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06197-OJSHS 2006 Program4

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06197-OJSHS 2006 Program4 Powered By Docstoc
					   The 47th Annual Ohio Junior
Science & Humanities Symposium
                     March 24-26, 2010

                             Sponsored by
Northwest Ohio Center of Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education
               (NWO) and Bowling Green State University
 In cooperation with The Academy of Applied Science and with the support
            of the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force




                     www.ojshs.org
2009 Ohio JSHS Award Winners


                                Top Row (L to R)
                                Julia Hu,
                                Karen Kruzer,
                                Aaditya Shidham,
                                Ashley Hoehn,
                                Christopher Jennings

                                Bottom Row (L to R)
                                Keith Hawkins,
                                Kevin Hawkins




  2009 Ohio JSHS Participants
Table of Contents
 2010 Ohio JSHS Schedule “At A Glance” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
 Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
 2010 Ohio JSHS Schedule for March 24-26, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
 Keynote Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
 Poster Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-24
 Judges Score Sheet
    Paper Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
    Poster Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
 2009 Ohio JSHS Awardees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-30
 2010 Ohio JSHS Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-33
 Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
 Judging Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-35
 2010 Advisory Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
 History of the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
 Cumulative Awards
    Thomas Alva Edison Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
    The Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
    Ohio JSHS Presenters to the National JSHS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
 BGSU Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41




                                                                                                                                                School of Teaching and Learning




                                                      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                                                                  1
Schedule “At a Glance”
                  2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
                                 March 24-26, 2010


    Wednesday, March 24
    4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.     Check In                                   Hampton Inn, Bowling Green
    6:30 p.m.               Mandatory Meeting for ALL Participants     Hampton Inn, Great Room
    7:15 p.m.               Board Buses to BGSU Ice Arena
    7:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.     Pizza Buffet                               Conference Room, Ice Arena
    8:00 p.m.-9:30 p.m.     Ice Skating                                Ice Arena
    9:35 p.m.               Board Buses for Return to Hampton Inn


    Thursday, March 25
    6:00 a.m.-7:45 a.m.     Breakfast                                  Hampton Inn, Great Room
    7:50 a.m.               Board Buses to BGSU Student Union          Student Union 206
    8:30 a.m.               Opening Session                            Student Union 206
    8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.     First Paper Session                        Student Union 206
      Break (15 minutes)
    10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.   Second Paper Session                       Student Union 206
    10:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m.   Concurrent Poster Judging                  Student Union 228
      Break (15 minutes)
    11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.   Third Paper Session                        Student Union 206
    12:15 p.m.-1:20 p.m.    Lunch                                      Student Union, Falcon’s Nest
    1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.     Fourth Paper Session                       Student Union 206
                            Concurrent Poster Viewing: Session 1       Student Union 228
    2:10 p.m.               JH Students to Planetarium
      Break (15 minutes)
    2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m.     Fifth Paper Session                        Student Union 206
                            Concurrent Poster Viewing: Session 2       Student Union 228
      Break (15 minutes)
    4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.     Laboratory Tours




2         The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule “At a Glance”
               2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
                              March 24-26, 2010


 Thursday, March 25 (cont.)
 5:15 p.m.               Board Buses to Hampton Inn
 6:30 p.m.               Board Buses to Student Union
 6:45 p.m.-8:15 p.m.     Banquet/Keynote Presentation           Student Union 228
 8:15 p.m.               Board Buses to Hampton Inn
 8:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.    Open Activities                        Pool, Meeting Room
                         Adult Reception                        Hampton Inn, Great Room



 Friday, March 26
 6:30 a.m.-7:50 a.m.     Room Checkout/Breakfast                Hampton Inn, Great Room
 8:00 a.m.               Board Buses to BGSU Student Union
 8:40 a.m.               Announcements                          Student Union 308
 8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.     Sixth Paper Session                    Student Union 308
                         Concurrent Poster Viewing: Session 3   Student Union 228
   Break (15 minutes)
 10:00 a.m.-11:20 a.m.   Seventh Paper Session                  Student Union 308
                         Concurrent Poster Viewing: Session 4   Student Union 228
 11:30 a.m.              Lunch                                  Student Union, Falcon’s Nest
                         Judges Luncheon                        Student Union 309
                         Advisory Board Luncheon                Student Union 316
                         Student Advisory Board Meeting         Student Union 307
 12:30 p.m.              Dismantle Posters                      Student Union 228
 1:00 p.m.               Group Photograph                       Student Union, Center Stairwell
 1:15 p.m.               Imagination Station                    Student Union 206
 2:15 p.m.               Awards Ceremony                        Student Union 206
 2:45 p.m.               Adjournment
 3:00 p.m.               Board Buses to Hampton Inn




                            The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium            3
Welcome

Welcome to Bowling Green State University (BGSU):
We are delighted to once again welcome you to the 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities
Symposium. The symposium is hosted by the Northwest Ohio Center of Excellence in STEM Education
(NWO) and the School of Teaching and Learning at BGSU with the financial support of the U.S. Army
Research Office, U.S. Office of Naval Research, and U.S. Air Force Research Office.This event offers a valuable
opportunity for young scientists and scholars to share their impressive achievements with their peers, their
parents, and professional scientists and scholars. The Ohio JSHS provides public recognition and
certificates, honoring achievement and interest in research pursuits. This program also helps students
attain a sense of achievement and self-confidence resulting from interaction with students from other
schools and regions and with professional researchers and educators. To quote a former JSHS participant,
“[At JSHS] I learned a tremendous amount of science, got to meet other high school students who shared
my interests in science, and learned that I could succeed at any program that I chose to pursue.”The Junior
Science & Humanities Symposium program also awards thousands of dollars in scholarships to
acknowledge the extraordinary levels of achievement of the participants.
Each year, over 48 regional JSHS symposia are held throughout the United States and in the Department
of Defense Schools of Europe and the Pacific. Two student finalists and three delegates from the Ohio
JSHS program are chosen (all expenses paid) to attend the National JSHS that takes place in Bethesda,
MA from April 28 to May 2, 2010. The Ohio JSHS first and second place finalists present their research
papers to compete for six opportunities to represent the United States at the London International Youth
Science Fortnight (LIYSF). Since 1966, forty-nine Ohio JSHS winners have presented papers at the National
Junior Science & Humanities Symposium. Sixteen of these students have subsequently presented their
papers at the LIYSF in London, England. For the last two years, the winner of the Ohio competition has
also won the top national award. Clearly, Ohio has many high achieving young people. We are proud to
be able to highlight some of their success with this event.
We are grateful for your participation in this year’s event and we hope that you find the 2010 Ohio
Junior Science & Humanities Symposium to be a very beneficial and educational experience. Thank
you for joining us!




    Dr. Emilio Duran                  Dr. W. Robert Midden                    Ms. Iris Szelagowski
   Ohio JSHS Director                 NWO/COMOS Director                     Ohio JSHS Coordinator




                                 The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                       5
Schedule of Events
    2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium

    Wednesday, March 24
    4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.       Check In                                       Hampton Inn, Bowling Green
    6:30 p.m.                 Mandatory Meeting for ALL Participants         Hampton Inn, Great Room
    7:15 p.m.                 Board Buses to BGSU Ice Arena
    7:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.       Pizza Buffet                                   Conference Room, Ice Arena
    8:00 p.m.-9:30 p.m.       Ice Skating                                    Ice Arena
    9:35 p.m.                 Board Buses for Return to Hampton Inn




    Thursday, March 25
    6:00 a.m.-7:45 a.m.       Breakfast                                      Hampton Inn, Great Room
    7:50 a.m.                 Board Buses to BGSU Student Union              Student Union 206
    8:30 a.m.                 Opening Session, BGSU                          Student Union 206


    Presentation of Colors:   Pershing Rifles Color Guard, Army ROTC, Bowling Green State University


    Opening Remarks
      Dr. Emilio Duran, School of Teaching and Learning, Ohio JSHS Director, BGSU
      Dr. Robert Midden, NWO/COSMOS Director, Associate Professor of Chemistry, BGSU
      LTC Steven J. Letzring, U.S. Army, Commander/Professor, Military Science, BGSU
      Ms. Iris Szelagowski, Ohio JSHS Coordinator




6         The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.              First Paper Session                                      Student Union 206

 8:45 a.m.
   Ibtissam Gad, Sylvania Southview High School
   “Two Studies of the Effectiveness of the Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) Method”

       Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) is an easy, efficient, and inexpensive method to improve the microbiological quality
       of water using UV-A radiation and temperature. The process requires exposing bottles of contaminated water to the
       sun. SODIS is typically performed in tropical climates; therefore, the process was initially performed on tap water
       from Cairo, Egypt. The project was unsuccessful and a modified experiment at temperatures below 1°C was
       performed to evaluate the effectiveness of SODIS on Escherchia coli. To test the hypothesis nine bottles were
       artificially contaminated the E. coli (~4x105 CFU mL-1). There were three conditions: i: sunlight exposure, ii: no
       exposure, covered with paper bags, and iii: an exposed control without bacteria. Water samples were collected
       and plated at each time period, 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6h. Over 99% of the E. coli was inactivated with the exposed
       treatment, and the control and no exposure condition generally stayed constant throughout. The hypothesis was
       supported, thus SODIS can be used at cold temperatures to inactivate E. coli.


