Salesman Training Manual by smk18139

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Welcome to NASDA

 Welcome to NASDA




                    Welcome to NASDA
Welcome to NASDA                                                    menu




     About this Course

      This course is designed to help you learn more about
      NASDA and your new role as an Enumerator.

      You’ll learn about:
       – The state of agriculture in the U.S. today. You’ll learn
         about the types of people who work in the industry,
         and why information is important to them.
       – What NASDA and NASS are all about, and how their
         relationship serves U.S. agriculture and both state
         and federal governments.
       – The skills, tasks and tools you’ll need to be
         successful as an Enumerator.
Welcome to NASDA                                                  menu




     About this Course

      This course is designed specifically for newly hired
      Field Enumerators. You may see it presented as part of
      your initial training, or you may have the opportunity to
      take it online by yourself. In either case, when you
      complete the course, you will be asked to take a test.
      Your test results will be kept on file as part of your
      employee record to verify that you have been trained.
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Today’s Agricultural Environment

There…




                                   Today’s Agricultural Environment
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                     menu




      What’s in This Section

      In this section, we will examine the state of agriculture in
      the U.S. today.

      During the next 15 minutes, you will learn about current
      trends in our industry. You’ll also better understand how
      the information you’ll be gathering reflects – and affects –
      those trends.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                   menu




      Agriculture as an Industry

      The agricultural industry is one of change and transition.
      No longer a local, family-based industry, farming is now
      big business.

      In 2005, farming assets were estimated to be worth $1.5
      billion in the U.S. – and net cash income from farming
      was estimated at $64.4 billion. Large farms earn an
      average of $500,000 in gross sales annually.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                 menu




      Agriculture as an Industry

      Agriculture makes a substantial contribution to the U.S.
      economy and to the lives of American citizens. Only
      about 2% of the American population actually produces
      food – yet that 2% feeds the entire nation.

      In addition, U.S. farmers also feed about 70 million
      people abroad.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                menu




      The Agricultural Community

      The agricultural community includes a wide range of
      people and businesses. It can include anyone working in
      the production and processing of any product that is
      harvested or processed in the U.S.

      It is estimated that the agriculture industry employs
      nearly 15% of the American workforce – that’s nearly 25
      million individuals.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                           menu




      The Agricultural Community
                                                                  INPUT SECTOR
      Employment in the agricultural industry mainly falls into
      one of three prominent sectors:
        – The input sector                                                       PRODUCTION
        – The production sector, and                                               SECTOR
        – The output sector



                                                                    OUTPUT SECTOR
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                      menu




    The Input Sector
     Supplies farmers and ranchers with seed, fertilizer, crop
     protection chemicals, machinery, fuel, etc.
     •Examples:
     • John Deere (farm machinery)                                               PRODUCTION
     • Dow AgroScience (crop protection)                                           SECTOR
     • Purina (animal feed)


                                                                 OUTPUT SECTOR
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                       menu




      The Production Sector
      Produces raw agricultural products, and consists of      INPUT SECTOR
      farmers and ranchers, as well as producer cooperatives
      (corporations owned by their members)
      •Examples:
      • Sunkist
      • Associated Milk Producers


                                                                 OUTPUT SECTOR
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                     menu




      The Output Sector
     Processes and markets raw and value-added products to   INPUT SECTOR
     the public
     •Examples:
     • Tyson (poultry processing)                                           PRODUCTION
     • Kraft (processed foods)                                                SECTOR
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                  menu




      Changes Affecting Agriculture

      Agriculture in the U.S. is constantly evolving. It is a
      challenge for the people who serve the agricultural
      community to keep up.

      From small producers to agribusiness executives,
      everyone in the industry needs to be better informed if
      they want to stay competitive. Busy lawmakers must stay
      in touch with the trends and realities of the industry to
      better represent their constituents. In both cases,
      communication and information exchange is critical.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                 menu




      Changes Affecting Agriculture

      Improvements throughout the industry – mechanization,
      technology, crop protection, and developments in genetic
      modification – are all having a huge impact on the
      industry.

      In addition, people in the industry are
      changing themselves. The number of
      producers and the size of farms and
      ranches is shifting. The number of
      traditional farms is decreasing, while large
      farms and hobby farms are increasing
      in number.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                menu




      Changes Affecting Agriculture

      Agricultural professionals are now able to easily track
      and analyze data about their own operations and
      performance.

      When we gather accurate, useable data about the
      various changes occurring within the sectors, we are
      creating a powerful informational tool that benefits
      everyone from individual producers to businesses at
      every level.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                 menu




      Discussion Time

      Information is the key element to the ongoing success of
      the agricultural industry.
         True
         False
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                 menu




      Discussion Time

      Information is the key element to the ongoing success of
      the agricultural industry.
         True
         False


                         The answer is True.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                               menu




      Discussion Time

      Answer the following questions by checking the correct
      box.

      Multiple Answer – Check all that apply

      The following are factors in the changing landscape of
      agriculture.

        Mechanization
        Farm Size
        Weather Prediction
        Crop Protection
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                      menu




      Discussion Time

      Answer the following questions by checking the correct
      box.

      Multiple Answer – Check all that apply

      The following are factors in the changing landscape of
      agriculture.

