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					2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
A Growing Population

                                                                                                                            Croydon's Population 2001
Year          Population (thousands)
       2001                      335.1
                                                                                               350
       2002                      334.7
       2003                      334.2                                                         348
       2004                      334.7




                                                             Resident Population (Thousands)
       2005                      335.5                                                         346
       2006                      336.8                                                         344
       2007                      338.4
       2008                      341.2                                                         342
       2009                        342
                                                                                               340
       2010                      344.5
                                                                                               338
                                                                                                      335.1                                          336.8
                                                                                               336              334.7
                                                                                                                                            335.5
                                                                                               334                                334.7
                                                                                                                        334.2
                                                                                               332
                                                                                               330
                                                                                                     2001     2002   2003        2004     2005   2006   2007




              2010 Text                                                                                                         2011 Text

              About Croydon                                                                                                     About Croydon

              Croydon covers 8,662 hectares including 2,770 hectares of                                                         Croydon covers 8,662 hectares including
              green belt land and is one of the largest boroughs in                                                             is one of the largest boroughs in
              London. Croydon is an outer London borough bordering                                                              London. Croydon is an outer London bor
              Surrey to the south and the boroughs of Lambeth,                                                                  and the boroughs of Lambeth,
              Lewisham and Southwark to the north, and it is London‟s                                                           Lewisham and Southwark to the north, a
              southern-most borough. The borough has London‟s second                                                            borough. The borough has London‟s sec
              largest population and it is the ninth largest unitary authority in                                               ninth largest unitary authority in the coun
              the country. It is one of London‟s biggest local retail and                                                       retail and commercial centres, with good
              commercial centres, with good rail, tram and road links, more                                                     120 parks and open spaces and some o
              than 120 parks and open spaces and some of London‟s most
              expensive housing.                                                                                                Large parts of the borough also have inn
                                                                                                                                of affluence and at the same time Croydo
              Large parts of the borough also have inner-city                                                                   Neighbourhood Renewal Funding (NRF)
              characteristics. There are areas of affluence and at the same                                                     pockets of deprivation - mostly in the nor
              time Croydon has been eligible for Neighbourhood Renewal                                                          the east, New Addington and Fieldway. A
              Funding (NRF) for the past seven years due to severe                                                              live in poverty. Black and Minority Ethnic
              pockets of deprivation - mostly in the north of the borough and                                                   Croydon residents.
              in two wards in the east, New Addington and Fieldway. About
              a quarter of children in Croydon live in poverty. Black and
              Minority Ethnic (BME) communities comprise 36% of Croydon
              residents.
                                                                  of affluence and at the same time Croydo
Large parts of the borough also have inner-city                   Neighbourhood Renewal Funding (NRF)
characteristics. There are areas of affluence and at the same     pockets of deprivation - mostly in the nor
time Croydon has been eligible for Neighbourhood Renewal          the east, New Addington and Fieldway. A
Funding (NRF) for the past seven years due to severe              live in poverty. Black and Minority Ethnic
pockets of deprivation - mostly in the north of the borough and   Croydon residents.
in two wards in the east, New Addington and Fieldway. About
a quarter of children in Croydon live in poverty. Black and
Minority Ethnic (BME) communities comprise 36% of Croydon
residents.


What does this graph show?                                        What does this graph show?

Population growth                                                 Population growth

In June 2009 Croydon had an estimated population of               In June 2010 Croydon had an estimated
342,000. Population has increased steadlily since 2003 and        increased steadlily since 2003 and Croyd
Croydon today has the second largest population of all            population of all London boroughs. Popu
London boroughs. Population increases in the borough have         been driven by longer lives and increasin
been driven by longer lives and increasing birth rates rather     its population continues to grow, Croydon
than migration. As its population continues to grow,
Croydon will also consume more resources.                         Population density

Population density                                                Population density in Croydon is 39.6 pe
                                                                  population densities are in the north and
Population density in Croydon is 39.6 people per hectare. The     of high density in New Addington and Fie
highest population densities are in the north and the west of
the borough, with a pocket of high density in New Addington
and Fieldway in the east of the borough.


Population Density in Croydon & London
 Population 2001-2010




                                     344.5



                                    342
                            341.2

                    338.4
            336.8




               2007    2008     2009      2010




covers 8,662 hectares including 2,770 hectares of green belt land and
 he largest boroughs in
Croydon is an outer London borough bordering Surrey to the south
 oroughs of Lambeth,
m and Southwark to the north, and it is London‟s southern-most
 The borough has London‟s second largest population and it is the
 est unitary authority in the country. It is one of London‟s biggest local
  commercial centres, with good rail, tram and road links, more than
   and open spaces and some of London‟s most expensive housing.

 ts of the borough also have inner-city characteristics. There are areas
 ce and at the same time Croydon has been eligible for
 rhood Renewal Funding (NRF) for the past seven years due to severe
 f deprivation - mostly in the north of the borough and in two wards in
 New Addington and Fieldway. About a quarter of children in Croydon
  erty. Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities comprise 36% of
 esidents.
ce and at the same time Croydon has been eligible for
rhood Renewal Funding (NRF) for the past seven years due to severe
f deprivation - mostly in the north of the borough and in two wards in
New Addington and Fieldway. About a quarter of children in Croydon
 erty. Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities comprise 36% of
esidents.




es this graph show?

on growth

010 Croydon had an estimated population of 344,500. Population has
 steadlily since 2003 and Croydon today has the second largest
n of all London boroughs. Population increases in the borough have
en by longer lives and increasing birth rates rather than migration. As
tion continues to grow, Croydon will also consume more resources.

on density

n density in Croydon is 39.6 people per hectare. The highest
n densities are in the north and the west of the borough, with a pocket
 nsity in New Addington and Fieldway in the east of the borough.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Summary: Reducing CO2 Emissions From Our Home
                                                                                                 Proportional Distribution of C
Sector                      Proportion of Emissions
Domestic                                          49%
Road Transport                                    31%
Industrial and Commercial                         20%

Percent OF Domestic                                                                    Industrial and Commercial
Category                    Proportion of Emissions
Space Heating                                     56%
Water Heating                                     26%
Lighting and Appliances                           15%
Cooking                                            3%

Percent FROM Domestic
                                                                                              Road Transport
Category                    Proportion of Emissions
Space Heating                                  27.44%
Water Heating                                  12.74%
Lighting and Appliances                         7.35%
Cooking                                         1.47%


                            Overall Trend from Chapter: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

                            Getting Better




                            2010 Text

                            What does this graph show?
                            The domestic sector contributes 48% of carbon emissions in Croydon, the highest of all
                            sectors.

                            According to London-wide data (Mayor of London 2010a) the vast majority of energy
                            consumed in a home, just over 80%, is used either for space heating or heating water.
                            The remainder is split between lighting and appliances, which account for 15% of CO2
                            emissions, and cooking, which accounts for 3%.

                            The London mayor‟s vision is that by 2030, all of London‟s existing homes will be
                            retrofitted with energy efficiency measures and have the potential to generate energy,
                            Londoners will use energy more efficiently and fuel poverty will be eradicated.

                            What has been achieved so far by the partnership:
                            • 100% of all suitable existing council homes have cavity wall insulation and at least
                            100mm of loft insulation.
                            • New council homes are built to the highest environmental standards.
                            • A total of nearly 4,000 installations (cavity and loft insulation) have been carried out in
                            private households since 2006.
                            • The Coldbusters and other grant schemes are specifically aimed at installing energy
                            efficient heating and insulation measures in private sector fuel poor properties.
                            • Croydon was one of the first local authorities to require major housing developments
                             to incorporate renewable energy technologies to reduce site CO2 emissions by 10%.
                            • The total annual emissions savings achieved since 2005 amount to 6.13 ktCO2 /yr.
                            With the addition of emissions from new build housing, the total saving amounts to 3.1
What has been achieved so far by the partnership:
• 100% of all suitable existing council homes have cavity wall insulation and at least
100mm of loft insulation.
• New council homes are built to the highest environmental standards.
• A total of nearly 4,000 installations (cavity and loft insulation) have been carried out in
private households since 2006.
• The Coldbusters and other grant schemes are specifically aimed at installing energy
efficient heating and insulation measures in private sector fuel poor properties.
• Croydon was one of the first local authorities to require major housing developments
 to incorporate renewable energy technologies to reduce site CO2 emissions by 10%.
• The total annual emissions savings achieved since 2005 amount to 6.13 ktCO2 /yr.
With the addition of emissions from new build housing, the total saving amounts to 3.1
 kt/CO2. This equates to a carbon saving of 1% from the 2005 baseline
and an approximate total annual financial saving from household energy bills of
£1,452,277.50.
Proportional Distribution of CO2 Emissions by Sector and Domestic Housing




nd Commercial

                                             Space Heating
                                                                                Water Heating




                                  Domestic
                                                                             Lighting and Appliances

                                                                   Cooking




/Getting worse?




                               2011 Text

                               What does this graph show?
ydon, the highest of all       The domestic sector contributes 49% of carbon emissions in Croydon, the
                               highest of all sectors.

 t majority of energy          According to London-wide data (Mayor of London 2010a) the vast majority of
 ting or heating water.        energy consumed in a home, just over 80%, is used either for space heating or
count for 15% of CO2           heating water. The remainder is split between lighting and appliances, which
                               account for 15% of CO2 emissions, and cooking which accounts for 3%.

g homes will be                The Mayor of London‟s vision is that by 2030, all of London‟s existing homes
 to generate energy,           will be retrofitted with energy efficiency measures and have the potential to
  eradicated.                  generate energy, Londoners will use energy more efficiently and fuel poverty
                               will be eradicated.

 lation and at least           What has been achieved so far by the partnership:
                               • 100% of all suitable existing council homes have cavity wall insulation and at
ards.                          least 100mm of loft insulation.
ve been carried out in         • New council homes are built to the highest environmental standards.
                               • A total of nearly 7,000 installations of energy efficiency measures have been
d at installing energy         carried out in Croydon‟s households since 2006.
or properties.                 • These installations provide annual energy bill savings of approximately
 using developments            £455,000 to householders
2 emissions by 10%.            • The Coldbusters loan scheme and other grant schemes are specifically
 t to 6.13 ktCO2 /yr.          aimed at installing energy efficient heating and insulation measures in
 aving amounts to 3.1          private sector fuel poor properties.
 lation and at least     What has been achieved so far by the partnership:
                         • 100% of all suitable existing council homes have cavity wall insulation and at
ards.                    least 100mm of loft insulation.
ve been carried out in   • New council homes are built to the highest environmental standards.
                         • A total of nearly 7,000 installations of energy efficiency measures have been
d at installing energy   carried out in Croydon‟s households since 2006.
or properties.           • These installations provide annual energy bill savings of approximately
 using developments      £455,000 to householders
2 emissions by 10%.      • The Coldbusters loan scheme and other grant schemes are specifically
 t to 6.13 ktCO2 /yr.    aimed at installing energy efficient heating and insulation measures in
 aving amounts to 3.1    private sector fuel poor properties.
 seline                  • Croydon was one of the first local authorities to require major housing
 energy bills of         developments to incorporate renewable energy technologies to reduce site
                         CO2 emissions by 10%.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
CO2 Savings from Home Insulation Measures

Years         Tonnes CO2 Saved
2006/07                   284.5                                                                      Carbon Dioxide Savings from Home
2007/08                  605.41




                                                               Tonnes Carbon Dioxide saved
2008/09                  824.58                                                              2000
2009/10                  1258.1
2010/11                1856.45
                                                                                             1500




                                                                        per year
                                                                                             1000


                                                                                             500


                                                                                               0
                                                                                                    2006/07       2007/08



          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Getting Better




          2010 Text                                                                                 2011 Text

          What does this graph show?                                                                What does this graph show?
          This is a cumulative graph showing CO2 savings obtained                                   This is a graph showing cumulative CO2 sav
          through cavity wall insulation, loft insulation and top up loft                           energy efficiency measures to houses in Cro
          insulation in Croydon between 2005/06 and 2009/10.                                        2010/11. The data includes loft and cavity w
          This data includes insulation completed through a                                         partnerships with other organisations includi
          partnership with British Gas offering residents the chance                                Environmental Networks (CEN) and Heatse
          to benefi t from a £100 council tax reduction when taking                                 installed by the Council in its own housing st
          up home insulation measures (see                                                          The CO2 and energy bill savings from meas
          www.keepcroydonwarm.org.uk for more information).                                         greater than in any other previous year, altho
          Together with a number of other schemes run by partners                                   before the borough's housing stock can be c
          such as CEN (Creative Environmental Networks) and the                                     its energy consumption.
          Energy Saving Trust this has led to cumulative carbon                                     The Energy Saving Trust Advice Centre Lon
          savings of 2.97 Kt/CO2 to date. The Energy Saving Trust                                   impartial advice on energy efficiency, home
          Advice Centre London offers free, personalised and                                        associated
          impartial advice on energy effi ciency, home energy                                        grants, water, waste and personal transport
          improvement and associated grants, water, waste,                                          For more information visit the Energy Saving
          personal transport.                                                                       www.energysavingtrust.org.uk or call free on
          For more information visit the Energy Saving Trust
          website: www.energysavingtrust.org.uk or call 0800 512
          012
impartial advice on energy effi ciency, home energy            grants, water, waste and personal transport
improvement and associated grants, water, waste,               For more information visit the Energy Saving
personal transport.                                            www.energysavingtrust.org.uk or call free on
For more information visit the Energy Saving Trust
website: www.energysavingtrust.org.uk or call 0800 512
012


RE:NEW and the Home Energy Efficiency Programme                RE:NEW and the Home Energy Efficiency
demonstration
                                                                 Keep same text
Croydon was one of 9 south west London sub region              The forthcoming year will see the delivery of
boroughs who took part in the demonstration trial for the      Norbury. RE:NEW is an area-based program
Home Energy Effi ciency Programme (HEEP), now known            advice to householders, install simple energ
as RE:NEW. RE:NEW is an area-based programme to                referrals to other energy efficiency schemes
target and provide energy effi ciency advice, install simple   funder by the London Development Agency
energy saving measures, and refer to energy effi ciency        homes in the area, helping to save residents
schemes for larger measures.                                   fuel poverty.               At the same time,
The area chosen for the demonstration programme for            with Heatseekers in the south of the boroug
RE:NEW was in Thornton Heath in the north of the               of heat loss using unique thermal imaging ve
borough. 832 properties received in-house advice and           Heatseekers can provide installations of affo
installations of ‟10 easy measures‟ to provide energy and      insulation. For further information, contact H
water savings. Over 200 referrals were also made to
energy companies during the programme for loft and
cavity wall insulation, boiler upgrades, draught proofi ng
and heating controls.
 Dioxide Savings from Home Insulation




    2007/08        2008/09        2009/10        2010/11




                             Keep same text
es this graph show?
graph showing cumulative CO2 savings obtained through fitting
 iciency measures to houses in Croydon between 2005/06 and
The data includes loft and cavity wall insulation installed through
 ps with other organisations including British Gas, Creative
 ental Networks (CEN) and Heatseekers, as well as measures
by the Council in its own housing stock.
 and energy bill savings from measures installed in 2010/11 were
 an in any other previous year, although there is a long way to go
e borough's housing stock can be considered truly efficient in terms of
  consumption.
gy Saving Trust Advice Centre London offers free, personalised and
advice on energy efficiency, home energy improvement and
 d
 ater, waste and personal transport.
 information visit the Energy Saving Trust website at
 gysavingtrust.org.uk or call free on 0800 512 012.
ater, waste and personal transport.
information visit the Energy Saving Trust website at
gysavingtrust.org.uk or call free on 0800 512 012.




and the Home Energy Efficiency Programme demonstration



coming year will see the delivery of the RE:NEW programme in
RE:NEW is an area-based programme to provide energy efficiency
householders, install simple energy saving measures and provide
o other energy efficiency schemes where appropriate. RE:NEW is
 the London Development Agency and will aim to treat over 1,500
 the area, helping to save residents money on energy bills and reduce
 ty.              At the same time, Croydon Council has partnered
seekers in the south of the borough to identify homes with high levels
ss using unique thermal imaging vehicles. Where appropriate,
ers can provide installations of affordable loft and cavity wall
  For further information, contact Heatseekers free on 0800 111 4968.
  2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Energy Efficiency of Local Authority Homes

Years     Average SAP Rating of LA-owned dwellings
                                                                                                              Energy efficiency of Croydon
     2008                                          77                                                    80




                                                                             Average SAP Rating of LA-
     2009                                          78
     2010                                          79
                                                                                                         79




                                                                                  owned dwellings
     2011                                        79.5

                                                                                                         78

                                                                                                         77

                                                                                                         76

                                                                                                         75
                                                                                                                  2008




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Getting Better.