 9:05 a.m.
   Connor Smallwood, Gahanna Lincoln High School
   “Investigating the Possible Effects of Atrazine on Microinvertebrates”

       The purpose of this experiment was to test the affects of the chemical Atrazine commonly found in herbicides
       on organisms in waterways including Daphnia magna. Heart rates were found for daphnia (N=14) in normal pond
       water. They were then exposed to a .01 concentration of the normal application rate for Atrazine on crops and
       after a five minute exposure were re-examined. Results indicated that the chemical had a negative effect on the heart
       rates, with the means of the treated organisms dropping a significant twelve percent (p = .0002) The hypothesis
       was supported, as the chemical reduced the heart rate of the animals as the data showed. Additional research
       looking at digestive rates of daphnia, as well as a general protozoa survey in streams above and below Atrazine
       treated crops is recommended.




                                      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                               7
Schedule of Events
    Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

    9:25 a.m.
      Shannon Wu, Orange High School
     “Functional Analysis of a Naturally Occurring Corin Mutation Identified in Patients with Hypertension”

         Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone, acting as a mechanism in regulating blood pressure.
         Alternations in the human ANP gene are linked to hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. In heart cells, ANP is
         made as an inactive precursor, pro-ANP, which is converted by an enzyme to shorter but active ANP. The protease
         corin has been identified as the pro-ANP convertase. Corin variants are associated with hypertension and heart
         disease in patients. In a recent genetic study, the first naturally occurring corin gene mutation was found in a
         patient with heart failure at a hospital in Suzhou, China. The mutation, S472G, is located in corin frizzled-2 domain but
         its functional significance was unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the corin mutation impairs its
         function. We expressed human corin S472G protein in cultured cells and examined its pro-ANP processing activity
         by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our results showed that S472G corin mutant lost >90% of activity
         compared to that of wild-type (n=4, p<0.01). Moreover, the reduction in corin activity was caused by impaired
         corin zymogen activation. Thus, our data provide strong evidence that corin gene mutations may affect its
         function and contribute to the development of hypertension and heart disease in humans.


    9:45 a.m.                        Break and Announcements

    10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.            Second Paper Session                                        Student Union 206
    10:00 a.m.-12:15 a.m.            Concurrent Poster Judging                                   Student Union 228

    10:00 a.m.
     Dennis Tseng, William Mason High School
     “Generalized Nonaveraging Integer Sequences”

         Let the sequence SEm of nonnegative integers be generated by the following conditions: Set the first term a0 = 0,
         and for all k ≥ 0, let ak+1 be the least integer greater than ak such that no element of {a0,…,ak+1} is the average of m-1
         distinct other elements. Szekeres gave a closed-form description of SE3 in 1936, and Layman provided a similar
         description for SE4 in 1999. We first find closed forms for some similar greedy sequences that avoid averages in
         terms not all the same. Then, we extend the closed-form description of SEm from the known cases when m= 3 and
         m = 4 to any integer m ≥ 3. With the help of a computer, we also generalize this to sequences that avoid solutions
         to specific weighted averages in distinct terms. Finally, from the closed forms of these sequences, we find
         asymptotic bounds for their growth rates.




8         The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 10:20 a.m.
   Russell W. Kittel, Gahanna Lincoln High School
  “Development and Testing of a Remotely Operated Rotundus”

      The purpose of this project was the design of a new ROV that performed better than more conventional ROVs
      and robots used in today’s military and law enforcement. This project was to make a small and portable Rotundus
      that would be used for soldiers and law enforcement officers. The Rotundus used a simple method to create motion
      by swinging a pendulum in the desired direction of movement. This changed the center of gravity which caused
      the Rotundus to move. The turning of the pendulum was controlled by two continuous servos. The servos turned
      an axis causing the center of gravity to be changed. If the operator wanted to turn the Rotundus left or right, a third
      servo was used to sway the pendulum in either direction, causing the Rotundus to turn. The Rotundus ran a series
      of tests against a simple radio controlled (R/C) car as a baseline comparison to a real robot or ROV. The Rotundus and
      the R/C car ran various tests such as a speed test in a straight line, a maneuverability course, and an incline test.
      Results suggest that the Rotundus is significantly more maneuverable than a conventional R/C (p < .002) but
      significantly slower (p = 1.14E-24) and less able to climb an incline (p < .01). Further work to make the Rotundus
      more programmable and autonomous is suggested.


 10:40 a.m.
   Michael D. Fu, Beavercreek High School
  “A Security Hash Function Based On Modi_ed Logistic Map (MLMSH)”

      The notion of using cryptographic hash functions as the basis for cryptographic systems has become a major
      concern among researches. After conventional hash functions such as MD5 and SHA-1 were successfully attacked,
      the development of a new breed of secure and e_cient hash function became necessary. In this paper, a new
      hash function based on Mod-i_ed Logistic Map (MLMSH) is proposed. This new hash function utilizes a chaos
      system to generate pseudo-random behavior, while in actuality its completely deterministic properties make the
      hash function more secure and e_cient. MLMSH produces a 256-bit digest from any plaintext with length less than
      264 bits. Statistical analysis and computer simulation show that MLMSH is strong in irreversibility and is sensitive to
      the initial plaintext.


 11:00 a.m.                      Break and Announcements




                                      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                                9
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 11:15 a.m.-12:15 a.m.             Third Paper Session                                       Student Union 206

 11:15 a.m.
   Amy Johnson, Bowling Green High School
     “Utilization of the Phosphonate Compounds PBTC and HEDP as Phosphorus Sources by Bacteria”

         Bacteria, including cyanobacteria possess the unique ability to utilize phosphonates as a source of phosphorus
         by degrading phosphonates into usable phosphates. This overgrowth of bacteria is a problem in bodies of water
         such as Lake Erie. The ability of bacteria to utilize the phosphonate compounds PBTC and HEDP was tested to
         examine the ability of these compounds to stimulate algal growth. One set of bottles of water was amended with
         PBTC, another set was amended with HEDP, one set had nothing added to it (the negative control), and another set
         was amended with inorganic phosphate (the positive control). The algal growth in all bottles was regularly monitored
         by in vivo fluorescence. This procedure was then repeated a second time. In the first repetition of the experiment,
         the total average algal growth at the end of the experiment for HEDP was 34% more than the negative control and
         the average algal growth for PBTC was 70% more than the negative control. However this data was not statistically
         significant. At the end of the second repetition of the experiment the average algal growth for HEDP was 57%
         more than the negative control and the average algal growth for PBTC was 322% more than the negative control.
         The data for the bottles amended with HEDP was not statistically significant, but the data for the bottles
         amended with PBTC was. The data collected supported the hypothesis that PBTC does stimulate algal growth
         but does not support the hypothesis that HEDP stimulates algal growth. The data collected also presented the
         possibility that PBTC may actually initially inhibit algal growth.


 11:35 a.m.

     “Conformation of the β-globin Gene Locus at Specific Cell-Cycle Stages”
   Mary R. Towers, Lakota West High School


         The human β-globin gene locus is comprised of five β-like globin genes (5’-ε-Gγ-Aγ-δ-β-3’) under the control of an

         binding sites for several co-regulators, and is required for high-level expression of the β-like globin genes.
         upstream Locus Control Region (LCR). The LCR is comprised of five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS), which contain

         Previous studies have shown that, through the formation of a loop, the LCR comes in physical contact with the
         appropriate gene to be expressed. This study examines whether contacts between the LCR and the globin genes
         are lost during synthesis (S) phase of the cell cycle. Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) was performed on
         synchronized K562 (human erythroleukemia cells) cells to determine the frequency of interaction between the
         globin genes and the LCR.




10       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 11:55 a.m.
   Linda Yao, William Mason High School
  “A Study of Menadione-Induced Cytotoxicity Reduction in Yeast Cells by Antioxidant Enzymes”

      The experiment tested whether adding Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) to yeast cells exposed to
      menadione (Vitamin K3) would keep cells alive by reducing oxidative stress caused by menadione. Catalase
      decomposes hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen while SOD converts superoxide anions into hydrogen
      peroxide and oxygen. Because SOD produces additional hydrogen peroxide, Catalase was hypothesized to be
      more effective than SOD in reducing menadione-induced cytotoxicity. To test the extent of cytotoxicity to yeast
      cells (cell viability), MTT assays measured absorbances using a spectrophotometer. Yeast cells with active
      mitochondria reduce MTT (3-(4, 5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) to colored formazan
      crystals and have higher absorbances than yeast cells with damaged mitochondria due to menadione. To
      determine the protective effect of SOD and Catalase, they were added to yeast suspensions before adding
      menadione. MTT assays were conducted after menadione was added. In the experiment, yeast suspensions exposed to
      menadione showed lower absorbances (reduced cell viability). When the menadione concentration was 0.025 mM,
      both SOD and Catalase decreased menadione-induced cytotoxicity.When the menadione concentrations were 0.1 mM
      and 0.5 mM, only Catalase significantly decreased cytotoxicity. This experiment shows that both SOD and Catalase
      reduce oxidative stress and menadione-induced cytotoxicity, but Catalase is more effective.