        Mechanization
        Farm Size
        Weather Prediction
        Crop Protection

       The answer is Mechanization, Farm Size, and Crop Protection.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                     menu




      The Importance of Information

      Even for the most traditional farmer, agriculture is first
      and foremost a business. For these folks, profitability,
      stability, and the financial health of their families are at
      stake.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                    menu




      The Importance of Information

      As with any business, information is critical --information
      about the markets, product demand and potential, new
      technologies, trends, and competitive performance. This
      information must be available and accessible for farms to
      continue to function well.

      Access to timely, accurate information is enabling
      everyone in the agricultural community to make better
      decisions and become more successful.
Today’s Agricultural Environment                                  menu




      The Importance of Information

      It’s our job at NASDA to gather and organize this
      information from thousands of people in the agricultural
      community across the country. We gather it in a
      confidential, systematic, unbiased way – and the results,
      once made public, are a benefit to the entire industry.
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About NASDA and NASS

A…




                       About NASS and NASDA
About NASDA and NASS                                           menu




     What’s in This Section

     For the next 10 minutes, we’ll take a close look at
     NASDA, the National Association of State Departments
     of Agriculture, and NASS, the National Agricultural
     Statistics Service.

     We’ll explore NASDA and NASS, their relationship, and
     how they serve the U.S. agricultural community, as well
     as state and federal governments.
About NASDA and NASS                                                        menu




     Who is NASDA?

     Formed in 1915, The National Association of State
     Departments of Agriculture, or NASDA, has one mission.     To support and promote the American
                                                                 agriculture industry, while protecting
                                                              consumers and the environment, through
                                                                the development, implementation and
                                                              communication of sound public policy and
                                                                               programs.
About NASDA and NASS                                             menu




     Who is NASDA?

     NASDA, headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a non-
     profit and bi-partisan organization.

     NASDA’s membership consists of Commissioners,
     Secretaries and Directors of Agriculture from the 50
     states and the territories of Puerto Rico, Guam, American
     Samoa and the Virgin Islands
About NASDA and NASS                                              menu




     NASDA and NASS

     In 1972, NASDA formed an agreement with the National
     Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). NASS, an agency
     of the U.S Department of Agriculture, seeks to provide
     meaningful, accurate and objective statistical information
     to serve the United States and its agricultural
     communities.
About NASDA and NASS                                          menu




     NASDA and NASS

     NASS regularly surveys thousands of operators of farms
     and agribusinesses who voluntarily provide information
     on a confidential basis.

     NASS then consolidates and publishes this information
     on a state, regional and national basis.
About NASDA and NASS                                                menu




     NASDA and NASS

     NASDA, in cooperation with NASS, employs
     Enumerators to collect this data. These employees work
     on behalf of their state’s NASS field office, but are hired,
     trained, managed and employed by NASDA.
About NASDA and NASS                                           menu




     NASDA and NASS

     Enumerators gather information about production,
     supplies, marketing, prices, the weather and many other
     topics that directly affect or influence agriculture.

     An Enumerator may gather this information face to face,
     by mail or by phone, using the questionnaires and
     materials provided by the state NASS Field Office.
About NASDA and NASS                                         menu

           About NASDA and NASS
 Discussion Time

 Determine which
                       Employs                 Gathers        Trains      Publish
bucket each items                   Part of
                                                                          reports
                    Enumerators               Information   Enumerators
    goes into.                      USDA                                  locally




                            NASDA                    NASS
About NASDA and NASS                            menu


Discussion Time Answers



        Employs             Trains                     Part of
      Enumerators         Enumerators                  USDA




       NASDA                             NASS
                            Gathers                    Publish
                           Information                 reports
                                                       locally
About NASDA and NASS                                           menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     The information that is gathered by Enumerators is used
     by a number of different entities in the agriculture
     industry.

       – Farmers and ranchers
       – Farm organizations
       – Processors
       – Agribusinesses
       – Media
       – Local, state and federal government agencies
       – Congress
About NASDA and NASS                                            menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     Farmers and Ranchers use information about yields
     and prices to help plan how much and what they will
     grow or raise.

     They also use NASS statistics to monitor industry trends
     and to stay ahead of them, maximizing the positive
     impact of new developments, legislation and technology.
About NASDA and NASS                                           menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     Farmers and Ranchers can also benefit from being able
     to compare their own planting progress and crop
     conditions to the regional averages.

     They may also use the information when negotiating with
     insurance companies and banks.
About NASDA and NASS                                         menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     Farm Organizations are able to use NASS data to plan,
     create and implement useful, relevant programs to aid
     the production and profitability of their members.
About NASDA and NASS                                            menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     As they support the production sector, Processors use
     the data to be better prepared as industry production
     levels shift. Because they can better anticipate yields,
     they can ramp up or down when needed, keeping costs
     down and prices lower.
About NASDA and NASS                                             menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     Agribusinesses use NASS information to make
     decisions about setting up new offices and facilities, to
     spot sales opportunities, and to anticipate the changing
     needs of their customers.

     Financial organizations use the data to offer advice and
     make credit and financing decisions for their clients.
About NASDA and NASS                                             menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     The Media often use agricultural statistics to create
     context for important news stories. Industry-specific and
     mainstream media use this information to better inform
     their audience and to promote issues in the industry.
About NASDA and NASS                                              menu




     Who Uses This Data?

     The information is used by Government Agencies to
     make and administer key legislative decisions for the
     agriculture industry. This data is also used to create and
     evaluate programs that encourage productivity and
     facilitate success of the American agricultural community.