          2010 Text

          What does this graph show?
          SAP ratings measure the energy efficiency of homes. The higher the rating, the
          more energy efficient are the homes. As of 1st April 2010 Croydon Council‟s
          housing stock had an average SAP rating of 79. This is one of the highest in London
          and in the top quartile for the country.7 Croydon‟s drive to cut energy wastage of its
          housing stock started with its first Energy Strategy in 1995. Today:
          • 100% of all suitable homes have cavity wall insulation and at least 100mm of loft
          insulation
          • 99% have a modern form of space heating
          • 87% double glazing
          These investments have led to
          • 30% cut in CO2 emissions since 1999 14 tCO2 per year
          • 40% reduction in comparative heating costs
          The Council‟s target is to carry on increasing the average SAP rating by 1 point
          each year.
Energy champions

The `energy champions` scheme has been set up to play a key role in disseminating
advice about energy efficiency to council tenants. Tenants are more receptive to
advice from a similar peer group. The council has already trained 50 energy
champions in easy ways to save energy such as the correct use of heating controls,
but needs to train more to ensure there is an energy champion in each residents‟
association.
Energy champions can engage tenants on other environmental issues as well for
example water saving and recycling.
gy efficiency of Croydon local authority homes




              2009               2010              2011




          2011 Text
                                                 Keep same text
          What does this graph show?
          SAP ratings measure the energy efficiency of homes. The higher the rating, the
          more energy efficient are the homes. As of 1st April 2011 Croydon Council‟s
          housing stock has an average SAP rating of 79.5. This is one of the highest in
          London and in the top quartile for the country. Croydon‟s drive to cut energy
          wastage of its housing stock started with its first Energy Strategy in 1995.
          Today:
          • 100% of all suitable homes have cavity wall insulation and at least 100mm of
          loft
          insulation
          • 99% have a modern form of space heating (107 properties out of a stock of
          14,000 do not yet have central heating)
          • 88% double glazing
          The Council‟s target is to carry on increasing the average SAP rating by up to 1
          point each year.
Energy champions
                          Keep same text
The Council is not able to continue to resource this initiative at the present time
however will look to start this again at some point in the future if resources
permit.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Impact of Social Housing

          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Staying the same




          2010 Text                                                       2011 Text

          Council-run social housing                                      Council-run social housing

          Croydon has started a programme of building new                 Croydon has started a programme of building
          council homes. We are building all our new homes to a           new homes to a minimum standard of Level 4
          minimum standard of Level 4 Code for Sustainable                target has been set above the current governm
          Homes (CSH). This target has been set above the                 The Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) is the
          current government recommendations to build to Level            and construction of new homes. The CSH aim
          3.                                                              emissions and create homes that are more su
          The Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) is the national            During the first phase Croydon Council has bu
          standard for the sustainable design and construction of         Home excellent standard. As part of th second
          new homes. The CSH aims to reduce our carbon                    delivered, of which 23 will achieve CSH Level
          emissions and create homes that are more sustainable.           by March 2011. These homes will include featu
          During the first phase Croydon Council has built 32 large       • On-site renewable energy sources meeting 1
          family eco-friendly homes to CSH level 4. An additional         increase in later phases)
          64 homes will be built as part of the second phase, of          • Solar thermal panels to generate hot water
          which 23 will achieve CSH Level 5. These homes will             • Solar PV panels to generate electricity
          include features such as:                                       • Whole-house heat recovery ventilation system
          • On-site renewable energy sources meeting 15% of               • 75% of lighting will be dedicated low energy f
          domestic energy needs (which will increase in later             • Water saving taps and showers
          phases)                                                         • Water butts to recycle water
          • Solar thermal panels to generate hot water                    • Bird boxes and bat boxes to encourage wildli
          • Solar PV panels to generate electricity                       Some homes are provided with an
          • Whole-house heat recovery ventilation system                  energy monitoring system.
          • 75% of lighting will be dedicated low energy fittings         This system will provide Croydon Council with
          • Water saving taps and showers                                 performing and help the council decide what fe
          • Water butts to recycle water                                  developments.
          • Bird boxes and bat boxes to encourage wildlife




          Solar water heating on council houses                           Solar water heating on council houses

          Solar water heating uses solar radiation to heat water          Solar water heating uses solar radiation to hea
          via solar panels mounted onto the roof (usually south-          roof (usually south-facing). As water is pumped
          facing). As water is pumped through them it is heated           by the sun.
          by the sun.                                                     A typical solar water heating installation will pro
          A typical solar water heating installation will provide         water requirements, with up to 100% of hot wa
          around 50% of a property‟s annual hot water                     panels to heat hot water have been fitted in all
          requirements, with up to 100% of hot water in the               homes in New Addington, which was part of th
          summer months. Solar thermal panels to heat hot water           also been incorporated into some of the new h
          have been fitted in all 13 homes at Sumner Gardens
          and in 19 homes in New Addington.
via solar panels mounted onto the roof (usually south-       roof (usually south-facing). As water is pumped
facing). As water is pumped through them it is heated        by the sun.
by the sun.                                                  A typical solar water heating installation will pro
A typical solar water heating installation will provide      water requirements, with up to 100% of hot wa
around 50% of a property‟s annual hot water                  panels to heat hot water have been fitted in all
requirements, with up to 100% of hot water in the            homes in New Addington, which was part of th
summer months. Solar thermal panels to heat hot water        also been incorporated into some of the new h
have been fitted in all 13 homes at Sumner Gardens
and in 19 homes in New Addington.




Registered Social Landlords                                  Registered Social Landlords

The G15 is a group of leading London housing                 Not necessary
associations. The G15 is supportive of the government‟s
sustainability objectives and run their own sustainability
working party.
 un social housing        Keep same text

has started a programme of building new council homes. We are building all our
es to a minimum standard of Level 4 Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH). This
  been set above the current government recommendations to build to Level 3.
  for Sustainable Homes (CSH) is the national standard for the sustainable design
 ruction of new homes. The CSH aims to reduce our carbon
  and create homes that are more sustainable.
e first phase Croydon Council has built 32 large family eco-friendly homes to Eco
cellent standard. As part of th second phase 70 new homes homes will be
  of which 23 will achieve CSH Level 5. We handed over 31 of these new homes
 2011. These homes will include features such as:
 enewable energy sources meeting 15% of domestic energy needs (which will
 n later phases)
ermal panels to generate hot water
V panels to generate electricity
 ouse heat recovery ventilation system
 ghting will be dedicated low energy fittings
aving taps and showers
utts to recycle water
 es and bat boxes to encourage wildlife
mes are provided with an
onitoring system.
em will provide Croydon Council with feedback on how well your home is
 g and help the council decide what features should be included in future
 ents.




 er heating on council houses          Keep same text

er heating uses solar radiation to heat water via solar panels mounted onto the
ally south-facing). As water is pumped through them it is heated
n.
solar water heating installation will provide around 50% of a property‟s annual hot
uirements, with up to 100% of hot water in the summer months. Solar thermal
 heat hot water have been fitted in all 13 homes at Sumner Gardens and in 19
 New Addington, which was part of the first phase. Solar thermal panels have
  incorporated into some of the new homes in our second phase.
ally south-facing). As water is pumped through them it is heated
n.
solar water heating installation will provide around 50% of a property‟s annual hot
uirements, with up to 100% of hot water in the summer months. Solar thermal
 heat hot water have been fitted in all 13 homes at Sumner Gardens and in 19
 New Addington, which was part of the first phase. Solar thermal panels have
  incorporated into some of the new homes in our second phase.




ed Social Landlords          Keep same text

ssary
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
New developments achieving Ecohomes very good or CSH Level 3

Years     Total Dwellings    Dwellings meeting standards Dwellings not meeting standards
     2006                274                          111                               263
     2007                950                          308                               642
     2008                857                          198                               659
     2009                194                          194                                 0
     2010                487                          408                                79




         Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Overall getting better (percentage wise)



         2010 Text

         What does this graph show?
         In 2009 100% of major housing completions (10 units or more) achieved BREEAM Ecohomes Very Good
         or Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) Level 3. This is a marked improvement from previous year where
         the dwellings meeting such standards formed only a proportion of major housing completions. A total of
         808 dwellings meeting at least EcoHomes Very Good/CSH Level 3 were built in Croydon between 2006
         and 2009. This represents 34% of all major housing completions during that timeframe.
         Ecohomes provides an authoritative rating for new, converted or renovated homes, and covers houses,
         flats and apartments. This rating system was replaced by the CSH in 2007.
         Croydon was one of the first local authorities to require major housing developments to incorporate
         renewable energy technologies to reduce site CO2 emissions by 10% and the first to implement this
         policy for major non-residential developments. New developments are expected to meet high
         environmental standards (Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4 / BREEAM Excellent) in advance of the
         national requirement for zero carbon homes from 2016.
Flagship private developments

BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) is the leading and most widely used environmental
assessment method for buildings.
A development in Sanderstead Road, Croydon was given national recognition by scooping one of the top
prizes at the BREEAM sustainable building awards 2010. Key environmental features that led to the
award include:
• A well located development site with good access to local amenities and public transport
• Use of sustainable drainage techniques
• Energy efficient internal and external lighting
• Solar photovoltaic panels (BREEAM 2010) Homes designed to high environmental standards can
become very desirable properties due to the quality of the building and financial savings from reduced
utility bills. In a house designed to CSH Level 4, energy bills can be reduced by up 30% or more.
                                           New Developments Achieving Ecohomes Very Good or CSH
                                                                  Level 3

                                           1000
                     Number of Dwellings




                                            800
                                            600
                                            400
                                            200
                                              0
                                                       2006           2007           2008           2009           2010
                                            Dwellings meeting standards                Total Dwellings




                                                  2011 Text
                                                                                         Keep same text
                                                  What does this graph show?
M Ecohomes Very Good                              In 2010 84% of major housing completions (10 units or more) achieved
m previous year where                             BREEAM Ecohomes Very Good or Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) Level
  ompletions. A total of                          3. This is slightly down on the previous year, although this can be mostly
 roydon between 2006                              explained by the fact that a number of large developments completed during
rame.                                             this time received planning permission before the requirements entered into
s, and covers houses,                             force.                    Croydon was one of the first local authorities to require
                                                  major housing developments to incorporate renewable energy technologies to
nts to incorporate                                reduce site CO2 emissions by 10% and the first to implement this policy for
  to implement this                               major non-residential developments. New housing is expected to meet high
o meet high                                       environmental standards in advance of the national requirement for zero
ent) in advance of the                            carbon homes from 2016.
                          Flagship private developments             Keep same text

ly used environmental     BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) is the leading and most
                          widely used environmental assessment method for buildings.
scooping one of the top   A development in Sanderstead Road, Croydon was given national recognition
 res that led to the      by scooping one of the top prizes at the BREEAM sustainable building awards
                          2010. Key environmental features that led to the award include:
ransport                  • A well located development site with good access to local amenities and
                          public transport
                          • Use of sustainable drainage techniques
tal standards can         • Energy efficient internal and external lighting
avings from reduced       • Solar photovoltaic panels (BREEAM 2010) Homes designed to high
 30% or more.             environmental standards can become very desirable properties due to the
                          quality of the building and financial savings from reduced utility bills. In a house
                          designed to CSH Level 4, energy bills can be reduced by up 30% or more.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Summary: Low Carbon Economy

CO2 Emissions from Industry and the Commercial Sector
Sector                    Proportion of Emissions                        CO2 Emissions from Industry and the Commercial Secto
Domestic                                       49%
Road Transport                                 31%
Industrial and Commercial                      20%

                                                                                20%



                                                                                                   49%



                                                                             31%




CO2 Emissions from Industry/Commercial Sector
                         Electricity              Gas
                    2005                      381              157
                    2006                      408              114
                    2007                      395               95




                         Overall Trend from Chapter: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

                         Staying the Same




                         2010 Text

                         What do these graphs show?

                         According to the most recent available data, the industry and
                         commercial sector constitutes 31% of Croydon‟s CO2
                         emissions.

                         The majority of these emissions are from commercial electricity
                         use. Gas use in industry and commerce has nearly halved
                         between 2005 and 2007, however electricity use has remained
                         high.

                         It has been estimated that moves towards a low carbon
                         economy offer London businesses potential opportunities of
                         up to £3.7 billion a year (GLA 2010).

                         The Croydon metropolitan centre is one of the most significant
                         business, commercial, leisure and entertainment centres in the
                         south east, containing 762,000 m2 of retail space and with a
                         GDP of about £2.5 billion, attracting over 140,000 workers and
use. Gas use in industry and commerce has nearly halved
between 2005 and 2007, however electricity use has remained
high.

It has been estimated that moves towards a low carbon
economy offer London businesses potential opportunities of
up to £3.7 billion a year (GLA 2010).

The Croydon metropolitan centre is one of the most significant
business, commercial, leisure and entertainment centres in the
south east, containing 762,000 m2 of retail space and with a
GDP of about £2.5 billion, attracting over 140,000 workers and
home to 20 “blue-chip” companies.

Croydon has been identified by central government as a growth
borough and has been earmarked as the main driver for growth
in south London in the period up to 2031. A key challenge will be
decoupling economic growth from increased energy demand
and associated carbon emissions.




What has Croydon achieved so far?

• CO2 emission reductions from council operations
A total of over 2,500 tonnes of CO2 and £320,000 has been
saved since 2005.

• CO2 emission reductions from non residential buildings
Major developments in Croydon are expected to meet high
sustainable construction standards, including producing 10%
renewable energy on site.

• Improving the environmental performance of businesses
Croydon‟s free environmental business support programme
„Envibe‟ has worked with 750 businesses since 2005.

• Working towards sustainable schools
The majority of CO2 emissions from council operations (53%)
comes from the schools sector. Schools in Croydon have saved
2,600 tCO2 over the last 5 years and energy and through energy
efficiency installations.

• District Energy
An innovative low cost low carbon heating project is currently
being developed. This could reduce emissions from Croydon
metropolitan centre by 20%.
om Industry and the Commercial Sector                                           CO2 Emissions from Industry/Commercial Sector


                                                                          450

                                                                          400

                                                                          350

                                                 CO2 Emissions (Kt CO2)
                               Domestic                                   300

                                                                          250                                                   Electricity
           49%                 Road Transport
                                                                          200                                                   Gas

                               Industrial and                             150
                               Commercial
                                                                          100

                                                                          50

                                                                            0
                                                                                   2005             2006              2007




e/Getting worse?




              2011 Text

              What do these graphs show?

              According to the most recent available data, the industry and
              commercial sector constitutes 20% of Croydon‟s CO2 emissions.

              The majority of these emissions are from commercial electricity
              use. Gas use in industry and commerce has nearly halved between
              2005 and 2007, however electricity use has remained high.

              It has been estimated that moves towards a low carbon
              economy offer London businesses potential opportunities of
              up to £3.7 billion a year (GLA 2010).

              The Croydon metropolitan centre is one of the most significant
              business, commercial, leisure and entertainment centres in the
              south east, containing 762,000 m2 of retail space and with a
              GDP of about £2.5 billion, attracting over 140,000 workers and
              home to 20 “blue-chip” companies.
2005 and 2007, however electricity use has remained high.

It has been estimated that moves towards a low carbon
economy offer London businesses potential opportunities of
up to £3.7 billion a year (GLA 2010).

The Croydon metropolitan centre is one of the most significant
business, commercial, leisure and entertainment centres in the
south east, containing 762,000 m2 of retail space and with a
GDP of about £2.5 billion, attracting over 140,000 workers and
home to 20 “blue-chip” companies.

Croydon has been identified by central government as a growth
borough and has been earmarked as the main driver for growth in
south London in the period up to 2031. A key challenge will be
decoupling economic growth from increased energy demand and
associated carbon emissions.




What has Croydon achieved so far?

• CO2 emission reductions from council operations
A total of over 2,500 tonnes of CO2 and £320,000 were saved from
2005 to 2010. In 2010/11 we completed four energy efficiency
projects resulting in a total annual financial saving of £47,019 and
carbon emissions reduction of 312tCO2/year.

• CO2 emission reductions from non residential buildings
Major developments in Croydon are expected to meet high
sustainable construction standards, including a requirement to
achieve a 10% reduction in site CO2 emissions through the
installation of renewable or low carbon technologies on site.

• Working towards sustainable schools
The majority of CO2 emissions from council operations (53%)
comes from the schools sector. Schools in Croydon have saved
2,600 tCO2 from 2005 to 2010 and energy and through energy
efficiency installations.

• District Energy
An innovative low cost low carbon heating project is currently being
developed. This could reduce emissions from Croydon metropolitan
centre by 20%.
Electricity
Gas
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Croydon Council CO2 Emissions (new 5 year plan)


Baseline 2009/10 NI 185 data

Croydon Emission category                  Percentage
Schools                                            44%
Street lighting                                    12%
Transport/travel                                    8%
Outsourced activities-stationary sources            4%
Other operational buildings                         7%
Coporate buildings                                 22%
Other educational                                   3%


Five year plan for lowering emissions by 25% by 2015

Years                                      Percentage




Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

Not enough data to determine a trend.




Carbon Management Energy Efficiency Programme (CMEEP 2010-2015)



Croydon council is committed to reducing its own carbon footprint across all key areas of the Council‟s
operations, (including non-housing building stock, Schools, business mileage and commercial fleet and street
lighting etc
The total CO2 emissions for the year 2009/10 from energy use in the Council‟s buildings, travel, street lighting
and some outsourced activities is 45, 625 tCO2. Building energy use i.e. electricity, gas and oil, accounts for 92
% of the total carbon emissions while transport/travel (staff business travel at work and commercial fleet etc) is
8% of the total CO2 emissions. Schools are the largest contributors to the council‟s carbon emissions with 44%
share of the total carbon footprint.
In October 2010, the Cabinet approved the Carbon Management Energy Efficiency Programme (CMEEP) to
achieve a carbon reduction target of 25% by 2015 compared to 2009/10 baseline. The scope of the CMEEP
includes carbon emissions from the council‟s own operations; corporate buildings energy use (including schools),
street lighting, transport and emissions from outsourced services (Leisure, Parks, IT etc.)
Full implementation of this programme will result in 25% reduction in the council‟s carbon footprint and
 estimated financial savings of £2.16 million per year in energy bills.
achieve a carbon reduction target of 25% by 2015 compared to 2009/10 baseline. The scope of the CMEEP
includes carbon emissions from the council‟s own operations; corporate buildings energy use (including schools),
street lighting, transport and emissions from outsourced services (Leisure, Parks, IT etc.)
Full implementation of this programme will result in 25% reduction in the council‟s carbon footprint and
 estimated financial savings of £2.16 million per year in energy bills.




Carbon Reduction and Energy Efficiency Projects



The CMEEP is a live programme, projects will be added as they are identified and it will be reviewed annually by
CMT and Cabinet to track progress against targets. Ongoing Programme management will be via the CMEEP
Board. The projects under this programme will be delivered in three distinct streams:
• Stream 1 – Small scale energy efficiency projects with payback of up to 5 years
• Stream 2 – Large scale energy efficiency projects undertaken through the RE:FIT scheme [large scale
investment in energy efficiency]
• Stream 3 – Projects for which no additional financing is required under this programme but will contribute
towards reducing council‟s carbon footprint e.g. property rationalisation etc


What have we achieved in 2010/11?

In 2010/11 we completed four energy efficiency projects resulting in a total annual financial saving of £47,019 and
carbon emissions reduction of 312tCO2/year. This means that in the last financial year we have achieved
approximately 1% of the overall target. All these projects were funded by the Local Authority Energy Finance
[LAEF] loan scheme with a maximum pay back period of 5 years or less.




Plans for 2011/12

We have already conducted energy audits in 6 Croydon schools and one corporate site and will be looking at the
recommendations of those audits to implement energy efficiency projects funded by the Local Authority Energy
Finance [LAEF] loan scheme. In order to achieve the over all 25% target, this year we will also be looking at the
technical and financial feasibility of a large scale energy efficiency scheme under the LDA supported mechanism
called „REFIT„
                        Breakdown of Croydon Council CO2 emissions by category (2009/10 NI 185 data,
                                        Croydon sustainable development services)



                                                                                Schools

                                                  3%
                                                                                Street lighting


                                           22%                                  Transport/travel


                                                            44%                 Outsourced activities-
                                                                                stationary sources

                                                                                Other operational buildings
                                      7%

                                       4%                                       Coporate buildings


                                             8%                                 Other educational
                                                  12%




he Council‟s
cial fleet and street

 travel, street lighting
and oil, accounts for 92
mmercial fleet etc) is
n emissions with 44%

 mme (CMEEP) to
 pe of the CMEEP
use (including schools),

 ootprint and
 pe of the CMEEP
use (including schools),

 ootprint and




e reviewed annually by
 l be via the CMEEP


e [large scale

ut will contribute




l saving of £47,019 and
 have achieved
ty Energy Finance




 d will be looking at the
ocal Authority Energy
also be looking at the
 supported mechanism
09/10 NI 185 data,




operational buildings
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
                                                                                                               Schools registered on the Eco
Schools registered on the Eco-Schools scheme




                                                                               Percentage of Croydon schools
Years     Registered Eco-Schools Not registered
     2010                    38%            62%                                                                60%
     2011                    50%            50%                                                                50%




                                                                                         registered
                                                                                                               40%
                                                                                                               30%
                                                                                                               20%
                                                                                                               10%
                                                                                                                0%




         Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Getting better



         2010 Text                                                                                   2011 Text

         What does this graph show?                                                                  What does this graph show?
         38% of schools in Croydon are registered as part of the Eco-
         Schools programme. This is an international award programme that                            50% of schools in Croydon are reg
         guides schools on their sustainable journey, providing a framework                          programme. This is an increase fro
         to help embed these principles into the heart of school life.                               doing better than the national avera
                                                                                                     registered). Eco-schools is an inter
                                                                                                     schools on their sustainable journe
                                                                                                     these principles into the heart of sc
                                                                                                     becoming sustainable.




