highlighted enough.



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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


● Nearly two-thirds of African-American fourth-graders in the US do not read at even the basic
  level, according to results on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

● More than half of fourth-grade Native Americans do not have basic reading skills.

● Half of Latino eighth-graders do not perform math at the basic level.

Finding #5

Topic: Addressing the perception of HSAs as punitive, not supportive, of students

● Maryland State’s implementation of HSAs and higher academic standards without
  demanding accountability from all responsible sectors is a problem.

● Accountability must not only be sought from our high school students (in terms of awarding
  or denying diplomas to them), but also from State education officials, local school
  administrators, teachers, and elected and appointed officials.

●   National, State and local levels of neglect is evident in perennially inadequate funding and
    needed resources for some schools and communities, outright neglect, and institutional
    inefficiencies. As a result, our statewide and local educational system is rigged to give our
    children less of everything they need to succeed including highly qualified teachers, labs,
    equipment and supplies.

● From 2004 to 2006, the numbers of classes not taught by “highly qualified teachers’ in Prince
  George’s County exceeded the numbers of classes in neighboring jurisdictions and other
  Maryland counties. It is necessary to obtain evidence that the Maryland Legislature, the
  Government of the State of Maryland and the MSBE are being held or will be held as
  accountable for providing proportionate education resources (highly qualified teachers, labs,
  other equipment and supplies needed in local schools) as high school students are being held
  accountable for passing the HSAs.

Finding #6

Topic: Keeping the Maryland HSAs as tools for improving instruction and learning

● Between August and November 2006 here in Prince George’s County, MD, many
  respondents to a survey of HSA Attitudes, Alternatives and Knowledge stated that they do
  not object to the testing but to the high stakes attached to the results, which they say force
  schools to develop a myopic curriculum focused on the test.




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Finding #7

Topic: Addressing issues of HSA design quality, validity, and reliability

● There are some outstanding questions about the quality of the design and/or the validity and
  reliability of the HSAs as used by MSDE. For example:

    (i)      There are some critiques of the confusion that can ensue and has ensued from the
             perceived inaccuracies or inappropriateness of the wording of certain questions on the
             Maryland HSAs;

    (ii)     There are also questions in the minds of some County parents and organizations about
             the utility of the HSAs since, theoretically, a student could pass all the required in-
             school, in-class academic subjects, and not pass one or more HSA subject tests;

    (iii)    Also, a student may pass any or all HSAs and still require academic remediation upon
             admission and entrance into a two-year community college or four-year college or
             university;

    (iv)     The HSAs are sometimes marketed or publicized or viewed in the community as
             being (a) tests which only require a grade 7 to grade 10 subject matter content
             mastery, as well as being (b) non-rigorous, lower-level tests which require minimal
             subject matter competency or understanding for success;

    (v)      There is no convincing evidence that institutions of higher education in Maryland
             view the HSA as possessing an indication which can demonstrate a student’s future
             success in college courses or future careers.

Finding #8

Topic: Studying/Analyzing the development/implementation of an extended year public
high school option

● Many college students in Maryland, as well as in other states in the U.S., complete their
  undergraduate studies and obtain their college degrees in five or more years, not in the
  traditional four years. This is becoming increasingly important non-traditional Distance
  Learning modalities continue to be seen as a force in modern American higher education.

● More adults (who are older than the typical high school graduating age of 18 years) are going
  back to high school and college to complete their education.

●    A similar expansion of years of eligibility for a Maryland high school diploma should be
    extended to high school students by moving to a 5-year public high school paradigm as an
    option or addition to, but not as a replacement for, the 4-year Maryland public high school.




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               REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Finding #9

Topic: Attracting/Recruiting and retaining specialized teachers

● Prince George’s County has (and other Maryland counties have) a perennial shortage of
  specially-trained, special education teachers and bilingual teachers for students with Limited
  English Proficiency (LEP).

Finding #10

Topic: Promoting and expanding the involvement of County businesses, companies,
organizations and churches in County education and school reform efforts by each entity
adopting and supporting at least one school of their choice

● “Education is a priority” is a dictum that many companies, businesses, organizations and
  churches say that they believe in, agree with, and support. Many businesses, companies,
  organizations and churches do in fact support schools in communities around the County.
  There is much room for improvement in this area. By bold action, the Board of Education
  and the County Government could create attractive incentives for each business, company,
  organization or church to adopt and support, on a long-term basis, at least one school of their
  choice, in the County.

The goal of such adoption is to:

       (i)       Improve student and school performance on academic activities including local,
                 statewide, regional, national and international competitions, MSA and PSAT test
                 success (in elementary and middle schools) and PSAT, SAT, ACT, AP/IB, and
                 HSA (in high schools and alternative high schools);

       (ii)      Increase opportunities for student service learning, student internships and
                 sponsored research, and

       (iii)     Expose more County students to higher education opportunities, travel and
                 exchange opportunities, career exploration activities, and community service
                 activities.

Finding #11

Topic: Adding options and flexibility to the Maryland HSA by including other instruments
and measures (both standardized and non-standardized, internally/externally-developed
measures) to assist students in meeting the high school graduation requirements

● Success on standardized tests is only one measure of student learning.




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              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


● Assessments may be viewed as an opportunity to provide feedback rather than a
  determination of success or failure. If we want our County students to succeed, we must give
  them continual feedback. Assessments should be viewed as an opportunity to communicate
  the current level of performance and provide information to enhance a student’s
  performance.

●    Assessments can be used to target and assist specific student to reach Maryland’s and the
    County’s stated learning goals rather than be used to penalize students by denying high
    school diplomas to some students, especially students who may be most in need of academic
    and other assistance.

● The Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes testing agrees with the following statement
  issued by the National PTA: “Valid assessment does not consist of only a single test score,
  and that at no time should a single test be considered the sole determinant of a student's
  academic or work future, e.g., high school graduation, scholarship aid, honors programs or
  college admissions. Tests are only one facet of a sound assessment program.”

Finding #12

Topic: Improving, overall, all Prince George’s County public schools – short and long term
state actions

● The Maryland HSA is recognized by many educators and professionals as a means to an end,
  not an end in itself.

● Legislative (County and State) efforts, resources, monitoring and administration to improve
  instruction in all Prince George’s County public schools will yield dividends not only in
  better HSA scores for County students, but will improve learning and academic achievement
  for County students and schools.

Finding #13

Topic: Improving Special Education

● For special education efforts in all Maryland counties to improve and be successful, all of our
  State’s public schools must improve and be successful.

● Special Education lawsuits are expensive in the County and State. Efforts to streamline and
  reduce this legal expense can direct more resources to the actual instructional activities,
  learning methods, and support programs for our County’s special education students.

● Many parents statewide complain that their experience working with the schools to agree
  upon a special education student’s Individualized Education Programs (IEP) is unnecessarily
  contentious and intimidating.




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              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


● It is important that this process be improved, since it involves the lives of some of Maryland’s
  most vulnerable children and in some cases creates unnecessary ill will between parents and
  their school system.

● The fact that some parents feel the only way to get their child the services he or she needs is
  to sue the school system is further evidence that special education warrants the attention of
  the State legislature. If the public were more aware of which schools had an unusually high
  number of lawsuits and the amount of public dollars school systems were spending to litigate
  instead of educate, this would focus school systems’ efforts on improving special education
  overall, with attention to improved performance on all tests including the HSAs, Alt-MSA
  and Comp-HSA.

Finding #14

Topic: All across Maryland, the State Board of Education and MSDE must encourage,
invite, and use parental and community input in the implementation of important activities
especially in the areas of participation in HSA remediation programs and in-high-school
college preparation programs (as a means to reduce in-college academic remediation)

● Much of the public is in the dark about some aspects of the HSA testing program. The tests
  must produce, but currently do not produce, information that can be used to diagnose
  students’ strengths and weaknesses so that they can be helped as needed. For example, how
  well do Maryland students understand fractions (from the Algebra HSA) or the Chesapeake
  Bay ecosystem (Biology HSA)? The current HSA testing program does not provide parents
  and schools with this information, and the scoring mechanisms remain a mystery.

● The public does not have a formal way to suggest improvements in the HSA tests to
  Maryland State.

● Parents throughout Prince George’s County have expressed to the Blue Ribbon Committee,
  both verbally and in writing, concerns about many aspects of school improvement in general
  (relevance/depth of instruction, grading standards, short and long-term substitute teacher
  usage, teacher competency, etc.) HSA preparation and student success in particular.

● Statewide, there may or may not be large numbers of Grade 12 students in high schools who
  will not graduate in 2009 and beyond because of their inability to meet the HSA
  requirements. An unknown number of Maryland families will be affected by this
  development if it were to occur.

● Parents are expressing concerns that if too much instruction time in schools is directed to
  helping students prepare and pass the HSAs, school instructional programs throughout the
  State will be affected as schools focus more on increasing their passing rates on the HSAs.

● Parents have received information from some respected high stakes testing critics that that the
  Maryland Algebra/Data Analysis HSA exam contains questions which are not representative
  of conventional (real) Algebra. Some parents are concerned that this may lead to “dumbing


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


    down” of the real Algebra I syllabus to the syllabus of the less-rigorous Maryland High
    School Assessment (HSA) on some Algebra content. More emphasis on a perceived less
    rigorous Algebra HSA may increase the numbers of high school graduates who are or will be
    relegated      to     remedial       math       when       they        enter     college.

● To partially address the issue of students who pass HSA courses with A’s and B’s but do not
  pass the related HSA exam in that subject, county Boards of Education are revising,
  improving and strengthening their grading policies, especially in the elementary and middle
  school grades. This may directly or indirectly result in many more students repeating Grades
  7-10. After several repeats, students may get discouraged and drop out of school before they
  make it to Grade 12. Parents must become partners in the formulation of newer and
  consistent grading policies.

●    In Prince George’s County in 2006, about one in four County students who received the
    Grade of A in the Maryland High School Assessment (HSA) course in Algebra/Data
    Analysis and the Biology HSA course failed the respective HSA exams. About two of three
    students, who received the Grade of C in HSA Algebra or Biology failed the HSA. This may
    suggest that current grading and/or instruction standards in PGCPS are inconsistently applied
    or set at a low level. The confidence that parents have in our public schools’ grading systems
    need to be revived.

●   MSDE’s Assistant State Superintendent, Dr. Gary Heath noted in a presentation to the
    Committee that results from the MSA (the state’s elementary and middle school exams)
    indicate which students are not on track to pass the HSAs on Algebra or English. It is not
    certain how PGCPS actively uses this data and trend/forecasting tool to improve individual
    student’s performance on the HSAs in high school. Such data must be made available to
    parents also.

● Reading Comprehension: The Algebra/Data Analysis, Biology and Government HSAs all
  require good reading comprehension, not merely decoding skills. However, about one in two
  PGCPS          high       school      students      are      reading    below       grade
  level. (Gazette.Net Mon, 25 Sep 2006 3:13 PM PDT) This is a contributory
  factor to students not passing the HSAs on Algebra, Biology and Government.

●   Data on the passing rate of HSA Algebra, Biology and Government exams by all Maryland
    State and PGCPS students who are reading two or more years below grade level must be
    disaggregated, shared with parents, and used in individual schools and for individual
    students, to improve student’s overall learning and HSA achievement.

● Raising Content Knowledge Standards for Teachers: Many middle school teachers have K-8
  certification. Parents may not be yet convinced that when a teacher obtains the Maryland
  state endorsement as a "highly certified" middle school teacher, it guarantees that the teacher
  has profound knowledge of the subject.

● According to civil         rights activist Dr. Robert Moses, math literacy (and
  Algebra literacy) is       a civil rights issue. In his book “Radical Equations”


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              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


    Dr. Moses states that “the most urgent social issue affecting poor people
    and people of color is economic access. In today's world, economic access
    and full citizenship depend crucially on math and science literacy.” Parents and communities
    throughout Maryland state must be made aware of the importance of math and algebra
    literacy in today’s modern economies.

●   According to Dr. Robert Moses, verbal literacy is no longer enough. Algebra "now is the
    gatekeeper for citizenship; and people who don't have it are like the
    people who couldn't read and write in the Industrial Age." Competency on the Maryland
    Algebra HSA may not indicate competency on real Algebra needed in the world of work and
    in early college classes.

Finding #15

Topic: Expanding teacher training seats in all Maryland colleges and universities

● A recent New York Times editorial stated: “No matter how hard localities try, the best-
  designed high schools in the world will still fail unless the states and the federal government
  finally bite the bullet on teacher training. That means doing what it takes to remake the
  teacher corps, even if it means withholding federal dollars from diploma mills pretending to
  be colleges of education, forcing out unqualified teachers and changing the age-old practice
  of funneling the least-prepared teachers into the weakest schools.”

● Maryland has one of the most educated populations in the nation. Compared with other
  states, Maryland is ranked:

#1 – Percentage of Professional and Technical Workers
#1 – Percentage of Workers with Bachelor’s Degrees or Higher
#2 – Percentage of Workers 25 or Older with Master’s Degrees
#2 – Concentration of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers

● Maryland State’s inflexible teacher certification requirements discourage many of these
  highly-qualified people from becoming teachers. As a result, the state has a teacher shortage
  that has persisted for years.

● Maryland’s latest staffing report (2006) declared a shortage in 20 academic subject areas, in
  all 24 districts, and a shortage of male and minority teacher candidates. The shortage varies
  widely by subject. Some areas (elementary education, music, art, biology, history) have
  surpluses, while others (spanish, math, computer science, chemistry, physics) have shortages.

“The Monitor” dated October 2006, Vol. 1, Issue 10 states on page 2 of 7 under “Maryland
Teacher Staffing Report” that “the State Board declared the following content areas as critical
shortage areas”:

    1. Career and Technology Areas – Technology Education and Health Occupations;
       Computer Science;


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


    2. Dance;
    3. Foreign Languages – Spanish and Latin; English for Speakers of Other Languages
       (ESOL, PreK-12);
    4. Mathematics;
    5. Science Areas – Chemistry, Earth/Space Science, Physical Science, and Physics; and
       Special Education Areas – Generic Hearing Impaired, Visually Impaired, and Severely
       and Profoundly Disabled.”
    6. “In addition the State Board declared all systems as geographic areas with a shortage of
       certified teachers; a shortage of male and minority teachers; and a shortage of non-
       classroom professional positions including principals, reading specialists, and
       speech/language pathologists.”

● Most Maryland teacher shortages are in secondary subject areas and have persisted for years.
  Maryland’s small scholarships and signing bonuses have had little to no impact on alleviating
  these shortages.

● Maryland State’s alternative certification, the Resident Teacher Certificate, has produced
  only 1% of Maryland’s teachers since its inception in 1990. In contrast, New Jersey’s
  alternative certification produces 20-25% of its teachers annually.

● Maryland legislature must specifically target scholarships, grants, benefits and supports to
  current and future teachers in each of the following state-identified high shortage teacher and
  school personnel areas.

•   Last year the Maryland Legislature created the Alternative Teaching Opportunity Program
    (ATOP). To encourage districts to hire more teachers through alternative certification
    programs. Maryland’s staffing report shows that there are shortages in 20 subjects and a need
    of an additional 400 teachers per year, so the Maryland ATOP program does not do enough
    to address the problem.

● Maryland's Middle School Assessment (MSA) and High School Assessment (HSA) do not
  measure how much individual students gain during the year. Results of PGCPS benchmark
  testing are not shared with parents and guardians and it is not certain to parents if and when
  teachers use the benchmark results to improve instruction for individual students in need.

● The ability to measure individual student progress countywide and statewide is needed to
  track the progress of highly mobile (often low-achieving) students, and to carry out research
  on what is being practiced (in instruction in schools) which work effectively as well as what
  is being used in practice but does not work well.




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


5.3 MAJOR FINDINGS
The major findings of the Committee are arranged in this section according to the three specific
responsibilities as outlined in CR-62-2006 as follows:

     •   To evaluate whether the high school assessments meet standards of quality and validity;

     •   To analyze the one size fits all approach to high stakes testing methodology and its
         effect on the student population in Prince George's County; and

     •   To determine whether there are practical alternatives to high stakes testing.

I.       Whether or not the HSAs meet standards of quality and validity

According to representatives from MSDE, the MSBE and expert consultants used deliberate
care, an almost 10-year span of time, and great attention to detail in the psychometric and design
phases of the HSAs using consultants and experts. Teams of teachers from the State’s public
schools and University of Maryland researchers worked to ensure the validity and reliability of
questions used on the four subjects tested for the Maryland HSAs.

Dissenting opinions on the quality of the HSAs were provided by three experts who testified
before the Committee. According to (i) a Public Policy Researcher from the League of Women’s
Voters, Baltimore/Harvard University Center for Civil Rights staffer, (ii) one Government
classroom teacher from Eleanor Roosevelt High School, and (iii) a professor of mathematics
from the University of Maryland College Park, there are still unresolved issues and some
questions about the quality, validity and reliability of the HSAs and that additional work remains
to be done.

Some questions remain to be answered and certain doubts have been raised on this issue.

Specific questions asked and comments made (by the Harvard University Researcher/Policy
Analysts) on this issue include the following:

         1. Are the HSAs valid that is, do they measure what they purport to measure and what
            meaning can be drawn from the results? Can MSDE show that the tests are linked to
            the curriculum and instruction (which) students (actually) receive in different
            classrooms across the state?

         2. The use of the HSAs does not conform to guidelines for appropriate test use
            developed the American Educational Research Association (AERA), the American
            Psychological Association (APA), and the National Council on Measurement in
            Education (NCME). Please explain how MSDE plans to meet the following set of
            conditions considered essential to the sound implementation of high-stakes
            educational testing programs:

            a. Protection against high-stakes decisions based on a single test
            b. Adequate resources and opportunity to learn


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


           c.   Validation for each separate intended use
           d.   Full disclosure of likely negative consequences of high-stakes testing programs
           e.   Alignment between the test and the curriculum
           f.   Validity of passing scores and achievement levels
           g.   Opportunities for meaningful remediation for examinees who fail high-stakes
                tests
           h.   Appropriate attention to language differences among examinees
           i.   Appropriate attention to students with disabilities
           j.   Careful adherence to explicit rules for determining which students are to be tested
           k.   Sufficient reliability for each intended use
           l.   Ongoing evaluation of intended and unintended effects of high-stakes testing

II.    Analysis of the one-size-fits-all approach to high stakes testing methodology and its
       effects on the students’ population in Prince George's County

In analyzing the high stakes one-size-fits-all high school exit exams used by Maryland and other
US states, the Committee relied on position papers and statements issued recently and in the last
few years by several education advocacy and parent organizations in Maryland. Additionally the
Committee analyzed findings in published research reports by the Center for Educational Policy
(CEP) issued in 2004 and 2006.

For example, cited below, is the “National PTA Position Statement: Student Assessment and
Testing:”

       “The National PTA believes that the overall goal of student assessment and testing
       programs should be to identify how instruction can be improved and learning increased.
       Assessments should be used to increase the opportunities for students, rather than deny
       opportunities through practices such as tracking or discriminating by gender, ethnicity,
       culture or disability.”

Further, the NPTA states that:

       “The National PTA believes that valid assessment does not consist of only a single test
       score, and that at no time should a single test be considered the sole determinant of a
       student's academic or work future, e.g., high school graduation, scholarship aid, honors
       programs or college admissions. Tests are only one facet of a sound assessment
       program.”

Components of a sound assessment program should include:

           1. Instruments that are culturally and racially bias-free and in a language that the
              student understands;

           2. Measurement of what has been taught;

           3. Multiple measures which are performance based reflecting the different kinds of
              knowledge and skills that a student is expected to acquire, e.g., written


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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


               examinations, portfolios of student work, group projects, and open ended test
               questions;

           4. Strategies in providing special remedial and other instructional support for those
              students who fall below school district standards and expectations;

           5. Procedures and information that are understandable to parents, students and
              teachers, and provide guidance about how student learning can be increased;

           6. Provisions for maximum local and state control regarding the determination of
              tests to be given, the appropriate uses for the resulting data, and for continuous
              review related to assessment quality, appropriateness of standards, objectives,
              procedures, exercises and usefulness in improving the instructional program;

           7. Field testing of new assessment models to assure that they are educationally
              useful; and

           8. Involvement of parents at all levels, but particularly at the local level, in the
              design, development, implementation and evaluation of a viable student
              assessment and testing program.

An assessment system built solely on tests and what can be easily measured has the potential of
misleading parents and students. During the past several years, assessment has been expanded to
include other variables, called indicators that have an impact on student learning, but are not
easily identified or measured. The National PTA supports the development of indicators, in
addition to student testing, to provide a more balanced representation about educational quality
in a particular school district. Indicators such as equity, competency of teaching staff, physical
infrastructure, curriculum class size, instructional methods, existence of tracking, number of
higher cost students, dropout rates, and parental involvement are important in holding schools
accountable and monitoring the quality of education. These indicators are more difficult to
compensate for in a state-by-state comparison.

Indicators are statistics that measure our collective educational well-being. They provide
information about a significant feature of the system; they usually incorporate a standard against
which to judge progress or regression. From U.S. Department of Education National Center on
Educational Statistics.

Adopted: by the 1981 Board of Directors
Revised: by the 1987, 1990, and 1991 Board of Directors
Reviewed: by the 1993 and 1996 Convention Resolutions Committee

In a position statement released on November 13, 2003, the Maryland State Teachers
Association (MSTA), the Maryland PTAs, the Maryland Association of Boards of Education
(MABE) and the Maryland Education Coalition (MEC) stated, in part:




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       “We are alarmed at the prospect of State Board adoption (in December 2003) of
       the plan to implement a HSA high stakes testing program as a graduation
       requirement for the class of 2009. We urge the State Board to reject the
       recommendation from the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) to
       do so, especially in consideration of the data presented to the State Board at its
       September 23 meeting regarding student performance on the tests based on the
       proposed cut scores. The State Board’s adoption of those cut scores has sent
       shockwaves through the educational leadership of Maryland, and has prompted
       us to request a renewed and intensive discussion with the State Board and State
       Superintendent to analyze the issues and consequences arising from prematurely
       adopting the HSA as graduation requirement.”

Additionally, the Coalition stated that:

       “While we strongly endorse educational performance and accountability programs
       that hold all students and schools to high standards, we cannot endorse the
       adoption of a graduation requirement that appears to have the very real potential
       to exclude thousands of students from receiving a high school diploma. In this
       light, we caution the State Board to consider the consequences of adopting a high
       stakes testing program that may create new disincentives for students to complete
       high school.”

       Further, this position statement referred to the real and hidden costs and
       expenditures which will be required for a high stakes testing program in Maryland
       when it stated that:

       “We must not adopt a rigorous, high stakes testing program without enhancing the
       educational system with the full funding required to implement an intervention
       program that will increase the opportunity for all children to meet the new
       standards and expectations. Historically, State Board discussions of adopting the
       HSA as a graduation requirement have acknowledged that a precondition should
       be significant support for intervention services, e.g. summer school, tutoring and
       after-school programs, and professional development. We are increasingly
       concerned that the ongoing State Board deliberations and MSDE
       recommendations are not adequately addressing the costs and scope of the
       additional services that would be needed to provide successful intervention
       programs at the high school, middle school, and elementary school levels.
       Without additional funding, school systems will once again be forced to cut
       existing services to address a new mandate. Only through providing additional
       funding for enhanced programs and services can Maryland’s public schools hope
       to balance the objectives of rigor and attainability embodied in a high stakes HSA
       program.”

High Stakes Exams in States across the USA:
Research findings from the Center for Educational policy (CEP):


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In May 2006, in the “Key Findings” section of its report entitled “State High School Exit Exams:
A Challenging Year,” CEP wrote that “School year 2005-06 was a time of serious challenges to
state exit examinations—tests students must pass to receive a high school diploma.”

The CEP concluded with the following four points:

   1. Growth in the number of states adopting new exit exam requirements seems to have
      leveled off. Still, exit exams are a force in education, currently affecting two-thirds of the
      nation’s high school students.

   2. Controversy about exit exams tends to settle down in the years after diplomas are first
      withheld.

   3. With few exceptions, states have moved toward greater flexibility in their exit exam
      policies.

   4. Most states with exit exams require school districts to provide remediation to students
      who fail the exams, but these states don’t always pay for remediation. The amount of
      state funding for remediation appears to diminish once the exam requirement has been in
      effect for a few years.

CEP’s 2006 study report listed the following key findings for high stakes actions taken by US
states:

       In 2006, California, Arizona, and Idaho began withholding diplomas for the first time
       based on exit exam performance, while Utah policymakers decided not to withhold
       diplomas from students in the class of 2006 who failed the state’s high school
       competency test. Oklahoma began phasing in a new exit exam. These changes bring to
       22 the number of states that currently require students to pass exit exams before receiving
       a diploma. By 2012, a total of 25 states plan to have exit exams in place.

       In 2006, two-thirds of the nation’s public high school students and three-fourths of the
       nation’s minority public high school students attended school in the 22 states with current
       exit exams. By 2012, about 7 in 10 public high school students and 8 in 10 minority
       public high school students will attend school in the 25 states that expect to have exit
       exams in place.

       The remaining 25 states, which do not plan to withhold diplomas based on students’
       failure to pass an exam, have fashioned high school testing systems and policies to fulfill
       more limited roles in gauging high school students’ competency. These other assessments
       are used to make graduation decisions (but not as the sole determinant), to acknowledge
       and differentiate achievement, and to measure college and workplace readiness.

       Lawsuits in California and Arizona have delved into fundamental questions about exit
       exams, such as whether students have had an opportunity to learn the material being
       tested, whether it’s fair to hold students with disabilities and English language learners to
       exam requirements, and how much responsibility states have to fund preparation and


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       remediation programs or establish alternate paths to graduation for struggling students.
       Courts at different levels have come down on different sides of these difficult issues.
       Depending on how lawsuits in California and Arizona are finally resolved, 2006 could
       become the year exit exams withstood legal challenges in two key states, or the year the
       exit exam movement was stalled in its tracks.

       States that reported changing or adding to their mature exit exam systems are generally
       moving toward what they see as more rigorous exams. The few states that reported on
       CEP’s survey that they had changed passing scores on their exit exams raised the scores,
       not lowered them.

       Much of the opposition to and publicity about exit exams during the past year has been
       concentrated in states that began withholding diplomas this year or plan to do so in the
       next few years. Policymakers in these states have dealt with controversy in different
       ways. California leaders have chosen so far to hold firm and have rejected efforts to
       create alternate paths to a diploma for students. Policymakers in Arizona and Washington
       State (which plans to begin withholding diplomas in 2008) have created a variety of
       options for struggling students to meet graduation-testing requirements. Recent opinion
       polls in a few key states suggest that exit exams continue to be supported by a majority of
       the public.

Contrary to the above finding that in a few key states “exit exams continue to be supported by a
majority of the public,” it appears that here in Prince George’s County, in 2006, the majority of
residents who responded to a survey on their attitudes, knowledge and suggested alternatives to
the HSAs were opposed to the use of a single high stakes test to determine eligibility for a high
school diploma.

III.   Whether there exist practical alternatives to high stakes testing

The presentations made to the Committee by experts in Education, Economics, and Public Policy
unearthed several HSA alternatives and options. The testimonies of members of the public and
the results of a “Survey on HSA Attitudes, Alternatives and Knowledge,” administered both
online and offline, by the Committee to the public, also provided some support for certain
suggested alternatives and options.

The issue of HSA alternatives is, in fact, whether they are practical or not or better yet, what the
definition of “practical” should be.

Providing students with additional alternatives to the HSA exams - and providing opportunities
for remediation for them to pass the exams before and after the 12th grade - are two key actions
that several US states appear to be embarking on.

Remediation:

The CEP 2006 study listed the following:




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States provide remediation and other support programs to raise student achievement,
avoid public opposition due to low pass rates, head off lawsuits, and meet the
requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

According to our survey of state education officials, 18 of the 25 states with current or
planned exit exams require their school districts to offer remediation courses for students
who do not pass portions of their exit exams. But only six states actually require these
students to attend the remediation courses.

Almost all states use means in addition to remediation to help students, such as
publishing study guides, releasing past test items, providing professional development for
teachers, and conducting outreach programs to inform parents of the importance of the
exams.

Of the 25 states with exit exams, 14 fund programs to help students pass exit exams.
There is a wide range in spending, but it is difficult to compare across states.

There is evidence that remediation is effective in raising students’ exit exam scores.
States are still investigating what types of remediation programs are most beneficial.
Some factors that affect the success of remediation programs are student motivation and
attendance, scheduling, funding, and administration.




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                                            TABLE S-1

                            Prince George's County 2006 HSA Results
                  Percent of students who passed each of the 4 required subjects
                                  For county public high schools

                                             Page 1 of 2

     School                             Subject           School                        Subject
                                        Algebra %                                       Biology %
1     Eleanor Roosevelt *               74.7         1    Eleanor Roosevelt *           81.2
      State average                     66.6              State average                 67.8
2     C.H. Flowers *                    58.4         2    C.H. Flowers *                61.2
3     Parkdale                          55.7         3    Oxon Hill *                   56.1
4     Laurel                            53.5         4    Bowie                         51.8
5     Bowie                             51.3         5    Northwestern                  48.9
6     Bladensburg                       46.3              County average                46.1
      County average                    46.1         6    Laurel                        45.3
7     Northwestern                      45.3         7    Frederick Douglass            43.1
8     High Point                        41.1         8    Bladensburg                   40.6
9     Gwynn Park                        40.7         9    Croom Vocational              40.0
10    Friendly                          37.2         10 Gwynn Park                      39.7
11    Frederick Douglass                36.8         11 Friendly                        39.5
12    Largo                             31.5         12 High Point                      38.4
13    DuVal                             31.4         13 Parkdale                        36.7
14    Central                           30.8         14 Largo                           34.0
15    Surrattsville                     30.3         15 DuVal                           34.0
16    Oxon Hill *                       29.7         16 Potomac                         31.0
17    Tall Oaks                         29.7         17 Suitland                        30.6
18    Forestville                       25.5         18 Crossland                       30.5
19    Suitland                          25.2         19 Surrattsville                   26.0
20    Potomac                           24.4         20 Forestville                     24.8
21    Crossland                         20.8         21 Fairmont Heights                24.8
22    Fairmont Heights                  19.2         22 Central                         24.2
23    Alternative High                  9.1          23 Tall Oaks                       23.1
24    Croom Vocational                  0.0          24 Alternative High                12.0
*    Eleanor Roosevelt, Charles H. Flowers, and Oxon Hill each has roughly a third of
     its students in a competitive entry Math, Science and Technology Program.
     Source: MSDE, The Gazette ~ Greenbelt, Thursday 28Sep2006, p.A-16




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      School                        Subject             School                Subject
                                                                              English 10
                                    Gov't %                                   %
1     Eleanor Roosevelt *           84.9          1     Eleanor Roosevelt *   75.2
2     C.H. Flowers *                75.3          2     C.H. Flowers *        63.2
      State average                 74.2                State average         60.1
3     Bowie                         70.0          3     Bowie                 56.7
4     Northwestern                  66.2          4     Laurel                55.9
5     Laurel                        62.7          5     Oxon Hill *           54.5
6     Oxon Hill *                   57.7          6     Northwestern          49.7
      County average                55.5          7     High Point            48.8
7     DuVal                         54.5          8     Frederick Douglass    46.8
8     Friendly                      53.5                County average        45.9
9     Frederick Douglass            53.3          9     Gwynn Park            43.3
10    High Point                    51.2          10    DuVal                 43.0
11    Crossland                     50.0          11    Surrattsville         40.8
12    Parkdale                      47.5          12    Largo                 40.3
13    Largo                         47.3          13    Friendly              40.1
14    Surrattsville                 46.5          14    Suitland              40.0
15    Suitland                      46.3          15    Potomac               37.9
16    Bladensburg                   45.7          16    Bladensburg           37.4
17    Potomac                       45.7          17    Parkdale              36.1
18    Gwynn Park                    44.6          18    Crossland             32.2
19    Forestville                   38.5          19    Fairmont Heights      31.5
20    Fairmont Heights              38.5          20    Forestville           30.7
21    Central                       33.0          21    Central               28.4
22    Tall Oaks                     23.1          22    Alternative High      16.7
23    Croom Vocational              9.1           23    Croom Vocational      11.8
24    Alternative High              0.0           24    Tall Oaks             4.8

                    Howard County av., English 10                     78.2
                    Montgomery County av., English 10                 69.0
                    Anne Arundel County av., English 10               62.1

     Source: MSDE, The Gazette ~ Greenbelt, Thursday 28Sep2006, p.A-16




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Overall, the improvement of public education and schools in Prince George’s County will
inevitably lead to the improvement of the scores of our County’s public high school students on
the HSAs. This is attainable both in the short term (2006 to 2009) and in the long term (2009 and
beyond).

Specifically, as one participating County citizen relayed to the Committee on several occasions,
this County must “provide students with a good curriculum, with good, not terrible textbooks,
and with teachers who are truly qualified to teach the courses.”