     At every level – from local extension services to
     Congress and the White House – agricultural statistics
     are an invaluable tool for governmental decision makers
     and the citizens they serve.
About NASDA and NASS                                                    menu



 Discussion Time - Match each type of user with the ways they might use NASS data.

     Farmers and Ranchers                        • Create and administer legislation

                                                 • Serve producers more cost-effectively
       Farm Organizations
                                                 • Promote industry issues in context
            Processors
                                                 • Plan and develop relevant programs
         Agribusinesses
                                                 • Identify and act on business
               Media                               opportunities

                                                 • Make decisions about what and how
          Gov. Agencies
                                                   much to grow
About NASDA and NASS                                              menu



 Discussion Time – Here is what you should have said…

          Gov. Agencies                         • Create and administer legislation

                                                • Serve producers more cost-effectively
           Processors
                                                • Promote industry issues in context
              Media
                                                • Plan and develop relevant programs
      Farm Organizations
                                                • Identify and act on business
         Agribusinesses                           opportunities

                                                • Make decisions about what and how
     Farmers and Ranchers
                                                  much to grow
About NASDA and NASS                                             menu




     NASS’s Top Priority

     Safeguarding the privacy of farmers, ranchers, and other
     data providers is NASS’s top priority. NASS ensures that
     data is secure, confidential and reported in public press
     releases from the State Field Offices or via the internet
     at:

     www.nass.usda.gov
About NASDA and NASS                                              menu




     NASS’s Top Priority

     The statistics and data gathered by NASDA and
     published by NASS have helped to create a stable
     economic atmosphere and reduced the risk in production,
     marketing and distribution for the US agriculture industry
     for over 125 years.
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Your Role

Now, let’s ethics




                    Your Role
Your Role                                                        menu




     What’s in This Section

     Now, let’s take a look at your role as a Field Enumerator
     within NASDA. In this section, we’ll explore
        – How NASDA is structured
        – Key characteristics and skills you need to be
          successful on the job
        – The nature of your employment
        – Tasks you may be doing
        – Tools you may be using
        – Ways to communicate with your colleagues
        – How to work safely
        – NASDA’s policies on honesty, confidentiality and
          ethics
Your Role                                                             menu


                                                                                   NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                                       CSD
     Commissioner, Secretary or Director                         Board of
                                                                 Directors
     NASDA is governed by the Commissioner, the                EVP and CEO
     Secretary or the Director (CSDs) of each state’s
     Department of Agriculture.
                                                           COO PM FM         MIS


                                                                Supervisor


                                                        Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                             menu


                                                                                NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                                       CSD

     Board of Directors EVP and CEO                              Board of
                                                                 Directors
     The CSDs delegate direct oversight of NASDA to a          EVP and CEO
     Board of Directors. This 10-member board employs
     an Executive Vice President and Chief Executive       COO PM      FM MIS
     Officer. This position manages the day-to-day
     operations of NASDA.

                                                                Supervisor


                                                        Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                                  menu

                                                                                        NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                                           CSD

     COO, PM, FM, MIS                                                Board of
                                                                     Directors
     The EVP works closely with the Chief Operating                EVP and CEO
     Officer, the Program Manager, the Financial Manager,
     and the Manager of Information Services.                 COO     PM    FM    MIS


                                                                    Supervisor


                                                            Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                                  menu

                                                                                        NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                                           CSD
                                                                     Board of
     Chief Operating Officer
                                                                     Directors
     … oversees financial activities, employee relations,          EVP and CEO
     and NASDA Supervisory Enumerators.
                                                              COO     PM    FM    MIS


                                                                    Supervisor


                                                            Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                              menu

                                                                                    NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                                       CSD
                                                                 Board of
     Program Manager
                                                                 Directors
     …establishes employee procedures and coordinates          EVP and CEO
     with state offices regarding personnel issues
                                                          COO     PM    FM    MIS


                                                                Supervisor


                                                        Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                 menu

                                                                       NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                          CSD
                                                    Board of
     Financial Manager
                                                    Directors
     …oversees payroll and disbursements          EVP and CEO

                                             COO     PM    FM    MIS


                                                   Supervisor


                                           Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                             menu

                                                                                   NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured                                      CSD
                                                                Board of
     Manager Of Information Services
                                                                Directors
     …provides corporate information through various          EVP and CEO
     media, both internal and external.
                                                         COO     PM    FM    MIS


                                                               Supervisor


                                                       Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                                 menu


                                                                                        NASDA

     How NASDA is Structured
                                                                        CSD
     Supervisor                                                       Board of
                                                                      Directors
     NASDA Supervisors maintain a trained pool of                   EVP and CEO
     Enumerators and are authorized to advertise
     vacancies, hire candidates, assign and evaluate work      COO     PM   FM    MIS
     and promote or dismiss Enumerators.

     The Supervisor will be your primary point of contact.           Supervisor


                                                             Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                         menu



                                         NASS                                   NASDA

  How NASDA is Structured               NASS                       CSD
                                    State Directors
 Supervisor                                                     Board of
                                                                Directors
 NASDA Supervisors manage               NASS                  EVP and CEO
 work to fulfill the needs of the   Deputy Directors
 NASS Statisticians who design                             COO    PM     FM   MIS
 the surveys. To facilitate
 communications between these
                                       NASDA
 two groups, NASS employs a                                      Supervisor
 NASDA Coordinator to be the
                                     Coordinators
 primary source of contact with
 NASS.                                                 Field and Office Enumerators
                                                                                        NASDA
Your Role                                                               menu




     How NASDA is Structured                                        CSD
     Field Enumerators                                            Board of
                                                                  Directors
     Enumerators are the “gatherers” of information.            EVP and CEO
     Field Enumerators are generally part-time
     employees who work out of their home and               COO    PM    FM    MIS
     conduct both face-to-face and phone interviews.