         Croydon Sustainable Schools Programme                                                       Croydon Sustainable Schools Pr
         A programme of work is currently underway to support Croydon                                A programme of work is currently u
         schools to become sustainable schools. This support includes a                              their energy use and become susta
         sustainability audit, energy surveys to help identify where savings                         Carbon Trust and includes regular
         can be made and a managed investment fund to finance the upfront                            identify where savings can be mad
         capital costs of measures such as insulation, lighting and boiler                           the upfront capital costs of measur
         controls, and support to achieve eco-school status and beyond.                              controls, and support to achieve ec
         Support is also available to reduce water consumption and cut                               available from both the water comp
         waste - the number of schools that recycle paper and cardboard                              and cut waste -
         has gone up from 77 in 2006 to 102 in 2009. Schools‟ CO2
         reductions will make a significant contribution to reducing the
         council‟s own emissions.
Support is also available to reduce water consumption and cut              available from both the water comp
waste - the number of schools that recycle paper and cardboard             and cut waste -
has gone up from 77 in 2006 to 102 in 2009. Schools‟ CO2
reductions will make a significant contribution to reducing the
council‟s own emissions.




The Croydon's School's Climate Change Fund (CSCCF)                         The Croydon's School's Climate

The CSCCF is a grant fund for investment in renewable energy               not relevant anynmore
projects in Croydon‟s schools. Installations commenced in
December 2009 with all projects due for
completion by September 2010. The fund is made up of financial
contributions by developers who fail to meet renewable obligations
under local planning obligations, and is supplemented by national
grant schemes. 6 PV installations and 1 solar thermal installation
are being installed in schools through the CSCCF.
Total savings from these 7 projects are expected to achieve 24.6
tCO2 and £4,400 savings every year.

Interest-free loans to schools                                             Interest-free loans to schools

Croydon‟s schools have also received significant investment in             Croydon‟s schools have also receiv
energy efficiency measures through the council‟s interest-free Salix       efficiency measures through the co
loan fund over the last 5 years. Salix delivers interest free funding to   last 5 years. Salix delivers interest
accelerate investment in energy efficiency technologies across the         energy efficiency technologies acro
UK public sector. To date £305K has been invested with annual              year £7914 has been invested with
savings of 520 tCO2 and £80K.
    Schools registered on the Eco-Schools scheme




                          2010                              2011




                                      Keep same text
What does this graph show?

50% of schools in Croydon are registered as part of the Eco-schools
programme. This is an increase from 38% last year and this now means is
doing better than the national average (over 40% of schools in England are
registered). Eco-schools is an international award programme that guides
schools on their sustainable journey, providing a framework to help embed
these principles into the heart of school life and puts students at the forefront of
becoming sustainable.



                                                      Keep same text
Croydon Sustainable Schools Programme
A programme of work is currently underway to support Croydon schools reduce
their energy use and become sustainable. This work is supported by the
Carbon Trust and includes regular training sessions, energy surveys to help
identify where savings can be made and a managed investment fund to finance
the upfront capital costs of measures such as insulation, lighting and boiler
controls, and support to achieve eco-school status and beyond. Support is also
available from both the water companies in Croydon reduce water consumption
and cut waste -
available from both the water companies in Croydon reduce water consumption
and cut waste -




The Croydon's School's Climate Change Fund (CSCCF)                  Keep same text

not relevant anynmore




Interest-free loans to schools
                                      Keep same text
Croydon‟s schools have also received significant investment in energy
efficiency measures through the council‟s interest-free Salix loan fund over the
last 5 years. Salix delivers interest free funding to accelerate investment in
energy efficiency technologies across the UK public sector. For the 2010/11
year £7914 has been invested with an annual savings of 47.95 tCO2.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Floorspace Achieving BREEAM Very Good or Above

Years     New Floorspace Non-Residential (m2)         Total Non-Residential Space (m2)
2005/06                                           0                                      0
2006/07                                           0                                   4427
2007/08                                           0                                   2123
2008/09                                       23206                                  25858
2009/10                                        3298                                   3298
2010/11                                        5236                                  14580




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Staying the Same



          2010 Text

          What does this graph show?
          The Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) is a tool to measure
          the sustainability of new non-domestic buildings. In a building designed to BREEAM excellent standard,
          energy bills can be reduced by up to 20%.
          Before 2008, no new developments achieved BREEAM Very Good or above. In 2008/09 more than half of
          new floorspace in Croydon achieved this. In 2009/10 despite a dramatic reduction in the amount of new
          build due to the economic downturn, 100% achieved this standard.
          Major developments in Croydon are expected to meet high sustainable construction standards. Expected
          elements of this include:
          1. Renewable energy production to off-set 10% of carbon emissions – e.g. solar water heating,
          photovoltaic cells, micro-wind turbines.
          2. For non-residential developments ≥ 1,000m2, BREEAM Excellent is expected for all non-residential new
          build projects, taking account of site constraints.
District Energy

Croydon Council is developing a programme to offer town centre business and residential developments
reliable low cost low carbon heat. This scheme will link public buildings, businesses and private houses in
a sustainable heating system and will help to establish Croydon town centre as a leading location for the
low carbon economy.
District Energy means joining up heating systems through a pipe network, and having a small number of
efficient “combined heat & power” (CHP) plants instead of lots of separate boilers.
An initial feasibility study has shown that DE could reduce emissions from Croydon
metropolitan centre by 20% & help in delivering 60% reductions by 2025.
                                                     Floorspace Achieving BREEAM Very Good or Above

                                        30000

                                        25000

                                        20000
                  New floorspace (m2)




                                        15000

                                        10000

                                        5000

                                           0
                                                2005/06           2006/07              2007/08   2008/09           2009/10              2010/11

                                                 New Floorspace Non-Residential (m2)                 Total Non-Residential Space (m2)




                                                  2011 Text
                                                                                              Keep same text
                                                  What does this graph show?
M) is a tool to measure                           The Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method
 excellent standard,                              (BREEAM) is a tool to measure the sustainability of new non-domestic
                                                  buildings. In a building designed to BREEAM excellent standard, energy bills
08/09 more than half of                           can be reduced by up to 20%.
n the amount of new                               Before 2008, no new developments achieved BREEAM Very Good or above. In
                                                  2008/09 more than half of new floorspace in Croydon achieved this. In 2010/11,
 standards. Expected                              the proportion of development that achieved this standard was lower than in
                                                  previous years (see comments on overall trend above).
ter heating,                                      Major developments in Croydon are expected to meet high sustainable
                                                  construction standards. Expected elements of this include:
 all non-residential new                          1. Renewable energy production to off-set 10% of carbon emissions – e.g.
                                                  solar water heating, photovoltaic cells, micro-wind turbines.
                                                  2. For non-residential developments ≥ 1,000m2, BREEAM Excellent is
                                                  expected for all non-residential new build projects, taking account of site
                                                  constraints.
                         District Energy
                                                  Keep same text
dential developments     Croydon Council is developing a programme to offer town centre business and
 and private houses in   residential developments reliable low cost low carbon heat. This scheme will
ading location for the   link public buildings, businesses and private houses in a sustainable heating
                         system and will help to establish Croydon town centre as a leading location for
ng a small number of     the low carbon economy.
                         District Energy means joining up heating systems through a pipe network, and
                         having a small number of efficient “combined heat & power” (CHP) plants
                         instead of lots of separate boilers.
                         An initial feasibility study has shown that DE could reduce emissions from
                         Croydon
                         metropolitan centre by 20% & help in delivering 60% reductions by 2025.
2010/11
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Summary: Transport and Air Quality

Sector                      Proportion of Emissions                                               Protional Distribution
Road Transport                                         31%
Domestic                                               49%
                                                                                                     Industrial and
Industrial and Commercial                              20%
                                                                                                      Commercial

Percent OF Transport
Category                    Proportion of Emissions
Cars                                                   66%
Motorcycles                                            22%
Artic                                                   2%
Rigid                                                   3%
LGV                                                     6%
Buses and Coaches                                       1%
Taxis                                                   0%

Percent FROM Transport                                                                Domestic
Category                    Proportion of Emissions
Cars                                                   20%
Motorcycles                                             7%
Artic                                                   1%
Rigid                                                   1%
LGV                                                     2%
Buses and Coaches                                       0%
Taxis                                                   0%

                            Overall Trend from Chapter: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

                            Staying the Same




                            2010 Text

                            What does this graph show?

                            Road transport in 2007 accounted for about 21% of CO2
                            emissions in Croydon (this is consistent with the London average
                            of 22%). Over half of this comes from private cars. Under a
                            business-as-usual scenario, transport emissions in
                            the UK are expected to continue rising, by 35% between 1990
                            and 2030. Transforming transport is therefore critical in achieving
                            our emissions reduction targets. Road transport is also a key
                            source of local air pollutants, such as NO2 and PM10 which have
                            an impact on everyone living and working in Croydon, but mainly
                            on the most vulnerable such as children, older people and those
                            with heart and respiratory conditions.
our emissions reduction targets. Road transport is also a key
source of local air pollutants, such as NO2 and PM10 which have
an impact on everyone living and working in Croydon, but mainly
on the most vulnerable such as children, older people and those
with heart and respiratory conditions.




What has Croydon achieved so far?

• The construction of Croydon Tramlink in 2000 brought a
sustainable transport system that regularly carries more than
70,000 passengers per day and also links parts of the borough
and south London previously ill-served by public transport.

• Croydon is also benefiting from the extension of the East
London line opened in the summer 2010. This has put Croydon
on the Underground map; improved connections to Canada
Water and cross river links to Dalston and Shoreditch.

• 10 electrical vehicle charging points are being installed in 2010.
Each charging point is expected to take up to 25 conventional
vehicles off the road (Carplus 2010).

• Number of travel plans approved to date: 40 workplace travel
plans and 142 school travel plans.
   Protional Distribution of CO2 Emissions From Transport

      Industrial and
       Commercial




                                                                                    Motorcycles
                                   Transport



                                                                                        Artic
                                               Cars                                    Rigid

                                                                                LGV

                                                                               Buses and Coaches
                                                                   Taxis




e/Getting worse?




             2011 Text

             What does this graph show?

             Road transport in 2010 accounted for about 31% of CO2 emissions
             in Croydon, which is higher than the London average of 22%. Over
             half of this comes from private cars. Under
             a business-as-usual scenario transport emissions in the UK are
             expected to continue rising by 35% between 1990 and 2030.
             Transforming transport is therefore critical in achieving our
             emissions reduction targets.

             Road transport is also a key source of local air pollutants, such as
             NO2 and PM10 which have an impact on everyone living and
             working in Croydon, but mainly on the most vulnerable such as
             children, older people and those with heart and respiratory
             conditions.
emissions reduction targets.

Road transport is also a key source of local air pollutants, such as
NO2 and PM10 which have an impact on everyone living and
working in Croydon, but mainly on the most vulnerable such as
children, older people and those with heart and respiratory
conditions.


What has Croydon achieved so far?

• Croydon Tramlink links parts of the borough and south London
previously ill-served by public transport. and there is hope of further
extensions.

• Croydon is also benefiting from the East London line being opened
in the summer of 2010. This has put Croydon on the „Underground‟
map and giving a direct connection to Canada Water and on to
Shoreditch, Dalston and Islington.

• 15 electrical vehicle charging points are due to be operation by the
end of 2011. Within 5 years each charging point is expected to take
up to 25 conventional vehicles off the road (Carplus 2010).

• Number of travel plans approved to date: 40
workplace travel plans and 142 school travel plans.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Volume of traffic on Croydon roads Source: TFL 2010

Years   Millions of Vehicle Kilometers
1993
1994
                                   1321
                                   1339
                                                                                          Volume of traffic on Croydon roads So
1995                               1331
                                                                                   1400
                                                                                                            TFL 2010
1996                               1339
1997                               1342                                            1380




                                                 Millions of Vehicles Kilometers
1998                               1353
1999                               1377                                            1360
2000                               1362
2001                               1375                                            1340
2002                               1376                                            1320
2003                               1384
2004                               1373                                            1300
2005                               1360
                                                                                   1280
2006                               1366
2007                               1378                                            1260
2008                               1323
2009                               1296                                            1240
2010




        Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

        [Insert text here]



        2010 Text                                                                                        2011 Text

        What do these graph show?                                                                        What does this graph show?
        The borough suffers from significant levels of traffic congestion,                               [Insert text here]
        particularly on routes into/out of Croydon metropolitan centre, along
        the Purley Way and out to Gatwick (Croydon Council,
        2009). The volume of traffic on Croydon roads in 2007 (most recent
        data available). was 13 million vehicles Average volume of traffic
        between 1994 and 2007 was 12 million vehicles per year.
        Croydon‟s average volume of traffic is higher than both the average
        for outer London boroughs (6.8 million vehicles/year)
        and the inner London average (10
        million vehicles/year).

        58% of trips to work in Croydon are made by car. (2001 Census
        data, the most recent estimate). These figures are likely to have
        changed after the introduction of Tramlink. More up-to-date data will
        be published after the 2011 census.
        Croydon has one of the highest levels of reliance on car travel in
        London. Percentage of car travel for internal commuter trips range
        from 28% in centrally located Fairfield, to 48% in neighbouring
between 1994 and 2007 was 12 million vehicles per year.
Croydon‟s average volume of traffic is higher than both the average
for outer London boroughs (6.8 million vehicles/year)
and the inner London average (10
million vehicles/year).

58% of trips to work in Croydon are made by car. (2001 Census
data, the most recent estimate). These figures are likely to have
changed after the introduction of Tramlink. More up-to-date data will
be published after the 2011 census.
Croydon has one of the highest levels of reliance on car travel in
London. Percentage of car travel for internal commuter trips range
from 28% in centrally located Fairfield, to 48% in neighbouring
Waddon, and 47% in New Addington (Croydon Council/Peter Brett
Associates 2010). Overall the highest levels
 of car travel for internal commuter trips are in the south of the
borough. This corresponds to accessibility of public transport
links.




Car Clubs                                                                 Car Clubs           Keep same text


Car clubs are an excellent solution for those who would like the          Car clubs are an excellent solution fo
flexibility to have access to a car occasionally but would like to save   car occasionally but would like to save
money and explore other transport solutions for the majority of their     majority of their trips. Research sugge
trips. Research suggests joining a car club could save families           and also saves you worrying about ca
£1,000 a year – and also saves you worrying about car tax, parking        more information go to: www.carplus.
permits, cleaning and service bills. For more information go to:
www.carplus.org.uk




Council pool car scheme                                                   Council pool car scheme


The council has adopted a car club system to provide pool cars for        The council has adopted a car club sy
staff. Car clubs reduce the amount of CO2 produced in local               amount of CO2 produced in local com
communities as a result of sharing resources and encouraging              encouraging members to use the car
members to use the car occasionally rather than frequently.
                                  Travel to work mode share

                                  Mode of transportation      2001   2011
roydon roads Source:




                                  Driving a car/van           58%
                                  Walk                        12%
                                  Bus                         10%
                                  Train                        8%
                                  Passenger in a car/van       4%
                                  Tram/Underground             3%
                                  Taxi/minicab                 1%
                                  Motorcycle/scooter           1%
                                  Cycle                        1%




                      Keep same text
es this graph show?
 t here]
           Keep same text


  are an excellent solution for those who would like the flexibility to have access to a
ionally but would like to save money and explore other transport solutions for the
 f their trips. Research suggests joining a car club could save families £1,000 a year –
saves you worrying about car tax, parking permits, cleaning and service bills. For
rmation go to: www.carplus.org.uk




pool car scheme
                             Keep same text


cil has adopted a car club system to provide pool cars for staff. Car clubs reduce the
 CO2 produced in local communities as a result of sharing resources and
ng members to use the car occasionally rather than frequently.
 Travel to work mode share (borough
         1%
                wide)
              1%          Driving a car/van
      3% 1%
         4%               Walk
      8%                  Bus
                          Train
10%
                          Passenger in a car/van
              58%         Tram/Underground
12%                       Taxi/minicab
                          Motorcycle/scooter
                          Cycle
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Numbers of adults and children trained in Croydon

  Years     Number Trained (Children)        Number Trained (Adults)
2007/08                                905                              0                                1000
2008/09                                683                            131                                 900
2009/10                                903                            231                                 800
20010/11                               827                            408




                                                                                       Numbers trained
                                                                                                          700
                                                                                                          600
                                                                                                          500
                                                                                                          400
                                                                                                          300
                                                                                                          200
                                                                                                          100
                                                                                                            0
                                                                                                                2007/08




           Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

           Getting Better



           2010 Text

           What does this graph show?
           A total of 2416 children and 363 adults have received cycle training in Croydon
           since 2007. The number of adults trained increased by 76% between 2008 and
           2009. Cycle training increases the rider‟s confidence and their ability to ride safely
           in urban areas.




           Cycle Training in Croydon

           Adult cycle training courses. Adults and young people who live, work or study in the
           London Borough of Croydon can book a free two-hour individual lesson online
           www.cyclinginstructor.com


           Levels of cycling in Croydon

           Currently only 1% of trips in Croydon are made by bike. This is lower than the
           current London average of 2%. The mayor‟s target is to increase cycling to 5%
           across London. Analysis of current levels of cycling in Croydon and a review of
           potential cyclable journeys in the borough has determined that:
           • A very large section of the population in Croydon has never cycled (63%).
           Regular cycling appears to be highest among the youngest age band (5-19).
           • Cycling in Croydon is mainly used for very short trips with 65% of trips below 2km
           and 20% between 2km and 5km. This is a noticeably higher proportion of shorter
           trips than in London overall. The proportion of cyclists in Croydon making longer
Currently only 1% of trips in Croydon are made by bike. This is lower than the
current London average of 2%. The mayor‟s target is to increase cycling to 5%
across London. Analysis of current levels of cycling in Croydon and a review of
potential cyclable journeys in the borough has determined that:
• A very large section of the population in Croydon has never cycled (63%).
Regular cycling appears to be highest among the youngest age band (5-19).
• Cycling in Croydon is mainly used for very short trips with 65% of trips below 2km
and 20% between 2km and 5km. This is a noticeably higher proportion of shorter
trips than in London overall. The proportion of cyclists in Croydon making longer
trips (over 8km/5 miles) is lower than that in London – 6% compared to 9%.
• The level of potential cycle trips is in the highest quartile of outer London
boroughs, highlighting the high level of potential for cycling in Croydon
(Cycling Star Alliance 2010).



School cycling training session


The Bikeability (National Standard) courses, are available to all year 5 and year 6
chlldren across the borough. Children are trained through a variety of disciplines
and progress from Level 1 to Level 3.

