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					 RESPONDING TO THE NEEDS OF
      NORTH CAROLINA

 CAMPUS RESPONSE REPORTS –
          PHASE I



4.4 OUR COMMUNITIES AND THEIR
  ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION
                                 May 2008
                         Appalachian State University

D. Economic Transformation/Community Development

   As an engaged rural university, Appalachian has forged strong ties with both the
   state and the region in which the University is located. In addition to a long tradition
   of preparing excellent teachers and local government professionals, Appalachian has
   built an enviable reputation as an artistic and cultural center for western North
   Carolina, and a provider of a wide array of essential services—from health programs
   to economic development to science education--for the immediate community and
   the region. A number of these programs and activities have grown out of
   Appalachian’s mission to meet the distinctive needs of the rural communities within
   its geographical spheres of influence and service. In the last decade, Appalachian has
   added a robust portfolio of entrepreneurship activities and initiatives and developed
   signature programs in sustainable development and renewable energy.

   Appalachian State has seven centers and 25 academic programs that target specific
   industries, preparing students for careers in those industries and providing outreach
   support to companies and their employees. For example, a recent new initiative, the
   Appalachian Center for Mountain and Steep Slope Viticulture, will provide
   Appalachian State University with an opportunity to take a leadership role in
   developing and mentoring a small but viable segment in the wine industry, one of
   the fastest growing industries in the U.S.

   Sustainable Development and Appropriate Technology initiatives at ASU support
   multiple programs that help communities and industries in areas including biofuels,
   wind power, solar energy, and sustainable agricultural practices. Some of these
   multidisciplinary programs have been operating for 15 years and involve students
   and faculty across 11 departments and 3 colleges.

      1. Increased Capacity and Commitment to Lead Economic Transformation and
         Community Development [Recommendation 4.4.1.—UNC should increase
         its capacity and commitment to respond to and lead economic
         transformation and community development.]

          a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this
             recommendation.

              The Center for Entrepreneurship
The Center provides opportunities for students and citizens throughout
the region to learn about entrepreneurship through a growing array of
educational offerings and programs that promote interaction with
entrepreneurial organizations in the region and around the world.
Academic programs include a concentration in entrepreneurship for
business management majors and a new minor in entrepreneurship for
non-business students starting Fall, 2008. Eight new undergraduate and
graduate level courses in entrepreneurship have been developed recently
including innovative courses in International Entrepreneurship jointly
taught with partner universities abroad, an Entrepreneurship Practicum
courses where student teams work with regional entrepreneurs, and a
new course for first semester freshmen. Co-curricular programs and
activities include the Carole Moore McLeod Entrepreneur Summit, the
Pitch Your Idea in 90 Seconds Contest, the Young Entrepreneurs
Symposium, the Association of Student Entrepreneurs Club, the Dale
Tweedy Mentoring Program for Entrepreneur Scholars, the Extreme
Entrepreneur Tour, Start Your Own Business Workshops, and a new
Freshman Appalachian Entrepreneurs Community.

   i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
      assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

        Programs developed and/or supported by the Center for
         Entrepreneurship are successful in large part due to the strong
         support received from ASU faculty, staff, and administration
         across the entire campus. All of the co-curricular programs are
         funded from private sources. The effectiveness of
         entrepreneurship initiatives at Appalachian State is assessed by
         student enrollment in courses, participation in entrepreneurship
         events, and student surveys.

   ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
       if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

        No significant obstacles exist. Effectiveness can be improved,
        though, by adding human resources to be able to increase the
        breadth and depth of programs offered, working with more
        faculty and staff across campus to encourage broader student
        participation in entrepreneurship programs, increasing
        engagement with businesses in the region, developing
        collaborative relationships with similar programs at other UNC
        campuses, and obtaining increased financial support from both
        public and private sources.
Sustainable Development and Appropriate Technology

Appalachian’s Sustainable Development and Appropriate Technology
initiatives move academic theory to useful, workable practice for the
citizens of North Carolina by assisting communities and businesses solve
problems through active and supportive inter-relationships. The
programs, some operating for 15 years, involve more than 25 faculty and
their students from 11 departments and three colleges working with
municipalities, small business owners, and industries to plan and carry
out the following initiatives: watershed and farmland protection,
sustainable micro-enterprise development, small wind and hydropower
systems, waste and water management, community and shelter design,
technology assessment, small scale production systems, and technology
transfer. Examples of these outwardly-focused projects are: the
Collaborative Biofuels Project, powering area mass transit; the North
Carolina Small Wind Power Initiative and the Beech Mountain Turbine
Research & Demonstration Site; the Bio-Shelters Project targeting
growers greenhouses and solar lumber-drying kilns; planning for the Elk
Knob State Park; and the Valle Crucis teaching and research farm,
assisting local farmers and entrepreneurs build with sustainable
agricultural practice.

   i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
      assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

       The programs’ strengths and effectiveness are demonstrated by
       the competitive funding obtained from agents such as, the Z.
       Smith Reynolds and the Golden LEAF Foundations, state and
       federal grants, collaborative partnering, an endowment, and the
       continuing funding provided by local communities. Expansion and
       enhancement needs for Sustainable Development and
       Appropriate Technology research and outreach will continue to
       grow through the next decades.

   ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
       if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

       It is difficult to support multi-year, longitudinal research projects
       (e.g., North Carolina Small Wind Initiative and Sustainable
       Community Economic Development and Outreach program) with
       short-term grant funding. Some obstacles can be reduced with
       additional grant-writing training to pursue longer term funding
       opportunities.
   Appalachian and the Community Together (ACT)

   Appalachian and the Community Together (ACT) is Appalachian State
   University’s clearinghouse for community service, service learning, and
   community-based research opportunities within the North Carolina High
   Country area, as well as across the state, nation, and world. ACT offers
   diverse opportunities for individuals and student groups to get involved
   in human services and environmental advocacy, as well as assists faculty
   members and 130 community partners with integrating community
   service projects into their academic courses and local agencies.
   Appalachian was recognized “with distinction” on the President’s Higher
   Education Honor Roll, with a focus on outreach to disadvantaged youth.

   Highlights of community development include, 274,612 student hours
   spent serving the local community, $4,954,000 of volunteer value
   provided to the local economy, $116,000 in direct funds raised for local
   community agencies, $105,000 in educational awards provided to ASU
   students for their participation in our NC-ACTS/AmeriCorps Programs, 42
   community-based research projects, and 550 service projects in
   database.

       i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
          assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

          The ACT program is considered a model that has been emulated
          on many campuses. It is well-established and very successful. Its
          effectiveness has been refined from continual feedback over the
          years from many agencies and participants.

       ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
           if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

          No significant barriers exist. The program is very successful.

b. New Programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
   recommendation (including those in planning but not yet implemented,
   if any).

   No new programs are planned at this time.

c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated.

   Not applicable since no new programs are planned.
   d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines where appropriate
      (include department/position responsible for implementation, and
      identification of resources/costs).

      Not applicable since no new programs are planned.

2. Service/Engagement with Rural/Underserved [Recommendation 4.4.2.—
   UNC should focus specific effort in meeting the needs of rural and
   underserved areas of the state.]

   a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this
      recommendation.

      Successful Existing Programs

      Appalachian State University is meeting the needs of rural and
      underserved communities throughout the area with ongoing programs
      specifically designed to address issues affecting women, children and
      seniors in rural North Carolina. These programs include a three-county
      childhood obesity intervention program, the Blue Ridge Science
      Education Outreach Center, the NC Methamphetamine Initiative and ASU
      Partnership for Methamphetamine Treatment Program, Start Your Own
      Business Workshops, Appalachian Family Innovations, the Senior
      Companion Program, and the Appalachian (Retired and Senior Volunteer)
      Program.

          i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
             assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

              Programs focusing on rural and underserved communities at
              Appalachian are successful because of the diverse needs they
              address as well as because of the breadth of faculty expertise
              harnessed to meet those needs. A majority of the programs are
              focused on becoming demonstration models for other
              communities throughout the state. Effectiveness of these
              programs is determined primarily through feedback by
              participants and service providers.

          ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
              if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

              No significant obstacles are perceived.
b. New Programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
   recommendation (including those in planning but not yet implemented,
   if any).

   A Ph.D. program in Rural Clinical Psychology is under development.
   The Psychology Department is currently seeking internal permission to
   plan a Ph.D. program in Rural Clinical Psychology to prepare scientist-
   practitioner psychologists to practice, consult and conduct research in
   rural community settings. A Rural Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program at
   ASU would address the dearth of behavioral and mental health
   professionals in rural NC. Efforts would be made to encourage
   applications from individuals native to rural NC given such recruitment
   often relates to retention. Faculty and students would leverage their
   expertise to serve the citizens of NC and to disseminate scientific
   scholarship to inform government officials, the public, scientists and
   practitioners.


c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated.

   Regarding the College of Health Sciences, no programs will be eliminated;
   the six existing programs will be combined to form the new college.

   Costs of the new Ph.D. program will be minimized by eliminating the
   existing terminal masters program in Clinical Health Psychology.
   Interdisciplinary collaboration with Social Work, Anthropology, and
   Community Counseling will enhance efficiency as well as the
   interdisciplinary quality of Ph.D. candidate training.

   The Childhood Obesity program will initially be funded by an external
   federal grant for the three year grant period. Numerous partner agencies
   have agreed to allocate budgetary resources over the three year period
   which will enable them to sustain their respective programs after the
   grant program cycle is completed. In addition, the current initiative builds
   upon a pilot program currently supported by some internal funding. The
   external funds and community partner commitments will suspend the
   need for continued ASU financial support.

d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines where appropriate
   (include department/position responsible for implementation, and
   identification of resources/costs).

   The new College of Health Sciences should be constructed by fall, 2011.
   Academic Affairs and Business Affairs will be responsible for planning and
       construction of the building. The primary source of funds will be state
       appropriations.

       Pending ASU internal approval of the Ph.D. program and external NC
       General Administration’s approval of the Authorization to Plan
       document, the Department of Psychology will apply for authorization to
       establish the program in the fall of 2009. The first incoming class of Ph.D.
       students would arrive in the fall of 2011, and would graduate in 2016.
       The Chair of Department of Psychology, the Graduate Programs
       Coordinator for the Department of Psychology, the Dean of the College of
       Arts & Sciences, the Dean of Research and Graduate Studies, and the
       Provost will be responsible for program implementation and monitoring
       accountability and effectiveness. Internal resources from the eliminated
       MA program will be transferred to the Rural Clinical Psychology Ph.D.
       program. Department of Psychology faculty will maintain and improve
       existing contracts with community agencies, will seek training grants
       from community agencies, and will pursue external research grants and
       contracts. In addition, ASU administrators have agreed to allocate
       necessary funds to develop and maintain this program.

       If funded, the Childhood Obesity program will begin by January 2009 and
       end in December 2011. A grant board will monitor the progress of the
       grant program. Appalachian State University will control the fiscal aspects
       of the grant program and establish a Special Funds Account for that
       purpose. Semi-annual grant reports and an annual presentation will be
       made to the granting agency.

3. Mechanisms to Link Faculty and Campus Expertise with Regional Economic
   Transformation/Development [Recommendation 4.4.3.—UNC should seek
   to align appropriate campus programs with the strategic economic plans
   (including sector and cluster plans) of their regions and the state,
   recognizing the unique differences and challenges of our state’s economic
   and geographic regions.]

   a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this
      recommendation.

       Successful Existing Programs

       Appalachian State has a number of centers and academic programs that
       target specific industries, preparing students to become valuable
       contributors in those industries, and providing outreach support and
       educational opportunities to companies and their employees. Centers
       focused on specific industries include the Richard S. Brantley Center for
   Risk and Insurance, the Center for Financial Planning, the Energy Center,
   the Institute for Health and Human Services, the Center for Applied
   Research on Emerging Technologies, and two proposed new centers: the
   Appalachian Center for Mountain and Steep Slope Viticulture, and the
   Center for Economic Research and Policy Analysis. Industry-focused
   academic programs include: Accounting, Actuarial Sciences, Apparel and
   Textiles, Appropriate Technology, Art Management, Building Sciences,
   Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Criminal Justice,
   Electronic Media/Broadcasting, Finance and Banking, Graphic Design,
   Graphics Arts and Imaging Technology, Healthcare Management,
   Hospitality and Tourism Management, Industrial Design, Interior Design,
   International Business, Music Industry Studies, Recreation Management,
   Risk Management and Insurance, Technical Photography, Theatre Design
   and Technology. Appalachian’s first Professional Science Master’s (PSM)
   degree—in Instrumentation and Automation—enrolled its first students
   in Fall 2007. Other PSMs are in development.

      i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
         assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

          ASU has a long history of providing programs that support new
          and emerging industries and is often ahead of the curve in some
          areas, e.g. renewable energy (via the Energy Center and the
          Appropriate Technology programs) and a popular international
          business major that has more than 170 students enrolled. These
          programs are multi-disciplinary and involve significant cross-
          campus and inter-institutional collaborations. Effectiveness of
          these programs includes participation rates and direct feedback
          from participants.

      ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
          if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

          No obstacles are perceived.

b. New Programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
   recommendation (including those in planning but not yet implemented,
   if any).

   Wine Production and Management Degree

   A Bachelor of Science degree in Wine Production and Management is in
   the final approval process. The interdisciplinary curriculum includes
   course work in applied science (biology, botany, chemistry, viticulture,
      enology), business (entrepreneurship, sustainable business practice and
      small business management) and professional skills (GIS, technical
      writing). In addition, the program has a global component through
      established collaborations with the University of Udine (Italy), University
      of Bordeaux (France), and Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal). The
      new program will be a major partner in North Carolina's growing wine
      industry through faculty research, student internships, and the strategic
      placement of graduates in key positions that will have a significant impact
      on the development of the industry.

      Certificate in Economic Development

      A graduate certificate in economic development is being created to serve
      the needs of local communities in western North Carolina. The 18-credit
      certificate will insure that recipients have a good understanding of
      economic development issues. Participants will take courses in economic
      development, local government administration, planning theory, grant
      writing, environmental policy, group facilitation techniques, and public
      management.

   c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated.

      Existing stand-alone course work in enology and viticulture will be
      combined into the new Bachelor of Science in Wine Production and
      Management.

      The graduate certificate will combine selected existing course work from
      the Master of Public Administration and the Master of Arts in Geography.

   d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines where appropriate
      (include department/position responsible for implementation, and
      identification of resources/costs).

      The Bachelor of Science in Wine Production and Management is slated
      for implementation in Fall 2009.

      Implementation of the Certificate in Economic Development is scheduled
      for Fall 2009 under the aegis of the Department of Political Science and
      Criminal Justice. Given the projected demand for the certificate, one
      additional faculty line will be needed.

4. Promoting Arts [Recommendation 4.4.4.—UNC should promote the arts
   and cultural enrichment in all regions of the state.]
a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this
   recommendation.

   Arts, Cultural Enrichment Opportunities, and Co-Curricular Activities

   The arts and cultural enrichment opportunities are numerous and varied
   and respond directly to “enhancing the economic transformation and
   community development” of our region and state. Academic programs in
   the Hayes School of Music and the Departments of Art and Theatre and
   Dance, as well as the Industrial and Interior Design programs housed in
   the Department of Technology, and offerings sponsored by The Office of
   Arts and Cultural Programs, greatly enrich the lives and welfare of the
   people in our community. In addition, the Turchin Center for the Visual
   Arts, the largest facility of its kind in western North Carolina, eastern
   Tennessee, and southwestern Virginia, provides a home for world-class
   visual arts programming and offers arts outreach programming through
   the Community Art School.

   Performances, exhibitions, films, and Forum Series events presented on
   campus in multiple venues provide for significant outreach opportunities
   that number well over several hundred each year. The Appalachian
   Journal, the Cold Mountain Review, and the Undergraduate Journal of
   Historical Research are scholarly works that are unique and support the
   region. Arts and cultural events attract individuals to the area, which
   encourages economic growth.

   Co-curricular activities address community needs and concerns, and
   promote entrepreneurship initiatives in the region. These initiatives
   include, but are not limited to: Cannon Music Camp, the Center for
   Appalachian Studies, the Pilates Teacher Training Program, and
   Community Art School. Many programs are multi-disciplinary, involve
   significant cross-campus and inter-institutional collaborations, and
   provide visible and public examples of faculty expertise being shared with
   the community.

       i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
          assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

           ASU’s Arts and Cultural programs are successful in large part due
           to the strong support from ASU faculty, staff, and administration
           as well as the support received from the residents of the region.
           Appalachian is also building an international reputation in
           combining the arts with mental health interventions through
           programs like Expressive Arts Therapy and Music Therapy. The
              effectiveness of these programs is assessed through participation
              rates and feedback from participants and program providers.

          ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
              if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

              Effectiveness can be improved by reconfiguring all arts-related
              fields into one more conspicuous and comprehensive unit such as
              a College of Visual and Performing Arts. Effectiveness can further
              be improved by hiring a Director of Arts Publicity who would
              promote all of the visual and performing arts areas. The arts areas
              can enrich the culture only to the extent that the public is made
              aware of the events/publications offered. The breadth and depth
              of programs offered can be increased by obtaining financial
              support from public and private sources (including federal grants),
              encourage broader participation in arts and cultural programs,
              increase engagement and further develop collaborative inter-
              institutional collaborations that would support regional arts. The
              lack of adequate studio, classroom, laboratory and office spaces
              hinders the growth and enhancement of the arts on campus and
              in the region.

   b. New Programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
      recommendation (including those in planning but not yet implemented,
      if any).

       No new programs are planned at this time.

   c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated.

       Not applicable since no new programs are planned.

   d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines where appropriate
      (include department/position responsible for implementation, and
      identification of resources/costs).

       Not applicable since no new programs are planned.

5. Communicating Faculty Expertise on Important Community Issues [4.4.5.—
   UNC should facilitate inclusive discussions on important community issues.]

   a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this
      recommendation.
   Successful Existing Programs

   Appalachian State University has a wide-variety of programs that use the
   faculty’s expertise to address issues deemed important by the
   community. In this region, those issues of concern to the community tend
   to relate to economic development, the environment and health-related
   issues. Some of Appalachian’s programs that focus on these issues are
   the Appalachian Regional Development Institute (ARDI), the
   Communications Disorders Clinic, Research related to Stream
   Erosion/Restoration, and the Yadkin Valley Watershed, the NC Poultry
   Energy, Environmental, and Economic Promotion and. Sustainability
   Program (NCPEEEPS), the Center for Public Policy, the Appalachian Center
   for Steep Slope Viticulture and the Small Business and Technology
   Development Center (SBTDC).

       i. Strengths of the program (including how its effectiveness is
          assessed and whether it should be expanded or enhanced).

          Appalachian State is able to facilitate a multitude of inclusive
          discussions with the community based on the “community-
          centered” culture that has represented the University since it
          began. Faculty at Appalachian are as much a part of the
          community as they are part of Appalachian, often serving in
          elected positions and on community boards, allowing them to
          identify those issues that need the most immediate attention.
          Effectiveness of programs is assessed through feedback from
          participants and service providers.

       ii. Obstacles and barriers to enhancing the success of the program,
           if any (include steps that will reduce these barriers).

          The main obstacle to continuing discussions with the community
          is faculty resources to enable them to have the time and funds to
          effectively query the community as to what issues next need to be
          addressed. Reductions in faculty teaching loads will permit more
          faculty involvement.

b. New Programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
   recommendation (including those in planning but not yet implemented,
   if any).

   No new programs are planned at this time.

c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated.
   Not applicable since no new programs are planned.

d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines where appropriate
   (include department/position responsible for implementation, and
   identification of resources/costs).

   Not applicable since no new programs are planned.
                            East Carolina University

ECU’s VITALITY AND ECONOMIC PROSPERITY IN THE EAST – Visionary Ideas for ECU

ECU will help lead significant new investment in innovation and research to enhance the
quality of our teaching, to attract additional resources to support efficient and
productive institutional growth, and to drive the diversification, transformation, and
growth of the region’s economy.

1) ECU Millennial Campus (UNCT Nos. 4.1, 4.4, 4.7, 5.4, 5.5) - ECU will plan for and
   seek approval for establishment of a Millennial Campus where industry,
   government, and the University will combine in new models of collaboration that
   simultaneously: 1) enhance the University’s research, education and outreach
   enterprises; 2) contribute to the dynamic interaction of the University and its host
   community; and 3) serve as a destination and incubator for the region. ECU has
   begun the development of a new master plan including design and planning for the
   Millennial Campus and necessary collaborative research facilities. These, like other
   Millennial Campuses and resident research and partnership infrastructure, will
   require a varied and blended funding model.


2) ECU Outreach Service (UNCT Nos. 4.3, 4.4, 4.7, 5.7) - To benefit specific
   communities of interest, ECU is creating outreach institutions with liaison staff to
   connect the diverse strengths and expertise of the University with industry,
   government, and communities (in ways that complement and synergize those
   provided by other public agencies) to foster entrepreneurship, innovation, and
   economic growth throughout the region.
   a. Establish an Innovation Outreach Service leveraging the regional innovation
      capacities of ECU’s colleges, Entrepreneurial Initiative, and Office of Technology
      Transfer via:
       Innovation Design Lab – Begin May 2008, internal sources partially secured
          at present, seeking new private sector sources of funds.
       Innovation Outreach Associates – Pilot positions in place May 2008,
          permanent funding sought from reallocation of internal funds.
       Outreach Network of university, community college, P-12, and industrial
          partners to strengthen entrepreneurship, innovation, and new product
          development on campus and throughout the region.
   b. Sustainable Industry Outreach Service - ECU’s Office of Economic Development
      and Center for Sustainable Tourism are focusing campus-wide research and
      analysis activities to provide technical assistance outreach in support of
      sustainable practices by businesses, government agencies, destinations, and
      communities throughout North Carolina.
          Sustainable Industry Outreach Associate - Pilot position in place May 2008,
           permanent funding sought from reallocation of internal funds.



3) Community Enhancement and Economic Transformation Initiative (UNCT Nos. 4.1,
   4.4, 4.7, 5.7) - The North Carolina Department of Commerce (NCDOC) is seeking $5M
   in new legislative funding during the 2008 Short Session for an Economic
   Transformation Pilot Program with ECU as part of a larger package of community
   development resources.
    Funds ($4.5M) will be used to engage ECU faculty, staff, and students, in
       partnership with NCDOC staff, to provide sustainable community and economic
       development technical expertise, project implementation assistance, student
       service learning, and scholarly engagement. Where appropriate, ECU also will
       engage the resources of UNC institutions and other partners.
    Funds ($500,000) will support additional community development professionals
       within the Regional Development Institute (part of the Office of Economic
       Development at ECU) to facilitate implementation of item “a” above.
    The Office of Economic Development is providing seed funding and developing a
       comprehensive business plan for this community development partnership.
    This initiative is commensurate with the recent MOU between the North
       Carolina Department of Commerce (NCDOC) and the UNC General
       Administration.
    Both NCDOC and ECU are committed to a successful pilot program in the East
       that can be replicated by NCDOC with other universities across the state.


4) Precision Marketing Initiative Growing Targeted Industry Clusters (UNCT Nos. 4.4,
   4.7, 5.7) This effort expands a proven model for integrating North Carolina’s
   universities with regional efforts at job creation, industry expansion, technology
   development, and partnership innovation.
    Initial focus on the Advanced Learning Technologies cluster (the merger of virtual
       environments, education content and outcome assessments meeting the
       training and education needs of highly regulated industries, P-12, and other
       applications), the Advanced Medical Technologies cluster, and the Marine
       Sciences cluster.
    Existing partners include ECU, NC State, Pitt County Development Commission,
       Wake County Economic Development, and Wake Tech and Pitt Community
       Colleges. These partners are leveraging and strengthening university/industry
       connections and regional assets that serve to attract and retain innovation-
       driven firms.
      Current funding includes $100,000 per year from the Wake County
       Commissioners and $500,000 one-time legislative funding deployed through NC
       State’s Economic Development Partnership.
      ECU has invested in the Precision Marketing Initiative via a new Director of
       Industry and Economic Development (April 2008, part of the Regional
       Development Institute within the Office of Economic Development) and the
       participation of numerous deans and their interested faculty. Additional internal
       and external funding is being sought to support the following:
       o Development of marketing materials targeting specific firms in identified
           clusters.
       o Support the industrial recruiting and retention efforts of faculty and regional
           economic developers.


5) ECU Center for Municipal Management and Innovation (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 4.7, 5.1,
   5.6) - The Office of Economic Development (OED) will lead development of this
   Center designed to provide technical assistance and municipal planning and
   management capacity through ECU’s faculty and outreach staff expertise to enhance
   the efficiency and competitiveness of communities in the East. It is envisioned that
   the Center will be a primary mechanisms for the implementation of the Community
   Enhancement and Economic Transformation Initiative (above) and that it will
   primarily operate as a fee-for-service organization.
   a. OED has raised and committed $30,000 in private funds to seed the formation
       and initial activities of the Center.
   b. The Center will provide direct administrative, management, and planning-related
       technical assistance to low-wealth, limited-resource, and limited-capacity
       municipalities.
   c. Staff is identifying external funding sources to provide expanded outreach
       opportunities and long-term financial support.


6) Outreach and Engagement Directory/Repository (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 4.7, 5.6) - ECU will
   leverage its combined data collection and dissemination capabilities to create
   awareness and publicize ECU’s outreach and engagement products, services and
   outcomes. This effort should include a searchable repository of resources available
   to ECU’s many constituencies that improves access to the health, education, and
   economic development resources of the University.


7) Coastal Hazards and Economic Development (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 4.6, 5.1, 5.6) - In order
   to preserve and grow our coastal economy, which is of great significance to the
   economy and heritage of the state, we must examine the vulnerability of the natural
   resources and human infrastructure of coastal North Carolina to climate change and
   sea-level rise and determine the economic implications.
   a. Center for Water Resources on the Coastal Plain: ECU will develop an
      interdisciplinary Center to address the threat to economic development posed
      by issues of fresh water availability arising from natural trends (e.g., drought,
      salt-water intrusion, depletion of aquifers) and from inappropriate resource
      management (e.g., inefficient uses, pollution, pricing, lack of basin management
      schemes).
   b. Center for Coastal Biological Resources and Climate Change: ECU will develop a
      Center that will address the effects of climate change on economically important
      biological resources such as recreational and commercial fisheries (e.g., blue
      crab, shrimp, red drum) and coastal ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, subaquatic
      vegetation, swamp forest).
   c. North Carolina Coastal Hazards Decision System: ECU will develop a
      continuously evolving web site containing interactive products that will provide
      coastal residents, planners, and managers with the information and tools
      required to make sound, informed decisions in the face of increasing coastal
      storminess and sea-level rise.
       Seed funding provided by UNC system research competitiveness funds.
       ECU will coordinate with the Community Enhancement and Economic
          Transformation Initiative, the Sustainable Industry Outreach Service, and
          the Center for Municipal Management and Innovation above.
   d. Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) - ECU co-administers this institute with UNC
      General Administration. To date, ECU has invested heavily in joint faculty
      appointments with CSI and will continue to work with the institute to build its
      programs and to provide appropriate administrative infrastructure. ECU will also
      leverage its distance education capacity to help deliver courses in collaboration
      with other UNC campuses and the College of the Albemarle.


8) Chancellor’s Industry Roundtables (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 4.7) - Coordinated by the Office
   of Economic Development and regional economic development organizations, the
   Chancellor will host quarterly meetings with industry leaders from targeted industry
   clusters to enhance ECU’s awareness of and response to the innovation, workforce,
   and partnership needs of regional firms.
    Four roundtables per year, beginning Summer 2008.
    Funding from internal and external sources.

THE ARTS, CULTURE AND THE QUALITY OF LIFE – Visionary Ideas for ECU

ECU will provide world-class programs, concerts, athletics, and exhibits that provide
powerful inspiration as we work together to sustain and improve the quality of life in
our community and the region. Our visual and performing arts programs are among the
largest and most prestigious on the East Coast. We reach and enrich the lives of more
than 100,000 citizens throughout the region and state through more than 300 public
performances each year. And our musicians, dancers, and artists are invited to share
their expertise at prestigious venues all over the world. Our sports teams attract a
regional and increasingly national audience.

1) Center for Diversity and Inequality Research (CDIR) (UNCT Nos. 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4,
   4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 5.1, 5.6, 5.7) - The CDIR is a collaborative, interdisciplinary effort
   housed in the Department of Sociology. The primary goal of CDIR is the scholarly
   study of social diversity and inequality in Eastern North Carolina with research
   focusing upon the underserved populations identified in UNC Tomorrow. The
   second goal of CDIR is to formulate relevant public policy based upon this research
   and to educate the public and decision-makers.
    Over $665,000 in private money has been pledged to support the operation of
       this Center and the Harriot College of Arts and Sciences has committed $75,000
       in start-up funds. Additional matching funds for the private gifts are expected
       from UNC-GA.
    An Interim Director for the Center was hired in January 2008 and a second
       faculty member whose teaching and research supports the mission of the Center
       has been hired beginning fall 2008.


2) Intergenerational Center (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 4.7, 5.6) - The mission of the Center is to
   lead in neighborhood revitalization in the West Greenville community through
   assistance to families and individuals to reach their full potential through adult
   education, job training, counseling, home ownership readiness and social work
   services. The resources of many campus programs (for example, social work,
   criminal justice, nutrition, and green design) form the foundation for these efforts.
   This model is a collaboration of the City of Greenville, ECU and Pitt Community
   College. The center also serves as a field site for students in a variety of disciplines
   and is a major site for faculty research projects. This model of assistance has
   implications for assisting underserved and minority populations in the area, state,
   and nation.




3) Renaissance of Downtown Greenville (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 4.7, 5.6) - In collaboration
   with its community, ECU will bring to bear its needs, population, and expertise to
   help catalyze a true renaissance of downtown Greenville.
   a. The University will support positive development downtown.
   b. Utilize, where appropriate, new and renovated buildings within downtown.
   c. Operational and partnership planning between ECU and the community is
      facilitated through programs that include the regular meetings of the
       Chancellor’s Community Advisory Council, Town/Gown Coalition, and the
       Community Managers Meeting.


4) Center for Sustainable Design (UNCT Nos. 4.1, 4.4, 4.7, 5.4, 5.6) - This Center will
   bring together faculty and students (undergraduate and graduate) to conduct basic
   and translational research and development in conjunction with the outreach efforts
   of the University on issues of the natural and built environments at a variety of
   scales and in a variety of landscape positions. The unique purpose of this center will
   be to coordinate the integration and provision of sustainable design expertise via
   the format of an engaged learning laboratory. This effort will draw on ECU’s
   traditional strengths in coastal science and policy, rural communities, sustainable
   tourism, agromedicine, natural hazards research, STEM-related environmental
   education, geospatial information sciences, P-12 education and outreach, and the
   development of satellite communities. The Center will utilize existing design
   infrastructure across campus and utilize the planned Innovation Design Lab (See
   above ECU’s Vitality and Economic Prosperity in the East). ECU will recruit inter-
   disciplinary faculty and support aggressive recruitment of graduate students,
   specifically those with an interest in engaged scholarship.


5) Build a World-class Center for Visual and Performing Arts (UNCT Nos. 4.1, 4.4, 4.7,
   5.6) - ECU will develop the Center to attract and provide exhibits and performances
   that enrich the cultural vitality of the campus, the community, and the region.
   Through the current master planning process, we will select a location for the facility
   to maximize campus and community use and thus the center’s cultural and
   economic impacts.


6) Growing the Economic Contribution of ECU Athletics (UNCT Nos. 4.4, 5.6) - ECU’s
   athletics program contributes significantly to the local and regional economy and
   enhances the quality of life throughout the region. The proposed stadium and
   facilities expansions ($50M proposed football stadium expansion) will allow more
   people in the community to enjoy ECU athletics and foster further economic activity.
                            Elizabeth City State University

D. OUR COMMUNITIES AND THEIR ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION
   ECSU strives to establish collaborative relationships with regional and local Economic
   Development Agencies, Tourism Development Organizations, and Chambers of Commerce
   to promote and support their efforts in attracting new businesses to the region by engaging
   University resources to address the needs of emerging industries and improve municipal
   services. as well as encourage existing companies to grow and expand their operations. To
   this end, ECSU is committed to strengthening its relationships with local governmental
   agencies to promote and support community development initiatives.

   In an effort to determine the “needs” of ECSU’s 21 county area, ECSU has consulted
   “Strengthening the Rural Carolinas,” a 2002 report by MDC Inc, funded by the Duke
   Endowment. Based on this report, the University has identified some specific needs to be
   addressed in northeastern North Carolina in order for the region to become economically
   competitive with the state, nation and world:

         Loss of jobs                           Physical and technological Infrastructure
         Workforce skills                       Financial Infrastructure
         Social capital.                        Public Economics
         Demographic shift                      Leadership
       Major




               UNC should be more actively engaged in enhancing the economic transformation
               and community development of North Carolina’s regions and the state as a whole.