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5.4 Legal Challenges to High Stakes Testing
To date, there have been no legal challenges filed against the state of Maryland due to its
enactment of high-stakes testing regulations. Maryland has received no legal challenges because
the class of 2007 is not required to pass the test to meet graduation requirements. The first high
school class to be assessed based on high-stakes standards will be the graduating class of 2009.
The following list chronicles causes of action that have been filed against states using high-
stakes testing through the country. These legal challenges represent the kinds of cases that
Maryland could face as high-stakes testing principles are implemented in the coming years.


First Amendment – Establishment Clause

Establishment Clause: Triplett v. Livingston County Board of Education, 967 S.W.2d 25, 31
(KY 1997). Court held that requirement for taking Kentucky's mandatory exit exam did not
violate Establishment Clause because its purpose was secular; the exam did not advance or
inhibit religion, and the exam did not foster government entanglement with religion.

Free Exercise Clause: Triplett v. Livingston County Board of Education, 967 S.W.2d 25, 32-33
(KY 1997) Court held that despite Triplett's religious practice, the State's interest in the
improvement of the educational system was sufficiently compelling to require that all students
take the exam.

Fourteenth Amendment - Procedural Due Process

1. Mahavongsanan v. Hall, 529 F.2d 448, 450 (5th Cir. 1976). Student received timely notice
that she was required to take an exit exam and was given the option to complete additional
courses in lieu of the exam, which provided her adequate due process protections.

2. Debra P. v. Turlington, 644 F.2d 397, 404 (5th Cir. Unit B 1981). Court declared Florida law
unconstitutional under the Due Process Clause because it did not provide adequate notice for
students to pass a statewide minimum competency test in order to receive a diploma, and test
was fundamental unfair because covered material was not taught in Florida's schools.

3. Brookhart v. Illinois State Bd. Educ., 697 F.2d 179, 186-87 (7th Cir. 1983). Court held that
Due Process Clause of Fourteenth Amendment requires that students with disabilities be
provided substantial notice and opportunity, which is more than eighteen months, to prepare for a
minimum competency exit exam.

4. Bester v. Tuscaloosa City Bd. of Educ., 722 F.2d 1514, 1516 (11th Cir. 1984). Students have
no property right in an expectation that they will be promoted, despite objectively substandard
class work, and they have no procedural due process claim.




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5. Anderson v. Banks, 520 F. Supp. 472, 505 (S.D. Ga. 1981). Where a school ensured that an
exam could be retaken, remedial courses would be provided, and students given more than two
years notice of an exit exam, there was no procedural due process violation of students' rights.

6. Crump v. Gilmer Indep. Sch. Dist., 797 F. Supp. 552, 555-57 (E.D. Tex. 1992). Court granted
a temporary restraining order to students on grounds that the implementation period for Texas
Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) was insufficient, and that matters tested under TAAS
were not actually taught in schools, which violated the Due Process Clause. Cf. Williams v.
Austin Indep. Sch. Dist., 796 F.Supp. 251, 254-56 (W.D. Tex. 1992). Court denied a temporary
restraining order to the student on grounds that student provided was adequate notice that he
must pass the TAAS to graduate, and school courses adequately prepared him to take the TAAS,
which satisfied the Due Process Clause.

7. Erik V. v. Causby, 977 F. Supp. 384 (E.D. NC 1997). Students failed to establish that there is
any property right in promotion that triggers procedural protections under Due Process Clause.

8. GI Forum v. Texas Educational Agency, 87 F. Supp.2d 667, 682-83 (W.D. Tex. 2000). Court
ruled there was no due process violation on the ground that the Texas Educational Agency
provided adequate notice of the consequences of TAAS and ensured that the exam was
correlated to material actually taught in the classroom.

9. Bd. of Educ. of Northport-East Northport Union Free Sch. Dist. v. Ambach, 107 Misc.2d
830,843, 436 N.Y.S.2d 564, 573-575 (1981), aff'd in part, rev'd in part, 458 N.Y.S.2d 680, 680,
684-85 (A.D. 1982), aff'd, 469 N.Y.S.2d 669, 60 N.Y.2d 758, 457 N.E.2d 775, 776 (Ct. App.
1983), cert. denied, 465 U.S. 1101 (1984). There was no violation of the Due Process Clause
because students had no reasonable expectation of receiving a high school diploma without
completing a competency exam, and were given three years advance notice of the requirements
of the exit exam prior to graduation.

10. Rene Ex Rel Rene v. Reed, 751 N.E.2d 736, 742-42 (Ind. App. 2001). There was no due
process violation when students were provided adequate notice of competency exam
requirements.

Fourteenth Amendment - Substantive Due Process

GI Forum v. Texas Educational Agency, 87 F. Supp.2d 667, 682-83 (W.D. Tex. 2000). A state
educational determination may be invalid under substantive due process analysis when they
reflect a "substantial departure from accepted academic norms to demonstrate that the person or
committee responsible did not actually exercise professional judgment."




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Fourteenth Amendment - Equal Protection

1. Sandlin v. Johnson, 643 F.2d 1027, 1029 (4th Cir. 1981). Classifying students for promotion
on the basis of a reading level determined by the Ginn Reading Series was rationally related to
permissible governmental interests in education and passed muster under equal protection.

2. Debra P. v. Turlington, 730 F.2d 1405, 1409-1417 (11th Cir. 1984). There is no equal
protection claim when the apparent unfairness in causing failure of black students on the exit
exam is outweighed by the demonstrated effect of diploma sanctions on remedying the greater
unfairness of functional illiteracy, which helps remedy vestiges of past discrimination.

3. Larry P. v. Riles, 793 F.2d 969, 984 (9th Cir. 1984). Plaintiffs' equal protection claim fails
because pervasiveness of discriminatory effect without more cannot be equated with
discriminatory intent required by Washington v. Davis.

4. Georgia State Conf. of Branches of NAACP v. State of Georgia, 775 F.2d 1403, 1414-16 (11th
Cir. 1985). Ability grouping is not unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause, even
when it results in racial disparity in classrooms and when ability group schemes will remedy
consequences of past racial segregation.

5. Anderson v. Banks, 520 F. Supp. 472, 498-503 (S.D. Ga. 1981). The school district's exit exam
policy violated the Equal Protection Clause of Fourteenth Amendment.

6. Rankins v. Louisiana State Bd. of Elementary and Secondary Educ., 637 So.2d 548, 555 (La.
Ct. App. 1994). Court held there was no violation of the Equal Protection Clause because
students in non-public schools and home-based study programs were not treated differently from
all similarly treated students, and the test bore a rational relationship to the State of Louisiana's
interest in ensuring the minimum competency of students obtaining a high school diploma.

7. Bd. of Educ. of Northport-East Northport Union Free Sch. Dist. v. Ambach, 107 Misc.2d 830,
436 N.Y.S.2d 564, 571 (1981), aff'd in part, rev'd in part, 458 N.Y.S.2d 680, 689 (A.D. 1982),
aff'd, 469 N.Y.S.2d 669, 60 N.Y.2d 758, 457 N.E.2d 775, 776 (Ct. App. 1983), cert. denied, 465
U.S. 1101 (1984). Court held there was no violation of the Equal Protection Clause because
students with disabilities do not constitute suspect classification and equal protection test and
there is a rational basis for governmental interest in implementing exit exams as it improves
educational services to students, provides remediation, and improves value of high school
diploma.

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act

1. Erik V. v. Causby, 977 F. Supp. 384, 390 (E.D.N.C. 1997). Minority students failed to show
that a Board policy that provides students in grades 3 through 8 who not receive passing scores
on state-developed standardized test will be retained treats minorities more harshly than white
students.



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2. Anderson v. Banks, 520 F. Supp. 472 (S.D. Ga. 1981). Court held that Georgia's high school
exit exam violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act because it imposed diploma requirements on
black students who attended substandard segregated schools and were subject to tracking
systems in a school district. See also Debra P. v. Turlington, 644 F.2d 397, 407 (5th Cir. Unit B
1981). African-American students received inferior education compared to white students so that
immediate use of diploma sanction would be unfair and would punish black students for
deficiencies created by dual school systems.

3. Graves v. Alabama State Bd. of Educ., 776 F. Supp. 1518, 1523 (M.D. Ala. 1991). Redress is
available under Title VI for facially neutral "actions having an unjustifiable disparate impact on
minorities."

4. GI Forum v. Texas Educational Agency, 87 F. Supp.2d 667, 677-682 (W.D. Tex. 2000). The
TAAS test adversely affects minority students, but the Texas Educational Agency demonstrated
educational necessity for the test and there are no equally effective alternatives, therefore TAAS
exit exam does not violate regulations promulgated under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
1964.

Title IX of the Civil Rights Act

Sharif v. New York State Educ. Dept, 709 F. Supp. 345, 361 (S.D. N.Y. 1989). Plaintiffs used the
disparate impact test to show that exclusive use of the SAT to award merit scholarships to
disadvantaged female applicants violated Title IX of the Civil Rights Act.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

1. Brookhart v. Illinois State Bd. Educ., 697 F.2d 179, 184(7th Cir. 1983). Court held that
students with learning disabilities do not meet the requirement of "otherwise qualified" under
Section 504 so denial of a diploma because they could not pass the exit exam is not
discriminatory.

2. Larry P. v. Riles, 793 F.2d 969, 982 (9th Cir. 1984). Plaintiffs establish prima facie case under
Title VI by showing that tests have a discriminatory impact on black students so the burden shifts
to the defendants to demonstrate requirements that caused disproportionate discrimination
educationally necessary. Here, defendants failed to show educational necessity for using I.Q.
tests to place black students in classes for the educable mentally retarded). But see Georgia State
Conf. of Branches of NAACP v. State of Georgia, 775 F.2d 1403, 1416-1420 (11th Cir. 1985).
Defendants rebutted plaintiffs' prima facie case of disparate impact by establishing educational
necessity for achievement grouping.

3. Georgia State Conf. of Branches of NAACP, 775 F.2d 1403, 1428 (11th Cir.1985). Plaintiffs
must prove intentional discrimination or bad faith to obtain monetary damages under Section
504.    4. Anderson v. Banks, 520 F. Supp. 472, 510-12 (S.D. Ga. 1981). Court held that Section
504 regulations provide a claim for relief for those who were misclassified as disabled. But court
held that school authorities have not engaged in unlawful discrimination under Section 504


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against those students with disabilities who cannot meet a certain standard of academic
achievement because of their disability.

5. Ellis v. Morehouse School of Medicine, 925 F. Supp. 1529, 1549 (N.D.Ga. 1996). Court held
that a medical student who suffered from dyslexia did not prove he could not perform the
essential requirements necessary for a medical student despite his disability or with reasonable
accommodation, and thus he did not meet the requirement of "otherwise qualified" under Section
504.

6. Bd. of Educ. of Northport-East Northport Union Free Sch. Dist. v. Ambach, 107 Misc.2d 830,
836, 436 N.Y.S.2d 564, 569-70 (1981), aff'd in part, rev'd in part, 458 N.Y.S.2d 680, 688 (A.D.
1982), aff'd, 469 N.Y.S.2d 669, 60 N.Y.2d 758, 457 N.E.2d 775, 776 (Ct. App. 1983), cert.
denied, 465 U.S. 1101 (1984). Court held that denial of a diploma based upon inability to pass an
exit exam is not denial of a benefit "solely by reason of" a handicap; Section 504 requires that a
handicapped student be provided with an appropriate education but does not guarantee that the
student will successfully meet the requirements for a diploma.

7. Hawaii State Dept. of Educ., 17 EHLR 360 (OCR 1990). The Office of Civil Rights
determined that the State educational agency (SEA) failed to consider, on an individual basis,
whether students with disabilities required reading assistance during an exam. The SEA denied
those students, and those similarly situated, an equal opportunity to pass exam in violation of
Section 504 regulation, 34 C.F.R. 104(b)(1)(vii) and (b)(2)).

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

1. Larry P. v. Riles, 793 F.2d 969, 981 (9th Cir. 1984). A school district improperly used I.Q.
tests that have not been validated to place black students in "educable mentally retarded"
(E.M.R.) special educational classes, which violated the Education for All Handicapped Children
Act.

2. Bd. of Educ. of Northport-East Northport Union Free Sch. Dist. v. Ambach, 107 Misc.2d 830,
836, 436 N.Y.S.2d 564, 570 (1981), aff'd in part, rev'd in part, 458 N.Y.S.2d 680, 688 (A.D.
1982), aff'd, 469 N.Y.S.2d 669, 60 N.Y.2d 758, 457 N.E.2d 775, 776 (Ct. App. 1983), cert.
denied, 465 U.S. 1101 (1984)(1981). The award of diploma is not a necessary component of a
"free appropriate public education," and the denial of a diploma for failure to pass an exit exam
is not a violation of the EHA.

3. Brookhart v. Illinois State Board of Education, 697 F.2d 179, 182-83 (7th Cir. 1983). The
denial of diplomas to children with disabilities who qualified to receive special education and
related services under the IDEA, but who were unable to pass the Minimal Competency Test, is
not a denial of a "free appropriate public education."




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4. Rene Ex Rel Rene v. Reed, 751 N.E.2d 736, 742-42 (Ind. App. 2001). The state is not required
to honor certain accommodations in students' IEPs under the IDEA where they would affect the
validity of test results, such as reading of test questions that are meant to test reading skills and
comprehension.

Burden of Proof in Establishing the Adverse Impact of High-Stakes Testing

Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000(d) et seq., 34 C.F.R. 100.3, the
plaintiff bears the burden of proof to establish the adverse impact of the high-stakes test. If that
burden is met, then the burden of proof shifts to the school to establish an educational
justification for the test use. If the school establishes educational justification, then the burden
shifts back to the plaintiff to show that there are less discriminatory alternatives that are
practicable and that would effectively meet the educational objectives of the school. GI Forum v.
Texas Educational Agency, 87 F. Supp.2d 667, 677-682 (W.D. Tex. 2000).

Reasonable Accommodations and Modifications for Testing

1. Alabama Dept. of Educ., 29 IDELR 249 (OCR 1998). The student was provided with
approved testing modifications on the high school exit exam, such as testing in a small group
setting, large test print, math and language sections read aloud, marked answers in a test booklet.
The student was not permitted to use an Arkenstone scanner as a modification during the reading
subtest because it would not measure his ability to read and comprehend, but only his listening
skills. The reading subtest assessed whether the student could read well enough to comprehend
everyday material. A scanner could be used for math and language subtests on the exam. OCR
determined there was no violation of Section 504 and Title II of the ADA.

2. Florida State Dept. of Educ., 28 IDELR 1002 (OCR 1998). The Department of Education's
rules and guidelines did not allow reading items on the communication skills section of the high
school competency exam to be read as an accommodation, because it may invalidate the validity
of the exam. OCR found no violation of Section 504 and Title II of the ADA.

3. Virginia Dept. of Educ., 27 IDELR 1148 (OCR 1997). OCR found no violation of Section 504
and Title II of the ADA because the state's norm-referenced test was used to measure the
student's academic achievement, and was not for educational or placement purposes; the student
had test questions read to him, but this invalidated his scores on the reading portion of the test.

4. Georgia Dept. of Educ., 27 IDELR 1072 (OCR 1997). OCR determined that modifications
requested by the student to take the exam where not called for in the student's IEP and were
consistent with the student's primary method of communication. There was no violation of
Section 504 and Title II of the ADA.




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5. Mobile County (AL) Bd. of Educ., 26 IDELR 695 (SEA 1997). A hearing officer found that
Alabama's High School Exit Exam is a criterion-referenced test. Students with disabilities were
afforded accommodations such as an unlimited opportunity to pass the exam. The state's policies
and procedures in denying students to have certain portions of exam regarding language and
math read to them did not violate Section 504 and Title II of the ADA.

6. Santa Paula (CA) Unified High Sch. Dist., 26 IDELR 1021 (OCR 1997). OCR found
insufficient facts to support a claim that the district discriminated against the student by failing to
provide that he take all tests orally, or take tests in Resource Specialist's class.

7. Nevada State Dept. of Educ., 25 IDELR 752 (OCR 1996). OCR determined that there was no
violation of Section 504 and Title II of ADA because the state's required 11th grade exit exam
tested basic skills that were an essential part of its educational program. Students with disabilities
were provided accommodations, including extra time, pass scores were set relatively low, and no
student failed the test due to the state's failure to provide a calculator.

8. Northeast (TX) Indep. School Dist., 23 IDELR 52 (OCR 1995). OCR found that a district was
not at fault for failing to identify child as a student with a disability, so district was not obligated
to provide accommodations for a reading test.

9. Huntsville (AL) City Bd. of Educ., 21 IDELR 767 (SEA 1994). A hearing officer ruled that a
child was not denied a free appropriate public education because the district denied reading
accommodations for retaking of the language portion of the Alabama High School Graduation
Examination.

10. Birmingham (AL) Bd. of Educ., 20 IDELR 1281 (SEA1994). A hearing officer ruled that a
student with a disability should have been provided a reading accommodation on the math
portion of the Alabama High School Graduation Examination.

11. Hawaii State Dept. of Educ., 17 EHLR 360 (OCR 1990). OCR determined that requiring
students to complete sections of test that measure reading competency without a reader is not
discriminatory under Section 504 and Title II of the ADA but failure to provide a reader for
students with learning disabilities on other sections of the test not intended to measure reading
competency is discriminatory.

Challenges to High-Stakes Testing for Students with Learning Disabilities

1. Advocates for Special Kids v. Oregon Board of Education, Case No. CV-99-263 filed
February 24, 1999 (D. Or. 1999). In this class action lawsuit against the Oregon State Board of
Education for imposing discriminatory high-stakes testing requirements for children with
learning disabilities, the parties settled the lawsuit in February 2001.




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The settlement provides, in part, that the Oregon Board of Education will modify its current
high-stakes testing system for students with disabilities so they can demonstrate their abilities
instead of being tested on their disabilities.

2. Chapman et al v. California Department of Education, 36 IDELR 91 (N.D. Calif. 2001). The
California Board of Education was ordered to provide accommodations on the California High
School Exit Exam (CAHEE) for more than 45 students with learning disabilities. The Board of
Education was required to develop alternative methods to assess the knowledge and skills of
students who do not pass the exam, rev'd in part, and remanded. Smiley v. California
Department of Education, 37 IDELR 219 (9th Cir. 2002). Court upheld part of the district court's
decision permitting accommodations that are necessary for students to take the CAHEE, but held
that students did not meet burden of showing probable success on the merits, and that students'
challenge to the state's waiver provision was not ripe for adjudication.

3. Alexander Noon, et al. v. Alaska Department of Education and Anchorage School District,
Case number A04-0057 CV filed on March 16, 2004. This class action lawsuit charged that
Alaska's exit exam discriminates against students with disabilities in multiple ways and ensured
that students with disabilities will fail. Three areas of concern related to IDEA were cited:
children with disabilities need to have reasonable accommodations; children with disabilities
need to have an alternative way to be assessed; children should not be tested on things they have
not been taught or required to learn. Complaint in Noon v. Alaska Dept of Ed.

Togut, Torin. High-Stakes Testing: Educational Barometer for Success, or False
Prognosticator for Failure. The Beacon, Fall 2004.




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5.5 Economic
High school completion is a critical step on the road to entering the workforce. Most students
are being advised that they must attend college and obtain a degree in order to be successful,
however, businesses are desperately seeking workers with basic literacy, numeracy and technical
skill sets. The impact of not being able to adequately demonstrate these basic skills by virtue of
a high school diploma will have negative consequences on students.

Labor economists project that the nation is about to experience the greatest labor shortage in U.S.
history. The following literature point to this conclusion:

       In a recent League for Innovation publication, U.S. Senator Tom Harking wrote that
       America is facing a dramatic crisis in the workforce arising from a worker gap, a skills
       gap, and a wage gap (Harkin, 2003).

       The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that there will be 168 million jobs in our
       economy by 2001, but only 158 million workers to fill them (CAM Report, 2004). That
       is a real quantitative shortage of 10 million workers.

       Baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) are retiring in record numbers, and
       there are not enough workers in succeeding generations to fill the void. Due to declining
       birth rates in the U.S., there will be no growth in the number of native-born workers in
       their prime working years (Herman, Olivo & Gioia, 2003).

       The percentage of the workforce composed of four-year college graduates is predicted to
       stagnate.

       The number of workers with two-year degrees and skill certificates will fall far short of
       anticipated demand.

       A recent white paper published by the National Association of Manufacturers reports that
       the manufacturing sector has lost 2 million jobs in the recent economic downturn, yet 80
       percent of manufacturers, both large and small, report a moderate to serious shortage of
       qualified applicants (Keeping America Competitive, 2003).

As the following charts reveals, Maryland workforce projections mirror this trend. The code
given for an occupation represents the "usual" education and training requirement based on
research conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. For some occupations, it is possible
to have more or less education and/or training than the code indicates.

See the following charts on Maryland occupations with the most annual openings, 2004-2014.

               A = Bachelor degree or higher
               B = Post secondary award or associate degree
               C = High school or less




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The following snap shot of Prince Georges County workforce statistics represent an emerging
shortage in high school prepared entrants. In 2004, the projected demand for on the job training
(OTJ) was over 52% of the job market. These same workforce needs are projected through 2012.




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Additional implication of not earning a conventional high school diploma as a result of their
inability to meet the HSA requirements is the inability to attract employers in the job market.
Subsequently, when the unemployment rate rises, incomes will go down, and the possibility
becomes greater for increase in welfare dependency, crime, family instability and violence.

This could conceivably lead to fewer high quality jobs and fewer employed persons, which may
cause county income tax receipts to drop, as would the ability of the county government to
provide the quantity and quality of services desired. This condition could force tax rates to rise
thus increasing costs for police protection, incarceration and corrections, and the costs to
maintain living standards for the poor. These economic effects may be larger in Prince George’s
County than in other Maryland counties.

Given this economic outlook, Prince George’s County cannot afford to have a reduction in the
pool of high school graduates entering the workforce. The most costly and most valuable
business resource is human capital. Every consideration must be made to ensure new businesses
locate and operate within Prince George’s County. As such, we must cultivate our number one
asset—our future workforce.




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5.6 Public Safety & Welfare
While it is noteworthy that Prince George’s County saw double-digit reduction in overall crime
in 2006, the public safety and welfare implications of the lack of a high school diploma cannot
be ignored. There is a strong connection between not having a high school diploma and
involvement in the criminal justice system. (http://nationalsafeplace.org). Many individuals
lacking a high school diploma experience early parenthood, poverty, homelessness, and/or
alcohol and drug abuse. These are some of the conditions that contribute to criminal activity and
as a result, affect public safety and welfare. A Bureau of Justice report highlights that 68% of
state prison inmates do not have a high school diploma and 47% of drug offenders have neither a
high school diploma nor a GED. According to the 2006 Maryland Report Card, the dropout rate
for Prince George’s County was reported at 3.96% and there is the potential for this number to
increase, at least during the early years of High Stakes Testing. Federal demographic profiles
(www.fedstats.gov/mapstats/crime/county/24033.html) for Prince’s George’s County last
updated on January 12, 2007, were as follows:

            Crime                                                          Number
            Total                                             51,507
            Murder                                            72
            Rape                                              228
            Robbery                                           2,938
            Aggravated Assault                                4,174
            Burglary                                          7,043
            Larceny - theft                                   26,626
            Motor vehicle thefts                              9,881
            Population                                        801,515
            Coverage indicator                                100%

Thus, it is incumbent upon our educational systems to minimize the potential implications of
crime on the county criminal justice and social service systems.




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6. RECOMMENDATIONS
6.1 Rationale
The recommendations of the Prince George’s County Council’s Blue Ribbon Committee on
High-Stakes Testing will address:

   (1) School-based actions: These would be necessary, from 2006 to 2009 and beyond 2009,
       to assist students in the schools, for them to succeed on the HSA.

   (2) School-related, out-of-school actions: These would be necessary, beyond 2009, to assist
       youngsters 19 years old or older, who may have left high school without a diploma, to
       remediate, retake and pass the HSA. These youngsters would need assistance from the
       county either because they were promoted to Grade 12 but did not pass the HSA or did
       not reach or complete Grade 12 because they “dropped out” of high school.

       If successful, these youngsters could enter a community college, apply for admission to a
       four-year college or university, enter a job-training or vocational education program or
       join the workforce. It would be prudent for Prince George’s County not to neglect these
       youth.

   (3) Non-school-related, out-of-school actions: Until and before the out-of-school
       youngsters remediate or re-take and pass the Maryland HSA, this county must support
       and assist them with a wide variety of governmental and private-sector, community-
       based support services.

       These will include job training and workforce preparation programs, welfare and/or
       cash public assistance, parenting classes, safety enhancement and crime prevention
       information dissemination and related activities, etc.

       At both the County and State levels, the Prince George’s County Department of Health,
       Department of Social Services, Department of Parks and Recreation, Department of
       Public Safety, etc. must work with community-based organizations, programs and
       initiatives, to be directly or indirectly involved in developing operating services to assist
       such youth. If we fail to do this, we would be acting or doing so at our own peril.

It is this Committee’s belief that additional specific actions, by the Prince George’s County
government as well as the Maryland State Legislature, the State Board of Education, businesses,
organizations, parents and communities, will be necessary to effectively address this looming
crisis or existing potential for a state of emergency.




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6.2 Research Basis

The Blue Ribbon Committee has concluded that the AERA position statement on High-Stakes
Testing in PreK-12 Education most accurately reflects the sentiment of the body and
subsequently endorses the following:

      The AERA position statement on high-stakes testing is based on the 1999
      Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. The Standards represent a
      professional consensus concerning sound and appropriate test use in education
      and psychology. They are sponsored and endorsed by the AERA together with
      the American Psychological Association (APA) and the National Council on
      Measurement in Education (NCME). This statement is intended as a guide and a
      caution to policy makers, testing professionals, and test users involved in high-
      stakes testing programs. However, the Standards remain the most comprehensive
      and authoritative statement by the AERA concerning appropriate test use and
      interpretation.

      This statement sets forth a set of conditions essential to sound implementation of
      high-stakes educational testing programs. It is the position of the AERA that
      every high-stakes achievement testing program in education should meet all of the
      following conditions:

      Protection Against High-Stakes Decisions Based on a Single Test
      Decisions that affect individual students' life chances or educational opportunities
      should not be made on the basis of test scores alone. Other relevant information
      should be taken into account to enhance the overall validity of such decisions. As
      a minimum assurance of fairness, when tests are used as part of making high-
      stakes decisions for individual students such as promotion to the next grade or
      high school graduation, students must be afforded multiple opportunities to pass
      the test. More importantly, when there is credible evidence that a test score may
      not adequately reflect a student's true proficiency, alternative acceptable means
      should be provided by which to demonstrate attainment of the tested standards.

      Adequate Resources and Opportunity to Learn
      When content standards and associated tests are introduced as a reform to change
      and thereby improve current practice, opportunities to access appropriate
      materials and retraining consistent with the intended changes should be provided
      before schools, teachers, or students are sanctioned for failing to meet the new
      standards. In particular, when testing is used for individual student accountability
      or certification, students must have had a meaningful opportunity to learn the
      tested content and cognitive processes. Thus, it must be shown that the tested
      content has been incorporated into the curriculum, materials, and instruction
      students are provided before high-stakes consequences are imposed for failing
      examination.




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Validation for Each Separate Intended Use
Tests valid for one use may be invalid for another. Each separate use of a high-
stakes test, for individual certification, for school evaluation, for curricular
improvement, for increasing student motivation, or for other uses requires a
separate evaluation of the strengths and limitations of both the testing program
and the test itself.

Full Disclosure of Likely Negative Consequences of High-Stakes Testing
Programs
Where credible scientific evidence suggests that a given type of testing program is
likely to have negative side effects, test developers and users should make a
serious effort to explain these possible effects to policy makers.

Alignment Between the Test and the Curriculum
Both the content of the test and the cognitive processes engaged in taking the test
should adequately represent the curriculum. High-stakes tests should not be
limited to that portion of the relevant curriculum that is easiest to measure. When
testing is for school accountability or to influence the curriculum, the test should
be aligned with the curriculum as set forth in standards documents representing
intended goals of instruction. Because high-stakes testing inevitably creates
incentives for inappropriate methods of test preparation, multiple test forms
should be used or new test forms should be introduced on a regular basis, to avoid
a narrowing of the curriculum toward just the content sampled on a particular
form.

Validity of Passing Scores and Achievement Levels
When testing programs use specific scores to determine "passing" or to define
reporting categories like "proficient," the validity of these specific scores must be
established in addition to demonstrating the representativeness of the test content.
To begin with, the purpose and meaning of passing scores or achievement levels
must be clearly stated. There is often confusion, for example, among minimum
competency levels (traditionally required for grade-to-grade promotion), grade
level (traditionally defined as a range of scores around the national average on
standardized tests), and "world-class" standards (set at the top of the distribution,
anywhere from the 70th to the 99th percentile). Once the purpose is clearly
established, sound and appropriate procedures must be followed in setting passing
scores or proficiency levels. Finally, validity evidence must be gathered and
reported, consistent with the stated purpose.

Opportunities for Meaningful Remediation for Examinees Who Fail High-
Stakes Tests
Examinees who fail a high-stakes test should be provided meaningful
opportunities for remediation. Remediation should focus on the knowledge and
skills the test is intended to address, not just the test performance itself. There
should be sufficient time before retaking the test to assure that students have time
to remedy any weaknesses discovered.



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Appropriate Attention to Language Differences Among Examinees
If a student lacks mastery of the language in which a test is given, then that test
becomes, in part, a test of language proficiency. Unless a primary purpose of a
test is to evaluate language proficiency, it should not be used with students who
cannot understand the instructions or the language of the test itself. If English
language learners are tested in English, their performance should be interpreted in
the light of their language proficiency. Special accommodations for English
language learners may be necessary to obtain valid scores.

Appropriate Attention to Students with Disabilities
In testing individuals with disabilities, steps should be taken to ensure that the test
score inferences accurately reflect the intended construct rather than any
disabilities and their associated characteristics extraneous to the intent of the
measurement.

Careful Adherence to Explicit Rules for Determining Which Students Are to
be Tested
When schools, districts, or other administrative units are compared to one another
or when changes in scores are tracked over time, there must be explicit policies
specifying which students are to be tested and under what circumstances students
may be exempted from testing. Such policies must be uniformly enforced to
assure the validity of score comparisons. In addition, reporting of test score
results should accurately portray the percentage of students exempted.

Sufficient Reliability for Each Intended Use
Reliability refers to the accuracy or precision of test scores. It must be shown that
scores reported for individuals or for schools are sufficiently accurate to support
each intended interpretation. Accuracy should be examined for the scores actually
used. For example, information about the reliability of raw scores may not
adequately describe the accuracy of percentiles; information about the reliability
of school means may be insufficient if scores for subgroups are also used in
reaching decisions about schools.

Ongoing Evaluation of Intended and Unintended Effects of High-Stakes
Testing
With any high-stakes testing program, ongoing evaluation of both intended and
unintended consequences is essential. In most cases, the governmental body that
mandates the test should also provide resources for a continuing program of
research and for dissemination of research findings concerning both the positive
and the negative effects of the testing program.

Adopted, AERA, July 2000




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6.3 Detailed Recommendations Chart

Preparing for HSA success in 2009 and beyond will require short- (and medium-term) plans and
actions in addition to long-term plans and actions.

Short-term plan and actions (1 to 4 years) are those which may focus on assisting today’s
students in middle school grades 6, 7 and 8 and students in today’s high school grades 9 and 10
(class of 2009 and 2010), to succeed on the mandatory Maryland HSA.

Long-term plans and actions (5 to10 years) may focus on adequately preparing all students in
Prince George’s County Public Schools, in all of the elementary and middle school grades, to
succeed, in the future, on the mandatory HSA.

In the following chart, the Committee has further elucidated specific recommendations for Prince
George’s County in alignment with the conditions set forth above.




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                                                                                                                   RESPONSIBLE
                                                RECOMMENDATION                  PROPOSED ACTION                                          PRIORITY/COST                  COMMENTS
                                                                                                                     PARTIES

                                           1.    Provide multiple options   Institutionalize standardized       State Board of          Short-term/ Unknown   Assessment may be viewed as an
AERA CONDITION: PROTECTION AGAINST HIGH-




                                                 for measuring              examinations which are              Education                                     opportunity to provide feedback
 STAKES DECISIONS BASED ON A SINGLE TEST




                                                 competency standards       performance based and reflect                                                     rather than a determination of
                                                                                                                Prince Georges County
                                                 beyond the HSAs.           the different kinds of knowledge                                                  success or failure. Continuous
                                                                                                                Public Schools
                                                                            and skills based on content areas                                                 feedback is key to a student’s
                                                                            in the MD Voluntary School                                                        success.
                                                                            Curriculum (VSC), that include:
                                                                                                                                                              According to the National PTA,
                                                                                Portfolio Plus                                                                “valid assessment does not consist
                                                                                                                                                              of only a single test score, and that
                                                                                Preparation Plus
                                                                                                                                                              at no time should a single test be
                                                                                Combination (Constructed                                                      considered the sole determinant of a
                                                                                responses/CRs multiple                                                        student’s academic or work future,
                                                                                choice)                                                                       e.g. high school graduation,
                                                                                                                                                              scholarship aid, honors programs, or
                                                                                Limited Combination                                                           college admissions. Tests are only
                                                                                                                                                              on facet of a sound assessment
                                                                                                                                                              program.”




