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					 On The Move



Cooking
 Series



               70
                      On The Move
                    Native American Health Center
                    Nutrition and Fitness Department
                        3124 International Blvd
                           Oakland, Ca 94601

                 Director: Christina Weahunt, CDE, RD
                           510-535-4400 x135
           Coordinator/Writer: Katy Kinninger, RD
                           510-535-4400 x101

 Funded by the U.S Department of Agriculture Food Stamp Program, an
equal opportunity provider and employer, through the California Nutrition
Network for Healthy, Active Families. For information about the California
            Food Stamp Program, please call 1-800-952-5253.


   These materials may be reproduced for educational purposes. Please
                   maintain all logos on reproductions.

     For more information, contact the California Nutrition Network
      (916) 449-5400 or www.dhs.ca.gov/ps/cdic/cpns/default.htm




                                                                        71
                              On the Move


                         Table of Contents

75. Introduction
76. Preparation
    Six Weeks Before Session
    One Week Before Session
    One to Two Days Before Session
    Day of Session
    Set Up
    Publicity Flier
    Checklists
    Sign-in Sheet


87. Nature‟s Fast Food- FRUIT!
    Objectives and Schedule
    Registration, Welcome and Introductions
    Pre-test
    Questions
    Discussion/ Sharing/Food Safety
           Handout of Food Pyramid/ Why Eat Fruits and Vegetables/ Fruit &
           Vegetable Serving Sizes
    How to Follow a Recipe and Cooking Demonstration
           Summer Fruit Salad Recipe
    Taste Test
           Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables
    Evaluation
    Closing and Clean-up

100.Learn the Vegetable Tricks to Eating 5 a Day
   Objectives and Schedule
   Registration, Welcome and Introductions
   Questions
   Discussion/ Sharing/Food Safety



                                                                              72
         Handout of Food Pyramid/ Why Eat Fruits and Vegetables/ Fruit &
         Vegetable Serving Sizes
         Optional Handouts: Cooking Measurements, Measuring
         Foods/Liquids/Knife Skills
   How to Follow a Recipe and Cooking Demonstration
          Optional Handouts: Knife Skills & Safety
         Romaine Mango Jicama Salad Recipe
   Taste Test
         Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables
   Evaluation
   Closing and Clean-up

118.Learn to Make Lo-Carb Flat Bread
   Objectives and Schedule
   Registration, Welcome and Introductions
   Questions
   Discussion/ Sharing/Food Safety
           Handouts of Fiber Content and Beyond Oat Bran & Food Pyramid
           Optional Handouts: Cooking Measurements, Measuring Foods/Liquids
   How to Follow a Recipe and Cooking Demonstration
           Lo-Carb Flat Bread Recipe & Fresh Fruit Spread Recipe
   Taste Test
           Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables
   Evaluation
   Closing and Clean-up

135.Breakfast on the Run
   Objectives and Schedule
   Registration, Welcome and Introductions
   Questions
   Discussion/ Sharing/Food Safety
          Handout of Calcium Foods/Food Pyramid/Fruit & Vegetable Serving
          Sizes
          Optional Handouts: Cooking Measurements, Measuring
          Foods/Liquids/Knife Skills
   How to Follow a Recipe and Cooking Demonstration
          Fruit N Juice Smoothie & Tofu Smoothie Recipes
           Optional Handouts: Knife Skills & Safety
   Taste Test
          Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables
   Evaluation
   Closing and Clean-up

155. Eggalish Ways to Eat Your Protein


                                                                             73
   Objectives and Schedule
   Registration, Welcome and Introductions
   Post-test
   Questions
   Discussion/ Sharing/Food Safety
         Handout of Lean/Low-fat Protein Choices/Food Pyramid/Fruit &
         Vegetable Serving Sizes
         Optional Handouts: Cooking Measurements, Measuring
         Foods/Liquids/Knife Skills
   How to Follow a Recipe and Cooking Demonstration
         Veggie Egg Scramble Recipe
          Optional Handouts: Knife Skills & Safety
   Taste Test
         Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables
   Evaluation
   Closing and Clean-up

174.Handouts
   Why Eat Fruits and Vegetables
   Food Pyramid
   Fruit & Vegetable Serving Sizes
   Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables
   Cooking Measurements
   Measuring Foods & Liquids
   Knife Skills & Knife Safety
   Fiber Content and Beyond Oat Bran
   Calcium Foods
   Lean/Low-fat Protein Choices
   Recipes from Cooking Class Series (7 total)
   Cooking Class Measurement Worksheet
   Key Terms
   Cooking Class Certificate
Teacher Resources: Food Guide Pyramid Guide, Seasonal Fruit and Vegetables,
Fruit and Vegetable Tips, Fiber, Importance of Calcium and Good Fat/Bad Fat

197.Evaluation Forms
   Session Evaluation Form
   Pre and Post Survey

1. Resources




                                                                               74
                                           On The Move

                                    Introduction
Background: This curriculum is based on “Cooking Healthy!” from the San Diego
Nutrition Network. It has been adapted to suit the Native American population by
including culturally specific foods.

Purpose: To educate On The Move participants on the importance of eating fresh fruit
and vegetables and to demonstrate to participants how fast and easy it is to prepare and
make healthy meals and snacks.

Objectives:
By the end of the 5 sessions, participants will be able to:
a. Use measuring cups (liquid and dry) and spoons appropriately.
b. Modify recipes to accommodate additional servings.
c. Demonstrate appropriate knife handling and cleaning.
d. Use the Food Guide Pyramid in meal planning

Who should use this curriculum and why: The On The Move curriculum is designed to
be easy to follow, step by step. At the same time, there is room for discussion using a
question and answer format. The sessions can be used to complement other curricula and
trainings that focus on nutrition and healthy eating, or they can stand-alone. As a side
note, our clinic is an Urban clinic, which means we serve every ethnic population. I tried
specifically to adapt to Native American communities but also to incorporate recipes
related to other cultures as well. If you are a rural clinic you may want to adjust some
recipes or scenarios so they relate more specifically to your community.

Recipe Selection:
Each recipe was chosen to provide seasonal inexpensive ingredients. One of the five
recipes is Native specific- Lo Carb Flat Bread (griddle bread/fry bread).
However, you can adapt each of these recipes specifically to Native American culture.
For example:
Summer Fruit Salad: may choose concord grapes, blueberries, cranberries and/or
chokecherries.
Romaine, Jicama, Mango Salad: may include corn, beans and/or cactus.
Smoothie: milk products aren‟t traditionally a staple, many Native Americans are lactose
intolerant. Emphasize non-dairy choices of calcium. Instead of making the smoothie they
could choose to use calcium fortified orange juice to make an orange slushie.
Veggie Egg Scramble: included summer squash, corn, etc…




                                                                                           75
                       On The Move
                               Preparation
                        Six Weeks before the Session
                        One Week before the Session
                      One to Two Days before the Session
                              Day of the Session
                                   Set up

                    Six Weeks before the Session
1. Research space availability and cost. Visit the room to ensure there is enough
   space, chairs and tables for the session.
2. Reserve the room for a date and time when participants can attend. If possible,
   reserve times for the entire class series.
3. Advertise the sessions (Adapt Publicity Flier for use).
   Tell community leaders and organizations about the sessions.
   Put fliers in community sites, clinics, community centers, grocery stores and
   libraries. Advertise in community newsletters or publications.
   Tell your friends, relatives and neighbors
4. Keep a list of names and phone numbers of those who want to attend the sessions.
5. Read all trainer materials and the session outlines. Review resource list and order
   appropriate class materials posters, etc…
6. Research and choose recipes for the cooking demonstrations (recipes provided for
   this specific series of classes). Begin collecting food labels, see each recipe for
   food label suggestions.




                                                                                   76
                           On The Move
7. Complete Checklist for materials and supplies needed for the cooking
   demonstration (a list is included for each lesson, along with a general list to aid
   with overall planning).
   Below, is a list of some the things that may be helpful to have on hand and review
   in the manual prior to teaching the series.

       a. Five Cooking Class Lessons
          Trainer information
          Session outline for How to prepare fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein
          Sign-in sheet
          Name tags, markers, and pencils
          Pre- test and session evaluation forms
          Participations handouts, tip sheets and recipes

       b. Cooking Demonstration
          Groceries
          Cooking supplies (refer to general list)
          Taste test supplies-paper products, utensils
          Clean-up supplies-trash bags, paper towels




                                                                                    77
             On The Move
      One Week before the Session
1. Confirm room reservation, size and set-up.
2. If space still available in the class post additional flyers and
   advertisements.
3. Call all participants to remind them of the class or if time allows send
   a confirmation letter to participants to confirm their reservation.
4. Re-read all trainer materials and the session outline for Recipes.
5. Practice presenting the session and preparing the recipe.
6. Review the checklists for materials and supplies needed.

       a. Discussion List
          Prepare the sign-in sheet
          Make copies of evaluation forms needed
          Make colorful copies of handouts, tip sheets and recipes

       b. Cooking Demonstration List
          Read the recipe
          Complete list for groceries
          Complete list for cooking supplies, serving and clean up
          Practice making the recipes




                                                                          78
              On The Move
     One to Two Days before the Session
1.   May consider a “Welcome phone call” or “reminder call.”
2.   Shop for groceries and other supplies needed.
3.   Assemble cooking, serving and clean-up supplies.
4.   Review the outline for each session.
5.   Review recipes for cooking demonstration, if time and budget allows
     may practice making some of the recipes that are unfamiliar or have
     many steps.