   4.4.1 UNC should increase its capacity and commitment to respond to and lead economic
         transformation and community development.
   4.4.2 UNC should focus specific effort in meeting the needs of rural and underserved areas
         of the state.
   4.4.3 UNC should seek to align appropriate campus programs with the strategic economic
         plans (including sector and cluster plans) of their regions and the state, recognizing
         the unique differences and challenges of our state’s economic and geographic
         regions.

               a. Existing Programs, Initiatives, or Activities
                  Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC)
                  Operating under the School of Business and Economics, the SBTDC primarily serves
                  and assists medium to large business.
                  i. Strength
                      The Center helps businesses increase revenue, provides access to greater
                      markets, increases operational proficiency, generates jobs, commercializes
    technology, and facilitates the transfer of technologies.
ii. Obstacles and Barriers
    Provides some services to small business, but does not work with start-ups.

The Community Development Program is supported primarily by grant funds from
the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The program
provides assistance to low-wealth families in Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County,
and surrounding communities by addressing the pressing developmental needs of
affordable housing, neighborhood revitalization, and economic opportunity.
Community Development services are provided through housing assistance
projects, information dissemination, on-site technical assistance, and a series of
seminars and workshops.
i. Methods for Assessment

    The program’s effectiveness is measured through the total number of clients
    receiving the following counseling for the following services: pre-purchase of
    homes, default counseling to avoid foreclosure, resolution of a rental housing
    issues, fair housing education, and access to housing.
ii. Obstacles and Barriers
    The program requires additional funding and staff training.

Audio/Video Recording Studio
i. Strengths
   The Viking Recording Studio is an industry-standard equipped studio that acts
   as the primary laboratory for instruction in Audio Engineering and Studio
   Production courses. Equipped with a Pro Tools HD 3 system, Trident 80B
   console, Otari MX-80 2" multi -track, Otari 1/4" mixdown recorder and
   outboard equipment by Lexicon, Urei, universal Audio, Manley, Focusrite,
   Vintech, and dbx, it is an ideal facility to prepare musicians for careers in
   engineering and production.
   For expansion, the studio should develop the organizational structure to
   include:

      Best Practices Analysis and identification of applicable components
      An approved and published Operational Manual, Business Plan and Fee
       Schedule for services offered
ii. Obstacles and barriers
    None currently identified

Aviation Program
i. Strengths
   The degree program in Aviation Science offers minors in Aviation Management,
   Public Administration, Computer Science, Electronics, Avionics, Flight
   Education and Space Science. Each of these minor programs of study is
    specifically designed to meet the needs of the aviation and aerospace
    industries. The curricula include courses with a rigorous blend of mathematics,
    science and technology, communications, computers, management, and a
    thorough spectrum of aviation courses.
    Expansion and Methods for Assessment
                                   Build upon existing relationships, develop new
        ones, and leverage university assets to attract, enhance and expand
        aviation-related business ventures throughout the service territory.
                                   Develop a Master Database of aviation
            companies and airports in the Region, State, and Tidewater Virginia
            Region
                                   Contact with all airports and aviation companies
            in the service territory
                                   Open House/Information Forums at ECSU and
            regional airports
                                   Marketing campaign to high schools, community
            colleges,airports and aviation companies in and outside the Region
                                   Development of Recruitment and Retention
            strategies for aviation companies
                                   Survey results from existing companies
            identifying collaborative opportunities
                                   Increased internship opportunities for ECSU and
            COA students
     Establish partnerships and collaborative efforts with the Community
        Colleges in the service territory and Southside Virginia to increase number
        of transfer students through strengthening, expansion, and linkage to:
                                   Two-Plus-Two Program at College of the
            Albemarle and community colleges in the service territory
                                   Airframe and Power-plant Program at College of
            the Albemarle
                                   Development of an Aviation Research and
            Development Park at the Elizabeth City Regional Airport. Funding for
            this initiative has been approved
ii. Obstacles and barriers
    Budget appropriations for the housing of the Airframe and Power-Plant
    program within ECSU’s Aviation Program facilities is required.

Pharmacy
Expansion of the program to initiate Allied Health Programs should be achieved
through initiatives such as the:
 Development and institutionalization of a pilot Health Careers Academy
    Program through external funding.
 Leveraging of University assets to attract and expand business ventures and
    opportunities in the Biotechnology field throughout the service territory. This
    activity would involve:
     Establishment of a Pharmacy/Biotechnology Research Park
     Publication and distribution of the ECSU Biotechnology Resource Directory
         to include University resources and services, as well as external service
         providers
     Participation in Northeast Advisory Boards, client meetings, and other
         recruitment and retention efforts
     Development of an Existing Biotechnology Business and Industry database
 Expand research opportunities for the University.
     Increase collaborative research partnerships with UNC constituents and
         other private and public institutions across the nation, particularly
         neighboring states.
     Joint research projects with industrial or groups of institutions
 Develop and implement a healthcare team services training program through
    external funding
 Assist existing business and industry to better manage their healthcare costs
    Access through the provision of information and services by web-based
    sources or actual information centers
Upward Bound
This pre-college program targets six predominantly low-income northeastern
North Carolina counties for first-generation college students and students at high
risk for academic failure.

Mathematics & Science Education Network (MSEN)
This pre-College program for seven counties in Northeastern North Carolina
broadens the pool of students pursuing mathematics and science-based majors
and careers at ECSU and abroad.

TRIO Talent Search
This pre-college program assists students in reaching their maximum educational
potential by providing them with resources and skills that will enable them: (1) to
successfully meet the challenges of the 21st century, (2) to make sound career
decisions, and (3) pursue post-secondary opportunities, and rewarding trades and
professions.

Learning Centers for the 21st Century
Through this collaborative partnership with Elizabeth City and Pasquotank County,
ECSU is establishing learning centers to assist potential teachers in developing best
practices and skills in the classroom, enabling them to become effective teachers.

Transitioning to Teaching
This plan is a partnership with ECSU, in collaboration with fourteen (14) schools
  districts in northeastern North Carolina, to assist candidates without teaching
  license and to help obtain them. Two hundred, plus teachers have obtained their
  teaching license through this strategic plan. The economic impact upon this region
  has meant an additional $3.5 million. Given the fact that teacher education does
  impact the economy of this region, overall, this does have a domino effect as other
  sectors of the economy do benefit.

  Entrepreneurship concentration and minor
  The School of Business and Economics offers a concentration in Entrepreneurship
  for those students majoring in Business Administration and a minor in
  Entrepreneurship for students majoring outside the School of Business &
  Economics. A certificate program in Entrepreneurship is currently in development
  for non-degree seeking individuals.

b. New Programs
   Center for Entrepreneurship ECSU is in the process of establishing a Center for
   Entrepreneurship under the supervision of an acting Director reporting directly to
   the Chancellor. The Center, among other things, will serve as a repository and
   distributor of all information relevant to the establishment and growth of a
   business enterprise. This will build upon the University recent efforts to establish a
   portal for economic development outreach that promotes and engages University
   resources in impacting economic development activities and efforts throughout
   the region.

  The duties and responsibilities of the Center will include, but not be limited to the
  following:
   Develop, publish, and distribute a Directory of Entrepreneur Resources

     Collect, maintain, and provide information regarding the successful
      establishment and operations of a business.
     Offer a certificate program on Entrepreneurship, preferably through
      Continuing Education.
     Conduct courses and seminars on a wide variety of topics of interest to the
      entrepreneur.
     Provide assistance to individual businesses through use of ECSU faculty
      advisors and students interns
     Provide seminars and information on business ethics, capital acquisition,
      financial topics, basic economics, and investments
     Partner with Small Business Technology Development Center (SBTDC) and
      other business entities
     Coordinate the development/implementation of a strategic plan for the
      economic transformation of the area under a “select group” chaired by a
      university member and comprised of equal representation from the University
      and Community entities.
  Resources Needed – One-time start-up cost approximately $100,000 and operating
  cost approximately $200,000 per year for 2 to 3 years. Some (and eventually most)
  of the operating cost should be offset by grant funds. Cost to be incurred include
  but may not be limited to: personnel, space and other resources.

  Business Incubator – The Business Incubator will be the natural extension of the
  Center for Entrepreneurship. This extension of the Center, will be established in
  conjunction with a web-based, Virtual Entrepreneurial Incubator Facility. It will
  provide increased probability of business success by providing the following:
   Reasonable accommodations at a reasonable cost for a limited time
   Some administrative assistance
   Proximity to technical expertise

   As an extension of the Center for Entrepreneurship, the Business Incubator will
  require approximately $100,000 annually for: personnel, space and other
  resources.

  Expansion of Audio/Video Recording Services
   Promote Audio/Video Recording Studio throughout the service territory
   Establish the Audio/Video Recording Services as a training program resource
   Establish the A/V Recording Services as an Economic Development Marketing
     and Promotional resource
   Establish an artistic Incubator

  UNC System Air Transportation Program
  Institute a UNC System Air Transportation Program to provide air transport
  services to constituent universities, provide educational and employment
  opportunities for ECSU students and graduates, and attract addition aviation
  companies to the Region.
  Education
   Develop a Leadership Academy
   Establish Advanced Study Programs to meet the needs of Business and Industry
   Assist existing business and industry to develop and enhance their training
      programs
   Establish programs Expand cooperative entrepreneurial outreach throughout
      the service territory and meet current and future professional development
      and training needs

c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated
   N/A

d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines
                                  Provided for Initiatives Requiring Funds
          Activity                   Accountability               Cost/Support     Assessment      Timeline
Establishment of a Center   School of Business & Economics       $100,000/1 yr      Number of        2009
for Entrepreneurship            Office of the Chancellor          Start-up cost   Clients Served   Ongoing
                                                               $200,000/ 2-3 yrs and Businesses
                                                               Personnel, Capital Established
                                                                 Outlay & Other
                                                                    Resources
                                                                  (cost sharing)
Business Incubator          School of Business & Economics         $100,000/yr      Success of      2009
                                Office of the Chancellor       Personnel, Capital    Business      Ongoing
                                                                 Outlay & Other    Enterprises
                                                                    Resources
                                                                  (cost sharing)
                           Fayetteville State University
        Economic transformation is a pivotal strategic priority of FSU and fulfills the
promise to share faculty scholarship and research. FSU administrators and faculty are
available to provide leadership and guidance in response to the economic, social,
educational, and cultural issues facing individuals, communities, and organizations in the
community, Cape Fear region, and state. As a result, FSU programs and initiatives and
the associated intellectual capital can help advance the economic well-being of the
surrounding North Carolina communities through collaborative efforts that can focus on
the need to create and retain jobs in the community, region, and state through
workforce development initiatives. Economic transformation activities are most visible
through FSU’s partnerships and collaborative efforts with the Fayetteville Business
Center (FBC), the Bronco Square retail center adjacent to the campus, and the on-
campus Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC). FSU has always
recognized that it must be strongly connected and engaged with the region’s and the
state’s economic development infrastructure.

         Fayetteville State University continues to develop academic programs and
collaborative initiatives with entities such as the Base Realignment And Closure Regional
Task Force (BRAC RTF) and its 11 counties to the needs of rural and underserved areas
of the state. (See section 4.7) The Office of Public Relations maintains a comprehensive
list of faculty, their credentials, and their area(s) of expertise on a FSU “Speakers
Bureau” webpage. Prominent on this list are researchers, scientists, and technologists
in addition to the performing and fine arts scholars who tirelessly promote the arts and
cultural enrichment to the region and selectively throughout the state.


FSU Strategic Goals and Priorities for Community and Economic Transformation
   Lead in economic, social, and cultural transformation of the region
   Engage in assessment of economic trends and respond to economic needs

A. Existing Programs
1. Fayetteville Business Center
(Addresses 4.4.1, 4.4.2, 4.4.3, 4.4.5)

Description: The Fayetteville Business Center is an off-campus business incubator,
located nearby on Murchison Road. It was formed to assist start-up businesses with
office space and shared office resources. The FBC also offers a series of courses
throughout the year aimed at helping small businesses and an annual business
symposium. It also has summer programs for K-12 students on topics such as
entrepreneurship and provides internships for FSU School of Business and Economics
students. The FSU Development Corporation was formed to oversee community
development initiatives and serves as the owner of the Fayetteville Business Center.
Strengths of the Program:
 The FBC provides a unique collaboration of FSU, the School of Business and
    Economics, and the small business community.

Implementation Strategies and Plans:

   Unit Responsible: Entrepreneur Institute / School of Business and Economics
   Timeline: Ongoing
   Resources and/or Source of Funding:
     Recurring state and grant funds
   Assessment Measures:
     Incubator occupancy rates
     Number of small business programs offered throughout the year
     Amount of external funding

2. Bronco Square Retail Plaza
(Addresses 4.4.1, 4.4.3)

Description: The Bronco Square Retail Plaza is jointly owned by a private developer and
the FSU Development Corporation. Many of its occupants are first-time entrepreneurs
and are under the age of 35 years. The FSU Development Corporation was formed to
oversee community development initiatives and serves as the owner of Bronco Square.

Strengths of the Program:
 Bronco Square is conveniently located adjacent to the university providing retail
    shops, restaurants, and other services to students and the community.

Implementation Strategies and Plans:

   Unit Responsible: FSU Development Corporation
   Timeline: Ongoing
   Resources and/or Source of Funding:
     Rental income from retailers and businesses
   Assessment Measures:
     Occupancy rates
     Retailer sustainability

3. SBTDC Connectivity to the Local, Regional and State Economic Development
Infrastructure
(Addresses 4.4.1, 4.4.2, 4.4.3, 4.4.5)
Description: The SBTDC, an extension service for small businesses in the region, is
recognized by the NC Department of Commerce (DOC) as a primary service-delivery
resource partner. The SBTDC has effective working relationships with the seven
regional economic development partnerships and with local economic development
commissions and chambers of commerce. It also has strong connectivity to other state
and state-supported economic development resources, including the Board of Science
and Technology, NC Biotech Center, NCIDEA, NC Rural Center, BRAC Regional Taskforce
and the Community College Small Business Center Network.

Strengths of the Program:
 A well-known and respected organization among universities and businesses in the
    state
 Well-established relationships with the other economic development organizations
 A “bridge” between the business and economics development communities with
    FSU’s faculty, staff, administrators, and other assets and resources
 Expertise to provide significant levels of business start-up and development services
    to organizations in rural and underserved areas
 Core services including in-depth management counseling, technical assistance,
    research and educational services across the state
 Counseling and training activities for rural counties
 Two new equity capital initiatives—Inception Micro-Angel Funds (IMAF) and the
    Rural Center’s Rural Venture Fund

Implementation Strategies and Plans:

   Unit Responsible: SBTDC at FSU and central office at NC State University
   Timeline: Ongoing
   Resources and/or Source of Funding:
     Recurring state and federal DOC funds
   Assessment Measures:
     Outcomes reported quarterly by the FSU SBTDC on engagement with economic
       development organizations at local, regional, and state levels
     Number of requests for SBTDC services and expertise by external organizations

4. Arts and Cultural Enrichment
(Addresses 4.4.4)

Description: FSU scholars of the Performing and Fine Arts department promote arts
and cultural enrichment throughout the Cumberland County region and state through
the following programs:
 Fine Arts Concert Series
 FSU Concert Choir
 FSU Gospel Choir
   FSU Theatre Company
   Public Radio WFSS-FM 91.9
   Rosenthal Art Gallery
   Lyceum Programs
   FSU Marching Band
   FSU Symphonic Band
   PFA Instrumental Ensembles
   University Theatre Touring Company
   Chancellor’s Speakers Series
   Blam! Speaker Pilot Series, using comic books to teach writing skills to 4 th graders
   Art Education and Music Education faculty collaborations with public school art and
    music educators

Strengths of the Program:
 Cultural enrichment for the FSU students and citizens in the local community and
    region

Implementation Strategies and Plans:

   Unit Responsible: Chancellor’s Office / College of Arts and Sciences / Institutional
    Advancement
   Timeline: Ongoing
   Resources and/or Source of Funding:
     Recurring state, grant, and private funds
   Assessment Measures:
     Number of attendance
     Number of external partners
     Number of requests for participation

5. Entrepreneurship Institute
(Addresses 4.4.1, 4.4.2, 4.4.3, 4.4.5)

Description: Entrepreneurship programs across the county are in high demand. The FSU
Endowed Professor of Entrepreneurship and the FSU Entrepreneurship Institute,
established in the fall of 2007, offer programs and services intended to infuse
entrepreneurial thinking throughout the campus and community and provide
management expertise to entrepreneurs in the region. Through the Institute, MBA
students provide consulting services to small area businesses, the Fayetteville Business
Center, tenants at the Bronco Square Retail Plaza, and the Fayetteville Women’s Center.

Strengths of the Program:
   The institute enables and empowers local businesses to succeed and entrepreneurs
    to build their capacity by interacting with FSU business and economics faculty and
    students.
   It has the capability and expertise to provide operational plans and strategic support
    to existing businesses and develop business plans for start-up businesses

Implementation Strategies and Plans:

   Unit Responsible: School of Business and Economics
   Timeline: Ongoing
   Resources and/or Source of Funding:
     Recurring state and private funds
   Assessment Measures:
     Number of students enrolled in entrepreneurship courses
     Number of students and faculty engaged in business consulting projects
     Number of entrepreneurial workshops/activities hosted by the Entrepreneurial
       Institute
     Number of type of related curricula developed

B. New Programs

6. Millennial Campus
(Addresses 4.4.1, 4.4.2, 4.4.3, 4.4.5)

Description: In 2008, discussions began to develop an off-site Millennial Campus. Plans
are for this entity to be a collaboration among FSU, regional community colleges, the
City of Fayetteville, Cumberland County, the BRAC Regional Task Force, and the
Chamber of Commerce. Programs housed in the Millennial Campus will focus on the
application of scholarly work to real world issues related to the defense industry, new
technology development, and social issues. One of the first buildings being proposed for
the campus is the “Idea and Innovation Factory.” The factory will facilitate
entrepreneurship education, a new ventures laboratory, copyright and patents services,
funding source and information, technology commercialization, technical information
services, a technology development program to assist start-up businesses, an incubation
facility, and support for new ventures and their future growth.

Strengths of the Program:
 The Millennial Campus will be a collaborative effort with city and county
    government, military, and the local business community.
 It will afford FSU the opportunity to strengthen the School of Business and
    Economics by allowing faculty and students to be involved with cutting-edge
    projects and to interact with the government, business, and military communities.
Implementation Strategies and Plans:

   Unit Responsible: Chancellor’s Office / Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic
    Affairs / School of Business and Economics
   Timeline: 2008-2010 (Planning)
   Resources and/or Source of Funding:
     New funds request:
            - Planning Phase: To be determined
            - Capital Costs: To be determined
   Assessment Measures:
     Number and type of partnership agreements
     Completed strategic plan
     Financial commitments from external partners
     Completed capital plan
                            NC A&T State University
North Carolina A&T State University (NC A&T) has been a significant player in the
region’s entrepreneurial and economic development. Programs in agricultural science,
public health, supply chain management, nanotechnology and other fields have been
and continue to be vital to the development of high growth industries. Also, the Office
of Outreach and Technology Transfer assists students and faculty to transfer research
and scientific discoveries into marketable products. The office’s commercialization
pipeline includes a portfolio of 29 patents and 71 inventions. Currently, 41 percent of
the patent portfolio is licensed to industry and has generated $224,670 since 2005. The
establishment of the Gateway University Research Park, a joint venture between NC
A&T and University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), is an example of the
importance of partnerships to advanced regional economic development.

The proposed initiatives in this section challenge the University to be more actively
engaged in enhancing the economic transformation and community development of the
Triad region and the state. The section recommends (a) the establishment of an Office
of Economic Development and Engagement which would coordinate the university’s
economic development efforts and leverage its resources to foster economic growth
and ensure competitiveness in the global economy (b) the use of the cooperative
extension program and the SBTDC to increase the university’s capacity to lead economic
transformation and economic development, especially in the rural and underserved
areas and (c) the establishment of an Office of University Partnership to facilitate
community engagement, including dialogue with the community on important issues.

B. Existing Programs, Initiatives and Activities

1. Gateway University Research Park. Gateway University Research Park is a joint
collaboration between NC A&T and UNCG for the purpose of research and economic
development within the Triad region. The park offers research opportunities to
corporate, educational, and community service agencies interested in advanced
scientific and educational research and technology; provides about 850,000 square feet
of space and has the potential for incubation and development of new industries e.g.
nanotechnology, biotechnology, environmental science, alternate and renewable
energy, etc. It is the Triad’s premier center for basic and applied research

The strengths of the program are: its master plan and collaboration between NC A&T
and UNCG; its potential for incubation and new industries; the working together of
business leaders and technology transfer officers to use the research findings of the
universities to serve the needs of new and existing businesses; and the research
expertise of the two universities. As a new entity, the park faces some of the same
challenges as any new business, e.g. coordinating the various agencies involve and
organizing and planning to ensure an efficient operation. Another challenge the park is
facing is recruiting appropriate clients. The park is finding out that other parks in the
region are targeting some of the same clients. One way of reducing this problem is to
do joint marketing with the other research parks in the Triad area.

2. Interdisciplinary Center for Entrepreneurship and E-Business (ICEEB). The
Interdisciplinary Center for Entrepreneurship and E-Business (ICEEB), a joint program of
the Schools of Business and Economics, Technology, and Agriculture and Environmental
Sciences, supports educational, research and outreach programs that promote
entrepreneurial activity and economic development in the Triad Region. The focus is on
wealth creation through entrepreneurial activity. The ICEEB:
 Provides academic and experiential learning experiences for students interested in
   individual or corporate entrepreneurship and for local entrepreneurs interested in
   improving their businesses;
 Offers an Entrepreneur-in-Residence program that includes mentoring and counseling
   to assist students in starting businesses;
 Conducts an undergraduate and graduate business plan competition;
 Collaborates with the various schools and colleges on campus to offer the Certificate
   in Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurial Internship, and Entrepreneurship Lecture Series;
 Collaborates with community organizations to offer entrepreneurship training,
   franchise education, and QuickBooks Accounting and other seminars for local
   entrepreneurs.

The strengths of the program are its potential for creating a vibrant University-wide
entrepreneurship program; its collaboration with both on-campus and external
organizations; its partnership with several schools; and its growing academic program,
which includes the recently approved Entrepreneurship Concentration for management
majors. The main challenges are inadequate funding and support staff. NC A&T has
been, and continues to be, a significant player in the economic development of the
region. Through the ICEEB, the University will create a culture that supports
entrepreneurship and economic development and will inspire students to pursue
entrepreneurial careers.
3. The Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC). The SBTDC is the
University’s largest inter-institutional program, with 18 offices statewide, each
associated with one or more of the constituent institutions. It functions as the business
and technology extension service of the UNC system and is administered, on its behalf,
by NC State University. It is the most prominent University resource in the economic
development arena and is also NC A&T’s resource in Guilford and the surrounding
counties. The SBTDC provides management counseling, technical assistance, research
and educational services to existing small and mid-sized businesses and to start-up
companies. It also provides strategic planning, research and project management
services to economic and community development organizations and academic
institutions. Over 50 percent of counseling and training activities currently are provided
in the state’s rural counties.
In addition to its core services in the rural counties, the SBTDC is actively engaged in two
new equity capital initiatives. The first involves SBTDC support for the establishment of
six “Inception Micro-Angel Funds (IMAF)” across the state. These funds will provide
$50,000 to $125,000 in early seed stage capital to emerging businesses across the state.
The second initiative is the implementation and operational support role of the SBTDC
for the Rural Center’s Rural Venture Fund. This fund will provide equity and near equity
capital for existing businesses with the potential for growth and job creation.

The SBTDC strengths are as follows: its connectivity to local, regional and state
economic development infrastructure; its effective working relationships with the
Piedmont Triad Partnership and with local economic development commissions and
chambers of commerce throughout the Piedmont Triad; and its 18 offices statewide and
over 60 consultants. The main challenge that the SBTDC faces is being able to keep up
with demand for its services. To address this challenge, SBTDC is using technology to
become more productive and is increasing its collaboration with other partners to
effectively respond to the needs of clients.

The SBTDC is uniquely suited to effectively respond to this finding, to better serve
businesses and the economic development needs across the state, with a particular
focus on the rural and underserved areas. The best hope for economic growth and
prosperity in underserved areas is increased competitiveness and growth of existing
businesses and successful new business formation. Utilizing the SBTDC as a primary
campus resource for more formal campus engagement with the economic development
community provides a cost-effective opportunity to meet the needs of the community.

C. New Programs, Initiatives and Activities

The highest priority programs needed to respond to this UNC Tomorrow major finding
and associated recommendations are combined into Section G. Outreach and
Engagement under Priority 1. Create A Center For Outreach, Engagement And
Economic Development (COEED).

D. Programs, Initiatives and Activities that Should be Combined or Eliminated

 SBTDC should collaborate with the Cooperative Extension System to form a single
  priority program as listed above. This collaboration could form the basis of a new
  program similar to Industrial Extension Program.
 “Develop Advanced Degree Program….” should be referred to the various academic
  programs for implementation.

E. Implementation Strategies, Plans and Timelines

Priority 1. Create a Center for Outreach, Engagement and Economic Development
(COEED).
      Strategy                         Plans                  Responsible                Resources       Timeline
Center for Outreach,   Create the COEDD to develop a        Provost.                Director;          Fall 2009
Engagement and         program that will bring structure                              Administrative
Economic               of the University‘s outreach,        Vice Chancellor          Assistant; Data
Development            engagement and economic               for Research and         base manager.
(COEED).               development activities called         Economic                 ($500,000).
(matching Section      ―Aggie Solutions.‖ ―Aggie             Development.
4.5 – Economic         Solutions‖ will include five                                  State and grant
Transformation and     components: University               Deans, Schools           funds.
Community              initiatives, tools for success,       and Colleges.
Development).          departmental/unit outreach
                       plans and electronic data                                     Cooperative
                       collection system and marketing.                               Extension base
                       In addition, the COEDD will                                    funds.
                       have three offices: Service
                       Learning; University-Community
                       Partnerships; and Economic
                       Development.




1A. Office of Service Learning
Office of Service      Create an Office of Service           Provost.                See budget for      Fall
Learning (matching     Learning within COEDD to                                       COEDD.              2009
A1. Global             strengthen and expand the service     Deans Schools
Readiness: 21st        learning components of University      and Colleges.
Century Skills).       Studies and the Office of Career
                       Services and Experiential             Director, Office of
                       Learning.                              Career Services
                                                              and Experiential
                                                              Learning.




1B. Office of University-Community Partnerships.
                Strategy                                                 Plans                                       Responsible
Establish the Chancellor ‗s               Develop criteria for the various categories of awards, to be    Director, Center for Outreach,
Distinguished Community Service           given annually, and appoint a campus-wide committee to          Engagement, and Economic
Awards.                                   manage the awards process.                                      Development.
Establish Chancellor and Community        Utilize the proposed new Office of Economic Development in      Director, Center for Outreach,
Leaders Monthly Breakfast.                the Center for Outreach, Engagement and Economic                Engagement, and Economic
                                          development and the Continuing Studies and Professional         Development.
                                          Development staff to plan and manage the symposium.
Establish the Community Outreach          Collaborate with local community organizations to identify      Director, Center for Outreach,
Academy.                                  interested community leaders and develop a high quality         Engagement, and Economic
                                          program.                                                        Development.
Community and business leaders as         Collaborate with the local Chamber of Commerce and other         Director, Center for Outreach,
adjunct faculty in the University‘s       business and economic development organizations to market         Engagement, and Economic
schools and colleges.                     the program and attract qualified people.                         Development.

                                                                                                           Deans, Schools and Colleges.
Establish a Community Fellows             Collaborate with local community organizations to identify      Director, Center for Outreach,
Program.                                  interested community leaders and develop a high quality         Engagement, and Economic
                                         program.                                                             Development.
Develop a Faculty Expertise Directory.   The proposed office of Economic Development in the Center for        Director of the Office of Economic
                                         Outreach, Engagement and Economic Development will work              Development.
                                         with the University‘s Web Master, to establish a very efficient—
                                         easily searchable—Web site that shares faculty/staff expertise
                                         with the community.
Faculty groups to facilitate community   Monitor community issues that might benefit from University          Director, Center for Outreach,
dialogue on critical community issues.   involvement and schedule community forums.                           Engagement, and Economic
                                                                                                              Development.
Establish a University-Community         Monitor community issues that might benefit from University          Director, Center for Outreach,
Commission.                              involvement and schedule community forums.                           Engagement, and Economic
                                                                                                              Development.
Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion.     Establish, through the Office of the Provost, a high level faculty   The Provost‘s Office.
                                         committee to include Deans and Department Chairs, to ensure
                                         that Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion processes properly
                                         rewarded faculty for community engagement.
Use the Small Business Technology        Use the SBTDC state-wide network to provide economic                 SBTDC Directors and staff.
Development Center (SBTDC) proposed      development programs and services to new and emerging
state-wide Rural Business Development    businesses throughout the state, especially in rural and
program.                                 underserved areas.
1B. Office of University-Community Partnerships (Cont’d)
              Strategy                                                  Plans                                             Responsible
Use Applied Survey Research Lab.           Increase the promotion of the lab services to members of the        Lab Director.
                                           local community, thus making a more effective vehicle for
                                           economic development.
Use NC A&T International Trade Center      Expand services of the Trade Center to increase collaboration       Center Director.
to provide technical assistance in         with local economic development agencies to better serve local
business and economics to small            and regional businesses.
farmers and small businesses.
Use Cooperative Extension Program for       Use the current Cooperative Extension system, in all 100          Dean, School of Agriculture and
Alternative Agriculture Research; Family     counties, to share information and development models for         Environmental Sciences.
and Consumer Sciences; Community             rural and under-served communities. The programs should
Voices, Voices Reaching Vision and 4-        involve rural families in decision making, economic
H.                                           development, and help them develop solutions for such
                                             challenges as parenting, financial management, and health
                                             and nutrition.

                                            Collaborate with NC State University to implement this
                                             strategy.

1C. Office of Economic Development.
                Strategy                                           Plans                                         Responsible
Develop Minority Entrepreneurship          Collaborate with on campus and external               Director of ICEEB in collaboration with Office
Program in the Interdisciplinary Center    economic development programs to design and           of Economic Development.
for Entrepreneurship and E-Business        deliver a high quality program for women and
(ICEEB).                                   minorities interested in starting a business.
Annual Summer HS Program in                Using the Transportation HS Summer Program as         Relevant Department Chairs/Deans.
Transportation, Entrepreneurship, etc      a model, establish similar programs in
(Students, Teachers & Counselors).         Entrepreneurship, Technology, etc.; promote
                                           programs through the cooperative Extension and
                                           SBTDC network.
Establish Annual Economic                  Utilize the proposed new Office of Economic           Director of the Office of Economic
Development Symposium.                     Development in the Center for Outreach,               Development.
                                           Engagement and Economic development and the
                                           University‘s Continuing Studies staff to plan and
                                           manage the symposium.
Conduct University-wide Economic           Appoint a committee of faculty and administrators     Director of the Office of Economic
Development Study.                         to conduct the study and present the finding within   Development.
                                           a six-month period.
Develop Faculty Expertise                  The proposed office of Economic Development in        Director of the Office of Economic
Database/Website.                          the Center for Outreach, Engagement and               Development.
                                           Economic Development will work with the
                                           University‘s Web Master, to establish a very
                                           efficient—easily searchable—Web site that shares
                                           faculty/staff expertise with the community.
Create Economic Development                Establish governing policies and procedures and       Director of the Office of Economic
Advisory Board.                            appoint the initial Board to include members of the   Development.
                                           University, the business community and other
                                           community leaders.
                        North Carolina Central University
To be submitted during phase 2.
North Carolina School of the Arts
In Section 4.4: Our Communities and Their Economic Transformation, the major finding
challenges UNC to be more actively engaged in enhancing the economic transformation
and community development of North Carolina’s regions and the State as a whole. The
NCSA has been engaged in the community in many ways since its inception and will
continue to be engaged going forward. Recently, due to the severity of the economic
downturn in the Piedmont Triad, the NCSA has more deeply engaged in economic
transformation working with our regional partners to leverage the assets and expertise
of the School to lead the region into the 21st Century Knowledge Economy. Intellectual
property, in the form of books, films, TV series, software, etc., is the single largest U.S.
export and it continues to grow. The Arts are essential and fundamental in the
development of this valuable intellectual property. The following highlights a few
existing and new priority programs related to economic transformation and community
development.

1. Economic Transformation
   a. Existing Programs Related to Economic Transformation
     i. The Center for Design Innovation - The University of North Carolina includes
          16 campuses and the secondary School of Science and Mathematics, as well
          as 20 inter-institutional centers, in which multiple campuses work together to
          address a particular research or service area. CDI is the newest UNC inter-
          institutional research center, established in 2005 to conduct programs
          related to design and digital technologies. The CDI was developed in
          response to the findings of a Comprehensive Economic Development
          Strategy performed for the Northwest Piedmont Triad Region of North
          Carolina. The study encouraged the development of entities to catalyze and
          facilitate the accelerated growth of the existing creative enterprises cluster in
          the region to replace rapidly disappearing textile, furniture, and tobacco
          employment. The CDI brings together the North Carolina School of the Arts,
          Winston- Salem State University, and Forsyth Technical Community College,
          involving aspects of Wake Forest University such as Health Sciences and the
          Center for Biomolecular Imaging. The overall goal is to accelerate the growth
          of creative enterprises in our region, ultimately setting an international
          example of how design can be the basis of a strategy for economic
          development.