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                                                                                                                                                       RESPONSIBLE
                                                                                 RECOMMENDATION                   PROPOSED ACTION                                            PRIORITY/COST                  COMMENTS
                                                                                                                                                         PARTIES

                                                                            2.    Accelerate the scoring      Reduce the length of time             State Board of          Immediate/ Unknown   There is a critical need to provide
AERA CONDITION: OPPORTUNITIES FOR MEANINGFUL REMEDIATION FOR EXAMINES WHO




                                                                                  and report of HSA results   between administering the HSA         Education                                    school administration ample time to
                                                                                  to schools by the State     and distribution of scoring                                                        plan and implement remediation for
                                                                                  Board of Education.         reports prior to the end of the                                                    any student who does not pass the
                                                                                                              current school year.                                                               HSA.
                                                                                                              Increase the availability of taking                                                Students should be able to make use
                                                                                                              the HSAs and remediation                                                           of the multiple programs available
                                                                                                              coursework on-line.                                                                during the academic year. For
                                                                                                                                                                                                 students who may have difficulty in
                                                                                                              [NA: The HSAs are administered
                                                                                                                                                                                                 a traditional test setting, the state
                                                                                                              multiple times during the
                                                                                                                                                                                                 plans a 'comparable' high school
                                                                                                              academic year, however, this
                                                                                                                                                                                                 assessment. MSDE reports that
                                                                                                              recommendation only addresses
                         FAIL HIGH-STAKES TESTS




                                                                                                                                                                                                 they currently plan to deliver a
                                                                                                              one scoring report. Please
                                                                                                                                                                                                 solid, representative prototype and
                                                                                                              advise?]
                                                                                                                                                                                                 have it ready for the 2008-2009
                                                                                                                                                                                                 school year.

                                                                            3.    Establish mandatory         Enforce students participation in     State Board of          Immediate/Unknown    Teachers and guidance counselors
                                                                                  remediation options to      a wide variety of remediation         Education                                    should be held accountable to
                                                                                  ensure successful           programs made available through                                                    ensure that two-way communication
                                                                                                                                                    Prince Georges County
                                                                                  completion of the HSAs.     the county that should include:                                                    has taken place with parents
                                                                                                                                                    Public Schools
                                                                                                                                                                                                 regarding students’ HSA status.
                                                                                                                  Twilight Academy
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Formal documentation should be
                                                                                                                  Graduation Centers                                                             made through either face-to-face
                                                                                                                                                                                                 conference with parent/guardian or
                                                                                                                  School to Work Centers                                                         phone call to ensure that parent(s)
                                                                                                              A student should be mandated to                                                    or guardian(s) has received
                                                                                                              enroll immediately upon notice                                                     information and understands the
                                                                                                              of failure.                                                                        magnitude of failing test and
                                                                                                                                                                                                 student’s refusal to participate in
                                                                                                                                                                                                 remedial programs. In schools
                                                                                                                                                                                                 where applicable, school-based
                                                                                                                                                                                                 parent liaisons may be able to assist
                                                                                                                                                                                                 with this task.




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                                                                                                        RESPONSIBLE
                                  RECOMMENDATION                    PROPOSED ACTION                                           PRIORITY/COST   COMMENTS
                                                                                                          PARTIES

                             4.     Enhance reporting of        Track and report more detailed       State Board of          Short-term
                                   individual student           information on students progress     Education
                                   academic data for use in     toward meeting academic
                                   the development of a         standards (e.g. greater aggregated
                                   remediation plan.            data on students)
MEANINGFUL REMEDIATION FOR




                             5.    Broaden the strategies       Provide a detailed explanation of    State Board of          Immediate
 EXAMINES WHO FAIL HIGH-




                                   used to communicate          how HSAs are calculated when         Education
                                   student progress to          scores are disseminated.
    OPPORTUNITIES FOR
     AERA CONDITION:




                                                                                                     Prince Georges County
                                   parents
       STAKES TESTS




                                                                Conduct a Public Awareness           Public Schools
                                                                Campaign aimed at parents on
                                                                HSAs.
                                                                Develop “collaborative plans” to
                                                                help parents navigate the HSA
                                                                process in order to help their
                                                                student (especially for parents of
                                                                s children with special needs).




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                                                                                                                                      RESPONSIBLE
                                                                 RECOMMENDATION                    PROPOSED ACTION                                           PRIORITY/COST                 COMMENTS
                                                                                                                                        PARTIES

                                                            6.    Create and implement a       Develop an incentive package to     Prince George’s County   Immediate/un-known   According to a recent report by
AERA CONDITION: VALIDITY OF PASSING SCORE AND ACHIEVEMENT




                                                                  formal recruitment and       include:                            Council                                       MSDE, as of fall 2005, Maryland
                                                                  retention plan for                                                                                             schools hired more than 8,000 new
                                                                                                   Housing Subsidies               Prince Georges County
                                                                  academic and                                                                                                   teachers. “The number of first-time
                                                                                                                                   Schools
                                                                  administrative staff in          Transportation Subsidies                                                      teachers hired from out-of-state now
                                                                  workforce shortage areas                                         Prince Georges County                         doubles that of those graduating
                                                                  as identified by the State       Tax Benefits                                                                  from in-state colleges.” This
                                                                                                                                   Police Department
                                                                  Department of                    Professional Development                                                      approach represents a stopgap
                                                                  Education.                                                       Prince Georges County                         measure to meet the need for highly
                                                                                                   Opportunities
                                                                                                                                   Redevelopment                                 qualified teachers.
                                                                                               Through the collective              Authority
                                                                                               bargaining process, establish                                                     “Critical subject shortages run the
                                                                                                                                   Prince Georges County                         gamut: math and science,
                                                                                               starting teacher salaries at $50K
                         LEVELS




                                                                                                                                   Housing Authority                             technology and computer science,
                                                                                               annually.
                                                                                                                                   State Department of                           English as a 2nd language, and
                                                                                               Provide monetary incentives for                                                   foreign languages.... among others.”
                                                                                                                                   Education
                                                                                               teachers providing HSA
                                                                                               preparatory education.              State Legislature                             Critical workforce shortage areas
                                                                                                                                                                                 affect every school jurisdiction in
                                                                                               Require developers to submit a      Local Businesses and                          the state. This is not a sustainable
                                                                                               “school impact plan” for all new    Non-profit                                    strategy to meet the academic needs
                                                                                               housing developments.               Organizations                                 of our students. We cannot
                                                                                               Request CIP funds for leases.                                                     continue to rely heavily on out-of-
                                                                                                                                                                                 state new hires.
                                                                                               Enhance academic staffing
                                                                                               structure to include crisis                                                       Moreover, we have not begun to
                                                                                               management staff positions                                                        address the need for non-teaching
                                                                                                                                                                                 staff for the school system.




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                                                                                                                      RESPONSIBLE
                                                  RECOMMENDATION                   PROPOSED ACTION                                           PRIORITY/COST                COMMENTS
                                                                                                                        PARTIES

                                             7.    Adequate Resources          Redefine the HSA as a tool for      State Board of           Immediate/Unknown
ADEQUATE RESOURCES
AND OPPORTUNITY TO
 AERA CONDITION:




                                                   must be a prerequisite to   improving instruction and           Education
                                                   the HSA graduation          learning.
                                                   requirement for
      LEARN




                                                                               Create a positive connotation to
                                                   Maryland students.
                                                                               successfully taking the HSAs by
                                                                               developing a “Diploma with
                                                                               Distinction” or other similar
                                                                               endorsements would be recorded
                                                                               by SBOE/MSDE.

                                             8.    Ensure that educational     Establish accountability            BOE                      Immediate/Unknown   Lack of accountability is one of the
    AERA CONDITION: ADEQUATE RESOURCES AND




                                                   funding is spent in the     measurements that will confirm                                                   main frustrations expressed by
                                                                                                                   Prince George’s County
                                                   most strategic and          what is being reported as being                                                  parents. No matter how much
                                                                                                                   Council
                                                   effective way.              done is actually being done,                                                     funding is allotted to education,
                                                                               including parental involvement,     PGCPS Administrators                         there must be accountability. There
                                                                               i.e., random personal interviews                                                 must be a mechanism in place so
            OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN




                                                                               (documented and signed) to                                                       that parents and the public-at-large
                                                                               confirm parents’ participation in                                                can trust the system again. We
                                                                               school improvement plans,                                                        must do more than “read about it” in
                                                                               parents’ involvement in HSA                                                      documents or policies. We must be
                                                                               prep and remedial support, etc.                                                  to see it through the academic
                                                                                                                                                                progress of our students and the
                                                                               Ask BOE to have a number of
                                                                                                                                                                retention of our teachers.
                                                                               parents available who will be
                                                                               able to confirm their involvement
                                                                               and their experience regarding
                                                                               parent involvement initiatives
                                                                               that have been implemented, i.e.,
                                                                               positive, inclusive, what can be
                                                                               improved, etc., when BOE gives
                                                                               budget report to County Council.




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                                                                                                                   RESPONSIBLE
                                              RECOMMENDATION                   PROPOSED ACTION                                           PRIORITY/COST                  COMMENTS
                                                                                                                     PARTIES

                                         9.    Construct a mechanism       Develop a program that engages       Prince Georges County   Short-term/Unknown   Community stakeholders have a
                                               to expand the               businesses, non-profit               Council                                      vested interest in the success of our
AERA CONDITION: ADEQUATE RESOURCES AND




                                               involvement of              organizations and faith-based                                                     public schools. Student
                                                                                                                County Executive
                                               community stakeholders      organizations to collaborate with                                                 matriculation from school to work
                                               in school reform efforts.   public school on reform issues       Prince Georges County                        creates the necessary workforce to
                                                                           and projects (e.g. “Adopt a          Public Schools                               strengthen and grow the county
        OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN




                                                                           School”).                                                                         economy. Schools also help prepare
                                                                                                                Local Businesses/Non-                        students to become productive, law
                                                                           Establish state tax and county tax   Profit Organizations                         abiding citizens.
                                                                           incentives for school reform
                                                                           coalition members.                   Park and Planning                            The business and non-profit
                                                                                                                (Dept. of Parks and
                                                                                                                                                             community must participate in a
                                                                           Create an awareness campaign         Recreation)                                  long-term relationship with public
                                                                           targeting community
                                                                                                                                                             schools to build and sustain strong
                                                                           stakeholders focusing on making
                                                                                                                                                             educational infrastructures.
                                                                           “Education a Priority”.
                                                                                                                                                             BOE Policy No. 0105 (County’s
                                                                           Establish family-friendly policies
                                                                                                                                                             Parent Involvement Policy)
                                                                           that provide paid release time for
                                                                           employees to attend parent-
                                                                           teacher conference and
                                                                           volunteering in schools.




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                                                                                 RESPONSIBLE
  RECOMMENDATION                      PROPOSED ACTION                                                  PRIORITY/COST                  COMMENTS
                                                                                   PARTIES

10. Facilitate and support      Develop a Parental Involvement Initiative     State Board of          Short-term/Unknown   The research overwhelmingly
                                that would:
    parental involvement in                                                   Education                                    demonstrates that parent
    education                   Communicate to parents that their                                                          involvement in children's learning is
                                involvement and support makes a great         Prince Georges County
                                                                                                                           positively related to achievement.
                                deal of difference in their children's        Public Schools
                                school performance, and that they need
                                                                                                                           Further, the research shows that the
                                not be highly educated or have large          Prince Georges                               more intensively parents are
                                amounts of free time for their                Community College                            involved in their children's learning,
                                involvement to be beneficial. Make this                                                    the more beneficial are the
                                point repeatedly.                             PTSA                                         achievement effects. This holds true
                                Encourage parent involvement from the         Council of P.G. PTAs                         for all types of parent involvement
                                time children first enter school (or                                                       in children's learning and for all
                                preschool, if they attend).
                                Teach parents that activities such as                                                      types and ages of students
                                modeling reading behavior and reading to                                                   (http://www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs/3/
                                their children increase children's interest                                                cu6.html).
                                in learning.
                                Develop parent involvement programs
                                that include a focus on parent
                                involvement in instruction--conducting
                                learning activities with children in the
                                home, assisting with homework, and
                                monitoring and encouraging the learning
                                activities of older students.
                                Provide orientation and training for
                                parents, but remember that intensive,
                                long-lasting training is neither necessary
                                nor feasible.
                                Make a special effort to engage the
                                involvement of parents of disadvantaged
                                students, who stand to benefit the most
                                from parent participation in their
                                learning, but whose parents are often
                                initially reluctant to become involved.
                                Continue to emphasize that parents are
                                partners of the school and that their
                                involvement is needed and valued.




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                                                                                                                           RESPONSIBLE
                                                       RECOMMENDATION                    PROPOSED ACTION                                         PRIORITY/COST                 COMMENTS
                                                                                                                             PARTIES

                                                     11. Develop a P-16              Create a multi-disciplined panel   State Legislature       Short-term/unknown
                                                         education strategy to       of experts on P-16 education
                                                                                                                        Prince Georges County
                                                         ensure students are ready   who would develop and publish
AERA CONDITION: FULL DISCLOSURE OF LIKELY NEGATIVE




                                                                                                                        Council
                                                         to learn and schools are    widely a “shared values
  CONSEQUENCES OF HIGH-STAKES TESTING PROGRAMS




                                                         prepared to instruct.       statement on the utility and       Prince Georges County
                                                                                     direction of the Maryland HSAs.    Public Schools
                                                                                     The panel should include:
                                                                                         Professors,
                                                                                         psychometricians and
                                                                                         researchers from higher
                                                                                         education institutions
                                                                                         Experienced and acclaimed
                                                                                         teachers from PGCPS
                                                                                         Representatives of Maryland
                                                                                         public school teachers to
                                                                                         include both MSTA and
                                                                                         PGCEA.
                                                                                     Support the PGCPS District’s
                                                                                     “Children Come First” Plan.

                                                     12. Promote the use of          Provide curricula (science,        Prince Georges County   Short-term/unknown   Inspiration and motivation can often
                                                         historically accurate       government, and history) that      Public Schools                               spring from emulating pioneers or
                                                         curriculum to students.     exemplify the outstanding                                                       high achievers whose ethnicity
                                                                                     contributions of minority                                                       resembles the learner.
                                                                                     populations.




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                                                                                                                RESPONSIBLE
                                          RECOMMENDATION                    PROPOSED ACTION                                           PRIORITY/COST                      COMMENTS
                                                                                                                  PARTIES

                                        13. Limit the number of         Report “only” the most current       State Board of          Immediate/unknown       Students are at risk of being
                                            HSA scores reported on a    results of a students’ HSA test on   Education                                       negatively labeled by the school
                                            student’s permanent         student report cards.                                                                system and any higher education
                                                                                                             Prince Georges County
                                            school record.                                                                                                   agency reviewing their academic
                                                                        Report HSA scores in a separate      Public Schools
                                                                                                                                                             record due to excessive attempts to
                                                                        document and format, different
                                                                                                                                                             successfully complete the HSA test.
                                                                        from the quarterly report cards.
                                                                        Report HSA scores as Pass or
                                                                        Fail Requirement                                                                     The school system could be held
                                                                                                                                                             liable for aiding in the
                                                                                                                                                             discrimination of students by
                                                                                                                                                             outside agencies.
AERA CONDITION: APPROPRIATE ATTENTION




                                        14. Ensure resources for        Track, monitor, and report the       Prince Georges County   Short-term
                                            children with special       implementation of IEP                Public School
                                            needs are applied           accommodation for special needs
    TO STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES




                                            appropriately.              students.
                                                                        Create equal access to general
                                                                        education curriculum taught by
                                                                        highly qualified teachers.

                                        15. Insist on National          Make formal request to state and     State Board of          Short-term              One national standard for all states
                                            Standards for every state   national elected officials to        Education                                       would eliminate parents’ confusion
                                                                                                                                     Cost could be
                                            that will measure           include in legislative priorities.                                                   as it relates to national and state test
                                                                                                             Maryland Legislators    included in Public
                                            students’ progress across                                                                                        scores. It is important to have a
                                                                        Educate general public,                                      Awareness Campaign
                                            the country so that state                                        PGCPS                                           “true” picture when comparing
                                                                        specifically parents, to the                                 noted under
                                            and national tests                                                                                               students’ progress for national and
                                                                        difference in NAEP scores and                                Recommendation
                                            compare the same data.                                                                                           global competition.
                                                                        state scores when discussing                                 #13, Proposed Action.
                                                                        state HSAs scores.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


7. Conclusion
The Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing was created by Resolution of the Prince
George’s County Council on July 11, 2006 (originally adopted on May 23, 2006) to further
examine the High School Assessments, their impact on the students, and to consider appropriate
recommendations relating thereto. This visionary act must be applauded by all County residents
and advocates for children and schools. However, the work to prepare our children adequately
for the rigors and globally-competitive societies of the 21st century and beyond falls on the
shoulders of all of us.

The recommendations in this report are being submitted to the governing body, citizens of Prince
George’s County, and the State of Maryland as an affirmative call to action, in the spirit of Yale
University’s child development expert, Dr. James Comer’s principle of “consensus,
collaboration and no-fault.” The great strides being made by the Maryland State education
authorities in elevating academic achievements in the state need to be applauded. Higher
standards can only benefit our children, schools, communities, county and state. However, we
also have to anticipate, and deal resolutely, with any unintended or undesirable consequences
from any high-stakes high school exit examination requirements. We are very hopeful that
citizens and responsible parties of our County and State will join hands to improve not only the
Maryland State HSA but the overall condition of our children’s education and schools.

CALL TO ACTION:

These Recommendations for action are being issued for the urgent consideration of the Prince
George’s County Council and by extension, to all sectors of the Prince George’s County
Government, the Prince George’s County Public Schools, the Maryland State Legislature, the
Maryland State Board of Education action, and to all parents, communities, and businesses in
this County.

TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE:

In 2008, the Maryland State Board of Education plans to revisit and review the HSA
requirements set for the class of 2009 and beyond. The Board may act to revise the requirements
or leave them as is.

We do not have the luxury of waiting until 2008 to find out what will happen. It is not prudent to
wait. This is a call to action, by parents, communities, responsible officials and our business
sector.

June 2009 is less than three years away. Our County’s high school class of 2009, the first such
class to be required to meet the Maryland HSA graduation requirements, will either pass the
HSA and leave high school in June 2009 with a high school diploma – or not.

This County must act today, continuously and consistently, with a heightened sense of urgency,
to prepare our students for success in 2009 and beyond.



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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Sufficiently planning and implementing programs, activities, and options, to assist all county
youth 19 to 24 years of age, who, after 2009, will be out of the K-12 public school system would
not possess a high school diploma either because:

       (a) They dropped out of high school prior to the 12th Grade, or
       (b) They completed the 12th Grade but did not pass the HSA and consequently did not
           earn a Maryland High School diploma.

CONSEQUENCES OF FAILURE:

The consequences of failure may be quite dire. These include but may not be limited to:

       ● Increases in the numbers of undereducated youth
       ● Increases in the numbers and rates of petty and serious crimes
       ● Increases in unemployment and under-employment
       ● Increases in welfare dependency and public assistance
       ● Increases in the quality of jobs available

REWARDS FOR SUCCESS:

The refurbishing resulting in an increase in the County’s image as a rising economic, social,
educational, political, and business locus of activity in the Washington Metropolitan area, the
state of Maryland and the nation, will be one possible measure of our success.

In the short-term, we must plan to act today, consistently and insistently, and over the next three
years or so, to avert a crisis of major proportions which might befall our youth and spill over into
all sectors of our County’s social, economic, political and educational sectors.

In the long-term, Government agencies and non-profit, community-based organizations must
work collaboratively or separately, to develop, implement and evaluate action plans to deal with
the expected deluge of large numbers of youth entering society without a Maryland high school
diploma.

THE FORMULA FOR SUCCESS: "High standards plus accountability plus resources equals
results."




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8. APPENDICES




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    APPENDIX A: Maryland HSA Fact Sheet

What are the High School Assessments (HSA)?

A: Background Information on the HSA (from MSDE):

The Maryland High School Assessments are end-of-course tests that students take as they
complete the appropriate high school level course. All students including middle school students
taking high school level courses must take the High School Assessment after they complete the
appropriate course. These courses currently include English 2, Government, Algebra/data
analysis, and Biology.

All students receive a score for each test they take. Scores are also reported for the state, school
systems, and schools. The passing scale scores for three of the content areas have been
established. They are as follows:


HSA Passing Scores

                     Passing Score Minimum Score
Algebra/Data Analysis 412        402
Biology               400        391
Government            394        387
English               396        386



If a student does not pass a test, he or she can still fulfill the HSA requirement for the Maryland
diploma by earning at least the minimum score on each test and a combined score of 1602.
The combined score is the total of all HSA test scores.

Public Release Forms, scoring tutorials, and additional information may be found on the School
Improvement in Maryland Web site at http://mdk12.org/mspp/high_school/look_like/index.html,
http://mdk12.org/data/hsa/index.asp, and the Maryland State Department of Education Web site
at http://www.marylandpublicschools.org.




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              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING




APPENDIX B: Maryland High School Graduation Requirements
MARYLAND HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Effective with the graduating class of 2009 (entering freshman in 2005)

To be awarded a diploma, a student shall be enrolled in a Maryland public school system and
have earned a minimum of 21 credits that include the following:

SUBJECT         SPECIFIC CREDIT REQUIREMENTS                         HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENT
AREA
English        4 credits
Mathematics    3 credits                                      Students must take the Maryland High School
                 √ 1 in algebra/data analysis                 Assessments for English, algebra/data
                 √ 1 in geometry                              analysis, biology and government. The
Science        3 credits                                      students must achieve one of the following:
                 √ 1 in biology                               (1) the passing score on each test, (2) a
                 √ 2 that must include laboratory             minimum score for each test and a combined
               experience in any or all of the following      overall score, (3) a specific score on an
               areas: earth science, life science, physical   MSDE-approved comparable assessment(s),
               science                                        or (4) a passing score on the four High School
Social         3 credits                                      Assessments by a combination of (1) and (3).
Studies          √ 1 in U.S. history
                 √ 1 in world history
                 √ 1 in local, state, national
               government
                                        OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Fine Arts      1 credit
Physical       ½ credit
Education
Health         ½ credit
Technology     1 credit
Education
Other          2 credits of foreign language or
               2 credits of advanced technology ed. and
               3 credits in electives
               or
               4 credits by successfully completing a State-approved career & technology program and
               1 credit in an elective
STUDENTS MUST ALSO MEET ATTENDANCE, SERVICE-LEARNING, AND ANY LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEM
                                REQUIREMENTS.




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Background Information on the Maryland State Board of Education:

Maryland State Board of Education 2006
The State Board of Education is the voice of the public in its role as policy maker for
Maryland’s public schools, public libraries, and vocational rehabilitation services.

It solicits the views of interested groups and the public at large on all important issues. The
State Board is a 12-member body appointed by the governor. Members bring to their task a
wide range of professional and civic experience. Members serve staggered four-year terms
and may serve two full terms. A student member serves a one-year term.

The state superintendent of schools is chosen by the Board for a four-year, renewable term
and acts as its secretary-treasurer. She does not have a vote but does have an advisory
role and is the administrative head of the State Department of Education.

The Board sets the state’s education policies and standards for pre-kindergarten through
high school and for Maryland’s public libraries and correctional education and vocational
rehabilitation services. It passes regulations that have the force of law and is empowered to
interpret the true meaning and intent of the law. It also reviews and approves three annual
budgets (the Department of Education headquarters budget, the state aid to local education
budget, and state-aided institutions budget) before they’re passed on to the governor’s
office for approval or revision and then to the General Assembly for final action. The Board
is also required to decide all controversies brought before it that arise under the law.
Traditionally, however, the Board tempers its considerable legal power with respect for the
principle of local control of schools. Each of Maryland’s 24 school systems has its own board
of education.




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           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


APPENDIX C: HSA TABLES AND CHARTS
The following selected HSA and school system tables and charts (Charts #I to XVII) are taken
from local and state (Maryland State Department of Education, 2006) data sources.

Data for selected Maryland counties and Prince George’s County are presented for the following
data categories:

(1) student academic (test) performance
(2) student demographics and other information
(3) teacher information, and
(4) school system and enrollment information

Data Sources:
MSDE, available at http://www.mdreportcard.org &
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsaindex.asp




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING



(I) Teacher Information: Maryland, comparison of selected (neighboring) counties

Prince George’s County:
Percent of Classes Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers, 2004-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=33||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details         Classes Not Taught By Highly Qualified Teachers
                       Percent of Classes


                             Percent of
                     Year
                              Classes

                     2006       37.9

                     2005       38.0

                     2004       51.4




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Anne Arundel County
Percent of Classes Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers, 2004-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=33||02|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Anne Arundel County (LEA:02)




  Show Details         Classes Not Taught By Highly Qualified Teachers
                       Percent of Classes


                             Percent of
                     Year
                              Classes

                     2006       15.5

                     2005       16.0

                     2004       17.8




                                             A-7
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Calvert County
Percent of Classes Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers, 2004-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=33||04|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Calvert County (LEA:04)




  Show Details         Classes Not Taught By Highly Qualified Teachers
                       Percent of Classes


                             Percent of
                     Year
                              Classes

                     2006       13.0

                     2005       14.5

                     2004       22.3




                                             A-8
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Charles County
Percent of Classes Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers, 2004-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=33||08|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Charles County (LEA:08)




  Show Details         Classes Not Taught By Highly Qualified Teachers
                       Percent of Classes


                             Percent of
                     Year
                              Classes

                     2006       27.0

                     2005       40.8

                     2004       49.0




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Howard County
Percent of Classes Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers, 2004-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=33||13|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Howard County (LEA:13)




  Show Details         Classes Not Taught By Highly Qualified Teachers
                       Percent of Classes


                             Percent of
                     Year
                              Classes

                     2006       11.0

                     2005       15.8

                     2004       18.3




                                            A-10
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Montgomery County
Percent of Classes Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers, 2004-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=33||15|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Montgomery County (LEA:15)




  Show Details         Classes Not Taught By Highly Qualified Teachers
                       Percent of Classes


                             Percent of
                     Year
                              Classes

                     2006       14.5

                     2005       19.7

                     2004       25.4




                                            A-11
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


II: Aggregate school system information – comparison of selected counties
Prince George’s County
2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=40|All|16|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3
  Prince George's County (LEA:16)
                                               2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year


                             Wealth Per Pupil $221,943
                       Per Pupil Expenditures $8,403
           Instructional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 61.2
           Professional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 9.8
      Instructional Assistants per 1,000 Pupils 9.2
      Average Length of School Day for Pupils 6.5 hours
              Length of School Year for Pupils 180 days




Anne Arundel County
2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=40|All|02|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Anne Arundel County (LEA:02)
                                               2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year


                             Wealth Per Pupil $369,098
                       Per Pupil Expenditures $8,810
           Instructional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 64.1
           Professional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 10.7
      Instructional Assistants per 1,000 Pupils 9.9
      Average Length of School Day for Pupils 6.3 hours
              Length of School Year for Pupils 180 days




                                               A-12
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Calvert County
2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=40|All|04|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Calvert County (LEA:04)
                                               2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year


                             Wealth Per Pupil $262,301
                       Per Pupil Expenditures $8,731
           Instructional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 62.7
           Professional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 9.7
      Instructional Assistants per 1,000 Pupils 18.2
      Average Length of School Day for Pupils 6.5 hours
              Length of School Year for Pupils 180 days




Charles County
2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=40|All|08|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Charles County (LEA:08)
                                               2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year


                             Wealth Per Pupil $239,243
                       Per Pupil Expenditures $8,016
           Instructional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 59.6
           Professional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 9.5
      Instructional Assistants per 1,000 Pupils 12.4
      Average Length of School Day for Pupils 6.5 hours
              Length of School Year for Pupils 180 days




                                               A-13
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Howard County
2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=40|All|13|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Howard County (LEA:13)
                                               2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year


                             Wealth Per Pupil $347,557
                       Per Pupil Expenditures $9,929
           Instructional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 71.9
           Professional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 12.3
      Instructional Assistants per 1,000 Pupils 23.1
      Average Length of School Day for Pupils 6.5 hours
              Length of School Year for Pupils 180 days


Montgomery County
2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=40|All|15|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Montgomery County (LEA:15)
                                               2005 Wealth, Expenditures, Staffing, Length of Year


                             Wealth Per Pupil $454,845
                       Per Pupil Expenditures $10,974
           Instructional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 67.2
           Professional Staff per 1,000 Pupils 11.1
      Instructional Assistants per 1,000 Pupils 15.1
      Average Length of School Day for Pupils 6.5 hours
              Length of School Year for Pupils 181 days




                                               A-14
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(III) Data on Student Performance – Maryland State, combined, 2006;

HSA Results, Comprehensive (All Students, MD state)
MD, Algebra, 2006
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsascores.asp?SubjectID=5AL

                     High School Assessment (HSA): Algebra

            Year                                 Percent Passing
                     2006                             66.6


                     2005                             53.8


                     2004                             58.8


                     2003                             53.2


                     2002                             52.1




(III) HSA Results, 2006, Maryland State, combined, 2006
Biology
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsascores.asp?SubjectID=2BI

                      High School Assessment (HSA): Biology

            Year                                 Percent Passing
                     2006                             67.8


                     2005                             57.6


                     2004                             60.9


                     2003                             54.3


                     2002                             54.5




                                          A-15
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(III) HSA Results, 2006, Maryland State, combined, 2006

English 10
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsascores.asp?SubjectID=1EN&Detail=NO&

                     How did we perform on the High School Assessment?


                     High School Assessment (HSA): English 2

             Year                                Percent Passing
                     2006                               60.1


                     2005                               57.3




(IV) HSA Results, 2006, Maryland State, combined, 2006

Government

                    High School Assessment (HSA): Government

             Year                                Percent Passing
                     2006                               74.2


                     2005                               66.4


                     2004                               65.9


                     2003                               60.2


                     2002                               57.3




                                          A-16
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IV) HSA Results, 2006

Algebra, All Races by Gender, MD State combined, 2006
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsagrouprg.ASP?SubjectID=5AL&Detail=NO&Rcode=8&


                 Are there disparities in group performance by race or gender?




                 HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender: Algebra
                                   Percent Passing

         Am.       Am.               African      African
                         Asian Asian                      White White Hispanic Hispanic
   Year Indian    Indian              Am.          Am.
                         Male Female                      Male Female   Male   Female
         Male     Female              Male        Female
   2002   35.1      44.2    74.4   77.5    23.3     28.5   64.5   69.2    39.2   41.0


   2003   39.8      52.3    74.9   77.7    25.5     30.9   66.2   69.6    39.6   39.3


   2004   47.0      56.0    80.9   80.4    32.1     38.1   72.0   74.9    49.1   49.8


   2005   48.7      45.6    80.1   79.3    27.0     32.9   70.0   72.5    42.2   41.5


   2006   62.0      59.3    85.6   88.3    41.7     50.1   80.0   82.9    55.3   59.4




                                             A-17
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IV) HSA Results, 2006
Biology, All Races by Gender, MD State combined, 2006;
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsagrouprg.ASP?SubjectID=2BI&Detail=NO&Rcode=8&

                 Are there disparities in group performance by race or gender?




                 HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender: Biology
                                   Percent Passing

         Am.       Am.               African      African
                         Asian Asian                      White White Hispanic Hispanic
   Year Indian    Indian              Am.          Am.
                         Male Female                      Male Female   Male   Female
         Male     Female              Male        Female
   2002   35.0      40.0    73.4   77.3    27.4     33.4   65.3   70.7    44.1   45.3


   2003   52.1      45.3    75.2   76.6    28.5     33.2   66.2   70.6    41.6   43.4


   2004   61.3      65.2    77.8   81.9    34.4     42.2   72.6   77.5    46.2   49.4


   2005   46.0      56.1    76.3   77.5    30.2     37.0   69.2   74.0    42.1   46.6


   2006   58.6      67.0    84.9   84.7    42.0     52.0   78.3   82.3    53.9   57.1




                                             A-18
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IV) HSA Results, 2006

English 10 - All Races by Gender, MD State combined, 2006;
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsagrouprg.ASP?SubjectID=1EN&Detail=NO&Rcode=8&


                 Are there disparities in group performance by race or gender?




                 HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender: English 2
                                   Percent Passing

         Am.        Am.               African     African
                          Asian Asian                     White White Hispanic Hispanic
   Year Indian     Indian              Am.         Am.
                          Male Female                     Male Female   Male   Female
         Male      Female              Male       Female
   2005   41.7      61.0    69.6   79.5    28.8     48.0   63.7   78.3    39.9   52.0


   2006   53.2      59.1    72.6   80.6    32.1     51.9   64.3   80.2    39.7   57.1




                                             A-19
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IV) HSA Results, 2006

Government - All Races by Gender, MD State combined, 2006;
 http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/hsagrouprg.ASP?SubjectID=4GO&Detail=NO&Rcode=8&

                 Are there disparities in group performance by race or gender?




            HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender: Government
                                Percent Passing

         Am.       Am.               African      African
                         Asian Asian                      White White Hispanic Hispanic
   Year Indian    Indian              Am.          Am.
                         Male Female                      Male Female   Male   Female
         Male     Female              Male        Female
   2002   47.2      58.9    71.9   76.7    32.4     43.6   65.1   72.2    45.7   47.9


   2003   44.9      58.7    74.7   79.8    36.6     47.8   67.9   75.4    49.4   53.2


   2004   63.0      68.9    80.8   84.8    42.5     55.2   73.5   79.1    53.6   58.7


   2005   56.3      66.3    81.9   82.3    41.7     51.6   73.7   78.3    54.2   59.1


   2006   68.0      78.9    85.9   87.9    52.2     63.2   83.7   86.7    62.1   67.0




                                             A-20
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(V) HSA Results, 2006
Comparing All Students’ Performance - Comparison of MD Counties, 2006:
Most Successful – Algebra, MD county by county comparison
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Districts most successful with All Students in HSA Algebra in 2006.

Percent Passing   Local School                Total  Percentage of   Total Test
 All Students       System                     All   All Students     Takers
                                            Students    out of
                                              Test    Total Test
                                             Takers     Takers

            88.2 Washington         WASH      1763      100.0%         1763
                 County
            85.4 Carroll County     CARR      2927      100.0%          2927
            85.2 Howard County      HOWA      4363      100.0%          4363
            82.3 Calvert County     CALV      2011      100.0%          2011
            81.1 Frederick County   FRED      3671      100.0%          3671
            78.8 Montgomery         MONT     11585      100.0%         11585
                 County
            78.2 Cecil County       CECI      1327      100.0%         1327
            76.1 Worcester          WORC       817      100.0%          817
                 County
            75.8 Queen Anne's       QANN      677       100.0%          677
                 County
            75.3 Garrett County     GARR       534      100.0%          534
            73.1 Charles County     CHAR      2505      100.0%         2505
            72.8 Harford County     HARF      3553      100.0%         3553
            70.2 Saint Mary's       STMA      1151      100.0%         1151
                 County
            68.8 Somerset County    SOME       247      100.0%          247
            68.8 Anne Arundel       ANNE      8659      100.0%         8659
                 County
            67.9 Wicomico           WICO      999       100.0%          999
                 County
            66.3 Allegany County    ALLE      774       100.0%          774
            65.2 Dorchester         DORC      411       100.0%          411
                 County
            63.2 Baltimore County   BACO     11027      100.0%         11027
            62.1 Talbot County      TALB      441       100.0%          441




                                           A-21
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(V) HSA Results, 2006
Comparing All Students’ Performance - Comparison of MD Counties:
Most Successful - 2006 Biology, MD county by county comparison
Biology
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Districts most successful with All Students in HSA Biology in 2006.

Percent Passing    Local School              Total  Percentage of     Total Test
 All Students        System                   All   All Students       Takers
                                           Students    out of
                                             Test    Total Test
                                            Takers     Takers

            82.8 Calvert County     CALV     1421      100.0%           1421

            82.1 Howard County      HOWA     3892      100.0%           3892

            81.5 Carroll County     CARR     2244      100.0%           2244

            80.1 Washington         WASH     1410      100.0%           1410
                 County
            80.1 Saint Mary's       STMA     1103      100.0%           1103
                 County
            78.4 Montgomery         MONT     9862      100.0%           9862
                 County
            77.4 Frederick County   FRED     3926      100.0%           3926
            72.2 Garrett County     GARR      410      100.0%            410
            71.5 Queen Anne's       QANN      648      100.0%            648
                 County
            71.5 Anne Arundel       ANNE     5427      100.0%           5427
                 County
            71.3 Cecil County       CECI     1295      100.0%           1295
            69.9 Worcester County   WORC      525      100.0%            525
            69.2 Charles County     CHAR     2183      100.0%           2183
            68.7 Harford County     HARF     3104      100.0%           3104
            68.3 Caroline County    CARO      483      100.0%            483
            67 Baltimore County     BACO     8348      100.0%           8348
            67 Wicomico             WICO      907      100.0%            907
                 County
            66.4 Talbot County      TALB      369      100.0%            369
            65.4 Kent County        KENT      240      100.0%            240




                                           A-22
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(V) HSA Results, 2006
 Comparing All Students’ Performance - Comparison of MD Counties, 2006:
Most Successful - 2006 English, MD county by county comparison
English 10
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Districts most successful with All Students in HSA English 2 in 2006.

Percent Passing    Local School               Total    Percentage of    Total Test
 All Students        System                    All     All Students      Takers
                                            Students      out of
                                              Test      Total Test
                                             Takers       Takers

            78.2 Howard County     HOWA       3954        100.0%          3954

          74.1 Calvert County      CALV       1453        100.0%           1453
          73.6 Carroll County      CARR       2538        100.0%           2538
          69 Montgomery            MONT      11011        100.0%          11011
                County
          67.5 Saint Mary's        STMA       1243        100.0%          1243
                County
          66.5 Washington          WASH       1653        100.0%          1653
                County
          66.1 Frederick County    FRED       3290        100.0%          3290
          65.7 Queen Anne's        QANN        606        100.0%           606
                County
          65 Worcester County      WORC        595        100.0%           595
          63.8 Charles County      CHAR       2194        100.0%          2194
          63.2 Talbot County       TALB        370        100.0%           370
          62.1 Cecil County        CECI       1262        100.0%          1262
          62 Anne Arundel          ANNE       5934        100.0%          5934
                County
          61.3 Harford County      HARF       3009        100.0%          3009
          60 Garrett County        GARR        405        100.0%           405
          58.2 Baltimore County    BACO       8693        100.0%          8693
          58 Wicomico County       WICO        915        100.0%           915
          55.4 Kent County         KENT        204        100.0%           204
          53.2 Caroline County     CARO        451        100.0%           451
          53.2 Allegany County     ALLE        775        100.0%           775
(V) HSA Results, 2006



                                           A-23
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Comparing All Students’ Performance - Comparison of MD Counties, 2006:
Most Successful - 2006 Government, MD county by county comparison
Government
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Districts most successful with All Students in HSA Government in 2006.
 Percent Passing     Local School               Total  Percentage of Total Test
   All Students         System                   All   All Students    Takers
                                              Students    out of
                                                Test    Total Test
                                               Takers     Takers

             87.4 Carroll County    CARR     2624       100.0%         2624

             86.4 Anne Arundel      ANNE     4316       100.0%         4316
                  County
             85.9 Calvert County    CALV     1343       100.0%         1343

            85 Howard County        HOWA      3954      100.0%          3954
            81.7 Frederick County   FRED      3554      100.0%          3554
            81.4 Montgomery         MONT     11204      100.0%         11204
                  County
            80.7 Cecil County       CECI     1376       100.0%         1376
            80.5 Washington         WASH     1670       100.0%         1670
                  County
            79.8 Saint Mary's       STMA     1325       100.0%         1325
                  County
            78.4 Harford County     HARF     3299       100.0%         3299
            77 Charles County       CHAR     2595       100.0%         2595
            77 Worcester            WORC      664       100.0%          664
                  County
            75.4 Talbot County      TALB      357       100.0%          357
            75.1 Wicomico           WICO      894       100.0%          894
                  County
            73.8 Garrett County     GARR      347       100.0%          347
            72.5 Baltimore County   BACO     9232       100.0%         9232
            70.1 Dorchester         DORC      174       100.0%          174
                  County
            69.8 Queen Anne's       QANN      626       100.0%          626
                  County
            69.4 Allegany County    ALLE      794       100.0%          794
            63.5 Caroline County    CARO      485       100.0%          485
(VI) HSA Results, 2006


                                           A-24
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Comparing African-American Students’ Performance,
MD Counties: Most Successful
2006 Algebra
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with African American Students in HSA Algebra in 2006.

Percent Passing Local School              Total    Percentage Total Percent
    African       System                 African       of      Test  Passing
  American                              American    African   Takers    All
   Students                             Students   American          Students
                                       Test Takers Students
                                                     out of
                                                   Total Test
                                                     Takers

           70.5 Washington     WASH       156         8.8%       1763      88.2
                County
           66.1 Calvert        CALV       348        17.3%       2011      82.3
                County
           65.1 Cecil County    CECI      109        8.2%        1327      78.2
           65 Howard           HOWA       963        22.1%       4363      85.2
                County
           64.5 Somerset       SOME       110        44.5%        247      68.8
                County
           62.4 Charles        CHAR       1167       46.6%       2505      73.1
                County
           60.8 Carroll        CARR        74         2.5%       2927      85.4
                County
           60.4 Montgomery     MONT       2635       22.7%       11585     78.8
                County
           59.3 Frederick      FRED       378        10.3%       3671      81.1
                County
           58.4 Worcester      WORC       202        24.7%        817      76.1
                County
           52.4 Harford        HARF       717        20.2%       3553      72.8
                County
           50.6 Anne Arundel   ANNE       2008       23.2%       8659      68.8
                County
           46.9 Dorchester     DORC       160        38.9%        411      65.2
                County
           45.5 Baltimore      BACO       4470       40.5%       11027     63.2


                                          A-25
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                   County
             44.9 Wicomico         WICO          303            30.3%         999      67.9
                   County
             43.5 Saint Mary's STMA              223            19.4%        1151      70.2
                   County
             42.4 Prince           PRGE         9430            81.0%       11638      46.1
                   George's
                   County
             41.9 Allegany         ALLE           31            4.0%          774      66.3
                   County
             40.7 Queen Anne's QANN               59            8.7%          677      75.8
                   County
             34.9 Caroline         CARO          106            19.9%         533      58.9
                   County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-26
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VI) HSA Results, 2006
Biology
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with African American Students in HSA Biology in 2006.

Percent Passing Local School             Total    Percentage     Total   Percent
    African       System                African       of         Test    Passing
  American                             American    African      Takers      All
   Students                            Students   American               Students
                                      Test Takers Students
                                                    out of
                                                  Total Test
                                                    Takers

           64.3 Carroll        CARR       70          3.1%       2244      81.5
                County
           62.1 Howard         HOWA      803         20.6%       3892      82.1
                County
           59.9 Montgomery     MONT      2156        21.9%       9862      78.4
                County
           58.5 Saint Mary's   STMA      200         18.1%       1103      80.1
                County
           58.4 Calvert        CALV      202         14.2%       1421      82.8
                County
           57.4 Charles        CHAR      962         44.1%       2183      69.2
                County
           53.4 Washington     WASH      118          8.4%       1410      80.1
                County
           53.3 Frederick      FRED      448         11.4%       3926      77.4
                County
           52.4 Anne Arundel   ANNE      1170        21.6%       5427      71.5
                County
           52.3 Worcester      WORC      132         25.1%        525      69.9
                County
           50 Queen Anne's     QANN       58          9.0%        648      71.5
                County
           49.1 Baltimore      BACO      3162        37.9%       8348       67
                County
           48.2 Harford        HARF      514         16.6%       3104      68.7
                County
           48 Cecil County     CECI      100          7.7%       1295      71.3


                                          A-27
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


            47.7 Caroline         CARO           86            17.8%          483      68.3
                  County
            46.3 Wicomico         WICO          272            30.0%          907        67
                  County
            43.8 Baltimore         BACI        2297            85.8%         2678      47.9
                  City
            43 Somerset           SOME           93            49.2%          189      52.9
                  County
            42.8 Dorchester       DORC          145            38.2%          380      63.2
                  County
            42.3 Allegany          ALLE          26             3.6%          716      60.3
                  County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-28
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VI) HSA Results, 2006
English 10
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with African American Students in HSA English 2 in 2006.

Percent Passing Local School             Total    Percentage     Total   Percent
    African       System                African       of         Test    Passing
  American                             American    African      Takers      All
   Students                            Students   American               Students
                                      Test Takers Students
                                                    out of
                                                  Total Test
                                                    Takers

          62.9 Carroll         CARR       70          2.8%        2538     73.6
               County
          57.2 Howard          HOWA       810         20.5%       3954     78.2
               County
          53.1 Calvert         CALV       226         15.6%       1453     74.1
               County
          52.8 Charles         CHAR       978         44.6%       2194     63.8
               County
          46.6 Montgomery      MONT      2531         23.0%      11011      69
               County
          45.6 Worcester       WORC       158         26.6%       595       65
               County
          44.6 Saint Mary's    STMA       224         18.0%       1243     67.5
               County
          43.6 Frederick       FRED       358         10.9%       3290     66.1
               County
          43.4 Harford         HARF       498         16.6%       3009     61.3
               County
          43.2 Washington      WASH       146         8.8%        1653     66.5
               County
          43.2 Prince          PRGE      7659         79.6%       9617     45.9
               George's
               County
          42 Baltimore         BACO      3222         37.1%       8693     58.2
               County
          40.4 Anne Arundel    ANNE      1244         21.0%       5934      62
               County
          39.2 Cecil County    CECI       97          7.7%        1262     62.1


                                          A-29
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


            36.8 Queen Anne's QANN               57             9.4%          606      65.7
                  County
            35.9 Wicomico          WICO         281            30.7%          915        58
                  County
            35.5 Baltimore         BACI        4850            90.6%         5351      37.3
                  City
            33.7 Caroline         CARO           89            19.7%          451      53.2
                  County
            32.1 Dorchester       DORC          159            37.1%          428      50.7
                  County
            29.5 Somerset         SOME           78            45.3%          172      43.6
                  County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-30
          REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VI) HSA Results, 2006
Government
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with African American Students in HSA Government in 2006.

Percent Passing Local School             Total    Percentage Total Percent
    African       System                African       of      Test  Passing
  American                             American    African   Takers    All
   Students                            Students   American          Students
                                      Test Takers Students
                                                    out of
                                                  Total Test
                                                    Takers

           74.4 Anne Arundel   ANNE      797         18.5%      4316     86.4
                County
           71 Calvert          CALV      217         16.2%      1343     85.9
                County
           69.1 Carroll        CARR       81         3.1%       2624     87.4
                County
           68.9 Howard         HOWA      801         20.3%      3954      85
                County
           67.8 Montgomery     MONT      2577        23.0%      11204    81.4
                County
           67.3 Washington     WASH      150         9.0%       1670     80.5
                County
           67 Charles          CHAR      1220        47.0%      2595      77
                County
           64.1 Cecil County   CECI      117         8.5%       1376     80.7
           61.1 Frederick      FRED      396         11.1%      3554     81.7
                County
           60.8 Saint Mary's   STMA      250         18.9%      1325     79.8
                County
           59.7 Worcester      WORC      154         23.2%       664      77
                County
           59.6 Baltimore      BACO      3639        39.4%      9232     72.5
                County
           58.3 Harford        HARF      671         20.3%      3299     78.4
                County
           54.2 Wicomico       WICO      262         29.3%       894     75.1
                County



                                         A-31
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


              52.9 Prince           PRGE        7347            78.5%        9356      55.5
                    George's
                    County
              51.5 Baltimore        BACI        4056            89.9%        4513      53.9
                    City
              50.9 Dorchester      DORC           55            31.6%         174      70.1
                    County
              48.7 Talbot           TALB          78            21.8%         357      75.4
                    County
              44.8 Allegany         ALLE          29            3.7%          794      69.4
                    County
              42.4 Queen Anne's QANN              59            9.4%          626      69.8
                    County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-32
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VII) HSA Results, 2006
Comparing Special Ed Students’ Performance, MD Counties Most Successful
2006 Algebra
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Special Education Students in HSA Algebra in 2006.

   Percent       Local School             Total    Percentage     Total   Percent
   Passing         System                Special       of         Test    Passing
   Special                              Education   Special      Takers      All
  Education                             Students   Education              Students
  Students                             Test Takers Students
                                                     out of
                                                   Total Test
                                                     Takers

          60     Washington     WASH      170         9.6%        1763      88.2
                 County
          48.1   Worcester      WORC      106         13.0%       817       76.1
                 County
          47.9   Howard         HOWA      359         8.2%        4363      85.2
                 County
          47.5   Carroll        CARR      261         8.9%        2927      85.4
                 County
          45.9   Montgomery     MONT      1117        9.6%       11585      78.8
                 County
          41.7   Frederick      FRED      321         8.7%        3671      81.1
                 County
          37.7   Calvert        CALV      223         11.1%       2011      82.3
                 County
          31.9   Saint Mary's   STMA      113         9.8%        1151      70.2
                 County
          30.6   Caroline       CARO       49         9.2%        533       58.9
                 County
          30.4   Garrett        GARR       69         12.9%       534       75.3
                 County
          29.8   Harford        HARF      339         9.5%        3553      72.8
                 County
          28.6   Queen Anne's   QANN       77         11.4%       677       75.8
                 County
          28     Cecil County   CECI      157         11.8%       1327      78.2
          27.6   Charles        CHAR      123         4.9%        2505      73.1
                 County


                                           A-33
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


            26.7 Somerset         SOME          15              6.1%          247      68.8
                  County
            24.9 Anne Arundel ANNE             1048            12.1%         8659      68.8
                  County
            23.3 Baltimore        BACO         1037             9.4%        11027      63.2
                  County
            23.1 Allegany         ALLE          91             11.8%          774      66.3
                  County
            19.2 Wicomico         WICO          78              7.8%          999      67.9
                  County
            17.6 Dorchester       DORC          34              8.3%          411      65.2
                  County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-34
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VII) HSA Results, 2006
Biology
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Special Education Students in HSA Biology in 2006.

   Percent     Local School              Total   Percentage of Total Percent
   Passing       System                 Special     Special    Test  Passing
    Special                           Education   Education Takers      All
  Education                            Students    Students          Students
   Students                          Test Takers     out of
                                                  Total Test
                                                    Takers

         48.9 Washington WASH            133          9.4%        1410      80.1
              County
         48.1 Carroll       CARR         214          9.5%        2244      81.5
              County
         48.1 Caroline      CARO          27          5.6%         483      68.3
              County
         41.3 Calvert       CALV         109          7.7%        1421      82.8
              County
         40.9 Montgomery MONT            927          9.4%        9862      78.4
              County
         39.6 Howard        HOWA         298          7.7%        3892      82.1
              County
         38.9 Somerset      SOME          18          9.5%         189      52.9
              County
         36.3 Frederick     FRED         325          8.3%        3926      77.4
              County
         36.1 Wicomico      WICO          72          7.9%         907       67
              County
         33.7 Saint Mary's STMA           95          8.6%        1103      80.1
              County
         33.5 Anne Arundel ANNE          489          9.0%        5427      71.5
              County
         31.8 Talbot County TALB          22          6.0%         369      66.4
         31.6 Dorchester    DORC          19          5.0%         380      63.2
              County
         30 Worcester       WORC          30          5.7%         525      69.9
              County
         29.1 Cecil County CECI          165          12.7%       1295      71.3



                                          A-35
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


          26.5 Harford           HARF          324             10.4%        3104       68.7
                County
          25.2 Baltimore         BACO          836             10.0%        8348         67
                County
          25 Queen Anne's QANN                  68             10.5%         648       71.5
                County
          24.3 Kent County KENT                 37             15.4%         240       65.4
          20 Garrett             GARR           60             14.6%         410       72.2
                County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-36
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VII) HSA Results, 2006
English 10
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Special Education Students in HSA English 2 in 2006.

  Percent      Local School              Total    Percentage of Total Percent
  Passing        System                 Special      Special    Test  Passing
  Special                              Education   Education Takers      All
 Education                             Students     Students          Students
 Students                             Test Takers     out of
                                                   Total Test
                                                     Takers

      27       Howard          HOWA      307          7.8%        3954      78.2
               County
      24.7     Montgomery      MONT      1138        10.3%       11011       69
               County
      24.7     Carroll         CARR      239          9.4%        2538      73.6
               County
      23.5     Washington      WASH      179         10.8%        1653      66.5
               County
      21.1     Calvert         CALV      133          9.2%        1453      74.1
               County
      19.6     Cecil County    CECI      148         11.7%        1262      62.1
      19.6     Harford         HARF      317         10.5%        3009      61.3
               County
      19.6     Worcester       WORC       46          7.7%         595       65
               County
      17.2     Saint Mary's    STMA       93          7.5%        1243      67.5
               County
      16.9     Frederick       FRED      302          9.2%        3290      66.1
               County
      15.8     Talbot County   TALB       19          5.1%         370      63.2
      15.6     Wicomico        WICO       77          8.4%         915       58
               County
      15.4     Anne Arundel    ANNE      638         10.8%        5934       62
               County
      14.7     Queen Anne's    QANN       68         11.2%         606      65.7
               County
      14.7     Charles         CHAR      102          4.6%        2194      63.8
               County



                                           A-37
              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


       13.3    Somerset          SOME          15              8.7%          172       43.6
               County
        12.1 Baltimore           BACO         753              8.7%         8693       58.2
               County
        11.5 Kent County KENT                  26             12.7%          204       55.4
        10.8 Allegany            ALLE          83             10.7%          775       53.2
               County
        10.4 Garrett             GARR          67             16.5%          405        60
               County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-38
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VII) HSA Results, 2006
Government
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Special Education Students in HSA Government in 2006.

   Percent     Local School             Total    Percentage of Total Percent
   Passing       System                Special      Special    Test  Passing
   Special                            Education   Education Takers      All
  Education                           Students     Students          Students
  Students                           Test Takers     out of
                                                  Total Test
                                                    Takers

         51.2 Carroll         CARR      244          9.3%       2624      87.4
              County
         49.7 Howard          HOWA      294          7.4%       3954       85
              County
         47.8 Anne Arundel    ANNE      186          4.3%       4316      86.4
              County
         47 Frederick         FRED      347          9.8%       3554      81.7
              County
         45.3 Washington      WASH      161          9.6%       1670      80.5
              County
         45.3 Montgomery      MONT      1107         9.9%       11204     81.4
              County
         44.9 Harford         HARF      392         11.9%       3299      78.4
              County
         44.6 Cecil County    CECI      139         10.1%       1376      80.7
         40.5 Calvert         CALV      126         9.4%        1343      85.9
              County
         39.6 Charles         CHAR      134          5.2%       2595       77
              County
         36.2 Garrett         GARR       47         13.5%        347      73.8
              County
         35.9 Saint Mary's    STMA      131          9.9%       1325      79.8
              County
         33.9 Worcester       WORC       62          9.3%        664       77
              County
         32.4 Wicomico        WICO       74          8.3%        894      75.1
              County
         32 Baltimore         BACO      941         10.2%       9232      72.5



                                         A-39
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                 County
           31.3 Dorchester       DORC           16             9.2%          174       70.1
                 County
           30 Talbot County TALB                20             5.6%          357       75.4
           28.8 Allegany          ALLE         111             14.0%         794       69.4
                 County
           24.7 Queen Anne's QANN               73             11.7%         626       69.8
                 County
           17.6 Caroline         CARO           34             7.0%          485       63.5
                 County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-40
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VIII) HSA Results, 2006
Comparing student on Free and Reduced Meals
(FARM) Students’ Performance, MD Counties Most Successful
2006 Algebra
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Free/Reduced Meal Students in HSA Algebra in 2006.

Percent Passing     Local                Total    Percentage of Total Percent
 Free/Reduced      School            Free/Reduced Free/Reduced Test Passing
Meal Students      System                Meal         Meal      Takers    All
                                       Students     Students           Students
                                      Test Takers     out of
                                                   Total Test
                                                     Takers

            79.7 Washington   WASH       478           27.1%      1763     88.2
                 County
            69.2 Carroll      CARR       221           7.6%       2927     85.4
                 County
            66.1 Worcester    WORC       254           31.1%       817     76.1
                 County
            65.2 Calvert      CALV       224           11.1%      2011     82.3
                 County
            64.8 Garrett      GARR       199           37.3%       534     75.3
                 County
            64.3 Somerset     SOME       112           45.3%       247     68.8
                 County
            62.4 Montgomery   MONT       2327          20.1%      11585    78.8
                 County
            60.7 Frederick    FRED       435           11.8%      3671     81.1
                 County
            58.7 Charles      CHAR       416           16.6%      2505     73.1
                 County
            58.7 Cecil        CECI        46           3.5%       1327     78.2
                 County
            57.6 Howard       HOWA       429           9.8%       4363     85.2
                 County
            57.4 Harford      HARF       613           17.3%      3553     72.8
                 County
            55.3 Allegany     ALLE       311           40.2%       774     66.3
                 County
            54.2 Queen        QANN        83           12.3%       677     75.8


                                         A-41
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                   Anne's
                   County
              49.7 Anne           ANNE          1480              17.1%        8659     68.8
                   Arundel
                   County
              49.1 Dorchester DORC               167              40.6%         411     65.2
                   County
              48.6 Wicomico       WICO           290              29.0%         999     67.9
                   County
              48.2 Baltimore      BACO          3105              28.2%       11027     63.2
                   County
              46.5 Caroline       CARO           185              34.7%         533     58.9
                   County
              43.4 Saint Mary's STMA             205              17.8%        1151     70.2
                   County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-42
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VIII) HSA Results, 2006
Biology
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Free/Reduced Meal Students in HSA Biology in 2006.

   Percent         Local                 Total     Percentage of Total Percent
   Passing        School             Free/Reduced Free/Reduced Test Passing
Free/Reduced      System             Meal Students Meal Students Takers    All
Meal Students                         Test Takers     out of            Students
                                                    Total Test
                                                      Takers

          69.6 Carroll        CARR       184           8.2%       2244     81.5
               County
          64.5 Garrett        GARR       155          37.8%        410     72.2
               County
          64.5 Calvert        CALV       121           8.5%       1421     82.8
               County
          64.1 Washington     WASH       348          24.7%       1410     80.1
               County
          61.4 Cecil County   CECI        70          5.4%        1295     71.3
          57 Montgomery       MONT       1499         15.2%       9862     78.4
               County
          54.1 Caroline       CARO       146          30.2%        483     68.3
               County
          51.6 Frederick      FRED       374           9.5%       3926     77.4
               County
          51.4 Wicomico       WICO       296          32.6%        907      67
               County
          51.2 Saint Mary's   STMA       162          14.7%       1103     80.1
               County
          51.1 Worcester      WORC       139          26.5%        525     69.9
               County
          50.5 Baltimore      BACI       1278         47.7%       2678     47.9
               City
          50 Howard           HOWA       318           8.2%       3892     82.1
               County
          49.5 Somerset       SOME       105          55.6%        189     52.9
               County
          49.4 Baltimore      BACO       2287         27.4%       8348      67



                                          A-43
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                  County
            48.9 Anne            ANNE           712              13.1%        5427      71.5
                  Arundel
                  County
            48.3 Harford         HARF           458              14.8%        3104      68.7
                  County
            48.1 Charles         CHAR           320              14.7%        2183      69.2
                  County
            47.2 Allegany         ALLE          290              40.5%         716      60.3
                  County
            47 Kent County KENT                 100              41.7%         240      65.4
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-44
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VIII) HSA Results, 2006
English 10
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Free/Reduced Meal Students in HSA English 2 in 2006.

   Percent        Local                  Total     Percentage of Total Percent
   Passing       School              Free/Reduced Free/Reduced Test Passing
Free/Reduced     System              Meal Students Meal Students Takers    All
Meal Students                         Test Takers     out of            Students
                                                    Total Test
                                                      Takers

         54.2 Carroll        CARR        201           7.9%       2538     73.6
              County
         52.8 Calvert        CALV        125           8.6%       1453     74.1
              County
         52.1 Washington     WASH        403          24.4%       1653     66.5
              County
         46.5 Garrett        GARR        155          38.3%        405      60
              County
         43.6 Cecil County    CECI        55           4.4%       1262     62.1
         43.5 Howard         HOWA        340           8.6%       3954     78.2
              County
         43.3 Caroline       CARO        157          34.8%        451     53.2
              County
         43.1 Worcester      WORC        167          28.1%        595      65
              County
         43 Saint Mary's     STMA        214          17.2%       1243     67.5
              County
         41.7 Montgomery     MONT        1707         15.5%       11011     69
              County
         41.7 Charles        CHAR        319          14.5%       2194     63.8
              County
         41.7 Baltimore      BACO        2207         25.4%       8693     58.2
              County
         40.1 Wicomico       WICO        294          32.1%        915      58
              County
         39.6 Somerset       SOME         91          52.9%        172     43.6
              County
         39.5 Allegany       ALLE        299          38.6%        775     53.2



                                          A-45
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                 County
           39.1 Prince           PRGE         2644              27.5%         9617      45.9
                 George's
                 County
           38.6 Queen            QANN           57               9.4%          606      65.7
                 Anne's
                 County
           38.2 Harford          HARF          429              14.3%         3009      61.3
                 County
           38 Anne               ANNE          768              12.9%         5934       62
                 Arundel
                 County
           36.6 Kent County KENT                82              40.2%          204      55.4
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-46
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(VIII) HSA Results, 2006
Government
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Free/Reduced Meal Students in HSA Government in 2006.

Percent Passing    Local                Total    Percentage of Total Percent
 Free/Reduced     School            Free/Reduced Free/Reduced Test Passing
Meal Students     System                Meal         Meal      Takers    All
                                      Students     Students           Students
                                     Test Takers     out of
                                                  Total Test
                                                    Takers

           75   Calvert    CALV          120          8.9%       1343    85.9
                County
           72.2 Anne       ANNE          489         11.3%       4316    86.4
                Arundel
                County
           69.5 Carroll    CARR          220          8.4%       2624    87.4
                County
           69 Cecil County CECI           71         5.2%        1376    80.7
           68.9 Washington WASH          389         23.3%       1670    80.5
                County
           63.6 Worcester  WORC          173         26.1%       664      77
                County
           63.3 Montgomery MONT          1813        16.2%      11204    81.4
                County
           61.2 Frederick  FRED          412         11.6%       3554    81.7
                County
           60.8 Wicomico   WICO          283         31.7%       894     75.1
                County
           59.8 Howard     HOWA          341          8.6%       3954     85
                County
           59.1 Harford    HARF          619         18.8%       3299    78.4
                County
           58.4 Baltimore  BACO          2608        28.2%       9232    72.5
                County
           58.3 Charles    CHAR          441         17.0%       2595     77
                County
           57.8 Garrett    GARR          109         31.4%       347     73.8
                County


                                          A-47
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


             56.9 Dorchester DORC                65              37.4%         174      70.1
                  County
             55.5 Allegany        ALLE          335              42.2%         794      69.4
                  County
             55.4 Saint Mary's STMA             222              16.8%        1325      79.8
                  County
             54.7 Baltimore       BACI         2125              47.1%        4513      53.9
                  City
             53.5 Somerset        SOME          127              51.4%         247      59.5
                  County
             50 Talbot            TALB           64              17.9%         357      75.4
                  County
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-48
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IX) HSA Results, 2006
Comparing students with Limited English Proficiency
LEP Students’ Performance, MD Counties Most Successful
2006 Algebra
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp

Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Limited English Proficient Students in HSA Algebra in 2006.