 12:15 p.m.-1:20 p.m.            Lunch                                                      Student Union, Falcon’s Nest

 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.             Fourth Paper Session                                       Student Union 206
                                 Poster Viewing: Session 1                                  Student Union 228

 1:30 p.m.
   Karen Kruzer, West Geauga High School
  “Reducing Troponin Turnaround Time Through the Application of Lean/Six Sigma Processes and Evaluating
  Public Response Time to Heart Attack Symptoms”

      Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of death in the USA. Time plays a significant role in management of
      myocardial infarction (MI) from the patient initially recognizing symptoms and accessing medical care, to efficiency
      of troponin-T (TnT) turnaround time (TAT) in the emergency department (ED) and medical laboratory, to the
      timeliness of reperfusion. It was hypothesized that disparities will exist between anticipated versus actual wait times
      for seeking medical care when experiencing MI symptoms for specific age groups and genders. Survey results
      (n=1224) were compared to patient records (n=250) to identify disparities. Subjects predicted seeking care within
      “minutes” but chart review identified mean wait time as 4 days, validating significant disparity between anticipated
      versus actual wait times (p<0.001). It was hypothesized that application of Lean/Six Sigma will reduce TnT TAT in the
      ED and laboratory. Opportunities for improving care processes and outcomes in the ED and laboratory by reducing TnT
      were identified. TnT testing is a key diagnostic marker for cardiac conditions including MI. Pre-intervention (n=1217)
      and post-intervention (n=329) data were collected through laboratory informatics for comparison. Engineered
      process changes in the ED and laboratory yielded increased efficiency and improved TnT TAT, reducing TAT time from
      116 minutes to 61 minutes (p<0.001), surpassing the 68 minute national health system benchmark. Timeliness of
      reporting TnT results directly impacts the outcome of patients experiencing chest pain/MI and improves patient
      throughput. Lean/Six Sigma is an effective tool in improving health care processes and enhancing care management.



                                      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                                11
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 1:50 p.m.
   Megan Jashinski, Gahanna Lincoln High School
     “Investigating the Effects of Atrazine on the Development of Colinus virginianus”

         The purpose of this project is to look at the effects of Atrazine on developing northern bobwhite quail
         (Colinus virginianus). Atrazine is a chemical widely used in agriculture since 1959. It operates by inhibiting
         photosynthesis in dicot plants. Recent research has revealed that Atrazine causes male frogs in water with field
         runoff to become feminized. Research has also shown that there are links to the inhibition of growth in quail
         hatchlings and that the amounts of certain hormones in the chicks have been affected. Quail eggs were injected
         on the tenth day. Because Atrazine is a water-soluble chemical, the solutions injected into the eggs were diluted using
         distilled water. It was hypothesized that at high levels Atrazine would affect the mortality rates and that at lower
         levels the embryos would be unaffected. Results show that when Atrazine is injected into the egg, there are
         significantly high mortality rates, reaching 41% at 1.03 ppm. Of those embryos that did reach full term, their size was
         significantly reduced in comparison to the distilled water injected control group (p=0.0049). This suggests that
         Atrazine could potentially be a significant threat to quail and perhaps other fauna and suggests further research.


 2:10 p.m.                          JH Students to Planetarium

 2:10 p.m.
   Alexander Chernyakhovsky, William Mason High School
     “Designing Vaccines for Emerging Influenza Pathogens using a Multidisciplinary Bio-simulation and
     Bioinformatics Methodology”

         Influenza A viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 strains, undergo punctuated genetic evolutions in
         Hemagglutinin (HA) that significantly alter their antigenic characteristics potentially giving rise to pandemic strains.
         In the past, pandemic strains have emerged due to reassortment events in a host coinfected by human and avian
         strains. In 1997, the first outbreak of H5N1 human infections demonstrated the capability of humans to serve as
         mixing vessels for such reassortment events. Consequently, temporo-spatial forecasting of potential inter-species
         influenza in humans at the viral strain level is vital for development of effective vaccines. Accordingly, this
         paper describes a novel methodology involving the use of temporo-spatial, in silico macro-epidemiological analysis
         comprised of bio-simulations and bioinformatics to identify HA isolates from regions of infection with human
         and avian influenza. The SEIR-based model utilizes real-world statistical data on human infections with avian viruses,
         waterfowl migration (the primary vector of avian influenza), global poultry population (an intermediate host) and
         global human population. Results from the bio-simulations are subjected to bioinformatics-based analysis to isolate
         candidate viral strains. Candidate strains are compared to WHO vaccine strains to validate this methodology. The
         candidate strains are then proposed for use in the heterologous influenza vaccine targeted for emerging pathogens.


 2:30 p.m.                          Break and Announcements

 2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m.                Fifth Paper Session                                        Student Union 206
                                    Poster Viewing: Session 2                                  Student Union 228




12       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 2:45 p.m.
   Ji Hoon Chun, Gahanna Lincoln High School
  “The ‘Litespeed’ Project: Designs for a Next-generation Calculator to Facilitate Interactive Mathematical
  Exploration”

      The purpose of this project was to attempt to show the validity of a particular idea, the benefits of a playing around
      approach to learning mathematics compared to a directed approach to learning, by means of brain mapping analysis.
      It is hypothesized that playing around would generate different brain activity compared to being directed, specifically
      more right-brain activity. This idea is one of the main features of a new type of calculator the author is designing.
      Subjects were brain mapped while working on two types of math activities involving equations and graphs. One type
      involved playing around with equations, while the other type involved a list of equations to graph. They were also
      asked questions after they had worked on the activities. The brain mapping results did not show a difference in aver-
      age brain activity between the two types of activities, as the P-values for significance were all well above 0.05. However,
      frontal areas seemed to be used more than the rest of the brain for both activities (P = 8.40·10-3 and P = 0.017), which
      suggests that the two types of activities may be more similar than expected.The executive area of the frontal lobe was
      most likely used for both, meaning that the brain mapping was actually recording the students’ decision-making
      regarding equation coefficients in their activities rather than mapping the differences in how they approached the
      equations in the two types of activities. From the questions, subjects tended to prefer the play activities, although some
      others liked the directed activities more. They cited advantages and disadvantage to both types of activities.


 3:05 p.m.
   Lee Ann Song, Sylvania Southview High School
  “Developing a Model to Study Sub-cellular Distribution of C/EBPα in Prostate Epithelial Cells”

      Many methods exist for the treatment of prostate cancer, but understanding of the causes and potential prevention of
      it are still under examination. Though the causes of prostate cancer and the methods for curing it have not yet
      been fully understood, evidence suggests that the CCAAT (cytidine-cytidine-adenosine-adenosine-thymidine)
      enhancer binding protein, C/EBPα, plays an important role in suppressing the proliferation of cells. Studies done by
      the Medical University of Ohio have revealed an interesting observation that whereas C/EBPα exists in the nuclei
      in the prostate of aging mice, in humans about 50 years or older, the protein is largely found in the cytosol, where it has
      no known function. Since older men have a very high incidence of prostate cancer in contrast to mice, it is reasonable
      to suggest that the absence of nuclear C/EBPα may cause the prostate to become more prone to cancer. The purpose
      of this experiment was to establish a model cell line in which the sub-cellular distribution of C/EBPα mimics that in
      the primary prostate epithelium of older men. The human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, and FG12 cell lines were
      purchased from ATCC (American Type Culture Collection). Transfection, lentiviral infection, and immunefluorescent
      staining were performed to insert and determine the location of C/EBPα in the cells. The results revealed that
      lipofection was the most efficient method of gene transfer. However, the C/EBPα was located in the nucleus, making
      the cell line a poor model of real prostate epithelial cells. This warrants further investigation using different cell lines
      to achieve a successful model. Once a successful model is attained, examination of possible ways to restore C/EBPα to
      the nuclear compartment may help save the lives of many from prostate cancer.




                                       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                                    13
Schedule of Events
 Thursday, March 25 (Cont.)

 3:25 p.m.
   Jordan Zink, Gahanna Lincoln High School
     “Assessing the Viability of the Rotor Cipher in the Modern World”

         The purpose of this project is to determine the viability of the rotor cipher in the modern world of computer
         cryptography. This project consists of two phases: modifying the cipher to increase its security and running a
         simulation to assess the effectiveness of a brute force attack. While many modifications were made, one modification
         involved shortening the plaintext before encryption by removing unnecessary letters and replacing words with
         symbols. An experiment was run to determine the level of shortening that would not distort meaning. 20 subjects
         participated and it was found that a conservative level of shortening did not significantly distort meaning, while a
         liberal level of shortening did distort meaning slightly. It was also found that there was no significant difference
         between youth and adult subjects, or between subjects familiar and unfamiliar with texting and online lingo. To
         simulate a brute force attack, a computer program was written in Visual Basic. Initial testing found household
         computers could not break a message encrypted with 3 or more rotors. A regression equation was found to predict
         the key search speed based on plaintext length (R2 = 0.9988). Also, the equation t = 2562n/s was created to show the
         relation of time to run a brute force attack to the number of rotors and the key search speed. An investigation into
         the parts of a computer that make a brute force attack run faster was also conducted. It was found that processors
         with high l-2 cache, voltage, and front side bus speed were the fastest, with voltage at a significant level (p = .05) and
         RAM having no significant effect on time (p = .94). It was concluded that the rotor cipher is a viable cipher in the
         modern world. Also, plaintext shortening can be applied with most ciphers, which can boost security.