           The inter-institutional model – including public, private and community
           colleges – distinguishes UNC in the national discussion of resource utilization
           for educational facilities and programs. CDI will become a shared facility in
           which the constituent schools pool human resources to conduct
           interdisciplinary projects. Like the top research universities and design
           programs, CDI will work closely with the business sector. Corporate sponsors
           will engage through benefits such as facilities rentals and research consortia.
The collaborative mix will provide grounding for academic pursuits, real-life
experiences for students, and an inspiring environment for start-up
businesses.

The State has awarded $12 million for planning and creation of a permanent
facility and $500K/year for operations. In addition to design studios, meeting
areas, a learning lab and an auditorium, CDI's 33,000 square-foot building will
include specialized facilities for motion capture and analysis, data
visualization and modeling, audio production, large-scale photography, and
rapid prototyping in a range of materials. The CDI operates under the
direction of Dr. Carol Strohecker and has a current staff of 2 full-time
employees.

Benefits to the participating schools include potentials for improving and
expanding curricula and educational methods. By combining business
interests with academic research, CDI will offer students at all levels a
project-based alternative to the conventional classroom. Participating
through internships, graduate assistantships, fellowships, research faculty
lines and inter-institutional academic programs, CDI contributors will push
the boundaries of existing disciplines and practices.

The facilities for digital capture and analysis of actors', dancers' and athletes'
movements will attract industry participation and offer new approaches to
animation, choreography, coaching and physical therapy. Studies in
biomechanics and facilities for prototyping will support development of
orthotic and prosthetic devices. Data visualization and modeling will
promote research in life sciences and advances in health care.

CDI's studios will be equipped with advanced technologies for musical
recording, distribution, composition and performance. Filmmaking will go
beyond digital recording and editing to experimentation with methods for
animation, gaming and interactive narratives. CDI participants will employ
and invent techniques for performance design and production, including
innovations in lighting, sound, and haptics, robotic control systems,
electronic props, and computer simulations to facilitate staging and aid
explorations of plot and character.

Benefits to the community will include public events and lifelong learning
programs such as courses in digital design. Outreach projects will employ
grant agencies' funding for informal learning programs. CDI will help to turn
out students ready for the workforce and spin out companies that develop
from research and design projects. We are considering creation of a shared
intellectual property pool, which can encourage tech transfer, new jobs, and
new companies. Through non-exclusive licensing we can enable many
      participants to benefit from the knowledge we create, thereby increasing
      likelihoods of success.

      WSSU, NCSA, and Forsyth Tech faculty members in arts, architecture,
      animation, filmmaking, music, theater design and production, computer
      science, and life and health sciences can contribute through CDI to
      development efforts in the Piedmont Triad, aiming to grow the workforce
      and economic opportunities in creative enterprises, health care, and
      biotechnology.

      The CDI is already facilitating community dialogue on important community
      issues. CDI’s Idea Exchanges are addressing a wide range of topics, including
      issues such as digital divide, equitable urban design, offshore manufacturing,
      water conservation, and green building design. During the past year, this
      public forum has served more than 900 people and we have ongoing sessions
      planned. In the near future, we will be expanding to include evening sessions
      and Internet distribution.

      It should also be noted that many of the Idea Exchange speakers and
      participants are faculty at CDI's founding schools and other area schools
      which provides a method of disseminating faculty expertise on important
      community issues to broad audiences.

ii.   Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) – In 2006,
      the Piedmont Triad Partnership (PTP) was awarded a $15 million U.S.
      Department of Labor WIRED grant to support innovations in workforce
      development to transition the Piedmont Triad economy from a rapidly
      shrinking manufacturing-based economy to a 21st Century knowledge-based
      economy. Based on previous studies of the resources in the region, the PTP
      decided to focus its efforts on 4 strategic clusters that offered the greatest
      potential return on investment. These clusters are health care,
      transportation and logistics, advanced manufacturing, and the creative
      enterprises and the arts. This is the single most important economic
      transformation initiative underway in the Triad and the NCSA is firmly
      integrated into its implementation.

      From the beginning of the WIRED initiative the NCSA has worked closely with
      the Piedmont Triad Partnership (PTP) as it assembled its team for this
      initiative. The NCSA participated in a number of early strategy meetings
      aimed at refining the action plan for implementation of the initiative. As an
      outcome of those early meetings, the PTP established a number of working
      groups to assist with implementing their strategies for the clusters. A cluster
      roundtable consisting of business professionals has been created for each
      cluster. The Director of the Center for Design Innovation is a member of the
       Creative Enterprises and the Arts Roundtable insuring the School has a direct
       voice in the cluster development effort and is at the table ready to assist in
       the anyway possible.

       The PTP also established the Higher Education Innovation Council (HEIC).
       The HEIC brings together representatives from all the public and private
       universities, the community colleges, the Small Business Technology
       Development Center (SBTDC), and the PTP to collectively share information
       on workforce development and economic transformation related initiatives
       and to collaborate to offer higher education expertise to develop solutions
       that remove barriers to growth that are identified by the cluster roundtables.
       The NCSA Director of Economic Development and External Affairs is the
       NCSA representative to the HEIC.

       Most recently the Chancellor of the NCSA, John Mauceri, met at the PTP with
       the other leaders of the institutions of higher education in the Triad and UNC
       President Erskine Bowles to discuss further engagement of these institutions
       in the region’s economic transformation. Going forward, John Mauceri will
       co-chair this group with Nathan Hatch, President of Wake Forest University.
       There next meeting is scheduled for late April 2008. Some topics for further
       discussion from the first meeting are creating a virtual transformation
       university, the aerotropolis, a film center, developing a joint statement of
       support, the role of entrepreneurship, the role of the arts, furniture
       manufacturing, and health care.

b. New Programs Related to Economic Development
   i. NCSA School of Filmmaking Center for Excellence - established in 1993, the
      School of Filmmaking is a unique arts conservatory that combines rigorous
      professional classroom training with hands-on experience. Our program is
      young enough to be flexible and forward-looking, but still maintain a strong
      emphasis in all the film crafts, using both traditional and new digital media.

       The School of Filmmaking offers a Master of Fine Arts (Film Music
       Composition only), and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. However, with the fruition of
       the Center of Excellence, new graduate and undergraduate degrees will be
       offered in many areas of media entertainment. The people in a position to
       hire a NCSA graduate in the film business want to hire filmmakers who not
       only have excellent craft, but who also have something lyrical or important to
       say. The Center of Excellence will not only produce a workforce of fantastic
       leaders and storytellers, but it will also have a profound economic impact to
       our community and state overall.

       Key components of the Center of Excellence plan include:
           Tax Incentives (currently 15% in NC)
    North Carolina needs to be a model like Massachusetts and New
    Mexico. Massachusetts and New Mexico offer tax incentives of 25%
    for most areas, but higher for infrastructure investment and on the
    job training (up to 40%). New York is now 30%.
   Building of Motion Picture Sound Stages
    To be competitive, North Carolina needs three additional motion
    picture soundstages. Their locations would be Wilmington, Asheville
    and Winston Salem. Currently, New Mexico has built eight, is in the
    process of building three more and will start four more next year.
    The established stages are already rented for three years. In New
    Mexico, the film industry had a $480 million economic impact on the
    state in 2007 and $1 billion impact over the last five years.
   “Center of Excellence” status for the School of Filmmaking at NCSA
    The Center of Excellence will assist NCSA in obtaining a higher tier
    status as a film school. Establishments currently in the “First Tier” are
    USC, NYU and UCLA. How do we achieve this goal? We achieve the
    goal through the education of filmmakers as important storytellers
    with a “Value and Worth” orientation.
   There are three components of what we need to make it into the Top
    Tier in the next few years:
        o Equipment Investment & Maintenance
        o Investment in Infrastructure
        o Additional Faculty and Staff (for graduate and undergraduate
             programs)
   Expansion of Graduate Program is an essential component of the
    Center of Excellence. There is currently a MFA offered in Film Music
    Composition. Planning for a joint MBA/MFA degree to train
    executives and entrepreneurs in creative
    content/business/management in coordination with the Kenan-
    Flagler School of Business at UNC-Chapel Hill is underway. This will be
    the first program of its kind in the United States. In addition, a 2-year
    MFA and a 3-year MFA in documentaries with areas of concentration
    at multiple UNC campuses are also being explored.
   Graduate Program Enrollment Increase from 10 to 70 in 2009.
   Undergraduate Program Enrollment Increase from 251 to 282 in
    2009, then to 312 in 2010, and 350 in 2012 (to accommodate transfer
    students)
   With the addition of new programs and facilities there will be a need
    for new positions as well. A Senior Associate Dean, Graduate Director
    of Academic Programs, technical staff, production, post production,
    archival staff as well as additional faculty and administrative staff will
    need to be hired to accommodate the needs of the Center of
    Excellence.
             The projected budget of the Center of Excellence with the operations,
              renovations, and new facilities is $53,229,807.00. The economic
              impact of the Center of Excellence on North Carolina is priceless. The
              Center of Excellence when completed and fully operational will not
              only bring in filmmakers and companies who will spend countless
              amounts of money in our fair state but it will also encourage our
              talented graduates to stay here in North Carolina as opposed to
              leaving for New York or LA.

   ii. The Kenan Institute for the Arts continues to invite collaborators to work
       together to realize innovative and challenging ideas which correspond with
       the needs of the statewide and national arts landscape and which rouse and
       make the most of the creative energy and artistic connections of the North
       Carolina School of the Arts faculty, staff, students and alumni. One such
       potential future Kenan project is Creativity: Building Communities through
       the Arts. Not yet in development, but a future project that might address
       gaps in the economic landscape of North Carolina and the Southeast, to
       identify potential new arts initiatives, businesses and organizations. We
       currently have a fairly accurate picture of what presently exists, but we do
       not have a clear strategy for new developments statewide. This project
       could be initiated in collaboration with the Kenan Institute for Private
       Enterprise at UNC-Chapel Hill.

2. Community Development
   a. Existing Programs Related to Community Development
    i. The NCSA Stevens Center - The Stevens Center is dedicated to the training of
       the students of NCSA and as an entertainment venue for Winston-Salem and
       the region. The Stevens Center is committed to enhancing the cultural, social
       and economic needs of the community while maintaining the highest level of
       service to the patrons, performers and presenters. Originally a 1929 silent
       movie theatre, renovated in 1983, the Roger L. Stevens Center is a
       magnificently restored neoclassical 1377 seat theatre located in downtown
       Winston-Salem. The Stevens Center is the largest performance space of the
       North Carolina School of the Arts and is home to NCSA’s Something For
       Everyone series as well as the Winston-Salem Symphony (WSS), Piedmont
       Opera Theatre, annual productions of The Nutcracker (a joint production of
       NCSA and WSS), the RiverRun International Film Festival and several other
       local and state arts organizations. The center has played host to the 50 th
       Anniversary production of West Side Story, the All-School productions of
       Oklahoma and Brigadoon, as well as, world premieres of Neil Simon’s Lost In
       Yonkers, and Jake’s Women. Other performances have included Rodgers &
       Hammerstein’s State Fair, An Evening with Gregory Peck, Victor Borge, Nickel
       Creek, STOMP, Alison Krauss, Capitol Steps and a 35th Anniversary Reunion of
       The Andy Griffith Show.
          Attendance:
               o 2005-2006 = 134,547
               o 2006-2007 = 137,699
          Users Of Stevens Center:
               o North Carolina School of the Arts
               o NCSA Something For Everyone Series
               o NCSA Community Music School (located in building but
                  separate operation)
               o Winston-Salem Symphony
               o Piedmont Opera Theatre
               o RiverRun Film Festival
               o National Black Theatre Festival
               o North Carolina Shakespeare Festival
               o W-S Cinema Society
               o Chamber Theater
               o Various local Dance Studios
          Number Of Performances:
               o 2006-2007 = 126
               o The number of performances does not include time required
                  for load-in, rehearsals, strike, and restore. Including all
                  necessary activities the Stevens Center is booked almost 365
                  days a year.
          Staff:
               o 13 Full-time Staff
               o 100+Part-time Staff (as needed-both NCSA and non-NCSA
                  students & adults)

   The Stevens Center works in conjunction with the NCSA Schools of Dance,
   Drama and Music to make tickets available to Winston-Salem High School
   and University students for free or at reduced prices for various NCSA
   Student productions. Working through the NCSA Something For Everyone
   Kids Series, we expose Elementary and Middle school students from the
   geographic area to the arts. Many of these students attend free of charge as
   they would otherwise be unable to attend any arts programs due to cost. In
   2006-2007, the attendance at our daytime kid’s activities was 17,003. One of
   the great challenges of operating this historic building is the constant need
   for repairs and renovations. We are currently in need of replacing the seats
   in the theatre at a cost of $500,000. Increased needs by NCSA for the facility
   make the booking process slow and could cause a loss to part of the 65% of
   the budget generated through rentals.

ii. NCSA Summer Performance Festival In Manteo, NC
    NCSA has completed 10 summer seasons at Roanoke Island Festival Park
    (RIFP) offering a new level of cultural entertainment and opportunities to the
    local community and the more than 250,000 tourists to the Outer Banks each
    week. Since its inception, there has been a steady increase in the annual
    attendance and 2007 broke the all time attendance record for the events.

    Our policy is to involve students and programming from all areas of NCSA
    and to employ current students, alumni, staff and faculty. We have
    increased community outreach in Dare County by adding small (run-out)
    performances at many locations and special events in the public schools.
    Through this project, we have also arranged for The Open Dream Ensemble
    to perform at RIFP in the summer and then return in the fall for
    performances in all the elementary and middle schools in the county.

    We employ about 125 individuals from NCSA in the summer project offering
    special opportunities for our students to work in a different venue and
    location. NCSA is now well known in the coastal region of NC. Actual
    attendance for NCSA events at the park reached 6,869 in 2007 and the
    outreach program added over 5,000 additional audience members.

    To view a calendar of events for RIFP visit -
    http://www.ncarts.edu/summerperformances/currentcalendar.htm

    State budget reductions in past years to the original appropriated amount
    have reduced available funds while expenses have increased each season.
    Supplies and housing cost have increased by as much as 20%. This loss of
    funding presents a significant challenge to the ongoing viability of the
    program.

iii. NCSA Community Music School - The Community Music School (CMS) seeks
     to engage and enrich the lives of the local community by introducing music
     to people of all ages. Almost 300 students (250 families) from birth to senior
     citizen visit the CMS at the Stevens Center each week to attend a private
     lesson or group class. We believe that quality music education is a vital part
     of a person’s life and that everyone should have access to it.
           Impact upon NCSA:
                  o The CMS employs approximately 30 teachers annually, the
                      majority of whom are NCSA graduates.
                  o CMS employs current NCSA students on an as-needed basis.
                  o A number of CMS students audition each year for NCSA.
                  o With an annual budget of $243,000.00, the CMS program is
                      completely receipts funded, so is therefore never a financial
                      risk to NCSA.
           Barriers
                  o As a result of our effort to keep fees low so we can reach a
                      broader spectrum of the community, teachers can earn a
                  higher wage teaching at home or out of local music stores
                  than they can at the CMS of NCSA, the most prominent state
                  musical conservatory.
                o Low wages make it difficult to recruit and retain teachers.
                o Lack of funding to support scholarships makes it difficult to
                  serve economically disadvantaged members of the
                  community.

iv. The RiverRun International Film Festival - (an affiliated entity of the NCSA) - is
    one of the country's fastest-growing regional film festivals. Located in
    Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the festival annually presents a rich blend of
    new films by established and emerging filmmakers, showcasing a diverse
    collection of cinematic voices from around the world.

    Held annually each spring, RiverRun screens a wide variety of feature-length
    and short films from all genres, and also presents a broad range of special
    events, including high-profile regional premieres of significant films, celebrity
    tributes, family matinees and classic retrospectives as well as a full mixture of
    panel discussions and parties.

    In 2007, 95 films were selected after a full year of planning, researching,
    reviewing and screening. These 34 feature films and 61 shorts were pulled
    from a record submissions batch of 1,090 films, with applicants from 53
    different countries. This group was by far the largest submission pool that
    RiverRun has ever received, a 37% increase over last year. Consistent with
    previous years, the festival is committed to bringing the finest new foreign
    films, as well as a focus on films made in our region, as seen in the new
    Southern Spotlight. The distinguished features in our Narrative and
    Documentary Competitions comprise our most exciting competitive
    programs to date.

    Over 12,000 people attended the festival’s various film screenings and events
    in 2007 setting a new attendance record and it continues to grow.

v. Forsyth Futures – is a community collaborative of residents, organizations,
   and institutions working together to solve critical issues that no one
   organization can solve alone. As a participant of the Forsyth Futures
   collaboration the NCSA joins 34 other organizations in Forsyth County to
   improve the lives of adults, children, and families in our community. Forsyth
   Futures has formed five results teams to work collaboratively to ensure that
   all Forsyth County residents are:
         Economically self-sufficient
         Achieving educational success
         Engaged in their community
                  Mentally and physically healthy
                  Safe where they live, work, and play

           The NCSA has been involved as a member of the Board of Directors and by
           participating in committees. The School has provided expertise in data
           collection and the establishment of metrics to monitor the progress of
           change and to help guide future activities.

       vi. Another important aspect of the NCSA’s impact on community development
           is the participation of our students, faculty, and staff in many arts
           organizations in our region. Our students, faculty, and staff volunteer their
           time as performers, fundraisers, marketers, artistic directors, and members
           of Board of Directors in almost all the major non-profit arts organizations in
           our community and many of the smaller arts enterprises. The Little Theater,
           the Sawtooth School for Visual Art, the Winston-Salem Symphony, and the
           Piedmont Opera are just a few examples. As volunteers, they share their
           expertise and passion to enhance the quality of the performances and
           increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the operations. This
           volunteerism provides thousands of hours of support annually to enrich our
           community.

     b. New Program
The ACCORD Initiative (Artists Contributing to Civic-Oriented and Responsive Democracy)
– A early-stage developing Kenan Institute for the Arts project that engages state,
regional and local public arts agencies in pursuing questions relative to the artist within
particular communities, their roles and responsibilities, in articulating strategies to
address key questions: How are the arts essential to a thriving democracy? What civic
and creative roles do artists play? How can we galvanize public sector recognition,
understanding and support for those roles? ACCORD is currently being developed in
collaboration with the National Association of State Arts Agencies. In the future, there
is the potential to expand the collaboration to include the Kenan Institute for Ethics at
Duke University.
          North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
Interpreting the recommendations of this finding of the UNC Tomorrow Report, it is
clear that UNC must play a vital role in continuing to educate, train, and provide its
resources to better equip all North Carolinians to be skilled and functional in this highly
competitive, internationally-linked world. As an “interpreter of change,” UNC should
understand and communicate to all economic stakeholders the pulse of trends in the
economy and workforce.

NCSSM is located in the Research Triangle area and is in close proximity to three other
UNC System universities: UNC-Chapel Hill, NC Central University, and NC State
University. In considering the response of NCSSM to the UNC Tomorrow Report finding
that UNC should be more actively engaged in enhancing the economic transformation
and community development of North Carolina’s regions and the state as a whole, it is
important to recognize the physical size and space limitations of the NCSSM community
in Durham, while at the same time regarding its achievements in the field of distance
education across the state of North Carolina. In this response, NCSSM will address all
recommendations, except Recommendation 4.4.3.

1. UNC should increase its capacity and commitment to respond to and lead economic
   transformation and community development. (Recommendation 4.4.1)

   a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this recommendation.

   Launching the Venture program—a joint initiative of the Kenan-Flagler Business
   School and UNC's Office of Technology Department—combines lecture, functional
   workshops, lab sessions and hands-on expert coaching to help teams of aspiring
   entrepreneurs develop their business plan and its launch strategy. Staff, students,
   alumni ,and faculty of NCSSM are welcome to participate. In conjunction with
   Launching the Venture program, a two-trimester course, Entrepreneurship, is
   offered to interested NCSSM juniors and seniors. With a 2007-2008 enrollment of
   about 35 students, the course allows students to interact with real world
   entrepreneurs in the classroom and study the means necessary to launch a
   successful business initiative.

       i. & ii. Strengths and Obstacles: NCSSM students, staff, faculty, and alumni need
       to be more fully informed of the Launching the Venture program. With their
       science, mathematics, and technology backgrounds NCSSM students, staff,
       faculty, and graduates seem ideally placed to take advantage of this program.
       The potential is there to host information sessions on Alumni Weekend and to
       provide periodic updates through the Alumni newsletter.

   Through the Academic Colloquia NCSSM fosters a life-long commitment to learning
   through monthly speakers sponsored by the Broyhill Leadership Endowment.
NCSSM regularly hosts presentations by eminent scholars. Speakers have included
1988 Nobel Physics Laureate Leon Lederman, a scholar, educator, and advocate for
the improvement of science education; Mary Schweitzer, an authority on the
identification of soft tissue from the bone of a fossil of a T. Rex dinosaur; and Dr. Nils
Nilsson, a founder of the study of artificial intelligence. Faculty, staff, and students
are encouraged to attend these presentations and to view them as an occasion for
thinking about the range of possibilities in scholarly and artistic endeavors, as well as
opportunities to enhance their knowledge of a specific subject area. Students are
invited to interact with the visiting scholars in small, informal sessions and in
selected classroom experiences.

   i. & ii. Strengths and Obstacles: There are three potential ways to expand on the
   current Academic Colloquia program. First, NCSSM should explore options to
   publicize the colloquia to the local community of Durham and the Research
   Triangle. Opening the Colloquia to the local community beyond NCSSM could
   foster a broader discussion of the critical issues and ideas addressed by the
   speakers. This would necessitate the creation of a publicity initiative at NCSSM to
   make the local community aware of events at NCSSM. Second, NCSSM should
   explore options to use its videoconferencing facilities to make the Colloquia
   available to high school, university, and community audiences beyond the
   Durham community. This could provide an opportunity for the interchange of
   ideas across the states. A third possibility would be the publication of the
   Colloquia Series notes on an annual basis. This might take the form of transcript
   of the talk supplemented with a series of potential discussion questions and/or
   an annotated bibliography. Any or all of these extensions would open-up the
   Colloquia to a broader audience and could foster increased discussions of these
   important issues for the state and nation.

NCSSM has hosted annually since 1998 the NCSSM Ethics and Leadership Conference
focused on current issues in ethics and leadership. Hundreds of high school students
from across North Carolina attend the conference each year with their teachers and
other adult chaperones. The Conference keynote speaker is sponsored by the
Broyhill Leadership Endowment. Past speakers have included Dr. JoAnn Burkholder,
Associate Professor Aquatic Biology and Marine Sciences at NC State University and
discoverer of Pfisteria, a protozoan along the Atlantic coast that causes fish kills and
human toxicity; Dr. James P. Evans, Director of Clinical Cancer Genetics and The
Bryson Program in Human Genetics at UNC-Chapel Hill; and Doriane Lambelet
Coleman, Professor of Law at the Duke University School of Law. The conference is
designed with small-group breakout sessions to explore ethical and leadership
implications of current issues. Reading assignments to prepare students for
discussions are provided by session leaders, who include college faculty, high school
and middle school teachers, and Research Triangle professionals.
     i. & ii. Strengths and Obstacles: It could be possible to expand the concept of the
     Ethics and Leadership Conference to include regional conferences co-hosted by
     NCSSM and a local university: an eastern conference at Elizabeth City State
     University, a south central conference at UNC-Pembroke, a northwestern
     conference at Western Carolina University, and a north central conference at
     UNC-Greensboro. This expansion would make the opportunity available to a
     broader cross-section of the state’s middle and high school populations. The
     theme for the conference in each region could be the same and there might still
     be the potential to have a statewide keynote speaker by videoconference to all
     sites, if the conferences were scheduled on the same day. This statewide focus
     on an Ethics and Leadership Day across the state could draw additional publicity
     to the event and provide an even wider audience by including adult town
     meetings in addition to the student sessions.

NCSSM Project Lead the Way (PLTW) is an affiliate of its national program. PLTW
creates dynamic partnerships with the nation's schools to prepare an increasingly
more diverse group of students to be successful in science, engineering, and
engineering technology. This affiliation provides another means to support the
mission of NCSSM—to help meet North Carolina’s need for responsible leadership in
the development and application of science, mathematics, and technology. NCSSM
has introduced three courses from PLTW into its curriculum, Principles of
Engineering, Digital Electronics, and Civil Engineering and Architecture. In addition to
the expansion of the NCSSM curriculum, NCSSM staff is on the North Carolina
Advisory Board for PLTW and assists other middle and high schools across the state
with the introduction of these materials.

     i. & ii. Strengths and Obstacles: PLTW has allowed NCSSM to integrate a
     creditable engineering strand into its curriculum. Many NCSSM graduates have
     pursued careers in engineering, but this is the first attempt to put an “E” in the
     school’s STEM curriculum. Ongoing challenges to the PLW initiative are enrolling
     a critical mass of appropriate students and competing for scarce materials funds.

b.       New programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
     recommendation.

1) NCSSM should explore hosting supporting materials for the expansion of PLTW
   curriculum across North Carolina. This could include the hosting of materials on
   blade servers at NCSSM for access across North Carolina. This might reduce the
   costs of implementing this expansion of science, engineering, and engineering
   technology throughout the public schools.

2) NCSSM should explore the option of hosting community sessions for interested
   persons on specialized topics. These sessions could be hosted by students with
   adult supervision on weekends to make better use of the physical facilities of
        NCSSM. These special sessions could be publicized through the same network
        established to handle the Academic Colloquia information for the local
        community.

   c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated.

   There are no plans to eliminate current programs described in this section. Several
   programs described in this and other sections suggest the need for a fulltime
   Outreach Specialist to coordinate programs that target audiences beyond the
   school. These needed services could be combined and one new such person added
   to the staff.

   d.       Implementation strategies, plans, and timelines.

   The expansion and/or implementation of programs referred to above would need
   additional staffing at NCSSM. One critical need is a fulltime Outreach Specialist to
   coordinate the NCSSM initiatives. Additional weekend staff would be necessary to
   host community events. Additional Distance Learning staff would be required to
   handle the videoconferencing opportunities. Contacts will need to be made with
   local schools and with the NC PLTW director.

2. UNC should focus specific effort in meeting the needs of rural and underserved areas
   of the state. (Recommendation 4.4.2)

   a.       Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this
        recommendation.

   The NCSSM Distance Education program has as its focus rural and underserved
   school districts. These are often small districts that, if not for NCSSM programming,
   could not provide access to the advanced and specialized courses offered by
   interactive videoconferencing. Through the 1996-2004 NCSSM Cyber Campus
   initiative, NCSSM worked closely with the counties of Alleghany, Cherokee, Halifax,
   Lenoir, Kannapolis City, Pasquotank, and Pender to establish sophisticated
   technology suites in these high schools. These school-based hubs of advanced
   technology have had an economic impact in these regions. For example, some Cyber
   Campuses have been used by the community for certification sessions for local law
   enforcement, health care, and pre-school workers.

   NCSSM in cooperation with the Kramden Institute, Inc. has sponsored a series of
   Geek-a-thon events. These events supply refurbished computers to deserving
   students in the local community for home use. The students and adult volunteers set
   up, triage, repair, and clean computer equipment for three days, the outcome being
   free computers donated to needy students in the local area. This unique opportunity
   allows NCSSM students to experience repairing and rebuilding computers, thereby
using many of the technology skills they have learned. It also offers the students a
glimpse into the needs of the local community and the chance to see the rewards
associated with community service.

Started by Lucy Guo and Xainlin Li, NCSSM class of 2005 graduates, the Siemens
Science Days mission is to promote math and science literacy throughout the
country by providing volunteer mentors and classroom materials that will “help
children develop the knowledge, skills, and self-confidence needed to succeed in
school and in the workforce” (http://www.siemens-
foundation.org/en//scienceday.htm). The initial charter for the program was
granted to NCSSM in 2005. The program has now expanded to included high schools
and universities across the nation in this initiative to demonstrate science concepts
to students in elementary schools, using students as the instructors. NCSSM
students continue to provide programs for local Research Triangle elementary
schools each year.

Through NCSSM Tutoring Programs our students have helped young people as they
master mathematics, sciences, and foreign language. These have taken place in
schools near NCSSM and via tutoring sessions scheduled as part of our distance
education courses.

     i. & ii. Strengths and Obstacles: The Cyber Campus initiative demonstrated to
     small districts the potential of interactive videoconferencing, and these districts
     and neighboring districts who participated in sessions at the Cyber Campuses
     have continued to embrace new communication and teaching technologies. By
     investing in an Outreach Specialist and minimal funding for supplies, perhaps
     NCSSM could assist rural and underserved areas in implementing activities such
     as the Geek-a-thon, Science Days, and expansion of the school’s tutoring efforts.

b.       New programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
     recommendation.

1) There is a real need to expand the opportunities for NCSSM students to assist
   the local Durham community in English instruction for the rapidly increasing
   Spanish speaking population. There are two needs in this area. One is to work
   with young Hispanic children who are entering the local public schools. The
   second is to work with adults in the communities surrounding NCSSM. Because
   Spanish is the largest language offering at NCSSM (currently over 50% of the
   language program), this opportunity for NCSSM students to practice their
   Spanish while at the same time assisting in the transition of the Hispanic
   population to English fluency for education and jobs would be a significant
   service to the community.

c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated. None.
   d. Implementation strategies, plans, and timelines.

   As these programs expand, there will be a significant need for adult personnel to
   sponsor and supervise the activities. There will also be an increased need for reliable
   transportation from NCSSM to sites throughout the region and state.

3. UNC should promote the arts and cultural enrichment in all regions of the state.
   (Recommendation 4.4.4)

   a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this recommendation.

   Beginning at the middle school level, counselors from NCSSM’s Office of Admissions
   actively communicate NCSSM’s mission and purpose and emphasize the diversity of
   the school community and the inclusivity of the school’s programs. “Bridge”
   initiatives such as Nueva Vista, Living the Dream, and Dream Makers target North
   Carolina’s Hispanic, African-American, and Native American communities. These
   initiatives (described in greater detail in Section B. Increasing Access to Higher
   Education (4.2)) play an important role in acquainting North Carolina’s minority
   communities with NCSSM’s vision and purpose, and—by attracting talented minority
   students—ensuring that NCSSM is a diverse community where all of North Carolina’s
   voices are heard. NCSSM has been a consistent host for multicultural events, fests,
   and celebrations open to the local, state, and even national community. For over 20
   years, NCSSM has sponsored the Pow Wow for the Native American communities of
   North Carolina.

   NCSSM sponsors a variety of dramatic performances throughout the academic year.
   The students direct and produce performances, which included a spring musical—
   “Anything Goes” in 2008. These performances could be publicized to the local
   community to increase access to the arts in the Research Triangle.

   NCSSM hosts choral, orchestra, and band concerts in the fall and winter of each
   year. These performances by the NCSSM ensembles have been held in cooperation
   with several local music groups, including the Blacknall Presbyterian Church choir
   and the Durham Jewish Chorale. In addition, NCSSM has hosted an annual Fine Arts
   Weekend in the spring since 2006. This Weekend event, funded by the Mary Duke
   Biddle Fund through the NCSSM Foundation, has included the school’s Quarter
   Century Celebration in May 2006 with NCSSM alumni, Jeffrey Sykes and Arissa
   Kusimi, and a performance of the Carolina Chocolate Drops featuring another
   NCSSM alumna, Rhiannon Giddens. Randy Foy, the instructor of music at NCSSM in
   1981, also participated. The 2007 Weekend included a Community Bluegrass Brunch
   featuring mandolinist Mike Marshall and performances by NCSSM student
   ensembles. NCSSM also hosted the Taiko Drumming group from Japan in the winter
   of 2008. This group performed at various elementary and secondary schools in the
   area while using NCSSM as a rehearsal and performance center.

        i. & ii. Strengths and Obstacles: NCSSM should explore ways to open these
        performances to a wider audience in the Research Triangle. The performances
        take place in the 700-seat auditorium on the NCSSM campus. The school is
        limited to this seating capacity as it considers opening these events to the larger
        community. It might also be possible to consider televising these performances
        either through videoconferencing or public television to other parts of the state
        and nation.

   b. New programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
      recommendation.

   At the current time, given the physical size and space limitations of the NCSSM
   campus there does not seem to be potential to create additional programs in these
   areas.

   c.    Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated. None

   d.    Implementation strategies, plans, and timelines. None

4. UNC should facilitate inclusive discussions on important community issues.
   (Recommendation 4.4.5)

   a. Existing programs, initiatives, or activities that respond to this recommendation.

   The Academic Colloquia and Community Sessions on Technology Use, Robotics,
   English/Spanish Instruction discussed earlier in this section are possible ways that
   NCSSM can address this recommendation. Other important community issues
   NCSSM addresses relate to environmental and sustainability issues.

   b. New programs, initiatives, and activities needed to respond to this
      recommendation. None

   c. Programs related to this section that should be combined or eliminated. None

   d. Implementation strategies, plans and timelines. None
                        North Carolina State University
True to its roots as a land-grant institution, NC State has always been a leader in forging
links between activities in the academy and economic progress in our region, state,
nation, and world. NC State is UNC's unparalleled leader in the delivery of extension
and outreach programs. Our responsibility for extension and outreach extends
statewide. We have Cooperative Extension offices in all 100 counties of North Carolina
and on the Qualla boundary of the Eastern Tribe of the Cherokee Indians. By measures
of industry-sponsored research, technology transfer, and licenses and patents granted,
NC State is a leader in the state and nation. We can count more than $450 million
annually in economic impact to the state in our Cooperative Extension, Industrial
Extension, and North Carolina Small Business and Technology Development Center
alone.