     Field Enumerators also spend time in the field,
                                                                  Supervisor
     gathering samples and counting crops. The
     nature of this work is seasonal and intermittent.
     Hours are also unpredictable, since Field
     Enumerators must try to coordinate their            Field and Office Enumerators
     schedules with the people they are interviewing.
                                                                                          NASDA
Your Role                                                                 menu




     How NASDA is Structured                                          CSD
     Office Enumerators                                             Board of
                                                                    Directors
     Office Enumerators work in their state’s NASS                EVP and CEO
     office and conduct interviews over the telephone.
     They also prepare surveys and sometimes                  COO    PM    FM    MIS
     process the samples collected by Field
     Enumerators.
                                                                    Supervisor
     Office Enumerators’ work is also intermittent and
     generally part-time. Because it is sometimes
     difficult to reach respondents during the work day,
     Office Enumerators often work in the evenings or      Field and Office Enumerators
     on weekends.
Your Role                                                   menu




     The NASS Relationship

     NASS employees coordinate and direct NASDA projects.
     NASS employees

        – Decide which tasks need to be completed
        – Select the best methods and survey criteria
        – Prioritize tasks
        – Evaluate the quality of the work, based on the
          standards set at the beginning of the project.
Your Role                                            menu


  Discussion Time – Place each role in the pyramid          NASDA


      Field and Office Enumerators


               Supervisors

            COO, PM, FM, MIS


              EVP and CEO

                   CSDs
                                                   NASDA



Your Role                                            menu


  Discussion Time

                               CSD
                             Board of
                             Directors
                           EVP and CEO

                       COO    PM   FM     MIS


                             Supervisor


                    Field and Office Enumerators
Your Role                                                        menu




     The Successful Field Enumerator

     For the next few minutes, let’s take a look at the key
     characteristics that a successful Field Enumerator
     possesses.

     Many of these characteristics you may already have –
     that’s why you’ve been hired. It’s rare, though, for
     someone just starting out to be “perfect.” Just make note
     of areas you need to work on and try to continuously
     improve.

     Ask your supervisor if you want help or extra coaching.
Your Role                                                                          menu




     Discussion Time - Go through the list and determine the characteristics you already have. Make note
     of things you think you will need to work on. These are just a few items to look at.
                                                                                          PROFESSIONAL DRESS

     Characteristics of a Successful Field Enumerator

     Has a basic knowledge of agriculture

     Has common sense

     Has the ability to understand complex instructions

     Has the discipline to work independently

     Has good people skills, and the ability to persuade and enlist cooperation

     Maintains a professional appearance and demeanor
Your Role                                                        menu




     The Enumerator as an Employee

     An Enumerator’s work is seasonal. Because some
     surveys are designed to be only applicable during certain
     times of year, and because you may need to work around
     respondent’s schedules, you will not work regular hours.

     There may be times when no work is available – and
     other times when you will be extremely busy. You may
     also be asked to work on weekends or holidays.
Your Role                                                              menu




     The Enumerator as an Employee

     An Enumerator is allowed 1,500 hours of work per year.
     In certain circumstances you may be eligible for
     overtime. Any overtime must be authorized by the
     supervisor.

     Enumerators are part-time employees, making them
     ineligible for full-time benefits. It is also important to note
     that unemployment benefits are unavailable during active
     NASDA work sessions.

     Check your NASDA Enumerator Handbook for more
     information.
Your Role                                                       menu




     Discussion Time

     It is critical that an Enumerator has good communication
     skills that instill trust and develop a professional
     relationship.

        True
        False
Your Role                                                       menu




     Discussion Time

     It is critical that an Enumerator has good communication
     skills that instill trust and develop a professional
     relationship.

        True
        False




                                True
Your Role                                                      menu




     Discussion Time


     An Enumerator is allowed to work 2,000 hours in a given
     year.
       True
       False
Your Role                                                      menu




     Discussion Time


     An Enumerator is allowed to work 2,000 hours in a given
     year.
       True
       False




                               False
Your Role                                                    menu




     The Job of the Field Enumerator


     Now let’s take a look at the job itself.

     The Field Enumerator is responsible for the following
     tasks:

     •Setting up and keeping appointments

     •Interviewing operators or other agriculture-related
     professionals by phone or in person

     •Asking questions and listening to responses without
     “leading” the conversation
Your Role                                                       menu




     The Job of the Field Enumerator

     The Field Enumerator is responsible for the following
     tasks (continued):

     •Obtaining permission to enter fields, and be physically
     able to access property while carrying equipment

     •Using survey equipment to accurately stake and
     measure sample areas

     •Reading aerial photos and acreage grids, and drawing
     maps of sampled areas

     •Identifying agricultural crops and commodities

     •Making crop counts in designated fields
Your Role                                                          menu




     The Job of the Field Enumerator

     The Field Enumerator is responsible for the following
     tasks (continued):

     •Delivering timely, detailed, legible records of interviews
     and crop counts by the designated deadline