 3:45 p.m.                           Break and Announcements

 4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.                 Laboratory Tours                                            BGSU Research Labs

 5:15 p.m.                           Board Buses to Hampton Inn

 6:30 p.m.                           Board Buses to BGSU Student Union

 6:45 p.m.-8:15 p.m.                 Banquet/Keynote Presentation                                Student Union 228

 Keynote Presentation                “Global Climate Change: What Is It? How Will It Affect Us? Can We Reduce the
                                     Impact By Our Actions?”
                                     Dr. Andy Jorgensen, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Director of
                                     General Chemistry, University of Toledo

 8:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.                Open Activities                                             Hampton Inn, Meeting Room
                                     Adult Reception                                             Hampton Inn, Great Room




14       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Friday, March 26
 6:30 a.m.-7:50 a.m.               Room Checkout/Breakfast                                      Hampton Inn, Great Room

 8:00 a.m.                         Board Buses to BGSU Student Union

 8:40 a.m.                         Announcements                                                Student Union 308

 8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.               Sixth Paper Session                                          Student Union 308
                                   Poster Viewing: Session 3                                    Student Union 228

 8:45 a.m.
   Jon Grooms, Gahanna Lincoln High School
   “The Comparison of Novice and Experienced Pitchers by Using a Three Axis Accelerometer Testing
   Fastballs and Curveballs”

       The purpose of this project was to determine if there was an easy way to measure the consistency of arm motion
       in a baseball pitcher. A Wireless Dynamics Sensor System (WDSS) from Vernier was strapped to the forearm of six
       different participants; 3 expert pitcher and 3 novice pitchers. The data from the WDSS was sent wirelessly to the
       data analysis program Logger Pro to be analyzed later. Logger Pro graphs were visually inspected and then data
       was transferred to Microsoft Excel to run t-tests. Fastballs were compared to fastballs, curveballs were compared to
       curveballs, and lastly fastballs were compared to curveballs. A total of 72 t-tests were run, having one t-test for the
       x-axis, y-axis, z-axis, and net acceleration of all 6 participants. The tests were determined significant if the p value
       was below .05. Results suggested no significant differences when comparing a fastball to a fastball and when
       comparing a curveball to a curveball. However, when comparing a fastball to a curveball, the range of the p values
       ranged from 4.7*10^-14 to .9174, which was unexpected. Visual examination of the two graphs showed they
       were obviously different, but the statistical analysis did not confirm it. On closer analysis, it is suggested that the two
       pitches take different times to complete, and the statistical analysis of different pitches must be adapted to account
       for this timing difference. It appears that with some adaptation, this method may be an excellent method to help
       train young pitchers as they attempt to improve their throwing ability.

 9:05 a.m.
   Ashley Hoehn, Ottoville High School
   “The Effects of Cinnamomum cassia on Glucose Uptake”

       Diabetes has become one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Cinnamomum cassia has been proven
       in past studies to decrease the blood sugar levels of type II diabetics. How long does it take cinnamon to lower
       glucose levels, and in what way is this happening? If Cinnamomum cassia lowers the glucose levels of type II diabetics,
       then this result may either be from an instantaneous effect which aides the entry of glucose into the cell or from
       a change in metabolic enzymes. This researcher hypothesized that the former is true: cinnamon has an
       instantaneous effect which aids the entry of glucose into the cells. This experiment was designed to see if
       instantaneous transport could be identified in type II diabetics and in an E. coli model. This experimenter’s
       hypothesis was not proven to be true. The data experiment showed that there is, indeed, an initial decrease in
       glucose levels. However, these levels continued to decrease until the end of the experiment as well, suggesting an
       alternate hypothesis for future study that cinnamon affects the levels of metabolic enzymes.




                                        The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                                   15
Schedule of Events
 2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
 9:25 a.m.
   Alison Yang, Sylvania Southview High School
     “Investigating the Mechanics of the Plasticizer DEHP Inducing Aneuploidy”

         This study examines the mechanism by which Diethylhexyl Phthalate, or DEHP, a common plasticizer, induces
         aneuploidy in human cells. DEHP is shown to have negative effects on animal health, including liver and genital
         radiation, and possible carcinogenicity. Understanding the mechanism by which DEHP causes aneuploidy may be

         premature exit from mitosis caused aneuploidy. HeLa cells were used, and subjected to 0.05 µL, 0.5 µL, and
         vital to understanding other aneugenic chemicals. This study focused on mitotic exit errors, and hypothesized that

         5 µL concentrations of DEHP. The control was a well without DEHP. Another set of cells were subjected to the same
         concentrations of DEHP along with 60 ng/mL Nocodazole. Nocodazole arrested the cells in mitosis, allowing
         observation of the destabilization or sustainment of the mitotic checkpoint. The control was a well without DEHP
         and with Nocodazole. Movies created from the wells were examined for mitotic indexes, then analyzed using standard
         error. Because of the lack of statistical significance and illogical correlation found in the data, it was concluded
         that mitotic exit error is not the mechanism by which DEHP induces aneuploidy.

 9:45 a.m.                          Break and Announcements

 10:00 a.m.-11:20 a.m.              Seventh Paper Session                                      Student Union 308
                                    Poster Viewing: Session 4                                  Student Union 228

 10:00 a.m.
   Merissa Chiu, Sylvania Southview High School
     “The Effects of Isoflavone on the Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells in a Prostate Cancer Cell Line”

         Researchers have seen a link between heightened consumption of isoflavone, found in the hypocotyls of the
         soybean, and a lower risk of being diagnosed with cancer. This new correlation between isoflavone and healthy cells
         are especially useful to patients who have battled cancer and are now in recovery, and to healthy individuals who
         wish to lower their risk of being diagnosed with cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among
         men and the number of cases continues to grow each year. Prostate cancer forms in tissues of the prostate, a gland
         in the male reproductive system found below the bladder and in front of the rectum. The purpose of the experiment
         performed was to indicate a relationship between the increased concentration of isoflavone and the slowed growth
         of prostate cancer cells within the prostate cancer cell line. Isoflavone was added in varying amounts to prostate
         cancer cell cultures and allowed to sit for two days. The cell cultures were examined and the cells were counted and
         recorded. Results showed that the isoflavone slowed the growth of prostate cancer cells in the prostate cancer cell line
         (K=0.465, p<.05). There was a greater arrest in growth among the experimental group when compared to the control.
         This research can be used to change the diet of prostate cancer patients to include more soy isoflavone to induce
         a reduction of prostate cancer cells, but further studies need to be done to establish a relationship between the
         apoptosis by genistein of the prostate cancer cells and an expression level that can be seen in the body of a prostate
         cancer patient.




16        The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Friday, March 26 (Cont.)

 10:20 a.m.
   Travis Murray, Gahanna Lincoln High School
  “The Development and Initial Testing of an Inexpensive Interactive Whiteboard using the Nintendo Wii Remote”

      The purpose of this project is to design, build, and do initial testing of an interactive whiteboard created using a
      Wii remote along with a computer and an infrared pen. It is anticipated that the project will show that an interactive
      whiteboard can be created at a low cost using pre-made items. Interactive whiteboard systems have cost hundreds
      to thousands of dollars. The purpose of this project is to incorporate the Wii remote in hopes to create a whiteboard
      for around fifty dollars. The long term goal is to integrate it into the classroom to create an entirely new learning
      environment and style. Testing included determining whether or not the setup would create an effective usable
      interactive whiteboard, and the appropriate distance and angle for a particular size screen. The viewing area of the
      Wii remote’s (Wiimote) camera was also tested. The Wiimote was placed at various angles and distances pointing at
      the middle of the screen in order to test the quality of the Wiimote’s position. After the viewing area of the Wiimote
      camera was tested, a regression analysis was run comparing the distance from the screen to the length of the
      diagonal of the screen.The R2 value resulting from the test was .99, giving a highly reliable equation for the calculation
      of the viewing area based on the distance from the screen. Based on the testing, the use of a Wii remote to create
      an inexpensive interactive whiteboard is a highly practical idea.


 10:40 a.m.
   Nathaniel Wilhelm, Bowling Green High School
  “The Effects of Manure Applications to Farm Fields on E. coli Bacteria Levels Found In Adjacent Drainage Ditches”

      The purpose of this research project was to assess the effects of manure applications to farm fields on E. coli bacteria
      levels found in adjacent drainage ditches. This information is important for assessing the safety of Concentrated
      Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs). CAFOs apply large quantities of manure onto land as fertilizer. This may be a
      problem because runoff from these fields has been found to transport E. coli bacteria to nearby waterways,
      posing a potentially serious health concern for humans. An IDEXX Colilert assay using Quantitray 2000 was used to
      enumerate the E. coli bacteria levels. Three collection sites were determined for each drainage ditch: (1) an upstream
      location, (2) at the main (drainage outlet), and (3) a downstream location. Series of water samples were collected
      from each ditch, four with manure applications and three without manure applications, after a rainfall of .5 inches
      occurred. The results showed some significant differences. On Weston Road, with manure applications, E. coli
      bacteria levels at the main were significantly higher than E. coli bacteria levels at the downstream location. Also,
      the E. colii bacteria levels at the Weston Road main, with manure applications, were significantly higher than the
      E. coli bacteria levels at the Weston Road main without manure applications. These results support the idea manure
      applications to farm fields can affect the amount of E. coli bacteria found in nearby waterways. More water samples
      and information about the manure applications need to be collected to better assess the safety of CAFOs.