To build on this impressive base, NC State must pay attention to basics. According to
many economists, the most important determinant of U.S. economic growth is progress
in science and technology—fields in which NC State has unique strengths. Our
prominence in science and technology is a potent force that drives innovation and
economic development locally, statewide, and nationally. Industry comes to North
Carolina to tap into its educated workforce, but also for easy, collaborative access to the
best research minds. Accordingly, an important component of NC State's UNC
Tomorrow response to 4.4 is to strengthen our faculty, our facilities, and our research
base in our College of Engineering so that we can regain our status as a premier College
of Engineering and a driver of economic and community development in North Carolina.

The new engineering infrastructure we have built and continue to build is housed on NC
State's Centennial Campus, a twenty-first century "technopolis" consisting of multi-
disciplinary R&D neighborhoods with university, corporate, and government facilities
intertwined. The Centennial Campus concept defines NC State's vision for collaborative
transformation of our university into an active participant in innovative economic
transformation and community development.

To extend the benefits of our attention to the College of Engineering, we will improve
the effectiveness of our Industrial Extension Service, expanding it in geographical
coverage, breadth, and depth. Under UNC Tomorrow, IES will partner with UNC
institutions not known for extension programs, help transform economic development
by focusing on important community-based business and industry issues, and offer
degree and certificate options to students and adult learners.

Finally, we will leverage our leadership role in extension and engagement statewide to
support entrepreneurship development across North Carolina. Under this UNC
Tomorrow initiative, NC State and its partners will cooperate to create significant
growth statewide in targeted industry clusters by supporting startups, by generating
technological innovation and new products, and by partnering with the Department of
Commerce in efforts to recruit and retain firms.
Building a Premier College of Engineering
UNC-T recommendation: 4.4, 4.1, 4.5, 4.6
Type: Expansion of an existing program

Description
Engineering education and research is a potent catalyst for economic development. NC State's
engineering faculty, students, and staff have played an important role in moving North Carolina
from an agricultural economy to a high-technology locus renowned throughout the nation and
the world.

But engineering education in North Carolina has been under considerable stress. Fifteen years
ago the accomplishments and reputation of the College of Engineering at NC State were on a
par with the very best colleges of engineering in the world. At that time the COE at NC State
was ranked by US News and World Report as 21st among all private and public research
colleges of engineering and 13th among all public research colleges of engineering.
Unfortunately, while the COE has continued to progress in many areas of engineering research
and education, this progress has not kept pace with some of its peer colleges of engineering. By
2007, NC State had dropped to 34th among all private and public research colleges of
engineering and 20th among public research colleges of engineering.

Returning NC State's College of Engineering to a position of global leadership in technological
research and development will require a substantial investment. With the assistance of the NC
legislature, we have already begun to take steps to reverse the erosion of our stature. To
shore up our research and educational infrastructure, we are investing in a move and expansion
of NC State’s College of Engineering to Centennial Campus, and we are committed to keeping
those facilities state of the art. Facilities, however, are only buildings and labs unless we
populate them with a critical mass of cutting-edge engineering faculty, students, and staff to
conduct research, make discoveries, and transfer this knowledge to the commercial sector.

To move NC State's College of Engineering to premier status, NC State has requested a series of
funding investments, over a four-year period, from the North Carolina Legislature. We are
grateful to the legislature for funding the first phase of our recovery plan. In 2007-08, NC State
Engineering hired twenty-four new COE faculty and broke ground on the third engineering
building on Centennial Campus. While many factors need to be considered in any recovery
effort, there is no doubt that this recent investment in engineering education and research has
played an important part in the COE's move up to 30th in the 2008 US News and World Report
ranking.

Under this initiative, we will make important strides in our drive to make NC State's College of
Engineering a premier engine of economic development for North Carolina and a source of
pride for every North Carolinian.
Partnerships
Successful partnerships both within NC State and with external groups are an absolute
requirement for the COE to achieve significant increases in research funding. Examples of
successful centers include the Semiconductor Power Electronics Center, Advanced Computing
and Communication, and the Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute. Most
recently, activities of the Institute for Maintenance Science and Technology have led to the
development of partnerships with the Naval Air Depot at Cherry Point and the U.S. Coast Guard
Station in Elizabeth City in support of military bases in North Carolina. Partnerships provide an
opportunity for faculty to work across departmental lines and capitalize on their collective
strength for a common purpose to solve challenging problems that are not unique to one
discipline.
Implementation
Provided that we receive the requisite funding, we will phase in the following investments over
the next four years.
    1. Investments to increase the number of research active faculty: The current number of
       tenure and tenure- track faculty in the College of Engineering at NC State is 250. In order
       to reach a faculty size comparable to preeminent colleges of engineering, NC State must
       hire an additional 100 faculty. A faculty of 350 will provide NC State’s COE with sufficient
       critical mass to attain a level of annual research expenditures commensurate with a
       premier college of engineering. The college will add faculty across interdisciplinary
       areas that respond to state and national needs as well as worldwide challenges in
       bioengineering, nanotechnology, information and communication technologies, critical
       infrastructure and security, energy and environmental systems, advanced materials and
       manufacturing, robotics and sensors technologies, and engineering services such as
       health care, transportation and financial systems.
    2. Investments to increase graduate enrollment, particularly at the Ph.D. level: While a
       major part of the funding for this investment will come from increased grant and
       contract activity, a proportional investment in recurring funding will be applied to
       graduate student support through tuition remission, internal fellowships, and related
       stipends.
    3. Investments in facilities/infrastructure needed to sustain a research enterprise of this
       size: The construction of Engineering Building III and the funding for and eventual
       construction of EB IV and EB V on Centennial Campus will create a set of world-class
       research and educational facilities that will position the college very well for achieving
       prominence on a par with the very best colleges of engineering in the world.

Funding
Future costs:
                  New
 One-time       recurring    New state     Campus       Grants
                                                          &
                            appropriatio (re)allocatio contract
   costs          costs         ns             n          s       Gifts   Receipts Other
                $25 million    100%

Responsibility
The dean of the College of Engineering.

Assessment
The long-term goal of the NC State's College of Engineering is to become and be perceived as a
leading public college of engineering in the United States. While funding beyond the four-year
horizon will be necessary to achieve this goal, a reasonable expectation is that this investment
will result in a "top 10" college of engineering with a ten-year horizon, a status that will clearly
mark NC State as a premier college of engineering.
Expanding the Industrial Extension Service
UNC-T recommendation: 4.4, 4.7
Type: Expansion of an existing program


Description
The Industrial Extension Service is the outreach branch of NC State’s College of Engineering. IES
currently has 90 FTE, an annual budget of approximately $12.7 million, and sixteen regional
offices around the state. IES helps new businesses grow and good businesses get better. It
works with industries from the coast to the mountains, from 1,000 feet underground to 30,000
feet up, and delivers results in quality, productivity, safety, environmental protection, energy
management, and innovation.

IES is the North Carolina hub for the nationwide Manufacturing Extension Partnership, a
program of the National Institute for Science and Technology. MEP provides resources and
training to strengthen small- and medium-sized businesses. IES currently works annually with
about 400 companies out of the 11,000+ manufacturers in the state, plus about 200
nonmanufacturing entities.

To improve the effectiveness of IES, this initiative expands IES in geographical coverage,
breadth, and depth. IES has identified the southeast coast, northeast coast, and mountains as
the top three priorities for physical expansion. Under this initiative, IES will also expand to UNC
institutions not known for extension programs, help transform economic development by
focusing on important community-based business and industry issues, and offer degree and
certificate options to students and adult learners.

Partnerships
Current IES partners include the Research Triangle Regional Partnership, the Piedmont Triad
Partnership, the North Carolina Hospital Association, the Occupational Safety and Health
Administration, the Small Business and Technology Development Center, and the Gateway
Technology Center in Rocky Mount. Expanding IES will involve developing and maintaining
many more partnerships (e.g., throughout the larger UNC system).

Implementation
Expansion of IES services will require office space, equipment, and personnel. Procedures for
expansion are as follows:
    Place a branch office on nearly every campus in the UNC system. IES plans to start by
       establishing partnerships for operating locations at Appalachian State University,
       Eastern Carolina University, Elizabeth City State University, UNC-Wilmington, and
       Western Carolina University. Additional partnerships will be developed with NC A&T
       State University and UNC Charlotte. Staffing will require 1 FTE at each location except
       ECSU (envisioned as a 50-50 joint assignment). Each office would require six months to
       open: three months to negotiate the agreement plus three months to hire staff and
       equip the office. IES could open two offices simultaneously, and then stagger the office
       openings in three-month intervals, so that all seven offices could open within fifteen
       months of authorization.
      Place a full-time service provider (1 FTE) at the Gateway Technology Center in Rocky
       Mount within 6 months of authorization.
      Establish a graduate engineering practicum to add a practical education opportunity
       specifically for graduate engineering students. This practicum will be analogous to the
       undergraduate opportunities afforded by Cooperative Education, the IES Student on
       Demand program, and various internships (e.g., through the Integrated Manufacturing
       Systems Engineering Institute, or Operations Research). The practicum will be offered
       at all graduate engineering programs in the state: NCSU, NC A&T State University, and
       UNC Charlotte. Staffing will require 3 FTE to administer the program, with the first
       position filled in 2008 and the two subsequent positions filled in 2009.
      Establish business innovation specialist positions in every economic development region
       in the state, following the model piloted at the Piedmont Triad Partnership. Staffing
       business innovation specialists in each economic region, including 0.5 FTE for centralized
       administrative support, will require 7.5 FTE, but regional cost sharing could reduce the
       NC State burden to as low as 4 FTE.
      Increase staffing for the Lean Healthcare program, a partnership with the North Carolina
       Hospital Association that tailors the principles of lean operations to the healthcare
       industry cluster. IES will have to hire at least 1 FTE by July 2008 to keep up with current
       demand, and demand is expected to grow to require a dedicated Lean Healthcare
       expert in each economic region. Staffing Lean Healthcare personnel in each region,
       including 0.5 FTE for centralized support, will require 7.5 FTE, but regional cost sharing
       could reduce the NC State burden to as low as 4 FTE.
      Staff the Southeastern OSHA Training Institute Education Center. NC State was recently
       named the lead agency for center, and the University of Tennessee is a consortium
       partner. Staffing for curriculum development, class scheduling, and course delivery will
       require 2 FTE to be hired within six months.
      Add 1 FTE by the end of 2008 to expand the Environmental Management Systems effort
       to develop an EMS for the NC State campus (which will be the first such university effort
       in the area); develop a program related to ISO 26000, Social Responsibility, and
       additional standards on sustainability; and implement a Clean and Lean assistance
       program for NC businesses.
      Add 1.5 FTE by the end of 2008 to the Emergency Response and Disaster Response
       effort to assist communities statewide with preparing to handle natural or manmade
       disasters by offering a disaster site worker (16-hour course) and train-the-trainer for
       disaster site worker courses.

Funding
Future costs:
                  New
 One-time       recurring   New state    Campus      Grants
                                                         &
                           appropriatio (re)allocatio contract
    costs        costs         ns             n          s        Gifts   Receipts Other
              $3.5 million    15%                       25%                 60%

Responsibility
Implementing this initiative will be the responsibility of the vice chancellor for extension,
engagement, and economic development, and the executive director of IES.

Assessment
IES effectiveness is assessed by third-party surveys of IES clients. NIST conducts these surveys
of manufacturing clients under the MEP. IES is developing surveys to assess impact on
nonmanufacturing clients, as well as clients of the Minerals Research Laboratory and other
outreach activities, which are not surveyed by NIST. Since the beginning of 2000, the
cumulative IES economic impact reported on NIST surveys is over $980 million.
Entrepreneurship, Industry Clusters, and Economic Development
UNC-T recommendation: 4.4, 4.7
Type: New emphasis on academic programs in entrepreneurship and statewide expansion of an
existing economic development outreach program.

Description
NC State has a number of programs and initiatives built either directly or indirectly on the
concept of entrepreneurship. On campus, the NC State Entrepreneurship Program is a new
initiative that will coordinate entrepreneurship activities across campus. The new program
builds on our Engineering Entrepreneurship Program, which has been active for over twenty
years, and on more recent programming in our College of Management. It will encourage
incorporation of entrepreneurial principles of creativity and risk-taking into the fabric of the
undergraduate student experience. Off campus, NC State is launching a statewide extension
effort to support entrepreneurs, small businesses, and priority industry clusters. This initiative
will coordinate NC State's activities in support of entrepreneurship, both on campus and off.

NC State's leadership role in extension and engagement statewide provides a unique platform
for supporting entrepreneurship development across North Carolina. Our leadership of the
Small Business and Technology Development Center activities at all of the UNC constituent
institutions provides connectivity for ongoing interaction and engagement with all campus
entrepreneurship programs. Our Cooperative Extension program, in collaboration with the
SBTDC, gives NC State the opportunity to increase access to entrepreneurship education and
support services in small town and rural areas statewide.

Increased entrepreneurial activity can mitigate and offset job loss in legacy production sectors
by encouraging burgeoning industry clusters, thereby increasing the reemployment prospects
of dislocated workers. Under this initiative, NC State and its partners will cooperate to create
significant growth statewide in targeted industry clusters by supporting startups, by generating
technological innovation and new products, and by partnering with the Department of
Commerce in efforts to recruit and retain firms. The industry clusters now receiving highest
priority include nonwovens and other advanced textiles; medical devices and advanced medical
technology; advanced manufacturing in aerospace; automotive; marine sciences;
biotechnology, and photonics sectors; value-added agricultural, aquacultural and natural
products; marine trades and boat building; and serious gaming/simulations and advanced
learning technologies. NC State and its partners will build local and statewide industry-cluster
networks; create strategic and marketing plans; contribute to industry trade shows; create and
provide training and technical assistance programs; hold innovation summits, workshops, and
conferences; and create databases, marketing materials, and websites.

This initiative builds on NC State's very successful collaborations with Precision Marketing
initiative of Wake County and the Research Triangle Regional Partnership. The firms expanded
under these initiatives (e.g. Spuntech nonwoven textile manufacturing in Person County,
Vescom in Vance County, and Freudenberg Nonwovens in Durham County) have added high-
paying jobs and brought in investment capital. The initiative also draws on the assets of our
Centennial Campus. With twenty-six incubator firms and forty-five other partners, government
agencies, and private firms, Centennial Campus was named Top Research Science Park in 2007.
MeadWestvaco cited the access to talented people and effective programs at NC State as a key
factor in their locating on Centennial Campus.

Partnerships
This initiative establishes and strengthens partnerships with economic developers across the
state, with the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, and with other UNC universities (in
particular East Carolina University, Western Carolina University, and UNC Charlotte), and NC
community colleges.

Responsibilities of each partner include identifying industry sectors with significant growth
potential, identifying assets at NC State (programs and researchers) and in the private sector
that can contribute to industry clusters. Deliverables might include background research by
university scholars, and the development of marketing materials by private-sector firms. NC
State can also play an integral role in helping economic developers intervene at critical strategic
points to help stabilize firms that are experiencing trade-related and market-driven pressures.
In such instances, the partnership can contribute to retaining and preserving good jobs.

Implementation
We will begin the implementation strategy immediately with an alignment and increased
interaction of NC State research and extension faculty with entrepreneurs; the accelerated
commercialization of new university innovations and technologies by the private sector;
educational programs; training and technical assistance to businesses in high-priority clusters;
and participation in corporate prospect and site selection, consultant presentations, and
related technical assistance to industrial recruiters. These are personnel-intensive activities
requiring new faculty on campus and in the field. The Economic Development Partnership will
be responsible for the growth in this program.

Funding
Current funding: Entrepreneurship programs are currently funded (at approximately $1.0
million) with a blend of state-appropriated funds, grant and partnership funds, and fee-for-
service activities.
Future costs:
                    New
  One-time recurring New state             Campus       Grants
                                                          &
                            appropriatio (re)allocatio contract
    costs          costs         ns            n          s     Gifts Receipts Other
                $4 million      75%                      15%                      10%
Responsibility
The Provost’s Office will be responsible for the academic programming. The Division of
Extension, Engagement and Economic Development (and its Economic Development
Partnership and Small Business Technology and Development Center) will be responsible for
the statewide extension initiative and cluster based economic development activities.

Assessment
We will assess effectiveness by tracking the development of new technologies, the
commercialization of these technologies in the private sector, and the creation of jobs and
additional investment in jobs by the private sector in regions of the state and targeted priority
clusters.
                     University of North Carolina at Asheville
The distinctive nature of a UNC Asheville educational experience combines the talents,
energies, and commitments of our graduates to form a compelling engine of economic
transformation for the 21st century. In addition, Greater Asheville is home to many vibrant and
growing communities, and the University is a major partner in existing and ongoing community
development efforts.

   1. Existing Program: Economist Amartya Sen has suggested that an important way to
      conceptualize economic development is through the development of human agency and
      the expansion of human capacity. University students and graduates, in the full
      spectrum of their intellectual and social capability and potential, provide a fundamental
      promise for economic transformation in North Carolina and beyond. UNC Asheville’s
      strategic plan leads the Student Outcomes section with the aspiration that, “UNC
      Asheville students [will] develop an inquisitive, interdisciplinary, engaged way of life in a
      vibrant university community which is just, collaborative, and increasingly diverse.”
      Work that is central to a liberal arts education is central to economic transformation in
      the future.
           Strengths: Consistent with the goals of our strategic plan, we have set high
           expectations for student success. This will be affirmed when our students
           “demonstrate an accountability to their own moral and ethical principles, and a
           responsibility to individuals, community, and humanity; they develop a service
           orientation, a sense of adventure, and a respect for differences; they discover the
           joys of entrepreneurship, enlightened risk-taking, and responsible activism,” in
           accord with their attending a premier public liberal arts college. One recent example
           is a 2003 cum laude graduate in chemistry and environmental studies. Building on
           his convictions and his scholarship, he founded and currently serves as CEO of Blue
           Ridge Biofuels, a local organization that has brought biofuel capabilities to our
           region. Combining his education in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and
           math) disciplines with an understanding of global issues, management practices, and
           his own ethical and moral convictions, this graduate is making a difference within his
           community and the environment.
           Obstacles: The general public is not yet convinced of the economic, community,
           business, and individual benefit of a liberal arts education. We have not consistently
           made the case for the value of the Liberal Arts as a solid preparation for the myriad
           challenges of the future. We need help refining how we describe ourselves to the
           public so that more people understand who we are, what we do, and why our
           mission matters to the State of North Carolina.

   2. New program: Much of our contribution to local and regional economic transformation
      is accomplished through student-directed, faculty-mentored undergraduate research. A
   combination of several UNC Asheville’s Strategic Plan goals (Action 21) will provide for
   North Carolina:
    More and better teachers who stay in the profession, especially here in North
      Carolina.
    More pre-med students who are well-rounded, ethical human beings, especially
      here in North Carolina.
    More pre-health graduates to address the growing health crisis in North Carolina.
    More environmentally savvy thinkers, planners, and problem-solvers collaborating
      with greater Asheville and our state on environmental issues.

        i. Implementation strategies:
       ii. Our Vice Chancellor for Alumni & Development and our Dean of University
           Programs will lead a group that includes: Dir, H&W; H&W faculty; Dir Pre-Health
           Professions program; Chair Pre-Health committee; Chair Environmental
           Sciences; Landscape Architect; Dir, EQI; Dir Craft Campus; Dir AGC; Dir NCCCR;
           Dir Education Dept; VC Alumni & Development; Dir Public Information; Asst to
           the Chancellor for External Affairs (2); 1-2 UR committee members; Key Center
           rep; Diversity Action Council rep; 2-3 students; Dir Leadership Programs.
       iii. Sample Benchmarks: Growth in the number of students completing Teacher
            Licensure or graduating in Pre-Health professions and Environmental Studies.


1. Existing program(s): The University is already involved in a variety of community
   partnerships that directly contribute to economic and community development.
      The University has undertaken a leadership role in the Asheville HUB economic
       development initiative, a collaborative economic, community, cultural, and
       sustainable development effort for Asheville and Buncombe County that aligns the
       University with the strategic economic plans of our region.
      RENCI at UNC Asheville is a community partnership focused on decision support
       tools, economic development and flood mitigation. Production of RENCI’s tools,
       created through partnerships with the City, the County and twelve local non-profits
       and companies, helps drive the local economy while assisting community and
       regional leaders in making sound decisions. Additionally, RENCI at UNC Asheville
       provides a fully technologically equipped van (the RENCI ROVER) to The North
       Carolina Arboretum, River Link and Colburn Earth Science Museum to support their
       education and outreach programs. Eleven UNC Asheville students have been
       supported in undergraduate research and community internships through RENCI at
       UNC Asheville.
      UNC Asheville’s National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC)
       leads the Technology Cluster of the Asheville Hub, Through Hub Technology Cluster
       funding, 10 UNC Asheville students have been supported in community research
       projects and internships.
      The North Carolina Center for Creative Retirement brings together the talent and
       energy of a new generation of dynamic seniors who actively contribute to the local
       economy and social networks. This nationally acclaimed center, and its College for
       Seniors, is a leading driver in making Greater Asheville a destination of choice for
       active seniors.
      The University hosts the State of Black Asheville conference, facilitating an inclusive
       discussion on diversity as it relates to education, the economy, employment,
       housing, and other important issues affecting the Asheville community
      The University shares oversight of the inter-institutional Center for Craft, Creativity
       and Design, helping our region take the lead in craft scholarship and research.
      Our Asheville Graduate Center hosts baccalaureate and master’s degree programs
       from six Universities in Greater Asheville.


       Strengths: Our strategic planning process was explicit in seeking advice about the
       needs of the greater Asheville community. Our chancellor is a visible, civic leader,
       and her presence and involvement is complemented by the lifelong engagement of
       many faculty, staff, and administrators in the economic, cultural, and sustainable
       community of which we are a part. The successes within Asheville and Buncombe
       County have received national and international press, in part because Greater
       Asheville has a first rate public liberal arts university.
       Obstacles: Our investments and commitments in the community are many and
       sometimes disconnected. We have described this dilemma with our community
       involvement as being ‘a mile wide and an inch deep.’ We have not always been seen
       as a reliable partner with our community, when we have not always been able to
       follow through on our commitments. We need to commit carefully and well, and
       assure that we can maintain our investment in the right number of initiatives. We
       will need to add and allocate staff to respond to and coordinate our community
       partnerships.

2. New Program: North Carolina Center for Health & Wellness [also meets goal 4.5: Our
   Health]The North Carolina General Assembly has provided the initial $35 million to
   launch this ambitious project. Scheduled to open in 2010, our new Center will be the
   first of its kind in North Carolina to focus on the health outreach and education of our
   Western North Carolina citizens. Initially focusing on senior wellness, workplace
   wellness and childhood obesity, this program will combine the University’s assets of a
   strong academic program in Health and Wellness Promotion and the many local
   partners already committed to this issue. Issues of nutrition, health education, health
   care disparity, disease prevention and management, the role of exercise, and special
   population health issues will have a champion and headquarters at NCCH&W. This new
   center will allow our community and our economy to capitalize further on our region’s
   reputation as a destination for health and rejuvenation. Faculty and students are
   already collaborating with community partners on important research into factors that
   affect health and wellness including lifestyle issues, aging, poverty, education, and
   employment. Addressing health and quality of life issues before people get sick holds
   the greatest potential for keeping the costs of health care down and for improving the
   health and quality of life for North Carolinians.
       i) Implementation strategies: Our undergraduate research and community
          partnerships frame excellent opportunities for research which will benefit the
          public. Our community values this potential. We know this, in part, because the
          North Carolina Center for Health and Wellness has already attracted over $4
          million of external, financial support.
       ii) Sample Benchmarks: Because of early focus on childhood obesity, workplace
           wellness, and senior wellness, we anticipate looking at measurements in these
           areas to gauge our progress toward improving the health of our region through
           outreach, education, collaboration, and support.

3. New Program: Establish Greater Asheville as the center for the modern American
   studio craft movement with our new sustainable Craft Campus. Educate practitioners of
   studio crafts and art, teachers, scholars, collectors and advocates who will
   communicate, strengthen and sustain the power of the handmade object within a
   region already recognized for its environmental literacy, creative economy and strong
   craft-based cultural heritage. The Craft Campus will serve as a national model for
   environmentally innovative campus design and dynamic interdisciplinary craft education
   combining the practice of art and craft, the acquisition of economic strategies for
   business success in design and craft, and an active stewardship of the environment. The
   campus itself combines the need for environmentally healthy craft studio spaces for
   students and faculty, a demonstration and teaching venue for outstanding faculty and
   leading craftspeople of the region, a model of ingenuity in sustainable studio design and
   alternative energy production, along with a craft and environmental education center
   for the State and Western North Carolina. [also meets goal 4.6: Our
   Environment]Programming efforts in the area of economic, cultural, creative and
   societal issues will be supported through partnerships with the Center for Craft,
   Creativity + Design, Penland School of Craft, John C. Campbell Folk School, Arrowmont
   School of Arts and Crafts, Handmade in America, Black Mountain College Museum,
   Asheville Art Museum, Southern Highlands Craft Guild, North Carolina Center for
   Creative Retirement, and the American Craft Council. These partnerships will support an
   efficient use of funds through organized scheduling of artists, lecturers and exhibitions
   and will enable more ambitious programming efforts through co-sponsorship.
        i. Implementation strategies: We have already collaborated with Buncombe
           County to lease land adjacent to a former landfill and to use the methane gas
           produced from the landfill to provide the fuel needs of the craft campus. We are
           currently designing both the curriculum for an exciting new major in craft
           studies, and the studio facilities in ceramics, glass, metal and wood that will
           comprise the Craft Campus.
       ii. The Director of the Craft Campus is convening a group that includes faculty from
           the art, environmental studies, chemistry, management, and other departments,
           fundraising professionals, our design & construction experts, regional craft
           experts, regional energy experts, students, and local/regional collaborators in
           government and the private sector.
      iii. Sample Benchmarks: Early indicators of success will include the number of
           regional and national crafts experts drawn to our Craft Campus, visitors to
           Western North Carolina who choose to visit the craft and environmental
           education center, and the number of craft and art degree graduates who can
           augment and sustain our creativity-based economy.

4. New Program: The North Carolina Center for Creative Retirement will embark on a
   planning process for their next couple of decades of serving the needs of older adults in
   the region. Plans include designing new ways to deepen its connection to UNC Asheville,
   collaborating with the NC Center for Health & Wellness on senior wellness and quality of
   life issues, and broadening the racial diversity of its members and participants. Now in
   their third decade of meeting the needs of active seniors in the region by promoting
   “thriving in the second half of life through learning, leadership, service and research,”
   the North Carolina Center for Creative Retirement is poised to bring newcomers to
   greater Asheville to our campus and into closer affiliation with both the center and the
   university.

        i. Implementation strategy: Example: In collaboration with the North Carolina
           Center for Health & Wellness, we will develop a model intergenerational
           wellness curriculum through which UNC Asheville students and faculty and
           NCCCR members can learn from and with one another through a laboratory of
           innovative programs, research, and outreach. This will enhance the capacity of
           NCCHW and NCCCR to reach out to a broad socioeconomic and diverse senior
           population.
       ii. NCCCR leadership will work with the current NCCHW team, which includes
           Health & Wellness faculty, staff from Alumni & Development, Athletics, the
           Chancellor’s Office, and Design & Construction. This team will work with NCCCR
           to plan and implement the above program.
      iii. Sample Benchmarks: Increase in the racial and socioeconomic diversity of NCCCR
           leaders, members and participants; Increase in the UNC Asheville collaborations
           and programs that include NCCCR participation and leadership, and vice versa.
                     University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Examples of successful community and economic development outreach at Carolina abound.
Some of these models of engagement include helping communities improve their leadership
capacities and providing technical assistance and training to businesses and entrepreneurs.
However, for a variety of reasons, these programs typically are not aligned or integrated for
maximum impact on the communities or businesses they support. The following proposals
better harness the talents of Carolina faculty and students to help build globally competitive
communities and businesses in our state through these means: convening faculty, students and
staff across disciplines and schools; aligning Carolina resources with community and economic
development challenges; guiding engagement projects from identification through
implementation; and distilling and disseminating lessons learned.

4.4.1 UNC should increase its capacity and commitment to respond to and lead economic
transformation and community development.

Existing Program

1.   Community Economic Development Program. This program at the School of Government
     provides public officials with training, research and assistance that support local efforts to
     create jobs and wealth, expand the tax base and maintain vibrant communities. For
     example, the Pathways to Possibilities Project in Fayetteville and Cumberland County will
     produce an economic development action plan that will position the communities in
     Cumberland County to take maximum advantage of the report of the Base Realignment
     and Closure (BRAC) commission along with other economic, social and demographic
     trends. The School of Government currently has a partnership with the N.C. Rural Economic
     Development Center to help small communities in the creation and implementation of
     strategies for community and economic development in the 21st century.

New program

2.   Carolina North. Carolina North is a planned research and mixed-use academic campus to be
     located on about 250 acres two miles north of the main UNC-Chapel Hill campus.
     Conceived in the academic mission of the University, it will help connect the University’s
     research programs to the economic well-being of the state. As a public research university
     charged with helping to lead a transformation in the state’s economy, Carolina must
     compete with national peers for the talent and resources that drive innovation. Today, that
     competition demands a new kind of setting — one that enables public-private
     partnerships, public engagement and flexible new spaces for research and education. Its
     very first building, the Innovation Center, is a business accelerator designed to house start-
     up companies with direct ties to UNC-Chapel Hill research. Carolina North will make a
     significant contribution to the recommendations of the UNC Tomorrow report, especially
     by making North Carolina more competitive in the global economy, transforming the
     economy of the community and the state, providing a home for research to improve health
    and the environment and engaging in civic outreach. The new campus will promote the
    economic transformation of the state by engaging faculty in strategic research that
    stimulates economic growth, launches new companies from University research and
    creates jobs for North Carolina.

    Implementation: The people responsible for the development of Carolina North are
    Executive Director Jack Evans and, ultimately, the University’s Chancellor. The 250-acre
    footprint is intended to cover development of the campus over its first 50 years, with
    groundbreaking for the Innovation Center, scheduled for early 2009. While very few
    numbers regarding the cost of the project are available at this time, it is known that
    funding will come from a wide variety of sources: state-appropriated funds, private and
    corporate funding, self-liquidating funding, and reallocation of rents. Effectiveness of the
    new campus will be judged by the success of the various programs located there.

4.4.2 UNC should focus specific effort in meeting the needs of rural and underserved areas
of the state.

Existing Program

1. Center for Civil Rights. This center in the School of Law has been actively engaged in a
   portfolio of outreach efforts that impact North Carolina. In four low-income communities in
   Moore County, in the town of Clayton (Hoke County), and elsewhere, the Center has
   represented and assisted minority residents seeking greater municipal services and political
   participation. It has also assisted efforts to stem the tide of resegregation in North
   Carolina’s public schools, including intervening in the long-running Leandro case on behalf
   of non-white children in Charlotte. The Center was started because of the need to have an
   institutional presence in the South to protect the civil rights of non-white and low-income
   communities in a time when 50 years of civil rights progress stands at risk.

New program

2. Community-Campus Partnership for Tomorrow. Please see description in The Community-
   Campus Partnership for Tomorrow, page 5.


4.4.3 UNC should seek to align appropriate campus programs with the strategic economic
plans (including sector and cluster plans) of their regions and the state, recognizing the
unique differences and challenges of our state’s economic and geographic regions.

Existing Programs

3. Carolina Center for Competitive Economies. With the loss of multiple traditional industries,
   North Carolina at every community level is facing the challenge of how to sustain, grow and
   prosper in the 21st century. Housed in the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the
   Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies works with
   leaders at the community, county and regional level to address the challenges of global
   competitiveness and create custom solutions that build on the unique assets of each region.
   The center has worked with Advantage Carolina, Advantage West Regional Partnership,
   Carteret County, Charlotte Regional Partnership, City of Salisbury, Kerr-Tar Council of
   Governments and multiple state agencies. Funding for this program is provided through
   grants from the entities served.

4. Launching the Venture. This program provides targeted training for highly-promising start-
   up ventures at Carolina. It offers training in business development, marketing, operations
   and finance. It identifies and supports ventures that have the likely potential for rapid
   employment growth and operational scale-up through training and coaching by faculty,
   entrepreneurs and strategy consultants. Teams enter with a promising venture concept and
   then they test and develop their idea.