                                                                       79
            On The Move
                 Day of the Session
1. Prepare fruit or ingredients needed for the recipes.
2. Prepare some of the ingredients ahead of time, peel, chop,
   grate…Reminder: don‟t prepare all of the ingredients, remember to
   leave the class the opportunity to participate and observe preparation.
3. Set up 30 minutes to 1 hour early.



                         Set Up
1. Place tables and chairs so all participants can easily see.
2. Clean tables and chairs if needed.
3. Place sign-in sheets, nametags and marking pens near the front.
4. Place pre- tests and pencils at every seat if needed.
5. Lay out the session outline, participant handouts; tip sheets, recipes
   and session evaluations.
6. Set up supplies and ingredients for the cooking demonstration in order
   of use.
7. Set up serving and clean-up supplies.




                                                                         80
                            On The Move
                          Cooking Lesson, First Day Intro
Registration
   1. Greet participants as they arrive and ask them to sign-in and make a nametag. If
       this is the first session, ask them to begin the pre- test while waiting for the class
       to begin.
Welcome and Introductions
   1. Welcome participants to the class.

   What to say: Today we are going to talk about fruits and how to prepare them. I will
   show you how to make a tasty dish and give you a recipe for preparing fruits in new
   ways.

   2. Tell them about yourself.
   3. Ask participants to introduce themselves and tell why they have come to the
      session. Try to include an ice-breaker of a favorite memory of cooking or a funny
      cooking story, for larger classes you can ask them to share their favorite fruit and/
      or vegetable, or a healthy meal they prepare at home.

Pre- Test
    1. Ask participants to complete the Pre- test (Pretest is to be used only on the first
       day of the session and then follow-up with a post-test the last day of the session.
       This pre- test doesn‟t need to be done at each session).

   What to say: This survey will help us find out if the class is useful and how we can
   work to improve it. The tests are not graded, they are anonymous. There will also be a
   short evaluation at the end of the session.
   2. Thank participants and collect the pre- tests.
   3. Place completed pre- test in the evaluation folder.




                                                                                            81
                    On The Move
                       Healthy Meals in Minutes
FREE
Lunch Time Cooking Classes, held at
Native American Health Center. 

                   Call now to Reserve your seat!

Program Outline
                   1st class-Nature’s Fast Food- FRUIT!
         2nd class-Learn the Vegetables Tricks to Eating 5 a Day!
                    3rd class-Prepare Lo-Carb Flat Bread
                        4th class-Breakfast on the Run
               5th class-Eggalish Ways to Eat Your Protein

  Held from 12-1pm in the second floor kitchen

                     For more information, call or email:
                                Katy Kinninger
                             510-535-4400 x101
                        email: katyk@nativehealth.org
                        Native American Health Center
                       3124 International Blvd.-Oakland




                                                                    82
                               On The Move
           Recipe Checklists and Cooking Demonstration Checklists


                         Summer Fruit Salad Checklist

Flip Chart, Pens, Tape
Teaching Aides: sample portion items of 1/2c of fruit or medium banana/apple and if
available find 100% juice labels.


Shopping List for Recipe - Amount listed will serve 6-8,
adjust according to class size.
3 baskets of Strawberries or Mixed berries
1 large Mango
3 Kiwis
4 oz of 100% Orange Juice

Ingredients depend on seasonal & availability- may need to adjust.



                     Romaine Mango Jicama Salad
Flip Chart, Pens, Tape
Teaching Aides: 1c of vegetables (raw) or ½ c of cooked vegetables and a carrot bag
label.

Shopping List for Recipe Amounts listed will serve 6-8, adjust according
to class size.
1 head of Romaine Lettuce
1 Red Onion
1 large Mango
1 Jicama
1 Avocado


                                                                                       83
Salad Dressing:
Cider Vinegar or Lime Juice (1- 12 oz container of cider vinegar or 2-3 limes to serve 6
or more)
Garlic (1 bulb or 1- 8oz jar of minced garlic to serve 6 or more)
1 bunch of Cilantro
1- 12 oz jar of Honey
1- 26 oz container of Salt
1- 1 pint bottle of Olive Oil


                              Lo-Carb Flat Bread
Flip Chart, Pens, Tape
Teaching Aids: sample label items of 1 slice of whole wheat bread, ¾ cup of dry cereal
and bring food labels of whole wheat bread bags, whole-wheat cracker box and whole
grain cereal box.

Shopping List for Recipe- Amounts listed will serve 6-8, adjust
according to class size.
1- 5 lb. bag of Whole Wheat Flour
1- 5 lb. bag of White Flour
1- 7oz. container of Baking Powder
1- 26 oz. of Salt (may use from last recipe or 1 container serves 8 or more)
1- 5 lb. of Sugar or 1-3 packets of Splenda (1 bag or box that can be used for both bread
& fruit spread)
1-9.6 oz box of Non-fat Dry milk
1- 1 pint of Olive Oil (may use from last recipe or 1 bottle serves 8 or more)
3 baskets or cups of Fresh Fruit

Ingredients depend on seasonal and availability- may need to adjust.


            Fruit N Juice Smoothie and Tofu Smoothie
Flip chart, tape, pens
Teaching Aids: bring in variety of milk cartoons- 1%, 2%, non-fat, whole milk, soy
milk or tofu labels.




                                                                                        84
Shopping List for Recipe- Amounts listed will serve 6-8, adjust
according to class size.
1- 10.5 oz package of Soft Silken Tofu
2- 2 lb. packages of Frozen Strawberries
3 Bananas
1- 64 fluid oz. carton Unsweetened 100%Orange or 100%Apple Juice
1- 8 oz of Low-fat Vanilla Yogurt

Ingredients depend on seasonal and availability- may need to adjust.


                            Veggie Egg Scramble
Flip Chart, Tape, Pens
Teaching Aids: use sample labels from container of egg beaters and from Swiss cheese
package

Shopping List for Recipe- Amounts listed will serve 6-8, adjust
according to class size.
1- 1 pint of Olive Oil (may use same container from last recipes)
6 Eggs
1-pint carton of Egg Beaters
1- 8oz container of Garlic (can use left over from previous recipes)
1 pint of Non-fat milk
1- 6 oz. block of Swiss cheese
1 bunch of Green Onions
2 Tomatoes
2 Summer Squash or Zucchini

Ingredients depend on seasonal and availability- may need to adjust.
Cooking Demonstration Checklist
      Apron                                      
      Cutting Board, one or more                    Potholder
      Bowls, large and small                        Blender
      Cooking knives                                Extension cord
      Cooking spoons                                Can Opener
      Spatula                                       Strainer
      Measuring cups, spoons                        Paper products: napkins, plates,
      Frying pan, pots, lids                         bowls, cups, paper towels, plastic
                                                      spoons and forks
                                                     Trash bags

Other _______________________________________________________


                                                                                           85
                             On The Move
                Native American Health Center
                  Nutrition and Fitness Department
                  Healthy Nations Wellness Center

            OTM Cooking Class Sign-in Sheet
                                                      Number of youths____
                                                      Number of adults____
Class Title___________________________________________________________
Staff________________________________________________________________



Name__________________________Phone/Address__________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________



                                                                       86
   On The Move



Session One
  Natures
 Fast Food
  FRUIT!
                 87
                        On The Move
                        Nature‟s Fast Food- FRUIT!
Objectives:
       At the end of the session, participants will be able to:
               1. Name 2 benefits of eating fruits.
               2. State the number of serving fruits and vegetables needed daily.
               3. Follow a recipe.

Schedule:

       Time (minutes)        Activity
       Pre-class             Registration
       10                    Welcome and Introductions
       10                    Pre- test
       10                    Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety
       15                    Cooking Demonstration
       10                    Taste Test & Closing
       5                     Review & Questions
       60 minutes




                                                                                    88
                            On The Move
Fruit: Nature’s Fast Food!

   Welcome, Introductions and Pretest
During this part of the session welcome the participants to the class and introduce
yourself. Then engage the students in the lesson by asking questions. The purpose of this
segment of the session is to teach about the benefits of eating fruit and the servings and
serving size needed to obtain these benefits. Before staring the discussion, conduct the
pretest , refer to the evaluations section of the back of the binder to find a copy. You need
to create an identifier that will help match the pre and post tests. For example: use
month/date of DOB and first three letters of their street address- 0719ARC.

Begin this class with this sample narrative:

Question 1: What are the benefits of eating fruits?

What to say: Fruits are nature‟s original fast foods. They are full of nutrients and other
good things that help us in many ways. Let‟s talk about some of these.

*Handout-Why eat fruit and vegetables

Question 2: How many fruits do we need to eat?