Cycling for all

Cycling for all is a Croydon-based service for people who wish to cycle using trikes
and four-wheelers, for example people with mobility impairments or balance
difficulties. Sessions are run at the Croydon Sports Arena. For more information
see: www.wheelsforwellbeing.org.uk
                 Number of adults and childen trained in Croydon




                                                                                   Number Trained (Children)
                                                                                   Number Trained (Adults)




2007/08                2008/09             2009/10              20010/11




          2011 Text
                                                Keep same text
          What does this graph show?
          A total of 3318 children and 770 adults have received cycle training in Croydon
          since 2007. The number of adults trained increased by 73% between 2009 and
          2010. Cycle training increases the rider‟s confidence and their ability to ride
          safely in urban areas.




          Cycle Training in Croydon            Keep same text

          Adult cycle training courses. Adults and young people who live, work or study in the
          London Borough of Croydon can book a free two-hour individual lesson online
          www.cyclinginstructor.com


          Levels of cycling in Croydon
                                               Keep same text
          Currently only 1% of trips in Croydon are made by bike. This is lower than the
          current London average of 2%. The mayor‟s target is to increase cycling to 5%
          across London. Analysis of current levels of cycling in Croydon and a review of potential
          cyclable journeys in the borough has determined that:
          • A very large section of the population in Croydon has never cycled (63%). Regular cycling
          appears to be highest among the youngest age band (5-19).
          • Cycling in Croydon is mainly used for very short trips with 65% of trips below 2km and
          20% between 2km and 5km. This is a noticeably higher proportion of shorter trips than in
          London overall. The proportion of cyclists in Croydon making longer trips (over 8km/5
Currently only 1% of trips in Croydon are made by bike. This is lower than the
current London average of 2%. The mayor‟s target is to increase cycling to 5%
across London. Analysis of current levels of cycling in Croydon and a review of potential
cyclable journeys in the borough has determined that:
• A very large section of the population in Croydon has never cycled (63%). Regular cycling
appears to be highest among the youngest age band (5-19).
• Cycling in Croydon is mainly used for very short trips with 65% of trips below 2km and
20% between 2km and 5km. This is a noticeably higher proportion of shorter trips than in
London overall. The proportion of cyclists in Croydon making longer trips (over 8km/5
miles) is lower than that in London – 6% compared to 9%.
• The level of potential cycle trips is in the highest quartile of outer London
boroughs, highlighting the high level of potential for cycling in Croydon
(Cycling Star Alliance 2010).



School cycling training session
                                          Keep same text
The Bikeability (National Standard) courses, are available to all year 5 and year 6 chlldren
across the borough. Children are trained through a variety of disciplines and progress from
Level 1 to Level 3.


Cycling for all
                         Keep same text
Cycling for all is a Croydon-based service for people who wish to cycle using trikes and
four-wheelers, for example people with mobility impairments or balance difficulties.
Sessions are run at the Croydon Sports Arena. For more information see:
www.wheelsforwellbeing.org.uk
2011 state of the Environment Update Sheet
School Travel Plans Approved

  Years            STP Approved
2005                                     34




                                                            Number of Schools Approved
2006                                     14                                              40
2007                                     20                                              35
2008                                     13                                              30
2009                                     28
                                                                                         25
2010                                     33
2011                                     10
                                                                                         20
                                                                                         15
                                                                                         10
                                                                                          5
                                                                                          0
                                                                                              2005    2006


          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Staying the Same



          2010 Text                                                                                  2011 Text

          What does this graph show?                                                                 What does this graph show?
          School travel plans in Croydon Transport contributes around 40%                            School travel plans in Croydon
          of all carbon dioxide emissions in the UK. Across the country, the                         Transport contributes around 40%
          twice daily school run makes a significant contribution to air                             Across the country, the twice daily s
          pollution, congestion and ultimately climate change. An effective                          to air pollution, congestion and ultim
          school travel plan puts forward a package of measures to improve                           travel plan puts forward a package
          safety and reduce car use. It is based on consultation with                                walking, cycling and car sharing an
          teachers, parents, pupils and governors and other local people. A                          consultation with teachers, parents
          total of 142 school travel plans have been approved in Croydon                             total of 142 school travel plans have
          since 2005. How children travel to school in Croydon                                       helped by the provision of funding f
          According to TFL data, as of February 2010,                                                crossings, signs and raised platform
          Croydon had the highest number of children                                                 renewing travel plans and for provid
          travelling to school by car among London                                                   do no new STPs have yet been app
          boroughs. It also has some of the highest levels of travelling by bus                      underway to update these plans an
          and rail, but the lowest levels of walking and cycling.                                    integrate them into the good manag
                                                                                                     5-10 this year.

                                                                                                     How children travel to school in Cro
                                                                                                     According to TFL data, as of Febru
                                                                                                     of children travelling to school by ca
                                                                                                     some of the highest levels of travel
                                                                                                     of walking and cycling.
                                                                       How children travel to school in Cro
                                                                       According to TFL data, as of Febru
                                                                       of children travelling to school by ca
                                                                       some of the highest levels of travel
                                                                       of walking and cycling.


Walk to school                                                         Walk to school


The „Walk to School‟ project is about parents, guardians and           The „Walk to School‟ project is abo
children discovering the benefits of walking to school, helping to     discovering the benefits of walking
reduce traffic congestion and vehicle pollution, and creating the      congestion and vehicle pollution, an
opportunity for children to learn the skills needed to cross roads     learn the skills needed to cross roa
safely.                                                                school are given a special badge to
                                                                       schools are currently taking part.
Walking buses are now in operation in the south of the borough,
where each day groups of parents take turns accompanying a             Several walking buses are now in o
group of children to school, picking up                                each day groups of parents take tu
children along the route. The benefits are:                            school, picking up
• walking is a good way to keep fit                                    children along the route. The benef
• they create a chance to teach vital road safety skills               • walking is a good way to keep fit
• they reduce pollution and improve air quality, assisting those who   • they create a chance to teach vita
suffer from asthma and related problems                                • they reduce pollution and improve
                                                                       asthma and related problems
                       STP Approved




                  2007             2008             2009             2010         2011




                                       Keep same text
What does this graph show?
School travel plans in Croydon
Transport contributes around 40% of all carbon dioxide emissions in the UK.
Across the country, the twice daily school run makes a significant contribution
to air pollution, congestion and ultimately climate change. An effective school
travel plan puts forward a package of measures to improve safety, increase
walking, cycling and car sharing and so reduce car use. It is based on
consultation with teachers, parents, pupils and governors and local people. A
total of 142 school travel plans have been approved in Croydon since 2005,
helped by the provision of funding for immediate measures such as fencing,
crossings, signs and raised platforms. There has been a gap in resources for
renewing travel plans and for providing any changes to local roads in response
do no new STPs have yet been approved in 2011. A new effort is now
underway to update these plans and
integrate them into the good management of each school. We anticipate
5-10 this year.

How children travel to school in Croydon
According to TFL data, as of February 2010, Croydon had the highest number
of children travelling to school by car among London boroughs. It also has
some of the highest levels of travelling by bus and rail, but the lowest levels
of walking and cycling.
How children travel to school in Croydon
According to TFL data, as of February 2010, Croydon had the highest number
of children travelling to school by car among London boroughs. It also has
some of the highest levels of travelling by bus and rail, but the lowest levels
of walking and cycling.


Walk to school
                         Keep same text

The „Walk to School‟ project is about parents, guardians and children
discovering the benefits of walking to school, helping to reduce traffic
congestion and vehicle pollution, and creating the opportunity for children to
learn the skills needed to cross roads safely. Each month children who walk to
school are given a special badge to reward their efforts. 10% of Croydon
schools are currently taking part.

Several walking buses are now in operation in the south of the borough, where
each day groups of parents take turns accompanying a group of children to
school, picking up
children along the route. The benefits are:
• walking is a good way to keep fit
• they create a chance to teach vital road safety skills
• they reduce pollution and improve air quality, assisting those who suffer from
asthma and related problems
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Average Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide Levels

Years     Annual Concentration (ug/m3)
     2001                             45                                                     Average Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide
     2002                          53.25
     2003                           64.5                                       70




                                                        Annual Concentration
     2004                          48.75                                       60
     2005                          53.25                                       50




                                                              (ug/m3)
     2006                          50.25
                                                                               40
     2007                          51.25
                                                                               30
     2008                             48
                                                                               20
     2009                             53
     2010                           61.5
                                                                               10
                                                                                0
                                                                                    2001   2002   2003     2004




         Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Overall trend is staying the same.



         2010 Text                                                                                2011 Text

         What does this graph show?                                                               What does this graph show?
         The graph shows air pollution levels averaged out across the whole                       The graph shows air pollution leve
         year at all roadside sites in Croydon. Overall there is no upward or                     all roadside sites in Croydon. The
         downward trend in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations since                            are not being met. Overall there is
         2001. At our background site (i.e. an air quality monitoring station                     concentrations since 2001. Pleas
         removed from a road) nitrogen dioxide levels have decreased slightly                     on nitrogen dioxide, its sources an
         during the same period. Please refer to the glossary for more                            for PM10 and NO2 has already pa
         information on nitrogen dioxide, its sources and its impact on health.                   Directive provides for Member Sta
                                                                                                  compliance with the limit values fo
                                                                                                  for NO2 until January 2015, provid
                                                                                                  particular, that a viable action plan

                                                                                                  The Government has applied to a
                                                                                                  NO2 limit values until 2015. The m
                                                                                                  are aimed at working towards ach
                                                                                                  2015 for NO2.
age Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide Levels




          2004      2005      2006      2007      2008      2009      2010




                                         Keep same text
 What does this graph show?
 The graph shows air pollution levels averaged out across the whole year at
 all roadside sites in Croydon. The current objectives for nitrogen dioxide (NO2)
 are not being met. Overall there is no upward or downward trend in NO2
 concentrations since 2001. Please refer to the glossary for more information
 on nitrogen dioxide, its sources and its impact on health.The compliance date
 for PM10 and NO2 has already passed. However, the EU Ambient Air Quality
 Directive provides for Member States to apply to extend the date for
 compliance with the limit values for PM10 until May 2011, and
 for NO2 until January 2015, provided certain conditions are met - in
 particular, that a viable action plan to meet the limit values is in place.

 The Government has applied to apply to the EC for a time extension to the
 NO2 limit values until 2015. The measures in the Mayor's Air Quality Strategy
 are aimed at working towards achieving the limit levels by 2011 for PM10 and
 2015 for NO2.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Average PM10 Levels

  Years     Thornton Heath Mean PM10 Concentration (ug/m3)
1999                                                      25
2000                                                      23
2001                                                      24
2002                                                      23
2003                                                      26
2004                                                      23
2005                                                      23
2006                                                      21
2007                                                      20
2008                                                      20
2009                                                      22
2010                                                    23.5




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Overall trend is staying the same.




          2010 Text

          What does this graph show?
          This graph shows that PM10 levels in Croydon meet the air quality objective. In 2008 the EU limit for PM2.5 was intr
          exposure reduction target to be achieved by 2010 will be set for the UK. The sources of PM2.5 tend to be very simil
          PM10, particularly road transport. We have concerns regarding particulate emissions as there is clear and unequivo
          there are no safe levels of PM2.5. Therefore we need to take proportionate and cost-effective steps to reduce PM2.
          Croydon was awarded beacon status for „Delivering Cleaner Air‟ in 2007-2008. PM stands for “particulate matter”. P
          glossary for more details on PM10 and PM2.5, their sources and their impact on health.

          In March 2005 Croydon Council developed an information service called airTEXT in partnership with Cambridge En
          Consultants (CERC). This service sends free air pollution alerts by text message, e-mail or by recorded message to
          residents when air pollution levels are forecast to be moderate, high or very high. The messages enable residents w
          high pollution levels, such as people who suffer from asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, heart disease or angina to ta
          the necessary steps to minimise exposure to the pollution episode and better manage their symptoms, improving qu
          hopefully reducing the need for visits to the doctor or hospital. In 2007 the airTEXT service was extended to other L
          and Slough Borough Council. By the end of 2009 5,931 people were receiving text alerts. AirTEXT is now run and m
          consortium made up of participating London boroughs.
hopefully reducing the need for visits to the doctor or hospital. In 2007 the airTEXT service was extended to other L
and Slough Borough Council. By the end of 2009 5,931 people were receiving text alerts. AirTEXT is now run and m
consortium made up of participating London boroughs.
 Sheet

                George Street Mean PM10 Concentration (ug/m3)
                                                        no data                                                       Average Levels of Particles (PM




                                                                                   PM10 concentration (ug/m3)
                                                             30
                                                             30
                                                             23                                                 35
                                                        no data                                                 30
                                                             25                                                 25
                                                             27                                                 20
                                                             26                                                 15
                                                             28                                                 10
                                                             22                                                  5
                                                             24                                                  0
                                                             30




                                                                                 Thornton Heath Mean PM10 Concentration (ug/m3)




ame/Getting worse?




                                                                                                                     2011 Text

                                                                                                                     What does this graph show?
  meet the air quality objective. In 2008 the EU limit for PM2.5 was introduced and a national                       This graph shows that PM10 levels
010 will be set for the UK. The sources of PM2.5 tend to be very similar to the sources of                           remain concerned that there are no
ncerns regarding particulate emissions as there is clear and unequivocal health advice that                          proportionate and cost-effective ste
 e need to take proportionate and cost-effective steps to reduce PM2.5 levels in Croydon.                            PM2.5 tend to be very similar to the
 ering Cleaner Air‟ in 2007-2008. PM stands for “particulate matter”. Please refer to the                            concerns regarding particulate emi
 their sources and their impact on health.                                                                           that there are no safe levels of PM2
                                                                                                                     effective steps to reduce PM2.5 lev
 information service called airTEXT in partnership with Cambridge Environmental Research                             for „Delivering Cleaner Air‟ in 2007-
air pollution alerts by text message, e-mail or by recorded message to the home phones of                            the glossary for more details on PM
  to be moderate, high or very high. The messages enable residents who are vulnerable to                             health.
 r from asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, heart disease or angina to take                                               The compliance date for PM10 and
he pollution episode and better manage their symptoms, improving quality of life and                                 Air Quality Directive provides for M
ctor or hospital. In 2007 the airTEXT service was extended to other London boroughs                                  with the limit values for PM10 until
 09 5,931 people were receiving text alerts. AirTEXT is now run and managed by a                                     certain conditions are met - in parti
oroughs.                                                                                                             in place.

                                                                                                                     In March 2005 Croydon Council de
                                                                                                                     partnership with Cambridge Enviro
                                                                                                                     sends free air pollution alerts by tex
                                                                                                                      home phones of residents when a
                                                                                                                     very high. The messages enable re
                                                                                                                     such as people who suffer from as
                                                                                                                     angina to take the necessary steps
                                                                                                                     better manage their symptoms, imp
ctor or hospital. In 2007 the airTEXT service was extended to other London boroughs   with the limit values for PM10 until
09 5,931 people were receiving text alerts. AirTEXT is now run and managed by a       certain conditions are met - in parti
oroughs.                                                                              in place.

                                                                                      In March 2005 Croydon Council de
                                                                                      partnership with Cambridge Enviro
                                                                                      sends free air pollution alerts by tex
                                                                                       home phones of residents when a
                                                                                      very high. The messages enable re
                                                                                      such as people who suffer from as
                                                                                      angina to take the necessary steps
                                                                                      better manage their symptoms, imp
                                                                                      hopefully reducing the need for visi
                                                                                      was extended to other London boro
                                                                                      and Slough Borough Council. By th
                                                                                      alerts. AirTEXT is now run and ma
                                                                                      consortium made up of participatin
    Average Levels of Particles (PM10)




M10 Concentration (ug/m3)       George Street Mean PM10 Concentration (ug/m3)




                                         Keep same text
  What does this graph show?
  This graph shows that PM10 levels in Croydon meet the air quality objective. However, we
  remain concerned that there are no safe levels of PM10 and that we should therefore take
  proportionate and cost-effective steps to reduce PM10 levels in Croydon.The sources of
  PM2.5 tend to be very similar to the sources of PM10, particularly road transport. We have
  concerns regarding particulate emissions as there is clear and unequivocal health advice
  that there are no safe levels of PM2.5. Therefore we need to take proportionate and cost-
  effective steps to reduce PM2.5 levels in Croydon. Croydon was awarded beacon status
  for „Delivering Cleaner Air‟ in 2007-2008. PM stands for “particulate matter”. Please refer to
  the glossary for more details on PM10 and PM2.5, their sources and their impact on
  health.
  The compliance date for PM10 and NO2 has already passed. However, the EU Ambient
  Air Quality Directive provides for Member States to apply to extend the date for compliance
  with the limit values for PM10 until May 2011, and for NO2 until January 2015, provided
  certain conditions are met - in particular, that a viable action plan to meet the limit values is
  in place.

  In March 2005 Croydon Council developed an information service called airTEXT in
  partnership with Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants (CERC). This service
  sends free air pollution alerts by text message, e-mail or by recorded message to the
   home phones of residents when air pollution levels are forecast to be moderate, high or
  very high. The messages enable residents who are vulnerable to high pollution levels,
  such as people who suffer from asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, heart disease or
  angina to take the necessary steps to minimise exposure to the pollution episode and
  better manage their symptoms, improving quality of life and
with the limit values for PM10 until May 2011, and for NO2 until January 2015, provided
certain conditions are met - in particular, that a viable action plan to meet the limit values is
in place.

In March 2005 Croydon Council developed an information service called airTEXT in
partnership with Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants (CERC). This service
sends free air pollution alerts by text message, e-mail or by recorded message to the
 home phones of residents when air pollution levels are forecast to be moderate, high or
very high. The messages enable residents who are vulnerable to high pollution levels,
such as people who suffer from asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, heart disease or
angina to take the necessary steps to minimise exposure to the pollution episode and
better manage their symptoms, improving quality of life and
hopefully reducing the need for visits to the doctor or hospital. In 2007 the airTEXT service
was extended to other London boroughs
and Slough Borough Council. By the end of March 2011 6580 people were receiving text
alerts. AirTEXT is now run and managed by a
consortium made up of participating London boroughs.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Summary: Waste, Recycling, and Street Cleanliness




          Overall Trend from Chapter: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          Waiting for most recent data, but the trend appears to be pointing towards getting better.




          2010 Text                                                                       2011 Text

          What does this graph show?                                                      What does this graph show?

          The 2010 Waste Framework Directive (WFD) puts a strong                          The 2010 Waste Framework Directi
          emphasis on waste reduction, re-use and high quality recycling,                 emphasis on waste reduction, re-us
          with separate collections of waste where technically,                           separate collections of waste where
          environmentally and economically practicable. Focus should be on                and economically practicable. Focus
          resource effi ciency, waste recovery and wider concerns including               ciency, waste recovery and wider co
          social, economic and environmental impacts of the methods by                    economic and environmental impact
          which we manage our waste.                                                      manage our waste.