 Percent Passing Local School              Total      Percentage Total Percent
 Limited English   System                 Limited         of     Test Passing
   Proficient                             English      Limited Takers     All
    Students                             Proficient    English         Students
                                         Students     Proficient
                                           Test        Students
                                          Takers        out of
                                                      Total Test
                                                        Takers

              85.7 Harford       HARF        7           0.2%      3553     72.8
                   County
              72.2 Washington   WASH         18          1.0%      1763     88.2
                   County
              66.7 Carroll       CARR        9           0.3%      2927     85.4
                   County
              60 Kent County    KENT         10          3.8%       266     51.1
              57.4 Howard       HOWA         94          2.2%      4363     85.2
                   County
              49.3 Frederick     FRED        67          1.8%      3671     81.1
                   County
              47.5 Montgomery   MONT        791          6.8%      11585    78.8
                   County
              40 Wicomico        WICO        15          1.5%       999     67.9
                   County
              38.9 Worcester    WORC         18          2.2%       817     76.1
                   County
              37.5 Baltimore    BACO        136          1.2%      11027    63.2
                   County
              28.6 Calvert       CALV        7           0.3%      2011     82.3
                   County
              25 Charles        CHAR         12          0.5%      2505     73.1
                   County
              25 Anne           ANNE        128          1.5%      8659     68.8


                                          A-49
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                      Arundel
                      County
               24.6 Prince            PRGE         528            4.5%       11638      46.1
                      George's
                      County
               20 Queen              QANN            5            0.7%         677      75.8
                      Anne's
                      County
               16.7 Talbot            TALB          18            4.1%         441      62.1
                      County
               15.2 Baltimore         BACI          79            1.1%        7059      36.8
                      City
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-50
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IX) HSA Results, 2006
Biology
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Limited English Proficient Students in HSA Biology in 2006.
 Percent Passing Local School              Total      Percentage Total Percent
 Limited English     System               Limited          of        Test Passing
    Proficient                            English       Limited     Takers    All
     Students                            Proficient     English            Students
                                         Students      Proficient
                                        Test Takers Students
                                                         out of
                                                       Total Test
                                                        Takers

            71.4 Washington    WASH         7           0.5%       1410      80.1
                 County
            48.3 Howard        HOWA         58          1.5%       3892      82.1
                 County
            45.8 Montgomery    MONT        554          5.6%       9862      78.4
                 County
            41.7 Charles       CHAR         12          0.5%       2183      69.2
                 County
            37.5 Wicomico      WICO         24          2.6%        907       67
                 County
            34.5 Anne          ANNE         29          0.5%       5427      71.5
                 Arundel
                 County
            33.3 Carroll       CARR         6           0.3%       2244      81.5
                 County
            32.1 Baltimore     BACO         84          1.0%       8348       67
                 County
            31.7 Frederick      FRED        41          1.0%       3926      77.4
                 County
            20.7 Baltimore      BACI        29          1.1%       2678      47.9
                 City
            19.2 Prince         PRGE       380          4.0%       9615      42.5
                 George's
                 County
            18.2 Talbot        TALB         11          3.0%        369      66.4
                 County
            15.4 Worcester     WORC         13          2.5%        525      69.9
                 County


                                           A-51
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IX) HSA Results, 2006
English 10 - http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Limited English Proficient Students in HSA English, 2006.
  Percent Passing         Local               Total    Percentage Total Percent
  Limited English        School             Limited         of        Test Passing
 Proficient Students     System             English      Limited Takers       All
                                           Proficient    English           Students
                                            Students Proficient
                                              Test      Students
                                             Takers       out of
                                                        Total Test
                                                         Takers
                 37.5 Harford      HARF          8         0.3%       3009    61.3
                      County
                 32.1 Howard      HOWA          56         1.4%       3954    78.2
                      County
                 26.9 Baltimore    BACO         93         1.1%       8693    58.2
                      County
                 25.8 Montgomery MONT          349         3.2%      11011     69
                      County
                 17.5 Frederick    FRED         40         1.2%       3290    66.1
                      County
                 15 Anne           ANNE         20         0.3%       5934     62
                      Arundel
                      County
                 14.3 Washington WASH            7         0.4%       1653    66.5
                      County
                 12.6 Prince       PRGE        215         2.2%       9617    45.9
                      George's
                      County
                 9.5 Baltimore     BACI         74         1.4%       5351    37.3
                      City
                 8.3 Charles       CHAR         12         0.5%       2194    63.8
                      County
                 7.1 Worcester    WORC          14         2.4%        595     65
                      County
                 5.6 Wicomico      WICO         18         2.0%        915     58
                      County
                 0    Talbot       TALB          8         2.2%        370    63.2
                      County
                 0    Carroll      CARR          5         0.2%       2538    73.6
                      County


                                           A-52
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(IX) HSA Results, 2006
Government
http://www.mdk12.org/data/hsa/benchstudentpop2.asp
Which districts have been most successful with specified student populations?
Districts most successful with Limited English Proficient Students, HSA Govt, 2006.

Percent Passing Local School              Total    Percentage Total Percent
Limited English   System                 Limited       of      Test Passing
  Proficient                             English    Limited   Takers    All
   Students                             Proficient  English          Students
                                        Students   Proficient
                                       Test Takers Students
                                                     out of
                                                   Total Test
                                                     Takers

            69.2 Harford       HARF        13          0.4%        3299     78.4
                 County
            62.5 Frederick     FRED        48          1.4%        3554     81.7
                 County
            53.5 Montgomery    MONT        664         5.9%       11204     81.4
                 County
            53.5 Baltimore     BACO        129         1.4%        9232     72.5
                 County
            48.3 Howard        HOWA        58          1.5%        3954      85
                 County
            45.5 Washington    WASH        11          0.7%        1670     80.5
                 County
            45 Wicomico        WICO        20          2.2%        894      75.1
                 County
            41.7 Worcester     WORC        12          1.8%        664       77
                 County
            40 Charles         CHAR        15          0.6%        2595      77
                 County
            35.5 Anne          ANNE        31          0.7%        4316     86.4
                 Arundel
                 County
            31.4 Baltimore     BACI        51          1.1%        4513     53.9
                 City
            31 Prince          PRGE        335         3.6%        9356     55.5
                 George's
                 County
            28.6 Carroll       CARR         7          0.3%        2624     87.4


                                          A-53
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


                   County
             14.3 Caroline         CARO            7             1.4%         485       63.5
                   County
             11.1 Kent County KENT                 9             4.0%         227       61.2
Please note that district with fewer than 5 total test takers in this population/subject combination
are not reported.




                                               A-54
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(X) HSA Results, 2006
Prince George’s County: Time-Trend analysis

Trends in HSA Results, All Students, PGC, 2002 – 2006:

Algebra:
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=20||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|4|2|1|1|1|1|3

  Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): Algebra


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        46.1

                    2005        30.7

                    2004        36.8

                    2003        28.1

                    2002        26.3




                                            A-55
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(X) HSA Results, 2006
Prince George’s County: Time-Trend analysis, 2002-2006
Biology:
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=20||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|2|2|1|1|1|1|3


  Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): Biology


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        42.5

                    2005        32.9

                    2004        35.8

                    2003        31.1

                    2002        32.6




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(X) HSA Results, 2006
Prince George’s County: Time-Trend analysis, 2005-2006
English 10
http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=20||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): English 2


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        45.9

                    2005        41.9




                                            A-57
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(X) HSA Results, 2006
Prince George’s County: Time-Trend analysis, 2002-2006

Government:
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=20||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|3|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): Government


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        55.5

                    2005        30.8

                    2004        48.8

                    2003        41.0

                    2002        36.8




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             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XI) Data on Student Demographics:
HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students
HSA Results by Race/Ethnicity/Gender, 2002-2006:

Algebra
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=21||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|4|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details            HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender:
                          Algebra
                          Percent Passing


                      American                     White
                                Asian /
                      Indian /           African  (not of
                 Year           Pacific                   Hispanic
                       Alaskan          American Hispanic
                               Islander
                        Native                    origin)

                 2006   46.2      75.7       42.4       77.2      47.4

                 2005   41.4      61.7       27.2       59.5      27.5

                 2004   48.3      63.3       32.2       66.9      37.4

                 2003   31.3      60.8       23.2       58.7      22.8

                 2002   33.3      54.5       20.6       59.3      18.9
(XI) Data on Student Demographics:
HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation


                                               A-59
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Prince George’s County, All Students,
HSA Results by Race/Ethnicity/Gender, 2002-2006

Biology
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=21||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|2|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details            HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender:
                          Biology
                          Percent Passing


                      American                     White
                                Asian /
                      Indian /           African  (not of
                 Year           Pacific                   Hispanic
                       Alaskan          American Hispanic
                               Islander
                        Native                    origin)

                 2006   39.6      72.8       39.5       69.3      39.1

                 2005   37.5      55.8       28.2       65.7      30.4

                 2004   42.9      65.6       31.7       67.4      31.2

                 2003   54.1      54.9       25.9       65.0      29.1

                 2002   40.0      56.0       26.7       65.3      27.0




                                               A-60
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XI) Data on Student Demographics:
HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students
HSA Results by Race/Ethnicity/Gender, 2005-2006:

English 10
http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=21||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details            HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender:
                          English 2
                          Percent Passing


                      American                     White
                                Asian /
                      Indian /           African  (not of
                 Year           Pacific                   Hispanic
                       Alaskan          American Hispanic
                               Islander
                        Native                    origin)

                 2006   46.2      68.5       43.2       70.3      42.7

                 2005   45.7      62.1       38.8       69.3      37.2




                                               A-61
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XI) Data on Student Demographics:
HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students
HSA Results by Race/Ethnicity/Gender, 2002-2006:

Government
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=21||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|3|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details            HSA Results for Race/Ethnicity and Gender:
                          Government
                          Percent Passing


                      American                     White
                                Asian /
                      Indian /           African  (not of
                 Year           Pacific                   Hispanic
                       Alaskan          American Hispanic
                               Islander
                        Native                    origin)

                 2006   56.5      74.9       52.9       78.2      52.8

                 2005   47.1      47.9       28.2       44.1      35.1

                 2004   58.9      73.7       45.3       75.6      46.7

                 2003   47.8      61.8       37.4       65.6      37.8

                 2002   46.7      57.5       32.0       63.8      35.7




                                               A-62
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Special Education, 2002-2006:

Algebra
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|4|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Special Education Students
                         Algebra
                         Percent Passing


                           Special   Regular
                   Year
                          Education Education

                  2006       9.9        50.5

                  2005       4.9        33.6

                  2004       9.7        38.5

                  2003       7.8        29.3

                  2002       7.0        27.3




                                               A-63
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING



(XII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Special Education, 2002-2006:

Biology
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|2|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Special Education Students
                         Biology
                         Percent Passing


                           Special   Regular
                   Year
                          Education Education

                  2006       8.4        46.3

                  2005       5.6        36.0

                  2004       7.9        38.7

                  2003       7.3        33.3

                  2002       9.5        34.5




                                               A-64
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Special Education, 2002-2006:

English 10
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Special Education Students
                         English 2
                         Percent Passing


                           Special   Regular
                   Year
                          Education Education

                  2006       8.4        50.0

                  2005       7.8        45.7




                                               A-65
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Special Education, 2005-2006:

Government:
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|3|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Special Education Students
                         English 2
                         Percent Passing


                           Special   Regular
                   Year
                          Education Education

                  2006       8.4        50.0

                  2005       7.8        45.7




                                               A-66
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Limited English Proficiency, 2002-2006

Algebra
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|3|4|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Limited English Proficient Students
                         Algebra
                         Percent Passing


                                        Non-
                        Limited
                                       Limited
                   Year English
                                       English
                       Proficient
                                      Proficient

                  2006      24.6         47.1

                  2005      13.3         31.5

                  2004      23.8         37.2

                  2003      13.2         28.7

                  2002      10.7         27.1

(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation


                                                A-67
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Limited English Proficiency, 2002-2006

Biology
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|3|2|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Limited English Proficient Students
                         Biology
                         Percent Passing


                                        Non-
                        Limited
                                       Limited
                   Year English
                                       English
                       Proficient
                                      Proficient

                  2006      19.2         43.4

                  2005      16.1         33.8

                  2004      17.4         36.5

                  2003      14.8         31.7

                  2002      15.1         33.2




                                                A-68
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Limited English Proficiency, 2002-2006

English 10
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|3|1|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Limited English Proficient Students
                         English 2
                         Percent Passing


                                        Non-
                        Limited
                                       Limited
                   Year English
                                       English
                       Proficient
                                      Proficient

                  2006      12.6         46.7

                  2005      15.0         42.8




                                                A-69
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Limited English Proficiency, 2002-2006

Government
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|3|3|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details           HSA Results for Limited English Proficient Students
                         Government
                         Percent Passing


                                        Non-
                        Limited
                                       Limited
                   Year English
                                       English
                       Proficient
                                      Proficient

                  2006      31.0         56.5

                  2005      32.9         30.5

                  2004      40.4         49.0

                  2003      22.2         41.4

                  2002      19.3         37.2

(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation


                                                A-70
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Free and Reduced Meals (FARM), 2002-2006

Algebra
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|5|4|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details             HSA Results for Free/Reduced Meal Students
                           Algebra
                           Percent Passing


                                         Non-
                        Free/Reduced
                 Year                Free/Reduced
                            Meals
                                         Meals

                 2006       42.7           47.5

                 2005       26.6           33.0

                 2004       31.7           39.4

                 2003       23.3           30.1

                 2002       19.9           28.5




                                               A-71
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Free and Reduced Meals (FARM), 2002-2006

Biology
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|5|2|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details             HSA Results for Free/Reduced Meal Students
                           Biology
                           Percent Passing


                                         Non-
                        Free/Reduced
                 Year                Free/Reduced
                            Meals
                                         Meals

                 2006       38.0           44.4

                 2005       25.4           36.6

                 2004       26.0           40.6

                 2003       23.8           33.9

                 2002       25.3           34.9

(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation


                                               A-72
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Free and Reduced Meals (FARM), 2005-2006

English 10
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|5|1|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details          HSA Results for Free/Reduced Meal Students
                        English 2
                        Percent Passing


                                      Non-
                     Free/Reduced
                 Year             Free/Reduced
                         Meals
                                      Meals

                 2006    39.1           48.5

                 2005    33.1           46.2




                                            A-73
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIII) HSA Results disaggregated by Race/Ethnicity/Gender and subpopulation
Prince George’s County, All Students

HSA Results by Subpopulation:
Free and Reduced Meals (FARM), 2002-2006

Government
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=22||16|AAAA|2|N|6|5|3|2|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details             HSA Results for Free/Reduced Meal Students
                           Government
                           Percent Passing


                                         Non-
                        Free/Reduced
                 Year                Free/Reduced
                            Meals
                                         Meals

                 2006       49.4           58.1

                 2005       28.7           32.0

                 2004       40.7           53.1

                 2003       33.0           44.5

                 2002       27.9           39.6




                                               A-74
            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIV) Prince George’s County Public Schools
2005 Enrollment and Enrollments, 1993-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=34||16|AAAA|2|N|6|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|3

 Prince George's County (LEA:16)
                          2006 Enrollment

                   Grades         Number

       Pre-Kindergarten            4,934

            Kindergarten           8,410

              Elementary           46,316

                    Middle         32,089

                      High         41,576

        Total Enrollment          133,325

 Enrollment is the official count of students enrolled in school as of September 30, 2005.




                                                A-75
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIV) Prince George’s County Public Schools
Enrollment, 1993-2006
                      Total Enrollment

                Year    Total Enrollment

               2006          133,325

               2005          136,095

               2004          137,285

               2003          135,439

               2002          135,039

               2001          133,723

               2000          131,059

               1999          130,259

               1998          128,347

               1997          125,198

               1996          122,415

               1995          118,478

               1994          115,918

               1993          113,132




                                           A-76
             REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XV) Prince George’s County Public Schools
HS Grades 9-12 Entrants vs. Withdrawals, 1993-2006

http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=37|H|16|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3
  Prince George's County (LEA:16)




  Show Details          Student Mobility:
                        Grades 9-12
                        Percent of Students

                  Year Entrants   Withdrawals

                 2006    18.3          22.4

                 2005    17.1          16.1

                 2004    17.3          15.9

                 2003    16.4          15.3

                 2002    15.9          15.0

                 2001    17.2          16.4

                 2000    15.3          14.5

                 1999    17.0          15.2

                 1998    17.4          15.5

                 1997    17.7          16.6




                                              A-77
REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING



    1996   17.6       17.5

    1995   17.3       18.0

    1994   17.0       16.8

    1993   15.4       15.8




                             A-78
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


(XIVa) Prince George’s County

Prince George’s County Public Schools – High Schools, Grades 9-12
Enrollments and State-Rated Capacity (SRC), 2005

PGCPS High Schools Enrollment 050930                Gr9      Gr10     Gr11    Gr12     Enrollment   SRC
Region
   2       Alternative Education Pilot Prg              79       70      17        6         172            100
   2       Bladensburg High School                     926      455     361      319       2,061          1,923
   4       Bowie High School                           817      767     637      630       2,851          1,934
   3       Central High School                         336      246     220      228       1,030          1,118
   3       Charles Herbert Flowers High                860      598     617      464       2,539          2,200
   4       Croom Vocational High                        21       27      18       10          76            100
   1       Crossland High School                       796      509     381      335       2,021          1,947
   2       Duval High School                           603      427     291      286       1,607          1,654
   2       Eleanor Roosevelt High School               875      738     681      633       2,927          2,164
   2       Fairmont Heights High School                435      364     202      206       1,207          1,139
   3       Forestville High School                     425      284     179      141       1,029          1,015
   4       Frederick Douglass High School              537      502     417      351       1,807          1,283
   1       Friendly High School                        538      425     375      384       1,722          1,505
   4       Gwynn Park High School                      417      419     352      341       1,529          1,203
   5       High Point High School                      807      598     462      421       2,288          2,253
   3       Largo High School                           664      512     467      392       2,035          1,849
   5       Laurel High School                          622      488     474      406       1,990          1,870
   5       Northwestern High School                    868      703     517      457       2,545          2,053
   1       Oxon Hill High School                       886      599     536      452       2,473          1,902
   5       Parkdale High School                        683      584     458      413       2,138          1,896
   1       Potomac High School                         542      349     298      218       1,407          1,271
   3       Suitland High School                        705      620     605      529       2,459          2,635
   4       Surrattsville High School                   418      392     316      293       1,419          1,235
   3       Tall Oaks Vocational                         14       32      39       54         139            100
   4       Evening High Bladensburg @Northwestern       39       36      29      109         213
           Total                                    13,963   10,790   8,982    8,128     133,872
Summary by Grade Level:

Pre-K                                               Gr4       9,617   Gr8     10,904                   8,128
K                                                   Gr5       9,901   Gr9     13,963                 133,872
Gr1                                                 Gr6      10,528   Gr10    10,790
Gr2                                                 Gr7      10,748   Gr11     8,982
Gr3

Source: PGCPS Pupil Accounting and School Boundaries, Sep. 30, 2005;




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(XIVb) Prince George’s County
Prince George’s County Public Schools
Grade 12, 2005 Documented Decisions:
Documented Decisions Data
Updated 12/7/2005
http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=38|12|16|AAAA|2|N|6|13|1|1|1|1|1|1|3
  Prince George's County (LEA:16)
  Show Details                                          2005 Grade 12 Documented Decisions
                                                                                 Students
                                                          Number            Percent

 Attend a four-year college                                3,434              47.5

 Attend a two-year college                                 1,051              14.5

 Attend a specialized school or specialized training        257                3.6

 Enter employment (related to high school program)          100                1.4

 Enter employment (unrelated to high school program)        381                5.3

 Enter the military                                         151                2.1

 Enter full-time employment and school                      556                7.7

 Enter part-time employment and/or school                  1,032              14.3

 Other and No Response                                      262                3.6




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            REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Grade 12 Documented Decisions – Definition of Terms:

The Maryland State Department of Education collects pre-graduation plans data using the High
School Graduate Follow-up Questionnaire. All graduating seniors indicate their post graduation
decisions within 30 days of anticipated graduation.

College is defined as the student’s decision to attend any public or nonpublic post-secondary
institution providing a two-year or four-year course of study resulting in the conferring of a
degree upon successful completion of the program or course of study.

Specialized School/Training is defined as the student’s decision to attend any public or
nonpublic institution providing further training resulting in credentials or diploma upon
successful completion of the program or course of study.

Employment Related to Program is defined as work in the area of the student’s high school
program.

Employment Unrelated to Program is defined as work in an area other than the student’s high
school program.

Military is defined as enlistment into a branch of the United States Armed Services.

Full-time Employment and School is defined as a student’s decision to attend a two-year or
four-year course of study and to work full-time in an area related or unrelated to the student’s
high school program.

Part-time Employment and/or School is defined as a student’s decision to work part-time
and/or attend a two-year or four-year course of study.

Other is defined as the student’s decision to plan for something other than the above options.

The denominator is the total number of students completing the High School Graduate Follow-
up Questionnaire.

Reported since November 1992: School, System, and State levels.


High School Program Completion

High School Program Completion reflects the percentage of students completing a rigorous
course of study.

University of Maryland - The number and percentage of graduates who completed course
requirements that would qualify them for admission to the University System of Maryland.
Career and Technology - The number and percentage of graduates who completed an approved
Career and Technology Education program.


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Both University and Career/Technology - The number and percentage of graduates who met both
of the above requirements.

Rigorous High School Program - The percentage of graduates who mastered 4 of the 6
performance indicators:

   •   Two or more credits in the same foreign language with a grade of B or better;
   •   One or more credits in mathematics courses at a level higher than Algebra II and
       Geometry with a grade of B or better;
   •   Four credits of science with a grade of B or better;
   •   Two or more credits of approved advanced technology education with a grade of B or
       better;
   •   A score of 1,000 or higher on SAT-1 or a score of 20 or higher on ACT, or both; and
   •   A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

Course requirements for the admissions standards are set by the Board of Regents of the
University System of Maryland. Ensuring the acceptability of each local system's courses by the
University System of Maryland is the responsibility of the individual school systems.

A list of approved Career and Technology Education programs is available from the Division of
Career and Technology Education, MSDE, the approving agency.

The denominator is the number of graduates for the school year. Reported since November 1991:
School, System, and State levels.
Revised for 1996-97 School Year.


Additional information may be found on the School Improvement in Maryland Web site at
http://www.mdk12.org and the Maryland State Department of Education Web site at
http://www.marylandpublicschools.org.


Special Ed
Special Services: Special Education Program Participants

The number and percentage of special education program participants - students with disabilities
who have current Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). The counts are reported as of the
student's last dayof enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the
student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of special education
students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.




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(XVI) MD Schools identified for improvement, by county:

2006–2007 Elementary and Middle Schools Identified for Improvement
http://www.mdreportcard.org/SchoolsForImprovement.aspx?K=16AAAA
    2006–2007 Elementary and Middle Schools Identified for Improvement

  The following Elementary and Middle schools have been identified as Schools in
  Need of Improvement for the 2006-2007 school year. School Improvement
  designations are:

        SI Year 1
        SI Year 2
        Corrective Action (CA)
        Restructuring - Planning (RS Plan)
        Restructuring - Implementation (RS Implement)




  Show LEA and ID numbers

  County Name               School Name                                       Title 1   Status

  Allegany                  Braddock Middle                                             Year 1
  Anne Arundel              Annapolis Middle                                            Year 2
  Anne Arundel              Brooklyn Park Middle                                        Year 2
  Anne Arundel              Lindale Middle                                              Year 2
  Anne Arundel              Marley Middle                                               Year 2
  Anne Arundel              Wiley H. Bates Middle                                       Year 1
  Baltimore City/Edison     Gilmor Elementary                                 Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Alexander Hamilton Elementary                     Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Arundel Elementary/Middle                         Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Beechfield Elementary                             Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Belmont Elementary                                Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Benjamin Franklin Jr. Middle                      Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Booker T. Washington Middle                       Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Calverton Middle                                  Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Canton Middle                                     Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Cherry Hill Elementary/Middle                     Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Chinquapin Middle                                           RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Collington Square Elementary                      Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Commodore John Rogers Elementary                  Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Dickey Hill Elementary/Middle                     Title 1   CA
  Baltimore City            Diggs-Johnson Middle                              Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson Prek through 8          Title 1   RS Imple
  Baltimore City            Dr. Nathan A. Pitts Ashburton Elementary/Middle             RS Imple




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Show LEA and ID numbers

County Name               School Name                                       Title 1   Status

Baltimore City            Dr. Roland N. Patterson Sr. Academy               Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Edgewood Elementary                               Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Eutaw-Marshburn Elementary                        Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Fort Worthington Elementary                       Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Furley Elementary                                 Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Garrison Middle                                   Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            General Wolfe Elementary                          Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            George G. Kelson Elementary                       Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Govans Elementary                                 Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Guilford Elementary/Middle                        Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Hamilton Middle                                             RS Imple
Baltimore City            Harford Heights Intermediate                      Title 1   CA
Baltimore City            Harford Heights Primary                           Title 1   Year 2
Baltimore City            Harlem Park Middle                                Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Harriet Tubman Elementary                         Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Hazelwood Elementary/Middle                                 RS Imple
Baltimore City            Highlandtown Elementary #215                      Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Highlandtown Middle                               Title 1   CA
Baltimore City            Holabird Elementary                               Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            James McHenry Elementary                          Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Johnston Square Elementary                        Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Lombard Middle                                    Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Mary E. Rodman Elementary                         Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Moravia Park Primary                              Title 1   Year 2
Baltimore City            Morrell Park Elementary/Middle                              RS Imple
Baltimore City            Northeast Middle                                            RS Imple
Baltimore City            Patapsco Elementary/Middle                        Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle                       Title 1   CA
Baltimore City            Pimlico Middle                                    Title 1   CA
Baltimore City            Robert Poole Middle                               Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Rognel Heights Elementary/Middle                  Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Samuel F. B. Morse Elementary                     Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Sharp-Leadenhall Elementary                                 CA
Baltimore City            Sinclair Lane Elementary                          Title 1   CA
Baltimore City            Southeast Middle                                  Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Steuart Hill Academic Academy                     Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Tench Tilghman Elementary                         Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            The Historic Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary   Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore City            Thomas G. Hayes Elementary                        Title 1   RS Imple



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Show LEA and ID numbers

County Name               School Name                          Title 1   Status

Baltimore City            Thurgood Marshall Middle #170        Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Walter P. Carter Elementary          Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Waverly Elementary                             Year 1
Baltimore City            West Baltimore Middle                Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Westport Academy                     Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            William H. Lemmel Middle             Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Windsor Hills Elementary             Title 1   Year 2
Baltimore City            Winston Middle                       Title 1   RS Imple
Baltimore City            Woodbourne Day School                          CA
Baltimore County          Arbutus Middle                                 Year 1
Baltimore County          Deer Park Middle Magnet School                 Year 1
Baltimore County          Lansdowne Middle                     Title 1   CA
Baltimore County          Old Court Middle                     Title 1   Year 1
Baltimore County          Southwest Academy                              CA
Baltimore County          Woodlawn Middle                      Title 1   RS Plan
Caroline                  Colonel Richardson Middle School               Year 1
Dorchester                Choptank Elementary School           Title 1   Year 1
Dorchester                Maces Lane Middle                              Year 2
Dorchester                North Dorchester Middle                        CA
Frederick                 South Frederick Elementary           Title 1   RS Plan
Harford                   Edgewood Middle                                CA
Harford                   Magnolia Elementary                  Title 1   CA
Kent                      Chestertown Middle                   Title 1   Year 2
Montgomery                Col. E. Brooke Lee Middle                      Year 2
Montgomery                Eastern Middle School                          Year 2
Montgomery                Forest Oak Middle                              Year 1
Montgomery                John T. Baker Middle School                    Year 1
Montgomery                Parkland Middle                                Year 2
Montgomery                Redland Middle                                 Year 1
Montgomery                Ridgeview Middle                               Year 1
Montgomery                Shady Grove Middle                             Year 1
Montgomery                Silver Spring International Middle             Year 2
Montgomery                Tilden Middle School                           Year 1
Montgomery                Watkins Mill Elementary                        Year 1
Montgomery                White Oak Middle                               Year 2
Prince George's           Andrew Jackson Middle School                   RS Imple
Prince George's           Arrowhead Elementary                           RS Plan
Prince George's           Beacon Heights Elementary            Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Benjamin D. Foulois Elementary                 CA



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Show LEA and ID numbers

County Name               School Name                          Title 1   Status

Prince George's           Benjamin Stoddert Middle                       CA
Prince George's           Berkshire Elementary                 Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Bladensburg Elementary               Title 1   RS Imple
Prince George's           Bradbury Heights Elementary          Title 1   CA
Prince George's           Buck Lodge Middle                    Title 1   CA
Prince George's           Charles Carroll Middle                         RS Imple
Prince George's           Clinton Grove Elementary                       CA
Prince George's           Columbia Park Elementary             Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Concord Elementary                   Title 1   CA
Prince George's           Cool Spring Elementary               Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Cora L. Rice Elementary                        Year 2
Prince George's           District Heights Elementary          Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Drew Freeman Middle                            CA
Prince George's           Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle                    Year 2
Prince George's           Ernest Everett Just Middle                     CA
Prince George's           Flintstone Elementary                Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Forest Heights Elementary            Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Francis Scott Key Elementary         Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           G. Gardner Shugart Middle                      RS Imple
Prince George's           G. James Gholson Middle                        CA
Prince George's           Gaywood Elementary                             RS Imple
Prince George's           Gladys N. Spellman Elementary        Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Glassmanor Elementary                Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Greenbelt Middle School                        CA
Prince George's           Gwynn Park Middle School                       Year 2
Prince George's           Hillcrest Heights Elementary         Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Hyattsville Middle School                      Year 1
Prince George's           J. Frank Dent Elementary             Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           James H. Harrison Elementary         Title 1   CA
Prince George's           John Carroll Elementary              Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           John Eager Howard Elementary         Title 1   RS Imple
Prince George's           Judge Sylvania W. Woods Elementary   Title 1   CA
Prince George's           Kenmoor Elementary                   Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Kenmoor Middle School                          CA
Prince George's           Kettering Middle School                        CA
Prince George's           Lewisdale Elementary                 Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Longfields Elementary                          RS Plan
Prince George's           Matthew Henson Elementary            Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Morningside Elementary               Title 1   CA



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Show LEA and ID numbers

County Name               School Name                           Title 1   Status

Prince George's           Nicholas Orem Middle School           Title 1   RS Imple
Prince George's           North Forestville Elementary                    Year 1
Prince George's           Oaklands Elementary                             Year 1
Prince George's           Overlook Elementary                   Title 1   RS Imple
Prince George's           Oxon Hill Elementary                            CA
Prince George's           Oxon Hill Middle School                         CA
Prince George's           Panorama Elementary                   Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Port Towns Elementary                 Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Riverdale Elementary                  Title 1   CA
Prince George's           Robert R. Gray Elementary             Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Samuel P. Massie Elementary           Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Seat Pleasant Elementary              Title 1   Year 2
Prince George's           Springhill Lake Elementary            Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           Stephen Decatur Middle School                   RS Imple
Prince George's           Thomas Claggett Elementary            Title 1   CA
Prince George's           Thomas Johnson Middle School                    RS Imple
Prince George's           Thurgood Marshall Middle School                 RS Imple
Prince George's           Walker Mill Middle School                       Year 1
Prince George's           William Paca Elementary               Title 1   Year 1
Prince George's           William Wirt Middle School            Title 1   CA
Saint Mary's              George Washington Carver Elementary   Title 1   Year 1
Saint Mary's              Lexington Park Elementary             Title 1   Year 1
Saint Mary's              Spring Ridge Middle                             CA
Somerset                  Somerset 6/7 Intermediate School                Year 1
Wicomico                  Bennett Middle                                  Year 1
Wicomico                  Salisbury Middle                                Year 1
Wicomico                  Wicomico Middle                                 Year 1




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(XVII) MD State
All counties combined, HSA Results – Time-Trend Analysis, 2002-2006

Algebra
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=20||99|AAAA|1|N|6|1|4|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Maryland State




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): Algebra


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        66.6

                    2005        53.8

                    2004        58.8

                    2003        53.2

                    2002        52.1




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(XVII) MD State
All counties combined, HSA Results – Time-Trend Analysis, 2002-2006
Biology
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=20||99|AAAA|1|N|6|1|2|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Maryland State




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): Biology


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        67.8

                    2005        57.6

                    2004        60.9

                    2003        54.3

                    2002        54.5




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(XVII) MD State
All counties combined, HSA Results – Time-Trend Analysis, 2005-2006

English 10
http://www.mdreportcard.org/StatDisplay.aspx?PV=20||99|AAAA|1|N|6|1|1|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Maryland State




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): English 2


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        60.1

                    2005        57.3




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(XVII) MD State
All counties combined, HSA Results – Time-Trend Analysis, 2002-2006

Government
http://www.mdreportcard.org/statDisplay.aspx?PV=20||99|AAAA|1|N|6|1|3|2|1|1|1|1|3
  Maryland State




  Show Details         High School Assessment (HSA): Government


                     Year Percent Passing

                    2006        74.2

                    2005        66.4

                    2004        65.9

                    2003        60.2

                    2002        57.3




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Excerpts from Recent (2006) Local Newspaper Articles and News Reports on the Maryland
HSA:

1.
Scores Improve Across State In English Test's Second Year
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/28/AR2006092801807.html

Lori Aratani, B06 (Post)

09/29/2006

Article

...than half those tested -- 45.9 percent -- made the mark. All Maryland students are required to
take High School Assessment (HSA) exams in four areas. In August, state officials released the
results of the Algebra, Biology and Government exams. Results from the English tests were
delayed because the test is newer and officials wanted to ensure that the scores were accurate, a
spokesman said...

2.
Calvert Leads Way as HSA Scores Rise : County Is 2nd Best in State on English Test; All 3...
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/22/AR2006092201653.html

Megan Greenwell, SM06 (Post)

09/24/2006

Article

Calvert County public schools recorded the second-best scores in Maryland on the High School
Assessment in English 2, administered in the spring. All three Southern Maryland public school
systems improved their performance on the standardized...

3.
Area HSA Test Scores Increase Dramatically : Gains Are Credited to Focus on State Exam
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/25/AR2006082501660.html

William Wan, SM01 (Post)

08/27/2006

Article

...graduation beginning in 2009. State education officials released the most recent scores
Monday. The scores for a fourth subject, English 2, are to be released in the fall. Students in the
Class of 2009 will still be able to receive a diploma if they do not pass...


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4.
Seeking to Support Latinos, Especially High Schoolers
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/23/AR2006082301065.html

Candace Kattar, GZ06 (Post)

08/24/2006

Article

...Beginning with the Class of 2009, students must pass the HSA to graduate. Last year, fewer
than half of Latino students passed the HSA exams in Biology, English 2 and Algebra. Less than
60 percent passed the Government test. Scores improved significantly this year, with 60 percent
or...

