Why Reader's and Writer's Workshop

Document Sample
Why Reader's and Writer's Workshop Powered By Docstoc
					     Rationale behind moving to a
Balanced Literacy Approach
 including Reader’s and Writer’s
                      Workshop

              Minneapolis Public Schools
                            Spring 2008
Reading and writing are among the most
important skills in today’s information-
driven world. Yet, according to the
National Assessment of Educational
Progress, more than one-third of children
in the United States lack fundamental
reading skills. This rate is even higher
for children living in poverty.
   -National Assessment of Educational Progress, The Nation’s
        Report Card (National Center for Educational Statistics,
                                       Washington, DC, 2005)
Illiteracy is a society-wide and costly
problem and is associated with increased
rates of grade retention, referral to special
education, high school dropout, and juvenile
delinquency.
                -A.J. Reynolds, S.-R. OU, Child Youth Serv. Rev. 26,1 (2004)

Many children fail to reach proficient levels
in reading only because they do not receive
the amount and type of instruction they
need.
                        -F. R. Vellutino et, al., J. Educ. Psych. 88, 601 (1996)
 - F.R. Morrison, H.J. Bachman, C.M. Connor, Improving Literacy in America:
         Guidelines from research (Yale Univ. Press, New Haven, CT, 2005)
                          -B.R. Foorman et al., J. Educ. Psych, 90, 37 (1998)
We Need to Improve Literacy Across the District
   80.00%
   70.00%
   60.00%
   50.00%
                                                     Minneapolis
   40.00%
                                                     Minnesota
   30.00%
   20.00%
   10.00%
    0.00%
             05'-06'              06'/07'
                                     Proficient   Proficient
                                     in Reading   in Reading
                                     05’/06’       06’/07’
              MINNEAPOLIS DIST.       58.37%           48.26 %
              STATE (MN)              71.52%         68.37 %
 We Need to Close the GAP
 2001-2005 MCA Grade 5 Reading: Percent of
 Students Scoring At or Above Proficiency
 (African American vs. Caucasian and MSP vs. MN)
100
 90
 80
                                         African
 70                                      American (MSP)
 60                                      African
                                         American (MN)
 50
                                         Caucasian
 40                                      (MSP)
 30                                      Caucasian (MN)
 20
 10
  0
      2001   2002   2003   2004   2005
All students have the right to rigorous
instruction that supports achievement of
high standards
      Lessons must be designed to ensure all
      students are engaged in learning
      reading, writing, speaking and listening
      content and habits identified in the
      standards
      Assessments must be aligned to
      standards and inform teaching and
      learning
We need to improve reading and
writing achievement
 At the 2001, Southeast Regional International Reading
 Association (IRA) conference in Savannah, GA, Allington
 stated that the only effective ways to improve reading
 achievement are to:
               Increase actual reading and writing activity.
               Select more appropriate literacy texts and
               tasks
               Enhance useful strategy instruction
According to Allington, and many
others, improving reading requires:
     providing more time for reading and writing in
     large, uninterrupted blocks
      thoughtful literacy instruction: where students
     think about what they’ve read and explain
     their thinking.
      ongoing strategy instruction
     “literate conversations” among students
It is not about “harder” reading
    Based on the research, there is not much
    good to say about “hard reading.” If you want
    kids to fail, give them “hard books” they can’t
    read with less than 95% comprehension. The
    end result of a steady diet of “can’t do” is
    unmotivated, hard to manage, oppositional
    students who prefer to be “bad” than “stupid”.
                                      -Allington
It is about more reading

It is estimated that students are currently spending
less than 10% of the school day involved in actual
reading and writing
According to Allington, students need to read at
least 2 hours a day or more and they need to read
important, relevant, rich books.
Neither struggling nor capable readers are best
served by limited time for real reading.
It is About Effectively Interacting with a
Variety of Text, Including More Non-fiction
Text
      The USA is one of the best in the world in terms of
      student capacity to read narrative texts, and one of
      the worst in the world when it comes to informational
      text.

      Is it any wonder our students are failing in this area
      on state tests?

      Reading about current events, science, social studies
      and health related content will provide them with
      much needed concepts and habits of thinking
It is about Talking
Developing language is key to developing thinking

Fostering conversation about text, achievement increases.

Teachers can foster dialogue by modeling and providing time
for students to talk with them and with peers about books and
about reading strategies

In successful high poverty schools, the classroom
environment supports talk that is more conversational and
less interrogational
Overall, it is about…
rigorous instruction and high standards
time spent reading
reading a variety of text genres
talking about text

A Balanced Literacy Approach using a Reader’s and
   Writer’s Workshop supports all of these pieces!
What do we mean by balanced?
By balance we are referring to an ecological
balance, a symbiotic relationship among authentic
and explicit instruction.
       -Pearson, Reading in the Twentieth Century www.ciera.org/library
There is no single method or single combination of methods
that can successfully teach all children to read.Therefore,
teachers much have a strong knowledge of multiple methods
for teaching reading and a strong knowledge of the children
in their care so that they can create the appropriate balance
of methods needed for the children they teach.”             -
International Reading Association (1999)
                                      position statement Brochure #1033
What does “balanced” look like?