    Expansion: Carolina proposes expanding Launching the Venture to three new campuses
    developed in partnership with other UNC System business schools in the east, west and
    central regions of North Carolina. Partner schools will be selected based on institutional
    and faculty interest and on their capacity to generate promising ventures. Faculty and
    professional staff of the Kenan-Flagler Business School’s Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
    (CES) will train faculty at partner UNC institutions to deliver the course. CES Executive
    Director Ted Zoller will be responsible for this expansion, and CES faculty and staff will
    serve as guest lecturers and assist in the recruitment process. Expansion of the program to
    three sites would require funding of $750,000, assuming biannual cycles of the course at
    each new site. Contingent on locating funding, expansion would most likely occur Fall 2009.
    Possible funding sources include state appropriations and foundation support from Golden
    LEAF, Kauffman or the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Association.
    Effectiveness will be assessed by gathering information on course participants. It is
    anticipated that this program will return a 50 percent sustained annual growth of
    employment for each entrepreneurial firm and a parallel increase in average salary
    compensation.

4.4.4 UNC should promote the arts and cultural enrichment in all regions of the state.

Existing Programs

5. Southern Oral History Program (SOHP). This program of the Center for the Study of the
   American South seeks to foster a critical, yet democratic understanding of the South — its
   history, culture, problems and prospects. SOHP has a collection of more than 2,900
   interviews with men and women from all walks of life and maintains an active research and
   teaching program. The tapes, videos and transcripts are preserved in the University’s
   Southern Historical Collection. SOHP has an ambitious outreach arm, sharing research and
   expertise with a wide audience. Students and staff teach oral history workshops and consult
   throughout the state.
6. The North Carolina Collection (NCC). This collection, established in 1844, is the premier
   repository for historic and current photographs, maps, state, county and town histories,
   town telephone books, journals of religious, fraternal and educational organizations and
   published works documenting the history and culture of the state. NCC’s mission includes
   proactively making these resources available to the citizens of North Carolina. NCC staff
   make public presentations throughout the state and take leadership roles in various
   statewide educational, historical and cultural organizations. While the collections are
   available in the library to anyone who comes to campus, many items are now being made
   available to everyone online, in support of teaching and learning at all levels. The North
   Carolina Collection and the State Library are strong partners in providing information
   statewide to all citizens.

    Expansion: This extensive information resource needs to be leveraged to help promote the
    goals of UNC Tomorrow. NCC will provide a series for citizens regarding the use of sources
    available in the collection to support business – demographic data on which market
    surveys could be created or pin-pointed local information that could help predict business
    potential. NCC will create a comprehensive portal to its holdings of state historical
    resources, combining them with those in other repositories across the state. With ongoing
    annual support of $100,000 for digitization services, editorial staff and creation of online
    and video presentations for community and business groups, NCC will extend the reach of
    its engagement activities to make its resources more widely available and useful for the
    state. This expansion is contingent upon locating funding, which would come from a
    combination of foundations, state appropriations and private donors. The effectiveness of
    the expanded offerings will be gauged through feedback from users as well as by the
    number of programs and resources created and the level of participation in the use of
    them. NCC Curator Robert Anthony will be responsible for this enhancement of its public
    engagement activities.

New Program

7. UNC Classroom of Tomorrow. The goal is to make the resources of the University more
   available and accessible to communities in their communities. It involves taking advantage
   of new technology, new forms of knowledge and new teaching methods to expand the
   reach and range of knowledge creation and distribution. We need to make knowledge
   accessible and modular through podcasting. Through this virtual classroom and the use of
   wikis, we could explore open-source knowledge creation with other campuses and other
   entities like businesses and government. For example, Carolina might use technology to
   share the experience of on-site visitors to the interactive media installation Spectacular
   Justice by artist Joyce Rudinsky, Associate Professor of Communications Studies. Created in
   collaboration with the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI), the installation uses video,
   audio and electronic tracking to target the installation’s soundtrack to individual viewers as
   they enter and move around the room. The resulting visual and audio experience is unique
   for each visitor and for each visit.
    Implementation. The UNC Classroom of Tomorrow would require investment in a new unit
    staffed with educational and technology experts whose goal is to convert the knowledge
    and resources of the campus into formats using new media, thereby making the University
    accessible anytime, anyplace to promote the arts and cultural enrichment, which are
    essential to community and economic development. Because it would require such an
    extensive investment, approximately $5 million for the first five years, the implementation
    of this program is contingent upon locating external funding, possibly from a state
    appropriation or a foundation grant. Effectiveness would be assessed by the number of
    communities who participated, as well as the number of events we would be able to share
    with new technology. No unit responsibility has been determined yet for this cross-campus
    initiative.

4.4.5 UNC should facilitate inclusive discussions on important community issues.

Existing Programs

Inclusive discussions on important community issues are an inevitable and natural part of what
Carolina does in many of its engagement activities. Particularly relevant examples include the
TRaCS Institute and its Community Connections component, the Center for Health Promotion
and Disease Prevention and the Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation.
Other ways Carolina engages communities on important issues include these programs:
Program in the Humanities and Human Values (continuing education seminars to help business
executives, public leaders, humanities scholars and teachers explore and respond to emerging
issues and challenges), the Program on Public Life (which encourages public dialogue on issues
important to the state and the formation of public policy), the Creative Campus of Carolina
Performing Arts (a year-long, interdisciplinary initiative across the UNC-Chapel Hill campus and
into the surrounding community, which uses the arts as a catalyst to engage in a conversation)
and the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education’s What’s The Big Idea? (a series
of evening lectures on important discoveries and contemporary issues in the sciences).

New Program

Community-Campus Partnership of Tomorrow (CCPT) As described previously on page 5, the
CCPT will be a substantive effort piloted with one community. Essential to this effort will be
initial and continuing discussions with an array of community representatives to identify and
explore the issues that matter to them. Indeed, engaging in these discussions is an important
and necessary first step in the process. Discussions are essential, but they are of little value to
the community if things end there, and too often they do. The CCPT is a model that will begin
with substantive and inclusive exploration of issues, but also will ensure that we move quickly
to incorporate action into the process. There are examples across campus to build on of how
such dialogues have contributed to effective partnerships, including efforts of the Center for
Urban and Regional Studies, the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention’s Health
Works for Women in Sampson and Duplin counties, the School of Government’s work with the
City of Wilson around economic development and the School of Public Health’s Engaged
Institution Initiative.
                     University of North Carolina at Charlotte
D.1. Existing Initiatives/Programs

UNC Charlotte has organized its approach to economic transformation and community
development principally around major university-wide institutes and centers with a mandate to
provide a link between specific groups of community stakeholders and the university, create a
matrix for education at all levels, and translate university discoveries into products that can
enhance and enrich the community and state. The goal in forming university-wide centers and
institutes is to be problem oriented rather than discipline focused and to simplify connections
to the University’s intellectual and physical resources.

D.1.1. The Charlotte Research Institute (CRI)

The Charlotte Research Institute is the portal for business-university partnerships at UNC
Charlotte. CRI supports the work of interdisciplinary research centers and laboratories with a
focus on applied science and technology. In the Charlotte region, CRI works in the community
to accelerate the growth of small businesses and University startups. More generally, CRI
develops intellectual capital through collaborations with industry, government and academia.
New business and research ventures, university partnerships with regional and national
enterprises, and CRI spin-off companies all draw research and businesses to the region and spur
economic growth.

Innovation, entrepreneurship, and business growth are strongly supported by CRI’s Ben Craig
Center and Business Incubator (BCC). The Incubator Program, Education and Community
events, and Advisory services offered by the BCC offer full support for dozens of companies
each year. The BCC focuses on community businesses and University startups that benefit most
directly from proximity to expertise, services, and equipment that only the BCC and the
University can provide. Over the past 21 years, BCC has worked with a diverse mix of companies
to create over 1,100 jobs, over $149 million in venture capital, 98 graduated companies, and
$104 million in annual economic activity. In addition, programs offered by the Small Business
and Technology Development Center at Ben Craig benefit hundreds of small businesses each
year

Science and engineering ventures at CRI are driven by the internationally known results of its
research centers in Precision Metrology, eBusiness Technology, and Optoelectronics. CRI’s
research vision continues to grow as emerging research initiatives, including bioinformatics,
biomedical engineering systems, and translational research, develop at UNC Charlotte. With
facilities housed in three new custom-designed buildings on the Charlotte Research Institute
Campus, CRI helps companies initiate new partnerships at UNC Charlotte by offering a variety
of opportunities to engage talented faculty and make use of specialized resources available only
at UNC Charlotte.
Examples include:
      A very strong industrial affiliates program for Precision Metrology with corporate
       members that include Boeing, Caterpillar, Intel, Mitutoyo, Cummins Engine, Corning
       Cable, Western Robotics, Veeco, and United Technologies, as well as government
       laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Lawrence
       Livermore National Laboratory
      A growing Biomedical Engineering Systems research center that collaborates with
       medical device companies and medical facilities that include OrthoCarolina and the
       Carolinas Medical Center Transplantation Group and Organ Recovery Systems
      A post doctoral funding program that regularly adds 6-12 applied researchers to federal
       and commercially funded research programs
      A Summer Faculty Program that funds new research initiatives
      Biology core facilities used for medical device and vaccine development
      Clean room facilities used for optoelectronic device development
      The Five Ventures business plan competition, the Charlotte region's most dynamic early-
       stage business development competition. Five Ventures offers training, seminars,
       matchmaking, one-on-one coaching and over $100,000 in cash and donated servies to
       entrepreneurs interested in starting a high-growth business
      The Charlotte Regional Biotechnology Conference that serves the Charlotte Region and
       the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) in Kannapolis on a yearly basis, bringing
       together faculty researchers and biotechnology companies in the region to foster
       partnership opportunities

In addition, CRI regularly works with local and regional economic development agencies to align
goals, enhance recruitment efforts, and add resources and value for business startup and
growth. As part of this business development effort, CRI opened the first office at North
Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis in 2006 and continues to work on business
recruitment, startup, and growth for the NCRC.

To further improve the connection of the university to regional economic development, CRI
launched the Open for Business project designed to better understand how to address industry
needs, make the University’s research and services more accessible to industry, and create a
model for university-industry collaboration. Ideas under study include developing a unified
integrated university portal for businesses, creating a Center for Entrepreneurship in the Belk
College of Business, implementing a marketing campaign directed to business, and developing a
package of research and technical advisory services for corporations, particularly in the areas of
mechanical engineering and optics.

       Funding: This effort is funded via user fees, state sources, industrial partners, federal
             funding, and an endowment with costs expected to grow with inflation.
       Assessment methods: Effectiveness is assessed through monitoring the amount and
             percentage of industrial research funding, feedback from partners, and feedback
             from the CRI Board of Directors.

       Accountability measures: Industry sponsored funding; partnerships established;
             patents, licenses, a new start up companies.

       Responsible Officers:
             Directors of research centers
             Director of The Ben Craig Center
             Executive Director of the Charlotte Research Institute

D.1.2. UNC Charlotte Urban Institute

        For nearly forty years, the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute has provided economic
analysis and technical assistance to communities in the Charlotte region experiencing economic
transformation. Recent examples of the Institute’s work include:

      The quarterly Charlotte Regional Economic Barometer that the Institute provides for the
       Charlotte Regional Partnership
      the facilitation of a community dialogue on economic transition and community
       development for disadvantaged neighborhoods near the NC Research Campus in
       Kannapolis
      A community visioning process for the Town of Badin in Stanly County which is
       struggling to reinvigorate its economy after the closure of the Alcoa smelting facility
       there

       Funding: The Institute’s work is supported by state and external funds.

       Assessment methods: Effectiveness is measured through community public opinion
             surveys and client satisfaction evaluations.

       Accountability measures: Funded projects; satisfaction of clients; publications and
             reports.

       Responsible officer: Executive Director of the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute

D.1.3. The Office of Technology Transfer

The Office of Technology Transfer (OTT), part of the Office of Research and Federal Relations,
promotes a culture of invention, application and innovation among students, faculty, and
industrial partners. In addition to managing invention disclosure, patenting, and licensing
processes, the office works closely with faculty, students, and outside partners to bring
inventions to application in the local region and beyond. UNC Charlotte has routinely been
ranked in the top three universities for patents and startups/$10 million of research by the
Association of University Technology Managers and was one of ten institutions selected as the
focus of a major case study in the 2007 report, “Technology Transfer and Commercialization
Partnerships,” produced by Innovation Associates for the National Science Foundation to
identify best practices. As stated in the report, “UNC Charlotte has outstanding technology
transfer outcomes, particularly in patents and startups. In FY 2005, UNC Charlotte filed 56
patent applications, placing it first nationally relative to research expenditures. In FY 2005, it
had 28 active licenses. Despite modest research expenditures, UNC Charlotte has generated a
substantial number of startups in the past several years. From FY 2000-05, the University has
launched 19 startups; and in FY 2005 alone, it launched three startups, placing it third
nationally relative to research expenditures.”

       Funding: OTT’s support comes via state sources, industrial partners, and federal funding
             and is expected to rise with inflation

       Assessment methods: Surveys, participation in national benchmarking efforts

       Accountability measures: Effectiveness is assessed through growth in invention,
             licensing, and business startup metrics and survey results

       Responsible Officer: Executive Director of the Office of Technology Transfer

D.1.4. Other Campus-wide Initiatives

Across the UNC Charlotte campus there is a broad effort to offer university expertise for
economic and community development. Examples of initiatives include:

      Design and analysis centers in Business, Geography, and Architecture assess and support
       regional economic development. For example, The Center for Real Estate in the Belk
       College of Business analyzed commercial real estate development in the region’s
       economically-depressed business corridors.
      Business and architecture students affiliated with the Charlotte Community Design
       Studio (CCDS) of the School of Architecture completed design studies and analysis for a
       conference center in Gastonia. CCDS completed a four-year cycle of leadership institutes
       for elected officials focused on Urban Open Space Development.

Industrial solutions organizations in various colleges make state of the art research equipment
and technical services available to regional companies and engage faculty and students in
research and development for products, services, and therapies. Examples include:

      The Industrial Solutions Laboratory in which senior engineering students and corporate
       partners work on real world engineering problems
      The Environmental Assistance Office in The William States Lee College of Engineering
       that provides assistance to small businesses to increase effective pollution prevention
       practices in the Charlotte area
      The Regional Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
       that serves a wide range of local industries including synthetic fibers, textiles, lubricants,
       surfactants, dyes, polymers, plastics, adhesives and coatings, and rubber with state of
       the art analytical chemistry
      The Software Solutions Laboratory in the College of Computing and Informatics that
       provides professional quality software to companies and organizations that have
       information technology problems that cannot be solved with off-the-shelf software.
       Recent projects have included a community problem-oriented policing system for the
       Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department; a data warehousing and reporting tool for a
       consortium of NC school districts; clinical outcomes databases for the Carolinas
       HealthCare System; and a database that integrates information from social service
       agencies and schools for the UNC Charlotte Institute for Social Capital.

       Funding: These efforts are supported with state and external funds as well as user fees

       Assessment methods: Client surveys; monitoring of contracts and services

       Accountability measures: Client satisfaction; extramural grants and contracts; efficiency
             and rapidity of service; growth in services offered and transactions competed

       Responsible officers:
             Directors of research centers
             Deans of the academic colleges

D.2. Improvements and New Initiatives

D.2.1. The UNC Charlotte Urban Institute “Charlotte Regional Indicators” Project

On a pilot basis, this year the Urban Institute created the Charlotte Regional Indicators Project,
a new benchmarking initiative that measures quality of life indicators including measures of the
economy and housing for a 16-county region. The local business and philanthropic community
has enthusiastically supported the start-up of this new initiative.

       Timeline: Ongoing

       Cost: $200,000 annually for research; $100,000 annually for dissemination.

             Total: $300,000 annually
       Funding: Foundation For The Carolinas, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Charlotte
             Regional Partnership, and the Knight Foundation.
       Assessment methods: Monitoring the use of the Regional Indicators Project website;
             tracking the number of Indicators-related presentations given annually;
             attendance at the Institute’s Regional Issues Conference, where the findings of
             the Indicators Report will be unveiled.

       Accountability measures: No specific goals have been set for the desired number of
             “hits” to the website, the number of presentations given, or attendance to the
             Regional Issues Conference. However, 2008 numbers for all three of these will
             be used as benchmarks to set goals in subsequent years.

       Responsible Officer: Executive Director, Urban Institute

D.2.2. Increasing Intellectual and Research Capacity

Significant gains in our economic transformation capability can be realized by increasing our
intellectual and research capacity at the University. Particular examples are listed below that
support fast growing sectors of the Charlotte economy that put an emphasis on sustainability:
finance, insurance, real estate, energy production, and healthcare.

       Expand engineering programs to support and sustain the Charlotte region’s role as a
    center for energy production. Examples include the Energy Production and Infrastructure
    Center (EPIC), the Innovative Design, Engineering, and Sustainability center (IDEAS), and a
    new Department of Systems Engineering. In addition to the existing programs in
    Engineering, new distance education master’s programs in Engineering Management, Fire
    Protection and Administration, and Construction and Facilities Management will support
    the workforce needs of the energy industry.

       Cost: Infrastructure for the EPIC program will be substantially addressed by the EPIC
              building at a cost of approximately $76M. To date $19M has been appropriated
              by the NC legislature and the remaining funds have been requested by UNC
              Charlotte with the highest priority for the current legislative session.

               Programs to be housed in EPIC will require:
                     New faculty - $1M/year
                     Operations and equipment- $300K/yr
                     Other costs - $850K/yr

       Funding: The research efforts are supported with state and external funds as well as
             user fees.

       Assessment methods: Monitoring student success, extramural funding, engagement
             with community partners
       Accountability measures: Federal and industry support, students graduated and
             placed, publications, patents, new business start-ups.

       Responsible officers: Dean of the College of Engineering


      Transform the Charlotte Community Design Studio into the College of Arts and
       Architecture “Design & Society Research Center” to develop programs for creative
       leadership in economic transformation of the region and serve as the home of a Master
       of Urban Design program focused on “Sustainable Urbanism.”

       Cost: This program can be expanded with $150K in operating funds

       Funding: These efforts will supported with state funds from enrollment increases and
             external grants and contracts

       Assessment methods: Monitoring student success, extramural funding, engagement
             with community partners

       Accountability measures: Student graduation and placement, grants and contracts,
             partnerships established, partner satisfaction

       Responsible officers: Dean of the College of Arts and Architecture


D.2.3. The Charlotte Research Institute

Our economic transformation capability can be further expanded by increasing the
infrastructure and activities of the Charlotte Research Institute. Particular examples include:
   Establish the Center for Nanoscale Science to coordinate research among faculty in the
    departments of Biology, Chemistry, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical
    Engineering and Engineering Science, and Physics and Optical Science. Over forty
    faculty members from these disciplines are engaged in nanoscale science and
    engineering research in such areas as nano-biotechnology, nano-optics, nano-
    mechanics, nano-materials, nano-electronics, nanoscale science and the environment,
    and surface and interface science. UNC Charlotte is a leader in nanoscale science
    research and education and launched North Carolina’s first Nanoscale Science Ph.D.
    program in fall 2007 as a collaborative effort among faculty in these departments. The
    Center will help attract internationally acclaimed researchers to the state and will
    strengthen UNC Charlotte’s ability to collaborate with other institutions on nanoscale
    science research, teaching, and outreach initiatives. Moreover, the Center, in
    combination with the Nanoscale Science Ph.D. program, will play a major role in
    nanotechnology-based economic development vital to North Carolina’s future.

    Cost: $50,000 administrative startup; $500,000 in operating support for equipment and
           technical staff; subsequent growth through external funding

    Funding: Enrollment growth funding; reprogramming of internal resources; external
          grants and contracts; expansion budget funding

    Assessment: Faculty and student participation; industry partnerships; external awards

    Accountability measures: External funding through grants and contracts

    Responsible officers:
          Chair of the Department of Chemistry
          Executive Director of the Charlotte Research Institute
          Deans of the academic colleges

   Establish the North Carolina Complex Systems Institute, with a focus on the conduct of
    large-scale, dual-use computing projects and programs for the defense and intelligence
    community as well as civilian applications. The Institute would bring together academia,
    industry, and federal agencies to advance synergistic computing simulation, analysis,
    and modeling capabilities, and would provide a mixture of secure and open laboratory
    space and test-beds to support joint research and development and facilitate
    technology transfer. The Institute would extend research currently sponsored by the
    Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) and the Defense Intelligence
    Agency (DIA) and would also provide significant opportunities for industry partnerships,
    thereby bringing additional defense contracting to North Carolina. Using the Sensitive
    Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) being planned for the new Partnership
    Outreach and Research to Accelerate Learning (PORTAL) Building, we would be uniquely
    positioned to become the national leaders in these multi-use computational solutions.
    Within the Institute, two centers would be established: the Defense Computing Center
    would be responsible for defense and intelligence related research, emphasizing system
    of systems modeling and simulation for analysis of complex problems and phenomena,
    where the participating systems are highly complex and interdependent. These activities
    align with the research currently sponsored by the Defense Intelligence Agency.

    The Center for Human Complex Systems would be responsible for analyzing dynamic,
    non-linear systems where behavior of system components and their interactions
    continuously change the overall performance of the system. Most aspects of human
    societies possess this characteristic. These activities align with the research currently
    sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency and also provide the best
    opportunity for North Carolina participation in the Minerva Consortia initiative in the
    Department of Defense for moving beyond weapons and technology research to social
    science and humanities work that could better inform public policy.

    Cost: $1.5 million in research staff & project management personnel over 3 years

    Funding: enrollment growth; reprogramming of internal resources; external research
          contracts

    Assessment methods: analysis of external funding and collaborative research
          agreements

    Accountability measures: success in recruiting industry partners and in attracting
          Department of Defense funding for research and development.

    Responsible officers: Dean of the College of Computing and Informatics


   Expand existing biomedical collaborations into a Center for Translational Research to
    support rapid growth of collaborative medical research among regional and statewide
    medical organizations as well as basic science, engineering, and informatics research
    groups at UNC Charlotte, Carolinas Medical Center, the North Carolina Research Campus
    (NCRC), and other medical entities in the region (See also Section E. Health)

    Cost: Approximately $500K in operating budget, new faculty, staff

    Funding: Enrollment increases, F&A receipts, state support for expansion

    Assessment methods: Monitoring extramural grants and contracts, intellectual
          property generated

    Accountability measures: Federal and industry support; scholarly productivity of
          faculty; students trained and placed; patents, new business start-ups
    Responsible officers:
          Executive Director of the Charlotte Research Institute
          Deans of the academic colleges

   Building on the international reputation of the NSF-sponsored Center for Precision
    Metrology, we propose to create the Center for Self Aware Manufacturing that supports
    regional and statewide efforts for advanced manufacturing.

    UNC Charlotte is positioned to be a world leader in a new engineering initiative known
    as “Self Aware Manufacturing,” which integrates high fidelity sensing, measurement,
    and control with advanced manufacturing. By tightly integrating metrology with
    advanced manufacturing, “Self Aware Manufacturing” can produce order of magnitude
    increases in quality and cost effectiveness while reducing manufacturing time. This
    approach will influence the growth of the North Carolina Economy across a broad
    spectrum of companies and applications, from micro-optical components to aerospace
    and medical applications and from mass customized production to one-of-a-kind.
    Research drawing on UNC Charlotte strengths will address four strategic platforms: (1)
    Highly-Accurate Large-Scale Manufacturing, (2) Fabrication of Optical-Quality Structures,
    (3) Precision-Guided Biomedical Processes, and (4) Micro and Nano Assembly.

    The manufacturing industry in North Carolina suffers from being at the low end of the
    high-technology spectrum, and manufacturing wages in North Carolina are significantly
    below the national average for high-technology industry. UNC Charlotte’s expertise and
    intellectual property in precision manufacturing can establish the state as a national
    leader in next generation technology.

    Our best opportunity for establishing such leadership is to develop an NSF Engineering
    Research Center (ERC). UNC Charlotte has been through one competitive cycle (2008)
    for the ERC competition and, although unsuccessful, we were rated so highly that our
    industry partners have agreed to invest in the Center over the next 18 months, even
    without NSF support, to prepare us for the next competitive cycle (2010). We also have
    strong partners in the University of Michigan, Morgan State University, NC A&T State
    University, the University of Bremen, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, the University of Tokyo,
    and University College Dublin.

    What is now needed to ensure success is state seed-money investment. An NSF
    Engineering Research Center would be a huge asset to the state, particularly in the area
    of advanced manufacturing technology. UNC Charlotte already has the premier
    university precision metrology laboratory in the entire world. We own the intellectual
    property for many of the advances in small part manufacturing processes, and are
    positioned to extend this technology to large components used in the aerospace and
    shipbuilding industry. The economic impact of the ERC will be quite broad as
    demonstrated by the range of industrial applications. An order of magnitude
improvement in precision has cost impact through improved fuel efficiency, reduced
assembly costs, improved medical outcomes, and the creation of new products. We
have an excellent opportunity to leverage economic development in manufacturing in
North Carolina with a modest investment by the state.

Cost: $2 million in annual recurring funds

Funding: State appropriation

Assessment methods: Monitoring success in attracting industry partnerships and
      funding, student success

Accountability measures: NSF funding, particularly an NSF Engineering Research Center;
      students and postdocs trained and placed; industry affiliates attracted; patents,
      licenses, start ups

Responsible officers:
      Dean of the Lee College of Engineering
      Executive Director of the Charlotte Research Institute
                   University of North Carolina at Greensboro
The two large UNCG/NCA&T collaborative efforts to use science and technology for economic
development are discussed in Section I.1-2: the Joint School of Nanoscience and
Nanoengineering, and the Joint Primary Data Center.

I.2.2. Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering

In order to meet the state’s increasing need for a well-educated, prepared workforce in
nanoscience and nanoengineering, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University
(NCA&TSU) and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) have received
permission from the UNC Board of Governors to establish a Joint School of Nanoscience and
Nanoengineering (JSNN). This joint initiative, to be located on the South Campus of the
Gateway University Research Park, will build on the strengths of the two universities to offer
cross-disciplinary masters and doctoral programs, and to drive research and economic
development in Greensboro, in the Triad, in North Carolina and beyond. It will help to shape
the economic future of Greensboro and position it at the cutting edge of some of the most
exciting developments in the sciences and engineering in the twenty-first century. For
example, the purpose of the School is to train scientists in various nanotechnology areas
including nanobioengineering and nanobiosciences, drug design and delivery, genetic
screening, biosensors, biotechnology, surface engineering, energy, environmental
improvement, agricultural improvements, and toxicology.

The JSNN will train students to conduct basic and applied research in nanoscience and
nanoengineering. It will offer a joint interdisciplinary Ph.D. degree and a joint professional
science master’s degree (M.S.), strengthen the representation of nanoscience and
nanoengineering in undergraduate and K-12 education, provide training for scientists and
engineers already in the work force, and engage in activities that influence economic
development globally. These programs will link to the entrepreneurial activities at both
campuses to better transfer innovations to practice. The interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in
Nanoscience will have tracks or concentrations to allow for areas of research specialization.
The Professional Science Master’s program will target students with strong backgrounds in
science or engineering to prepare them for positions in nanoscience or nanoengineering
research, development, or manufacturing companies.

Connections to UNC Tomorrow Components
B. Increasing Access to Higher Education
Undergraduate courses relevant to the research foci of JSNN will be developed by faculty at the
JSNN and departments at the partner universities. Faculty at the JSNN and departments at
NCA&T and UNCG will participate in teaching these courses and supervising undergraduate
research/senior projects. Successful graduate students at NCA&T and UNCG who have taken
these courses will be accepted into a graduate program at JSNN. The joint Ph.D. and
professional master’s program faculty will collaborate with community colleges to develop
short-term worker retraining programs in the subject areas of relevance to the JSNN. Creative
curricular arrangements such as 3+2 programs will also be available. The JSNN will develop
nanoscience programs for K-12. Dedicated outreach personnel will be hired to work closely
with elementary, middle and high school educators to bridge gaps and create opportunities for
students and teachers. These will include tours, class visits, electronic mentoring, internships,
and teacher workshops. Opportunities to conduct summer courses for K-12 teachers and to
help them integrate nanobioscience into the K-12 curriculum will also be explored.

D. Economic Transformation and Community Development
The JSNN will shape the future of Greensboro and the Piedmont Triad by positioning these
areas at the cutting-edge of some of the most exciting developments in the sciences and
engineering in the 21st century. Nanotechnology has the potential to create entirely new
industries as well as greatly affect the operation of existing ones. It is anticipated that the
synergy created by housing faculty and students affiliated with the JSNN and nanotechnology
centers in one place will build on the strengths of the partner universities and will produce an
engine for educational and economic development in the Piedmont Triad and beyond.

E. Health
The JSNN will study the proteins responsible for intracellular movement, key components in the
synthesis of products with new sensing and energy-transfer capacities. Nanoscale transport of
single molecules holds the promise of highly improved techniques for drug delivery to specific
sites in the body.

F. Environment
The JSNN will address the impact of nanotechnology on the environment, the use of
nanomaterials to address pollution, and ethical and social considerations arising from the
applications of nanoscience.

G. Outreach and Community Engagement
The JSNN will be ideally positioned to create, through research and technology transfer,
mechanisms for applying, translating and communicating nanotechnology applications to
Greensboro and the Piedmont Triad.

Timeline
The General Assembly has appropriated $50 million in non-recurring capital funding to
construct the JSNN building, $8 million in non-recurring equipment funding, and $1.4 million in
recurring funding for operating costs. An additional $2.9 million in recurring funding for
operating costs has been included in the 2008-09 budget priorities and submitted to General
Administration, and an additional $4 million in non-recurring funds. Requests to Plan the PhD
and MS degrees in nanoscience have been reviewed and approved by the Graduate Council of
UNC. A Management Agreement, which addresses mission and organizing principles,
governance, administration, the dean and faculty, curriculum/degrees, support services,
contingencies, and amendments/modifications has been written and approved/signed by the
NCA&T and UNCG Chancellors. The search for a founding dean is underway. It is coordinated
by a professional search firm, and finalists have been identified for campus interviews. It is
anticipated that a founding dean will be in place during the summer of 2008.


Necessary Resources
The current level of recurring operating funding is insufficient to support the personnel and
programs necessary to operate the JSNN. Increased appropriations will be necessary over the
next three years in order to attain the original request for recurring operating funding of $6.9
million.

What is the cost?
   See Appendix.

Where will funding come from?
-Utilizing/reprioritizing existing resources
-Eliminating unnecessary programs
UNCG is a leader in inter-university collaboration, with the significant cost avoidance this
promises. UNCG will study possible program elimination and reprioritizing of existing resources
as part of UNC Tomorrow Phase II. UNCG has a strong record of PACE initiatives (see Appendix)
that lead to real cost avoidance and cost savings, and we expect to continue to seek the most
cost-effective solutions.

How will effectiveness be assessed?
See the statement by UNCG’s Institutional Effectiveness Committee under Nursing.

Who is accountable?
The Chancellors and Provosts of UNCG and NCA&T, and the new Dean of the Joint School of
Nanoscience and Nanoengineering.


I.2.4. Joint Primary Data Center

UNCG and NCA&T have several collaborative initiatives that promise great benefits for the Triad
and the State. The two universities are using science and technology to boost economic
development in the region and State while at the same time strengthening the two universities.
The JSNN above is one, and the second large science technology collaboration is the
UNCG/NCA&T Joint Primary Data Center. Both will be located at the Gateway University
Research Park South Campus, and both will strengthen the Park’s ability to recruit and grow
new business.

NCA&T and UNCG have begun an initiative to build a Joint Primary Data Center (JPDC) at
Gateway Park South Campus, the campus targeted for science and technology expansion with
major benefits for regional and statewide economic development. UNCG and NCA&T are both
classified as “Doctoral/High Research Activity” Universities, and both need new, larger data
centers. As their research and administrative needs increase, the two Research Universities will
need increased information technology processing capacity. In addition, the Gateway
University Research Park needs a strong data center to meet the needs of facilities to be
located there.

UNCG’s campus computing needs are projected to outrun the capacity of its current and
planned data center renovations in 2011. Neither of the existing data center facilities on the
UNCG campus is built to Tier III data center standards for reliability and availability. Both
existing data centers are located on the UNCG campus and do not have the geographic diversity
required for proper disaster resistance.

NCA&T faces the same institutional challenges, further exacerbated by the technology-intensive
demands of an engineering curriculum. In addition to the issues mentioned above with regard
to the availability and reliability of the current campus data centers, as well as the need for
geographic diversity among the campus data centers, NCA&T is running out of data center
capacity today.

The goal of this collaboration is to provide a robust and secure computing environment that
supports critical enterprise technology services at both campuses and at the Gateway Park
South Campus in the most cost effective and efficient manner possible. This partnership allows
both Universities to leverage skills and resources on each campus to collectively advance both
institutions farther faster than what can be achieved by attempting to meet each campus’
urgent Data Center needs separately.

Connections to UNC Tomorrow Components
Global Readiness: In September 2007, UNCG Information Technology Services conducted a
national survey of all of the Universities across the country with active nanoscience/nano-
engineering degree and research programs, requesting detail regarding the backbone network
infrastructure they had deployed to support these research facilities. 42% of those surveyed
responded, and 100% of the respondent programs were supported by a 10Gb campus network
backbone infrastructure, with 1Gb network connectivity to the research facility.