5.
Concerns Persist for the Class of 2009 : School Officials Plan Programs to Help Sophomores...
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/23/AR2006082301030.html

Lori Aratani, GZ03 (Post)

08/24/2006

Article

...passed to earn a diploma in Maryland. Each May, students in Maryland are required to take the
HSAs in four subjects: Algebra, English, Biology and Government. The exam has been given
since 2002, but only became a requirement for graduation starting with this year's incoming
sophomores. In Montgomery, HSA scores have seesawed -- rising in 2003 and 2004, but
declining in 2005. Last fall, educators predicted that scores would rise...

6.
Standardized Testing: You Do the Math
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/23/AR2006082301014.html

Nick Anderson, T04 (Post)

08/24/2006

Article

...HSAs become a full diploma requirement. Students will have to pass all four -- Algebra-data
analysis, Biology, Government and English -- to graduate. The tests follow courses generally
taken in ninth and 10th grades (although some students take and pass the...But the gist is this: If
you fail the HSAs, you forgo a diploma. So consider this list from the 2006 results for the



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algebra HSA: At Fairmont Heights High, 19 percent passed, the lowest rate among major county
high schools. Passing rates for the rest...

7.
More in Md. Pass Tests Required to Graduate : Half of Pr. George's Students Earn Scores Low
Enough...
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/21/AR2006082101561.html

Jay Mathews, B01 (Post)

08/22/2006

Article

...Deasy said he is focused on raising scores in the school system, which has the second-highest
poverty rate in the state. The HSA system will deny a high school diploma, beginning with last
year's freshman class, to any student who cannot pass four tests -- in Algebra and data analysis,
Biology, Government and second-year English. Students can still receive a
diploma if they do not pass all four tests, as long as the score on each test does not fall...

8.
Proposal To Boost Schools' Offerings : Pr. George's Chief Would Expand AP
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/19/AR2006081900692.html

Nick Anderson, C01 (Post)

08/20/2006

Article

...fall slightly short on one. Tomorrow, state officials plan to announce results from this year's
HSAs for Biology, Government, English and Algebra-data analysis, taken in the spring. Prince
George's officials expect to learn that many of their students failed...test as soon as possible.
Deasy also proposed a mass media campaign and other steps to raise awareness of the high
stakes. The HSA effort would cost $3 million in the first year and $7 million in the second.
Among the other initiatives ……




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APPENDIX D: 2006 Detailed HSA Detailed Results




These data summaries are based on the Prince George's County Public Schools cumulative
history file – the results for all students taking an assessment in a
Prince George's County Public School starting in SY2002.




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The counts are unduplicated within a subject – if a student took a test more than once, the highest
score was reported. Percent passing in a school is not reported if there are fewer than ten
students.
                            Prepared by the Department of Testing
                                        November 2006




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APPENDIX E: HSA Survey Report
Prince George’s County Council’s Blue Ribbon Committee on High-Stakes Testing
                        Prince George's County Council
                            Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing
                          (Created pursuant to CR-42-2006)

                                     RESULTS
                                              of the

      Survey of HSA Alternatives, Attitudes and Knowledge
  The Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing was created by Resolution of
  the Prince George’s County Council to further examine the High School
  Assessments, their impact on the students, and to consider appropriate
  recommendations relating thereto.

  This voluntary survey was created to assist the Committee in completing its final
  report. Your responses combined with Citizen participation and testimony from
  earlier committee meetings represents your voice to the Committee.

  The Committee membership is appreciative of your time and comments as the
  entire community will be impacted by the education of our youth.

  Thank You for your participation.


       Beginning with all students in the Maryland Public School System 2009
   graduating class, the Maryland State Department of Education mandates that:

     To receive a Maryland high school diploma and graduate from high school,
    each high school senior MUST either: (i) pass all 4 HSAs in Algebra, Biology,
   English and Government, or (ii) obtain a combined minimum score of 1602 on
    all 4 HSAs or (iii) use AP/IB test scores as substitutes for one or more HSAs:




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Prince George’s County Council

HSA Survey Results
1. Overview
January 2007


   Survey Statistics



   Viewed                                                                                                 1488

   Started                                                                                                1018

   Completed                                                                                               409

   Completion Rate                                                                                   40.18%

   Drop Outs (After Starting)                                                                              609

             Average time taken to complete survey : 9 minute(s)


Q.1 Keep the Maryland HSA requirements for students, with no changes:

Keep the Maryland HSA requirements for students, with no changes:


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                   Count       Percent        20%        40%       60%       80%      100%

      1. I do not agree                 275      68.24%

      2. I agree                         71      17.62%

      3. I am not sure                   57      14.14%

          Total                         403        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.459 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.388 - 1.530]
   95%                                            n = 403          85.86% chose the following options :
                                                                           I do not agree
   Standard Deviation                              0.730                   I agree
                                                                   Least chosen option 14.14% :
   Standard Error                                  0.036                   I am not sure


Q.2 Keep the current HSA requirements but add other measures/standardized tests as alternatives (such as
SAT, ACT, AP/IB, etc) to them.

Keep the current HSA requirements but add other measures/standardized tests as alternatives (such as SAT, ACT,
AP/IB, etc) to them.




                                                      A-131
              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                    Count      Percent         20%        40%       60%        80%      100%

      1. I do not agree                  201     50.12%

      2. I agree                         151     37.66%

      3. I am not sure                    49     12.22%

          Total                          401       100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.621 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.553 - 1.689]
   95%                                            n = 401          87.78% chose the following options :
                                                                           I do not agree
   Standard Deviation                              0.694                   I agree
                                                                   Least chosen option 12.22% :
   Standard Error                                  0.035                   I am not sure


Q.3 Combine the current HSA requirements with other measures including non-standardized tests (such as
classroom teacher annual student evaluations, review of student portfolios, external/non-classroom teacher
annual evaluations of students’ work, etc).

Combine the current HSA requirements with other measures including non-standardized tests (such as classroom
teacher annual student evaluations, review of student portfolios, external/non-classroom teacher annual evaluations
of students’ work, etc).


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                    Count      Percent         20%        40%       60%        80%      100%

      1. I do not agree                  130     32.58%

      2. I agree                         234     58.65%

      3. I am not sure                    35      8.77%

          Total                          399       100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.762 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.703 - 1.821]
   95%                                            n = 399          91.23% chose the following options :
                                                                           I agree
   Standard Deviation                              0.598                   I do not agree
                                                                   Least chosen option 8.77% :
   Standard Error                                  0.030                   I am not sure


Q.4 Push our State Representatives to retract all of the current Maryland HSA requirements.

Push our State Representatives to retract all of the current Maryland HSA requirements.



          Frequency Analysis



                                                      A-132
              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


          Answer                  Count       Percent        20%       40%        60%         80%      100%

      1. I do not agree                124      30.92%

      2. I agree                       212      52.87%

      3. I am not sure                  65      16.21%

          Total                        401        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.853 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                 [1.787 - 1.919]
   95%                                           n = 401         83.79% chose the following options :
                                                                         I agree
   Standard Deviation                             0.671                  I do not agree
                                                                 Least chosen option 16.21% :
   Standard Error                                 0.034                  I am not sure


Q.5 No single high-stakes assessment should be applied to Maryland high school students – and multiple
measures of student achievement must be used to determine graduation eligibility.

No single high-stakes assessment should be applied to Maryland high school students – and multiple measures of
student achievement must be used to determine graduation eligibility.


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                  Count       Percent        20%       40%        60%         80%      100%

      1. I do not agree                 62      15.50%

      2. I agree                       308      77.00%

      3. I am not sure                  30       7.50%

          Total                        400        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.920 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                 [1.874 - 1.966]
   95%                                           n = 400         92.5% chose the following options :
                                                                         I agree
   Standard Deviation                             0.473                  I do not agree
                                                                 Least chosen option 7.5% :
   Standard Error                                 0.024                  I am not sure


Q.6 A public high school student, who is promoted through 12th grade based on the approved academic
curriculum, deserves to have a Maryland high school diploma.

A public high school student, who is promoted through 12th grade based on the approved academic curriculum,
deserves to have a Maryland high school diploma.




          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                  Count       Percent        20%       40%        60%         80%      100%

                                                     A-133
              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


      1. I do not agree                   77     19.11%

      2. I agree                         290     71.96%

      3. I am not sure                    36      8.93%

          Total                          403       100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.898 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.847 - 1.949]
   95%                                            n = 403          91.07% chose the following options :
                                                                           I agree
   Standard Deviation                              0.520                   I do not agree
                                                                   Least chosen option 8.93% :
   Standard Error                                  0.026                   I am not sure


Q.7 Amend the current HSA requirements extending the year for which the HSA requirements become
mandatory from 2009 to 2012 or beyond.

Amend the current HSA requirements extending the year for which the HSA requirements become mandatory from
2009 to 2012 or beyond.


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                    Count      Percent         20%        40%        60%       80%      100%

      1. I do not agree                  162     40.30%

      2. I agree                         164     40.80%

      3. I am not sure                    76     18.91%

          Total                          402       100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.786 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.714 - 1.858]
   95%                                            n = 402          81.09% chose the following options :
                                                                           I agree
   Standard Deviation                              0.740                   I do not agree
                                                                   Least chosen option 18.91% :
   Standard Error                                  0.037                   I am not sure


Q.8 The Maryland State Department of Education has been working on the HSAs for almost a decade. One
stated goal of the Department is to create a high School diploma which is meaningful and is based on high
academic standards and will be useful for future employment or training or service or higher education. Do
you agree that high standards for students and a meaningful high school diploma are necessary goal?

The Maryland State Department of Education has been working on the HSAs for almost a decade. One stated goal of
the Department is to create a high School diploma which is meaningful and is based on high academic standards and
will be useful for future employment or training or service or higher education. Do you agree that high standards for
students and a meaningful high school diploma are necessary goal?



          Frequency Analysis



                                                      A-134
               REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


          Answer                   Count      Percent         20%       40%       60%        80%      100%

      1. Yes                            336     83.58%

      2. No                              40      9.95%

      3. Do not know/Not sure            26      6.47%

          Total                         402       100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.229 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                 [1.175 - 1.283]
   95%                                           n = 402         93.53% chose the following options :
                                                                         Yes
   Standard Deviation                             0.554                  No
                                                                 Least chosen option 6.47% :
   Standard Error                                 0.028                  Do not know/Not sure


Q.9 Do you agree with the following statement: “Students in Prince Georges County and Maryland State
should not be denied a high school diploma if they do not meet the HSA mandates”.

Do you agree with the following statement: “Students in Prince George's County and Maryland State should not be
denied a high school diploma if they do not meet the HSA mandates”.


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                   Count      Percent         20%       40%       60%        80%      100%

      1. Yes                            219     55.30%

      2. No                             133     33.59%

      3. Do not know/Not sure            44     11.11%

          Total                         396       100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.558 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                 [1.491 - 1.626]
   95%                                           n = 396         88.89% chose the following options :
                                                                         Yes
   Standard Deviation                             0.686                  No
                                                                 Least chosen option 11.11% :
   Standard Error                                 0.034                  Do not know/Not sure


Q.10 Do you agree with the following statement: “Using one single instrument such as the HSAs to
determine whether a student graduates from high school and receives a diploma is an unfair requirement”.

Do you agree with the following statement: “Using one single instrument such as the HSAs to determine whether a
student graduates from high school and receives a diploma is an unfair requirement”.




          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                   Count      Percent         20%       40%       60%        80%      100%

                                                     A-135
               REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


      1. Yes                            312      78.99%

      2. No                               64     16.20%

      3. Do not know/Not sure             19      4.81%

          Total                         395        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.258 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.205 - 1.311]
   95%                                            n = 395          95.19% chose the following options :
                                                                           Yes
   Standard Deviation                              0.537                   No
                                                                   Least chosen option 4.81% :
   Standard Error                                  0.027                   Do not know/Not sure


Q.11 Do you agree with the following statement: The HSAs constitute a necessary tool to assist our students
to master some minimum academic material before they graduate from high school”.

Do you agree with the following statement: "The HSAs constitute a necessary tool to assist our students to master
some minimum academic material before they graduate from high school”.


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                    Count      Percent         20%        40%       60%        80%      100%

      1. Yes                            195      49.37%

      2. No                             165      41.77%

      3. Do not know/Not sure             35      8.86%

          Total                         395        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                            1.595 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                  [1.531 - 1.659]
   95%                                            n = 395          91.14% chose the following options :
                                                                           Yes
   Standard Deviation                              0.648                   No
                                                                   Least chosen option 8.86% :
   Standard Error                                  0.033                   Do not know/Not sure


Q.12 Do you agree with the following statement: “We should keep the HSAs but develop additional
alternatives to the HSAs or create new options in addition to the HSAs”.

Do you agree with the following statement: “We should keep the HSAs but develop additional alternatives to the
HSAs or create new options in addition to the HSAs”.




          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                    Count      Percent         20%        40%       60%        80%      100%

      1. Yes                            242      60.96%
                                                      A-136
                REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


      2. No                            115      28.97%

      3. Do not know/Not sure            40     10.08%

           Total                       397        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.491 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                 [1.425 - 1.557]
   95%                                           n = 397         89.92% chose the following options :
                                                                         Yes
   Standard Deviation                             0.673                  No
                                                                 Least chosen option 10.08% :
   Standard Error                                 0.034                  Do not know/Not sure


Q.13 Overall, how do you feel about the impact the HSAs will have on Prince George’s County students?

Overall, how do you feel about the impact the HSAs will have on Prince George’s County students?


           Frequency Analysis

           Answer                   Count     Percent        20%        40%       60%         80%      100%

           I am
      1.                                 62     15.58%
           optimistic/confident

           I am
      2.                               302      75.88%
           concerned/worried

           I am not sure/I need
      3.                                 34      8.54%
           additional information

           Total                       398        100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.930 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @                 [1.882 - 1.977]
   95%                                           n = 398         91.46% chose the following options :
                                                                          I am concerned/worried
   Standard Deviation                             0.487                   I am optimistic/confident
                                                                 Least chosen option 8.54% :
                                                                          I am not sure/I need additional
   Standard Error                                 0.024        information


Q.14 Prior to completing this survey, how informed were you about the Maryland HSA requirements?

Prior to completing this survey, how informed were you about the Maryland HSA requirements?




           Frequency Analysis

           Answer                   Count     Percent        20%        40%       60%         80%      100%

         I was very well
      1. informed about the            218      54.64%
         HSAs
                                                     A-137
               REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


        I was somewhat
     2. informed about the            146       36.59%
        HSAs

        I knew very little about
     3. the HSA or its                 32        8.02%
        requirements

          I was not aware of the
     4.                                    3     0.75%
          HSA requirements

          Total                       399         100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.549 Key Facts

   Confidence Interval @               [1.483 - 1.615]
   95%                                           n = 399       91.23% chose the following options :
                                                                       I was very well informed about the
   Standard Deviation                             0.674       HSAs
                                                                        I was somewhat informed about
                                                              the HSAs
                                                                Least chosen option 0.75% :
   Standard Error                                 0.034                 I was not aware of the HSA
                                                              requirements


Q.15 What is your gender?

What is your gender?


          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                   Count       Percent       20%     40%       60%        80%      100%

     1. Male                          104       26.13%

     2. Female                        294       73.87%

          Total                       398         100%

   Key Analytics

   Mean                                           1.739

   Confidence Interval @               [1.695 - 1.782]
   95%                                           n = 398

   Standard Deviation                             0.440

   Standard Error                                 0.022

Q.16 What is your age-group?

What is your age-group?




          Frequency Analysis

          Answer                   Count       Percent       20%     40%       60%        80%      100%


                                                     A-138
           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


  1. 18 years or younger     44     11.00%

  2. 19 to 24 years old       8      2.00%

  3. Over 25 years old      348     87.00%

       Total                400       100%

Key Analytics

Mean                                  2.760 Key Facts

Confidence Interval @        [2.698 - 2.822]
95%                                  n = 400       98% chose the following options :
                                                           Over 25 years old
Standard Deviation                    0.635                18 years or younger
                                                   Least chosen option 2% :
Standard Error                        0.032                19 to 24 years old




                                         A-139
               REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


Q.17 Do you now have, or will you in the future have a child or children in Prince George’s County Public
Schools?

Do you now have, or will you in the future have a child or children in Prince George’s County Public Schools?


              Frequency Analysis

              Answer                Count      Percent         20%       40%       60%       80%     100%

         1. Yes                          286     71.86%

         2. No                           112     28.14%

              Total                      398       100%

       Key Analytics

       Mean                                        1.281

       Confidence Interval @              [1.237 - 1.326]
       95%                                        n = 398

       Standard Deviation                          0.450

       Standard Error                              0.023

                                                                                                            X




                                                      A-140
              REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


2. HSA Survey Results, Sep 2006. to Jan. 2007

Zip codes/residence of respondents
& Additional (open-ended) comments
and suggestions by respondents
Please provide the zip code of your residence.

   09/07/2006 1645503

   09/07/2006 1645624 20721

   09/07/2006 1645641 20705

   09/07/2006 1645678 20745

   09/07/2006 1645684 20744

   09/07/2006 1645696 20721

   09/07/2006 1645731 20720

   09/07/2006 1645786 20707

   09/07/2006 1645895 20785

   09/07/2006 1646001 20706

   09/07/2006 1645990 20770

   09/07/2006 1646027 20708

   09/07/2006 1646085 20770

   09/07/2006 1646455 20705

   09/07/2006 1646536 20705

   09/08/2006 1646643 20774

   09/08/2006 1646680 20785

   09/08/2006 1646764

   09/08/2006 1646769 20715

   09/08/2006 1646772 20639

   09/08/2006 1646777 20772

   09/08/2006 1646794 20772

   09/08/2006 1646839 20735




                                                 A-141
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/08/2006 1646932 20785

09/08/2006 1646949 20721

09/08/2006 1647017 20744

09/08/2006 1647037 20743

09/08/2006 1647176 20706

09/09/2006 1650938 20613

09/09/2006 1651203 20721

09/10/2006 1652562 20784

09/11/2006 1653928 21046

09/11/2006 1653943 20707

09/11/2006 1653922 20715

09/11/2006 1654141 20785

09/11/2006 1654189 20785

09/11/2006 1654605 20707

09/11/2006 1654664 20721

09/11/2006 1654870 20735

09/11/2006 1654871 20744

09/11/2006 1655050 20743

09/11/2006 1655029 20708

09/12/2006 1656075

09/12/2006 1656099 20744

09/12/2006 1656130 20774

09/12/2006 1656168 20748

09/12/2006 1657124 20782

09/13/2006 1658266 20774

09/13/2006 1658497 20721

09/13/2006 1658785 20774

09/13/2006 1658839 20785

09/14/2006 1659439 20743

09/14/2006 1659619 20748

09/14/2006 1659701 20747

09/14/2006 1660162 20735




                                   A-142
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/14/2006 1660609 20721

09/14/2006 1660651 20769

09/14/2006 1660798 20772

09/15/2006 1661164 20705

09/15/2006 1661204 20721

09/15/2006 1661228 20744

09/15/2006 1661353 20774

09/15/2006 1661365 20707

09/15/2006 1661419 20770

09/15/2006 1661434 20705

09/15/2006 1661453

09/15/2006 1661477 20785

09/15/2006 1661486 20708

09/15/2006 1661611 20784

09/15/2006 1661643 20774

09/15/2006 1661713

09/15/2006 1661735 20770

09/15/2006 1661835 20744

09/15/2006 1661925 20721

09/15/2006 1661984 20748

09/15/2006 1662004 20774

09/15/2006 1662092 20747

09/15/2006 1662159 20705

09/15/2006 1662228 20705

09/16/2006 1662322 20774

09/16/2006 1662363 20721

09/16/2006 1662403 20748

09/16/2006 1662445 20657

09/16/2006 1662476 21228

09/16/2006 1662485 21140

09/16/2006 1662499 21042

09/16/2006 1662507 20685




                                   A-143
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/16/2006 1662518 20910

09/16/2006 1662521 20721

09/16/2006 1662584 20709

09/16/2006 1662595 21113

09/16/2006 1662601 20743

09/16/2006 1662628 21113

09/16/2006 1662634 21738

09/16/2006 1662658 20715

09/16/2006 1662678 20832

09/16/2006 1662692 20735

09/16/2006 1662824 20746

09/16/2006 1662828 20721

09/16/2006 1662847 20705

09/16/2006 1662880

09/16/2006 1662881 20721

09/17/2006 1662950 20876

09/17/2006 1662990 21212

09/17/2006 1662996 20706

09/17/2006 1662999 21770

09/17/2006 1663039 20906

09/17/2006 1663095 20747

09/17/2006 1663436

09/17/2006 1663467 20715

09/17/2006 1663745 20895

09/17/2006 1663912 20716

09/17/2006 1663908 20721

09/18/2006 1664538 20832

09/18/2006 1664579 20781

09/18/2006 1664588 20721

09/18/2006 1665045 20886

09/18/2006 1665052 20721

09/18/2006 1665053 20774




                                   A-144
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/18/2006 1665377 20735

09/18/2006 1665372 20710

09/18/2006 1665439 20774

09/18/2006 1665471 20774

09/18/2006 1665593 20774

09/18/2006 1665629 21703

09/18/2006 1665649 20716

09/18/2006 1665704 20774

09/18/2006 1665859 20716

09/18/2006 1665880 20721

09/18/2006 1666160 20721

09/18/2006 1666279 20782

09/18/2006 1666292 20782

09/18/2006 1666436 20721

09/18/2006 1666513 20794

09/18/2006 1666681 20721

09/19/2006 1666865 20904

09/19/2006 1666949 20774

09/19/2006 1666965 20740

09/19/2006 1667363 20772

09/19/2006 1667502 20748

09/19/2006 1667535 20721

09/19/2006 1667561 20721

09/19/2006 1667573 20721

09/19/2006 1667554 20747

09/19/2006 1667518 20785

09/19/2006 1667625 20783

09/19/2006 1667660 20721

09/19/2006 1667787

09/19/2006 1667965 20748

09/19/2006 1667951 20721

09/19/2006 1668015 20721




                                   A-145
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/19/2006 1668266 20744

09/19/2006 1668375 20774

09/19/2006 1668382 20783

09/20/2006 1668783 20705

09/20/2006 1668845 20737

09/20/2006 1668859 20721

09/20/2006 1668885 20782

09/20/2006 1668964 20721

09/20/2006 1669217 20784

09/20/2006 1669422 20715

09/20/2006 1669411 20772

09/20/2006 1669752 20748

09/20/2006 1669824 20743

09/20/2006 1669862 20744

09/20/2006 1669918 20721

09/20/2006 1669926 20657

09/20/2006 1670040 20748

09/20/2006 1670161 20782

09/21/2006 1670639 20782

09/21/2006 1670690 20744

09/21/2006 1670698 20774

09/21/2006 1670777 20772

09/21/2006 1670791 20705

09/21/2006 1671034 207327

09/21/2006 1671175 20747

09/21/2006 1671341

09/21/2006 1671456 20721

09/21/2006 1671472 20774

09/21/2006 1671563 20706

09/21/2006 1671565 20878

09/21/2006 1671638 20748

09/21/2006 1671643 20785




                                   A-146
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/21/2006 1671803 20748

09/21/2006 1671926 20782

09/21/2006 1672004 20747

09/21/2006 1672006 20744

09/23/2006 1675296 20705

09/23/2006 1675302 20781

09/23/2006 1675319 20740

09/23/2006 1675409 20024

09/23/2006 1676235 20769

09/24/2006 1676512 20712

09/24/2006 1676637 21029

09/24/2006 1676673 20737

09/24/2006 1676704 21207

09/24/2006 1676941 21014

09/24/2006 1677044 20707

09/25/2006 1677907

09/25/2006 1678163 20745

09/25/2006 1678256

09/25/2006 1678452 20745

09/25/2006 1678412 20770

09/25/2006 1678468 20744

09/25/2006 1678478 20744

09/25/2006 1678783 20716

09/25/2006 1678880 21921

09/25/2006 1679010 20745

09/25/2006 1679250 20774

09/25/2006 1679304 20735

09/26/2006 1680174 20716

09/26/2006 1680392 21114

09/26/2006 1680755 20769

09/26/2006 1680875 20746

09/26/2006 1681136 20721




                                   A-147
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


09/27/2006 1681755 20747

09/27/2006 1681820 20721

09/27/2006 1682189 20774

09/27/2006 1682200 20721

09/27/2006 1682211 20716

09/27/2006 1682668 20747

09/28/2006 1683770 20744

09/28/2006 1683801 20720

09/28/2006 1684069 20607

09/28/2006 1684428 20744

09/28/2006 1684591 20705

09/29/2006 1686274 20706

09/29/2006 1686743 20769

09/29/2006 1686825 20706

09/30/2006 1687534 20747

09/30/2006 1687733

09/30/2006 1688083 20740

10/02/2006 1689432 20706

10/02/2006 1689525 20706

10/02/2006 1690721 21223

10/03/2006 1691849 20772

10/03/2006 1692493 20743

10/03/2006 1692982 20784

10/04/2006 1693533 20715

10/04/2006 1694269 20706

10/04/2006 1694500 20721

10/04/2006 1694503 20722

10/04/2006 1694508 20715

10/04/2006 1694516 21133

10/04/2006 1694520 20721

10/04/2006 1694524 20769

10/04/2006 1694526 20774




                                   A-148
         REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


10/04/2006 1694530 20743

10/04/2006 1694533 20744

10/04/2006 1694559 20721

10/04/2006 1694567 20712

10/04/2006 1694572 20607

10/08/2006 1699312 20748

10/09/2006 1700937 20748

10/10/2006 1702956 20708

10/11/2006 1705272

10/11/2006 1705277 20721

10/11/2006 1705281 20715

10/11/2006 1705284 20774

10/11/2006 1705292 20774

10/11/2006 1705467 20706

10/12/2006 1706599 20721

10/12/2006 1706603 20715

10/12/2006 1706727 20721

10/12/2006 1706734 20715

10/12/2006 1708746 20747

10/13/2006 1710394 20772

10/13/2006 1710408 20772

10/13/2006 1710448 20772

10/13/2006 1710466 20772

10/13/2006 1710487 20772

10/13/2006 1711391 20747

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Please give us your comments or
suggestions about the (Maryland) HSA:
(Detailed responses):
Please give us comments about the Survey

   09/07/2006 1645503

   09/07/2006 1645624

   09/07/2006 1645641 I think it is also unconscionable that only public school students are required to pass
                      the test to graduate. A Maryland HS graduation diploma should mean the same thing
                      whether the student went to private school or not.

   09/07/2006 1645678 I hope the survey allows you to consider optional alternatives to students besides high
                      stakes testing. I was a student who did not test well but was an honor student. If you
                      give me an essay I will pass with flying colors but you give me multiple choice and I
                      always chose wrong. Everyone is not a good test taker so there should be alternatives
                      and the test should not be the only instrument on whether you get a high school
                      diploma.

   09/07/2006 1645684 I'm glad you are allowing parents to have a voice in this matter. Thank you.

   09/07/2006 1645696 Thanks to the county council for initiating this HSA Committee and survey. Thanks for
                      involving the public in this important community-wide discussion.

   09/07/2006 1645731

   09/07/2006 1645786

   09/07/2006 1645895

   09/07/2006 1646001

   09/07/2006 1645990 The major problem with having the HSA or any one test that MUST be passed is that
                      the curriculum for a subject is geared to the passing the test resulting in teaching to the
                      test. For example - 9th grade biology at Eleanor Roosevelt SR Science and Tech does
                      not dissect anything because it is not on the test.

                         Too much pressure is put on the schools to increase their passing rates for the test.

                         I was contacted by the PG Board of Ed. to see if I would be interested in a prep course
                         for the HSA for Algebra for my daughter. Why should she need a prep course to pass
                         the HSA if she is currently enrolled in Algebra? Note: She was in 7th grade at the time.

                         Teach the class/course/curriculum and the test should take care of itself.

   09/07/2006 1646027 I have a child who is currently in the 10th grade in a Prince George's County High
                      School. He should be able to pass the HSAs easily in all subjects. For the tests he has
                      already taken, he has commented on how easy they were. Granted, he is a TAG
                      student and they should be easy for him as such. There have to be some minimum
                      standards set for all High School graduates so that they are not given a diploma when
                      they have been socially passed every year. There are far too many students who
                      graduate and end up in remedial courses in college because they have failed to master
                      basics in High School.

   09/07/2006 1646085




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09/07/2006 1646455 The task of the school system is to involve all parents, students, and teachers in
                   education. Students have to master this material and pass the tests. Remedial help
                   must be available and students must take advantage of it.

09/07/2006 1646536

09/08/2006 1646643 Thanks for the opportunity to comment on the hsa.

09/08/2006 1646680 Other alternatives should be developed in determining if a student has mastered
                   specific skills. Some students have difficulties in testing and test taking. This test as
                   well as other standardized test does not demonstrate a complete understanding or
                   knowledge of the student.

09/08/2006 1646764

09/08/2006 1646769 There should be questions about the substantive content of the HSAs. Therein lies
                   much of the problems,
                   especially for algebra and perhaps for government.

09/08/2006 1646772 I am a candidate for State Senate in District 27, which includes southern Prince
                   George's County. The HSAs are a statewide issue, however, and this issue deserves
                   reexamination. We cannot cast 40% of Prince George's County's high school seniors
                   out into the street in 2009 because they failed the HSA. We need a more measured,
                   comprehensive and compassionate approach to determining a student's fitness to
                   graduate into the world of work or the pursuit of higher education. The human impact of
                   high-stakes testing is too great for our legislators to ignore.

09/08/2006 1646777 This comment is about the topic of the survey.
                   I consider education to be a ONE TEAM, ONE FIGHT and everyone is the blame if a
                   child fails to receive a diploma; child, parent(s), teachers, admin staff, county, and
                   ultimately the state.

                       Qualified/certified educators and higher pay are both areas that clearly need
                       addressing. I think that if the educators in Prince Georges County, MD had higher
                       wages then more certified teachers, that love teaching/who gives a darn about teaching
                       the children above and beyond what is only required to either pass the child to the next
                       grade, get the school off the AYP list, ensure the children do well on both MSA/HSAs
                       and etc; they would submit. :-) Make it worth their while to want to be in the education
                       industry.

                       Unfortunately, I noticed that the only info provided to the students is the information
                       needed to do well on the MSA/HSAs and no more. The assessments don't cover topics
                       about life, which hinders the child’s ability to function in society. Therefore the children
                       aren't prepared to deal with the way of the world TODAY from the limited knowledge
                       received while preparing them to take the various assessments and benchmarks.

                       Educators and parents also hurt children by passing them to the next grade level when
                       it clearly is evident that he/she was not academically ready to move forward.

                       Today some colleges have opted against using standardized tests...what is their
                       reasoning? My thought is that in some areas, high school graduates aren't being
                       prepared for college or their future.


09/08/2006 1646794 I feel that the entire system needs a lot of help. If, as our former CEO has stated,
                   children should not be retained in a particular because of the "stigma" that may be
                   placed on them, how will they be able to get the basic skills that they need in order to
                   move forward, let alone pass the HSA?

09/08/2006 1646839 Thank you for establishing this survey. I hope that it will provide a strong assessment of
                   the parents that do not agree that the HSA should be required for student to receive a
                   high school diploma. The HSA test is not a true accurate tool to judge if a student has



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                      gain certain skills. Some people in general just do not test well; you could be sick that
                      day or simply become overwhelm, pressured due to the implications of not passing. It
                      is not fair or a true assessment of actual knowledge and skill ability. I am not in favor of
                      HSA and feel that completion of academic curriculum is requirement enough for
                      students to graduate.

09/08/2006 1646932

09/08/2006 1646949

09/08/2006 1647017 Prince George's County Council Blue Ribbon Committee on High Stakes Testing
                   should be commended for the work they have been doing in getting the public involved,
                   and creating this much needed survey. The Maryland State Board of Education has
                   pushed their personal agenda without full disclosure, for this MSDE should be
                   sanctioned and stripped of its power, before it does any more harm to vulnerable
                   students in the public school system. MSDE is not about educating children. Nancy
                   Grasmick’s and MSBE's plan is about appeasing the Maryland Business Roundtable,
                   and the testing and textbook for-profit companies. These consortium of businesses as
                   part of the Business Roundtable - a bunch of politicians who are influencing the
                   educational policies and procedures in Maryland have little or no understanding or
                   background experience in education of diverse population that fall in the category of
                   ethnic groups, income, special populations-ESOL, Special Ed, TAG, FARM, etc.
                   MSDE is using a business plan called politics of profile under the guise of HSA.
                   What MSDE is telling us is that only those students who fit a specific profile should
                   receive a high school diploma. All others can expect only glorified babysitting services,
                   than exit the public school system after 12 years of effort with a certificate of
                   attendance if you have a student with an Individual Education Plan (student with
                   disability) and zilch if you do not.
                   I believe all students can learn, but each student learns differently. A single test or a
                   group of tests is not a valid measure of a child’s educational knowledge.

09/08/2006 1647037

09/08/2006 1647176 If the majority of last year's seniors would not have graduated, then there is a problem
                   with the HSAs or the students. My guess is the students. My children said that the HSA
                   tests they took were easy. I think the school system (including parents) need to do a
                   better job of teaching the students from 1st grade up. Maybe there should be a test at
                   the end of 8th grade to see if they are ready for high school. If not they can be held
                   back or offered extra help.