          In accordance with this and the Mayor of London‟s waste strategy,               In accordance with this and the May
          there is a hierarchy for managing waste. Croydon must consider                  there is a hierarchy for managing wa
          options to reduce and recycle prior to generating energy from                   options to reduce and recycle prior t
          waste.                                                                          waste.

          Each year, the UK generates about 100 million tonnes of waste                   Each year, the UK generates about
          from households, commerce and industry. 22 million tonnes of this               from households, commerce and ind
          are generated in London.                                                        are generated in London.

          Most of this ends up in landfi ll where the biodegradable part                   Most of this ends up in landfill wher
          generates methane as it decomposes. Methane is regarded as the                  generates methane as it decompose
          most potent greenhouse gas and has a warming potential 21                       most potent greenhouse gas and ha
In accordance with this and the Mayor of London‟s waste strategy,    In accordance with this and the May
there is a hierarchy for managing waste. Croydon must consider       there is a hierarchy for managing wa
options to reduce and recycle prior to generating energy from        options to reduce and recycle prior t
waste.                                                               waste.

Each year, the UK generates about 100 million tonnes of waste        Each year, the UK generates about
from households, commerce and industry. 22 million tonnes of this    from households, commerce and ind
are generated in London.                                             are generated in London.

 Most of this ends up in landfi ll where the biodegradable part       Most of this ends up in landfill wher
generates methane as it decomposes. Methane is regarded as the       generates methane as it decompose
most potent greenhouse gas and has a warming potential 21            most potent greenhouse gas and ha
times more than carbon dioxide, therefore this has a considerable    more than carbon dioxide, therefore
contribution to climate change.                                      contribution to climate change.




What has Croydon achieved so far?                                    What has Croydon achieved so fa

• Recycling rates in Croydon doubled between 2005/06 and
2009/10, increasing from 16.17% to 32.2%.

• The percentage of streets with unacceptable levels of litter and
detritus (NB: deleted “has”) decreased from 37% to 2% between
05/06 and 07/08.

• Croydon has been nominated 3rd cleanest borough in London
(based on 2008/09 street cleanliness data) (GMB 2010).

• Croydon has been part of the South London Waste Partnership
since 2003 (together with Kingston, Merton and Sutton). Joint
governance, procurement, contract management and waste
planning have provided value for money and increased
performance.
es this graph show?

 Waste Framework Directive (WFD) puts a strong
 on waste reduction, re-use and high quality recycling, with
collections of waste where technically, environmentally
omically practicable. Focus should be on resource effi
aste recovery and wider concerns including social,
 and environmental impacts of the methods by which we
 ur waste.

ance with this and the Mayor of London‟s waste strategy,
hierarchy for managing waste. Croydon must consider
 reduce and recycle prior to generating energy from


, the UK generates about 100 million tonnes of waste
eholds, commerce and industry. 22 million tonnes of this
ated in London.

his ends up in landfill where the biodegradable part
  methane as it decomposes. Methane is regarded as the
 nt greenhouse gas and has a warming potential 21 times
ance with this and the Mayor of London‟s waste strategy,
hierarchy for managing waste. Croydon must consider
 reduce and recycle prior to generating energy from


, the UK generates about 100 million tonnes of waste
eholds, commerce and industry. 22 million tonnes of this
ated in London.

his ends up in landfill where the biodegradable part
  methane as it decomposes. Methane is regarded as the
 nt greenhouse gas and has a warming potential 21 times
n carbon dioxide, therefore this has a considerable
on to climate change.




 Croydon achieved so far?
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Amount of Household Waste Per Head
                                                                                                             Amount of Household
     Year        Amount of household waste per head
2004/05                                            438




                                                         Kg of household waste per
                                                                                     460
2005/06                                            411
                                                                                     440
2006/07                                          407.4                               420
2007/08                                          401.8                               400




                                                                   head
2008/09                                          389.5                               380
2009/10                                         377.44                               360
2010/11                                                                              340
                                                                                           2004/05      2005/06




Municipal Waste By Material Produced in London
                                                                                                Municipal Waste By Material Produce

Material       2008/09              2009/10
                                                                               40%
Organic                       38%
                                                                               35%
Paper and card                18%                                              30%




                                                          Percent (%)
Mixed                         11%                                              25%
Metals                         8%                                              20%
Plastics                       7%                                              15%
                                                                               10%
Glass                          7%                                               5%
Wood                           5%                                               0%
Textiles                       3%
Soil                           3%
Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

[Insert text here]




2010 Text                                                           2011 Text

What do these graphs show?                                          What do these graphs show?
• Kg household waste per head has reduced from 483kg per head       [Insert text here]
in 2004/05 to approximately 377.4 kg8 per head in 2009/09.

• On average, each person in the UK, throws away seven times
their body weight (about 500 kg) in rubbish every year
(Wasteonline 2004).

• The total amount of waste per household in Croydon is 606.34
kg. This is less than London‟s average of 700 kg per household.

Household waste collected is composed of a wide variety of
materials. The majority of this household waste, around 70%, has
the potential to be either recycled or composted (Wasteonline
2004). Of the remaining waste, some materials such as wood
could be reused, and the use of materials such as nappies could
be reduced by replacing throw-away nappies with reusable ones.
In a landfill site nappies can take up to 500 years to decompose.
             Amount of Household Waste Per Head




        2005/06       2006/07      2007/08       2008/09   2009/10    2010/11




Municipal Waste By Material Produced in London                                  Municipal Waste By Material Produced in London
                                                                                                   2009/10



                                                            2008/09
                                                            2009/10
                             Keep same text
What do these graphs show?
[Insert text here]
Material Produced in London


                         Organic
                         Paper and card
                         Mixed
                         Metals
                         Plastics
                         Glass
                         Wood
                         Textiles
                         Soil
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Management of Household Waste in Croydon

  Year            Landfill             Energy Recovery           Recycling
2005/06                      82.00%                      0.00%     16.17%
2006/07                      79.67%                      0.16%     20.11%                  90%
2007/08                      77.05%                      0.17%     22.71%                  80%
2008/09                      72.07%                      0.23%     27.70%                  70%




                                                                             %Percentage
2009/10                      65.24%                      2.54%     32.22%                  60%
2010/11
                                                                                           50%
                                                                                           40%
                                                                                           30%
                                                                                           20%
                                                                                           10%
                                                                                            0%




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          [Insert text here]
2010 Text

What do this graph show?
• The amount of waste sent to landfill decreased from 82% in 2005/06 to
65.24%in 2009/10 . This constitutes a 21.6% decrease of waste to landfill. The
reduction in waste to landfill coincides with a considerable increase in the
amount of waste that is recycled.

• However, with just above 65% of waste still going to landfill, landfill in 2009/10
was still the main method of disposal in Croydon. This is higher than the 2008/09
London average of 49% waste to landfill (most recent available data).




What can I do?

Reduce: Waste reduction or prevention, is by far the most cost-effective and
environmentally beneficial way to reduce the impact of waste on the environment
(Mayor of London 2010b).

Reduce your food waste and save money! check out
www.lovefoodhatewaste.com for ideas.

In the UK, each person throws away around 70kg of avoidable food waste each
year (this is the weight of an average person!), or about 1/3 of the food we buy.
Reducing food waste could save each household around £420 per year.

Reuse: Visit the Croydon ARC centre to recycle your furniture (see next page for
more details).

Use reusable nappies for your baby – save yourself a fortune and provide
greater comfort for your baby. 15% of parents now use them. For general
information visit www.croydonrealnappies.ik.com/home.ikml

Recycle and composting: All Croydon households now have access to a
fortnightly twin box recycling service. Residents are now be able to recycle
plastic bottles and cardboard in addition to the normal paper, glass, cans and
textiles collections. Residents in flats also have access to recycling services.
Currently we have installed over 1,500 sites serving just short of 26,500
properties.

Home composting bin offer Croydon Council has teamed up with Straight Plc
to supply reduced priced home composting bins, wormeries and water butts.
For more information on the offers available visit
www.croydon.getcomposting.com or call 0844 472 1888.
properties.

Home composting bin offer Croydon Council has teamed up with Straight Plc
to supply reduced priced home composting bins, wormeries and water butts.
For more information on the offers available visit
www.croydon.getcomposting.com or call 0844 472 1888.
                 Management of Household Waste in Croydon

90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
 0%
      Landfill                 Energy Recovery              Recycling
2011 Text
                              Keep same text
What do these graphs show?
[Insert text here]




Local authority Carbon Management Programme
                                               Keep same text
[Insert text here}
            2005/06
            2006/07
            2007/08
            2008/09
            2009/10
            2010/11


Recycling
Recycling and Composting Levels

Household Recycling and Composting in Croydon
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Household Recycling and Composting in Croydon

  Year        Recycling       Composting        Rate           London Rate                         Household re
2000/01                13.6            2.4                16             9
2001/02                13.9            1.5              15.4           9.3
2002/03                11.5            1.6              13.1          10.9
                                                                                              35
2003/04                11.9            2.2              14.1          13.3




                                                                             Percentage (%)
                                                                                              30
2004/05               10.94           2.06                13          17.6                    25
2005/06               12.99           3.18             16.17          20.7                    20
2006/07               14.63           5.48             20.11          22.9                    15
2007/08               16.42           6.29             22.71          25.5                    10
2008/09                18.6            9.1              27.7          29.2                     5
2009/10               21.87         10.35               32.2                                   0
2010/11


Waste Furniture Collected by ARC
  Year    Recycled (Tonnes) Recycled      Reused (Tonnes)  Reused    Landfill (Tonnes)  Landfill
2009/10                 270   0.564853556            183 0.382845188                18 0.0376569
2010/11                         #DIV/0!                     #DIV/0!                     #DIV/0!




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          [Insert text here]



          2010 Text                                                                   2011 Text

          What does this graph show?                                                  What does this graph sh

          Croydon‟s recycling and composting rate has dramatically improved           [Insert text here]
          since 2004/2005, when it totalled 13%. After being well below the
          average London rate in 2004/05, it has been rapidly catching up with
          the London average since then.




            How does Croydon compare?                                                  How does Croydon co

          Although recycling rates have steadily improved, in 2008/09 Croydon         [Insert text here]
          ranked below neighbouring boroughs such as Bromley (35%
          recycling rate), Sutton (31% recycling rate), Merton (30%). The
          borough was ranked 19th for recycling and composting out of all 33
          boroughs in 2008/09 (Environment Agency 2010).

          However, recently published figures for 2009/10 suggest Croydon‟s
          recycling performance has noticeably improved and reached a rate
          of 32.2%. This figure is split with a recycling only rate of 21.87% and
          a composting rate of 10.35%. This is a noticeable improvement and
          brings Croydon‟s recycling figure to double that of 2005/06.

          Over the next years, the council will continue to explore ways of
          encouraging people to recycle more in order to deliver the
          government‟s national targets for recycling and diverting waste from
          landfill.
boroughs in 2008/09 (Environment Agency 2010).

However, recently published figures for 2009/10 suggest Croydon‟s
recycling performance has noticeably improved and reached a rate
of 32.2%. This figure is split with a recycling only rate of 21.87% and
a composting rate of 10.35%. This is a noticeable improvement and
brings Croydon‟s recycling figure to double that of 2005/06.

Over the next years, the council will continue to explore ways of
encouraging people to recycle more in order to deliver the
government‟s national targets for recycling and diverting waste from
landfill.


Croydon appliance reuse center.                                           Croydon appliance reus

Croydon Appliance Reuse Centre (ARC) is a charity that was set up         [Insert text here]
to help families on low income by providing low cost, quality furniture
and domestic appliances and by providing a training facility for
unemployed or disadvantaged people. ARC source all the products
they sell from generous donations from members of the public and
from the commercial services they provide to local councils, schools,
NHS trusts and commercial organisations.

Their centre of operations is in Grafton Road, Croydon, where they
have a large showroom, workshops and warehouse. The new shop
in St Georges Walk, central Croydon, is the main sales centre. See
www.arc-croydon.org.uk for more information.

Over the last 12 months, of the total 478 tonnes collected by ARC,
183 tonnes has been reused, 270 tonnes has been recycled and
only 18 tonnes has been sent to landfill. More than 2,000 households
have benefited from access to low-cost furniture.
Household recycling and composting in Croydon borough. Source:
                            Defra



                                                          Composting
                                                          Recycling
                                                          London Rate
5




                Total
                    478                                        Waste Furniture Collected by ARC

                                              0.6
                                              0.5


                                Percent (%)
                                              0.4
                                              0.3
                                              0.2
                                              0.1
                                                0
                                                    Recycled               Reused




What does this graph show?
                                Keep same text
[Insert text here]




    How does Croydon compare?   Keep same text

[Insert text here]
Croydon appliance reuse center.
                                  Keep same text
[Insert text here]
ected by ARC



                          2009/10
                          2010/11



               Landfill
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Proportion of the borough with unacceptable levels of litter and detritus

Amount of Litter and Deritus
                                                                                                         Amount of Litter and Deritus
Yr 2005/06               37.00%
Yr 2006/07               14.47%
Yr 2007/08                2.20%                                                 40.00%
Yr 2008/09                7.50%                                                 35.00%




                                                      % of litter and deritus
Yr 2009/10               12.50%                                                 30.00%
                                                                                25.00%
                                                                                20.00%
                                                                                15.00%
                                                                                10.00%
                                                                                5.00%
                                                                                0.00%
                                                                                         Yr 2005/06   Yr 2006/07




             Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

             The trend shows a slight deterioration but a score of 12.5 is still extremely good.



             2010 Text

             What does this graph show?

             This indicator measures the percentage of relevant land and
             highways that is assessed as having deposits of litter, detritus,
             graffiti and fly-posting that fall below an acceptable level.

             The above graph highlights the number of streets inspected that are
             considered to be below an acceptable standard.

             There has been a dramatic reduction in the amount of litter and
             detritus on Croydon streets since 2005. The percentage of streets
             with unacceptable levels of litter and detritus has decreased from
             37% to 2.2% between 05/06 and 07/08.

             This has been the result of increasing the frequency of cleansing in
             addition to clamping down on dropping of litter and fly-tipping.

             As a result in 2008/09 Croydon was ranked 3rd best out of 33
             London boroughs.
Capital Clean-Up 2010

The aim of the Capital Clean-Up Campaign is to create a cleaner
London through local action.

Londoners are encouraged to get involved in the campaign by
making improvements to the local environment, leading to a long
term sense of ownership and pride in the area, from which we all
benefit. The campaign cuts right across the cleaner, safer, greener
agenda providing opportunities for all Londoners to get involved.

Areas tackled during the clean up in 2010 were:
• Land at side of Woodside School.

• South Croydon Recreation Ground with members of Emmanuel
Church.

• Drayton Place with the Payback Team, Frith Road.

• Gravel Hill is done once every two months by the Payback Team.

• The Footpaths around Wattenden and a number of other sites
throughout the borough with are also looked after by the Payback
team.
Amount of Litter and Deritus




               Yr 2007/08          Yr 2008/09          Yr 2009/10




           2011 Text

           What does this graph show?
                                                   Keep same text
           This indicator measures the percentage of relevant land and highways that is
           assessed as having deposits of litter, detritus, graffiti and fly-posting that fall
           below an acceptable level.

           The above graph highlights the number of streets inspected that are considered
           to be below an acceptable standard.

           There has been a dramatic reduction in the amount of litter and detritus on
           Croydon streets since 2005. The percentage of streets with unacceptable levels
           of litter and detritus has decreased from 37% to 12.5% between 05/06 and
           09/10.

           This has been the result of increasing the frequency of cleansing in addition to
           clamping down on dropping of litter and fly-tipping.

           The council has continued to focus on areas of heavy footfall and rural roads.
           The lengthiest frequency of cleanse is four weekly with at least two thirds of the
           borough being swept at least weekly. Some locations such as shopping areas
           receive cleansing six times a day!
Capital Clean-Up         Keep same text

Londoners are encouraged to get involved in the campaign by making
improvements to the local environment, leading to a long term sense of
ownership and pride in the area, from which we all benefit.

Although the council supported community groups who wished to clean up areas
of private land, there was a reduction is such exercises. Community payback
were however used in selected areas.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Summary: Green Infrastructure and Climate Change


         Overall Trend from Chapter: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Staying the Same




         2010 Text                                                                    2011 Text

         The three main threats to London from climate change and extreme             The three main threats to Lon
         weather events are:                                                          weather events are:

         1. Overheating                                                               1. Overheating

         2. Flooding                                                                  2. Flooding

         3. Drought                                                                   3. Drought

         Natural open spaces and green infrastructure (which includes street          Natural open spaces and gree
         trees, food growing spaces and green roofs and walls), help to mitigate      trees, food growing spaces an
         climate change and also have a key role in adapting to future more           mitigate climate change and a
         extreme weather conditions.                                                  future more extreme weather

         Whilst mitigation measures are aimed at reducing the negative impact of      Whilst mitigation measures ar
         human activity on the climate, adaptation is about responding to the         impact of human activity on th
         unavoidable changes in climate that are already occurring.                   responding to the unavoidable
                                                                                      occurring.


         What has Croydon achieved so far?                                            What has Croydon achieved

         Croydon completed a Local Climate Impacts Profile (LCLIP) (Croydon           Croydon completed a Local C
         Council 2010c) in 2010 to provide an overview of the priority climate        (Croydon Council 2010c) in 20
         change risks from extreme weather events and the impacts these have,         priority climate change risks fr
         or will have, on public services across the borough. This was one of the     impacts these have, or will ha
         first major pieces of work produced in line with National Indicator 188,     borough. This was one of the
         „Guidelines For Planning to Adapt to Climate Change‟. This brought           line with National Indicator 18
         Croydon up to Level 1 under NI188. Croydon is currently working              Climate Change‟. This brough
         towards Level 2 through its Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan.           Croydon is currently working t
                                                                                      Change Adaptation Action Pla
         Croydon already supports an exceptionally rich range of green spaces
         and habitats. Building further on Croydon‟s good record in green             Croydon already supports an
         infrastructure provision will need to be an integral part of our climate     spaces and habitats. Building
         adaptation strategy.                                                         green infrastructure provision
                                                                                      climate adaptation strategy.
         The table below illustrates the many climate adaptation services green
         infrastructure can provide.                                                  The table below illustrates the
                                                                                      green infrastructure can provi
and habitats. Building further on Croydon‟s good record in green           Croydon already supports an
infrastructure provision will need to be an integral part of our climate   spaces and habitats. Building
adaptation strategy.                                                       green infrastructure provision
                                                                           climate adaptation strategy.
The table below illustrates the many climate adaptation services green
infrastructure can provide.                                                The table below illustrates the
                                                                           green infrastructure can provi


Green spaces Mitigation               Green spaces Adaptation              Green spaces Mitigation
services:                             services:                            services:

• Carbon storage and                  • Attenuating high temperatures      • Carbon storage and
sequestration                                                              sequestration
                                      • Attenuating flooding
• Fossil fuel substitution                                                 • Fossil fuel substitution
                                      • Mitigating surface water run-off
• Material substitution                                                    • Material substitution
                                      • Attenuating soil erosion
• Food production                                                          • Food production
                                      • Helping other species to adapt
• Reducing need to travel by car                                           • Reducing need to travel by c
(by providing accessible green        • Producing local food               (by providing accessible green
spaces)                                                                    spaces)
The three main threats to London from climate change and extreme
weather events are:

1. Overheating

2. Flooding

3. Drought

Natural open spaces and green infrastructure (which includes street
trees, food growing spaces and green roofs and walls), help to
mitigate climate change and also have a key role in adapting to
future more extreme weather conditions.