What to say: It‟s good to eat 2-4 servings of fruits and 3-5 servings of vegetables every
day. That means 5-9 servings a day of both! But a serving of fruits or vegetables may be
smaller than you think! That‟s why it‟s easy to eat one more serving of fruits or
vegetables at every meal. Let‟s talk about serving sizes.

*Handout- What is a serving size?(hold up measuring cups, food samples or food
models to aid with visual understanding) also refer to the Food Guide Pyramid and
discuss serving sizes-for e.g.: a tennis ball=1 cup of fruit (show serving size poster).

What to say: Healthy eating is all about eating a wide variety of healthful foods. A good
way to eat is to make plant foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and nuts-the
main part of your everyday eating; and to include lots of colorful fruits in your meals and
snacks.




                                                                                             89
                            On The Move
Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety

Recipe Procedures

This section will show the students how to follow a recipe, they will learn
how to read the directions and understand the serving sizes, which can all be
helpful in making a meal work!
What to say: Today I am giving you recipes to help you prepare and enjoy fruits.
This recipe will give you one or more servings from the fruit group.
       -Give participants the recipes or ask them to take out their copies to follow.

         Tip: To get participants involved in class lesson, ask a volunteer if they are
         familiar or unfamiliar with the ingredients and have a discussion if time
         allows. Ask them to find ingredients that contribute to their 5-a-day goal.


Question 3: How do we follow a recipe?

What to say: Follow a recipe in three steps.

   1. The first step is to read the entire recipe to become familiar with the ingredients
       and amounts needed, cooking utensils, and preparation steps.
   -Look at the different parts of the recipe: recipe name, list of ingredients, directions,
   cooking suggestions, and number of servings. Look at the nutrition information, if
   given.
   -Read the list of Ingredients. Make sure you have all the ingredients before starting
   the recipe.
   -Read the Directions, step by step.
   -Look at the Number of Servings the recipe makes.
       *If more servings are needed, double the amounts of the ingredients. Refer to
       worksheet if time allows to review skills of doubling.
       *If fewer servings are needed, use half of all the ingredients or plan to use
       leftovers.
   -Allow enough time to prepare and cook the recipe and for clean-up.




                                                                                           90
                            On The Move
   2. The second step is to prepare all the ingredients needed for the recipe.
      -Wash hands with soap and hot water before beginning to prepare any food and
      after handling raw meats while cooking. Dry hands with paper towels, dish cloths
      can carry germs.
      -Use a separate cutting board for raw meat. Color coding the cutting boards
      maybe helpful.
      -Remember to always rinse and wash fruit and vegetables.
      -Get out all the equipment and cooking utensils needed to make the recipe.
      Double check the equipment list to make sure you have everything you need.
      -Measure all ingredients carefully.
              Refer to handout-cooking measurements

             Instructor Tips for Preparing the Ingredients:
             -Don‟t pre-wash the berries, they spoil faster. Wash right before
             use.
             -May need to prepare chopped items ahead of time if class time is
             short.

*Discuss briefly the handouts of measuring foods with liquid and dry measuring cups and
spoons and review knife skills and pictures. Ask participants specific questions to help
them be able to answer the post-test questions. Specifically for this lesson, knives will be
used. Review/Read the knife skills handout and then have them recite safety tips on using
knives.

   3. The third step is to make the recipe.
      -Follow the directions in the order listed. Don‟t rush, that‟s when mistakes
      happen.
      - Before serving-taste the recipe, use a clean spoon and do not reuse after tasting.
      -Adjust seasonings to your taste. Watch the salt!
      -Serve. May have the option to garnish.
      -Cooking suggestions offer other ways to make or serve the recipe.




                                                                                         91
                             On The Move
         Instructor Tips for Making the Recipe:
         -Have each participant choose an item to prepare after seeing the
         demonstration. This speeds up the class if time is running short.
         -Have one participant read recipe for the class or for each group as the
         recipe is being prepared. This will provide class participation, and a
         means for each group to self-check their preparation.




                           Cooking Demonstration
Before the class prepares the recipe, the instructor demonstrates the steps in the recipe
preparation. While presenting, highlight critical methods, procedures and nutrition
information to reinforce the previous class discussion, as well as food and kitchen safety.

Sample Narrative:

“First, I always wash my hands before preparing any food.”
         -Wash and dry hands, then continue.

“Now I‟m going to show you how to make Summer Fruit Salad .”

“The ingredients for this recipe are” refer to recipe. “Depending on what season it is, you
may need to adjust recipe ingredients for availability and to help keep the cost down”.

       -Show the participants each ingredient as you name it, you might discuss what
       vitamins or minerals are specific to the Summer Fruit Salad Recipe, for example-
       Vitamin C (orange juice and strawberries), Vitamin A(mango) and Fiber (all
       fruits-kiwi, mango, berries).

Here are the steps to follow:
       -Prepare the recipe, following the directions in order.
       1. The first step in making Summer Fruit Salad is… refer to recipe handout.
       2. The second step is…
       3. The third step is…




                                                                                         92
USDA Food Pyramid




                    93
                On The Move
            Why Eat Fruits and Vegetables?


                        Taste Good
        High in Vitamins: like A, C and Folic Acid
High in minerals: like Calcium, Potassium and Magnesium
                       High in fiber
                  Help lower cholesterol
                 Help keep you regular
         Give you a variety of colors and flavors
    Rich in phytonutrients, protectors against disease
 Lower risk of cancer, heart disease, blood pressure and
                           stroke
                   Help control diabetes
                  Low in fat and calories
                    Help control weight
                      Easy to prepare




                                                      94
                  On the Move
                 What is a 5 A Day Serving?
Here are some guidelines for fruits and vegetables.


     1 medium-sized piece of fruit (e.g.        1 cup raw, leafy greens (e.g.
       banana, apple, orange, pear)               lettuce, spinach) or salad




    1/2 cup cut-up fresh fruit or canned
                                                 1/2 cup cooked vegetables
       fruit, canned in its own juices




                                               3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100%
  3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100% fruit juice
                                                      vegetable juice




   1/4 cup dried fruit (e.g. raisins, dried   1/2 cup cooked or canned beans,
             apricots, prunes)                         peas or lentils




                                                                           95
                                     On The Move

                              Summer Fruit Salad
Ingredients:

2 cups fresh berries (strawberries or mixed berries)
1 mango peeled, pitted
1 kiwi, peeled and sliced
2 tablespoons 100% orange juice

Directions:

1. Mix the fruit in a bowl.
2. Sprinkle with the orange juice.
3. Chill.
4. Serve.

Makes 4, approximately 1 cup servings.

Serving Suggestions:

Serve for breakfast with non-fat yogurt or an 8 oz glass of non-fat milk, or as a side dish
with lunch or dinner. Add low-fat/sugar-free whipped topping for a delicious summer
dessert.

Nutrition facts per serving (each serving=1 serving of fruit):
66 Calories, 0 gm Fat, 0 mg Cholesterol, 1 mg of Sodium, 16 gm Carbohydrate,
2gm Fiber, 1 gm Protein




                                                                                          96
                            On The Move
While doing the cooking demonstration:

       -Show how to use knives safely-refer to handouts. Review washing knives
       immediately and storing properly.
       -Give cooking tips or tell why some ingredients in the recipe make it healthier; for
       example, avoid adding sugar or honey and use 100% juice (avoid juice drinks like
       juicy juice or kool aid, etc...)
       -Food Safety: Serve meal immediately or divide into small containers and chill
       immediately. Will keep 3-4 days in refrigerator.




                                      Taste Test
What to say: Now let‟s try the finished dish. Please tell me how you like the recipe(s). Do
you think you will try this at home?
   -Ask participants‟ opinion of recipe and use at home. Encourage participants to rate
   the taste test with a number of satisfaction, for example:1= good through 4=bad. This
   can allow each participant to give their own opinion about different taste perceptions.
       -Put on food handler‟s gloves and serve a portion of the recipe to each participant.
       -Ask others who help serve to put on food handlers gloves.


         -Hint: If you have children at home, it will take thirteen tastes before
         children establish a preference, continue to offer children the
         opportunity to try new foods.



Question 4: Why is it good to know how to prepare fruits?

What to say: If we know how to prepare fruits, we are more likely to eat them. As we
learned today, we get many benefits from eating fruits. We get a variety of flavors,
nutrients and colors; we also get better health for families and ourselves.

*Handout: Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables.



                                                                                        97
        Fruitvale on the Move
                  Easy Ways to Get Your 5 A Day
Eating 5 (to 9) servings of fruits and vegetables a day is easy. Here is a plan to
help you –

      At every meal and snack eat at least one serving of a fruit or vegetable.

      Every day eat at least one vitamin A rich fruit or vegetable, such as cantaloupe,
       carrots, sweet potato, spinach or broccoli.

      Every day eat at least one vitamin C rich fruit or vegetable, such as orange juice,
       grapefruit, fresh pineapple, green pepper or cauliflower.

      Every day eat at least one high fiber fruit or vegetable, such as apples, grapefruit, or
       broccoli.

      Several times each week eat vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts or
       cabbage.