                                       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                                  17
Schedule of Events
 Friday, March 26 (Cont.)

 11:00 a.m.
   Chase Starrett, Gahanna Lincoln High School
     “Development of a Prototype Robotic Device Capable of Playing Bass Guitar”

         The purpose of this project was to develop a prototype robotic device that is capable of making the necessary
         complex motions that are involved in playing a guitar. The prototype had the capability to press down on the
         strings of the guitar, move up and down the neck of the guitar to press down the correct fret, and switch between
         the strings of the guitar similar to a human. The prototype was built in two parts: 1) the presser which presses down
         the strings, switches between the strings, and moves up and down the neck of the guitar; and 2) the strummer, which
         is similar to the presser, and is able to switch between the strings of the guitar, and strum the appropriate string at
         the correct time. Several different variables affected whether or not the prototype was able to truly play the guitar.
         These variables included gear ratios (if the motors had enough force to push down on a string with the right gear ratio),
         and speed (were the motors able to move the devices fast enough to stay with the rhythm of a song). The largest
         challenge was finding a way to ensure the two devices could be in sync with one another so that together they
         could produce a song. Testing of the prototype included the use of a pressure pad to determine the force applied to
         a string. The motors were able to put out a force of five to ten Newton’s which was enough force to produce a note.
         Testing also included timing the strummer and presser to determine if a mathematical equation could model
         how these became out of sync. Results obtained over four minute intervals were analyzed. The data was graphed
         and a power regression was found to be the best fit with a R² value of R² = 0.5377. Due to the power of the motors,
         the ability to switch between strings was inconsistent and unable to work when playing a song. This was solved
         by assigning a different presser to a different string each time a string needed to be switched. The inability of the
         two units to stay in sync is a major concern. However this is most likely the easiest thing to fix in the future. Based on
         the design and the tests, it is possible for a robotic device to make the necessary motions to play the guitar. This
         prototype may lead to new developments that could one day help people with disabilities and handicaps enjoy
         the ability to create and play music.




18       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
 Friday, March 26 (Cont.)

 11:30 a.m.          Lunch                                   Student Union, Falcon’s Nest
                     Judges Luncheon                         Student Union 309
                     Advisory Board Luncheon                 Student Union 316
                     Student Advisory Board Meeting          Student Union 307

 12:30 p.m.          Dismantle Posters                       Student Union 228

 1:00 p.m.           Group Photograph                        Student Union, Center Stairwell

 1:15 p.m.           Imagination Station                     Student Union 206

 2:15 p.m.           Awards Ceremony                         Student Union 206
                     Hans Glandorff, Science Teacher
                     Bowling Green High School

 2:45 p.m.           Adjournment

 3:00 p.m.           Board Buses to Hampton Inn




                        The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium             19
Keynote Speaker
 Global Climate Change:
 What Is It? How Will It Affect Us?
 Can We Reduce the Impact By Our Actions?
                                        Climate change is a very intense topic, particularly given the fact
                                        that legislation on the problem is now pending in Congress.
                                        Background information about the phenomenon and methods
                                        which have been used to characterize these changes will be
                                        presented.The human dimension of the problem will be emphasized.
                                        The possible consequences of various scenarios will be explored.
                                        We will then consider solutions to the problem characterized as
     Dr. Andy Jorgensen                 mitigation and adaptation strategies. Participants will be invited to
     Associate Professor of Chemistry
     & Director of General Chemistry    present their suggestions and discuss the possible response of
     University of Toledo
     andy.jorgensen@utoledo.edu
                                        the general public to such ideas.

 Dr. Jorgensen recently completed a sabbatical leave as Senior Fellow at the National
 Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE). His primary work on this leave was
 the development of climate change curricular materials in collaboration with other faculty
 from NCSE’s Council of Environmental Deans and Directors. At Toledo he directs the
 introductory chemistry program and works on innovative educational techniques. He
 previously served as an assistant vice president for academic affairs at the university.

 He earned a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a B.S.
 in Chemistry from Quincy University. He completed a postdoctoral appointment in
 chemical education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has conducted
 research in the area of the environmental impact of synthetic fuels while working at Argonne
 National Laboratory. He is a member of the American Chemical Society’s Committee
 on Education and their Committee on Community Activities. He has been awarded a
 University of Toledo Outstanding Teaching Award and was twice appointed as a Master
 Teacher in the College of Arts and Sciences.

 His present work on climate change education is supported by NASA and NSF.




20         The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
2010 Poster Presenters
 Spencer Allion, Hilltop High School
 “Comparison of Animal Beddings Used in Agricultural Practice”

 Sanchi Arora, Gahanna Lincoln High School
 “Development of a Low Cost Robotic Sensing Device to Aid the Blind”

 Maggie Azzi, Louisville High School
 “The Effect of Age on One's Threshold of Hearing”

 Neil Baker, Hilltop High School
 “Killing Power of Household Cleaners on Escherichia coli”

 Chrysta Beck, Pettisville Local Schools
 “The Growth of the White Cornish-Cross Strain When Fed at Different Protein Levels”

 Cayden Blaisdell, Hilltop Junior High
 “Will a Football Filled with Helium or Air Travel Farther?”

 Whitney Bolin, Bowling Green High School
 “Does the Amount of Skyglow in Bowling Green, Ohio Affect Crime Rates”

 Carlie Bowers, Hilltop High School
 “The Inhibition of Escherichia coli by Mouthwashes”

 John C. Boykin III, St Peter Chanel High School
 “Recycled Plastics Can Be Used to Improve Infra Structural Materials, While Reducing
 Environmental Waste and Cost”

 Jim Brittsan, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “How Clean Is It”

 Travis Burwell, Hilltop High School
 “The Relationship Between Exercise and Test Performance”

 Bridgitte A. Carroll, Sylvania Southview High School
 “The Effects of High Fructose Corn Syrup Consumption on Body Mass Index on People of Varying
 Age and Activeness”

 Sam Chang, Sylvania Southview High School
 “The Effects of a Copper Coil Electromagnet within a Ceramic Magnet to Produce an Efficient Method
 of Neutralizing a Magnetic Field”




                                    The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium        21
2010 Poster Presenters
 Jennifer Choe, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Music & Psychoacoustics”

 Sarah Clapper, Louisville High School
 “The Effect of Extreme and Non-extreme Cases vs. the Effectiveness of the DRX9000, Used for Chiropractic
 Care, in Improving Conductivity of Nerves Located in the Spine”

 Brooke Doubikin, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Bacteria Growth”

 Griffin Dubanowich, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Green Gaming”

 Smriti Gupta, Sylvania Southview High School
 “The Efficiency of Varied Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells under Multiple Light Wavelengths”

 Ivy Hankins, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “New Glass from Old Glass”

 Blaine Hart, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “The Strength of Different Building Designs”

 Eliot L. Hartzler, Pettisville Local Schools
 “What Is Pettisville’s Optimum Wind Turbine Height?”

 Mallory Hope, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Happy Cows…Got Milk?”

 Ali James, Hilltop High School
 “Teaching Methods–Montessori vs. Traditional”

 Emily Johnson, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “E. coli vs. Disinfectants”

 Rachel King, Hilltop High School
 “The Correlation Between Angle of a Knee Bend and the Amount of Stress Put on the Knee”

 Taylor Kruse, Pettisville Local Schools
 “The Effect of Fecal Matter Produced by New Zealand Rabbits Fed Different Percentages of Protein on
 the Growth Rate of Glycine max Plants”

 Angela Li, Sylvania Southview High School
 “The Effect of Trace Elements on the Staebler-Wronski Effect on Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells”




22      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
2010 Poster Presenters
 Brady Livensparger, Hilltop Junior High
 “Which Exercise Affects Heart Rate the Most?”

 Emily Maneval, Hilltop High School
 “Do Primary School Children Mistake Medicine as Candy?”