Whilst mitigation measures are aimed at reducing the negative
impact of human activity on the climate, adaptation is about
responding to the unavoidable changes in climate that are already
occurring.


What has Croydon achieved so far?

Croydon completed a Local Climate Impacts Profile (LCLIP)
(Croydon Council 2010c) in 2010 to provide an overview of the
priority climate change risks from extreme weather events and the
impacts these have, or will have, on public services across the
borough. This was one of the first major pieces of work produced in
line with National Indicator 188, „Guidelines For Planning to Adapt to
Climate Change‟. This brought Croydon up to Level 1 under NI188.
Croydon is currently working towards Level 2 through its Climate
Change Adaptation Action Plan.

Croydon already supports an exceptionally rich range of green
spaces and habitats. Building further on Croydon‟s good record in
green infrastructure provision will need to be an integral part of our
climate adaptation strategy.

The table below illustrates the many climate adaptation services
green infrastructure can provide.
Croydon already supports an exceptionally rich range of green
spaces and habitats. Building further on Croydon‟s good record in
green infrastructure provision will need to be an integral part of our
climate adaptation strategy.

The table below illustrates the many climate adaptation services
green infrastructure can provide.


Green spaces Mitigation             Green spaces Adaptation
services:                           services:

• Carbon storage and                • Attenuating high temperatures
sequestration
                                    • Attenuating flooding
• Fossil fuel substitution
                                    • Mitigating surface water run-off
• Material substitution
                                    • Attenuating soil erosion
• Food production
                                    • Helping other species to adapt
• Reducing need to travel by car
(by providing accessible green      • Producing local food
spaces)
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Green Infrastructure in Croydon

            Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

            Staying the same



            2010 Text

            What has Croydon achieved so far?

            Croydon hosts an exceptionally rich range of wildlife habitats and
            species. Croydon‟s wildlife habitats and green spaces range from
            the wildflower rich chalk grassland of the Farthing Downs and Happy
            Valley to the acid grassland and heaths of Addington Hill and
            Croham Hurst

            There are 120 parks and open spaces in Croydon. 40% of these
            spaces are natural open spaces, including woodlands, heathlands,
            chalk grasslands, ponds and lakes. 60% of the borough is made up
            of residential garden space, recreational space and broad leafed
            woodland.

            Over 200 ha of land in parks is cut for hay that feeds into the
            agricultural system.

            Croydon won in the „Large City‟ category for both the London in
            Bloom and Britain in Bloom competitions. Croydon also won the first
            place in the London in Bloom Best Public Park and Open Spaces
            Award for Coombe Wood and the RHS Britain in Bloom
            Conservation & Environment Award for Happy Valley and Farthing
            Downs.

            Our growing number of Green Flags (Croydon now has a total of 10)
            are testament to the effort that is made every year to maintaining our
            green standards.

            £1.5million has been allocated to nine parks as part of our parks to
            be proud of‟ project – which has seen nearly 10,000 people take
            part in a major participative budgeting exercise. Addiscombe
            Railway Park was formally opened by the deputy mayor in March
            this year demonstrating that Croydon is still acquiring new public
            open space.

            Ecological networks and connectivity of green spaces is important
            for climate change adaptation. A number of projects are underway
            to support this including the All London Green Grid (ALGG), the
            Wandle Valley Regional Park and the London Rivers Action Plan.
Wandle river restoration

Exciting plans have been proposed for Croydon‟s Wandle Park. The
London Borough of Croydon will use a £0.4 million grant to
contribute towards restoring the River Wandle, which now runs
underground in a concrete pipe. Plans include restoring the river as
a small stream, developing a lake or pond/wetland, restore a rose
garden, developing the skate park and children‟s playground,
improving the signage to the park and establishing community food
growing schemes. One of the main additional benefits of restoring
urban rivers, such as the Wandle, is in reducing flood risk (see
section 31 for more details).

As well as being key to climate adaptation, research shows that
green spaces are fundamental to residents‟ mental and physical well
being: they provide spaces for both relaxation and exercise, and also
improve air quality.
2011 Text

What has Croydon achieved so far?
                                                   Keep same text
Croydon hosts an exceptionally rich range of wildlife habitats and species.
Croydon‟s wildlife habitats and green spaces range from the wildflower rich
chalk grassland of the Farthing Downs and Happy Valley to the acid grassland
and heaths of Addington Hill and Croham Hurst

There are 120 parks and open spaces in Croydon. 40% of these spaces are
natural open spaces, including woodlands, heathlands, chalk grasslands, ponds
and lakes. 60% of the borough is made up of residential garden space,
recreational space and broad leafed woodland.

Over 200 ha of land in parks is cut for hay that feeds into the agricultural system.

Croydon won in the „Large City‟ category for both the London in Bloom and
Britain in Bloom competitions. Croydon also won the first place in the London in
Bloom Best Public Park and Open Spaces Award for Coombe Wood and the
RHS Britain in Bloom Conservation & Environment Award for Happy Valley and
Farthing Downs.

Our growing number of Green Flags (Croydon now has a total of 10) are
testament to the effort that is made every year to maintaining our green
standards.

£1.5million has been allocated to nine parks as part of our parks to
be proud of‟ project – which has seen nearly 10,000 people take
part in a major participative budgeting exercise. Addiscombe
Railway Park was formally opened by the deputy mayor in March
this year demonstrating that Croydon is still acquiring new public
open space.

Ecological networks and connectivity of green spaces is important
for climate change adaptation. A number of projects are underway
to support this including the All London Green Grid (ALGG), the
Wandle Valley Regional Park and the London Rivers Action Plan.
    Wandle river restoration
                                      Keep same text
Exciting plans have been proposed for Croydon‟s Wandle Park. The London
Borough of Croydon will use a £0.4 million grant to contribute towards restoring
the River Wandle, which now runs underground in a concrete pipe. Plans
include restoring the river as a small stream, developing a lake or pond/wetland,
restore a rose garden, developing the skate park and children‟s playground,
improving the signage to the park and establishing community food growing
schemes. One of the main additional benefits of restoring urban rivers, such as
the Wandle, is in reducing flood risk (see section 31 for more details).

As well as being key to climate adaptation, research shows that green spaces
are fundamental to residents‟ mental and physical well being: they provide
spaces for both relaxation and exercise, and also improve air quality.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Proportion of green/open spaces managed for nature conservation



Year                Percent of green spaces managed for nature conservation
2008/09                                                                       50%
2009/10                                                                       45%
2010/11                                                                       51%




                    Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

                    Insufficient data to determine a trend
2010 Text

What does this graph show?
In Croydon in 2008/09, 50% of open spaces were actively managed for nature
conservation, placing it joint 10th among London boroughs. In 2009/10 the score
has been verified at 45%, which indicates that there was a 10% decrease from
the preceding year. The Croydon Biodiversity Partnership has produced the
Croydon Biodiversity Action Plan which prioritises habitats and species for
protection and enhancement.




Heathfield Ecology Centre

The Heathfield Ecology Centre encourages awareness of Croydon‟s green
heritage and biodiversity.

A panel of conservationists is available to assist and advise environmental
groups and individuals throughout the borough, and the centre carries leaflets
and information about many Croydon conservation groups.

The centre offers educational activities to schools, including pond dipping, bird
watching, tree identification and talks on sustainable living.

Visit www.heathfield-ecology.org.uk for more information.




Friends of Parks

Croydon Council supports 20 „friends of park‟ groups through its community
partnership officer, based in the green spaces team. The officer provides start-
up and ongoing group support, funding advice, training events and workshops.
This work is also co-ordinated through BTCV, dozens of friends‟ groups, the
National Probation Service and many others. There were over 7,000 volunteer
work days in 2009 on everything from community cleanups to coppicing and
charcoal making.
                    Green/Open Spaces Managed for Nature Conservation


              52%
              51%
              50%
              49%
Percent (%)




              48%
              47%
              46%
              45%
              44%
              43%
              42%
                    2008/09                    2009/10                  2010/11
2011 Text
                                              Keep same text
What does this graph show?
In Croydon in 2008/09, 50% of open spaces were actively managed for
nature conservation, placing it joint 10th among London boroughs. In 2009/10
the score of 45%, which indicated that there was a 10% decrease from the
preceding year. The Croydon Biodiversity Partnership has produced the
Croydon Biodiversity Action Plan which prioritises habitats and species for
protection and enhancement.




Heathfield Ecology Centre                   Keep same text

Does not want this here




Friends of Groups
                             Keep same text
Croydon Council supports over 20 „friends of park‟ groups through its
Community Partnership Officer, based in the green spaces team. The officer
provides start-up and ongoing group support, funding advice, training events
and workshops. This work is also co-ordinated through BTCV, dozens of
friends‟ groups, the National Probation Service and many others. There were
over 6,500 volunteer work days in 20010/11 on everything from community
clean-ups, to woodland management & training, coppicing and charcoal
making.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Canopy Cover: Street Trees and Woodland

Year     Yr 2004 Yr 2005 Yr 2006   Yr 2007   Yr 2008 Yr 2009   Yr 2010   Yr 2011
             33000
Number of Trees     32000    32250     32500     32750   33000     33000




                                                                                   Number of street trees
         Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Staying the Same
2010 Text                                                                          2011 Text

What does this graph show?                                                         What does this graph sh
• There were approximately 33,000 street trees in Croydon in 2009. There           • There were approximate
was a 9% decrease in the number of street trees in 2005 due to lack of             a 9% decrease in the num
investment in maintenance, but numbers now have recovered.                         in maintenance, but numb

• Croydon‟s vision is to maintain and enhance Croydon‟s trees and
woodlands so as to maximise their amenity, biodiversity and resource value         • Broad Green in the north
for future generations, whilst ensuring that they offer minimal risk or hazard     priority area by the Mayor
to people and property.                                                            for funding to try to increas
                                                                                   of the borough.
• Broad Green in the north of the borough has been identified as a street tree
priority area by the Mayor of London. The Council is in the process of
applying for funding to try to increase the number of street trees, particularly
in the north of the borough.




The Benefits of Trees                                                              The Benefits of Trees

Trees provide a range of benefits, including habitats for wildlife, protection     In the mid 1990‟s partners
from winter winds, shade, heat reflection, flood attenuation thus reducing         approach to woodland ma
surface water runoff, and they increase the attractiveness and value of            mainly the Forestry Comm
neighbourhoods. Research also shows asthma rates among children aged               majority of the finance for
four to five falls by a quarter for every additional 343 trees per square km
(Woodland Trust 2010).                                                             All woods now have curre
                                                                                   programme of regular wor
                                                                                   carried out, ranging from c
Croydon's Woodland Cover                                                           Community participation is
                                                                                   all levels including the acti
In addition to street trees, Croydon has many biodiverse woodlands which           community groups includin
cover 8% cent of the borough, making Croydon the second most wooded                particular sites.
borough in London.
                                                                                   Croydon is unusual in that
A large proportion of Croydon‟s woodland is ancient and semi-natural, i.e.         woodlands it uses forestry
they have existed since the last ice age and are therefore of national             woodlands have suffered
importance.                                                                        2006, recent increased all
                                                                                   and works. Croydon is uni
                                                                                   UK to have its woodlands
                                                                                   held a FSC certificate sinc

                                                                                   Croydon is committed to m
                                                                                   urban woodland managem
                                                                                   woodland structure to ach
                                                                                   replacement trees, and inc
woodland structure to ach
replacement trees, and inc
                                             Number of Street Trees in Croydon


                         34500
Number of street trees




                                 33000                                               33000     33000
                         33000                                              32750
                                                                 32500
                                                      32250
                                           32000

                         31500



                         30000
                                 Yr 2004   Yr 2005   Yr 2006    Yr 2007    Yr 2008   Yr 2009   Yr 2010
                                           Keep same text
What does this graph show?
• There were approximately 33,000 street trees in Croydon in 2009. There was
a 9% decrease in the number of street trees in 2005 due to lack of investment
in maintenance, but numbers now have recovered.


• Broad Green in the north of the borough has been identified as a street tree
priority area by the Mayor of London. The Council is in the process of applying
for funding to try to increase the number of street trees, particularly in the north
of the borough.




The Benefits of Trees
                               Keep same text

In the mid 1990‟s partnership with an Environmental NGO produced a new
approach to woodland management supported by accessing external grants,
mainly the Forestry Commission‟s Grant Schemes which has provided the
majority of the finance for woodland operations.

All woods now have current management plans and a where viable a
programme of regular works by contractors and community organisations is
carried out, ranging from coppicing to the installation of nature trails.
Community participation is widespread throughout the Borough and occurs at
all levels including the active participation of voluntary organisations and
community groups including Friend Of groups who are actively linked with
particular sites.

Croydon is unusual in that as opposed to using arboriculturalists to work its
woodlands it uses forestry contractors. As with other trees in Croydon,
woodlands have suffered from a reduction in budget. However, as from April
2006, recent increased allocation has resulted in a programme of inspection
and works. Croydon is unique in London and was the second borough in the
UK to have its woodlands audited for the quality of management and have
held a FSC certificate since 2000.

Croydon is committed to maintaining its status as an exemplar of good
urban woodland management. This involves increasing the diversity of its
woodland structure to achieve a wide range of environments, recruit young
replacement trees, and increasingly involve local people in management.
woodland structure to achieve a wide range of environments, recruit young
replacement trees, and increasingly involve local people in management.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Access to Nature
                                                                                             Percentage of non
Percentage of non Green Belt and MOL Area of Deficiency
Borough                       2007                           2011
Croydon                          28
Lambeth                        33.1
                                                                                             40




                                                                              % Percentage
Merton                         14.4                                                          30
Sutton                         28.2
Richmond                       12.7                                                          20
Kingston                       29.3
Wandsworth                     11.2                                                          10
All of London                  23.3
                                                                                              0




              Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

              [Insert text here]
2010 Text

What does this graph show?
Croydon is one of the greenest boroughs in London, and offers some of the
most rich and diverse habitats. Despite this there remain areas of the borough
where access to nature is limited.

In Croydon 28.4% of the borough (Except Green Belt land and Metropolitan
Open space) is classified as deficient in access to nature, approximately the
same as neighbouring Sutton, lower than neighbouring Lambeth, but higher than
neighbouring Merton and the London average.

A number of outer London boroughs are surprisingly deficient in access to
nature and in each case it is because of the uneven scatter of wildlife sites,
leaving very large areas with little in the way of accessible nature. Croydon
Council has started to address this issue through a variety of measures,
including prioritising identified areas for tree planting initiatives.



Sustrans Connect2 Project

The Connect 2 project is a national project which aims to improve cycling
provision. In Croydon, the scheme will link densely populated parts of the
borough to some of the area‟s finest green spaces. A section of it uses a former
rail line to link the communities of Addiscombe and Woodside to South Norwood
Country Park, whilst another builds on the success of the Wandle Trail with a
connection into East Croydon and a link beside the Croydon tramline. By
connecting people to parks, this project creates the opportunity for local people
to make numerous journeys on foot or by bicycle to and through the town centre.
Percentage of non Green Belt and MOL as Area of
                Deficiency, 2007
2011 Text
                                    Keep same text
What does this graph show?
Croydon is one of the greenest boroughs in London, and offers some of the
most rich and diverse habitats. Despite this there remain areas of the borough
where access to nature is limited.

In Croydon 28.4% of the borough (Except Green Belt land and Metropolitan
Open space) is classified as deficient in access to nature, approximately the
same as neighbouring Sutton, lower than neighbouring Lambeth, but higher
than neighbouring Merton and the London average.

A number of outer London boroughs are surprisingly deficient in access to
nature and in each case it is because of the uneven scatter of wildlife sites,
leaving very large areas with little in the way of accessible nature. Croydon
Council has started to address this issue through a variety of measures,
including prioritising identified areas for tree planting initiatives.



Sustrans Connect2 Project
                                      Keep same text
The Connect 2 project is a national project which aims to improve cycling
provision. In Croydon, the scheme will link densely populated parts of the
borough to some of the area‟s finest green spaces. A section of it uses a
former rail line to link the communities of Addiscombe and Woodside to South
Norwood Country Park, whilst another builds on the success of the Wandle
Trail with a connection into East Croydon and a link beside the Croydon
tramline. By connecting people to parks, this project creates the opportunity for
local people to make numerous journeys on foot or by bicycle to and through
the town centre.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Urban and Semi-Urban Food Growing

         Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Getting Better. The number of allotments has not increased but the number
         of people on the waiting list for allotments has grown.


         2010 Text                                                                        2011 Text

         At present there are 18 allotment sites located within the                       At present there are 18
         borough.                                                                         borough.

         The allotment sites include very active sites such as SPA Hill Organic           The allotment sites inclu
         Growers, who also offer a variety of gardening and food growing courses.         who also offer a variety o
         Data available however highlights a shortage of allotment spaces throughout      Data available however h
         the borough. Hundreds of people are on waiting lists for council-owned           the borough. Hundreds o
         allotments with the credit crunch thought to be partly behind the increasing     allotments with the credi
         demand, with more people wanting to save money by growing their own fruit        demand, with more peop
         and vegetables.                                                                  and vegetables. Waiting
                                                                                          waiting for a plot on Cou

         Capital Growth                                                                   Capital Growth

         Croydon council has also committed to finding 60 spaces for community food       Croydon council has also
         gardens in the two years leading up to the 2012 Olympics. These initiatives      gardens in the two years
         will particularly benefit those with no access to a private garden. This         particularly benefit those
         commitment forms part of „Capital Growth‟ an initiative aimed at providing       forms part of „Capital Gro
         Londoners with 2,012 brand new places to grow their own fruit and                2,012 brand new places
         vegetables. For more information, visit www.capitalgrowth.org                    information, visit www.ca


         New Addington Good Food Matters- Community Food Learning Centre                  New Addington Good F

                                                                                            Keep same text

         The Croydon Community Food Learning Centre project                               The Croydon Community
         (www.goodfoodmatters. org.uk/Siteplans.html) supports disadvantaged and          (www.goodfoodmatters.
         young people to build healthier lifestyles, supporting people of all ages and    young people to build he
         abilities and backgrounds to learn how to grow, cook and market organic food     abilities and background
         thus benefiting their physical and mental health and contribution to community   thus benefiting their phys
         cohesion.                                                                        cohesion.
                   Keep same text

At present there are 18 allotment sites located within the
borough.