                                                                                              98
                            On The Move
                          Session Evaluation Form
The evaluation provides the instructor immediate suggestions for changing or improving
future classes.
        1. Distribute the Session Evaluation Forms.
        2. Give class directions for completing the forms.
        3. Collect completed evaluations and place in a folder.

Sample narrative:

   1. Ask participants to complete the session evaluation form.
   What to say: These questions will help us to make this session better, no need to put
   your name on it. Thank you for answering them.
   2. Place completed evaluations in folder.


                                        Closing
   1. Tell participants that you hope that they will enjoy preparing and eating fruits in
      new ways to benefit themselves and their families.
   2. Thank participants for attending the session and for their helpful comments.
   3. If this is the first session, tell participants about the next session, time and place
      and give them a flyer. Ask for sign-ups for the next class.

        “ At Home” Idea: Ask them to try this recipe at home before the next session or
        try a new fruit and vegetable. Also, if the participants are open with discussion
        ask them to reflect on a new skill they learned this session and make sure to
        follow up next session to hear their feedback.

                                          Clean up
   1.   Wash dishes and collect trash and place it in the trash can.
   2.   Pack up supplies.
   3.   Clean tables.
   4.   Return tables and chairs to the place where you found them.
   5.   Check to see that everything is packed and cleaned up.




                                                                                            99
On The Move




              100
  Session
   Two

   Learn the
Vegetable Tricks
   to Eating
    5 a Day


                   101
                        On The Move
                      Learn the Vegetable Tricks to Eating 5 a Day!

Objectives:
       At the end of the session, participants will be able to
               4. Name 2 benefits of eating vegetables.
               5. State the number of servings needed daily.
               6. Follow a recipe.


Schedule:

       Time (minutes)         Activity
       Pre-class              Registration
       11                     Welcome and Introductions
       20                     Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety
       15                     Cooking Demonstration
       11                     Taste Test & Closing
       5                      Review & Questions
       60 minutes

       Post-class             Clean-up




                                                                      102
                            On The Move
Learn the Vegetable Tricks to Eating 5 a Day
Introduction:
Ask if anyone has any questions or comments from the last class. Can they share if they
made the recipe at home? If they didn‟t use it, try to get feedback why not.

Last week we discussed the healthy ways to eat fruits. Today will learn the benefits of
eating vegetables and how many servings are required to keep a healthy diet.

Question 1 : What are the benefits of eating vegetables?

What to say: Vegetables are full of nutrients and other good things that help us in many
ways. Let‟s talk about some of these.
*Handout- Why eat fruits and vegetables


Question 2 : How many vegetables do we need to eat?

What to say: It‟s good to eat 3-5 servings of vegetables every day; and 2-4 servings of
fruit. That means 5-9 servings a day of both. But a serving of fruits or vegetables may be
smaller than you think! That‟s why it‟s easy to eat one more serving of fruits or
vegetables everyday. Let‟s talk about serving sizes.

**If this is the same class of participants, ask if they have noticed their serving sizes and
if they think they maybe eating more than 1 serving at a time.

 *Handout-What is a serving size? (hold up measuring cups, food samples or labels, and
food models to aid with visual understanding) & Review Food Guide Pyramid.


What to say: Healthy eating is all about eating a wide variety of healthful foods. A good
way to eat is to make plant foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and nuts-the
main part of your everyday eating; and to include lots of colorful vegetables in your
meals and snacks.


                                                                                          103
                        On The Move
   Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety
Recipe Procedures
What to say: Today I am giving you recipes to help you prepare and enjoy vegetables.
This recipe will give you one or more serving from the vegetable group.

         Instructor Tip: Ask participants if they had a chance to try the previous
         recipe at home and if they have thoughts about trying a new skill at home.
         This may get the group to open up for more discussion and response!


-Give participants the recipes or ask them to take out their copies to follow.

Question 3: How do we follow a recipe?

   If this the same class of participants, ask them to share the steps in reading the recipe
   and discuss or explain any steps they missed.

What to say: Follow a recipe in three steps.

   4. The first step is to read the recipe, to become familiar with the ingredients and
       amounts needed, cooking utensils and preparation steps.
   -Look at the different parts of the recipe: recipe name, list of ingredients, directions,
   cooking suggestions, and number of servings. Look at the nutrition information, if
   given.
   -Read the list of Ingredients. Make sure you have all the ingredients before starting
   the recipe.
   -Read the Directions, step by step.
   -Look at the Number of Servings the recipe makes.
       *If more servings are needed, double the amounts of the ingredients. Review
       worksheet on doubling if time allows.
       *If fewer servings are needed, use half of all the ingredients or plan to use
       leftovers.
   -Allow enough time to prepare and cook the recipe and for clean-up.




                                                                                          104
                         On The Move
   5. The second step is to prepare all ingredients needed for the recipe.
   -Wash hands with soap and hot water before beginning to prepare any food and after
   handling raw meats while cooking. Remember use paper towels to dry hands, dish
   cloths carry germs.
       -Use a separate cutting board for cutting vegetables and raw meats-color coding
       the cutting boards maybe helpful.
       -Remember to always rinse and wash fruit and vegetables.
       -Get out all the equipment and cooking utensils needed to make the recipe.
       Double check the equipment list to make sure you have everything you need.
       -Measure all ingredients carefully.
               Refer to handout-cooking measurements

*Discuss briefly the handouts of measuring foods with liquid and dry measuring cups and
spoons and review knife skills and pictures. When reviewing these handouts again, ask
participants specific questions to help them be able to answer the post-test questions.
Specifically for this lesson, knives and measuring will be used. The previous lesson
focused on knife skills- do a quick review and then focus more on the measurement
pages. Specifically, ask them the differences in measuring spoons.

          Instructor Tip: May need to prepare chopped items ahead of time if class
          time is short. Get group involved to prepare and gather items, this can
          help with timeline.


   6. The third step is to make the recipe.
      -Follow the directions in the order listed. Don‟t rush, that‟s when mistakes
      happen.
      -Before serving-taste the recipe, use a clean spoon and do not reuse after tasting.
      Adjust seasonings to your taste. Watch the salt!
      -Serve. May have the option to garnish.
      -Cooking suggestions offer other ways to make or serve the recipe.

        Instructor Tip: Some ingredients may be similar from the last recipe,
        allow each participant to try preparing different ingredients if possible.
        Have one participant read recipe as you go, this can engage the class.




                                                                                      105
USDA Food Pyramid




                    106
                On The Move
            Why Eat Fruits and Vegetables?


                        Taste Good
        High in Vitamins: like A, C and Folic Acid
High in minerals: like Calcium, Potassium and Magnesium
                       High in fiber
                  Help lower cholesterol
                 Help keep you regular
         Give you a variety of colors and flavors
    Rich in phytonutrients, protectors against disease
 Lower risk of cancer, heart disease, blood pressure and
                           stroke
                   Help control diabetes
                  Low in fat and calories
                    Help control weight
                      Easy to prepare




                                                      107
                 On The Move
                 What is a 5 A Day Serving?
Here are some guidelines for fruits and vegetables.


     1 medium-sized piece of fruit (e.g.        1 cup raw, leafy greens (e.g.
       banana, apple, orange, pear)               lettuce, spinach) or salad




    1/2 cup cut-up fresh fruit or canned
                                                 1/2 cup cooked vegetables
       fruit, canned in its own juices




                                               3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100%
  3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100% fruit juice
                                                      vegetable juice




   1/4 cup dried fruit (e.g. raisins, dried   1/2 cup cooked or canned beans,
             apricots, prunes)                         peas or lentils




                                                                          108
                                         On The Move
Measure Equivalents
1 tablespoon        3 teaspoons (tsp)
(tbsp) =
1/16 cup (c) =      1 tablespoon
1/8 cup =           2 tablespoons
1/6 cup =           2 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
1/4 cup =           4 tablespoons
1/3 cup =           5 tablespoons + 1
                    teaspoon
1/2 cup =           8 tablespoons
2/3 cup =           10 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
3/4 cup =           12 tablespoons

1 cup =             48 teaspoons
1 cup=              16 tablespoons
8 fluid ounces      1 cup
(fl oz) =
1 pint (pt) =       2 cups

1 quart (qt) =      2 pints
4 cups =            1 quart
1 gallon (gal)      4 quarts
=
16 ounces           1 pound (lb)
(oz) =
1 milliliter (ml)   1 cubic centimeter
=                   (cc)
1 inch (in) =       2.54 centimeters
                    (cm)




                                                       109
                              On The Move
                               Measuring food

Dry measuring cups




Liquid measuring cups




Measuring spoons




¼ tsp, ½ tsp, 1 tsp, 1 tbsp




                                                110
                           On The Move

                             Measuring Dry Foods

-Measure dry foods in cups, use cups marked with amounts.
-Use cups that you can level off across the top ledge.




-Spoon dry foods into measuring cup.
-Use the flat side of a knife or spatula to level off top of measure.
-Use a dry measuring cup to measure flour, sugar, cornmeal, etc…




                                                                        111
                           On The Move
                                    Measuring Liquids


Measure liquids in cups or glass jars that you can see through.




Use a liquid measuring cup to measure water, salad oil, fluid milk, juices and syrup.