09/09/2006 1650938

09/09/2006 1651203 Understand that there are many people that have graduated from high school that are
                   not great test takers but have been quite successful. Some people would not be able to
                   be successful without a high school diploma. To make graduation that much harder, we
                   are setting our children up for failure. What are we really trying to prove? This is the
                   first year our students will be tested in Science. Is this fair. Most elementary students
                   have not had science since they have been in school. As a matter of fact PG just this
                   year has started a somewhat sound science program for all grade level. The teachers
                   haven't been trained to use the program, but who cares? The kids will be tested
                   anyway!!!!

09/10/2006 1652562 Several efforts, including the MSDE Comparable Assessments Task Force, need to be
                   pursued to develop some alternative to the current HSAs, but most students ought to
                   be able to pass these tests if they really deserve a high school diploma. I am most
                   concerned about equity for students with special needs and English Language
                   Learners.

09/11/2006 1653928

09/11/2006 1653943 We need strong academic curriculum and a system that starts in Kindergarten teaching
                   children and encouraging them to achieve and succeed to the absolute best of their



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                       abilities. A child should be on grade level in core courses before they are passed on to
                       the next grade. Standard assessment tests should be given in third, fifth and eight
                       grades. No student who cannot read and do basic math should enter high school. Not
                       all students are college bound, but each child deserves the right to an education and
                       should be able to read, write and do math when they graduate from high school. That is
                       not the case today. Our standards should be raised and our energy and time focused
                       on helping students achieve the higher standards rather than dumping all the time and
                       energy into HSAs.

09/11/2006 1653922

09/11/2006 1654141

09/11/2006 1654189

09/11/2006 1654605

09/11/2006 1654664 It is absolutely essential as we push for increase rigor in high school reform that we
                   also not unfairly penalize the student. Multiple opportunities for retest and a
                   comprehensive strategy (portfolios, alternate measures, etc.) should be offered.
                   Additionally, the school system must provide supplemental tutoring for struggling
                   students.

09/11/2006 1654870 Let's keep in mind that all students do not test well. They may do well on all class work
                   but may not be able to deal with the pressure of possibly repeating 12th grade if they
                   don't pass the HSA. Let's also keep in mind that most test are NOT written to include
                   all cultures.

09/11/2006 1654871 I'm a very concerned parent with 2 students currently enrolled in the Prince Georges
                   County School System. I feel that making HSA testing mandatory for students to
                   receive a Maryland High School Diploma is scary mostly because what happens to
                   those students who just do not test well. And if a student does not test well on these
                   pressured assessment tests I feel that the student is setup for failure. I really hope that
                   the assessment tests that are mandatory for Maryland High School Diplomas are
                   reevaluated. Thank You.

09/11/2006 1655050 The survey did not take into account the numerous students who are now being
                   educated with special needs. (504 plans, IEP.)

09/11/2006 1655029

09/12/2006 1656075

09/12/2006 1656099

09/12/2006 1656130 I feel parents and students should be better informed about the HSA requirements.
                   Students should begin preparing for the HSA as early has elementary school since
                   students will not be eligible to receive a high school diploma. Also, I believe we are
                   moving away from teaching students the basic skills (reading, math, and writing) to
                   teaching them how to take test-which is a disservice to the students.

09/12/2006 1656168

09/12/2006 1657124 I think it's equally important to place accountability on teaching staff by evaluating
                   teacher's knowledge of subject matter as well as pupil performance. I would further
                   suggest that our teachers' tests be audited to ensure that cheating doesn't exist. I have
                   heard from students that teachers often provide answers to students on standardize
                   tests or choose "smart" students to take tests to boost scores--- if true -- its a sad state
                   of affairs.

09/13/2006 1658266 WE should make sure that are teaching mechanism in place that will help our children
                   learn. It's hard to rely on one test if the information is not being taught properly in our




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                      schools

09/13/2006 1658497

09/13/2006 1658785 All students are not good test takers. Don't punish them by having to take unnecessary
                   tests in order to graduate. If they don't pass tests, will they be kept back until they do?
                   Isn't that a burden on tax payers in Maryland?

09/13/2006 1658839 I graduated from a pgcps high school in 2005

09/14/2006 1659439

09/14/2006 1659619 Students who complete 12 years of education should be afforded a high school
                   diploma. However, I feel that during the school year all students should have access to
                   additional tutorial programs and other higher level education to develop skills of
                   children during the learning process. In addition if we wait until graduation day to inform
                   a child that he or she will receive a diploma, I feel this is not justice for the student or
                   the community. The school system is responsible for educating the children and
                   everyone is responsible for ensuring that this happens. Teachers and instructors
                   should have adequate training both in the subject the teachers are teaching and in the
                   recognizing defects or deficiencies in the student’s performance. Parents should be
                   involved throughout the school year. Elected officials should have representatives that
                   do unscheduled school walk-through and teachers should be held accountable for the
                   students learning the information provided to them. An electronic or person to parent
                   notification should be developed so that parents are aware of students performance on
                   a weekly bases. Also diversity programs should be set up for all schools throughout the
                   county. Saturday school and evening school should be available to all students in PG
                   County. Regular and high performance programs should be included in each school
                   program. Crimes of any kind should not be acceptable in our county school. Mandatory
                   Alternative schooling should be set up for these teenagers that are dropping out of
                   school only to become a ward of the state or hazard to the community. I feel the parent,
                   student, school system, and elected officials should be held accountable for making
                   this happen. Electronic schooling should also be made apart of our school system. I
                   would not mind a tax increase if it meant more students to graduate and become
                   productive and proactive citizens for this county and county.

09/14/2006 1659701

09/14/2006 1660162 A start...

09/14/2006 1660609 If we want to prepare our youth to compete locally (not to mention compete on a
                   statewide basis or globally), then we must establish the rigor in our curriculum and
                   instructional delivery and employ such assessments as high school exit requirements
                   and the basis of receiving a high school diploma. Such preparation, I believe, enables
                   our youth to adequately join the workforce or enter higher institutions of learning. The
                   subjects - Algebra, Biology, English, and Government are pretty basic when you
                   consider secondary math, science, communications and the foundation for becoming a
                   productive citizen in the United States. We must caution against "dumbing down" our
                   youth but challenge them to reach higher standards. We must caution against creating
                   "basement babies" - young adults who cannot be gainfully employed hence destined to
                   live in their parents' basements or cannot enter college because of their ill preparations
                   in high school. The high school assessments is much needed and over the last 10 ten
                   years has been in process. The onset of HSAs has been a well known in Prince
                   George's County for sometime now, especially since 2003. Why now - prior to elections
                   - was such a committee established? And, why now at least 3 years hence, are we
                   asking such questions that should have been asked years ago. We need to buckle
                   down and prepare our youth not make excuses for what we believe they cannot do.
                   NCLB impacts all gender, race and ethnicity groups. Others are preparing for the reality
                   of global competition; we must do the same or always be destined to be substandard
                   and ill prepared as people. Keep the HSAs and stand behind our youth as they work
                   towards the achieving these standards.




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09/14/2006 1660651

09/14/2006 1660798 I have a tenth grader at Suitland HS. She passed the Algebra HSA in 8th grade and the
                   Biology HSA last year. She is on track to pass the remaining two. I do not have a
                   problem with this standard.

09/15/2006 1661164

09/15/2006 1661204

09/15/2006 1661228 This is a fair survey, I believe if a student is to achieve beyond high school they will
                   take the initiative themselves to achieve this goal.

09/15/2006 1661353 I feel that if a student passed all their classes they should graduate.
                   Period. True.. There will be students that slip thru the cracks but they are really about
                   to slip when you do this.

09/15/2006 1661365

09/15/2006 1661419

09/15/2006 1661434 For generations, students graduated from h.s. and succeeded in life without the HSAs.
                   The bad teachers need to be fired and the good teachers need to be allowed to teach.
                   Attendance policies should be RIGID with no exceptions. Then all students would
                   learn.

09/15/2006 1661453

09/15/2006 1661477

09/15/2006 1661486 As a retired Prince George's Teacher, I know that many students are leaving our
                   school with a diploma, but the students are not competent. They have been passed
                   along. Their reading and math competency are very low. I believe in competency
                   testing, however alternate measures need to be used. Better alignment with the County
                   curriculum must happen. Students must understand what knowledge must be acquired
                   and they must acquire it.

09/15/2006 1661611

09/15/2006 1661643 The HSAs make no provision for children with learning disabilities, IEP's and other
                   specialized education entitlements. Yet, these children will be required to meet and
                   pass the same exact tests designed for regular education students which is unfair to
                   those children who are having a truly difficult time following, learning and mastering
                   basic skills. What provisions are being made to accommodate children in these special
                   education programs?

09/15/2006 1661713

09/15/2006 1661735 Thank you

09/15/2006 1661835 I think it is outrageous requirement and what alternatives are in place for children with
                   disabilities. The students haven't been prepared (from K-12) to be successful on these
                   exams.

09/15/2006 1661925

09/15/2006 1661984 Stop treating our children like a commodity, don't assess, test.

09/15/2006 1662004 I am the parent of 3 graduates from PGCPS and a teacher.

09/15/2006 1662092




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09/15/2006 1662159 Learning must be assessed by multiple methods and consider the entire body of
                   knowledge. One standardized test cannot properly reflect a student's grasp of the
                   materials. If a student received an A in a class and the teacher was assured that the
                   student understood and could use the materials learned but the same student did not
                   achieve a passing grade on the HSA for any reason (did not test well, became ill etc)
                   the student would not be allowed to graduate. This is a gross miscarriage of the intent
                   of the higher standards to fulfill the letter of the requirements.

09/15/2006 1662228 There are several other technical details that are important. MSDE is not concerned
                   about students learning. This test is punitive. A test at all levels of learning can be used
                   as an instrument of learning. If MSDE wanted students to be able to learn from the
                   HSAs, MSDE's policies would reflect MSDE intentions.
                   1. School systems should get not only scores but the graded tests should be returned
                   to the school system by
                   July 15 so that school systems can respond to the needs of the students. Instead,
                   school systems must spend more money to obtain additional testing material (quarterly
                   benchmarks) to try and determine which students may pass/fail the HSAs. Why not use
                   the HSA to answer that question? MSDE simply wants to make the obtaining of a
                   diploma difficult and does not want students to learn. Or to learn on MSDE terms only.
                   2. Why is MSDE being so punitive? What is the philosophy behind these tests?
                   3. I believe that the law in COMAR that makes it a crime for parents to discuss test
                   scores is unconstitutional. Its existence does not allow "redress of grievances". This
                   fact is against the 1st Amendment and therefore is unconstitutional and un-American.
                   4. If MSDE is so concerned about students learning, why doesn't MSDE instruct the
                   teachers themselves? Why doesn't Achieve, Inc. make up the unit tests so that the
                   students at least will know in advance what they are up against?

09/16/2006 1662322 Hopefully once the HSA fiasco has been resolved and I get married and have children,
                   they will be able to attend PGCPS.

09/16/2006 1662363 Useful survey.

09/16/2006 1662403

09/16/2006 1662445 Thank you so much for doing this survey and for putting together the Blue Ribbon
                   Committee. You are wonderful work!

09/16/2006 1662476 I applaud PG county for this effort and only hope other counties will follow suit.

09/16/2006 1662485

09/16/2006 1662499 I have 2 children receiving special education services in Howard County. I'm concerned
                   that they will not pass the mandatory tests the first time and will suffer emotionally from
                   their failure and not want to keep retaking the test. Who will support our children's
                   emotional needs as well as ensure they receive a diploma that they need for many
                   jobs.

09/16/2006 1662507

09/16/2006 1662518

09/16/2006 1662521 The students who took the test in prior years knew they were not necessary to
                   graduate and treated them accordingly. As students age into the HSAs they will pay
                   more attention in class and study for the tests.

09/16/2006 1662584

09/16/2006 1662595 Even though I do not live in PG county now, I might soon. Also, I am very upset about
                   the HSA and hope that if one county makes changes, others might follow.

09/16/2006 1662601




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09/16/2006 1662628

09/16/2006 1662634 I am an educator of Prince George's County Public Schools' students.

09/16/2006 1662658

09/16/2006 1662678

09/16/2006 1662692 I think the HSA puts more responsibility on the student to understand the subject. Too
                   many teachers have passed students who should not have passed and the HSA forces
                   teachers to give correct grades.

09/16/2006 1662824 When my child did attend the PG public schools, I thought the expectations were much
                   lower than when I went to high school.

09/16/2006 1662828 good idea necessary parent information

09/16/2006 1662847 As a former teacher in the Pr. Geo. School system, I am afraid that once again excuses
                   and exceptions will be used to water down the system. Most other school systems in
                   other countries have strong "exit" requirements. This system does not lack the teachers
                   with the ability to teach these graduation requirements, it lacks the backbone in the
                   administration to enforce the requirements and stand up to the parents who are more
                   than willing the make excuses for why the students can't or won't do the work for
                   success. Good Luck.....

09/16/2006 1662880

09/16/2006 1662881 Good survey. How will it be used?

                     I believe raising teachers' salaries, recruiting the best and the brightest plus demanding
                     high standards and expectations from teachers and students are essential and
                     necessary. I do not believe that test taking tells the whole story, therefore, it is prudent
                     that a blended approach be used in order to determine a students’ level of achievement
                     and understanding. Unfortunately, some students do not test well--Bill Gates as an
                     example-- but has GREAT potential to be successful and contribute significantly to our
                     country.

09/17/2006 1662950 The Algebra HSA (aka MSA Algebra) and the English HSA (aka MSA English) are
                   used to assess how well a school is doing as well as determining which students
                   graduate. It is ironic that the AMO for the MSA Algebra exam for high school is 29.8%
                   for the May 2006 administration of the exam, but the students taking the exam this year
                   who are in the class of 2009 (which would be a large percentage of the test takers
                   taking the HSA/MSA algebra exam in the high schools) HAVE to PASS the exam. It
                   seems that if all students are required to pass, the high school should be held
                   accountable for ALL students in the class of 2009 passing the algebra exam; not just
                   29.8% of them. (Actually, not even 29.8% of the students taking the test will have to
                   pass courtesy of the lower bound of the CI.) (I am using 'Pass" loosely as I understand
                   that you can not pass a HSA, if certain other conditions are met.

                     While students can retake the test, the problem is that there IS NO PLAN for the
                     students who did not pass the exam. It is my understanding that the state of Maryland
                     has no plan for students not passing the exams so that they can pass the exams. (I
                     have asked at school level and have been told the school, county and the state have
                     no plan.) As a matter of fact the school year has already started and students and
                     parents still do not know whether or not a student has passed the exam.

                     So who is accountable? Certainly not the school, not the county and not the state. The
                     only people being held accountable are the students.
                     The failure to pass the algebra exam is an indication of a failure on the part of the
                     school system to ensure that students have the skills they need in a timely manner.

                     I would think the big concern for the HSA would be for the students who struggle, not



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                       the students taking the AP or IB exams. Why is the state not looking for acceptable
                       alternative ways for a student to demonstrate their competency in a given content
                       area?

09/17/2006 1662990

09/17/2006 1662996

09/17/2006 1662999 I am a parent of Frederick County students as well as an educator. This problem will
                   affect the entire state, especially the special ed population.

09/17/2006 1663039

09/17/2006 1663095 The current time they give the testing is wrong. The tests, if given at all should be given
                   annually, throughout high school in grades 9,10, and 11 and not 12th, more as a gauge
                   that the teachers are getting their points across, more than are the students learning or
                   are able to take a comprehensive exam after 4 years of high school. The reality is, if
                   the students aren't learning it’s more of a reflection of the schools failing to teach, that
                   the students failing to learn.

09/17/2006 1663436 I am a teacher in Howard County and this was forwarded to us by a fellow teacher. NY
                   and CA have had Regent's for years and they are a graduation requirement...they are
                   ahead of the game in many educational aspects. We need to research and look at
                   other states before we lose accountability. Students will be faced with "high stakes" for
                   their entire lives and they should be able to produce when it comes down to it. If you
                   are teaching appropriately and giving all the accommodations, you should be able to
                   handle these tests. The Algebra HSA is not difficult and some of my students thought it
                   an insult to their intelligence. If you'll research the students' records, you will probably
                   find multiple years of being unsuccessful in school. The reason these tests are
                   important is that we have too many teachers that are willing to pass a student to either
                   get them out of their class or because they work really hard. Those aren't results and
                   that's why our country is behind so many in math and science developments. Look at
                   the big picture before you start asking for change...at least our students and teachers
                   are being held accountable for doing their jobs.

09/17/2006 1663467

09/17/2006 1663745

09/17/2006 1663912

09/17/2006 1663908

09/18/2006 1664538 Great job getting this out to other teachers in MD.

09/18/2006 1664579 Based on my own experiences with graduation exit exams, my biggest concern is that
                   students be given the opportunity to take the exams while information is at least
                   somewhat fresh in their minds. If they are tested in 12th grade about skills/materials
                   unused/unstudied since 9th grade, then the cutoff point for the test should be set at a
                   point that takes into account the fact that some knowledge may be rusty.

09/18/2006 1664588

09/18/2006 1665045 I would like to have my opinion considered even though I don't reside in Prince
                   George's county because the HSAs affect all students in Maryland.

09/18/2006 1665052 The HSA is going to create an underclass of students who attended schools that failed
                   them then are punished because their inferior education has left them unable to pass a
                   test that will determine if they receive a diploma. It's ludicrous!

09/18/2006 1665053 Thank you for seeking input from all residents, regardless of active role with the public
                   school system.




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09/18/2006 1665377

09/18/2006 1665372 What will happen with the Special Education children if they do not complete the
                   academic credits to take a High School Diploma?

09/18/2006 1665439

09/18/2006 1665471 Thanks for listening to us parents.

09/18/2006 1665593

09/18/2006 1665629

09/18/2006 1665649

09/18/2006 1665704

09/18/2006 1665859 Did the Maryland Legislature pass this law, and if not, how can we get them involved?
                   Lawmakers must draft and pass laws if they are to affect all of us. We are a nation of
                   laws!

09/18/2006 1665880

09/18/2006 1666160 I think that it's wrong to only depend on one test is not fair

09/18/2006 1666279

09/18/2006 1666292

09/18/2006 1666436 This HSA puts all of us at a crisis point. We are about to delegate several students to
                   the unemployable, welfare-dependent category. State officials must rethink this. It is a
                   huge burden on students who, through no fault of their own, may not have been taught
                   the material or were taught by uncertified teachers, substitute teachers or non-
                   committed teachers. We should look at students who do not do well on the HSA but do
                   well on other tests or projects as equally deserving of a diploma. Save out future
                   generation. Do not disenfranchise them but help them to succeed. This is not about
                   high standards. It is about equity, fairness and common sense.

09/18/2006 1666513

09/18/2006 1666681

09/19/2006 1666865 In 2009 there will be many students who have passed all the required classes and not
                   the HSAs that will be denied a diploma because they failed one or more of the HSAs.
                   Many students do not test well and will fail. This does not mean that they do not know
                   the subject material. The test can be administered as a measure to see how the
                   schools are measuring up to national standards. Having HSAs as a graduation
                   requirement is a bad idea.

09/19/2006 1666949 My child has already missed NEEDED education because in middle school they spent
                   half the year prepping for a state test that would help the school receive additional
                   funds due to the NO Child Left Behind Act! This Act has put my child at a definite
                   disadvantage from other school systems-I was taught more at her age. The teachers
                   have even stated that the children are suffering because of this Act and if they are
                   required to only graduate if they pass this test, then the test questions need to reflect
                   the inadequate education our children are given. Question-will my child's HS now
                   devote half of the year to prepping the student to pass the HSA? Will she again be
                   denied learning because 4 out of 5 days in EACH class will be devoted to passing the
                   HSA so that the school appears excellent on paper? This test is unfair to our children
                   who are suffering due to the BUSH Administration! If a child is able to acquire the
                   needed credits to graduate, then the child should be allowed to graduate. Also,
                   everyone does not test well and this may lead to an increase in drop-outs. Who will pay




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                       for the additional schooling that a child has to take in order to graduate if they fail the
                       test? If the children were being properly taught, there would not be a need for this test!
                       Do not use our children as a way to evaluate how well or not children are being taught.
                       Does the child have to pay for the crimes of the school system?

09/19/2006 1666965

09/19/2006 1667363 HSA specifically punishes teens who are not good test takers. Being a good test taker
                   is NOT the preeminent requirement for having a successful life! NOR does it provide
                   appropriate information about the breadth of knowledge a student has. There are
                   numerous studies showing this.

09/19/2006 1667502

09/19/2006 1667535

09/19/2006 1667561

09/19/2006 1667573

09/19/2006 1667554

09/19/2006 1667518 The survey needed to ask if we had qualified teachers to prepare the students for the
                   HSAs. I'm not that confident that the teachers have the necessary skills to do that.
                   Furthermore, holding a diploma from a student based on test results is not fair. Some
                   students have a fear of testing but that doesn't mean they don't know the work. Also,
                   How can you tell a student that they have to pass the HSAs if the teacher is not
                   teaching the subject or you are learning from a substitute? Board of Education needs to
                   hire professional teachers who are willing and able to teach these students. Thank you.

09/19/2006 1667625

09/19/2006 1667660 Many children have not been properly prepared due to lack of funding to help schools
                   in assisting, targeting and bridging the gaps for academic achievement. Current
                   students do not have the necessary resources due to lack of funding, conditions of the
                   learning environment such as overcrowded classrooms. This makes it difficult for
                   teachers to advance the high achievers and/or give special attention to those that are
                   lacking skills in various subject areas.

09/19/2006 1667787

09/19/2006 1667965

09/19/2006 1667951 I believe that the HSA is a portrait of the literacy and health literacy of the Nation. I
                   think that a test alone will not validate the knowledge, skill or the ability of our youth.
                   We all have different learning styles and I think that we need to consider using
                   combined measures to test the validity of our children's education, failure to strongly
                   address this issue will continue to escalate the problem. It is significantly at arms now
                   and if we do not address the issue now then all our children will not have an equal
                   opportunity to education. Education is a civil right and no one rights should be
                   compromised. We need to change a community by addressing the issue at the lowest
                   level possible. We need to teach our children test taking skills so they can really have
                   the knowledge, skills and abilities to succeed in life and pursue their dreams and
                   achieve their bill of rights.

09/19/2006 1668015

09/19/2006 1668266

09/19/2006 1668375

09/19/2006 1668382




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09/20/2006 1668783 There should be other options for kids who KNOW they don't want to go on to college.
                   Having alternative classes and assessments, particularly for after they turn 16 (official
                   age they can stop going to school). Some kids find academics difficult and more
                   vocational or options for these students should be available and not try to 'cram' HSAs
                   and other requirements at the last minute so they can get a diploma. Perhaps it is a
                   societal issue that we want to think ALL students should go on to college. But when
                   faced with 'not' getting a diploma or dropping out of High School, I would guess many
                   parents would go for a vocational option. An 'alternative' option would need to be
                   available in ALL schools.

09/20/2006 1668845

09/20/2006 1668859

09/20/2006 1668885

09/20/2006 1668964 Availability of "simplified" literature on the HSAs. Present more seminars for parents on
                   HSAs.

09/20/2006 1669217 As a parent, I have four daughters in the PG County System. I have been most
                   unpleased about the way the State of Maryland has unfairly presented the academics
                   to our children. In all the years my children have attended the school system, they have
                   been tested to death and less taught on real lessons. Homework is based on passing
                   assessments and not what was taught and then review again for homework. I am
                   disappointed. For every turn, they want to raise the stakes higher for kids to pass when
                   over the majority cannot read nor comprehend the lessons. What really matters here,
                   the fact that the State of Maryland realizes their mistakes and now trying to test us to
                   death to get us into a place we should have been in years ago, or making sure that by
                   not every child being left behind we need to take a good look and maybe go back to the
                   basis of what really works!

09/20/2006 1669422

09/20/2006 1669411 The survey needs to include a definition or brief description of the HSA i.e., the
                   purpose, results or expected outcome of the "assessment" or why it was developed? A
                   hot link or website i.e. http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/testing/hsa/ to
                   educate those taking the survey not familiar w/HSAs. I searched the web for more
                   details

09/20/2006 1669752 a lot of teachers just want a pay check

09/20/2006 1669824

09/20/2006 1669862 I believe students do not learn in the traditional manor of just testing to determine ones
                   aptitude. Today we compete with the TV and millions of dollars have been spent to
                   control there minds. Unless we match resources and or techniques we wont achieve or
                   objectives which is to equip our young people with the skills to compete in a global
                   market.

09/20/2006 1669918 How does lack of a diploma impact those who may get the GED? If a person gets a
                   GET after high school will he or she be allowed to enter college?

                      I suggest subject experts (qualified) teachers review the tests to be sure they align with
                      the standardized curriculum.

09/20/2006 1669926

09/20/2006 1670040

09/20/2006 1670161

09/21/2006 1670639




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09/21/2006 1670690

09/21/2006 1670698 A wonderful idea to have this survey, I wish it could be widely distributed to all parents,
                   those of us with computer access and those who do not have this facility.

09/21/2006 1670777

09/21/2006 1670791

09/21/2006 1671034 I'm not sure enough parents were aware of this Survey and thus your sampling
                   audience may not actually convey the overall opinion of the majority.

09/21/2006 1671175

09/21/2006 1671341

09/21/2006 1671456

09/21/2006 1671472 I think testing is a good way to gauge how well a student is learning, but it should not
                   be the basis of which a student is deemed fit to graduate. Statistics are already against
                   minority students being able to succeed in college or beyond, this will further
                   discourage our youth. What happens to the students who have been honor roll or good
                   students throughout the school years but suffer anxiety on test, should they be denied
                   a diploma because the are not good test takers. Stop testing so much and teach them
                   reading, writing and arithmetic -- maybe we will produce better well rounded students.
                   Thank you for your time and Good Luck! Thank goodness mine are will be done with
                   school this year!!!

09/21/2006 1671563

09/21/2006 1671565 I am a teacher and concerned that many of the children and their parents are not
                   informed or misinformed about the importance of the HSAs. I believe we should keep
                   the HSAs, making modifications to accommodate our student with special needs. In
                   addition, I believe it is time for us to explore vocational/on-the-job training for some
                   students who are unable to perform on the HSAs.

09/21/2006 1671638

09/21/2006 1671643

09/21/2006 1671803 The current HSA standards make no room for youth that are late bloomers that take a
                   little longer to come to themselves. For some, 18 years is just not enough time.

09/21/2006 1671926

09/21/2006 1672004

09/21/2006 1672006 I do not agree with the standardized testing to determine if a student has the ability to
                   complete High School, or whether they will do well in college.

09/23/2006 1675296 I am concerned that we are focusing on the wrong problem in the opposition to the
                   HSA as they now exist. Rather than working to improve the entire school system top to
                   bottom to ensure our children are learning, and not simply being socially promoted,
                   there is a vocal minority demanding that (once again) standards of excellence be
                   watered down to become standards of mediocrity, or worse yet, not standards at all.
                   We have exactly ONE cycle of testing under our belts, and there are calls for changes
                   and exceptions all ready. It is not as if we didn't know this was coming along.

                      How about some competition in education, like we see in the District of Columbia, with
                      school vouchers?

09/23/2006 1675302 I think the whole statewide/countywide testing of students to evaluate schools is the




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                       wrong approach. Focus on getting good teachers into the schools and put more focus
                       on individual student needs to improve the school. Every child is not the same. Some
                       do well on tests, others do not, testing does not work for all and should not be used as
                       a means to justify progress or not. Teachers should know if students are learning or not
                       and if the teachers don't know, then they need to be replaced by teachers that are
                       capable of knowing and understanding their students.

09/23/2006 1675319 I have a bright special needs child who does not test well. I am very concerned about
                   the implications of a few standardized tests being the sole evaluation tool to determine
                   if my son will receive a diploma.

09/23/2006 1675409 Educators in the classroom need to teach smaller classes of 30 or less to
                   accommodate the visual learners we teach. Besides teaching for testing, we must
                   teach and students must learn in order to get a job, be a productive citizen in society
                   and be able to live in a world where real world skills are necessary to survive. Students
                   might have high test scores but what good is that if they have no common sense of the
                   difference of right or wrong decisions they make daily. If a child comes to high school
                   with a fourth or fifth grade reading level, can educators teach a high school curriculum
                   and teach to the middle if we are being told to turn the page and move forward to the
                   testing schedule at hand???

09/23/2006 1676235 If the state could offer assurances that ALL students in the state receive the same
                   education (skilled teachers, funding, facilities, class sizes, technology) then the HSA
                   could probably be fairly administered.

                       But the State cannot do that. Therefore I see great bias in the implementation of an
                       HSA as a requirement for receiving a diploma.

09/24/2006 1676512

09/24/2006 1676637 I live in Howard County and have the same intense concerns as those parents in prince
                   George's County. Please feel free to contact me, Leslie Weinsweig, if you needed
                   additional parental input. 443-535-9567. I am an active parent in Howard County.

09/24/2006 1676673 I have two children with Learning Disabilities. They need accommodations to perform
                   well. We should allow these accommodations so that their knowledge will be assessed,
                   rather than their ability to take the test in a form that is incompatible with their disability.

09/24/2006 1676704

09/24/2006 1676941

09/24/2006 1677044 Use the HSA as a tool for assessing the quality and effectiveness of the curriculum. Do
                   not use it as the sole determinant for a diploma.

09/25/2006 1677907

09/25/2006 1678163 Too many parents are still unaware of the affects of HSA requirements. Although
                   information is available, it's not getting to them. Some people are not computer savvy
                   so they don't know how to look it up on-line. We have a lot of ESOL students & parents
                   that may not understand. For Middle & High School students, some of the information
                   just doesn't make it home. This information is just too important for us not to look at
                   ways to ensure that parents get the information in their hands. Also, with many school
                   in school improvement & not being able to meet MSA requirement, I'm confused as to
                   how students are expected to meet HSA requirements.

09/25/2006 1678256

09/25/2006 1678452 not all parents are completely informed (myself included) I would have preferred to
                   read more information about the requirements

09/25/2006 1678412 I do not have a problem with the HSA in and of them. Here are my concerns: 1.




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                      Although the PGCPS is unable to provide a highly qualified teacher in EACH of the
                      HSA-related courses, our students are still held accountable. As a result, I don't believe
                      that the HSA should carry as much weight as is currently outlined for the class of 2009
                      and beyond. 2. We must stop socially promoting students. It is a disservice to the
                      students, parents, and community. 3. Many parents are unaware that MSA is related to
                      HSA. Also, many parents, students, and PGCPS employees are unaware of HSA and
                      what it really entails. As a result, MUCH more outreach needs to be conducted. I
                      commend the Blue Ribbon Committee for its recent Forum and other efforts. 4. I am
                      very concerned about the impacts of the HSA on our students, parents, and
                      community. For example, a recent article in the Las Vegas Sun (
                      http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/sun/2006/sep/13/566651743.html)
                      highlights the great lengths that students will go to in order to pass these tests (e.g.,
                      pulling the fire alarm, increase in cheating, etc.). The financial independence of our
                      students looks very dismal. 5. Oftentimes, we complain about the lack of
                      parental/community involvement at education forums and the outpour of involvement at
                      athletic events/activities. Instead of complaining that the parents do not attend
                      education-related events, perhaps more efforts need to be made to reach the parents
                      where THEY are (e.g., disseminate HSA info at the gates of athletic/performing arts
                      events.)


09/25/2006 1678468 As an admissions officer at a state institution, I am aware of the impact that
                   standardized test scores can have on our children. I believe that developing other
                   options for qualifying a child to achieve his/her high school diploma will prove
                   beneficial.

09/25/2006 1678478

09/25/2006 1678783

09/25/2006 1678880 I do have children in the Maryland Public School System.

09/25/2006 1679010

09/25/2006 1679250

09/25/2006 1679304 Testing in this manner is not always a fair measurement of one's abilities. To have
                   these students future depend on a test that is not nationally mandated is so unfair.
                   They will still be placed in a society with other young people who may have not done as
                   well as they have academically, but based on the results of a test will not be given the
                   same opportunities. Let’s try enhancing the school system first by providing the
                   children with the necessary tools before you try to measure their abilities.

09/26/2006 1680174 I believe any standardized test to determine the assessment of a student is unfair.
                   There are students that excel in class, but fold under the pressure of any standardized
                   test. These students deserve a high school diploma which they will need in life.
                   Students should be judged on their efforts throughout their high school experience not
                   on a test that only takes the pressure off teachers, parents and other adults.

09/26/2006 1680392 I am a teacher in Prince George's County Public Schools who is assisting in the
                   preparation for the HSA testing at the Middle School level.

                      We, as a county, need to make sure that parents are aware of and understand the
                      requirements that are being placed upon the students.