     •Having a valid driver’s license and having access to a
     dependable vehicle that is insured

     •Have a working telephone and be prepared to work from
     home

     •Represent NASDA and NASS as a professional at all
     times
Your Role                                                         menu




     The Tools You Will Use

     To be effective at your job, you will learn to use certain
     tools:

     •Navigational aids, like maps, GPS systems, PLATT
     books, aerial photographs, and MapQuest

     •Survey questionnaires and handbooks

     •Calculators, scales and calipers
Your Role                                                        menu




     About Training

     Because the surveys vary, you will be required to attend
     regular training sessions. These workshops will teach
     you to use these tools effectively as they are needed for
     specific projects and surveys.
Your Role                                                          menu




     Administrative Tasks

     Along with your information-gathering responsibilities,
     you will be expected to do basic administrative tasks like:
        – Receiving, organizing, and returning surveys, aerial
          photography, and other tools via mail
        – Tracking and submitting your mileage, time and
          other expenses
        – Monitoring and requesting supplies as needed
        – Providing proof of insurance and re-signing the
          pledge of confidentiality annually
Your Role                                                                   menu




     Communication Within the Organization                   NASS
                                                          Field Office
     Each Enumerator is assigned to a Supervisor,
                                                           Director
     and reports directly to that Supervisor.
     Supervisors are ultimately responsible for hiring,            NASDA
     handing out assignments and evaluating an                   Coordinator
                                                                                      Supervisor
     Enumerator’s performance. It is critical that the         (NASS Employee)
     lines of communication between the Enumerator
     and the Supervisor remain open at all times!
                                                                                 Enumerator
     Enumerators are responsible for reporting all                         Communicates directly
     accidents (no matter how small) to the supervisor                    with his or her Supervisor.
     within 24 hours of the occurrence. All other                     (unless Supervisor is unavailable)
     incidents need to be reported in timely manner.
Your Role                                                                  menu




     Communication within the Organization                   NASS
                                                          Field Office
     If the supervisor is unavailable, an Enumerator        Director
     can contact the following team members at
     the NASS office.                                               NASDA
                                                                  Coordinator
         – The NASDA Coordinator is in charge of                                     Supervisor
                                                                (NASS Employee)
           all surveys and is the contact for technical
           information.
         – The NASDA Field Office Director is
           responsible for public relations issues in                           Enumerator
           your state.                                                    Communicates directly
                                                                         with his or her Supervisor.
                                                                     (unless Supervisor is unavailable)
Your Role                                                                      menu



     Safety Tips

     NASDA is committed to ensuring the safety of its employees at all times. Enumerators should follow
     common-sense safety precautions.




                            In fields                        On the road




      Around animals                     In bad weather                       Around people
Your Role                                                              menu




       Safety Tips -

            AROUND ANIMALS
                             Ask respondents to restrain dogs during your visit. If
                             your approach a farm and see a threatening animal, do
                             not leave your car until the animal is restrained.
Your Role                                                             menu




       Safety Tips -

               IN FIELDS
                           Enumerators can sustain cuts, scratches, bruises and
                           sprains in the course of entering a farmer’s property.
                           Take care to avoid falls, especially if you are carrying
                           something.
                           Treat any injury in an appropriate manner to prevent the
                           spread of infection. Report any accidents to your
                           supervisor within 24 hours.
Your Role                                                                 menu




       Safety Tips -

            IN BAD WEATHER
                             Pay attention to weather forecasts as you plan your
                             visits. Ice, lightening, heavy snow, hail or tornadoes can
                             put you in jeopardy if you are in unfamiliar territory. Stay
                             home, or stop work and take cover if weather conditions
                             are threatening.
Your Role                                                           menu




       Safety Tips -

            ON THE ROAD
                          Practice safe driving habits. Never try to read maps or
                          use cell phones while moving. Keep your car gassed up
                          and in good repair, and make allowances for road
                          conditions and your own physical state. Never speed to
                          make up time – and always wear your seat belt.
Your Role                                                           menu




       Safety Tips -

            ON THE ROAD
                          In general the people you meet are friendly and not a
                          threat physically to you. However, in rare instances you
                          may come in contact with someone who threatens you. If
                          this happens, contact your Supervisor and NASDA
                          Coordinator immediately.
Your Role                                                   menu




     Honesty and Integrity

     It is impossible to stress the importance of honesty
     enough. Records must be accurate. The credibility of
     the data and the reputation of NASS and NASDA rest
     solely on our accuracy and integrity.
Your Role                                                            menu




     Honesty and Integrity

     It is critical to record data in a timely fashion – never try
     to memorize answers and record them after your call.
     Such entries are notoriously inaccurate!

     Never falsify data of any kind. The submission of false or
     fabricated records is cause for immediate dismissal.

     If you suspect that a responder is deliberately falsifying
     his or her responses, contact your supervisor.
Your Role                                                         menu




     Confidentiality and the Enumerator

     Much of the information that is gathered in surveys is
     personal and sensitive. Respondents are only willing to
     give out this kind of information if they completely trust
     the Enumerator and the organization he or she works for.
Your Role                                                         menu




     Confidentiality and the Enumerator

     The laws and regulations governing NASS guarantee
     respondents that the information they give will be kept
     strictly confidential and will be used for statistical
     purposes only. In order to protect this public trust, you
     will be asked to sign a Confidentiality Certificate before
     you begin employment as a Field Enumerator.
Your Role                                                     menu




     Confidentiality and the Enumerator

     You should never collect data over a cell phone, since
     cell phone conversations are not truly secure.