The computing intensive research activities at the Joint School of Nanoscience and
Nanoengineering will have the same network connectivity requirements as other schools.
Providing the state of the art network and data center infrastructure at the South Campus will
ensure that the appropriate level of computing resources are available for faculty to be globally
competitive and perform cutting-edge research activities that are relevant and significant.

Economic Transformation: The Gateway Park is a joint UNCG/NCA&T venture, and its South
Campus soon will have research-focused buildings for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and
the UNCG/NCA&T Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering. Powerful data center and
networking infrastructure are requisite in drawing research intensive activities to the South
Campus. The JPDC will accelerate the growth of the Gateway Park South Campus, the two
universities, the Triad, and the State.

Responding to the needs of our State: Development of the JPDC addresses head on the
commission’s directive to examine our missions in light of State and regional needs from a
“system” perspective so that the programs and resources of all institutions serve the State and
its regions in a manner that complement each other, maximize resources, and avoid
unnecessary duplication.

A data center houses the most important and most costly information technology resources to
support academic and administrative activities. Because of the power, air conditioning, and
security requirements, these centers are expensive to build and operate.

The JPDC has been identified as a “PACE” cost-avoidance initiative. (See Section Appendix on
PACE.) Building appropriate data centers on the already space-constrained campuses of UNCG
and NCA&T, plus the cost of building an appropriate center at the Gateway Park South Campus
– three separate data centers - would cost $102 million. Building a single, large, robust data
center at the South Campus would cost $46 million – saving the State $56 million, plus
undetermined long-term cost-avoidance in annual operating costs.

Timeline
Chancellors Battle and Sullivan each have listed $23 million on his/her university’s Capital
Facilities Priority List, and will seek funding of the design portion of the $46 million JPDC in the
2008 General Assembly session and the remainder in the 2009 session. If the project is funded
by the legislature on this schedule, we anticipate that design will occur in 2008 – 2009, followed
by construction from 2009 – 2012, with an anticipated move-in date of August 2012.

An Operating Plan for the JPDC was signed by Chancellors Battle and Sullivan in October 2007.
Between now and 2012, the two universities will determine how to implement the staffing and
operating processes and expenditures required for the JPDC.

Necessary Resources
Most staff and operating costs will be provided by the two universities, but the Operating Plan
identified a small number of new staff necessary at startup. One-time funds will be required to
cover startup costs, including initial licensing, furniture and fixtures. $380,000 in recurring
annual operating funds will be required to support the joint personnel in the JPDC Operating
Plan.

What is the cost?
See Appendix.

Where will funding come from?
-Utilizing/reprioritizing existing resources
-Eliminating unnecessary programs
UNCG is a leader in inter-university collaboration, with the significant cost avoidance this
promises. UNCG has a strong record of PACE initiatives (see Appendix) that lead to real cost
avoidance and cost savings, and we expect to continue to seek the most cost-effective
solutions.

How will effectiveness be assessed?
See the statement by UNCG’s Institutional Effectiveness Committee under Nursing.

Who is accountable?
The Chancellors and Vice Chancellors/CIOs at UNCG and NCA&T.

   3. What administrative and policy changes are needed to successfully implement
      response plans in ways that ensure UNC’s efficiency, effectiveness, and relevance to
      both current and future challenges? Examples: rewards and incentives for faculty,
      removal of administrative barriers that inhibit inter-institutional collaboration, more
      flexible personnel policies

Faculty issues will be addressed as part of UNC Tomorrow Phase II. Here are changes suggested
by Business Affairs.

Finance:
Basis of Accounting: Modern software packages recognize that generally accepted accounting
principles dictate that financial reports be presented using the accrual basis of accounting. The
State of North Carolina requires the University to maintain and report monthly its financial
records on the cash basis of accounting. Therefore, we must convert accrual records to cash
records throughout the year, and then convert the cash records to the accrual basis for financial
reporting.

Financial Reporting to Multiple State Agencies: The University must report and reconcile
monthly data that is provided to the UNC Data Mart, the North Carolina Accounting System
(NCAS), the North Carolina State Auditor and more recently, the Office of State Budget and
Management (OSBM). Relief from the requirement to convert accrual records to the cash basis
as well as reporting financial data to multiple state agencies would free significant time devoted
to this task that could be put towards more strategic needs.

Repay Debt From State Operating Budget: Currently, the university can follow established
procedures to lease space and pay the lease obligation with appropriated funds. Only relatively
recently, legislation has enabled the university to borrow funds for energy saving initiatives
(ESCO) that is repaid from state appropriations. This has been a major shift in thinking and is
beneficial to the state as well as the university. With anticipated growth, the university
frequently must secure lease space to address this demand. It would save the state and
university funds in the long term if instead of paying rent, the University could repay long term
debt. Legislation that would allow universities to borrow against state appropriations, with
approvals to assure the purchase is in the best interest of the state’s long term needs would help
the University to use these dollars more wisely.

Property:
Real Estate Purchases. In a mode of growth, UNC institutions with severe land deficiencies
must acquire additional real estate to fulfill current and plan for anticipated need. There is a
significant barrier to negotiating terms friendly to the state when the acquisition process
cannot move quickly enough to allow offers to be made within a reasonable time after
appraisals have been received. Recently, this process has taken two months. The current
process represents a barrier to an even further extent as closings on small, individual parcels
cannot be made within six months after necessary approvals have been acquired, potentially
including those of the Board of Trustees, the Board of Governors, and Council of State. Recent
legislation allows the UNC system to approve certain leases. A similar designation of authority
is in order for purchases as well. Legislation that allows universities to negotiate real estate
purchases with property owners after securing appraisals and using contracts approved by the
State Property Office would make sellers more willing to sell to the state, allow strategic
properties to be acquired in a timely manner and reduce acquisition costs to the state.

Gateway University Research Park (Gateway): Gateway is a collaborative venture of UNCG and
NC A&T State University. Its oversight is from a Board of Directors, of which at least 60% is
appointed by the two sponsoring universities. It was established to streamline the
development of the Joint Millennial Campus, and supported by a development agreement
between Gateway and the universities and a ground lease between Gateway and the State.
Significant state funding has been approved to construct a building to house the Joint School of
Nanoscience and Nanoengineering. Funds have also been approved by the General Assembly
for an interdisciplinary research facility. OSBM however, will only award the funds to one of
the universities and will not allow the universities to grant these funds to Gateway, since the
legislation authorizing the funding did not specifically state this was permissible. Legislation
that allows these funds as well as future funds authorized by the General Assembly for the Joint
Millennial Campus to be awarded directly to Gateway or through one of the universities to
Gateway as authorized by the ground lease would save construction time and funds as well as
encourage inter-institutional collaboration.

   4.   Where appropriate, what interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations can be established
        (preferably within existing resources) and what “best practices” by campuses can be modeled and
        adopted by others to address needs identified in the Commission’s recommendations?


UNCG and NCA&T are leaders in the State in developing large, complex collaborations to
advance State interests. The largest are the JSNN and JPDC. The JPDC also is a major cost-
avoidance initiative, as part of the President’s Advisory Committee on Efficiency and
Effectiveness (PACE). Building a single data center at the Gateway Park South Campus will save
the State approximately $56 million over the cost of building separate data centers at UNCG,
NCA&T, and the Gateway Park South Camp
                    University of North Carolina at Pembroke
The demands placed upon regional universities are significant. These institutions are expected
to be “all things to all people,” providing quality undergraduate and graduate education
(particularly a strong vocationally-oriented curriculum), substantial assistance with regional
economic and workforce development, public access to library and information services,
opportunities for non-credit and continuing education course offerings, a myriad array of
volunteer and service learning engagements with nonprofit, business, and industry, and of
course, cultural and entertainment options. Not only does UNC Pembroke actively serve as a
vital resource for the local community and region in these multiple areas, UNCP also has a large
footprint on the regional economy. The Institution’s economic impact is estimated to be over
$200 million annually. Payroll, construction, operating expenses, grants, and visitor and student
spending make the University a major player in its community. Because of UNCP’s growth in
enrollment and construction spending, its impact is growing in a region that has lost jobs in
textiles, manufacturing and tobacco.

UNC Pembroke is committed to, and our strategic plan reflects the high value we place on,
serving our local community, our region, and the state as a whole. For example, as our strategic
plan was developed over the past couple of years, we recognized that the accessibility of
education leads to enhancement of the economy and culture in a region; therefore, we will
continue to develop programs for the purpose of improving educational attainment and
literacy. Other strategic goals formulated by our University community address this
recommendation by focusing on encouraging research that contributes to regional
development; expanding opportunities for community and University interaction by utilizing
professional development courses and workshops and campus programming for community
members and alumni/ae; and continuing to work with local and regional planners and investors
to develop an infrastructure (examples: roads, bike path, hotels, restaurants, transportation,
multiplex, etc.) to cultivate Pembroke as a university/college town.

Specific examples of ways in which UNCP is or will enhance economic transformation and
community development in its region and the state are given below.

4.4.1 UNC should increase its capacity and commitment to respond to and lead economic
transformation and community development.
UNCP has a large number of curriculum programs and grants that support the economic
transformation of our region. These include an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Science in
Biotechnology as well as multiple biotechnology, biomedical, environmental, and other science
undergraduate research activities. NASA, NIH, NOAA, NSF, and NCBC-funded grant programs
are underway. In addition, UNCP’s Regional Center for Economic, Community and Professional
Development provides a host of non-credit professional development programs to enhance the
skills of area citizenry.
The Thomas Family Center for Entrepreneurship was established two years ago as the result of
a partnership between a donor with a vision to bolster the economic development of the
community in which he was born and the University. The Center is working to establish an
infrastructure and financial source for nascent and potential entrepreneurs to start and grow
their businesses. It will also promote entrepreneurial programs for undergraduate and graduate
students to ensure that there is a college-educated pool of regional talent to start and grow
local businesses.

One particular initiative that is proposed by the Regional Center is Project RAISE: Rural Area
Initiative to Support Entrepreneurship. This project will target four small, rural towns and
extend assistance in the following activities: provision of targeted technical assistance through
local community planning to identify sustainable community and economic strategies to create
new businesses; establishment of an Interdisciplinary Faculty Fellows Program; provision of
training to strengthen the leadership and capacity of small-town leaders; establishment of a
Certificate Program for Entrepreneurship and other workshops/seminars to assist small
businesses and prospective entrepreneurs; development and hosting of a Summer Youth
Entrepreneurship Camp (EntreU); coordination and hosting of an Export Opportunities Forum
to inform the citizens about global marketing opportunities; and development of a Web-based
community and economic development resource tool kit.

The Thomas Family Center for Entrepreneurship, Regional Center, and the Small Business and
Technology Development Center (SBTDC) coordinate and provide business consulting services
to clients who are potential start-up companies or small-medium sized businesses that are
interested in retaining or expanding their businesses.

Several parts of UNCP’s curriculum and academic-related activities support community
development, align with strategic economic plans, and facilitate inclusive community
discussions. For example, the department of Political Science’s Master of Public Administration
program has a concentration in Emergency Management to respond to local public
administrators and emergency services providers. Another example comes from the
department of Social Work that hosts a yearly symposium to provide CEUs for community social
workers.

Other units in UNCP provide support similar to those listed above. These include: the Shining
Stars Pre-school program, Read Across America, Communities in School partnerships with
various UNCP Departments, essay competitions, Family Literacy Day, African American Read-in,
Quiz Bowl, Wizard program, student tutors, adult learning system, students who work with the
Robeson County Humane Society, and annual science fairs. These and other partnerships (e.g.,
between UNCP and the Robeson County Public Library in Pembroke) will continue to be
strengthened. The Regional Center hosts an annual Visions Program that provides an economic
outlook for the region and also recognizes an Entrepreneur of the Year, Business Person of the
Year, and a Spirit of Unity Award to someone from the community.
UNCP’s growth continues to play a major part in the economic development in the region.
Looking to the future, UNCP’s Advancement division has begun planning a comprehensive
University-wide capital fundraising campaign that will touch virtually every part of the campus.
This campaign will seek to inject increased amounts of private funding into each academic unit
by promoting endowed professorships, endowed scholarships, and both capital and
programmatic enhancements. This will be the first such comprehensive effort on the campus,
and it will be designed to impact our campus, our alumni and friends, and the local and regional
communities we serve.

4.4.2 UNC should focus specific effort in meeting the needs of rural and underserved areas of
the state.
As can be seen above, UNCP participates in a vast number of activities to support the rural and
underserved portion of our state, and these efforts will be continued and enhanced. For
example, the University will make a more concerted effort in working with Pembroke to recruit
businesses to town such as restaurants, hotels, stores, coffee shop, copy store, retail stores,
movie theatre, bookstore, entertainment and new places to live (i.e. establishments that will
affect the quality of life). A major way in which UNCP plans to respond directly to articulated
needs in the region (i.e., the University’s service area) is through the addition of new academic
programs. Two proposed graduate programs especially would address these needs –
Doctorates in Physical Therapy and in Public Affairs and Administration. Undergraduate degrees
in public health, nutrition and wellness, geosciences, life sciences, and media integration
studies will also contribute to meeting these needs.

4.4.3 UNC should seek to align appropriate campus programs with the strategic economic
plans (including sector and cluster plans) of their regions and the state, recognizing the
unique differences and challenges of our state's economic and geographic regions.
Continued enhancement of coordination with regional economic development organizations
and their plans is an on-going goal of UNCP. The University has been intensely involved in some
regional economic development planning projects such as creation of the All American Defense
Corridor, which will span an eleven-county area and capitalize on the presence of military
assets in and near Fort Bragg. The University is also participating in the BRAC Comprehensive
Growth Study that we hope will provide more guidance as to how UNCP can marshal its
services and resources to serve the economic development needs of the region. UNCP’s
location within a rural setting has given faculty, staff, and administrators first-hand experience
with the economic challenges faced by North Carolinians who live outside metropolitan areas
and spurred the institution’s efforts to assist in overcoming those challenges. For example,
UNCP is hosting a strategic information session titled “A Small Town Summit” in June at which
experts will discuss economic sustainability strategies with leaders from regional municipalities.

4.4.4 UNC should promote the arts and cultural enrichment in all regions of the state.
UNCP has an abundance of activities to support the arts and cultural enrichment of the area.
For example, the American Indian Studies department and Native American Resource Center
both respond to the need for more and better information about North Carolina’s American
Indian cultures and history. Additionally, the American Indian Studies department offers a
program to educate students about the rich diversity of American Indian history and culture, to
promote research and scholarship concerning American Indian issues, and to prepare students
for professional or scholarly careers. UNCP also provides cultural enrichment and awareness
through the Paul R. Givens Performing Arts Center (GPAC), which is the finest stage in
southeastern North Carolina. With more than 1,600 seats, GPAC is home to three professional
performing arts series and numerous other events such as a Distinguished Speaker Series,
which brings in world-renowned figures that enhance the cultural and political make-up of the
University and the surrounding community.

4.4.5 UNC should facilitate inclusive discussions on important community issues.
UNCP is active in a number of inclusive ways to support the region and its community and
economic efforts. Some examples include: working with local and regional planners and
investors to develop an infrastructure to cultivate Pembroke as a “college town;” in partnership
with the Town of Pembroke, hosting Pembroke Day at which local merchants and governmental
service providers set up booths to showcase their activities for the campus community,
including students; and convening the Town and Gown Committee for bimonthly meetings.
UNCP has been able to resolve some serious problems through focused, intentional
partnerships with the town and county. For example, by cooperating in a multi-jurisdictional
effort to create a drainage district, the University was able to maximize the benefits of
improvements to its storm water drainage facilities and substantially improve storm water flow
off campus into surrounding drainage systems, thereby mitigating threats of flooding on
campus. Students are directly involved in UNCP’s efforts to improve communication with the
local community. The Student Government Association has hosted forums for debate of local
and regional issues, such the potential impact of a referendum on liquor-by-the-drink.
                     University of North Carolina at Wilmington

4.4.1.1 Existing programs, initiatives and activities

   MARBIONC
            MARBIONC discovers, develops and markets new products and technologies
             derived from living organisms found in the sea. We accomplish this by identifying
             niche markets, assembling optimal teams and providing the necessary
             infrastructure to successfully bring products to market. Other economic benefits
             include the generation of a highly skilled workforce and the creation of new
             businesses and selective funding of late-stage marine biotechnology products
             and processes throughout the UNC system.
   CORMP
            The University of North Carolina Wilmington’s Coastal Ocean Research and
               Monitoring Program (CORMP) is a member of the congressionally mandated
               Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). CORMP, primarily funded by NOAA,
               was established in 2000 as a research and monitoring program to address the
               IOOS goals in the southeastern North Carolina coastal ocean. CORMP's overall
               goal is to provide an interdisciplinary science-based framework that supports
               sound public policy leading to wise coastal use, sustainable fisheries and
               improved coastal ocean ecosystem health.
   Marine Science Economic Development
            Marine Science: 1) The marine sciences train students at the undergraduate, MS
               and PhD levels. Students at all levels achieve a high degree of expertise in
               scientific inquiry, a skill set necessary to contribute to the workforce in
               academia, industry, government, and private small companies; 2) faculty carry
               out extramural research that addresses problems of local, regional, and national
               importance; 3) discoveries made have applications to coastal resource
               management, coastal observing, health, food, and energy. The Center for
               Marine Science itself is an economic development engine in the region; 4)
               intellectual property and facilities resources provide fertile areas of collaboration
               for economic development between university and private sector. Individual
               and collaborative marine science programs frequently have outreach/economic
               development facets. CORMP and MARBIONC are two excellent examples.
   Business of Marine Biotechnology
            Program participants must have a PhD in a biotechnology-related area and are
               expected to conduct research in marine science laboratories (that have a marine
               biotechnology focus) at the University while pursuing a professional MBA degree
               in the University’s Cameron School of Business. The goal of this program is to
               produce individuals with a solid science background as well as the business skills
               needed to prosper in a modern competitive business environment. Students in
               the MBA portion of the program will master the core functions of business,
               develop analytical and quantitative business skills, and study current and future
               business issues through real world experiences with regional companies involved
               in marine biotechnology. This is a funded element of the MARBIONC program.
   Aquaculture Program
            Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic organisms under controlled conditions,
               primarily for the production of food. The Aquaculture Program at UNCW utilizes
               UNCW’s strategic location in coastal North Carolina and its Center for Marine
               Science to teach environmental responsibility in conjunction with mariculture
               technology development. The goals are to develop and transfer to commercial
               users cost-effective, environmentally sound technologies for marine food
               production and to mitigate depletion of marine populations through commercial
               cultivation or stock enhancement. The MARBIONC program assists in
               development of technologies with spin-out or partnership potential, presently in
               the area of black sea bass cultivation for the restaurant trade.
   Technology Transfer
            The Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) at the University of North Carolina
               Wilmington manages, protects and licenses to industry, the intellectual property
               developed and created at UNCW, while serving faculty, staff and students in all
               aspects of intellectual property.
            Technology transfer is accomplished at UNCW through either of two processes.
               Where sufficient, the OTT licenses its available technology to interested
               commercial partners. When feasible, the OTT can also employ a more direct
               commercialization process by providing technology transfer services to the
               UNCW coastal community. In these instances, UNCW participates in facilitating
               the creation of a new development-stage entity based on its technology. Overall,
               the guiding principle is to transfer research-derived technology into commercial
               use in a manner that: (1) is consistent with UNCW’s dedication to scholarly
               practice, research, and creative activities; (2) demonstrates commitment to
               community and regional service; (3) conforms to the highest ethical standards.
   Geography, Geology & GIS
            Several Undergraduate internship programs, such in Geography and
               Environmental Studies, provide UNCW students with educational opportunities
               outside the classroom and laboratory; connect faculty and students with private
               sector companies, non-profits, and government agencies; and create jobs and
               employment opportunities throughout southeastern North Carolina and the
               state. For example, there are several small businesses in the UNCW region that
               implement Geographic Information System technology (such as Geofiny and
               Land Management Group) and rely on UNCW interns to sustain their contractual
               obligations. The EVS department places approximately 70 to 90 interns per year
               in local and regional agencies.
   Quality Enhancement of Nonprofit Organizations (QENO)
            The purpose of QENO is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of non-profit
               organizations and to increase philanthropy in the Southeastern North Carolina.
               Quality Enhancement for Nonprofits (QENO) is an initiative of the University of
               North Carolina Wilmington, the Cape Fear Area United Way, the Community
               Foundation of Southeastern NC, Southeastern Alliance for Community Change,
               the Landfall Foundation, the City of Wilmington, New Hanover County and Cape
               Fear Memorial Foundation.
   Obesity Prevention Initiative
            The Obesity Prevention Initiative is a complex health initiative to establish
               services, advocacy, and education to prevent obesity. Coordinates with more
               than thirty community organizations and university faculty; develops and
               implements strategies to help lower-income citizens improve nutrition and
               exercise; seeks and applies for program/research funding; conducts
               interventions; performs assessments of best practices and community needs;
               and facilitates faculty research efforts on obesity.
   Academy for Strategic Management
            The Academy for Strategic Management is offered by the Master of Public
               Administration program and provides leadership and management training for
               executives in the public and nonprofit sectors throughout the region.
   Educational/Curriculum Programs
            Master of Public Administration, Master of Criminology and Public Sociology,
               Master of Social Work, and Public History Program
   Cameron School of Business: Academic Programs
            A large majority of the more than 1,900 B.S. in Business Administration majors
               are actively engaged in internships or other work or service to the community
               before graduation and become valuable employees after graduation
            An undergraduate concentration in entrepreneurship with an external advisory
               board
            Professional MBA program, including a “Business of Marine Biotechnology” MBA
               concentration
            Highly successful MSA program, including nearly 35 students completing a full
               semester at work internship per year with professional accounting firms
            MS-CSIS program that is highly responsive to regional needs for information
               systems/computer science applications
            International MBA with a concentration in international Finance that links well to
               campus global priority, the state’s financial institutions, the CIS financial markets
               rooms, and the BB&T student managed investment fund (forthcoming $1 million
               fund)
            MBA Learning Alliance, MBA Practicums, numerous class projects assisting
               business, etc., which help support local businesses
            A strong core of CSB faculty interested/involved in social and rural economics
            Collaboration with the Watson School of Education in a new doctoral program
            Collaboration with the Department of Political Science in the MPA program
            Information Technology, Accountancy and Entrepreneurship programs have
               advisory boards, with related programs for respective professional persons.
   Cameron School of Business: Cameron Executive Network
           The Cameron Executive Network is composed of nearly 150 mostly more
             recently retired senior managers/professionals who give of their time and
             knowledge to the CSB in support of student mentoring, assistance with resumes,
             support of international education programs and other support critical to
             sustaining overall high quality of programs and service to students. There is a
             potential role of CEN members becoming engaged in matters supporting
             economic development.
   Cameron School of Business: Center for Business and Economic Services
           The CBES has a 26-year history on the campus of the University of North Carolina
             Wilmington. However, for all except the past two years the CBES has focused on
             the provision of regional economic analysis and forecasting and economic impact
             studies. Beginning in 2006, the CBES expanded its programs to provide more
             outreach and economic impact on the region.
           Regional Outreach / Impact
                 o CBES staff collects regular periodic data on various measures of
                     socioeconomic activity for 40 counties in eastern North Carolina. There
                     are currently some 140 time series data sets that are maintained.
                     Requests for data and interpretation and analysis come from numerous
                     audiences and groups. These recipients have included business owners
                     considering new and/or expanded operations in the local area and public
                     officials who are planning for infrastructure investments.
                 o The CBES annually sponsors an Economic Outlook Conference in October,
                     in which regional and national economic forecasts are presented, as well
                     as in-depth analyses of selected regional business sectors. The
                     conference draws approximately 250 attendees.
                 o The CBES senior economist also undertakes specialized research and
                     service projects and conducts press briefings on the current state of the
                     local economy and the short-term and intermediate-term outlook. The
                     results of the economic impact studies that are conducted provide
                     information to local development groups to support applications for
                     public incentives to encourage these developments.
                 o The CBES staff work with their counterparts at Fayetteville State
                     University and UNC Pembroke to prepare annual editions of a regional
                     data book for North Carolina’s Southeast (NCSE), one of the regional
                     partnerships in the State of North Carolina charged with fostering
                     regional economic development. NCSE uses these data in its recruiting
                     efforts in its 11-county service region.
                 o The CBES hosts the annual Procurement Summit Conference, an activity
                     of the Inclusion Coalition Board, which attempts to provide economic
                     information about contract availability and processes to small and diverse
                     business entities in the region. The recent conference attracted
                     approximately 60 attendees.
                 o The CBES sponsors the annual Youth Entrepreneurship Program which
                     attracts inner-city underprivileged youth, brings them to campus for one
                       week in the summer and attempts to foster entrepreneurial and
                       professional training. The program attracts approximately 50 students
                       annually and is well received by students and community leaders.
            Professional Business Consulting.
                   o The CBES currently sponsors a faculty team operating in an unpaid
                       consultancy to the North Carolina State Ports Authority to develop a
                       business forecasting model as well as other activities. The CBES expects
                       to further develop this collaboration, possibly leading to some form of a
                       joint institute or center in support of supply-side management, logistics,
                       trade and the port.
                   o Working with the Cameron Executive Advisory Council, the CBES is
                       establishing other strategies for consulting support, possibly to focus on
                       one business or sector annually.
            Professional Development/Education Activities
               The CBES develops and offers professional development programs to individuals
               and organizations within the region. Current examples of offerings are the
               Entrepreneurship Seminar Series, the Executive Business Certificate Program,
               and training for insurance professionals, financial planning professionals, real
               estate professionals, and project management professionals. These offerings are
               expected to expand as we respond to the indicated needs of the region.
            Fostering of Grant Activities
               The CBES is expanding its activities to work with faculty who have an interest in
               responding to grant opportunities within the region. We are intent on providing
               as much logistical support as possible.
   UNCW SBTDC
    The specific results for the UNCW SBTDC (not inclusive of Boating Industry Services) in
    2007:
            Counseled 449 new clients
            Provided them with over 6100 hours of assistance (about 2700 of those are from
               teams of MBA students).
            90% of that time was spent with existing businesses.
            Training – served over 900
            Results for our clients –
                   o Created or retained over 300 jobs
                   o Obtained financing of over $8.6 million
                   o Increased sales by over $16 million
            In 21 years at UNCW
                   o Counseled over 8000 clients
                   o Provided over 57,000 hours of valuable – yet free-of-charge counseling to
                       them.
                   o Offered training to at least another 7000 people
                   o Served, with counseling or training events, over 15,000

a. Assessment methods
   Marine Science Economic Development
            All undergraduate and graduate programs are continuously assessed by faculty
               committees which assess curriculum and individual student progress. Informal
               5-year external review committees provide feedback and precede formal state-
               mandated reviews. Reports are provided following review, and academic groups
               respond to review elements; 2) extramural research is reviewed annually for a)
               dollars generated, b) publications arising from research, c) discoveries made that
               generate IP or disclosures, d) copyrights and patents are cataloged, e) ongoing
               competitive renewals are achieved; 3) consulting activities and modification of
               policy decisions are two areas that measure effectiveness. The increasing
               number of jobs in Marine Science is a quantitative measure of success; 4)
               intellectual property generates agreements for discovery development, as
               cataloged by Technology Transfer office, including NDA, MDA, patent, and
               copyright agreements and licensing revenue.
   Business of Marine Biotechnology
            Applied learning products that integrate practical and theoretical knowledge,
               increased regional collaborations around marine biotechnology, improved
               marketing and development of biotechnology products, formation of startup
               companies
   Aquaculture Program
            Improved hatchery techniques, enhanced growout techniques, formation of
               startup companies. Revenue from eggs, spawn, and fingerlings that are sold to
               grow-out fish farmers is quantified. Alternative uses of flounder hatchlings for
               biomedical research is also a quantified product, both in number of institutions
               using said model, and numbers purchased.
   Quality Enhancement of Nonprofit Organizations (QENO)
            Improved efficiency and effectiveness of nonprofit organizations, increased
               regional philanthropy, improved coordination among nonprofit organizations
   Obesity Prevention Initiative
            Reduce obesity in Southeastern North Carolina, improve knowledge obesity
               prevention strategies, increased levels of exercise
   Academy for Strategic Management
            Improved government and nonprofit leader performance, reduced reliance on
               external consultants, improved coordination among governmental and nonprofit
               organizations
   Education/Curriculum Programs
            Student graduation rates, placement success, engagement hours of service
   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services
            The impacts of these efforts are assessed from participant’s evaluations of the
               services provided. The CBES also tracts “repeat business” from those clients who
               request additional services. Grant activities are evaluated by grant awards.
b. Improvements

  Marine Science Economic Development
          Provide additional resources to permit increased pilot projects, core resources to
             increase effectiveness of research programs, graduate student stipend support
             to augment research programs, research laboratories to permit effective
             laboratory utilization, and on-site housing to permit effective marine science
             collaboration up and down the coast of North Carolina---both for teaching and
             research. Coastal Carolina marine science institutions cannot increase
             collaboration in research and teaching without quality short-term
             accommodation.
 Community and Rural Development Group
          Increased dedicated/recurring appropriations
          Shared administrative support mechanisms
          Additional personnel dedicated to assessment and evaluation
 Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services
          Complete the development of the web-based accessibility of the periodic data
             on various measures of socioeconomic activity for 40 counties in eastern North
             Carolina
          Expand economic outlook conferences across state line to South Carolina with
             joint conference(s) with Coastal Carolina University.
          Expand number of programs/courses and level of consulting services designed
             for specific companies and/or professional/managerial organizations. Costs will
             be covered by fees.
          Expand number of participants in the Business of Marine Biotechnology
             Program.
          Build upon the present faculty collaboration with the North Carolina Port to
             establish a continuing institute (or equivalent) in support of supply-side
             management, logistics, trade and the port.
          Develop and offer new programs and training opportunities for users of the
             North Carolina Port
          Build upon the entrepreneurship concentration, advisory board and current
             CBES entrepreneurial activities towards an entrepreneurship center, Center for
             Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures.
          Expand the Youth Entrepreneurship Program to additional summer cohort
             groups.
c. Costs

   Marine Science Economic Development
           Pilot projects:
              Circa $100k salary and fringe, $50k graduate and undergraduate student
              summer support, supplies and other support relative to research $50k.
           Core Resources:
             Common research equipment shared by groups $250k-$500k per Core start-up,
             $75k annual maintenance for staff and minimal supplies, and for maintenance
             service contract.
           Graduate stipends
             $25k per student x 10 students.
           Research laboratories:
             Circa $400 per sq ft. 67k sq ft new research building to optimize public/private
             marine biotechnology industry $29M.
           On-site housing:
             Hurricane Katrina type small bungalows, each at $34k purchase and $20k
             assembly. 12 estimated need. Incremental funding is possible.
   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services (CSBES)
           Complete the development of the web-based accessibility of the periodic data
             on various measures of socioeconomic activity for 40 counties in eastern North
             Carolina: $25,000.
           Expand economic outlook conferences across state line to South Carolina with
             joint conference(s) with Coastal Carolina University. Costs will be covered by
             sponsorships and registration fees
           Expand number of programs/courses and level of consulting services designed
             for specific companies and/or professional/managerial organizations. Costs will
             be covered by fees
           Expand number of participants in the Business of Marine Biotechnology
             Program. Minimum of $30,000 for support of faculty per student
           Build upon the present faculty collaboration with the North Carolina Port
             towards the future establishment of a continuing institute (or equivalent) in
             support of the center. Minimum of $25,000 per year.
           Develop and offer new programs and training opportunities for users of the
             North Carolina Port. Costs will be covered by fees.
           Build upon the entrepreneurship concentration, advisory board and current
             CBES entrepreneurial activities towards an entrepreneurship center, Center for
             Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures.
           Expand the Youth Entrepreneurship Program to additional summer cohort
             groups. $10,000 per cohort.

d. Funding sources

   Marine Science Economic Development
           Pilot projects: lapsed salary, unfilled positions, existing categories of state
              funding. Core Resources: lapsed salary, existing supplies monies, university
              resources for laboratory renovation, minor upgrades of utilities endowment
              potential for each Core. Graduate Stipends: some existing lapsed salary, some
              F&A recovery, some teaching fellowships, some Federal independent grant
              support, will require some additional resources largely from endowment support
              and from Federal training grants for specific program foci. Research
             Laboratories: some state funds for planning and architecturals. Some Federal
             support for site development. Some industrial and entrepreneurial funds for
             construction. Some DOT funds for road upgrades from NCDOT. UNC Board of
             Governors authorized securing loans to build building, not a bond issue building.
             On-site housing for visitors. This will require new funds from the state of North
             Carolina.
   Community and Rural Development Group
           Improved coordination of administrative resources
           Additional non-state funds (grants/contracts)
   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services (CBES)
           Complete the development of the web-based accessibility of the periodic data
             on various measures of socioeconomic activity for 40 counties in eastern North
             Carolina: $25,000. Additional non-state funds (grants/contracts)
           Expand economic outlook conferences across state line to South Carolina with
             joint conference(s) with Coastal Carolina University. Costs will be covered by
             sponsorships and registration fees
           Expand number of programs/courses and level of consulting services designed
             for specific companies and/or professional/managerial organizations. Costs will
             be covered by fees
           Expand number of participants in the Business of Marine Biotechnology
             Program. Minimum of $30,000 for support of faculty per student. Cost covered
             by tuition and fees and additional non-state funds (grants/contracts)
           Build upon the present faculty collaboration with the North Carolina Port
             towards the future establishment of a continuing institute (or equivalent) in
             support of the center. Minimum of $25,000 per year. Reallocation of CBES funds
             and additional non-state funds (grants/contracts)
           Develop and offer new programs and training opportunities for users of the
             North Carolina Port. Reallocation of CBES funds, private grants and fee income.
           Build upon the entrepreneurship concentration, advisory board and current
             CBES entrepreneurial activities towards an entrepreneurship center, Center for
             Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures.
           Expand the Youth Entrepreneurship Program to additional summer cohort
             groups. $15,000 per cohort. Sponsorships and BB&T Morals of Capitalism
             endowment.