 Bethany Meadows, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Get the Scoop on Stroop”

 Shelby Miller, Pettisville Local Schools
 “The Type of Gray Wastewater Used to Water Plants and Its Affect on Plant Growth”

 Caitlin Moore, Hilltop High School
 “The Effects of Massage on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Muscle Tension”

 Darren Ng, Southview High School
 “The Effect of Tennis Racquet Frame Modification on Its Resulting Amount of Aerodynamic Drag”

 Mcrea Nofziger, Hilltop High School
 “Pain Tolerance on Various Areas of Skin”

 Devan Osborne, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Personality Determined by Fingerprints”

 Dahkota Parish, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “The Affect of Wingspans on Planes”

 Jessica Potter, Sylvania Southview High School
 “The Effect of Numerous Questioners on the Foot-in-the-Door Phenomenon”

 Addison Rehark, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “The Boldest Brightest Tie Dye”

 Sanchin Rudraraju, Olentangy Liberty High School
 “Energy Harvesting: How Does the Piezo Affect Scale Up”

 Laura Rupp, Pettisville Local Schools
 “How Transparent Covers Protect Scrapbook Paper and Pictures from Fading Due to Sun Damage”

 Megan Russell, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “The Effects of Web Stiffeners on the Load Capacity of a Bridge”




                                   The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium    23
2010 Poster Presenters
 Susan Salari, Sylvania Southview High School
 “The Immediate Effects of Sodium Chloride on the Heart Rate”

 Himanshu Savardekar, Dublin Coffman High School
 “Vaccination of Mice Lacking CD4+ T Cells With an Adenovirus Vector Results in Impaired Humoral
 and Cellular Immune Responses--Implications for HIV/AIDS Patients”

 Sheila Shahri, Sylvania Southiew High School
 “The Use of Solar Energy to Create a Road Deicing System”

 Elaine Souder, Louisville High School
 “Compaction Action: Topsoil as a Natural Filter”

 Alyssa Spencer, Buckeye Valley Middle School
 “Grip It or Rip It”

 Nicole Szparagowski, Bowling Green High School
 “What If a Roof Could Change Color? The Effects of Color on Heat Gain of Roofing”

 Abigail M. Tanner, St. Vincent-St. Mary High School
 “HS Dissolution Rates of Fluorescein Dye in PCL, Techophilic, and PEO Nanofibers”

 Michael L. Thomas, Louisville High School
 “The Effects of Age and Weight on Hip Laxity Percentiles in Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers,
 and Rottweilers”

 Traven Towns, Hilltop High School
 “The Effect of Treated and Non-Treated Water on Daphnia's Heart Rate”

 Brooke Waidelich, Pettisville Local Schools
 “The Most Effective Waterproof Sunscreen”

 Jesse Westfall, Hilltop Junior High
 “Does Verbal Praise or a Reward Work Better When Trying to Motivate Kindergartners?”

 Hannah Wirt, Bowling Green High School
 “Effect of Wind on Geometric Structure of Neoscoma arabesca Spider Web”

 Sophie Wirt, Bowling Green High School
 “Silicone and Non-Silicone Polymer Effects on Moisture Balance in Hair"




24      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Judges Score Sheet for
                Paper Presenters
 Name of Student __________________________________ Name of Judge: ____________________________________

 The Ohio JSHS recognizes students for original research achievements in the sciences, technology, engineering, or
 mathematics (STEM). The overall requirement for a paper presentation is that students demonstrate valid investigation and
 experimentation aimed at discovery of knowledge. The judging criteria and scoring for the Ohio JSHS are presented in
 the following chart. This scale has a total score of 30 points and serves as the basis for discussions among the judging team.
 The decisions of the judging team are final.

                 5 = Superior          4 = Excellent          3 = Good          2 = Satisfactory        1= Fair
                                                                                                              Suggested
 Judging Criteria                                                                                              Weight

 Statement and identification of research problem
     • Is the problem clearly stated?                                                                      5 4 3 2 1
     • Does the presenter demonstrate understanding of existing knowledge about the research problem?
 Scientific thought, creativity/originality
     • Process skills demonstrated by the student in the solution to the research problem and/or the
       research design                                                                                     5 4 3 2 1
     • Student demonstrates his or her individual contributions to and understanding of the
       research problem
     • Level of effort
 Research design, procedures (materials & methods), results
 1. Science
     • Appropriateness of research design and procedures
     • Identification and control of variables
     • Reproducibility
 2. Engineering, computer science, technology                                                              5 4 3 2 1
     • Workable solution that is acceptable to a potential user
     • Recognition of economic feasibility of solution
     • Recognition of relationship between design and end product
     • Tested for performance under conditions of use
     • Results offer an improvement over previous alternatives
 Discussion/conclusions
     • Clarity in stating conclusion
     • Logical conclusion that is relevant to the research problem and the results of experimentation
       or testing                                                                                          5 4 3 2 1
     • Recognizes limits and significance of results
     • Evidence of student’s understanding of the scientific or technological principles
     • Theoretical or practical implications recognized
     • What was learned?
 Skill in communicating research results–oral presentation and written report
     • Clarity in communicating research results to non-specialized audience and to judges
     • Definition of terms as necessary                                                                    5 4 3 2 1
     • Appropriate use of audio-visuals
     • Response to questions from audience and judges
 Acknowledgment of sources and major assistance received                                                   5 4 3 2 1
 TOTAL SCORE




                                     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                           25
Judges Score Sheet for
              Poster Presenters
 Student Name ______________________________________________________________________

 A. Quality of Research Design: (60 pts)
 ______________ 1. Clarity and delineation of problem (10 pts)
 ______________ 2. Identification of variables (10 pts)
 ______________ 3. Suitability of research equipment (10 pts)
 ______________ 4. Recognition of limitations in the data (10 pts)
 ______________ 5. Degree to which the data support the conclusions (10 pts)
 ______________ 6. Uniqueness of, or originality, in the research topic (10 pts)


 B. Quality of Presentation: (40 pts)
 ______________ 7. Abstract (10 pts)
 ______________ 8. Organization of the presentation (10 pts)
 ______________ 9. Clarity of expression of graphs and tables (10 pts)
 ______________ 10. Handling of questions from the viewers (10 pts)


 C. ______________ Total


 D. Judge’s Comments




26     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Research Paper Awardees: 2009
 1st Place Winner        – Keith Hawkins, GlenOak High School, Canton, Ohio
  • $2,000 Ohio JSHS College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
  • Presented research paper at 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid
  • Won the First Place Award in Physical Sciences at the National JSHS and a $16,000 Scholarship
  • Awarded a trip to the 2009 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF)


 2nd Place Winner         – Kevin Hawkins, GlenOak High School, Canton, Ohio
  • $1,500 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
  • Presented research paper at 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid
  • Competed for an expenses-paid trip to the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF)
  • Won the Third Place Award in Mathematics at the National JSHS and a $2,000 Scholarship


 3rd Place Winner        – Julia Hu, Sylvania Southview High School, Sylvania, Ohio
  • $1,000 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
  • Invited to participate in the 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid



 4th Place Winner        – Karen Kruzer, West Geauga High School, Chesterland, Ohio
  • $500 Award sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, BGSU
  • Delegate to the 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid


 5th Place Winner        – Aaditya Shidham, Upper Arlington High School, Columbus, Ohio
  • $250 Award sponsored by the Department of Chemistry, BGSU
  • Invited to participate in the 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid




                            The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium           27
Research Paper Awardees: 2009
 1st Alternate       – Ashley Hoehn, Ottoville High School, Cloverdale, Ohio
     • $150 Award sponsored by College of Education and Human Development, BGSU
     • Delegate to the 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid


 2nd Alternate        – Christopher Jennings, Sylvania Southview High School, Toledo, Ohio
     • $100 Award sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy, BGSU




28     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Research Poster Awardees: 2009
 “Best in Show” Award
   – Rebekah Meller, Pettisville High School, Wauseon, Ohio
      • Invited to attend the National JSHS with expenses paid
      • Sponsored by Perstorp Polyols, Inc.


 Outstanding Poster: 1st Place - 9th and 10th Grade Award
   – John Boykin III, St. Peter Chanel High School, Brunswick, Ohio
      • $50 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Outstanding Poster: 1st Place - 11th and 12th Grade Award
   – Rebekah Meller, Pettisville High School, Wauseon, Ohio
      • $50 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Outstanding Poster: 2nd Place - 9th and 10th Grade Award
   – Kevin Fenk, Louisville, Ohio
      • $25 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Outstanding Poster: 2nd Place - 11th and 12th Grade Award
   – Chelsea Donelson, Gahanna Lincoln High School, Gahanna, Ohio
      • $25 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU




                            The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium   29
Research Poster Awardees: 2009
 Thomas Alva Edison Award
     – Abigail Styron, Hilltop High School, Alvordton, Ohio
        • $250 Award sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
        • Delegate to the 2009 National JSHS with expenses paid


 Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award




     – Cristin D. Hagans, Hilltop High School, Alvordton, Ohio
        • $500 Faculty Award for Classroom Material
        • Sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force




30     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Research Paper Awards: 2010
 1st Place Winner
   $2,000 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
        • Presents research paper at National JSHS with expenses paid
        • Chance to compete for an expenses paid trip to the London International Youth
          Science Forum (LIYSF)



 2nd Place Winner
   $1,500 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
        • Presents research paper at National JSHS with expenses paid
        • Chance to compete for an expenses paid trip to the London International Youth
          Science Forum (LIYSF)

 The 1st and 2nd place winners have an opportunity to win the following awards at the
 National JSHS:
   • Six $12,000 undergraduate tuition scholarships, awarded to each of the 1st place finalists
     in the National research paper competition
   • Six $8,000 undergraduate tuition scholarships, awarded to each of the 2nd place finalists
     in the National research paper competition
   • Six $4,000 undergraduate tuition scholarships, awarded to each of the 3rd place finalists
     in the National research paper competition
   • An expenses paid trip to the London International Youth Science Forum, an exchange
     program bringing together over 400 participants from 60 nations. The London trip
     is awarded to each of the 1st place National JSHS finalists; the runner-ups are
     alternate winners.