     A balanced approach uses authentic texts
     and tasks, writing, literature response, and
     comprehension.

     The balanced approach also includes explicit
     instruction for phonics, word identification,
     comprehension, spelling and writing.
Balanced Literacy Framework
 The workshop apprentices students as readers and writers while engaging them in
  conversing, presenting, performing and visually representing their thinking.


     ReaderÕ Workshop (60min)
           s                                        s
                                              WriterÕ Workshop (60min)
            Minilesson                                Minilesson               Language Skills Block (30min)
                                                                                   Some Options Include:
                                                                                   Phonemic Awareness
                                                                                        Phonics
                                           Independent Guided Literature
 Independent Guided Literature                                                        Handwriting
                                              Writing Writing Investigations
   Reading Reading Study                                                              Vocabulary
                                                                                      Conventions
                                                                                      Word Study
Group Share, Reflection & Celebration Group Share, Reflection & Celebration
What is Reader’s Workshop?
The reading workshop is a structure for language arts
instruction. Teachers plan instruction that supports
students reading with others, reading independently
and with the teacher at their point of need (i.e., ZPD).

Students concentrate on reading, lots of reading,
improving their reading and thinking about how and
why they read.
More about Reader’s Workshop
 In the workshop model, students are invited
 to become actively involved in their own
 learning, and in the process learn more
 about how to read various kinds of texts.
 (Atwell, 1987, 1998)
 In the workshop, students learn to read by
 reading and “We learn to do something by
 doing it. There is no other way.” (Holt, 1993)
What does the Reading
Workshop look like?
 The workshop typically starts with an opening
 meeting/mini-lesson for the whole class.
 It includes a structured work period in which
 students read independently at their own
 level, allows time for guided reading groups,
 individual conferences or literature circles.
 It finishes with a closing meeting with all
 students for reflection and celebration of
 specific learning.
Comparison: Traditional Reading Instruction
and Reader’s Workshop
Traditional                                                Reading Workshop
Time for Reading is Limited:                Time for Reading is Increased:
-Reading group or whole class reading       -Whole class, small group and independent
-Students may only be reading during        reading
their reading group                         -Students read during the entire Reading
-Students given “seatwork” when not in      Workshop
reading group                               -Students read independently, in pairs, and in
-Students “held back” in reading; i.e.,     small groups and respond to reading
teacher has all students reading at same    -Students read at their own pace; they can move
pace                                        ahead or re-read as necessary
Tasks and Skills Emphasized:                Strategic Reading is Emphasized:
-Reading is taught as a task to complete.   -Reading is taught as a process with teacher
-Primary instruction of reading skills      modeling strategies.
presented in a format based on basal.       -Instruction emphasizes teaching reading
-Less interesting, less challenging         strategies based on standards through selected
instruction for less able readers           literature.
-Students not aware of teacher’s reading    -Rigorous instruction for all readers
processes and practices                     -Teacher models reading processes and shares
                                            reading practices (use of read alouds and think
                                            alouds, demonstrations)
What is a Writing Workshop?
    The writing workshop is a scheduled time for
    students to concentrate on writing, improving
    their writing and thinking about how and why
    they write.
    The writing workshop is organized so
    students explore what they want to say in
    writing. They work through their own drafts,
    with the support of teachers and peers, to the
    point that they have something to share with
    an audience.
What does the Writing
Workshop look like?
  The workshop typically starts with an opening
  meeting/mini-lesson for the whole class.
  It includes a structured work period in which
  students engage in various stages of the writing
  process, guided writing groups, student response
  groups and conferencing
  It finishes with a closing meeting in which students
  share their work, receive feedback and recognition
  and celebrate their accomplishments
How are reading and writing
connected in the workshop
model?
  At different times during the year both reading
  and writing workshops are geared to focus on
  different genres

  Students read and write in these genres,
  apprenticing themselves as readers and
  authors of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and
  more.
Balanced Literacy Framework
 The workshop apprentices students as readers and writers while engaging them in
  conversing, presenting, performing and visually representing their thinking.


        s
  ReaderÕ Workshop (60min)         WriterÕs Workshop (60min)
         Minilesson                        Minilesson               Language Skills Block (30min)
                                                                        Some Options Include:
                                                                        Phonemic Awareness
                                                                             Phonics
Independent Guided Literature   Independent Guided Literature              Handwriting
  Reading Reading Study            Writing Writing Investigations          Vocabulary
                                                                           Conventions
                                                                           Word Study
  Group Share and Evaluation       Group Share and Evaluation
   Resources
 Orehovec, B. and Alley, M. (2003) Revisiting the
 Reading Workshop: Management, Mini-lessons
 and Strategies located at:
http://books.google.com/books?id=al99Zm-
 IhPEC&pg=PA13&lpg=PA13&dq=rationale+for+re
 ading+and+writing+workshop&source=web&ots=_
 LFWbdspOO&sig=1Fiwi7B4P7NvY48HsGD_dQz8
 1dM&hl=en#PPA13,M1

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:9
posted:7/27/2011
language:English
pages:26