     Collected data must never be shared or discussed with
     anyone who is not a NASDA or NASS employee. Data
     may not be used for any other purpose! Enumerators
     must not discuss data among themselves, with family,
     friends, or colleagues.
Your Role                                                      menu




     Confidentiality and the Enumerator

     All data collected and any survey materials are the
     property of NASS and must be returned to the supervisor
     or the NASS office.

     No breach of confidentiality will be tolerated. Such a
     breach is cause for immediate dismissal. Violators may
     also face a fine of $250,000 and a possible sentence of
     up to five years imprisonment.
Your Role                                          menu




     Discussion Time

     Breaches of confidentiality will result in…
     (check all that apply)

     Immediate dismissal
     Up to $250,000 in possible fines
     Up to 5 years possible imprisonment
Your Role                                                  menu




     Discussion Time

     Breaches of confidentiality will result in…
     (check all that apply)

     Immediate dismissal
     Up to $250,000 in possible fines
     Up to 5 years possible imprisonment



                           All are correct!
       You will be dismissed, and fines and imprisonment
                        are also possible.
Your Role                                                     menu




     Ethics in NASDA

     Surveys and interviews may not be delegated to any
     other individual and must be completed by the assigned
     Enumerator.

     While on NASDA business, an Enumerator should
     display appropriate NASDA identification badges. No
     other business or political identification may be
     distributed.
Your Role                                                          menu




     Ethics in NASDA

     Political activity is not permitted while conducting NASDA
     business.

     It is neither necessary or appropriate to comment on or
     defend any local, state or federal program while officially
     representing NASDA.
Your Role                                                         menu




     Ethics in NASDA

     All NASS office equipment, such as phones, faxes and
     copiers are for NASS and NASDA business only.

     NASDA employees must abide by all regulations
     restricting drugs, tobacco, alcohol, weapons, bigotry,
     sexism, etc. applied to offices housed in state or federal
     buildings.

     See your NASDA Enumerator Handbook for more
     details.
Your Role                                                          menu




     Ethics in NASDA

     All in all, be mindful of the fact that you are a NASDA
     employee. Your are being entrusted with an important
     task – one that contributes immeasurably to the
     agricultural industry and the American economy as a
     whole. Be proud of that fact – and take that responsibility
     seriously!
                                                            menu




A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator

All in all, be




                                          A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                         menu




      What’s in This Section

         Now we’re going to see what this job is like from an
                   Enumerator’s point of view…
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                               menu




      What’s in This Section

      This is April. April has been a Field Enumerator for
      several years, and she’s terrific at her job.

      Let’s listen as she tells us a little about herself, and what
      it’s like to be a Field Enumerator for NASDA.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                              menu




      Meet April

      Hi! I’m April. First of all, I’ll bet you’re wondering how I
      happened to choose this job.

      I do know a little about farming – I live in a rural
      community and my husband and I operate a family farm
      ourselves. Like most folks, we look for opportunities to
      “fill in the gaps.” So when I heard about this job, it
      seemed perfect, because it’s part time and the hours are
      flexible.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      Meet April

      I know the industry, and I have personal relationships
      with some of the people I survey. I understands the
      challenges they face. As a result, I think people tend to
      be more comfortable dealing with me, and it’s easier to
      gain their trust.

      That doesn’t mean you have to be a farmer to be a good
      Enumerator– but being able to establish trust is
      important.

      But let’s start at the beginning. You want to know how I
      start my day.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      The Assignment

      My supervisor contacts me when she’s got work for me.
      Often, if a survey is new or different, she’ll send me to a
      training workshop first, so I’ll learn about the purpose of
      the survey and how to administer it – how to ask the
      questions, what they mean, and how to interpret answers
      if necessary.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      The Assignment

      There’s always a specific, limited time period when a
      survey is conducted. When the survey is about to begin,
      I’ll get a packet of materials – the survey forms
      themselves, maps, a list of people or locations to visit,
      and maybe other reference materials. These might come
      by mail, or my supervisor might meet me in person if she
      needs to go over anything.

      I like to go through the materials beforehand, so I have
      time to ask questions if I need to.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                               menu




      Making Appointments

      Depending on the nature of the survey and the people
      involved, I make a decision about whether to call or visit
      the respondents. If the survey is short, it can save a lot of
      time if I do it over the phone--but most of the time, if a
      survey’s given to a Field Enumerator, it’s because a visit
      is needed.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                                menu




      Making Appointments

      The next decision is about whether to try to make an
      appointment. Some people prefer the courtesy of a call.
      Others are tough to reach, or don’t want to be bothered,
      so they try to avoid you. With folks like that, it’s easier if
      you catch them without warning – it’s harder for them to
      say no when I’m already standing in their yard!
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Making Appointments

      I keep a calendar just for NASDA appointments. You
      need to make sure you allow enough time to get from
      one place to the next, especially if you’re visiting
      someplace for the first time.

      I also allow extra time for folks I know will want to chit-
      chat -- of course, I try not to waste too much time, but
      sometimes that personal connection pays off next time
      you need to visit.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                                  menu




      Making Appointments

      I also block off time for people who don’t have
      appointments--but you have to be flexible about this. If
      you show up without an appointment, folks may not be
      home, or they may be in the middle of something they
      can’t interrupt.