 3rd Place Winner
   $1,000 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
        • Expenses paid trip to the National JSHS




                              The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium          31
Research Paper Awards: 2010
 4th Place Winner
     $500 Award sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, BGSU
         • Expenses paid trip to the National JSHS


 5th Place Winner
     $250 Award sponsored by the Department of Chemistry, BGSU
         • Expenses paid trip to the National JSHS


 1st Alternate
     $150 Award sponsored by the College of Education and Human Development, BGSU


 2nd Alternate
     $100 Award sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy, BGSU




32     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Research Poster Awards: 2010
 “Best in Show” Award
   Presents poster at National JSHS with expenses paid; sponsored by Perstorp Polyols, Inc.

 Outstanding Poster: 1st Place - 9th and 10th Grade Award
   $50 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Outstanding Poster: 1st Place - 11th and 12th Grade Award
   $50 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Outstanding Poster: 2nd Place - 9th and 10th Grade Award
   $25 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Outstanding Poster: 2nd Place - 11th and 12th Grade Award
   $25 Award sponsored by COSMOS, BGSU


 Thomas Alva Edison Award
   $250 Award sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU


 Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award
   $500 Faculty Award for Classroom Materials sponsored by the United States Army, Navy,
   and Air Force




                            The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium        33
Acknowledgments
 2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium

 Dr. Emilio Duran, Ohio JSHS Director, School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
 Dr. Robert Midden, NWO/COSMOS Director, Department of Chemistry, BGSU
 LTC Steven J. Letzring, U.S. Army, Commander/Professor, Military Science, BGSU
 Ms. Iris Szelagowski, Ohio JSHS Coordinator




Judging Teams
 Mr. Hans Glandorff, Ohio JSHS Assistant Coordinator, Science Teacher, Bowling Green High School




 Paper Judges
 Dr. Anjali Gray              Biology & Health Sciences, Lourdes College
 Dr. David Meel               Mathematics & Statistics Department, BGSU
 Dr. Stephania Messersmith    Chemistry, BGSU
 Dr. Jon Secaur               Physics, Kent State University
 Mr. Jerry Szelagowski        Geologist, Industrial Chemist, Retired

 Poster Judges
 Dr. Kate Dellenbusch         Department of Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
 Dr. Jodi Haney               School of Teaching and Learning & Department of Environmental
                              Sustainability, BGSU
 Dr. Chris Keil               Department of Environmental Sustainability, BGSU
 Dr. Dale Klopfer             Department of Psychology, BGSU
 Dr. John Laird               Department of Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
 Dr. Kamau Mbuthia            Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
 Dr. Robert Midden            Department of Chemistry, BGSU
 Dr. Jeff Miner               Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
 Dr. Matt Partin              Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
 Dr. Vipa Phuntumart          Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
 Dr. Eileen Underwood         Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
 Dr. Rick Worch               School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
 Mr. Jake Burgoon             Northwest Ohio Center of STEM Education, BGSU
 Ms. Tami Wales               Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU

 Session Moderators
 Ann Burkam                  Buckeye Valley Middle School, Teacher
 Fred Donelson               Gahanna Lincoln High School, Teacher
 Donna Meller                Pettisville Local Schools, Teacher
 Cristin Hagans              Hilltop High School, Teacher
 Robert Sudomir              Louisville High School, Teacher
 Abbie Smith                 Millcreek-West Unity High School, Teacher
 Blythe Tipping              Sylvania Southview High School, Teacher



34     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Judging Teams cont.
 2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium

 Staff
 Lisa Addis                        Graphic Design/Web Support
 Patricia Ball                     Photographer
 Emilio Duran                      Ohio JSHS Director
 Hans Glandorff                    Assistant Ohio JSHS Coordinator
 Nancy Hoose                       BGSU/COSMOS Support Staff
 Robert Midden                     NWO/COSMOS Director
 Iris Szelagowski                  Ohio JSHS Coordinator

 Session Presiders/Program Assistants/Chaperons
 Josh Godfrey                 BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Jason Kimmel                 BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Patricia Lanser              BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Renee Lipstraw               BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Tara Lozen                   BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Audrey Maran                 BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Amanda O’Shea                BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Wayne Oswald                 BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Megan Persinger              BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Brooke Roth                  BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Mackenzie Shafer             BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Tara Terndrup                BGSU Undergraduate Student
 Nathan Yaussy                Graduate Student, Kent State University

 University Sponsors
 COSMOS and The Northwest Ohio Center of Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education
 College of Arts and Sciences
 College of Education and Human Development
 Department of Biological Sciences
 Department of Chemistry
 Department of Physics and Astronomy
 School of Teaching and Learning

 Community Sponsors
 Terry Hartman, Libbey Glass, Inc.
 Linda Lower, Perstorp Polyols, Inc.

 Special Thanks
 Hampton Inn, Bowling Green
 Ice Arena, BGSU
 Imagination Station, Toledo
 Laboratory Tours, BGSU
 Planetarium, BGSU




                                       The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium   35
Advisory Board
 2010 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium

 Dr. Emilio Duran, Ohio JSHS Director           Dr. Robert Midden, NWO/COSMOS Director
 School of Teaching and Learning                Department of Chemistry
 Bowling Green State University                 Bowling Green State University

 LTC Steven J. Letzring                         Dr. Lena Ballone-Duran
 U.S. Army, Commander                           School of Teaching and Learning
 Bowling Green State University                 Bowling Green State University

 Ms. Iris Szelagowski                           Mr. Hans Glandorff
 Ohio JSHS Coordinator                          Assistant Ohio JSHS Coordinator
                                                Bowling Green High School

 Dr. Jon Secaur                                 Mr. Gerald Szelagowski
 Kent State University                          Geologist, Industrial Chemist

 Ms. Blythe Tipping                             Ms. Donna Meller
 Sylvania Southview High School                 Pettisville High School

 Ms. Leslie Yaussy, RN, BSN                     Mr. Daniel Yaussy
 Public Health Nurse                            Forest Service
 Advanced Professional, Delaware                U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

 Ms. Ann Burkam                                 Mr. Fred Donelson
 Buckeye Valley Middle School                   Gahanna Lincoln High School

 Ms. Abbie Smith                                Ms. Cristin Hagans
 Millcreek-West Unity School                    Hilltop High School

 Ms. Linda Lower                                Ms. Nancy Hoose
 Perstorp Polyols, Inc.                         COSMOS, Bowling Green State University

 Mr. Robert Sudomir
 Louisville High School




36     The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
History of the Junior Science &
          Humanities Symposium
 In 1958, Colonel George F. Leist, a native Toledo resident, together with the U.S. Army Research Office,
 initiated the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium (JSHS) for secondary school science students
 throughout the United States. The JSHS Program has been sponsored by the United States Department
 of the Army since its inception. The Departments of the Navy and Air Force joined this initiative after
 1995 to increase and encourage student interest in science, engineering, and mathematics. Resulting
 from this sponsorship and the cooperative efforts of universities throughout the nation, the JSHS
 program encompasses forty-eight regional symposia reaching high schools throughout the United States,
 Puerto Rico, and in cooperation with the Department of Defense Schools of Europe and the Pacific.

 In 2010, Bowling Green State University and the School of Teaching and Learning at BGSU with the
 support of The Northwest Ohio Center of Excellence in STEM Education (NWO) will host the 47th Ohio
 JSHS for the third year. At the symposium, first and second place finalists will be chosen to present their
 research papers at the National JSHS to be held in Bethesda, Maryland, on April 28 to May 2, 2010.
 These two paper presenter finalists will compete at the National JSHS for a $12,000 scholarship and one
 of six opportunities to represent the United States at the London International Youth Science Fortnight
 (LIYSF) during the summer of 2010. In addition, three other presenters will win an all expenses paid trip
 to the National JSHS as part of their award. These five Ohio JSHS awardees will have the opportunity to
 interact with over 400 participants in a program of networking and scientific exchange. Since 1966,
 forty-eight Ohio JSHS winners have presented papers at the National JSHS. Having earned a first place
 award, sixteen of these students have subsequently presented their papers at the LIYSF in London, England.



 WHY PARTICIPATE?
 Former JSHS participants confirm that the significance and results of JSHS extend beyond scholarships and
 recognition. At regional and national symposia students and their teachers have the opportunity to:
   • Participate in a forum honoring exceptional work and encouraging personal and academic growth.
   • Interact with practicing researchers who offer a look beyond high school to opportunities in
      post secondary education and to academic and career development in the sciences, engineering,
      and mathematics.
   • Develop higher-order thinking skills and integrated learning across disciplines through the process
     of scientific inquiry, writing a scientific paper, and developing a presentation – all skills that will
     benefit future post secondary and graduate pursuits.
   • Participate in a scientific conference, take field trips, and have their work published.
   • Gain self-confidence not only through the experience of the research investigation, but also
     through networking among participants of similar interests.