       4.4.1.2 New programs, initiatives and activities

   Community Development – Academic Programs
          COI for Marine Biotechnology
            Center of Innovation in Marine Biotechnology, funded by the North Carolina
            Biotechnology Center, will involve those institutions in NC with a marine sciences
            program or having expertise in marine related research. “Marine Biotechnology”
            is broadly defined to include products or processes related to any marine
            endeavor, including those technologies that might be peripheral (like ocean
             technologies or physical devices. UNCW and Steve Fontana are leading the
             project development and writing, together with Al Delia in the Eastern Region.
             Invited program is funded at $100,000 presently, and with final approval to yield
             $2.5 million.
            The Center of Innovation (COI) will be designed to strategically focus on
             innovation in and development of biotech dependent industries and to enhance
             commercialization of research in those areas through 1) public-private
             partnerships, 2) alliances among multiple educational institutions, 3) commercial
             and economic development, 4) innovation pipelines, and 5) alignment of new
             resources. The present model is being developed around a “coupled or
             bundled” technology base, arising from component technologies presently
             available or to-be-developed for licensing from UNC institutions.

   CREST – UNCW’s Millennial “Campus for Research, Entrepreneurship, Service & Teaching”


   UNCW has designated three millennial campus sites within which to develop activities that
    will contribute to the achievement of UNCW’s mission and strategic plan, and the
    enhancement of the economic development of the region through:
             Expanding the academic and research capacity of the university;
             Fostering creative research and entrepreneurial thinking;
             Developing new processes and products that will benefit the region, the state
                and the global community;
             Creating opportunities for students to interact with business partners in a real-
                world environment;
             Providing opportunities to develop new and creative funding sources for
                academic and research activities; and
             Identifying economic development and workforce initiatives.
             The following elements will be pursued as initial program activities within the
                millennial campus sites:
                    o Marine Science, Biology and Marine Biology:
                        Collaborative Initiative for Marine Biotechnology in North Carolina
                        (including UNCW, ECU, UNCCH, NCSU, ECSU, Eastern Regional Office,
                        NCBC)
                    o Chemistry and Biochemistry, Nursing, Biology and Marine Biology,
                        Sociology and Criminal Justice:
                        Accredited Analytical Laboratory in Forensic Chemistry and
                        DNA Sequencing Laboratory
                        Multi-purpose Laboratory and Regulatory Agency Complex
                    o Health and Human Sciences, Nursing:
                        Health, Fitness, and Nutrition Center

   Center for Geographic Information Science or Geospatial Technology
   Marine Science Economic Development
           PhD in marine science, with specialties in coastal observing,
              marine biotechnology, and oceans and human health. Center of Innovation in
              Marine Biotechnology.
   Community and Rural Development Group
           Southeastern North Carolina Food Systems Project
              The project includes rural and urban counties for the purpose of creating rural-
              urban linkages for knowledge and resource sharing and for strengthening and
              expanding local and regional markets for agricultural product sales. Partners
              include but are not limited to NC Cooperative Extension Offices on the county
              level, local and regional farmers markets, food banks, farmers, nonprofit and
              public service providers, institutional buyers, local governments, and institutions
              of higher education. Rising poverty and the massive loss of manufacturing and
              agricultural jobs throughout the entire rural Southeastern NC needs to be
              addressed. Twenty-four percent of the population is African-American, 30 % of
              which live at the poverty level. Farming serves only the export markets and
              tobacco farming has declined significantly. The establishment of local and
              regional food systems is a key to developing vibrant and sustainable economies
              in Southeast NC.

            Institute for Memory Research
             The premise of the IMR is to discover and mediate the biological, chemical and
             cognitive processes involved in memory and memory disorders and translate
             these discoveries into new technologies to aid the wider community and to
             provide research training to students and professionals. The proposed Institute
             has the potential to be self sufficient in a short time and could be the beginning
             of an important national contribution to the understanding and treatment of
             Alzheimer’s Dementia and other memory related disorders. The IMR has the
             potential to have a significant positive impact on the economic development of
             the state of North Carolina. The highly skilled students coming out of the IMR
             will 1) provide the human resources required by the technical firms already
             present in the region (e.g., PPD, AAI, etc.), and 2) attract new technical firms to
             the region. The IMR’s focus on transferring discoveries into patentable
             technologies (including biochemical interventions, technologies that enhance
             research productivity, technologies that enhance the quality of life of those living
             with memory loss, among others) has the potential to 1) enhance existing
             industries, (2) create new industries, and 3) reduce the financial impact of
             memory loss on the federal budget.

            Center for Civic Engagement and Policy Studies
             The Center is dedicated to helping the civic community in the Cape Fear Region
             develop better public policy through innovative engagement strategies;
             developing data bases and tracking systems to monitor and assess the critical
             demographic, economic, social, and environmental changes in the region; and
              identifying and disseminating "best practices" to the governmental and
              nonprofit sectors as needed. The Center will be dedicated to engaging UNCW
              faculty and students across disciplines with community stakeholders to address
              pressing public policy challenges facing the region.

            Educational/Curriculum Programs
             UNCW is collaborating with North Carolina State University to establish a
             Restoration Design Studio in Wilmington. The effort will link UNCW's programs
             in public history, public policy, and historical preservation with NCSU's programs
             in architecture toward the goal of preserving and adapting older buildings and
             creating sustainable designs in the context of the social interactions between
             people in neighborhoods and cities.

   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services

            Establish the Center for Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures. The new
             center would be housed under the CBES. It would
             o     Build upon the entrepreneurship concentration, advisory board and
                 current CBES entrepreneurial activities.
             o Become catalyst for Southeast NC for entrepreneurship & emerging
                 ventures forums, networking & programs (successor to Coastal
                 Entrepreneurial Council and regional office of Council for Entrepreneurial
                 Development).
             o Partner with CMS, CREST, Film Production & Research Center, SBTDC, and
                 external partners to help focus and leverage entrepreneurship/emerging
                 ventures.
            Provide leadership for entrepreneurship across the curriculum at UNCW.
            Oversee and further develop the Business of Marine Biotechnology Program
            Expand the Youth Entrepreneurship Program to adjacent counties.
             o Expand economic data base to whole state. The present CBES economic data
                 base includes periodic data on various measures of socioeconomic activity
                 for 40 counties in eastern North Carolina. This data base will soon become
                 web-based available to any user. The CBES proposes to complete the
                 remaining 60 counties in North Carolina to have the most uniform, complete
                 economic data base in the state available to any user.
             o Expand the North Carolina Port initiative/possible institute or center. The
                 CBES presently has a five-person faculty team operating in an unpaid
                 consultancy to the North Carolina State Ports Authority to develop a business
                 forecasting model as well as other activities. The CBES plans to further
                 develop this collaboration, possibly leading to a joint institute or center with
                 the Port, to support both its present and expected expanded mission with
                 the new major port facility. The expected institute or center will focus on
                 supply-side management, logistics, international trade and other business
                 issues related to Port business for the Port and its clients. Longer term it is
                expected that such an institute or center could provide lead collaboration to
                other UNC centers/institutes and/or governmental agencies focused on
                international trade.
              o Establish logistics/supply side management concentration under the B.S. in
                Business Administration degree. An undergraduate business degree with
                focus in logistics/supply side management is critical to help meet the
                expected high demand for such professional persons in support of
                business/trade with the proposed new North Carolina Port in Brunswick
                County.
              o With the Department of Computer Science, establish a new Information
                Technology major. Such a major is needed in the region to better serve
                demand of students and needs of region.
              o Longer term: MBA with a concentration in logistics/supply side management
                and/or separate MS in Logistics degree. Such a program is needed in the
                region to better serve demand of students and needs of region.




a. Cost

   Community and Rural Development Group
          Southeastern North Carolina Food Systems Project
            $130,000/annually (federal and Golden Leaf proposals)
          Institute for Memory Research
            $225,000/annually
          Center for Civic Engagement and Policy Studies
            $175/annually
          Educational/Curriculum Programs
            n/a

   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services (CBES)
           Establish the Center for Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures (CEEV)
                o $25,000 minimum to begin
                o $50,000 minimum annually to sustain
                o Assignment of existing CMS/CSB faculty position to CEEV

           Expand economic data base to entire state
               o $75,000 one-time
               o $25,000 minimum per year to sustain

           Expand the North Carolina Port initiative/possible institute or center
               o $75,000 minimum one-time to begin
               o $40,000 minimum per year to begin to sustain
            Establish logistics/supply side management concentration under the B.S. in
             Business Administration degree.
                 o To begin, two business faculty lines ($115,000 each)
                 o $25,000 to help re-tool existing business faculty persons

            With the Department of Computer Science, establish a new Information
             Technology major.
                o To begin, two faculty lines ($115,000 each): computer science/IS
                o $25,000 to help re-tool existing business faculty persons

            Longer term: MBA with a concentration in logistics/supply side management
             and/or separate MS in Logistics degree.
                o To begin, two business faculty lines ($115,000 each)
                o $25,000 to help re-tool existing business faculty persons


b. Funding sources

   Community and Rural Development Group
           Increased use of shared/common administrative structures
           Additional non-state funding (grants/contracts)
   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services (CBES)
           Establish the Center for Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures (CEEV).
             Multiple funding sources, including: new and re-prioritized funding; public-
             private investment; industry-specific investment; program fees.
             Assign existing funded faculty/staff line between CMS/CSB to CEEV.
           Expand economic data base to entire state.
             Multiple funding sources, including: new and re-prioritized funding; public-
             private investment; industry-specific investment.
           Expand the North Carolina Port initiative/possible institute or center.
             Multiple funding sources, including: new and re-prioritized funding; public-
             private investment; industry-specific investment. Potential program fees.
           Establish logistics/supply side management concentration under the B.S. in
             Business Administration degree.
             New and re-prioritized funding.
           With the Department of Computer Science, establish a new Information
             Technology major.
              New and re-prioritized funding.
           Longer term: MBA with a concentration in logistics/supply side management
             and/or separate MS in Logistics degree.
             New and re-prioritized funding. Fee revenue.

c. Assessment
   Community and Rural Development Group
           Southeastern North Carolina Food Systems Project
             Increased local and regional markets for local agricultural products, increased
             number of sustainable local agricultural cooperatives, and increased use of local
             and regional markets.
           Institute for Memory Research
             Provide the human resources required by the technical firms already present in
             the region (e.g., PPD, AAI, etc.), attract new technical firms to the region, and
             mitigate memory loss.
           Center for Civic Engagement and Policy Studies
             Increased faculty and student involvement in applied research projects,
             developing better public policy through innovative engagement strategies;
             creation of data bases and tracking systems to monitor and assess the critical
             demographic, economic, social, and environmental changes in the region; and
             identifying and disseminating "best practices" to the governmental and
             nonprofit sectors as needed.
           Educational/Curriculum Programs
             Preservation and adaptation of older buildings, adoption of sustainable designs
             for neighborhoods
   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services
           Establish the Center for Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures (CEEV).
                 o Offer, satisfaction of attendees of entrepreneurship & emerging ventures
                     forums, networking & programs.
                 o Increased faculty and student involvement in applied research projects.
                 o Value-added show by survey from work with CMS, CREST, Film
                     Production & Research Center, etc. and external partners to help focus
                     and leverage entrepreneurship/emerging ventures.
                 o Establishment of entrepreneurship across the curriculum at UNCW,
                     strong enrollments.
                 o The Business of Marine Biotechnology Program larger in enrollment,
                     satisfaction with program continues to be strong.
                 o Youth Entrepreneurship Program expanded through region, strong user
                     feedback.
           Expand economic data base to entire state.
                 o Availability of economic data to all users, satisfaction of users.
           Expand the North Carolina Port initiative/possible institute or center.
                 o Availability of new and additional services to North Carolina Port and its
                     users, satisfaction of Port and users.
           Establish logistics/supply side management concentration under the B.S. in
             Business Administration degree.
                 o Availability of new concentration, capabilities of new graduates and
                     satisfaction of employers.
            With the Department of Computer Science, establish a new Information
             Technology major.
                o Availability of new concentration, capabilities of new graduates and
                    satisfaction of employers.
            Longer term: MBA with a concentration in logistics/supply side management
             and/or separate MS in Logistics degree.
                o Availability of new program, capabilities of new graduates and
                    satisfaction of employers.

       4.4.1.3 Administrative and policy changes

l. Marine Biotechnology
           Senior Technology Development Officer : As MARBIONC develops, the university
              will need to develop new mechanisms to deal with optimizing intellectual
              property, with business/university relationships and documentation, and with
              facilities development. This should be developed to augment and not duplicate
              individual university tech transfer.
 Community Development – Academic Programs
           Economic Development Officer and Council
              As UNCW has increased its engagement in regional economic development
              activities, the university has established an economic development council to
              coordinate the various initiatives across the campus. Initially the council was
              convened by an assistant vice chancellor for public service and continuing
              studies, but this was a time-limited position that is now vacant.
              UNCW is now in the process of formulating a job description for an economic
              development officer who will be the primary liaison for the campus on the
              various economic development committees and bodies in the state. This
              individual may also oversee the construction and operation of CREST, UNCW’s
              millennial campus.
           UNCW Research Corporation
              To facilitate many of the technology transfer activities and the receipt of
              corporate and private foundation grants and contracts, UNCW has begun the
              process of moving our Research I, LLC out from the UNCW Corporation and
              establishing it as a separate 501(c)(3) and 509 (a) supporting entity.


   Community and Rural Development Group
           Recognition of community and rural development in RTP process
           Flexible wage scales to allow for increased base salary from grants/contracts
   Cameron School of Business/Center for Business and Economic Services (CBES)
           Flexible wage scales to allow for increased base salary from
             grants/contracts/fees.
       4.4.1.4 Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations

   Community Development – Academic Programs
       (See the COI for Marine Biotechnology above)
           Faculty from UNCW, ECU, UNCC, and UNCG are already collaborating on various
              grant proposals and professional service, such as planning for the NC GIS
              conferences that are held every other year (the next is 2009) and attract 4,000
              GIS practitioners from across NC and the US.

4.4.2 UNC should focus specific effort in meeting the needs of rural and underserved areas of
      the state.

       4.4.2.1 Existing programs, initiatives and activities

   UNCW and other campuses, with funding from the North Carolina Geological Survey, have
    conducted many mapping projects in rural parts of the state as well as stratigraphic and
    coastal geological investigations in various remote locations. Publications of these results
    to various planning agencies may lead to resource management and future ecotourism and
    sustainable development.

       4.4.2.4 Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations

   Existing collaborations (discussed in 4.4.2.1)
             The Center for Business and Economic Services staff work with their
                counterparts at Fayetteville State University and UNC Pembroke to prepare
                annual editions of a regional data book for North Carolina’s Southeast (NCSE),
                one of the regional partnerships in the State of North Carolina charged with
                fostering regional economic development. NCSE uses these data in its recruiting
                efforts in its 11-county service region.
   Proposed collaborations (discussed in 4.4.2.2).
             Center for Entrepreneurship and Emerging Ventures (CEEV).
             Expand economic data base to entire state.
             Expand the North Carolina Port initiative/possible institute or center.

4.4.3 UNC should seek to align appropriate campus programs with the
      strategic economic plans (including sector and cluster plans) of their
      regions and the state, recognizing the unique differences and challenges
      of our state’s economic and geographic regions.

       4.4.3.1 Existing programs, initiatives and activities

   Targeted Academic Programs:
            On-line Corporate MS Chemistry Program
              The Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry began a program in 2000 with a
              potential economic impact to North Carolina. The initial industrial partner was
              aaiPharma, a local pharmaceutical services company. They contributed $4000
              per student to UNCW to provide for their employees’ tuition, books, parking and
              all of the other expenses associated with this program. We taught courses both
              at UNCW and at aaiPharma, and their students worked on research projects here
              on campus, often with aaiPharma scientists on their committees. Of the twenty
              or so who began that program in 2000, about half have successfully completed
              their degrees, and four still remain.

            The current program is a true distance learning program. There are at least four
             companies involved: Wyeth, Eisai, Metrix and PPD. Students do their research
             on-site, under the supervision of a senior scientist at the company. We have
             developed eight fully on-line graduate courses to serve these students, and
             currently have about 20 in the program, including 7 or so PPD students who are
             located in Richmond VA and Madison, WI. With the exception of the PPD
             students, the distance learning graduate students pay either in-state or out-of-
             state tuition.

            There is more information at http://www.uncw.edu/chem/DMS/#index

   Professional Master’s Programs
            In AY 2003-04 UNCW engaged in the promotion and development of
              professional master’s degrees. A number of the programs above were
              supported in their planning and implementation by grants from the Council of
              Graduate Schools in association with the Sloan and the Ford Foundations, and
              from UNC-GA in association with the Sloan Foundation. Seven programs were
              proposed for the Council of Graduate Schools initiatives with the Sloan and Ford
              Foundations for professional science (PSM) and professional social sciences and
              humanities (PSSHM) master’s degree planning. UNCW submitted applications to
              CGS for planning 2 PSM and 5 PSSHM programs. We received funding to plan six
              of these: two PSM programs – a M.S. in computer science and information
              systems and an applied statistics option for the M.S. in mathematics, and four
              PSSHM programs – an applied behavioral analysis option for the M.A. in
              psychology, a M.S. in environmental studies, a M.A. in criminology and public
              sociology, and a M.A. in gerontology. UNCW submitted, and was funded for,
              more of these grants than any other university in the country.
            In AY 2004-05, UNCW received funding for implementation grants for four
              programs: MSCSIS, M.A. in Applied Gerontology, M.A. in criminology and public
              sociology, and a concentration in applied behavioral analysis in the M.A. in
              psychology. Again, UNCW received more of these grants than any other
              university in the country. In AY 2006-07 we received an additional grant from
              UNC-GA and the Sloan Foundation for implementation of the M.A. in
             environmental studies, and in AY 2007-08 for implementing the M.S. in coastal
             and ocean policy.
            All of these programs were developed in consultation with advisory boards
             comprised of the target employers. Consequently, these programs are designed
             to meet the workforce needs of the region and state.
            In addition, the Geology Master’s Program enables students to pursue either a
             thesis option as well as a professional, non-thesis, track which is tailored to
             professional certification. Graduates work in North Carolina for both state
             agencies and private sector firms.

   “Business of Marine Biotechnology”
            The Center for Marine Science at the University of North Carolina Wilmington
               seven research fellowships in marine biotechnology. Candidates must have a
               PhD in a biotechnology-related area and are expected to conduct research in
               marine science laboratories at the University while pursuing a professional MBA
               degree in the University’s Cameron School of Business. The goal of this 24
               month program is to produce individuals with a solid science background as well
               as the business skills needed to prosper in a modern competitive business
               environment. Students in the MBA portion of the program will master the core
               functions of business, develop analytical and quantitative business skills, and
               study current and future business issues through real world experiences with
               regional companies involved in marine biotechnology.

            B.S. in Clinical Research
             Wilmington has become a center for clinical research organizations (CROs). To
             meet the needs of these companies and to provide an incentive to other CROs to
             locate in SE North Carolina, UNCW has implemented a program to train
             professionals for careers in clinical research.

            This undergraduate program prepares health science professionals to participate
             in the science and business of developing health care products and protocols,
             from discovery to market and human utilization. This four year undergraduate
             program includes a didactic curriculum and a mentored experience or internship
             in clinical research during the senior year. The program is designed to provide
             competency in methodologies, including protocol development and regulatory
             compliance; data collection, analysis and synthesis derived from human-oriented
             research; research ethics; assessment and evaluation of the safety and efficacy
             of investigational products; application of knowledge and skills to clinical
             situations; oral and written scientific presentation; and collaborative team
             membership. All CLR courses are online or web enhanced.

            B.A. in Film Studies
   EUE Screen Gems Ltd. is the largest full service motion picture facility in the U.S.
   east of California. Over its 20 year history, Screen Gems has been the home of
   over 300 film, television and commercial productions. The studio and its
   ancillary industries have made a major economic impact on the region. UNCW
   has developed a film studies program that provides internship opportunities for
   students and supports the film industry.

   Drawing upon the expertise of department faculty, filmmaking professionals,
   and scholars and filmmakers in other departments in the College of Arts and
   Sciences and the Cameron School of Business, the Film Studies Department
   offers a variety of courses in the art, history, production and business of film.

 GIS Training
  The undergraduate Geographic Information Science certificate program is very
  active and has produced students with 100% job placement. Most of the UNCW
  GISci graduates work in NC either in the public or private sectors, although some
  are now employed by large International corporations such as Environmental
  Systems Research Institute (ESRI).

 B.S. in Business Administration
  The Cameron School of Business offers a BS in Business Administration with ten
  concentrations and over 1,900 students. Students are active in internships,
  group projects and other service learning activities in the region. Each year
  nearly 600 graduates become available to serve employers in the region.

 Professional MBA
  The Cameron School of Business offers a Professional MBA primarily of service to
  the region that includes a “Business of Marine Biotechnology” MBA
  concentration.

 International MBA
  The Cameron School of Business offers a joint International MBA with five other
  universities in Europe. The focus of the UNCW International MBA program is
  international finance, in keeping with the strong financial focus of the State of
  North Carolina.

 MS-CSIS
  The Information Systems and Operations Management Department, of the
  Cameron School of Business, and the Computer Science Department, of the
  College of Arts and Sciences, created the joint MS-Computer Systems and
               Information Systems program in response to demand and need of employers
               within Southeast North Carolina.

            MSA
             The Master of Science in Accountancy program graduates approximately 60
             students per year to work for public accounting firms, governmental
             organizations and private industry throughout Southeast United States.

a. Costs

   On-line Corporate MS Chemistry Program:
       The department needs to receive $500 per credit hour taken by them, to be put in a
       fund we can use for graduate tuitions and scholarships. If we are to expand beyond 20
       (and there appears to be significant demand), we need an additional faculty line as well.
        We are also exploring ways to attract students who may not work for a cooperating
       employer, including teachers seeking an MS in chemistry. Successful expansion and
       implementation requires a model that fairly compensates the department.


       4.4.3.2 New programs, initiatives and activities

              M.S. in Biopharmaceutical Clinical Research
              M.F.A. in Film Studies
              M.S. in Logistics
              M.S. in Coastal & Ocean Policy
              M.S. in Geographic Information Science or Geospatial Technology
              B.S. in Business Administration (logistics concentration).
              B.S. in Information Technology.

       4.4.3.4 Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations

   Meeting the Engineering Education Needs of Southeastern NC
      One of the overarching requests heard at the Wilmington community listening session
      for UNC Tomorrow was that UNCW meet the need for engineering education in the
      area. General Electric, among other industrial concerns, sought a local venue for
      training their workforce.

   UNCW is working to establish a joint degree baccalaureate engineering program with North
    Carolina State University. UNCW students will earn their engineering degrees entirely at
    UNCW, with UNCW providing basic studies and some major courses using UNCW faculty
    and resources. NC State will provide special upper division courses for the majors using
    distance technologies. UNCW is currently evaluating the needs of regional business to
    determine the fields of engineering to be offered through this program.
4.4.4 UNC should promote the arts and cultural enrichment in all regions of the state.

       4.4.4.1 Existing programs, initiatives and activities

   Arts and Cultural Initiatives
            UNCW has implemented a multi-layered, interdepartmental and institutionally
               comprehensive strategy to utilize its own artistic and infrastructure support
               resources in order to play a dynamic leadership role in the artistic and cultural
               enrichment of its service region. The key players in this strategy implementation
               include:
            Office of Cultural Arts
                   o generates and coordinates partnership and outreach activities with
                       regional and statewide arts entities, e.g., Carolina Ballet, Chamber Music
                       Wilmington, Cape Fear Jazz, Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington
                       Symphony, Alban Elved Dance Ensemble, WHQR-FM (public radio), N.C.
                       Symphony and the N.C. Arts Council.
                   o established Wilmington as the summer home of the Carolina Ballet,
                       providing professional training and performance opportunities of
                       national stature to young dancers from the region and state.
                   o generates ongoing schedule of special events, e.g., Holocaust Days of
                       Remembrance, bringing international artists and musicians to campus
                       and community.
                   o works in close collaboration with the Watson School of Education, the
                       N.C Arts Council and the region’s public schools in planning and
                       implementing educational outreach strategies and activities: UNCW
                       Opera Outreach Project, Young People’s Chamber Theatre, Voice of the
                       Whale, Langston Hughes Project, Theatre Arts for Youth, Wilmington
                       Symphony Youth Orchestra, Holocaust Remembrance Teachers
                       Workshops, etc.
            UNCW Presents
                   o student fees-funded lecture and performing arts series providing diverse
                       opportunities for cultural enrichment through the arts. Many are free
                       and open to the public, including pre-or post-performance discussions,
                       master classes, workshops, and lecture/demonstrations.
            UNCW Art & Art History
                   o hosts regular faculty and guest artist-in-residence exhibitions and
                       lectures open to the community and region.
            UNCW Department of Music
                   o produces over 90 concerts per year in a wide range of musical genre
                       open to the public at either no admission or a nominal ticket fee. The
                       department provides significant faculty and facility support for the
                       Wilmington Symphony Orchestra.
            UNCW Creative Writing
                o provides frequent opportunity for regional involvement with the annual
                     Creative Writer’s Retreat, Writers in Action (school outreach) program,
                     UNCW Writers Week (bringing nationally-acclaimed authors to campus
                     and community), and on-going schedule of public readings and lectures
                     by published and emerging authors.
            UNCW Film Studies
                o through the its Cinema Nouveau, Moviemakers and Scholars series, Scene
                     First Festival and its integral involvement with Wilmington’s Screen Gems
                     Studios and the Cucalorus Film Festival, Film Studies plays a significant
                     role in the region’s re-energized film industry and related activities,
                     providing showcase opportunities for both beginning and established
                     filmmakers as well as interactive opportunities for a regional audience.
            Public Service and Continuing Studies
                o provides to the entire region in-depth arts and cultural learning and
                     enrichment opportunities for the adult community through the Osher
                     Lifelong Learning Institute, including Mid-Winter Weekend seminars,
                     Plato Society seminars, Summer Nights Under the Stars, Sunday Brunch
                     and Music series.

a. Assessment methods

   Arts and Cultural Initiatives
            Effectiveness is assessed via (1) ticket sales, audience data, numbers of formally
               enrolled participants, percentage of public school educators and students
               participating in outreach activities; and (2) arts economic impact data from
               regional Chambers of Commerce and the N.C. Arts Council.

       4.4.4.2 New programs, initiatives and activities

   Arts and Cultural Initiatives
            Arts in Education Outreach Initiative
                   o The successful effort to develop substantive cultural enrichment and
                       community arts involvement must be long-term in its impact. Thus, that
                       effort must be integral to the K-12 curricular structure. However, the
                       budgetary realities for local public schools, particularly within historically
                       underserved counties, create budget priorities for the arts which range
                       from the lowest to the non-existent.
                   o To meet this specific need in these specific underserved areas of the
                       institution’s service area, the UNCW Office of Cultural Arts proposes the
                       establishment of a formal, on-going, program-specific, curriculum-based
                       Arts in Education Outreach Initiative, to be developed jointly with the
                       Watson School of Education and the North Carolina Arts Council, to be
                       administered jointly with UNCW Public Service and Continuing Studies,
                       and to be targeted to the K-12 needs of Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus,
          Duplin, Onslow and Pender counties. Building on the highly-successful
          initiatives undertaken informally in the last three years, this expanded
          program will provide hands-on teacher training and student interaction
          opportunities in the state-of-the-art educational and cultural arts
          performance facilities on the UNCW campus, as well as directly in the
          public schools located in the university’s service region.
       o Arts in Education Outreach will focus on the visual, literary and
          performing arts with a particular emphasis on North Carolina
          performers/artists and cultural traditions, with curricular tools and live
          performances designed to equip educators with effective strategies for
          developing involvement, awareness and direct participation in a broad
          spectrum of arts activities. Utilizing its faculty, facility and infrastructure
          resources, UNCW will partner with local public school educators in
          creating long-term opportunities for creative and artistic development---
          an endeavor of vital importance to the quality of life and cultural
          enrichment in our historically underserved communities.
 A film production and research center
       o For decades southeastern North Carolina has had a close and symbiotic
          relationship with the film industry, and the industry’s current re-
          energized activity has had demonstrable economic impact in the region.
          Building on this dynamic relationship, the UNCW Office of Cultural Arts
          and the UNCW Department of Film Studies propose the creation of a film
          production and research center utilizing (1) state-of-the-art digital
          production and distribution capability; (2) regionally-based production
          crew resources; and (3) the university’s creative, scholarly, and
          entrepreneurial expertise.
       o With the university’s recent acquisition of a former commercial cinema
          complex, there is already in place an ideal physical site for the creation of
          an entrepreneurial enterprise involving state-of-the-art, high-definition
          digital film production, screening and distribution, as well as archival and
          research capabilities. Future plans for this site include the addition of two
          sound stages (for simultaneous multiple production capability), digital
          editing studios, festival screening research and archive capabilities. The
          renovation and equipment costs for the facility would be partially funded
          through this proposal, with a significant portion of those costs provided
          through private partnerships. The University has already made a sizable
          financial commitment to the structure and its potential.
       o Such a center provides the opportunity to build a thriving, long-term
          indigenous film industry in the region and state which, while working in
          close coordination with one of the nation’s prestigious film and television
          studios (Screen Gems) in Wilmington, will not be tied to the economic
          variables of Hollywood or New York. This initiative represents a public-
          private endeavor with a potent and far-reaching economic impact of
          regional and statewide significance---a unique opportunity for UNCW to
                       partner its faculty, infrastructure and entrepreneurial resources, and
                       consequently to effect a demonstrable transformation of the cultural,
                       skilled employment, tourism/hospitality and housing economic indices
                       for the entire region and state.

a. Cost

   Arts and Cultural Initiatives
            Arts in Education Outreach Initiative
               $136,000 [additional staffing/administrative support]
               $ 82,300 [publications, artist fees, material, travel, miscellaneous]
            National Independent Film Production Center
               Total costs are difficult to specify given the variables involved, but are projected
               to range from $2-2.5 million. [It should be noted that UNCW has preliminarily
               invested over $50,500 in the pre-design phase of a potential site (Oleander
               Drive) housing a proposed Independent Film Production Center].

b. Funding sources

   Arts and Cultural Initiatives
            Arts in Education Outreach Initiative
               New and re-prioritized funding sources
            National Independent Film Production Center
               Multiple funding sources, including: new and re-prioritized funding; public-
               private investment; industry-specific investment.

c. Assessment

   Arts and Cultural Initiatives
            Arts in Education Outreach Initiative
               Regional educator and student participation; formal survey process via N.C. Arts
               Council and Watson School of Education
            National Independent Film Production Center
               Film production distribution; tracked economic impact on service region.

d. Accountability and timeline
  Arts and Cultural Initiatives
           Arts in Education Outreach Initiative
               Time line: 4-6 months

            National Independent Film Production Center
             Time line: 12-16 months
Program                       Cost        Funding         Assessment methods                     Accountability
                                          sources
Arts in Education             $218,300    New and         Regional educator and student          UNCW Office of
Outreach                                  reprioritized   participation; formal survey process   Cultural Arts
                                                          via N.C. Arts Council and Watson
                                                          School of Education
National Independent Film $2-2.5          Multiple        Film production/distribution;          UNCW Film
Production Center         million                         regional economic indices              Studies


          4.4.5 UNC should facilitate inclusive discussions on important community issues.

          New and existing programs to communicate faculty expertise on important community issues
          to broader audiences are treated under Recommendation 4.7.1 in Section G of this report. An
          examination of the faculty reward system with respect to involvement in important community
          issues will be addressed in Response Phase II.
                            Western Carolina University
 WCU will apply the Stewards of Place model to effect regional economic transformation.

 Since its founding, WCU has acted as a “steward of place.” The Stewards of Place model was
 developed by AASCU to describe in detail the role of regional universities. The basic model
 has four domains in which a university is to act.
  Assist in creating a vibrant region economy that is linked to the emerging global
     economy (create a “new economy”).
  Assist the region in developing livable communities. Livable communities are
     characterized by a high-quality natural environment, safety, excellent schools, high-
     quality health care, and active cultural life. Livable communities also have excellent
     universities and community colleges focused on regional needs.
  Assist the region in developing inclusively so that all groups in the region’s population
     have an opportunity to benefit.
  Assist the region in creating strong civic leadership including voluntary organizations,
     elected representatives, and government operations.

 One of the most important aspects of the Stewards of Place model is that it recognizes the
 University’s role as a partner and contributor to regional quality, not as the “owner” or
 expert. Universities must link with the people of the region to understand their needs and
 to understand how to respond.