Measure the correct amount. Hold measure at eye level to check amount.




                                                                                        112
                      On The Move
                                   Knife Skills

   1. Make sure knives are not left at the edge of the counter to avoid
      accidents.
   2. Cut carefully on a cutting board, moving your fingers as you cut (
      remember to curl your fingers to avoid injury).
   3. If the knife drops, let it fall and then pick it up and wash it before
      continuing. Never try to catch a falling knife.
   Source: Mission Latino Families Partnership, San Francisco City and County Public
   Health Department.

                                 Knife Safety
1. Use the correct size and type of knife for the job.
2. Hold the knife firmly in your hand and cut away from your body.
3. Make sure knives placed on flat surfaces are never covered with towels,
napkins, or other materials.
4. Reach deliberately for the handle. Do not grab blindly for a knife;
5. When handling a knife to another person, point the handle toward him or
her.
6. Wash knives immediately, don‟t put knife into the sink,

Source: Cooking a World of New Tastes-USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, 98‟




                                                                                  113
                       On The Move
                                       Uses of Knives




Paring Knife-small knife used for trimming and shaping vegetables.




Scalloped Knife-used to slice bread.




Chef Knife-an all purpose knife used for most cutting and dicing.




                                                                     114
                        On The Move
                                  Cooking Demonstration

Before the class prepares the recipe, the instructor demonstrates the steps in the recipe
preparation. While presenting highlight critical methods, procedures and nutrition
information to reinforce the previous class discussion, as well as food and kitchen safety.

Sample narrative:

“First, I always wash my hands before preparing any food”.
         -Wash and dry hands, then continue.

“Now I‟m going to show you how to make Romaine Jicama Mango Salad.”

“The ingredients for this recipe are” refer to recipe. “Depending on what season it is, you
may need to adjust recipe ingredients for availability and to help keep the cost down”.

       Show the participants each ingredient as you name it, you might discuss what
vitamins or minerals are specific to the Romaine Jicama Mango Salad Recipe, for
example- Vitamin C (mango), Vitamin A (mango) and Fiber (romaine, jicama, mango).


Here are the steps to follow:
       Prepare the recipe, following the directions in order.
       4. The first step in making The Romaine Jicama Mango Salad is…refer to recipe
           handout.
       5. The second step is….
       6. The third step is…..

While doing the cooking demonstration:

       1. Show how to use knives safely, refer Knife Skills and Safety handouts. Review
       washing knives immediately and storing properly.
       2. Give cooking tips or tell why some ingredients in the recipe make it healthier;
       for example, olive oil, reduced salt products and instead of honey, sugar
       substitutes can be used.
   3. Food Safety: Serve meal immediately or divide into small containers and chill
   immediately. Will keep 3-4 days in refrigerator.




                                                                                        115
                             On The Move
                  Romaine Salad with Mango and Jicama
Ingredients:
1   head romaine lettuce (or mixed greens), washed and torn into bite size pieces
½   red onion, finely sliced
1   firm mango, peeled and cut into ¾” cubes
½   medium jicama, cut into ¼” x 2 strips
1   avocado peeled and sliced

For Salad Dressing:
1½ tablespoons cider vinegar or 2 tablespoons lime juice
½ clove of garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup cilantro, chopped
1 teaspoon honey
¼ teaspoon salt
pepper to taste
¼ cup olive oil

Directions:
     1. In a large bowl, place romaine, onion, mango and jicama. Set aside.
     2. To make the dressing, blend lime juice, garlic, cilantro, honey, salt and pepper in a medium bowl.
     3. Add olive oil slowly to the lime juice mixture, blending well. Taste.
     4. Toss salad lightly with the dressing and adjust seasoning.
     5. Garnish with avocado slices.
     Makes 6, (1 cup servings).

Cooking Suggestions-“In a Hurry?”: Make the dressing ahead of time or use a slightly modified version
using ¼ cup prepared light vinaigrette dressing and add 1-2 tablespoons lime juice, 1-teaspoon honey and
¼ cup chopped cilantro. To make a meal add grilled chicken slices.

Nutrition Facts per Serving (each serving provides=1cup of leafy greens=1 serving of vegetable):
188 Calories, 14 gm Fat, 0 mg Cholesterol, 113 mg Sodium, 17 gm Carbohydrate, 6 gm Fiber, 2 gm Protein




                                                                                                      116
                        On The Move
Taste Test
What to say: Now let‟s try the finished dish. Please tell me how you like the taste(s). Do
you think you will try this recipe(s) at home?

   - Ask participant‟s opinion of recipe and use at home. Encourage participants to rate
   the taste test with a number of satisfaction, for example:1= good through 4=bad. This
   can allow each participant to give their own opinion about different taste perceptions.
       -Put on food handler‟s gloves and serve a portion of the recipe to each participant.
       -Ask others who help serve to put on food handlers gloves.

Question 4: Why is it good to know how to prepare vegetables?

What to say: If we know how to prepare vegetables, we are more likely to eat them. As
we learned today, we get many benefits from eating vegetables. We get a variety of
flavors, nutrients and colors; we also get better health for families and ourselves in
reducing risk of cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure.

       * Handout: Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables and Knife Safety.

Session Evaluation Form
The evaluation provides the instructor immediate suggestions for changing or improving
future classes.
        4. Distribute the Session Evaluation Forms.
        5. Give class directions for completing the forms.
        6. Collect completed evaluations and place in a folder.

Sample Narrative:

   3. Ask participants to complete the session evaluation form.
   What to say: These questions will help us to make this session better, no need to put
   your name on it. Thank you for answering them.
   4. Place completed evaluations in folder.




                                                                                        117
                 On The Move
Closing
  4. Tell participants that you hope that they will enjoy preparing and eating
     vegetables in new ways to benefit themselves and their families.
  5. Thank participants for attending the session and for their helpful comments.
  6. If this is the first session, tell participants about the next session, time and place.
     May give them a flyer and ask for sign-ups for the next class.

   “At Home” Idea: Ask them to try this recipe at home before the next session or try
  a new fruit and vegetable. Also, if the participants are open with discussion ask them
  to reflect on a new skill they learned this session and make sure to follow up next
  session to hear their feedback.



                                       Clean up
  6. Wash dishes, collect trash and place it in the trash can.
  7. Pack up supplies.
  8. Clean tables.
  9. Return tables and chairs to the place where you found them.
  10. Check to see that everything is packed and cleaned up.




                                                                                          118
  On The Move



 Session
  Three
Learn to
Make Lo-
                119
            Carb Flat
             Bread
                           On The Move
                  How to Prepare Lo-Carb Flat Bread
Objectives:
       At the end of the session, participants will be able to
               7. Name 2 benefits of whole grains.
               8. State the number of servings needed daily.
               9. Follow a recipe.

Schedule:

       Time (minutes)         Activity
       Pre-class              Registration
       11                     Welcome and Introductions
       20                     Discussion
       16                     Cooking Demonstration
       12                     Taste Test & Closing
       5                      Review & Questions
       60 minutes




                                                                 120
       Post-class            Clean-up




                       On The Move
                    Learn to Make Lo-Carb Flat Bread
Introduction:
Ask if anyone has any questions or comments from the last class. Can they share if they
made the recipe at home? If they didn‟t use it, try to get feedback why not.

Last week we discussed the healthy ways to eat vegetables. Today will learn the benefits
of eating whole grains and how many servings are required to keep a healthy diet.

Question 1: What are the benefits of eating whole grains?

What to say: Whole grains are your health link to preventing heart disease because whole
grains have fiber which can help lower cholesterol and keep you feeling full.
Why are whole grains better for you then other grains? Let‟s talk about why they are
better than other forms and what the difference is between whole grains and refined
grains.




                                                                                     121
*Handout- Fiber Content and Beyond Oat Bran.


Question 2: How many whole grains do we need to eat?

What to say: It is good to choose 6-11 servings of grains a day. Check the food label to
make sure it says “whole grains.” Try to make at least half of your grain choices from
whole grain products.

   What are some examples of servings of whole grains? (Show examples of products,
   food labels/models and/or measuring cups to aid with visual understanding- e.g. ½ c
   oatmeal, 1 slice of bread…). Focus on how to tell if a product is whole grain or not,
   describe some ingredients and allow them to read the labels to help identify “whole
   grains.”


What to say: Today I am giving you a recipe to help you prepare and enjoy whole grains.
The recipe gives you one or more servings of whole grains and is easy, tasty and
economical.




                        On The Move
Discussion/ Sharing/ Food Safety
Recipe Procedures
What to say: Today I am giving you a recipe to help you prepare and enjoy whole grains.
This recipe will give you one or more servings from the grains food group.

     ***Ask participants if they had a chance to try the previous recipe at home and
     if they have thoughts about trying a new skill at home. This may get the group to
     open up for more discussion and response!



Give participants the recipes or ask them to take out their copies to follow.

Question 3: How do we follow a recipe?

What to say: Follow a recipe in three steps.