      You may have to go back a second, or even a third time.
      So if they can’t talk to me on the first visit I try to at least
      get them to agree to do the survey. That enables you to
      make an appointment for the second visit if necessary.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Making Appointments

      It’s also important to plan your appointments with location
      in mind. I always try to do visits in the same area on the
      same day – otherwise you can end up driving all over a
      couple of counties, and waste a lot of time on the road.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                          menu




      Planning the Visit

      One thing you must have is a good, current map! You
      may be going to some out-of-the-way places, and you
      don’t want to get lost. Some people even use compasses
      and GPS systems.

      If you know how to use Internet map sites like MapQuest,
      you can get great directions from one place to the next.
      But I also keep good paper maps in my truck at all times
      so I can stay oriented.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                                menu




      Planning the Visit

      A cell phone is pretty useful if you have one. It allows you
      make appointments, check directions, or make sure
      someone is home – but you should never gather survey
      data on a cell phone. It isn’t secure enough meet our
      data security standards.

      Of course, you need to bring all your survey materials. I
      also pack a clipboard, a calculator, pens and pencils,
      timesheets and expense records, and a notepad. I keep
      all of this in a container I can carry in and out of my truck,
      and easily lock up if I need to.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                              menu




      Planning the Visit

      One of the rules is that you have to identify yourself
      clearly. I have a sign I put in the truck window, and I wear
      a badge. I also carry NASDA business cards, in case
      someone wants to verify my identity.

      It’s a lot of stuff to remember. You may want to practice
      making a checklist for yourself, to make sure you don’t
      forget anything.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                menu




      Discussion Time

      Discuss the items you’ll want to take along.

      •_____________________________________________
      •_____________________________________________
      •_____________________________________________
      •_____________________________________________
      •_____________________________________________
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                       menu




      Discussion Time

      These are just a few items you’ll want to take along.

      •Survey materials
      •Maps
      •Cell Phone
      •Business Cards
      •Badge
      •Appointment books
      •Expense reports
      •Time cards
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Getting There

      NASDA puts a high priority on safety. I spend a lot of
      time on the road – so driving carefully is a really
      important part of my job.

      We’re required to wear seatbelts. And we’re encouraged
      to use common sense and pull well off the road when
      using the cell phone, looking at maps, or trying to ask for
      directions.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                              menu




      Getting There

      Here we are at our first stop.

      Some people are pretty particular about how and where
      you park when you’re visiting. I try to always use the
      driveway and sidewalks.

      I also keep an eye out for dogs. Most of them are friendly
      enough, but if a dog isn’t wagging his tail, growls or
      seems nervous, I stay away from it. If the dog seems
      really aggressive, I don’t even get out of the car until the
      owner has restrained the dog.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator    menu




      Making Contact

      Let’s see if these folks are home.
      Hear how I introduce myself.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Making Contact

      Good morning! I’m April Jones, with NASDA. I'm a
      collecting confidential data on behalf of USDA’s NASS
      Indiana office. We’re conducting a survey on crop
      production. Is Mr. Edwards at home?

      OK. I know this is a busy time of year for him. Since he’s
      unavailable, will you please let him know I’ll stop back by
      tomorrow afternoon? Here’s my card. Thank you!
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Dealing with Reluctance

      Well, this respondent isn’t at home right now. I’ll have to
      check in with him again tomorrow. If he gets the
      message, I think he’ll make a point to be here – he’s
      usually very cooperative.

      Sometimes, though, people try to avoid me. In my area,
      usually the reason they give is that they feel the survey
      questions are intrusive – some of the questions are pretty
      personal.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                            menu




      Dealing with Reluctance

      When they feel that way, I have to get creative – if I see
      them out in the field, I might approach them there. Or I
      might stop by on a Sunday evening, at a time they don’t
      expect me. I’ve even tracked them down at work, if they
      have a second job.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                                         menu




      Dealing with Reluctance

      Once I get their attention, I need to be a bit of a salesman.

      A lot of respondents have concerns. They usually want to know
      who I am and may want to know more about the organization.
      They also sometimes want to know why they’ve been chosen.
      They ask about how long it will take and how difficult it will be --and
      they want to know what’s in it for them.

      If I’ve done my homework, I can answer all of these concerns. I
      remind them of all the ways the industry will benefit from the
      survey, and how important they are to the process. It’s also really
      important to stress that the information they give will be completely
      confidential.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Here’s the next farm on the list. I was here a few months
      ago, and this respondent may take a little more care. He
      doesn’t really like answering the questions, but we’ve
      established a relationship now, and I’m going to take
      advantage of it.

      Looks like this man is spraying his orchard. Let’s give
      him a try. You can listen in, if you like.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                         menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Hi, Mr. Clark. Do you remember me? I’m April Jones with
      NASDA. I’m working on another confidential survey on
      behalf of USDA’s NASS office, and could use your help.