                                  The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                   37
Cumulative Awards
                                          Cumulative Poster Awards are listed on our website: www.ojshs.org

Thomas Alva Edison Award
 The Thomas Alva Edison Award is presented each year to the student who has independently constructed
 research equipment and carried out a successful research investigation. The following students are past
 winners of this award:


 Year         Name                           City                   School
 1979         Diana Lauck                    Ravenna                Ravenna High School
 1981         James Kasner                   Millersburg            West Holmes High School
 1982         Cindy Raymond                  Kent                   Roosevelt High School
 1983         Eric Wertz                     Stow                   Lakeview High School
 1984         Lyle Reusser                   Millersburg            West Holmes High School
 1985         David Roberts                  Westerville            Westerville North High School
 1986         Eric Germann                   Van Wert Co.           Lincolnview High School
 1987         Rodney Hartman                 Carroll                Bloom-Carroll High School
 1988         Matthew Fuerst                 Wickliffe              Wickliffe Senior High School
 1989         Michael McGrath                Ashland                Ashland City High School
 1990         Mathew Heston                  Carrollton             Carrollton High School
 1991         Michael Ruthemeyer             Cincinnati             St. Xavier High School
 1992         Gregory Lohman                 Medina                 Highland High School
 1993         Aimee Springowski              Sheffield Lake         Brookside High School
 1994         Jeff Smith                     Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
 1995         Stephan M. Gogola              Kent                   Theodore Roosevelt High School
 1996         Adreanna Decker                Barnesville            Barnesville High School
 1997         Lev Horodyskyj                 North Royalton         Padua Franciscan High School
 1998         Lev Horodyskyj                 North Royalton         Padua Franciscan High School
 1999         Andrew Sauer                   Cincinnati             St. Xavier High School
 2000         Margaret Engoren               Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
 2001         Lindsey Heine                  Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
 2002         James Ristow                   Kent                   Theodore Roosevelt High School
 2003         Jared Steed                    Delaware               Buckeye Valley High School
 2004         Jared Steed                    Delaware               Buckeye Valley High School
 2005         Robbie Christian               North Canton           Hoover High School
 2006         Alex Liber                     Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
 2007         Ruth Chang                     Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
              Victoria Ellis                 Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
 2008         Elizabeth Engoren              Sylvania               Sylvania Southview High School
 2009         Abigail Styron                 Alvordton              Hilltop High School




38      The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
The Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished
                                        Teacher Award
 Each year, an Ohio teacher is selected to receive The Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award.
 The United States Army, Navy, and Air Force sponsor this award of $500 to purchase books, supplies,
 and equipment for the school. The following teachers have been honored as past winners of the
 Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award:

 Year         Name                               City                    School
 1978         Father Charles S. Sweeney          Toledo                  St. John’s High School
 1979         Father James Lotze                 Toledo                  St. John’s High School
 1980         Earl Shafer                        Bowling Green           Bowling Green High School
 1981         Jerry Jividen                      Hudson                  Hudson High School
 1982         Jon Secaur                         Kent                    Roosevelt High School
 1983         Sister Mary Blandina               Toledo                  Cardinal Stritch High School
 1984         Rebecca Stricklin                  Cincinnati              Oak Hills High School
 1985         Kay Ballantine                     Thornville              Sheridan High School
 1986         Iris Szelagowski                   Toledo                  Woodward High School
 1987         Diane Gabriel                      Carroll                 Bloom-Carroll High School
 1988         Spencer E. Reams                   Zanesfield              Benjamin Logan High School
 1989         Father Charles S. Sweeney          Toledo                  St. John’s High School
 1990         Jon Secaur                         Kent                    Roosevelt High School
 1991         John A. Blakeman                   Sandusky                Perkins High School
 1992         Penny Karabedian Cobau             Sylvania                Sylvania Southview High School
 1993         Vaughn D. Leigh                    Hudson                  Hudson High School
 1994         Penny Karabedian Cobau             Sylvania                Sylvania Southview High School.
 1995         Kathleen Keller                    Dayton                  Carroll High School
 1996         John Jameson                       Cincinnati              Cincinnati Country Day
 1997         Evelyn Davidson                    Cincinnati              Ursuline Academy
 1998         Paula Butler                       Cincinnati              Cincinnati Country Day
 1999         Barbara Kraemer                    North Royalton          Padua Franciscan High School
 2000         Susan Sanders                      North Royalton          Padua Franciscan High School
 2001         Tim Giulivg                        Parma                   Padua Franciscan High School
 2002         Darla Warnecke                     Miller City             Miller City High School
 2003         Peggy Sheets                       Upper Arlington         Upper Arlington High School
 2004         Connie Hubbard                     North Canton            Hoover High School
 2005         Ann Burkam                         Delaware                Buckeye Valley Middle School
 2006         Hans Glandorff                     Bowling Green           Bowling Green High School
 2007         Connie Hubbard                     North Canton            Hoover High School
 2008         Donna Meller                       Wauseon                 Pettisville Local Schools
 2009         Cristin Hagans                     West Unity              Hilltop High School




                                The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium                    39
Cumulative Record of the State of Ohio Student
           Presenters to the National JSHS 1966-2009
 Year                Name                                  City                            School
 1966-L              Patricia Fraser                       Mayfield Heights                Regina High School
 1967-L              Mark Meuty                            Toledo                          Woodward High School
 1968-L              Katharine Lowenhaupt                  Cincinnati                      Walnut Hills High School
 1969-L              Susan Krueger                         North Olmsted                   Magnificant High School
 1970-L              Bruce Arthur                          Westerville                     Westerville High School
 1971-L              Robert Butcher                        Wapakoneta                      Wapakoneta High School
 1972-L              Jon Alexander                         Maumee                          St. John’s High School
 1973-L              William Steers                        Toledo                          St. John’s High School
 1974-L              Francis Sydnor                        Toledo                          St. John’s High School
 1975-L              Jane Stoffregen                       Toledo                          St. Ursula Academy
 1976                Harlan Krumholz                       Dayton                          Meadowdale High School
 1977                Paul Cahill                           Akron                           East High School
 1978                Kevin Anderson                        Toledo                          St. John’s High School
 1979-L              Eric Evans                            Stow                            Stow High School
 1980                Carl Von Patterson                    Ravenna                         Ravenna High School
 1981                Kelly McAleese                        Medina                          Black River High School
 1982                Robert Sturgill                       Toledo                          St. John’s High School
 1983                Shirley Bodi                          Toledo                          Cardinal Stritch High School
 1984                Douglas Gorman                        Cincinnati                      Oak Hills High School
 1985                Robert Freeman                        Thornville                      Sheridan High School
 1986                Jill Thomley                          Toledo                          Woodward High School
 1987                Kenneth Clubok                        Athens                          Athens High School
 1988                Ron Birnbaum                          Toledo                          Maumee Valley Country Day School
 1989                Aaron P. Garcia                       Toledo                          St. John’s High School
 1990                Simon Solotko                         Kent                            Roosevelt High School
 1991                Joann Elizabeth Roy                   Sandusky                        Perkins High School
 1992                Andrew Gano                           Sylvania                        Sylvania Southview High School
 1993                Daniel Stevenson                      Hudson                          Hudson High School
 1994-L              Scott Damrauer                        Sylvania                        Sylvania Southview High School
 1995                Amy Caudy                             Sunbury                         Big Walnut High School
 1996                Paul Gemin                            Dayton                          Carroll High School
 1997                Smita De                              Cincinnati                      Cincinnati Country Day School
 1998                Stephanie Meyers                      Cincinnati                      Ursuline Academy
 1999                Jason Lee Douglas                     Cincinnati                      Cincinnati Country Day School
 2000-L              Ulyana Horodyskyj                     North Royalton                  Padua Franciscan High School
 2001                Ulyana Horodyskyj                     North Royalton                  Padua Franciscan High School
 2002                Ulyana Horodyskyj                     North Royalton                  Padua Franciscan High School
 2003-L              James Zhou                            Upper Arlington                 Upper Arlington High School
 2004                Paul Hoffman                          Upper Arlington                 Upper Arlington High School
 2005                Paul Scheid                           Gates Mills                     Gilmour Academy
                     Laura Johnson                         Upper Arlington                 Upper Arlington High School
 2006                Daniel Litt                           Pepper Pike                     Orange High School
                     Madhav Chopra                         North Canton                    Hoover High School
 2007                Jyotiraditya Sinha                    North Canton                    Hoover High School
                     Saumitra Thakur                       Sylvania                        Sylvania Southview High School
 2008-L              Aaditya Shidham                       Upper Arlington                 Upper Arlington High School
                     David Litt                            Pepper Pike                     Orange High School
 2009-L              Keith Hawkins                         Canton                          GlenOak High School
                     Kevin Hawkins                         Canton                          GlenOak High School
 L = Winners of National JSHS who presented papers at the London International Youth Science Fortnight (LIYSF).



40        The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
BGSU Campus Map




        The 47th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium   41
           The 47th Annual Ohio Junior
        Science & Humanities Symposium
                 March 24-26, 2010




Sponsored by:



                                     School of Teaching and Learning

				
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