                                                                                         122
   7. The first step is to read the recipe, to become familiar with the ingredients and
       amounts needed, cooking utensils and preparation steps.
   -Look at the different parts of the recipe: recipe name, list of ingredients, directions,
   cooking suggestions, and number of servings. Look at the nutrition information, if
   given.
   -Read the list of Ingredients. Make sure you have all the ingredients before starting
   the recipe.
   -Read the Directions, step by step.
   -Look at the Number of Servings the recipe makes.

        *If more servings are needed, double the amounts of the ingredients. Refer to
        worksheet if time allows to review skills of doubling.

        *If fewer servings are needed, use half of all the ingredients or plan to use
        leftovers.

-Allow enough time to prepare and cook the recipe and for clean-up.

*Ask participants if they see anything new with the recipe.




                                          On The Move
   8. The second step is to prepare all the ingredients needed for the recipe.
   -Wash hands with soap and hot water before beginning to prepare any food and after handling raw meats while cooking.
   Remember use paper towels to dry hands, dish cloths carry germs.

        -Use a separate cutting board for cutting vegetables and raw meats-color coding
        the cutting boards maybe helpful.
        -Get out all the equipment and cooking utensils needed to make the recipe.
        Double check the equipment list to make sure you have everything you need.
        -Measure all ingredients carefully.
                Refer to handout-cooking measurements

*Discuss briefly the handouts of measuring foods with liquid and dry measuring cups and
spoons and review knife skills and pictures. When reviewing these handouts again, ask
participants specific questions to help them be able to answer the post-test questions.
Specifically for this lesson, measuring will be used. The previous lesson focused on knife
skills and measuring- do a quick review and then focus more on the measurement pages.
Specifically, ask them the differences in dry measuring cups verses liquid measuring
cups.


                                                                                                                          123
            -Get group involved to prepare and gather items, this can help with
            timeline. Can allow participants to try already prepared fruit spread.

    9. The third step is to make the recipe.
       -Follow the directions in the order listed. Don‟t rush, that‟s when mistakes
       happen.
       -Before serving-taste the recipe, use a clean spoon and do not reuse after tasting.
       -Adjust seasonings to your taste. Watch the salt!
       -Serve. May have the option to garnish.
       -Cooking suggestions offer other ways to make or serve the recipe.


            Instructor Tip: This recipe is specific to the Native American
            community, try to get the group to offer their recipes for Fry Bread
            and discuss the different ingredients and how to prepare each meal
            healthfully.




                          On The Move

                                 Teacher Resource on Fiber


WHAT IS DIETARY FIBER?
Fiber is a substance found in foods that come from plants. Dietary fiber is found only in plant
foods. Good sources of dietary fiber include whole grains, vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds.
Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, fats, oils and sugar contain no dietary fiber.

WHY SHOULD WE INCLUDE DIETARY FIBER IN OUR DIETS?
Consuming high fiber foods may help prevent and treat constipation. In addition, researchers
have shown that dietary fiber can play an important role in the prevention or treatment of various
diseases and disorders. These include obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, colon cancer,
diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as constipation.


WHAT ARE SOME SOURCES OF SOLUBLE AND INSOLUBLE FIBERS?
Ideally, we should incorporate both soluble and insoluble fibers in our diets. Good
sources of soluble fiber include oats, barley, legumes (dried beans and peas) and some
vegetables and fruits. Good sources of insoluble fiber include whole grain products
(breads, cereals, rice, pasta), nuts, seeds and some vegetables.

HOW MUCH DIETARY FIBER SHOULD WE CONSUME EACH DAY?
Experts are now recommending a dietary fiber intake in the range of 20 - 35 grams/day
for the healthy adult. The average American consumes between 10 - 20 grams/day - well



                                                                                                  124
below the current recommendations. By eating 5-9 servings of fruit and vegetables a day
and 3-5 servings of whole grains we can easily adhere to the recommendations.




                          On        The               Move

                         Fiber Content in Common Foods
       Grain Products                        Amount         Dietary Fiber       Calories
                                                                 (g)


       Bran Muffins                          1 muffin         0.0 - 4.0           ~104


       Bread, Whole Wheat                     1 slice            1.6               61


       Rice, Brown (cooked)                   1 cup              3.3              216


       Spaghetti, Whole Wheat                 1 cup              4.5              174


       Tortilla (Corn)                          1                1.0               67


       Bran Chex™                              2/3               6.1               90


       Corn Flakes                              1                1.0              100


       Oatmeal                                 3/4               1.6              108




                                                                                           125
Black Beans (cooked)      1       7.2   227


Pinto Beans (cooked)      1       6.8   235


Spinach (boiled)        1/2 cup   2.0   21


Apple (with skin)      1 medium   3.0   81


Strawberries            1 cup     3.9   45




                                              126
                                         On The Move
Measure Equivalents
1 tablespoon        3 teaspoons (tsp)
(tbsp) =
1/16 cup (c) =      1 tablespoon
1/8 cup =           2 tablespoons
1/6 cup =           2 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
1/4 cup =           4 tablespoons
1/3 cup =           5 tablespoons + 1
                    teaspoon
1/2 cup =           8 tablespoons
2/3 cup =           10 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
3/4 cup =           12 tablespoons

1 cup =             48 teaspoons
1 cup=              16 tablespoons
8 fluid ounces      1 cup
(fl oz) =
1 pint (pt) =       2 cups

1 quart (qt) =      2 pints
4 cups =            1 quart
1 gallon (gal)      4 quarts
=
16 ounces           1 pound (lb)
(oz) =
1 milliliter (ml)   1 cubic centimeter
=                   (cc)
1 inch (in) =       2.54 centimeters
                    (cm)




                                                       127
                              On The Move
                               Measuring food

Dry measuring cups




Liquid measuring cups




Measuring spoons




¼ tsp, ½ tsp, 1 tsp, 1 tbsp




                                                128
                           On The Move

                             Measuring Dry Foods

-Measure dry foods in cups, use cups marked with amounts.
-Use cups that you can level off across the top ledge.




-Spoon dry foods into measuring cup.
-Use the flat side of a knife or spatula to level off top of measure.
-Use a dry measuring cup to measure flour, sugar, cornmeal, etc…




                                                                        129
                           On The Move
                                    Measuring Liquids


Measure liquids in cups or glass jars that you can see through.




Use a liquid measuring cup to measure water, salad oil, fluid milk, juices and syrup.


Measure the correct amount. Hold measure at eye level to check amount.




                                                                                        130
                           On The Move
                           Cooking Demonstration
Before the class prepares the recipe, the instructor demonstrates the steps in the recipe
preparation. While presenting, highlight critical methods; procedures and nutrition
information to reinforce the previous class discussion, as well as food and kitchen safety.

Sample Narrative:

“First, I always wash my hands before preparing any food”.
         -Wash and dry hands, then continue.

“Now I‟m going to show you how to make Lo Carb Flat Bread and Fresh Fruit
Spread”.

“The ingredients for these recipes are”, refer to recipe handouts.
               Show the participants each ingredient as you name it, may discuss what
       vitamins or minerals are specific to the Lo Carb Flat Bread and Fresh Fruit
       Spread, for example- Fiber (whole wheat flour and fresh fruit) and vitamin C
       (strawberries). Refer to specific Teacher Resources on Fiber information prior to
       lesson.



Here are the steps to follow:
       Prepare the recipe, following the directions in order.
       7. The first step in making Lo-Carb Flat Bread (return to this step when
           starting next recipe-Fresh Fruit Spread) is… refer to recipe handout
       8. The second step is….
       9. The third step is…..

While doing the cooking demonstration:
Give cooking tips or tell why some ingredients in the recipe make it healthier; for
example, olive oil or reduced salt products.
Food Safety: Serve meal immediately or divide into small containers and chill
immediately. Will keep 3-4 days in refrigerator.



                                                                                        131
                                  On The Move
                        Lo-Carb Flat Bread (Griddle Fry Bread)
Ingredients:
1c whole wheat flour & 1c white flour *
1tablespoon baking powder
½ tsp salt
1tsp sugar or 1 packet of Splenda
2 tbsp non-fat dry milk
1 tbsp olive oil
3/4c plus 2 tbsp warm water
Non-stick cooking spray
*( you can purchase whole wheat flour at most grocery stores, next to the white flour)
Directions:
    1. In a large bowl, mix the dry foods.
    2. Add water and oil.
    3. Stir until dough forms.
    4. Form the dough into 8 balls. Flatten each ball to ¼ inch thick and 4-5 inches in
        diameter on a floured surface.
    5. Spray griddle or skillet with no-stick cooking spray or 1 tbsp olive oil.
    6. Pre-heat on medium heat or 350 degrees.
    7. Cook breads on hot griddle until lightly browned about 3 minutes. Turn and
        brown other side. Serve immediately.
Serves 8 (4-5 inch flat breads).

Serving Suggestions:
      Serve with natural peanut butter, sugar free jam or lite cream cheese and fruit.

Nutrition Facts per Serving (per each flat bread):
246 Calories, 2 gm Fat, less than 5 mg Cholesterol, 25 mg Sodium,
52 gm Carbohydrates, 2gm Fiber, 5 gm Protein


*”Honor the gift of food”




                                                                                         132
                          On The Move
                                Fresh Fruit Spread
Ingredients:

1 cup of ripe fresh fruit-strawberries, raspberries or chopped bananas
1 packet of splenda (only if fruit isn‟t ripe).