The allotment sites include very active sites such as SPA Hill Organic Growers,
who also offer a variety of gardening and food growing courses.
Data available however highlights a shortage of allotment spaces throughout
the borough. Hundreds of people are on waiting lists for council-owned
allotments with the credit crunch thought to be partly behind the increasing
demand, with more people wanting to save money by growing their own fruit
and vegetables. Waiting lists increasing approximately 300 applicants are
waiting for a plot on Council managed sites alone. In some cases, "taster

Capital Growth
                         Keep same text

Croydon council has also committed to finding 60 spaces for community food
gardens in the two years leading up to the 2012 Olympics. These initiatives will
particularly benefit those with no access to a private garden. This commitment
forms part of „Capital Growth‟ an initiative aimed at providing Londoners with
2,012 brand new places to grow their own fruit and vegetables. For more
information, visit www.capitalgrowth.org


New Addington Good Food Matters- Community Food Learning Centre

  Keep same text

The Croydon Community Food Learning Centre project
(www.goodfoodmatters. org.uk/Siteplans.html) supports disadvantaged and
young people to build healthier lifestyles, supporting people of all ages and
abilities and backgrounds to learn how to grow, cook and market organic food
thus benefiting their physical and mental health and contribution to community
cohesion.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Summary: Green Infrastructure and Climate Change




         Overall Trend from Chapter: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         Insufficient Data to determine a trend




         2010 Text                                                                    2011 Text

         What does this graph show?                                                   What does this graph show?

         The UK Climate Projections 09 (UKCP09 - DEFRA) models show that              Due to the uncertainty attache
         there is a high probability of a temperature increase of two degrees         projections the graphs show th
         Celsius or higher by the end of the century. This temperature change         temperature change from 2010
         will mean that in the future London will have hotter drier summers and       knowledge of how the climate
         warmer wetter winters, plus more extreme weather events such as              of this uncertainty (Met, 2010).
         storms, floods and heatwaves. What we consider to be a freak or              indicates that it would be ve
         extreme weather event today is likely to become far more frequent.           greater than the projection,
                                                                                      10% indicates that temperatu
         Due to the uncertainty attached to modelling climate change projections      the projected estimate.
         the graphs show the different probability levels for temperature change
         from 2010 to 2070. Limitations on our knowledge of how the climate will      The UK Climate Projections 09
         behave in the future is the cause of this uncertainty (Met, 2010). A         that there is a high probability
         probability level of 90% indicates that it would be very unlikely for        degrees Celsius or higher by t
         temperature to be greater than the projection, 50% is the central            temperature change will mean
         estimate and 10% indicates that temperature is very unlikely to be less      have hotter drier summers and
         than the projected estimate.                                                 extreme weather events such
                                                                                      What we consider to be a frea
                                                                                      likely to become far more frequ
Due to the uncertainty attached to modelling climate change projections   the projected estimate.
the graphs show the different probability levels for temperature change
from 2010 to 2070. Limitations on our knowledge of how the climate will   The UK Climate Projections 09
behave in the future is the cause of this uncertainty (Met, 2010). A      that there is a high probability
probability level of 90% indicates that it would be very unlikely for     degrees Celsius or higher by t
temperature to be greater than the projection, 50% is the central         temperature change will mean
estimate and 10% indicates that temperature is very unlikely to be less   have hotter drier summers and
than the projected estimate.                                              extreme weather events such
                                                                          What we consider to be a frea
                                                                          likely to become far more frequ




Source: Mayor of London 2010c London Draft Climate Change adaptation strategy
What does this graph show?

Due to the uncertainty attached to modelling climate change
projections the graphs show the different probability levels for
temperature change from 2010 to 2070. Limitations on our
knowledge of how the climate will behave in the future is the cause
of this uncertainty (Met, 2010). A probability level of 90%
indicates that it would be very unlikely for temperature to be
greater than the projection, 50% is the central estimate and
10% indicates that temperature is very unlikely to be less than
the projected estimate.

The UK Climate Projections 09 (UKCP09 - DEFRA) models show
that there is a high probability of a temperature increase of two
degrees Celsius or higher by the end of the century. This
temperature change will mean that in the future London will
have hotter drier summers and warmer wetter winters, plus more
extreme weather events such as storms, floods and heatwaves.
What we consider to be a freak or extreme weather event today is
likely to become far more frequent.
the projected estimate.

The UK Climate Projections 09 (UKCP09 - DEFRA) models show
that there is a high probability of a temperature increase of two
degrees Celsius or higher by the end of the century. This
temperature change will mean that in the future London will
have hotter drier summers and warmer wetter winters, plus more
extreme weather events such as storms, floods and heatwaves.
What we consider to be a freak or extreme weather event today is
likely to become far more frequent.
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Flood Risk

Likelihood of households flooding in Croydon

Year          Significant Likelihood Moderate Likelihood Low Likelihood No result
       2008                    25.00%            13.00%          61.00%        1.00%
       2009                                                                                                       70.00%




                                                                                            % of at risk houses
       2010                                                                                                       60.00%
                                                                                                                  50.00%
                                                                                                                  40.00%
                                                                                                                  30.00%
                                                                                                                  20.00%
                                                                                                                  10.00%




              Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

              [Insert text here]



              2010 Text

              What does this graph show?

              In Croydon, there are just over 4,700 properties (3% of all properties)
              currently at risk of fluvial (river) flooding.

              The majority of these properties are residential. The chart shows that, for
              those at risk, 25% are in areas of significant likelihood of flooding.

              The areas most at risk are located to the west of the borough, around the
              Norbury Brook and River Wandle.




              Cost of flooding
              The flooding in the summer of 2007 was estimated to have cost Britain £3
              billion. Flooding events such as this which cause extensive and expensive
              losses to properties will become more frequent due to climate change.
              (Islington 2009) because climate change will bring wetter winters, more
              frequent and intense heavy rains. Croydon‟s growing population and
              economy will also add to the number of people and buildings at risk.
The flooding in the summer of 2007 was estimated to have cost Britain £3
billion. Flooding events such as this which cause extensive and expensive
losses to properties will become more frequent due to climate change.
(Islington 2009) because climate change will bring wetter winters, more
frequent and intense heavy rains. Croydon‟s growing population and
economy will also add to the number of people and buildings at risk.



River restoration and sustainable urban drainage

There are a number of measures that provide very effective flood alleviation
as well as providing additional recreation, amenity and ecological
improvements to an area. They range from the development of parks and
open spaces through to river restoration schemes, for example the river
Norbury and Wandle de-culverting scheme currently under way in Croydon.

These schemes will restore the rivers to their natural state by re-aligning and
removing the culverts. This will return the areas back into their natural
wetland state, thus enhancing their ability to manage flood waters, and
reducing flood risk in the area.

The mayor‟s London adaptation strategy includes an action to restore 15km
of rivers by 2015, Croydon could contribute to 1.45km of restored rivers to
this objective (River Restoration Centre 2010).

Green infrastructure - parks, gardens, green roofs, street trees etc - all have
the capacity to capture and slow rainfall and prevent surface water flooding,
and also help to prevent runoff into water courses and associated pollution.




Soakaways on the public highway

A soakaway is a means of storing and dispersing over a period of time storm
water from the public highway into the natural underlying soil (ideally
chalk/gravel or other permeable soil). A soakaway is not connected to a
public sewer. Since 2008, Croydon Council has been implementing a
programme of work to cleanse its stock of soakaways of silt build up that
reduces storage capacity and efficiency.
                                     Likelihood of Households Flooding

70.00%
60.00%
50.00%                                                                                     2008
40.00%
                                                                                           2009
30.00%
20.00%                                                                                     2010
10.00%
 0.00%
            Significant Likelihood     Moderate Likelihood    Low Likelihood   No result




2011 Text

What does this graph show?
                                             Keep same text
[Insert text here]




                                Keep same text
Cost of Flooding
[Insert text here]
[Insert text here]




River restoration and sustainable urban drainage       Keep same text

[Insert text here]




Sokaways on the public highway
                                              Keep same text
[Insert text here]
2008
2009
2010
Dealing With Heat Stress

          Temperature Distribution in London, August 2003




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          [Insert Text Here]
2010 Text                                                                        2011 Text

Nine out of the last ten years have been the hottest on record (since global     The Met Office has report
instrumental records began). Like other countries in Europe, the United          than the previous ten year
Kingdom experienced a record breaking heat wave in early August 2003. In         warmest year on record, g
the south east of England, maximum temperatures exceeded 32°C (89.6°F)           Kingdom experienced a re
on a total of eight days between 4 - 12 August, with a peak of 38°C. The         south east of England, ma
map above shows that built up areas are particularly at risk during a heat       total of eight days between
wave as temperatures in these areas rise even higher (this is part of what is    shows that built up areas a
known as the “urban heat island effect”, which means that urban areas tend       heat wave as temperature
to be warmer than surrounding rural areas). The August 2003 heat wave            is known as the “urban he
was associated with a large short-term increase in mortality, particularly in    to be warmer than surroun
London, and particularly amongst the elderly.                                    heat wave was associated
                                                                                 600 excess deaths in Lon
 In Croydon, heat waves have also been recorded in July 2006, May 2008
and July 2009 (Croydon Council LCLIP 2010). With climate change, it is            In Croydon, heat waves h
likely that by 2040 the temperature reached in the heatwave of 2003 will         and July 2009 (Croydon C
become the norm. It is predicted that by 2050 summers will be at least 3.5ºC     that by 2040 the temperat
warmer than they are today. In dense urban areas the presence of                 become the norm. It is pre
the urban heat island effect could mean temperatures increase by as               warmer than they are tod
much as 9ºC (London Climate Change Partnership 2010).                            the urban heat island effec
                                                                                 much as 10ºC (London Cl

Green Spaces Cooling Effects                                                     Green Spaces Cooling E

Green spaces, street trees and water bodies help to reduce high                  Green spaces, street trees
temperatures in summer by providing shade and by moderating the impacts          in summer by providing sh
of the urban heat island as they radiate out less heat than harder man made      island as they radiate out
surfaces. Green roofs assist in the cooling of the urban environment. Linear     roofs assist in the cooling
planting along the Wandle links and Connect2 cycling and walking routes will     Wandle links and Connec
also play an important role in contributing to cooling within the borough.       will also play an important
Additional adaptation services delivered by green spaces include improved        Additional adaptation serv
air quality (higher temperatures are likely to lead to increased levels of air   air quality (higher tempera
pollution) and reducing extreme winds (trees in particular will deliver these    pollution) and reducing ex
benefits).                                                                       benefits).

Other ways to keep cool                                                          Other ways to keep cool

• Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside. If it is      • Shut windows and pull d
safe, open them for ventilation when it is cooler.                               open them for ventilation w

• Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don‟t go out between 11am and          • Avoid the heat: stay out o
3pm (the hottest part of the day).                                               (the hottest part of the day

• Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the             • Keep rooms cool by usin
windows. If this isn‟t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them       windows. If this isn‟t possi
closed (NHS 2010). For more advice visit                                         (NHS 2010). For more adv
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/Pages/Heatwave.aspx                      http://www.nhs.uk/Livewel
Residents in priority areas can also register for the mayor‟s street tree        Residents in priority areas
 programme to get trees planted in their area                                     programme to get trees p
 www.london.gov.uk/streettrees/areas/croydon.jsp                                  www.london.gov.uk/stree
windows. If this isn‟t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them   windows. If this isn‟t possi
closed (NHS 2010). For more advice visit                                     (NHS 2010). For more adv
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/Pages/Heatwave.aspx                  http://www.nhs.uk/Livewel
Residents in priority areas can also register for the mayor‟s street tree    Residents in priority areas
 programme to get trees planted in their area                                 programme to get trees p
 www.london.gov.uk/streettrees/areas/croydon.jsp                              www.london.gov.uk/stree
                 Keep same text

The Met Office has reported that the last ten years (2001-2010) were warmer
than the previous ten years (1991-2000) by 0.2 °C, with 2010 being the second
warmest year on record, globally. Like other countries in Europe, the United
Kingdom experienced a record breaking heat wave in early August 2003. In the
south east of England, maximum temperatures exceeded 32°C (89.6°F) on a
total of eight days between 4 - 12 August, with a peak of 38°C. The map above
shows that built up areas are particularly at risk during a
heat wave as temperatures in these areas rise even higher (this is part of what
is known as the “urban heat island effect”, which means that urban areas tend
to be warmer than surrounding rural areas). The August 2003
heat wave was associated with a large short-term increase in mortality, with
600 excess deaths in London alone, and particularly amongst the elderly.

 In Croydon, heat waves have also been recorded in July 2006, May 2008
and July 2009 (Croydon Council LCLIP 2010). With climate change, it is likely
that by 2040 the temperature reached in the heatwave of 2003 will
become the norm. It is predicted that by 2050 summers will be at least 3.5ºC
 warmer than they are today. In dense urban areas the presence of
the urban heat island effect could mean temperatures increase by as
much as 10ºC (London Climate Change Partnership 2010).

Green Spaces Cooling Effects
                                         Keep same text

Green spaces, street trees and water bodies help to reduce high temperatures
in summer by providing shade and by moderating the impacts of the urban heat
island as they radiate out less heat than harder man made surfaces. Green
roofs assist in the cooling of the urban environment. Linear planting along the
Wandle links and Connect2 cycling and walking routes
will also play an important role in contributing to cooling within the borough.
Additional adaptation services delivered by green spaces include improved
air quality (higher temperatures are likely to lead to increased levels of air
pollution) and reducing extreme winds (trees in particular will deliver these
benefits).

Other ways to keep cool

• Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside. If it is safe,
open them for ventilation when it is cooler.

• Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don‟t go out between 11am and 3pm
(the hottest part of the day).

• Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the
windows. If this isn‟t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed
(NHS 2010). For more advice visit
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/Pages/Heatwave.aspx
Residents in priority areas can also register for the mayor‟s street tree
 programme to get trees planted in their area
 www.london.gov.uk/streettrees/areas/croydon.jsp
windows. If this isn‟t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed
(NHS 2010). For more advice visit
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Summerhealth/Pages/Heatwave.aspx
Residents in priority areas can also register for the mayor‟s street tree
 programme to get trees planted in their area
 www.london.gov.uk/streettrees/areas/croydon.jsp
2011 State of the Environment update Sheet
Water Management

Water use per person per day
Area                                             2010                         2011
London WRZ                                      158.4                          163
Sutton and East Surrey WRZ                      168.2                        166.8




                                                                                               Water Use per Person per Day
England and Wales average                         148                        146.1




                               Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

                               Insufficient to determine trend.
2010 Text

What does this graph show?
 Croydon‟s water supply is provided by two companies: Thames Water and
Sutton and East Surrey Water Plc. The five year average (2004/05 to 2008/09)
water use in the London Water Resource Zone is 158.4 litres per person per
day (l/p/d)1, and 168.2 l/p/d in the Sutton and East Surrey „East Surrey WRZ‟.
This is much higher than the England and Wales average of 148 l/p/d. Average
water use in Croydon in 2008/09 was 160.8 l/p/d, compared to a London
average of 162 l/p/d.

The south east is an area of serious water stress and water efficiency
measures will be essential to support new growth in the borough. Personal
water consumption has been rising by 1% a year since 1930. This consumption
level is not sustainable in the long-term. The bathroom and toilet use nearly
40% of all water in the home; 15 - 20% is used washing clothes.

The kitchen is a major consumer of water in the home, using around 10% of
total household water consumption for cooking, cleaning, washing or drinking
(Waterwise, 2010).

Despite having a seemingly wet climate some parts of the UK are experiencing
water shortages. The south east of England has less water available per person
than Sudan and Syria (Waterwise, 2010).

Transporting and cleaning our water uses lots of energy so by reducing our use
of it at home we can also reduce our carbon footprint.

• Drought resistant planting:
Arid roundabouts have been introduced in the borough where the planting has
been designed to be drought tolerant with low maintenance. As well as
selecting drought resistant plants for your garden, other easy ways to save
money and water in your house include:

• Invest in a water butt and connect it to your drainpipe in your garden - this can
then collect some of the 85,000 litres of rainfall that falls on your roof every
year. This water can be used to water your garden, clean your car and wash
your windows.

• If you don‟t have a dual flushing system, install a cistern displacement device
in your toilet – these can be obtained free of charge from your water company
and displaces water in your cistern so that the volume of water in
your flush is reduced by between 1 – 3 litres.

For more information visit www.waterwise.org.uk

The Energy Saving Trust water calculator allows you to work out your yearly
water consumption and suggest some ways to save money and water
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/watercalculator/flashcalculator
The Energy Saving Trust water calculator allows you to work out your yearly
water consumption and suggest some ways to save money and water
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/watercalculator/flashcalculator
                                             Water Use per Person per Day by Area


                               170                         168.2

                               165
Water Use per Person per Day




                               160   158.4

                               155

                               150                                              148

                               145

                               140

                               135
                                     London WRZ          Sutton and East    England and Wales
                                                          Surrey WRZ             average

                                                           2010      2011
2011 Text
                                    Keep same text
What does this graph show?
Croydon‟s water supply is provided by two companies: Thames Water and
Sutton and East Surrey Water Plc. The average water use in the London Water
Resource Zone is 163 litres per person per day (l/p/d)1, and 166.8 l/p/d in the
Sutton and East Surrey WRZ. This is much higher than the England and Wales
average of 146.1 l/p/d.

The south east is an area of serious water stress and water efficiency
measures will be essential to support new growth in the borough. Personal
water consumption has been rising by 1% a year since 1930. This consumption
level is not sustainable in the long-term. The bathroom and toilet use nearly
40% of all water in the home; 15 - 20% is used washing clothes.

The kitchen is a major consumer of water in the home, using around 10% of
total household water consumption for cooking, cleaning, washing or drinking
(Waterwise, 2010).

Despite having a seemingly wet climate some parts of the UK are experiencing
water shortages. The south east of England has less water available per
person than Sudan and Syria (Waterwise, 2010).

Transporting and cleaning our water uses lots of energy so by reducing our use
of it at home we can also reduce our carbon footprint.

• Drought resistant planting:
Arid roundabouts have been introduced in the borough where the planting has
been designed to be drought tolerant with low maintenance. As well as
selecting drought resistant plants for your garden, other easy ways to save
money and water in your house include:

• Invest in a water butt and connect it to your drainpipe in your garden - this can
then collect some of the 85,000 litres of rainfall that falls on your roof every
year. This water can be used to water your garden, clean your car and wash
your windows.

• If you don‟t have a dual flushing system, install a cistern displacement device
in your toilet – these can be obtained free of charge from your water company
and displaces water in your cistern so that the volume of water in
your flush is reduced by between 1 – 3 litres.

For more information visit www.waterwise.org.uk

The Energy Saving Trust water calculator allows you to work out your yearly
water consumption and suggest some ways to save money and water
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/watercalculator/flashcalculator
water consumption and suggest some ways to save money and water
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/watercalculator/flashcalculator
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Global Climate Dimension

Ecological footprint (Gha)
Country                    2010                          2011
Guyana                       2.5
UK                           6.1                                                                 7

                                                                                                 6




                                                                          Ecological footprint
                                                                                                 5

                                                                                                 4

                                                                                                 3    2.5

                                                                                                 2

                                                                                                 1

                                                                                                 0
                                                                                                     Guyana




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          N/A
2010 Text

What does this graph show?
The ecological footprint is a measure of human demand on the Earth‟s
ecosystems. It compares human demand with planet Earth‟s ecological capacity
to regenerate. It represents the amount of biologically productive land and sea
area needed to regenerate the resources a human population consumes and to
absorb and render harmless the corresponding waste. Croydon has nearly
double the ecological footprint of a country like Guyana.