 The Board of Trustees adopted the Stewards of Place model as its official position on WCU’s
 relationship with its region. All initiatives in this section are consistent with this model and
 Board policy.


Recommendation 4.4.1 - Economic Transformation and Community Development: UNC
should increase its capacity and commitment to respond to and lead economic transformation
and community development.

WCU has been focused on the economic transformation of this region since 1996. In this
period of more than a decade, WCU has created research capacity in core areas and
redeveloped its curriculum to directly address the needs of the 21 st century. In addition, WCU
has increased its focus on applied research and development, and adopted the Boyer Model
of Scholarship to support those faculty members who will lead this regional economic
transformation.

WCU has developed a national reputation as one of the leaders in linking academic
institutions to the economic, social, and cultural transformations that define the 21 st century.
An exemplar of this philosophy is the realignment of the University’s academic structure to
better focus on the economic transformation of the region. For example, the Kimmel School
was created as an organization based primarily on business-University interaction. The Center
for Rapid Product Realization, the Photonics Consortium, and the Center for Adaptive Devices
are located within the Kimmel School. All of these centers directly focus on business
competitiveness and development of entrepreneurial enterprises. The focus of the College of
Business was changed to implement an external philosophy of business education and
engagement. Additionally, the College of Business was restructured to better fit the modern
business climate, and a Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation was created. This Center
is actively involved in redeveloping the business base of Canton and other small communities
in the Western region. Critical to this reorganization is the requirement that the College of
Business and the Kimmel School jointly plan and execute extensive business interventions;
that they jointly develop new economy businesses; and that they prepare students for the
global economy.

Note: Many of the key initiatives that affect economic transformation are addressed in
response to Recommendation 4.1.1, 4.1.2 and 4.7.1.

 Initiative 4.4.1.1: Implement the Millennial Initiative

 The Millennial Initiative is WCU’s strategic approach to redeveloping its campus and
 institutional direction by taking advantage of the Millennium Campus legislation. The
 institution is creating nine public-private partnership neighborhoods and a town center on
 campus. This physical transformation of the campus is designed to promote economic
 development through faculty-community interaction, technology transfer, University
 service delivery, and, most importantly, the fundamental improvement of undergraduate
 and graduate education.

   Summary of Implementation Strategies
   1. Continue development of the “Health Neighborhood” by attracting private partners,
      including health care providers, retirement and assisted-living developers, and age-
      related businesses

   2. Seek full funding for the Education Building that will become the center of the
      “Education Neighborhood” (See response to Recommendation 4.3.1)

   3. Create conditions to support a profitable, privately developed town center

 Initiative 4.4.1.2: Increase WCU’s emphasis on innovation, entrepreneurship, applied
 research, and development

 The literature on economic development clearly indicates that most successful New
 Economy enterprises will be entrepreneurial and based in technological innovation.
 Because of WCU’s adoption of the Boyer Model, the institution now has a reward structure
 capable of supporting faculty members in applied research and development. Additionally,
 because of the institution’s strong emphasis on undergraduate research and engaged
education, its student body is increasingly well positioned to engage in business
development. For example, all graduate students in the Entrepreneurship Program have
started a business and half of all undergraduate students in the program have started their
own businesses.

While WCU has developed many programs to address this initiative, there remains a core
problem with regard to obtaining early stage capital. Without innovative solutions to this
issue, the western region of North Carolina will not achieve its economic potential.

 Summary of Implementation Strategies
 1. Develop faculty staffing plans in critical fields to promote regional economically related
 applied research and development

 2. Allocate faculty positions in critical departments to address innovation,
    commercialization or applied research and development

 3. Expand the institution-level support for the student entrepreneurship competition
    (“WISE Challenge” – Western Innovative Student Enterprise Challenge )

 4. Seek funding for “transitional space” for new and emerging enterprises

 5. Seek non-enrollment based funding for staff to support faculty and student
    entrepreneurship

 6. Allocate a position to coordinate and manage faculty and student entrepreneurial
    activities, including contract management and specification of deliverables

 7. Work with General Administration to revise the R&D investment tax credit in the IRS
    code

 8. Work with General Administration to create a mechanism to generate early stage
    capital for student and faculty entrepreneurial enterprises

Initiative 4.4.1.3: Continue to develop national-class capacities in key disciplines and
programs that support New Economy economic development in the Western region.

As part of UNC-Tomorrow, WCU is focusing on program development to address regional
needs as defined by the Clusters of Innovation in the AdvantageWest Vision Plan
(www.advantagewest.com/uploads/File/Vision_Plan_--_Final.pdf). Specifically, WCU is
responding to the following clusters: Advanced manufacturing, Communications and IT,
Environment, Health Care, and Security (see 4.1.2, 4.4.3, 4.5.2, and 4.6.2 for additional
implementation strategies). It should be noted that this approach is consistent with the
Board of Governors’ proposed policy on academic planning.
 WCU’s current program array addresses issues within each broad cluster. Because of the
 unique location of WCU and its connections to Oak Ridge National Laboratory and forensic
 businesses, WCU intends to become one of the lead institutions in the nation in forensic
 DNA analysis and forensic anthropology. This specialization will allow WCU to utilize its
 Millennium Initiative to create a strong cluster of security-related businesses that are tied to
 human identification, DNA database management, security and health uses of DNA, and
 other applications of this emerging science.

 Summary of Implementation Strategies
 1. Seek advanced degrees in forensic sciences and expand capacities in forensic science and
    environmental science to promote business development in the region (see
           response to Recommendations 4.1.2 and 4.6.2). Because of the unique location of
    WCU and its connections to Oak Ridge National Laboratory and forensic businesses,
    WCU intends to become one of the lead institutions in the nation in forensic DNA
    analysis and forensic anthropology

 2. Seek national accreditation for forensic science programs from the Forensic Science
    Education Programs Accreditation Commission

 3. Implement the applied-focus Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree (BSE) to
    promote global competitiveness of key technology-based industries in the Western
    region

 4. Expand the focus of the Public Administration Program on core questions of local
    taxation, land use planning, public management, and government policies that
    promote regional economic development


Recommendation 4.4.2 - Needs of Rural, Underserved Regions: UNC should focus specific
efforts on meeting the needs of rural and underserved areas of the state.

WCU’s response to UNC-Tomorrow deals primarily with a rural underserved region utilizing
the Stewards of Place model. With the exception of the counties included in the Asheville
MSA, all other counties in Western North Carolina are rural. Therefore, this recommendation
will not be dealt with separately because it is embedded in the entire report. Of particular
note is the development of the Millennial Initiative. This initiative is designed to create an
“economic central place” to act as a catalyst for development of rural Jackson County and the
surrounding rural counties, Macon, Swain, and Graham. (See specifically response to Finding
4.2, Access)


Recommendation 4.4.3 - Alignment with Strategic Economic Plans: UNC should seek to align
appropriate campus programs with the strategic economic plans (including sector and cluster
plans) of their regions and the state, recognizing the unique differences and challenges of our
state’s economic and geographic regions.

WCU‘s traditional mission has focused on meeting the needs of the people of Western North
Carolina. As a result, the institution utilized the AdvantageWest Vision Plan in its strategic
planning process. Responses to this recommendation are embedded throughout WCU’s
response to UNC-Tomorrow and specifically in Initiative 4.4.1.3

 Initiative 4.4.3.1: Respond to the AdvantageWest Vision Plan’s call for development of a
 “think tank” to analyze regional development needs.

 Western North Carolina’s efforts at economic development have been hampered by a lack
 of ready sources of data regarding regional conditions, analyses of regional trends, and
 examination of the external factors that are driving regional development. Additionally,
 there are few studies that inform counties and regions in North Carolina regarding best
 public policy practices associated with development. Because of WCU’s emphasis on
 applied research, it is appropriate for the institution to address these concerns.

   Summary of Implementation Strategies
   1. Restructure the Institute for the Economy and the Future to be an economic data
      development and analysis center focused on the Western region

   2. Refocus the Public Policy Institute to address core policy issues associated with
      regional development


Recommendation 4.4.4 - Promote the Arts and Cultural Enrichment: UNC should promote the
arts and cultural enrichment in all regions of the state.

Because of the importance of arts and culture to the Stewards of Place model, WCU has
invested significantly in facilities and support for the visual and performing arts. The largest
project funded by the 2000 bond issue at WCU was construction of the Fine and Performing
Arts Center. WCU also has invested in state-of-the-art sound recording and video production
facilities. These investments are made even more important because Western North Carolina
has a rich tradition in art, culture, and craft.

 Initiative 4.4.4.1: Better integrate academic programming with regional visual and
 performing arts and crafts to enhance the livability of the community

   Summary of Implementation Strategies
   1. Develop a cultural arts activities calendar (performing arts and the WCU Gallery) to
      promote the University’s role as an arts center
   2. Expand arts academic programs in Musical Theater, Commercial Music, Film          (digital
   video) Production, and Television

   3. Elevate the Department of Stage and Screen to “School” status as it expands its
      programming and enrollment

   4. Develop a College of Fine and Performing Arts strategic plan that increases the
      College’s external regional engagement


Recommendation 4.4.5 - Inclusive Discussions: UNC should facilitate inclusive discussions on
important community issues.

WCU regularly hosts conferences, regional activities, and regional discussions. Both the Public
Policy Institute and the Institute for the Economy and the Future will continue to discuss their
data and findings in regional forums and provide information to local news outlets. As has
been documented throughout this response, WCU’s adoption of the Stewards of Place and
Boyer models directly addresses recommendation 4.4.5.
Table 4. Economic Transformation (4.4) Initiatives
                             Type
                           (New or
                          Existing –
                         Program or                                                                                                                          Responsible            Implementation     Budget
       Initiative           Policy)             Key Strategies               Key Descriptors of Success               Key Barriers/Obstacles               Unit/Department              Timeline       Source
4.4.1.1: Implement     Existing         Continue development of the        Bring Health Building online            Limited funding for capital      Office of the Chancellor,   Phased            New,
the Millennial         Program           Health Neighborhood                Occupancy targets met in                 projects                         Office of the Provost,      implementation    Reallocation
Initiative                              Seek full funding for the           commercial spaces                       Government regulatory            Vice Chancellor for         beginning Fall    and Existing
                                         Education Building                 Full funding received for                issues                           Administration and          2008
                                        Create conditions to support        Education Building                      Mortgage crisis                  Finance, Dean of
                                         profitable town center                                                                                        Health and Human
                                                                                                                                                       Sciences
4.4.1.2: Increase      Existing and     Develop faculty staffing plans     Increased faculty in critical fields    Funding dependent on             Office of the Chancellor,   Continuous        Reallocation
WCU‘s emphasis         New Programs      in critical fields                 Increased participation in               projected enrollment growth      Office of the Provost,                        and New
on innovation,                          Allocate faculty positions in       entrepreneurship competitions           Limited funding available for    Academic Deans
entrepreneurship,                        critical departments               Funding acquired for space to            capital projects
applied research                        Expand support for student          house new and emerging                  Insufficient State funding for
and development                          entrepreneurship competition        enterprises                              non-credit University
                                        Seek funding for ―transitional     Increased economic activity in the       activities
                                         space‖ for new and emerging         region
                                         enterprises
                                        Seek non-enrollment based
                                         funding to support faculty and
                                         student entrepreneurship
                                        Allocate position to coordinate
                                         and manage entrepreneurial
                                         activities
                                        Work with GA to revise R&D
                                         investment tax credit in the
                                         IRS code
                                        Work with GA to develop
                                         mechanism to acquire early
                                         stage capital for
                                         entrepreneurial enterprises
4.4.1.3: Continue to   New and          Seek advanced degrees and          Advanced degrees implemented            Non-enrollment based             Office of the Provost,      Current through   New (GA
develop national       Existing          expand capacities in forensic      Enrollment targets met                   funding                          Dean of the Graduate        2011              requested),
class capacities in    Program           science and environmental          Graduation targets met                  Clarity of institutional         School, Dean of Arts &                        Reallocation
key disciplines and                      science                            Local government leader                  mission                          Sciences, Dean of the                         and Gifts
programs that                           Seek national accreditation for     satisfaction                                                              Kimmel School,
support New                              forensic science                   Increase in MPA projects/theses                                           Department Head of
Economy economic                        Implement BS in Engineering         that address core issues                                                  Political Science,
development in the                      Expand focus of Public             Awarded national accreditation for                                        Department Head of
Western region.                          Administration program on           forensic science                                                          Engineering and
                                         core questions related to          Increased economic activity in the                                        Technology, Program
                                         regional economic                   region                                                                    Director of Forensic
                                         development                                                                                                   Science
Table 4. Economic Transformation (4.4) Initiatives, Continued

                          Type
                        (New or
                      Existing –
                      Program or                                                                                                     Responsibl
     Initiative          Policy)            Key Strategies            Key Descriptors of Success        Key Barriers/Obstacles     Unit/Departm
4.4.4.1: Better      Existing         Develop a cultural arts        Published activities calendar    None                    Dean of Fine &
integrate            Programs          activities calendar            Expanded programming                                      Performing Arts
academic                              Expand arts-related            School of Stage and Screen
programming with                       academic programs              Published CFPA strategic
regional visual                       Elevate the Department of       plan
and performing                         Stage and Screen to            Increased
arts and crafts to                     ―school‖ status                 attendance/participation at
enhance the                           Develop the College of Fine     arts-related events
livability of the                      and Performing Arts‘           Increased enrollment in arts
community                              strategic plan to address       programs
                                       regional engagement            Increased regional
                                                                       engagement of Fine &
                                                                       Performing Arts faculty
                                   Winston-Salem State University
As in other areas of the nation, the Piedmont Triad region is experiencing a significant shift in its economic
drivers. The local economy is changing from one driven by tobacco, textiles, and furniture manufacturing to
one based on healthcare, logistics, financial services, and knowledge management. In this environment, all
institutions of higher learning have been charged with developing the knowledge resources that drive
economic development, helping citizens and communities plan for new industries. They must equip the
workforce with the skills required to drive the new industries. Winston-Salem State University has recognized
this need and, through its academic programs, centers and strategic planning, has begun to address the needs
of both the urban area of Winston-Salem and the rural areas and counties surrounding the city. New avenues
for employment and economic prosperity for communities and citizens are aggressively targeted with vision
statements and strategic goals.

WSSU has been integrally involved in the economic transformation of the Piedmont region for many years and
has played a major role in providing employees for the large healthcare industry. Recently, through the
activities and centers of the School of Business and Economics (SBE), the multi-institutional Center for Design
Innovation, and the Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation, it has accelerated its efforts as
a change agent for the region, with particular emphasis on identifying and meeting the needs of underserved
populations in neighborhoods contiguous to the university, within Forsyth County, and in surrounding areas.

The work of the Small Business Technology Development Center (SBTDC) is well known. It has been a catalyst
for economic development throughout the state. The office located in the School of Business and Economics
(SBE) has served clients primarily within Forsyth County; recently, it has been proactively seeking clients in the
rural areas of Surrey and Yadkin counties. Plans for expansion include meeting the office’s staffing needs and
working more collaboratively with the SBE Masters in Business Administration program to offer more hands-
on, in-class projects that link students with clients and real-life problems. Those UNC campuses that house
SBTDCs will collaborate more closely in order to assess “best practices” in their individual operations. Once
identified, those practices will be shared with other campuses that do not have SBTDCs. This assessment and
sharing will utilize SBTDC as a resource for development in new locations in the state.

The Center for Entrepreneurship (CFE) has devoted itself to fostering entrepreneurship through knowledge
creation and training for the citizens of the Piedmont region. It has positioned itself to collaborate with other
academic units of the WSSU campus to train students in the basics of entrepreneurship, no matter what their
majors. Its most important task, however, has been the provision of entrepreneurial training through
collaboration for those underserved populations in Forsyth and surrounding counties who lack a tradition of
business ownership or who have inadequate preparation for grassroots business ownership. It fosters the
spirit of entrepreneurship through such innovative initiatives as a program designed for promoters of music
business; an initiative to meet the entrepreneurial needs of STEM scholars, and the delivery of
entrepreneurship and capitalism training to high school students in the area.

The Center for Design Innovation (CDI) resulted from an economic development study by Angelou Economics
prompted by severe job losses in Piedmont. The study found that in the midst of this downturn, there was an
economic sector associated with design that was not only healthy but growing. Angelou Economics
recommended that a strategy for economic development could be to accelerate the growth of this creative
industry sector. This result led to discussion among universities in Winston-Salem and Greensboro about
creating organizations dedicated to promoting creative and design activity. The University of North Carolina
established CDI largely as an economic development project, aiming to accelerate the growth of creative
enterprises in the Piedmont Triad by supporting new and developing businesses and by modeling academic
collaborations with industry. The General Assembly dedicated funds for the development of a center in
Winston-Salem as a collaboration among Winston-Salem State University, the North Carolina School of the
Arts, and Forsyth Technical Community College.

The Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation (SGACDC), a community-based nonprofit
organization named for the university’s founder, was established by Winston-Salem Sate University and
incorporated in 1998 to reverse neighborhood decline and help residents regain control of their
neighborhoods. To date, the CDC has helped eighteen families become homeowners, loaned $77,000 to small
businesses that have created 65 jobs, built 13 new homes, and provided technical assistance to homebuyers,
entrepreneurs and neighborhood associations.

Motorsports Management is a new program that has the potential to attract both those seeking to further
their education and those seeking to expand their businesses’ reach into one of North Carolina’s emerging
employment segments. The motorsports industry has broad reach into many areas of employment and
currently accounts for over 26,000 jobs in North Carolina alone. There are deep historical roots surrounding
racing in the rural counties near WSSU. In fact, Bowman Gray Stadium, the oldest weekly running track in
NASCAR, is home to the Motorsports Management program offices. The university is in a position to leverage
the affinity many have for racing into jobs in existing and new businesses, in both the traditional populations
attracted to racing and to new populations that the industry is reaching out to attract. Armed with knowledge
and experiences in the management and production of motorsports events, graduates will be able to create
businesses in their communities or expand existing businesses.

Outlined in this section is more information about the initiatives that were introduced and about plans for
those initiatives to expand their scope. These include
   1. Small Business and Technology Development Center in the School of Business and Economics
   2. Center for Entrepreneurship in the School of Business and Economics
   3. Center for Design Innovation, an inter-institutional UNC center supported by Winston-Salem State
        University, the NC School of the Arts, and Forsyth Technical Community College
   4. Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation
   5. Motorsports Management in the School of Education and Human Performance

WSSU’S RESPONSE:

1. The Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC), an inter-institutional program with
branches across the state, provides business counseling services to over 15,000 new and existing businesses
statewide, per year, as well as city, county, and regional economic development organizations.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. Business Startup and Management Development. SBTDC serves startup businesses as well as existing
businesses and community organizations.
2. Engagement of Students. SBTDC engages over 500 undergraduate, graduate and professional students
annually in supervised opportunities to work on real world business and community projects.
3. Rural Center Venture Fund. SBTDC is involved in and supports the Rural Center’s Venture Fund.
4. Inception Micro Angel Funds. SBTDC created and manages six Inception Micro Angel Funds statewide.
Effectiveness:
     The SBTDC has a sophisticated system for data collection, tracking, monitoring and assessing the
        quality and impact of its services including:
        o A robust client tracking Management Information System
        o Client evaluation of services
       o Formal quarterly reporting by operating units
       o External accreditation
Enhancements:
    Cost effective systems for monitoring and assessing program performance are currently in place
       leading to continuous improvement in service quality and customer satisfaction.
Cost and Funding: No additional funding is requested for maintenance of existing initiatives.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:
1. The Rural Business Development Program is a newly proposed SBTDC program designed to provide a
higher and deeper level of service to rural North Carolina.
     The best hope for economic growth and prosperity in these areas is to increase the competitiveness
        and growth of existing businesses and successful new enterprise formation, in these areas especially in
        tier-one counties.
     The proposed program will add 16 counseling positions across the state to more adequately serve rural
        North Carolina with business counselors and students from host institutions.
2. The Teacher Entrepreneurship Curriculum and Individual Experience (TEC-IE) through the CFE, the Maya
Angelou Institute for the Improvement of Child and Family Education, the Early Childhood Development
Center, and the School of Education and Human Performance will provide an entrepreneurship curriculum and
training program for high-school teachers and students in rural and underserved areas in the region.
     The customized entrepreneurship curriculum will consist of classroom and web-based materials in the
        areas of agriculture, software and information technology, and new product development.
     The project will involve distance learning for continuing education, workshops, and the opportunity to
        observe, first-hand, entrepreneurship in action through site visits to businesses or participation with
        students in a business plan competition.
     TEC-IE will sponsor an annual Winston-Salem business plan competition for youth entrepreneurs and
        establish a mentor program to connect local entrepreneurs to students with an interest in starting
        small businesses.
Effectiveness:
     This will be measured by the number of new clients counseled and the number of partnerships
        developed as well as the scope of membership, level of activity, and degree of collaboration.
Enhancements:
     CFE anticipates increasing the level of activity of the club, i.e., the number of projects in which
        members are participating.
Cost and Funding:
     SBTDC Rural Business Development Program: $2,000,000 per year from General Administration to
        enhance the current inter-institutional program. WSSU supports this request.
     TEC-IE: $85,000 over five years from Enrollment Growth and targeted foundations.
     Corporate sponsors
     Membership contributions

2. The Center for Entrepreneurship (CFE) was created and designed to spearhead the efforts of programs in
entrepreneurship education, research, and outreach. The CFE provides entrepreneurial training for students
and citizens in the local area.
     The Kauffman Foundation awarded the CFE the Platinum Award for "dedication and outstanding
        support in shaping the next generation of entrepreneurs.”
     The Director of the CFE and many other faculty from different departments have began an active
        dialogue in creating new courses that “blend” individual course material (i.e., in computer science,
        music, health care, etc.) with entrepreneurial elements.
      Many business ventures and new projects are often spawned outside the boundaries of traditional
       business schools.
      Wake Forest University colleagues are invited to share with us successful programs of a similar nature.

a. EXISTING INITIATIVES:
1. The Regional Entrepreneurial Group, composed of members from the Piedmont Triad counties, was co-
founded by the Director of the CFE and is a critically needed organization for the region.
Effectiveness:
     The group’s collaborations have enabled co-applications for regional grants targeted to urban and rural
        populations. To date, two proposals have been created to seek funding from the DOL-funded WIRED
        initiative and the DataMax Foundation.
Enhancements
     Financial support is needed to extend outreach support to populations that often have no means or
        assistance in seeking help in critical stages of new business creation or refinement of existing
        operations.
Cost and Funding:
     The first three years require at least $50,000 to cover costs of operations from remote location
        (downtown Winston-Salem) as well as location-specific training and support.

2. The Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE) chapter at WSSU is geared toward community involvement and
student support of local populations.
     During Spring 2008, in collaboration with Truliant Federal credit union, student teams mentored 22
       urban entrepreneurs in need of coaching and technical detail of how to strengthen credit scores and
       prepare an appropriate and effective business plan for a new startup.
     Other members of SIFE assisted two local elementary schools in delivering economic awareness
       programs in collaboration with Junior Achievement.

b. NEW INITIATIVES:
1. The School of Business and Economics will develop and implement the Scientific Innovation and
Entrepreneurship through Discovery (SIED) project as an interdisciplinary entrepreneurial training program
for all graduate students at WSSU and will offer a certificate program to qualified students. SIED goals are to
    (1) infuse broad-based knowledge of entrepreneurship across WSSU graduate programs,
    (2) expand entrepreneurship at WSSU via collaborations among academic departments and centers on
         campus, and
    (3) deepen the partnership between WSSU’s entrepreneurship programs in Forsyth County and economic
         development initiatives in North Carolina.
2. A minor program in Entrepreneurship and a series of workshops will be developed that will address the
challenges minority entrepreneurs face in the formation of new ventures.
3. The Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Project (STEP) will be an entrepreneurship program for
students in science and technology fields, jointly offered by the WSSU Center for Entrepreneurship,
Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center, SBTDC, and the WSSU Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics (STEM) Scholars Program. STEP goals are to
    (1) involve students and faculty from across campus in entrepreneurial studies and activities,
    (2) promote entrepreneurship as a career option, and
    (3) provide opportunities for students to meet and work with practicing entrepreneurs in the community.
4. The Music Business Entrepreneurship and Technology (Music BEAT) Program will develop and implement
a web-based distance learning certificate program in Music Business Entrepreneurship for non-degree
professionals in the music industry and lead to an academic minor in Entrepreneurship for non-business
majors at WSSU.
      It will involve customized teaching modules (including educational videos) in entrepreneurship for
        industry-specific issues.
      The Entrepreneurship minor for non-business majors will significantly increase WSSU students’
        exposure to the concept of self-employment.
5. The Child-Hood Art, Research and Television (CHART) program will be developed by an interdisciplinary
research team of music education faculty and members of the Birth-Kindergarten program in the School of
Education and Human Performance who are involved in research regarding early childhood arts impact on
literacy.
      Fine Arts Department faculty with experience in film, animation, and sound production will aid in
        CHART, which could be picked up by PBS, Noggin, or another major children's television network.
      Previous work with arts-integrated literacy instruction for early childhood was very successful with
        Smart Start of Forsyth County.
      The target groups will be clearly identified, and all scripting will reflect standards-based and
        developmentally-appropriate material.
6. The SBE will offer a Summer Entrepreneurs Program (SEP), a two-week summer day-camp program for
teens (ages 15-18) of Winston-Salem and the surrounding areas incorporating education materials and hands-
on projects.
      It will be a creative “package” of events, activities, field trips, workshops, business training, instruction,
        networking opportunities, community involvement, and incentives, all designed to excite these young
        people about the expectations of small business ownership and how they can benefit by becoming
        active participants in the capitalist system.
      Within the two weeks of continuous learning experiences, students will be exposed to actual situations
        and dilemmas facing entrepreneurs.
      They will learn the consequences of choices being made and the importance of planning.
Effectiveness:
      Each initiative listed above has its own metrics for measuring success and impact. In some instances, it
        is the number of involved teachers and students; in others, it is the number of successful enterprises
        launched and the tracking of businesses through critical milestones.
Cost and Funding:
      Institute of Regional Transformation, $950,000 over five years from Enrollment Growth and grants.

3. Through the CENTER FOR DESIGN INNOVATION (CDI), WSSU, NCSA, and Forsyth Tech faculty members in
arts, architecture, animation, filmmaking, music, theater design and production, computer science, and the
life and health sciences can contribute to economic development efforts in the Piedmont Triad that aim to
grow the workforce and economic opportunities in creative enterprises and applications of digital media
technologies for the healthcare and biotechnology sectors.
      CDI stemmed from an economic development study by Angelou Economics which the Northwest
        Piedmont Council of Governments requested after severe job losses in the region as traditional
        economic bases in tobacco, textiles, and furniture manufacturing diminished.
      The study found that in the midst of this downturn, there was an economic sector that was not only
        healthy but growing. Angelou Economics recommended that a strategy for economic development
        to accelerate the growth of this creative industry sector.
      This result led to discussion among universities in Winston-Salem and Greensboro about creating
        organizations dedicated to promoting design activity. By 2005 this effort had led to several outcomes:
        o the State's General Assembly released $2,000,000 for planning and equipment for a design center,
            with $10,000,000 to create the permanent facility soon to follow;
       o    the Northwest Piedmont Council of Governments contracted a second study by Angelou
           Economics, focusing on creation of a design center with an emphasis on relevant business
           incubation;
       o   the UNC Board of Governors established the inter-institutional Center for Design Innovation as a
           partnership among Winston-Salem State University, the NC School of the Arts and Forsyth
           Technical Community College; and
       o   the Golden Leaf Foundation awarded funds to begin initial operations of CDI in an interim facility.
       o   The architectural firm has been selected and they are well into the process of designing CDI's
           permanent facility with a Building Committee that consists of administrators and faculty of the
           constituent schools.
       o   CDI's Board has been appointed, the $500,000/year recurring funds for operations are in place, and
           program development is well underway.

       Many of CDI's planned and existing programs will focus on using digital technologies to support
        understanding and growth of the biotechnology sector. CDI will make extensive use of broadband and
        Internet technologies to extend our reach, involving members of communities across the region, state,
        nation and planet. We are already working with WinstonNet and beginning discussions with MCNC.
     We are responding to initiatives from the UNC Office of Economic Development Research, Policy, and
        Planning and working with the economic development functions of NCSA and WSSU.
     CDI's model of direct partnership with industry will benefit members of WSSU, and vice versa, as
        faculty find real-world grounding for research projects and students develop relationships leading to
        internships and jobs.
     CDI’s Idea Exchanges are addressing a wide range of topics, including issues such as the digital divide,
        equitable urban design, offshore manufacturing, water conservation, and green building design.
     During the past year, this public forum has served more than 900 people and we have ongoing sessions
        planned. We are also expanding to include evening sessions and Internet distribution.
     CDI will help to turn out students ready for the workforce and spin out companies that develop from
        research and design projects.
        o We are considering creation of a shared intellectual property pool that can encourage tech
            transfer, new jobs, and new companies.
        o Through non-exclusive licensing, we can enable many participants to benefit from the knowledge
            we create, thereby increasing likelihoods of success.
        o We are also beginning plans with Wake Forest University to participate in a Nanotech Center that
            will become the basis multiple proposals to federal agencies.
Effectiveness:
     CDI’s initial programs include workshops for the larger community and of participating schools, as well
        as developing programs for the schools including cross-registration, 2/2 and 4/4 cooperation, and
        potentially an inter-institutional graduate degree. The Idea Exchange is serving as a networking forum
        as well as an educational/enrichment program, having generated a project proposal to the MacArthur
        Foundation and currently developing proposals to two directorates of the National Science Foundation.
Cost and Funding:
     We are conducting CDI programs with $500,000/year recurring operating funds from the state. This
        support is allowing us to conduct initial programs and establish foundational capabilities for writing
        grant proposals for supplemental funds.

4. The Simon Green Atkins Community Development Corporation (SGACDC) is a community-based nonprofit
organization that was established by Winston-Salem State University – the governing agency for the SGACDC –
and incorporated in 1998 to reverse neighborhood decline and help residents regain control of their
neighborhoods.
       With funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and construction financing
        from the City of Winston-Salem, the SGACDC aims to revitalize a once-thriving African-American
        neighborhood along the Martin Luther King Jr. Drive corridor.
     By planning and implementing affordable housing, economic development, and beautification and
        preservation efforts, the SGACDC is fueling revitalization, restoring pride, and re-envisioning the future.
Effectiveness:
         HUD/HBCU grant awards have helped create affordable housing opportunities for 15 families while
            increasing the tax base by over $1.5 million.
         First-time homebuyers have received $125,000 in down payment and closing cost assistance.
         New homes have sparked resident participation in neighborhood groups and an interest in
            planning future neighborhood development.
         HUD/HBCU funding has also helped create a small business loan pool that has so far provided
            $77,000 to seven businesses and created 65 jobs.
Enhancements:
     More collaboration with WSSU faculty, students, and staff is needed as resources are invested in
        improving the quality of life in the neighborhoods adjoining WSSU. The program is seeking additional
        funds to acquire vacant substandard homes and underutilized commercial properties for
        redevelopment.
Cost and Funding:
     SGACDC operations are completely grant funded. Five grant proposals have been funded by
        U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Additional funds have been awarded by the City
        of Winston-Salem and the Winston-Salem Community Development Funders Collaborative.

5. The Motorsports Management degree program was developed in response to the needs of the growing
motorsport industry primarily in North Carolina. Considering the uniqueness of this program, there is also the
potential to meet the needs of the industry both nationally and globally as well.
     The motorsports industry creates over 26,000 jobs in North Carolina alone. Hundreds of thousands of
        visitors, spending millions of dollars in local economies, come to the state each year to attend one of
        the many NASCAR-related events; hundreds of suppliers and manufacturing arms of the industry exist
        here; and dozens of race teams call North Carolina home.
     With the uniqueness of the Motorsports Management program and the economic impact of the
        industry on the state and nation, WSSU should stimulate growth in the management-related skill sets
        and future employment opportunities for students and citizens.
     Motorsports-related companies will have access to participate in WSSU research projects designed to
        enhance motorsport business. The results of this research should provide benchmark data that can be
        applied to existing motorsport industry businesses to more efficiently operate in this competitive
        environment. This should in turn increase potential profits and economic expansion of the industry
        within both rural and urban locations.
     Graduates of the program will also have the necessary skill sets to develop new business strategies to
        address specific unmet needs that may develop as the industry evolves.
     The state legislature also recognizes the importance of the motorsports industry as new incentives are
        being offered to attract these types of businesses to North Carolina.
Effectiveness:
     This will be measured by the impact of graduates in transforming and assisting the current regional
        economies and the ability of motorsports-related research to enhance and transform the industry
Enhancement:
     Motorsports Management faculty need to be included in and contribute to regional economic summits
        and legislative committees assigned to motorsports industry topics.
       It will be critical for legislative bodies to understand the impact that academic preparation in this area
       can have to the long-term success of the state with regards to keeping the motorsports economy
       healthy.
Cost and Funding:
    Minimal costs associated with this initiative can be addressed through resources at the university and
       in the industry.

				
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