      By the way, how’s your spraying coming along? Have
      you seen any of those apple maggots in your area?
      They’re having a real problem with them down to the
      south.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Mr. Clark is a really good example of what you can do if
      you handle someone the right way. The first time I came
      out, he didn’t want to talk with me at all – he practically
      ran me off his property. But I tried to stay professional,
      and was persistent. He eventually agreed to do a survey.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Afterward, when the results were published, I sent him a
      copy of the report so he could see exactly how the
      information was used. The next time I visited, his attitude
      was completely different – he said he felt, for the first
      time, like his opinions mattered to someone. That made
      me feel really good.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Every survey’s a little different. We might be asking about
      crops, about animals, or any of a dozen other topics that
      are related to the farming community. That’s why we’re
      trained on each new survey.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                            menu




      Establishing Rapport

      There are specific techniques we’re taught about asking
      questions and interpreting answers. For example, you
      have to be careful not to “reword” a question, because
      sometimes you can inadvertently change the meaning.
      And you have to be sure to capture answers immediately
      – not wait until later. That’s an important point, because
      it’s really easy to forget exactly what someone said.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Sometimes the respondent goes off on a tangent. Last
      time I was here, Mr. Clark spent ten minutes expressing
      some very strong opinions about the government. It's not
      appropriate for us to represent or support any political
      viewpoint. Even when someone gets really worked up,
      you can’t take it personally.

      The professional thing to do is to empathize, but tactfully
      come back to the point, without ruffling feathers.
      Listening patiently helped him feel like he’d made his
      point, and the rest of the survey went just fine. Do you
      want to know how I handled it?
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      Establishing Rapport

      Well, Mr. Clark, I certainly understand how you feel. I
      have a farm, too, so we’re in the same boat.

      One of the reasons we gather information from you about
      your business is so that the lawmakers and government
      agencies have a more accurate understanding of the
      realities of farming today. That can help them make
      better decisions about what it takes to serve your needs.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      Refusals

      Of course, there are people who are simply not going to
      participate, no matter what you say. It happens only in a
      small percentage of cases, but it does happen.

      In those situations, there’s not a lot you can do, except
      acknowledge and indicate their refusal. Of course, if the
      respondent is hostile or scares you in any way, you
      should report it to your supervisor.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                        menu




      Sampling

      Sometimes the job involves staking out an area in
      someone’s field and taking samples. We’re given the
      tools and specific instructions about how to do those
      samples. Sometimes we have to carry a lot of equipment
      – and it can be muddy work. Weather is always a factor
      we need to keep in mind.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                          menu




      Staying Safe

      In those situations you need to follow some basic safety
      rules. You might find yourself alone in rough terrain,
      sometimes carrying heavy equipment. You might get
      caught out in severe weather or after dark. You might
      end up in a situation with unfamiliar animals, people or
      conditions that make you uncomfortable. When you work
      for NASDA, your safety comes first – remember that, and
      make decisions accordingly.

      Fortunately, these situations are pretty rare.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Reinforcing Participation

      Most of the people I deal with are helpful and pleasant. I
      try to always reinforce a cooperative attitude by making
      sure I thank them and acknowledge their contribution. I
      let them know how much I appreciate their support, and
      how important their opinions are.

      If they are interested, I offer to send them a finished
      report. And I remind them about all of the ways that
      information is going to be valuable – and all the people it
      will help.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                              menu




      Reinforcing Participation

        A lot of times I know there will be follow-up visits. So I
       make an effort to ensure that I’ve developed the kind of
       relationship that will make the next visit a welcome one.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                               menu




      Keeping Track of Time and Expenses

      After each trip, I record my time and mileage on my
      NASDA Time, Mileage and Expense Sheet. These forms
      are just like a time-clock – so accuracy is important. I try
      to make this routine, so I never skip this step. My time
      and activities vary so much from day to day, that if I didn’t
      write things down right away I’d surely forget something.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                             menu




      Completed Work

      Another thing I try to do routinely is make sure I keep all
      of the information well-organized. I use these envelopes
      to keep everything straight--but no matter what system
      you use, use it consistently. Accuracy is the bottom line.
      And anything you can do to systematically ensure
      accurate, complete results is worth the effort.

      Once everything in this stack is completed, I return it all
      to my supervisor, and it gets compiled with the work of
      other Enumerators.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                         menu




      Completed Work

      Because confidentiality is so important, there are some
      things I do to personally ensure things are safe while
      they’re in my possession. When I’m not using them, the
      survey results are kept in a locked file drawer in my
      house. I never, ever make copies of anything. And I
      never discuss the results with anyone outside NASDA,
      not even my family.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      Working Throughout the Year

      The work is irregular, but I kind of like that. There are
      times when I’m really busy, but also times when I can
      relax and spend more time with my family. I always have
      the choice. There are the occasional training sessions,
      but those are fun – an opportunity to meet other
      Enumerators, exchange ideas and learn from each other.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                           menu




      The Joys of the Job

      The most important advantage is the flexibility of hours.
      My daily schedule is frequently driven by my children and
      their needs. It’s great to have a job where I can control
      what I hours I work.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                              menu




      The Joys of the Job

      Not having to go into an office is great, too. I’m not stuck
      in a cubicle -- I meet new people and make new friends
      every day. I’m outdoors, spending time in some of the
      most beautiful country around.
A Day in the Life of a Field Enumerator                            menu




      The Joys of the Job

      Best of all, I’m staying in touch with my industry and my
      community. I learn every day from this job --- it gives me
      a perspective I would never otherwise have on
      agriculture as a business and a lifestyle.

      Living on a farm has given me so much – I love knowing
      that I’m giving something back, that I’m doing something
      that matters to the people I work and live with.

      Being an Enumerator is a great job – you’re going to love
      it!
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