Developed countries such as the UK also have a much higher carbon footprint
per capita than most developing countries. However the consequences of
climate change will be felt most strongly in developing countries.

According to Oxfam (2010) and other leading development agencies, No one will
be immune, but climate change will have a disproportionate effect on the lives of
people living in poverty in developing countries. Between 1990 and 1998, 94% of
the world‟s 568 major natural disasters, and more than 97% of all natural
disasterrelated deaths, were in developing countries. This is due to a
combination of lack of infrastructure, geographical location, lack of access
to information, and other complex historical reasons.



Guyana – climate change is real
• Climate change brings rising sea levels, placing low-lying coastal areas such
as Guyana, which are home to the majority of the population, under threat.
• Around 90% of the population of Guyana could face floods in the future if
current weather patterns continue.

• In 2005 and 2006, extensive flooding destroyed sugar-cane fields, farmland
and homes along the country‟s east coast. Many farmers lost their cattle in the
rising waters, which led to floods in the Mahaica river.

• Croydon-Guyana Link

The Guyana Link is a Croydon based organisation launched in 1985. Guyana
was chosen as Croydon already has many links with this country. A former
mayor, the late Alderman McKenzie, came from Guyana and there is a sizeable
Guyanese community in the borough.

• The Link promotes the fact that environmental issues have a global impact,
especially in developing countries. Croydon‟s sustainability team set up the Link
as an independent organisation, and have in the past funded a co-ordinator, who
now carries on working on a voluntary basis.
       Ecological Footprint 2006


                             6.1




 2.5




Guyana                       UK
2011 Text
                                      Keep same text
What does this graph show?
The ecological footprint is a measure of human demand on the Earth‟s
ecosystems. It compares human demand with planet Earth‟s ecological
capacity to regenerate. It represents the amount of biologically productive land
and sea area needed to regenerate the resources a human population
consumes and to absorb and render harmless the corresponding waste.
Croydon has nearly double the ecological footprint of a country like Guyana.

Developed countries such as the UK also have a much higher carbon footprint
per capita than most developing countries. However the consequences of
climate change will be felt most strongly in developing countries.

According to Oxfam (2010) and other leading development agencies, No one
will be immune, but climate change will have a disproportionate effect on the
lives of people living in poverty in developing countries. Between 1990 and
1998, 94% of the world‟s 568 major natural disasters, and more than 97% of all
natural disasterrelated deaths, were in developing countries. This is due to a
combination of lack of infrastructure, geographical location, lack of access
to information, and other complex historical reasons.



                                              Keep same text
Guyana – climate change is real
Guyana and the challenge of its environment by Wayne McWatt.
Guyana is situated on the main land of South America. The Amazon and
Orinoco rivers shelter the pristine rain forests with unique flora and fauna. This
is a strength in its favour which can only be sustained through local and
international efforts to respect the ecology and with its rich bio-diversity.
Guyana has a challenge to manage and maintain its wilderness and vast
waterways.

Climate change has caused a variation in weather patterns upsetting the
regularity of the two rainy seasons. Any over abundance of rain water results
in flooding, which has implications for health and human welfare; water borne
diseases and malaria from mosquito infestations brought on in the wet
conditions.

Anyone living or working in Croydon can apply to become a
member/friend of the Link.
For further information please contact:

The Coordinator
Croydon Guyana Link
c/o Environment & Sustainability Team
Planning & Transportation
Taberner House
Park Lane
Croydon, CR9 3BT
Email: croydonguyana.link@googlemail.com
c/o Environment & Sustainability Team
Planning & Transportation
Taberner House
Park Lane
Croydon, CR9 3BT
Email: croydonguyana.link@googlemail.com
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Energy Efficiency of Low Income Homes

Years      <35 SAP rating >65 SAP rating
London Ave        13.00%              25.00%
2008/09           16.58%              21.69%
                                                                                                                      Energy effi
2009/10           21.70%              13.75%
2010/11           no longer collected




                                                                                          percentage of people on
                                                                                                                    30.00%
                                                                                                                    25.00%
                                                                                                                    20.00%




                                                                                                 benefits
                                                                                                                    15.00%
                                                                                                                    10.00%
                                                                                                                    5.00%
                                                                                                                    0.00%


                                                                                                                    London Ave




           Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

           [Insert text here]



           2010 Text                                                                      2011 Text

           What does this graph show?                                                     What does this graph s
           In 2008/09 16.5% of residents receiving income based benefits in Croydon       [Insert text here]
           lived in homes with a very low energy efficiency rating (<35 SAP rating). In
           2009/10 this number rose to 21.7%. This is higher than the London average
           of 13%. 13.7% of local residents live in homes with a high energy efficiency
           rating. A household is said to be in fuel poverty if it needs to spend more
           than 10% of its income on fuel to maintain an adequate level of warmth
           (usually defined as 21°C for the main living area, and 18°C for other
           occupied rooms (ONS 2010).
           The consequences of fuel poverty can be severe. Children, older people
           and those who are sick and disabled can suffer serious health implications,
           including respiratory infections, bronchitis, asthma, heart attacks, strokes
           and hypothermia. Fuel poverty is also associated with a significant number
           of winter deaths. The UK Fuel Poverty Strategy aims to eradicate fuel
           poverty from England by 2016.The Mayor of London‟s target is to eradicate
           fuel poverty in London by 2030.
poverty from England by 2016.The Mayor of London‟s target is to eradicate
fuel poverty in London by 2030.




Coldbusters                                                                     Coldbusters

Research has confirmed that owner-occupied and private rented homes are         [Insert text here]
the least energy efficient.
The Coldbusters grant scheme installs energy efficient heating and
insulation measures in private sector fuel poor properties.
In Croydon it is funded by the council grant budget and provides a complete
package, generating referrals, taking client enquiries, surveying, appointing
installers, processing quotations and managing payments.
For more information on this scheme please contact: Coldbusters - energy
grants; tel: 0800 358 66 68;
www.cen.org.uk/energy_efficiency/coldbusters.asp




Warmfront                                                                       Warmfront
The Warmfront scheme provides a package of insulation and heating               [Insert text here]
improvements up to the value of £3,500 (or £6,000 where oil, low
carbon or renewable technologies are recommended).
For more information, tel: 0800 3162805 or visit www.warmfront.co.uk
        Energy efficiency of low income homes in Croydon
                  2008/09 - 2009/10 Source:CEN
     30.00%
     25.00%
     20.00%
     15.00%
     10.00%
      5.00%
      0.00%
                  <35 SAP rating            >65 SAP rating

     London Ave         2008/09            2009/10           2010/11




                                  Keep same text
What does this graph show?
[Insert text here]
Coldbusters                 Keep same text

[Insert text here]




                     Keep same text
Warmfront
[Insert text here]
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Croydon Council CO2 Emissions

                                                                                         Annual cost saving from Carbon Dioxide
Years          Cost Savings (£)      Annual CO2 Savings (t/CO2)
                                                                                                       reductions
2005/06               30451.28                           265.78                       140000
2006/07                 58452.3                          532.93                       120000




                                                                   Cost Savings (£)
2007/08                 98015.8                          829.47
                                                                                      100000
2008/09              128982.69                           954.69
2009/10             no longer collected: new 5 year plan                               80000
                                                                                       60000
                                                                                       40000
                                                                                       20000
                                                                                           0




          Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

          [Insert text here]
2010 Text

What do these graphs show?
The total carbon footprint of Croydon Council‟s operations in 2009/10 was
45,625 tCO2. The majority of CO2 emissions from council operations (44%)
comes from the schools sector, followed by corporate buildings (22%).
CO2 emissions savings from Croydon Council‟s own operations have increased
from 270 tonnes of carbon saved in 2005/06 to 954 in 2009/10, totalling 2,581
tonnes.
To put this in context, 2,500 tonnes of CO2 represents approximately 5% of the
council‟s current total carbon footprint of 49,000 tonnes of CO2. Since its
inception in 2005, a total of over 2,581 tonnes of CO2 and £320,000 has been
saved through energy efficiency projects and improvements. Projects
implemented in 2010/11 are expected to yield additional savings in excess of
£50,000 and 500 tonnes of CO2 per annum.
The carbon emissions reduction target under the revised Carbon Management
and Energy Efficiency Programme is a 25% reduction target from a 2008/09
baseline, by 2015.



Local authority Carbon Management Programme
Croydon Council has been reducing its own carbon footprint in partnership with
the Carbon Trust. In December 2009 Croydon attained the Carbon Trust
Standard for continual reduction in carbon emissions from the Central Civic
Complex. This was awarded in recognition of a 20.4% reduction in carbon
emissions from 2006/7 to 2008/9, equating to 1442 tCO2 per annum.
Croydon is also a participant in the Carbon Trust‟s Local Authority Energy
Finance (LAEF) Scheme. Through this, it receives grant funding, which it must
match, to implement an energy efficiency „internal loan fund‟. The fund is used to
cover the upfront capital costs of energy saving measures (such as insulation or
lighting controls). The fund operates as an interest-free internal loan system.
Loans are paid back from future savings on energy bills, from the cost code that
pays the energy bills for that building. The Carbon Trust has stipulated that
maximum permissible financial payback is 5 years.
cost saving from Carbon Dioxide                                Carbon Dioxide saved from Croydon Council's
       reductions                                                         operations 2005-2009




                                  Annual CO2 savings (t/CO2)
                                                               1200

                                                               1000

                                                                800

                                                                600

                                                                400

                                                                200

                                                                  0
                                                                      2005/06   2006/07   2007/08   2008/09   2009/10
2011 Text
                              Keep same text
What do these graphs show?
[Insert text here]




                                               Keep same text
Local authority Carbon Management Programme
[Insert text here]
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Green Awards for Businesses
                                                                                           Green awards for businesses Source:Envibe
Years     Gold         Silver      Bronze
     2010          9            30      150                                      160
     2011                                                                        140




                                                          Number of businesses
                                                                                 120
                                                                                 100
                                                                                 80
                                                                                 60
                                                                                 40
                                                                                 20
                                                                                  0
                                                                                             Gold              Silver




         Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

         [Insert text here]



         2010 Text                                                                     2011 Text

         What does this graph show?                                                    What does this graph show?
         Croydon‟s free environmental business                                         [Insert text here]
         support programme „Envibe‟ continues to be
         recognised regionally for its success in
         helping local businesses to improve
         environmental performance. Improving the
         environmental performance of businesses is
         a key priority for Croydon. Croydon is the
         third largest centre of business in London,
         and the largest commercial and retail centre
         in the south east excluding central London. It
         is estimated that more than 20,000
         businesses trade here.
         Since its inception in 2004, Envibe has
         worked with 750 businesses. Over 150
         businesses have received recognition
         through Envibe‟s three-tiered award scheme
         with 150 businesses achieving bronze, 30
         silver and 9 gold. Over £500,000 of cash
         savings have been achieved through
         reducing utility use, waste, smarter
         purchasing and travel. Envibe aims to
         increase the number of businesses
         supported to 1,332 by March 2015.
through Envibe‟s three-tiered award scheme
with 150 businesses achieving bronze, 30
silver and 9 gold. Over £500,000 of cash
savings have been achieved through
reducing utility use, waste, smarter
purchasing and travel. Envibe aims to
increase the number of businesses
supported to 1,332 by March 2015.



Envibe - successful businesses save             Envibe - successful businesses save
money and resources                             money and resources

ITC Concepts services cover refurbishment,      [Insert text here]
fitting out, new build and maintenance
projects, predominantly serving clients in
London and the south east. Established in
1992 it now employs more than 40 staff.
Through Envibe, sustainability is now at the
core of their business. They have been
awarded the Envibe Bronze, Silver and Gold
awards. Key achievements:
• Paper consumption has been reduced from
25 reams in 2006, to fewer than 3 reams per
employee in 2008.
• Waste to landfill has reduced by 30%. This
along with other waste saving initiatives has
saved ITC over £24,000.
• Since 2005, by implementing energy and
water efficiency recommendations, they
have achieved savings of £76,000.
• Workplace travel planning has seen a
36.55% saving in the use of petrol and
28.39% saving in diesel.
businesses Source:Envibe




                                 2010
                                 2011




                     Bronze




                Keep same text
 businesses save
                   Keep same text
es
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Proportion of green/open spaces managed for nature conservation

Boroughs                                  2010                      2011
Waltham Forest                            86%
Lambeth                                   72%                                        100%
Ealing                                    69%                                         90%
Southwark                                 66%                                         80%
                                                                                      70%
Bromley                                   64%                                         60%
Sutton                                    57%
                                                                                      50%
                                                                                      40%
Hackney                                   54%                                         30%
                                                                                      20%
Tower Hamlets                             52%                                         10%
Westminster                               52%                                          0%




                                                                                            Waltham…
Croydon                                   51%
Hounslow                                  51%
Merton                                    51%
Hillingdon                                48%
Greenwich                                 40%
Redbridge                                 40%
Enfield                                   38%
Islington                                 37%
Wandsworth                                35%
Brent                                     34%
Barnet                                    33%
Harrow                                    33%
Camden                                    31%
Barking & Dagenham                        29%
Bexley                                    28%
Kingston                                  25%
Hammersmith & F                           21%
Havering                                  20%
Newham                                    17%
Haringey
Kensington & C
Lewisham
Richmond

                     Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

                     [Insert Text Here]
2010 Text

What does this graph show?
In Croydon in 2008/09, 50% of open spaces were actively managed for nature
conservation, placing it joint 10th among London boroughs. In 2009/10 the score
has been verified at 45%, which indicates that there was a 10% decrease from
the preceding year. The Croydon Biodiversity Partnership has produced the
Croydon Biodiversity Action Plan which prioritises habitats and species for
protection and enhancement.




Heathfield Ecology Centre

The Heathfield Ecology Centre encourages awareness of Croydon‟s green
heritage and biodiversity.

A panel of conservationists is available to assist and advise environmental
groups and individuals throughout the borough, and the centre carries leaflets
and information about many Croydon conservation groups.

The centre offers educational activities to schools, including pond dipping, bird
watching, tree identification and talks on sustainable living.

Visit www.heathfield-ecology.org.uk for more information.




Friends of Parks

Croydon Council supports 20 „friends of park‟ groups through its community
partnership officer, based in the green spaces team. The officer provides start-
up and ongoing group support, funding advice, training events and workshops.
This work is also co-ordinated through BTCV, dozens of friends‟ groups, the
National Probation Service and many others. There were over 7,000 volunteer
work days in 2009 on everything from community cleanups to coppicing and
charcoal making.
   Waltham…
   Lambeth
      Ealing
 Southwark
   Bromley
     Sutton
   Hackney
      Tower…
Westminster
   Croydon
 Hounslow
     Merton
 Hillingdon
 Greenwich
 Redbridge
     Enfield
   Islington
Wandsworth
       Brent
     Barnet
    Harrow
   Camden
  Barking &…
     Bexley
   Kingston
  Hammers…
  Havering
                         N 197 Bio-diversity in London 08/09




   Newham
  Haringey
 Kensingto…
 Lewisham
 Richmond
           2011
                  2010
2011 Text
                                         Keep same text
What does this graph show?
[Insert text here]




Heathfield Ecology Centre                Keep same text

[Insert text here]




Friends of Parks
                            Keep same text
[Insert text here]
2011 State of the Environment Update Sheet
Green roofs

              Overall Trend: Getting better/Staying the same/Getting worse?

              Not enough information.




              2010 Text

                Currently 4.200 m2 of green roofs have been identified and mapped in Croydon

              Croydon Council is currently in the process of mapping all green roofs in the borough as
              part of the green infrastructure study. The council encourages the inclusion of green roofs
              in new planning applications.


              Key facts about green roofs

              Green roofs are arguably the best example of multifunctional urban design, whereby
              elements on, in, and around the built environment serve several purposes (Grant 2006).

              Green roofs:
              • help maintain pre-development or greenfield run-off volumes and rates from
              development sites.

              • Improve biodiversity on all new development sites.

              • Help ensure that developments are designed to adapt to climate change.
              • Help improve the quality of water/run-off.

              • Evidence from Germany also suggests that green roofs can reduce winter fuel
              consumption. This depends on how wet the roofs are as this reduces their insulation
              value. The cost of the green roof can be balanced with savings in other areas, such as
              ground-level storm water solutions and energy demand.


              Green roofs in Croydon

              The following developments have incorporated green roofs into their design

              • Davidson Road
              • Surrey Street – „Bridge House‟ and „the Exchange‟
              • Impact House – Edridge Road
              • Centre View Apartments – Whitgift Street
              • Mayday Road (Living Roof)
              • London Road
              • Purley Way – Barretts Development (deck garden)

              Within the Croydon metropolitan centre a number of buildings have incorporated green
              roofs into their development. Further regeneration within the CMC and areas such as
              Purley will provide additional opportunities for developers to incorporate green walls or
              roofs into their buildings.
• Centre View Apartments – Whitgift Street
• Mayday Road (Living Roof)
• London Road
• Purley Way – Barretts Development (deck garden)

Within the Croydon metropolitan centre a number of buildings have incorporated green
roofs into their development. Further regeneration within the CMC and areas such as
Purley will provide additional opportunities for developers to incorporate green walls or
roofs into their buildings.
2011 Text

Currently [4.200] m2 of green roofs have been identified and mapped in Croydon

[Insert text here]




Key facts about green roofs          Keep same text

Green roofs are arguably the best example of multifunctional urban design, whereby
elements on, in, and around the built environment serve several purposes (Grant 2006).

Green roofs:
• help maintain pre-development or greenfield run-off volumes and rates from development
sites.

• Improve biodiversity on all new development sites.

• Help ensure that developments are designed to adapt to climate change.
• Help improve the quality of water/run-off.

• Evidence from Germany also suggests that green roofs can reduce winter fuel
consumption. This depends on how wet the roofs are as this reduces their insulation value.
The cost of the green roof can be balanced with savings in other areas, such as ground-
level storm water solutions and energy demand.


Green roofs in Croydon
                                 Keep same text

The following developments have incorporated green roofs into their design

• Davidson Road
• Surrey Street – „Bridge House‟ and „the Exchange‟
• Impact House – Edridge Road
• Centre View Apartments – Whitgift Street
• Mayday Road (Living Roof)
• London Road
• Purley Way – Barretts Development (deck garden)

Within the Croydon metropolitan centre a number of buildings have incorporated green
roofs into their development. Further regeneration within the CMC and areas such as
Purley will provide additional opportunities for developers to incorporate green walls or
roofs into their buildings.
• Centre View Apartments – Whitgift Street
• Mayday Road (Living Roof)
• London Road
• Purley Way – Barretts Development (deck garden)

Within the Croydon metropolitan centre a number of buildings have incorporated green
roofs into their development. Further regeneration within the CMC and areas such as
Purley will provide additional opportunities for developers to incorporate green walls or
roofs into their buildings.
Keep same text

				
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