Directions:

   1.   Rinse fruit and take the stems off of the berries.
   2.   Place fruit in a medium sized bowl.
   3.   Using a fork, mash berries/fruit mixture till saucy.
   4.   Add 1 packet of splenda and mix until combined.
   5.   Serve, chill and store.

Makes two 1/2c servings (each serving = 1 fruit)

Serving Suggestions:
Serve for breakfast on top of low-fat yogurt, use as a jam/jelly on top of
whole wheat toast/low-carb flat bread or add to your oatmeal.
Nutrition Facts per Serving (each serving provides 1/2c= 1 serving of fruit):
60 Calories , 0gm Fat, 0 mg Cholesterol, 0 mg Sodium, 15gm Carbohydrate, 2 gm Fiber
0 gm Protein




                                                                                 133
                       On The Move
Taste Test

What to say: Now lets try the finished dish. Please tell me how you like the taste(s). Do
you think you will try this recipe(s) at home?
   - Ask participant‟s opinion of recipe and use at home. Encourage participants to rate
   the taste test with a number of satisfaction, for example:1= good through 4=bad. This
   can allow each participant to give their own opinion about different taste perceptions.
       -Put on food handler‟s gloves and serve a portion of the recipe to each participant.
       -Ask others who help serve to put on food handlers gloves.


Question 4: Why is it good to know how to prepare whole grains that may be part
of side dishes of other food groups?

What to say: If we know how to prepare whole grains, we are more likely to eat them. As
we learned today, we get many benefits from whole grains, specifically fiber. Fiber is
important to have in our diets because it can help lower cholesterol.



                         Session Evaluation Form
The evaluation provides the instructor immediate suggestions for changing or improving
future classes.
        7. Distribute the Session Evaluation Forms.
        8. Give class directions for completing the forms.
        9. Collect completed evaluations and place in a folder.

Sample narrative:

   5. Ask participants to complete the session evaluation form.
   What to say: These questions will help us to make this session better, no need to
   include your name on it. Thank you for answering them.
   6. Place completed evaluations in folder.




                                                                                       134
                    On The Move

            Quick and Easy Ways to get your
                     5 a day in!
Toss  fruit into your green salad for extra flavor,
variety, color and crunch (apple slices, pear squares,
dried cranberries).

Expand your colors with green, red, orange, yellow
peppers.

Think Frozen! Frozen fruits and vegetables are just
as healthy as fresh and they‟re ready when you need
them.

Add apples, raisins or pineapple chunks to deli
salads like chicken pasta.

Add frozen or mixed vegetables to canned or dried
soups.

Make a quick smoothie using frozen fruit.



                                                     135
                       On The Move

Closing
   7. Tell participants that you hope that they will enjoy preparing and eating fruits and
      whole grains in new ways to benefit themselves and their families.
   8. Thank participants for attending the session and for their helpful comments.
   9. Tell participants about the next session, time and place. You may offer a flyer and
      ask for sign-ups for the next class.

   “ At Home” Idea: Ask them to try this recipe at home before the next session or try a
   whole grain or a new fruit. Also, if the participants are open with discussion ask them
   to reflect on a new skill they learned this session and make sure to follow up next
   session to hear their feedback. A fun idea to get the kids involved with this recipe, is
   allow them to ball the dough.



Clean up
   11. Wash dishes, collect trash and place it in the trash can.
   12. Pack up supplies.
   13. Clean tables.
   14. Return tables and chairs to the place where you found them.
   15. Check to see that everything is packed and cleaned up.




                                                                                       136
  On The Move



  Session
   Four
 Breakfast
on the Run
                137
            Fruitvale on the Move
                            Breakfast on the Run
Objectives:
       At the end of the session, participants will be able to
               1. Name 2 benefits of calcium-rich or dairy foods.
               2. State the number of servings of calcium-rich or dairy foods are needed
                  daily.
               3. Follow a recipe.


Schedule:

       Time (minutes)       Activity
       Pre-class            Registration
       10                   Welcome and Introductions
       20                   Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety
       15                   Cooking Demonstration
       10                   Taste Test & Closing
       5                    Review & Questions
       60 minutes

       Post-class            Clean-up




                                                                                    138
                       On The Move
Breakfast on the RUN

Introduction:
Ask if anyone has any questions or comments from the last class. Can they share if they
made the recipe at home? If they didn‟t use it, try to get feedback why not.

Last week we discussed the healthy ways to eat whole grains. Today will learn the
benefits of eating low-fat dairy products and how many servings are required to keep a
healthy diet.

Question 1: What are the benefits of dairy products?

What to say: Low-fat dairy products are your health link to consuming enough calcium,
which can help keep bones strong.
Why are low-fat, 1%, lactose-free milk or non-fat milk better than whole, let‟s talk about
some of these reasons (specifically encourage the selection of 1% or non-fat over 2%).
The nutrients in milk don‟t change, however the amount of fat does differ. The higher the
% fat, the more saturated fat in the milk. Saturated fat is found in milk with higher fat
content. This type of fat can raise your LDL and increase risk of cardiac disease.

*Handout- Calcium Foods (when reviewing handout- discuss lactose intolerance-give
option of soy milk, tofu, leafy greens…)

Question 2: How many dairy servings do we need to eat?

-It is good to choose 2-3 servings of low-fat dairy products a day. (Show examples of
products, food labels/models and/or measuring cups to aid with visual understanding of
serving size). Review different fat and calcium content with each product. Use the Food
Guide Pyramid handout to help reinforce servings.
What to say: Today I am giving you a recipe to help you prepare and enjoy healthy dairy
products. The recipe gives you one or more servings of dairy products and is easy, tasty
and economical.




                                                                                      139
                       On The Move
Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety
Recipe Procedures
What to say: Today I am giving you a recipe to help you prepare and enjoy dairy
products. Remember if you can‟t drink dairy products, there are many other healthy high
calcium foods to choose from. This recipe will give you a serving or more from the dairy
group.

   Instructor Tip: Ask participants if they had a chance to try the previous
   recipe at home and if they have thoughts about try a new skill at home.
   This may get the group to open up for more discussion and response!


Give participants the recipes or ask them to take out their copies to follow. Ask the
participants‟ their opinion about trying Tofu (some people maybe against trying it, but
once it is made they maybe more open to trying it).

Question 3: How do we follow a recipe?

What to say: Follow a recipe in three steps.
  1. The first step is to read the recipe, to become familiar with the ingredients and

   amounts needed, cooking utensils and what you need to do.

   -Look at the different parts of the recipe: recipe name, list of ingredients, directions,
   cooking suggestions, and number of servings. Look at the nutrition information, if
   given.
   -Read the list of Ingredients. Make sure you have all the ingredients before starting
   the recipe.
   -Read the Directions, step by step.
   -Look at the Number of Servings the recipe makes.
       *If more servings are needed, double the amounts of the ingredients. Refer to
       worksheet if time allows to review skills of doubling.
       *If fewer servings are needed, use half of all the ingredients or plan to use
       leftovers.
   -Allow enough time to prepare and cook the recipe.


                                                                                          140
                              On The Move
   2. The second step is to prepare all the ingredients needed for the recipe.
       -Wash hands with soap and hot water before beginning to prepare any food and
       after handling raw meats while cooking. Remember use paper towels to dry
       hands, dish cloths carry germs.
       -Use a separate cutting board for cutting vegetables and raw meats-color coding
       the cutting boards maybe helpful.
       -Remember to always rinse and wash fruit and vegetables.
       -Get out all the equipment and cooking utensils needed to make the recipe.
       Double check the equipment list to make sure you have everything you need.
       -Measure all ingredients carefully.
               Refer to handout-cooking measurements

*Discuss briefly the handouts of measuring foods with liquid and dry measuring cups and
spoons and review knife skills and pictures. When reviewing these handouts again, ask
participants specific questions to help them be able to answer the post-test questions.
Specifically for this lesson, knives and measuring will be used. May want to have
participants state out load both skills they have learned with knives and measuring.

            Instructor Tip: Get group involved to prepare and gather items, this
            can help with timeline.

   7. The third step is to make the recipe.
      -Follow the directions in the order listed.
      -Taste the recipe, use a clean spoon and do not reuse after tasting. Adjust
      seasonings to your taste. Watch the salt!
      -Serve. May have the option to garnish.
      -Cooking suggestions offer other ways to make or serve the recipe.

        Instructor Tip: Have one participant read recipe as you go, this
        encourages class participation. Review the safety of the blender-make
        sure it isn‟t plugged in next to water, always have the top on and
        don‟t over fill!