09/26/2006 1680755

09/26/2006 1680875

09/26/2006 1681136

09/27/2006 1681755




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09/27/2006 1681820

09/27/2006 1682189

09/27/2006 1682200

09/27/2006 1682211

09/27/2006 1682668

09/28/2006 1683770 I think if the teachers are allowed to review material until she feels that class has
                   learned the material. Instead of keeping to a schedule. Then our kids would be learning
                   more and be smarter. Now they have to learn a chapter a week and all kids don't learn
                   on the same level. So they need to let teachers decide when there class is ready to
                   more on and be told how much they have to teach the material. I also think that
                   teachers need to be evaluated more. You still have teachers that really don't care
                   about there job. I have experience at one high school in the county that told my child
                   that he didn't have to come to class any more and he won't tell anyone. This teacher
                   didn't tell anyone. So when I receive his report car I notice he had 17 absences from 2
                   class and no one ever called me. Of course he failed but the teacher notice he wasn't
                   coming they should made someone aware of the problem. So we need more qualified
                   and caring teachers.

09/28/2006 1683801 The county should provide alternatives to college prep classes and exams for students.
                   More vocational programs for students who do not aspire to attend college. In countries
                   that do better on standardize test students who do not test well are forced into
                   vocational training in lieu of college prep courses. Algebra, biology , government,
                   English 10 is not necessary to work in most vocational fields. If the system is left as is,
                   many students will be denied the opportunity to attend vocational program after high
                   school because they will not have a high school diploma. We as a county and nation
                   must assure our young people an avenue to become productive citizens. The Hsa
                   exams seem to be a barrier to becoming productive citizens.

09/28/2006 1684069 I believe the HSA will create another underclass of people. And that underclass will be
                   made up of primarily African Americans and Hispanics. Many students are made to
                   believe in themselves after that have obtained a high school diploma. It's important that
                   we don't take away the hope of those less fortune than ourselves (not every high
                   school student has access to a home computer, or educated adults). However; if that
                   child is able to study and pass the requirements of the classroom, then that child's
                   future should not be damped by his/her inability to pass the HSA. He/She should be
                   awarded a high school diploma which will level the playing field of their future
                   educational goals, and afford them the opportunity to seek a higher education. Many of
                   the historically black colleges have always and continue to provide exceptional
                   opportunities for the less scholarly students to pursue and obtain a higher education. I
                   believe the HSA will take away this opportunity for many African Americans and
                   Hispanic students.

09/28/2006 1684428

09/28/2006 1684591 I think the HSA is an attempt to cure a symptom versus the problem. The problem is
                   not that we have students graduating from High School w/o a proper education. The
                   problem is the school system from Grade 1. Perhaps we as a state and perhaps a
                   nation should look at public school models in other countries that are working. Why
                   reinvent the wheel?

09/29/2006 1686274

09/29/2006 1686743

09/29/2006 1686825 While I believe in high standards for every student, I do not feel one single
                   standardized test adequately reflects the capability of students. The HSAs will
                   disproportionately affect students with minimal preparation, which may not be due to



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                       the student's ability nor an accurate assessment of what that student may be able to
                       accomplish after high school. The HSAs are tools that have the ability to limit a number
                       of students who may or may not have high GPA's, may or may not participate in extra-
                       curricular activities and/or may become productive citizens after high school. One sole
                       requirement, such as a HSA score is unfair.

09/30/2006 1687534

09/30/2006 1687733 I teach middle school in the county and fully support higher standards. When we lower
                   student standards so that all can pass we do a disservice to those kids by making
                   graduation meaningless. The community needs to get behind the educational process
                   by volunteering in schools and learning more about these requirements. My
                   apprehensions regarding the tests are for the ESL learners and special education
                   students being given the same test as all other students. This seems illogical. Other
                   than that we should stop making excuses for our students and instead put faith in their
                   ability to achieve when pushed to excel.

09/30/2006 1688083

10/02/2006 1689432

10/02/2006 1689525 First, we need to focus on more repetition in Prince Georg's County Public Schools.

10/02/2006 1690721

10/03/2006 1691849

10/03/2006 1692493

10/03/2006 1692982

10/04/2006 1693533

10/04/2006 1694269 My comments are on the HSA. Right now most of our(PGC)school class rooms are
                   over sized, in some cases 28 plus students to one teacher. So to put this additional
                   burden on the students with out creating an environment where they can lean
                   effectively is just ludicrous. I'm so angry with you people! The testing requirement can
                   be so biased and it is our children that will suffer. And as our children suffer so will our
                   nation.


10/04/2006 1694500

10/04/2006 1694503

10/04/2006 1694508

10/04/2006 1694516

10/04/2006 1694520

10/04/2006 1694524

10/04/2006 1694526

10/04/2006 1694530

10/04/2006 1694533 In addition recruit qualified teachers or prepare teachers to be qualified in teaching the
                   required information to students with different learning styles. Give whatever incentives
                   necessary to increase teachers desire to what to have evening or Saturday tutorials

10/04/2006 1694559 Thank you for the opportunity to provide feedback to the commission




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           REPORT OF THE BLUE RIBBON COMMITTEE ON HIGH STAKES TESTING


10/04/2006 1694567

10/04/2006 1694572 Make the HSA test part of completing the course/class. Tests should be reviewed and
                   revised to ensure coincides with course instruction.

10/08/2006 1699312 Hello my name is Kabelo Barnes and I’m a sophomore at Suitland High School. I don’t
                   think it's fair for the class of 2009 to have to pass all those exams just to get out of high
                   school because, we have to start to get ready for college by, taking the PSAT, SAT and
                   etc. Unfortunately, we have to worry about many exams and that takes toll on the mind.
                   Lastly, the class of 07 and 08 don’t have to pass it so why should we?

10/09/2006 1700937 I believe that the test should only be used as a gauging tool of what the students have
                   learned and how well they may know the material. It should not be used to determine if
                   a student should graduate or not.

10/10/2006 1702956

10/11/2006 1705272

10/11/2006 1705277

10/11/2006 1705281 Great survey. Thanks for letting students voice their opinions.

10/11/2006 1705284 Do teachers also have to take the HSA?

10/11/2006 1705292

10/11/2006 1705467

10/12/2006 1706599

10/12/2006 1706603

10/12/2006 1706727

10/12/2006 1706734

10/12/2006 1708746 My concerns relative to the HSAs pertain specifically to the impact it will have on
                   students who do not pass the assessment. Current measures of student performance
                   indicate that a vast majority of students do not meet levels of proficiency in reading or
                   math. This would suggest that many of those students would not be able to perform at
                   levels required to pass an HSA and receive a High School Diploma. Moreover, the
                   experience of my children, both high school graduates of PGCPS, has led me to
                   believe that even when students have been deemed high-performing students (e.g.,
                   honor roll, national honor society, academic achievement awards, etc.) there is no
                   guarantee that they have acquired the levels of proficiency needed relative to national
                   standards of achievement (e.g., SAT, ACT, and college placement exams). I often
                   wonder, if my children, both high-performing honor roll students, were required to pass
                   a HSA, would they even hold a high school diploma? Given that a high school diploma
                   is the minimum entry-level requirement for many jobs and higher education
                   opportunities, the outlook for those that do not possess a high school diploma seems
                   grim. I would prefer to see greater effort applied toward ensuring that a greater majority
                   of students are meeting or exceeding established criteria for proficiencies in reading
                   and math instead of sanctioning a mandatory test as a requirement for graduation.
                   HSA as a requirement for graduation will not ensure that students are provided with the
                   learning experiences that ensure their ability to successfully pass an HSA or be
                   successful in employment or postsecondary education. It will only ensure that a greater
                   percentage of those within a broken system will have decreased options for
                   employment and higher education at the end of the road.

10/13/2006 1710394




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10/13/2006 1710408

10/13/2006 1710448 I do well on classroom tests but I did not do well on the Algebra hsa too nervous. Help
                   to change the pressure.

10/13/2006 1710466

10/13/2006 1710487

10/13/2006 1711391

10/13/2006 1713387

10/13/2006 1713399

10/14/2006 1714667 The HSAs do not reflect the learning abilities of ALL students. There are students that
                   are clinically diagnosed as learning disabled, slow learners, and then those should be
                   learners that have been and are being socially promoted. They are included in the
                   current testing population and some of these students are not able improve their
                   cognitive abilities through no fault of their own. No Child Left Behind does not
                   adequately address the students that cannot help themselves or come from homes
                   where parents cannot help them either. The school system was not developed to
                   replace parental guidance and does not have the resources to assist those families in
                   dire need of guidance and correction in order to reform that portion of the student
                   population that is currently enrolled in the public schools. It really is not about reforming
                   the public school system, but more about reforming the public that attends our school
                   system. One day we shall return to reform school or some other alternative educational
                   environment to support the needs of ALL learners in Prince George's County.

10/14/2006 1715361

10/14/2006 1715564

10/15/2006 1715839

10/15/2006 1715906 I believe that standard requirements are necessary. We have to ask ourselves why
                   students in Prince George's County are having such a hard time on these exams. We
                   first have to agree what are the minimal standards. And if students are graduating
                   without the skills to be able to lead a successful life than we are kidding ourselves that
                   it is the test and not other factors that are to blame. This survey is a start that I hope
                   will broaden the discussion that has needed to take place for quite sometime.

10/15/2006 1715991 I am so glad a committee that have the knowledge on what the HSA entails has come
                   forwarded and address this issue with parents who are not fully aware on how the HSA
                   requirements affects their child. I have a child who has ADD and AHD. How can he be
                   expected to pass the HSA, when he has these disabilities? Prince George's County
                   School Board needs to rethink this requirement for a child to graduate. This means we
                   will not have our children attending college. You must have diploma to attend college.
                   My child or any other child couldn't even get a job with out a diploma.

10/15/2006 1716020 DO AWAY WITH THIS REQUIREMENT NOW. HOW CAN MY CHILD ATTENT
                   COLLEGE WITHOUT A DIPLOMA?

10/15/2006 1716046

10/15/2006 1716271

10/15/2006 1716430 If you are going to test the students then I believe that the Teachers should also be
                   tested in order to keep the jobs yearly. After all, the students are only as smart as
                   teacher that is in giving the life long basic foundation for higher education. That is how
                   it is done in Texas.




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10/16/2006 1717018 N/A

10/16/2006 1717056

10/16/2006 1717248

10/16/2006 1717318

10/16/2006 1717400

10/16/2006 1717473

10/16/2006 1717539 I would suggest that all teachers and principals be required to take the HSA and should
                   they fail, they would be out of their respective positions.
                   Thank you!

10/16/2006 1717596 Some students struggle all there life through school. To receive their diploma is one of
                   gratitude. Why rob them of that by telling them they will not get it unless they pass this
                   assessment test?

10/16/2006 1718129

10/16/2006 1718199

10/16/2006 1718574

10/17/2006 1719003

10/17/2006 1719257

10/17/2006 1719314

10/17/2006 1719298 The HSA is an unfair document. Everyone does not learn at the same rate. Those
                   students who may blossom in college should not be denied because they don't have a
                   high school diploma. All colleges and universities require a high school diploma. Many
                   students are not good test-takers but they do well academically. Why should they be
                   denied a diploma? Some of today's greatest leaders would not have passed this test.
                   This does not mean that they are not qualified for their jobs. Think before you enforce
                   this test. You may lose some of the best students.

10/17/2006 1719338 There are children that work hard to maintain C averages and above they deserve to
                   graduate if they have met academic curriculum requirements. It needs to be considered
                   that some students can be A average students and not very good test takers. How is
                   this measured??? Also, how are teachers being measured. I have not seen any impact
                   of teacher assessments and truthfully there are some awful teachers in PG county, not
                   just talking about their skill. They may be educated however their ability to teach is not
                   good and this needs to be measured. To me if you raise the stakes for children you
                   ought to do the same for teachers. I had a teacher in my daughters class tell the whole
                   class that most of them were failing, then went on to blame them and cited reasons.
                   She never took any responsibility for her inability to teach or reach the students
                   academically. The funny part about that incident was that later we found out it was a
                   computer error that gave the class the low grades. She did apologize for the computer
                   error, however never apologized for her blaming them, nor did she believe that if they
                   were failing that she had a role in it. So to me who is to blame for the state of PG
                   Schools. Do not penalize those that work hard because they may not test well or get
                   nervous. The way this HSA is set up it has the potential to cause poverty than prevent
                   it. Has anyone thought of that??? People who are limited in job choices and
                   educational choices turn to other means to provide. Please look at the big picture.

10/17/2006 1719414

10/17/2006 1719505




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10/17/2006 1719527

10/17/2006 1719921 I do not agree with the HSA requirements.

10/18/2006 1721608

10/18/2006 1721630

10/19/2006 1722184

10/19/2006 1722654

10/19/2006 1723798 I think it is extremely UNFAIR to use a test such as the HSA to determine if a child will
                   or will not receive their HS Diploma. All students don't test well on standardized exams.
                   Does being in school getting good grades count for anything anymore?? This is entirely
                   TOO MUCH PRESSURE AND STRESS

10/20/2006 1724883

10/21/2006 1726929 I think there is not enough time in the day for some courses. I think the children should
                   be given all of their books to work in and to write in without having to make copies.
                   Each student should have their own disposable books. This will curtail the low grades
                   and eliminate the need for HSAs just the final exams should be enough.

10/21/2006 1727503

10/22/2006 1728129

10/24/2006 1732301 The HSAs should not be the deciding factor when it comes to graduation, especially
                   when the student excels academically in the classroom.

10/25/2006 1733170 I welcome the survey. I have two daughters attending Suitland High School. The
                   current HSA requirements affect only my younger daughter who is in the 10th grade. I
                   agree the students need to be held more accountable, but I also believe they need to
                   be provided the tools to succeed. Right now, I am very concerned because the
                   teachers cannot teach what they do not know. Also, no tutoring is being provided to
                   prepare her for the Algebra tests she did not pass last year, nor is she currently taking
                   algebra this year. It is October and she will be retested in January. As for the other
                   HSAs she must take this year, she wants to take Biology tutoring, but none is being
                   offered. Is just seems unfair. It is like our kids are being set up to fail!

10/25/2006 1733765 I think the HSA should be revised and geared to help the student but I think it will hurt
                   the students.

10/26/2006 1736055

10/27/2006 1736770

10/27/2006 1736868

10/27/2006 1736940 My daughter has done well in public school with consistent grade point averages of 3.4
                   and above and took Algebra in 8th grade (barely passed the HSA). A private tutor
                   stepped in to prepare her in December after the math teacher was absence due to
                   accident for more than a quarter! She went from "D" in quarter 3 to "A" in Qtr 4 and a
                   "B" overall, however, it is the tutor who enabled her to pass the HSA and climb from a
                   "D" to an "A" not the school. She is currently in a school designated as needing
                   improvement (Potomac) but we continue to employ 2 tutors in Math and Language Arts
                   to enable her to succeed.

10/27/2006 1737056

10/27/2006 1737143




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10/27/2006 1737399 You claim this will help in their future I agree with math and English but not with the
                   algebra and science no I was told if the students did not pass they would get a
                   certificate of attendance and now I found out you do not get anything. It seems to
                   change all the time

10/27/2006 1737453

10/27/2006 1737822 Why wasn't there a question asking do you think the students should be able to decide
                   if the want to take the test?

10/28/2006 1738287

10/28/2006 1738681

10/29/2006 1739645

10/30/2006 1740017

10/30/2006 1740274

10/30/2006 1740598 I am afraid that Maryland schools are becoming like the Washington DC schools of the
                   past. The classes are getting larger, and the resources are being taken out or away
                   from the schools. I also feel that is happening in PG County because the county is
                   becoming more populated with
                   African Americans. Please don't take the resources from our kids. We all will pay later!
                   Look around the country.

10/30/2006 1741515

10/30/2006 1741577

10/31/2006 1742872 If think the HSA should be in place for the children that are in the elementary school
                   now and that way the PGC school staff and prayerful parents, day care providers,
                   tutors, Program can have the opportunity to change the mind set of the new
                   generation, especially now that the elementary school are training the preschoolers. I
                   am afraid that the teachers/parents will drop the ball and when that happens, the
                   children pay the price. I have the opportunity of taking my grandchildren to a program
                   the call The S.B. Step Ahead Program (outside contractor) that's pressing to number
                   one make the parents accountable with information on educating the children now
                   without excuses.

11/01/2006 1746579 The HSAs are a very poor decision on the part of the Board of Education and Prince
                   Georges County. I have a son in 10th grade at Fairmont Heights High Struggling to
                   stay afloat. The HSA'S impact his graduating class of 2009. My son has been VERY
                   POORLY educated all his life in the Prince Georges County public school system, to
                   my findings the County in a whole does not have a handle on the schools, most
                   teachers can not control the classrooms and the students are not being taught
                   properly. If Mr. Jack Johnson and his staff, also the Board of Education members were
                   to go out and visit the schools and classrooms on a regular basis as I do, they to would
                   be devastated and embarrassed at what goes on in the classrooms. 80% of our
                   students don't stand a chance when it comes to there future, not to mention the HSA'S.
                   Please these kids are not learning and the teachers, parents and the students know it. I
                   believe the only ones that don't know are the ones making the rules. What a shame!
                   You put community services in front of the kids now the HSA'S, what's next? What you
                   need to be focusing on is better education for the teachers so they can properly pass
                   that on to our children. More programs for the kids that need extra help, the kids with
                   learning disabilities are expected to take and pass these test also COME ON! They get
                   no REAL help from the PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM, what happened to the no child left
                   behind act? That was nothing. NO HSA'S PLEASE RETHINK THIS. IT WON'T BE
                   GOOD! You would be putting al ot of minorities on the streets with no high school
                   diploma and no chance for landing a halfway decent job so they can at least take care
                   of themselves. The focus with most of our kids in Prince Georges County is getting the



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                      most out of what they have to work with the teachers that they have and getting the
                      best grades possible and obtaining a diploma for future success. Let's not have a
                      whole community full of drop-outs especially our young men. No diploma ,no job, no
                      money what's left for them to do? I'm not say don't educate our children or hold then
                      accountable but let's do it a different way!

                      Sincerely,
                      Ms Graham

11/01/2006 1746842

11/02/2006 1748580 As a graduate of Prince George’s County Public Schools(Eleanor Roosevelt 1996), I
                   would hope that the HSAs will evolve with the changing academic world around them.

11/02/2006 1748732

11/03/2006 1750007 good survey but what will this be used for e-mail me at timsnetwork@hotmail.com

11/06/2006 1754255

11/08/2006 1757805

11/09/2006 1759446 It was very nice to get my opinion out in the open.

11/10/2006 1761017

11/10/2006 1761530 This is a good survey to find out about what people think in the county.

11/12/2006 1763100

11/12/2006 1763192

11/13/2006 1764420

11/13/2006 1764795 I feel that the classroom size and current state of the public schools in Prince George's
                   Country is horrible. Our students are loosing the desire to learn because of many of the
                   obstacles they consistently face. More forums to dialogue and assist our students in
                   becoming independent learners must become the norm instead of the exception.

11/14/2006 1765684 Some children are not test taker. They understand the material but when it comes to
                   taking important test like the HSA and final exams, they freeze up.

11/16/2006 1771586

11/17/2006 1773016

11/20/2006 1776318

11/21/2006 1778248 THE COUNTY SCHOOL BUDGET SHOULD BE INCREASING TO THE MATCH THE
                   NEW HOUSING GROWTH..

11/22/2006 1781392 I believe the HSA is a set-up for the youths of PG County. The teachers administers
                   final exam that covers comprehensive data of the assignments and tasks that were
                   review in their class. I believe we should utilize our tax payers' dollars by putting inept
                   teachers in the classroom to motivate our children. The children morale is down to the
                   attitudes of the under paid teachers. Provide after school activities, honor roll
                   programs, incentives for our kids to want to learn. Provide individuals in leadership
                   positions with the desire and hunger to push our children to the next level. Get qualified
                   teachers in our classroom, knowledgeable coaches for the athletic programs; if the
                   child succeeds to greater heights they'll come back and give to the community. Stop
                   judging the youths for what they are now and judge them for what they want to
                   become. I've seen good students on the basketball courts, on the football fields, on the
                   playing fields that just don't want to do better because of individuals that keep putting



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                      them down...what youth doesn't want to go to the NBA, NFL, NHL, or etc...That’s
                      everyone dreams to make it big. Where's the scouts, where's the leaders. I know
                      education is first but if they knew that if they continue excelling in academics, the
                      scouts will show up, scholarships will be pouring in, contracts will be signed. Students
                      will continue to fail and transfer out of the PG system if people don't start caring. How
                      many homeowners and/or tax payers pay their taxes to cover the PG Public School
                      and fund the private schools so their child can excel. But why should PG care...they're
                      probably collecting on both ends, the more the money the better it is.

11/27/2006 1786021

11/27/2006 1787500 I would like to look at the current requirements for hs students in PGCPS and compare
                   them to other counties across the country and in the immediate area.

11/27/2006 1787744

11/28/2006 1787927

11/28/2006 1788391 This is a good starting point, but there needs to be community forums. Some
                   individuals do not utilize the internet on a regular basis.

11/30/2006 1792312 The concept of the HSA is a good one, but there needs to be alternate methods for
                   assessing those students who are not good test takers and for those who don't get the
                   necessary support at home. Teachers should be able to recognize if they are
                   promoting a student based on actual achievement or not.

12/01/2006 1794011

12/04/2006 1797109

12/06/2006 1802919 Each of my daughters is in the VPA program at Suitland and doing quite well, however,
                   some students do not take tests well. We need to NOT promote students who are
                   failing. This should start in the first grade. Correct problems early.

12/06/2006 1803094 The HSAs are designed to contribute to the failure of our children. A single requirement
                   that determines the ability to obtain a diploma is ridiculous. What about the extremely
                   smart students who cannot perform well on standardized tests. Every student learns
                   and retains and recalls information differently so to require every student to pass the
                   HSA will be a disaster for future generations.

                      Teachers are not allowed to teach children a wide range of material because they have
                      to "teach the test". I think the HSAs and NCLB is the worst thing to happen in public
                      education since segregation.

12/06/2006 1803513

12/06/2006 1803732

12/07/2006 1805747

12/08/2006 1808412 I do not feel that enough good instructions are given to the schools system. I have boys
                   both at Crossland and Thurgood and they are constantly without math teachers; how
                   can they learn and be productive in this subject if not given the proper tools - teachers.
                   I am concern because they should be given after-school instruction on passing this test
                   - such as tutoring, but those classes are design for upper level students. I think the
                   concept is good but I do not feel the outcome will be good for a lot of students.

12/10/2006 1811482 The HSA is not neccesary, they should change it to 2010-2012 since they are the new
                   freshmen

12/11/2006 1812302




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12/11/2006 1812488

12/12/2006 1814184

12/12/2006 1814568

12/12/2006 1814609

12/12/2006 1814849 Both of my children graduated and passed all test, some with perfect scores. The State
                   should look at a tiered system of rewarding students who pass the standardized test
                   and not penalize students who fail regardless of the reason. Our emphasis should not
                   be on punishing mediocre students rather rewarding students who excel.

12/12/2006 1815504

12/21/2006 1834930 It is a good idea to get information on the public's opinion of the impact of HSA. One
                   thing Maryland needs to take a look at is other states that have dealt with High School
                   testing and how they successfully have implemented it. For Example New York State
                   and their Regents exams. In NY students are given tracks to follow for their diplomas. It
                   was not expected that everyone is capable of completing or wanting to complete the
                   college track. There needs to be alternative diplomas for the students that reach for
                   passing the HSA but fail.

12/22/2006 1838231

12/22/2006 1839254 I am a 2005 graduate of Bladensburg High School. I participated in the preliminary
                   HSAs and I must say that they do measure a student's ability to comprehend the
                   material applied in the classroom. Yet, if teachers are not covering the material that will
                   be assessed, then testing a student is pointless. This identifies another issue; often,
                   educators are not allowed to be creative because the HSA is a priority. This will not
                   particularly attract educators to PGCPS. As an education major at Morgan State
                   University, I plan to work some where at which I am able to apply my skills and
                   knowledge effectively. The HSA should not be a graduation requirement, but should be
                   used to measure a student's academic progress and identify areas in which educators
                   should improve. I think that the persons who mandated the HSA for graduation are
                   stupid because I believe that this test as a requirement will retain many students in the
                   system instead of mobilizing them to realistic lives after high school.

12/26/2006 1841117

12/26/2006 1842075 I am very concerned about the impact the HSAs will have on children who do not test
                   well, and children who have a difficult time writing. Children learn differently and this
                   "one test fits all" mentality will hurt a majority of our children.

12/26/2006 1842146

12/27/2006 1843386

12/29/2006 1846228 I feel that the HSA should have been able to review prior to the questionnaire. I have 2
                   children that have graduated from Suitland and a 3rd to graduate in the year of 2007. I
                   also have a 2 year old that will be attending public schools as well. I think we have to
                   find a way to get parents involved in their child’s education.

12/29/2006 1846407

01/01/2007 1848340

01/01/2007 1848448 The biggest concern I have is the lack of motivation and willingness of some of our
                   educators to teach our children. Research has proven that if an educator is satisfied
                   with their job the students will benefit as a result. However, the students should not
                   receive negative consequences. There is no willingness to communicate with parents
                   outside the time of schools sessions, so that parents and teachers can be on one




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                      accord for the good of the students. I am not blaming all teachers for the lack low test
                      score, inadequate material being introduced nor the amount of time allowed for
                      students to grasp the material. The blame need to be placed on several factors such
                      as: parent involvement, government policies, the school board/teachers and the
                      unacceptable allocation of funding for our schools. The hsa will be the destruction of
                      our youth because inadequate methods of teaching.

01/02/2007 1849258

01/02/2007 1850498 looked skewed towards giving kids a way out of having to be held to a real standard.
                   Why is this a good thing for our people?

01/03/2007 1850745 Please publish the results of this survey

01/03/2007 1851217

01/03/2007 1851720 I have a daughter that’s in the 10th grade she’s a special ed child with some disabilities
                   and I know she’s not able to score high enough to pass the HSA tests and I don’t think
                   its fair to deny her a high school diploma because she cant get a passing score on the
                   HSA some kids can pass their classes bit not those special tests I think they need to
                   reconsider the HSA tests for some students

01/04/2007 1852385

01/04/2007 1853034

01/07/2007 1856211

01/08/2007 1858550

01/09/2007 1858623

01/10/2007 1862224 The HSA is unfair. My son took the Algebra test last year and passed with a score of
                   386. I've spoken with many teacher that say the data analysis is not even taught in
                   school so how can kids pass it. He will be graduating in 2009 and we all are worried
                   about information given on test that is not taught in the classroom.

01/11/2007 1865041

01/14/2007 1867600

01/17/2007 1871863

01/17/2007 1871919 HSAs can be a useful tool, but it should not be the all-and-all to determine academic
                   success within the Prince George's School System. This system has never had the
                   leadership or dedication to implement such a large scale project. This county has too
                   many hidden agenda' and fails to keep sight on the education of our future (youth). It is
                   a shame that this is the wealthiest county of African-American's in the United States,;
                   however, it is not indicative seen through the eyes of a faltering school system.

01/17/2007 1872587 I'm a resident of the Fairwood community in Bowie. I believe that for this country to
                   move forward we must stress education as a means to end some of the crime levels
                   attributed to this county, as well as to raise the status of PG country as a premier place
                   to raise a family, have a business, or to visit.

01/17/2007 1872762 The schools in PG county are in serious trouble. Until we bring the school system up to
                   grade the county will always be considered a failure.

01/22/2007 1878236

01/25/2007 1883953 Please provide additional information on the research you've done about "high stakes"
                   testing and about viable alternatives or supplements. Thanks for your good work on




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                      this.

01/25/2007 1884741 No comment.

01/25/2007 1885101 I have 2 children who have reading disabilities and they are in middle school/ high
                   school. I would like to know how the heck is my 7th grader suppose to pass the any
                   test in PG County if he's only reading on a 3rd grade reading level and how the heck
                   did he get this far before I could get any help. Don't get me wrong I requested help for
                   him since the third grade but just got it last year. My 12th grader is reading on a 9th
                   grade reading level. How the heck did he get this far? So this is why I disagree with the
                   students must pass the testes given in order to graduate. So what do I do as a parent
                   hold my child accountable for not graduating. When his teachers should be graded for
                   the work and lessons that they teach our students. What Happen to the NO CHILD
                   LEFT BEHIND because 2 out of the 6 children I have has been left behind. Please feel
                   free to contact me at Bu3Kar@aol.com

01/25/2007 1885975




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REFERENCES:

                                         I: PUBLICATIONS

A: Reports

Mosser, D. P, Hawley, T. D. (2005). Economic and Workforce Outlook, 2005-2010: Key issues
and trends shaping career, technical, occupational and professional education in Prince George’s
County, Maryland.. Prince George’s Community College, (i)-(ii), p. 1-85.

Johnson, J., Dozier, W. et al., (2005) Visionary Panel for Excellence in Education Across the Lifespan,
       Office of the County Executive, Upper Marlboro, Prince George’s County, MD, p. 5-14.

Taft, B. & Warner, M. R., National Education Summit on High Schools (2005). An Action
Agenda for Improving America’s High Schools, Achieve, Inc. and National Governors
Association in partnership with Business Roundtable, the Educational Commission of the States
and the Hunt Institute, p. 3-24.

Conkin, K. D. (2006). National Governors Association Center for Best Practices .Redesigning the
       American high school – Getting it done: Ten steps to a state action agenda, A guidebook of
       promising state and local practices, p. 1-49.


Sunderman, G.L. & Kim, J. (2005). Teacher quality: Equalizing educational opportunities and
       outcomes. Cambridge, MA: The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University.

Batt, L. Kim, J., & Sunderman, G.L. (2005). Limited English proficient students: Increased
         accountability under NCLB. Cambridge, MA: The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University.


B: Books and Book chapters

Sunderman, G.L. Kim, J.S., & Orfield, G. (2005). NCLB meets school realities: Lessons from the field.
       Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Wong, K. K. & Sunderman, G. L. (1996). Redesigning accountability at the system-wide level: The
      politics of school reform in Chicago. In K. Wong, (Ed.), Advances in educational policy:
      Rethinking school reform in Chicago. Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, Inc.

Wong, K.K., Dreeben, R., Lynn, Jr., L.E., Meyer, R. & Sunderman, G. L. (1996). System-wide
      governance in the Chicago Public Schools: A report on the findings and recommendations for
      institutional redesign. In K. Wong, (Ed.), Advances in educational policy: Rethinking school
      reform in Chicago. Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, Inc.

Wong K. K. & Sunderman, G. L. (1995). Redesigning accountability at the system-wide level: The
      politics of school reform in Chicago. In T. Downs & W. Testa, (Eds.), Midwest approaches to
      school reform. Chicago: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.



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      C: Refereed Journal Articles

      Kim, J.S. & Sunderman, G.L. (2005). Measuring academic proficiency under the No Child Left Behind
              Act: Implications for educational equity. Educational Researcher, 34 (8) 2-13.

      Wong, K.K. & Sunderman, G.L. (2000). Implementing districtwide reform in schools with Title I
            schoolwide programs: The first two years of “Children Achieving” in Philadelphia. Journal of
            Education for Students Placed at Risk, 5 (4), 355-381.

      Wong, K., Dreeben, R., Lynn, Jr., L.E., & Sunderman, G. L. (2000). Education Policy: Integrated
            governance as a reform strategy in schools. International Journal of Economic Development, 2
            (2), 218-255.

      Other Publications

      Orfield, G. & Sunderman, G. (April 4, 2006). Takeover policy fails poor schools. The Baltimore Sun,
               p. 19A.

      Orfield, G. & Sunderman, G. (March 15, 2006). It’s vital to show education law’s flaws. The
               Indianapolis Star, p. A13.

      Sunderman, G.L. (February 28, 2000). From myths to methods of improving education.
             Opinion/Editorial. The Baltimore Sun, p. 9A.

                                            II: WEBSITES AND LINKS:

      Sample and practice HSAs, Public Release Forms, scoring tutorials, and additional information
      on school improvement in Maryland, at
      http://mdk12.org/mspp/high_school/look_like/index.html
      http://mdk12.org/data/hsa/index.asp, and

      The Maryland State Department of Education Web site at
      http://www.marylandpublicschools.org.

      Survey of HSA Alternatives, Attitudes and Knowledge (2006). Prince George’s County
      Council’s Blue Ribbon Committee on High-Stakes Testing, Upper Marlboro, MD.
      http://egov.co.pg.md.us/hsasurvey

Maryland State Department of Education (2005). 2005 HSA Technical Report,
http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/divisions/planningresultstest/2005+HSA+Technical+Report.htm,
Maryland High School Assessment Program Algebra/Data Analysis, Biology, English, ... A complete copy of
the 2005 HSA Technical Report.

Marylanders Against High-Stakes Testing (MAHST), Coordinator Sue Allison at sueallison@comcast.net,
http://www.geocities.com/stophsa/




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American Educational Research Association: High-Stakes Testing in PreK-12 Education, Position statement,
Standards and Testing > High Stakes Testing, http://www.aera.net/policyandprograms?id=378




National Center on Fair and Open Testing (NCFOT), A Primer: Diagnostic, Formative, & Summative Assessment,
(1999), http://www.mmrwsjr.com/assessment.htm




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