                                                                                    141
                             On The Move
2005 Dietary Guidelines Recommend for Calcium
4-8 year old= 800 mg Calcium
8-10 year old= 800-1200 mg Calcium
11-18 year old= 1200-1500 mg Calcium
19-50 year old= 1000 mg Calcium
50+ year old=1200 mg Calcium


                                  Calcium Rich Foods


300 mg of Calcium
1cup of Skim Milk
1cup of Non-fat yogurt
1 cup of Calcium fortified 100% Orange Juice
4 oz of sardines, solids


200 mg of Calcium
1 oz of Cheddar cheese
1 cup of low-fat ice-cream



100 mg of Calcium
1 cup of non-fat cottage cheese
1/2c of cooked greens
1cup of dried beans
1/2c of tofu




                                                       142
USDA Food Pyramid




                    143
                 On The Move
                 What is a 5 A Day Serving?
Here are some guidelines for fruits and vegetables.


     1 medium-sized piece of fruit (e.g.        1 cup raw, leafy greens (e.g.
       banana, apple, orange, pear)               lettuce, spinach) or salad




    1/2 cup cut-up fresh fruit or canned
                                                 1/2 cup cooked vegetables
       fruit, canned in its own juices




                                               3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100%
  3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100% fruit juice
                                                      vegetable juice




   1/4 cup dried fruit (e.g. raisins, dried   1/2 cup cooked or canned beans,
             apricots, prunes)                         peas or lentils




                                                                          144
                                         On The Move
Measure Equivalents
1 tablespoon        3 teaspoons (tsp)
(tbsp) =
1/16 cup (c) =      1 tablespoon
1/8 cup =           2 tablespoons
1/6 cup =           2 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
1/4 cup =           4 tablespoons
1/3 cup =           5 tablespoons + 1
                    teaspoon
1/2 cup =           8 tablespoons
2/3 cup =           10 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
3/4 cup =           12 tablespoons

1 cup =             48 teaspoons
1 cup=              16 tablespoons
8 fluid ounces      1 cup
(fl oz) =
1 pint (pt) =       2 cups

1 quart (qt) =      2 pints
4 cups =            1 quart
1 gallon (gal)      4 quarts
=
16 ounces           1 pound (lb)
(oz) =
1 milliliter (ml)   1 cubic centimeter
=                   (cc)
1 inch (in) =       2.54 centimeters
                    (cm)




                                                       145
                              On The Move
                               Measuring food

Dry measuring cups




Liquid measuring cups




Measuring spoons




¼ tsp, ½ tsp, 1 tsp, 1 tbsp




                                                146
                           On The Move

                             Measuring Dry Foods

-Measure dry foods in cups, use cups marked with amounts.
-Use cups that you can level off across the top ledge.




-Spoon dry foods into measuring cup.
-Use the flat side of a knife or spatula to level off top of measure.
-Use a dry measuring cup to measure flour, sugar, cornmeal, etc…




                                                                        147
                           On The Move
                                    Measuring Liquids


Measure liquids in cups or glass jars that you can see through.




Use a liquid measuring cup to measure water, salad oil, fluid milk, juices and syrup.


Measure the correct amount. Hold measure at eye level to check amount.




                                                                                        148
                            Cooking Demonstration
Before the class prepares the recipe, the instructor demonstrates the steps in the recipe
preparation. While presenting, highlight critical methods; procedures and nutrition
information to reinforce the previous class discussion, as well as food and kitchen safety.

Sample Narrative:

“First, I always wash my hands before preparing any food “.
         -Wash and dry hands, then continue.

“Now I‟m going to show you how to make Fruit ‘N Juice & Tofu Smoothies”.

“The ingredients for this recipe are” refer to recipe handout. “Depending on what season
it is, you may need to adjust recipe ingredients for availability, to keep the cost down”.

       Show the participants each ingredient as you name it, you may discuss what
       vitamins or minerals are specific to the Fruit „N Juice Smoothie and the Tofu
       Smoothie Recipe, for example-Vitamin C (strawberries), Vitamin A, Calcium
       (soy and yogurt) and Fiber (all fruit).

Here are the steps to follow:
       Prepare the recipe, following the directions in order.
   1. The first step in making The Fruit ‘N Juice Smoothie is (return to this step when
       starting next recipe- Tofu Smoothie) …. Refer to recipe handout.
   2. The second step is….
   3. The third step is…..

While doing the cooking demonstration:
           Give cooking tips or tell why some ingredients in the recipe make it
              healthier; for example, avoid adding sugar or honey, use 100% juice(avoid
              juice drinks like juicy juice or kool aid, etc...) and they can other fruit such
              as peaches, raspberries, blueberries, oranges and many more-use your
              imagination!

              Food Safety: Serve meal immediately or divide into small containers and
               chill or freeze immediately. Will keep 3-4 days in refrigerator.




                                                                                          149
                        On The Move

Tofu Smoothie
Ingredients:
    1- 10.5 oz package soft lite silken tofu
    1 cup Frozen Strawberries and Sliced Bananas
    2 cup Unsweetened 100% orange juice or 100% apple juice, chilled (look for calcium
    fortified juice)

Directions:
   Combine all ingredients in electric blender; cover and process until smooth ( should
   have milkshake consistency).

Serves 5 (½) cup servings. Serve immediately!

Serving Suggestions:
   Garnish with a sprinkle of granola or dried fruit. This recipe is best as snack or
   breakfast.


Nutrition Facts per Serving( each ½ cup serving provides 1 serving of fruit):
144 Calories, 3.2 gm Fat, 0 mg Cholesterol, 6 mg Sodium, 25.8 gm Carbohydrates,
165 mg Calcium, 2 gm Fiber, 5.8 gm Protein




                                                                                        150
                        On The Move
                            Fruit ‘N Juice Smoothie
Ingredients:
2    banana, fresh or frozen, peeled and cut into pieces
1c fruit, fresh or frozen, washed, peeled and cut up (Examples: strawberries, peaches,
pineapple or papaya)
1 1/4c 100% juice-examples: apple, orange, pineapple, cranberry
2 1/2c low-fat vanilla yogurt

Directions:
   1. Put fruit into blender first.
   2. Add juice.
   3. Add vanilla yogurt.
   4. Blend(should be a milkshake consistency) until smooth.
   Makes 5 (1c) servings. Serve immediately!

Cooking Suggestions:
In place of low-fat yogurt, use 1/2c of silken tofu. Garnish with a sprinkle of granola or
dried fruit. This recipe is best as snack or breakfast.

Nutrition Facts per serving (each serving provides 1c= 1 serving of fruit and ½ c. of milk
serving): 148 Calories, 1 gm Fat, 3mg Cholesterol, 5mg Sodium, 32gm Carbohydrate,
3gm Fiber, 4 gm Protein, 300 mg Calcium




                                                                                        151
                      On The Move
                                   Knife Skills

   4. Make sure knives are not left at the edge of the counter to avoid
      accidents.
   5. Cut carefully on a cutting board, moving your fingers as you cut (
      remember to curl your fingers to avoid injury).
   6. If the knife drops, let it fall and then pick it up and wash it before
      continuing. Never try to catch a falling knife.
   Source: Mission Latino Families Partnership, San Francisco City and County Public
   Health Department.

                                 Knife Safety
1. Use the correct size and type of knife for the job.
2. Hold the knife firmly in your hand and cut away from your body.
3. Make sure knives placed on flat surfaces are never covered with towels,
napkins, or other materials.
4. Reach deliberately for the handle. Do not grab blindly for a knife;
5. When handling a knife to another person, point the handle toward him or
her.
6. Wash knives immediately, don‟t put knife into the sink,

Source: Cooking a World of New Tastes-USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, 98‟




                                                                                  152
                       On The Move
                                       Uses of Knives




Paring Knife-small knife used for trimming and shaping vegetables.




Scalloped Knife-used to slice bread.




Chef Knife-an all purpose knife used for most cutting and dicing.




                                                                     153
                       On The Move
                                        Taste Test

What to say: Now lets try the finished dish. Please tell me how you like the taste(s). Do
you think you will try this recipe(s) at home?
   - Ask participant‟s opinion of recipe and use at home. Encourage participants to rate
   the taste test with a number of satisfaction, for example:1= good through 4=bad. This
   can allow each participant to give their own opinion about different taste perceptions.
       -Put on food handler‟s gloves and serve a portion of the recipe to each participant.
       -Ask others who help serve to put on food handlers gloves.

Question 4: Why is it good to know how to prepare dairy or calcium- rich foods
and fruits that may be part of side dishes of other food groups?

What to say: If we know how to prepare dairy and fruit and vegetable products, we are
more likely to eat them. Specifically fruit and vegetables that contain calcium, for
example: fortified orange and apple juice, broccoli, etc…As we learned today, we get
many benefits from eating calcium-rich foods. We get a variety of flavors, nutrients and
colors; we also get better health for families and ourselves.

*Handout-Easy Ways to Eat Fruit & Vegetables.



                         Session Evaluation Form
The evaluation provides the instructor immediate suggestions for changing or improving
future classes.
        1. Distribute the Session Evaluation Forms.
        2. Give class directions for completing the forms.
        3. Collect completed evaluations and place in a folder.

Sample narrative:

   1. Ask participants to complete the session evaluation form.
   What to say: These questions will help us to make this session better, no need to
   include your name on it. Thank you for answering them.
   2. Place completed evaluations in folder.


                                                                                       154
                    On The Move

            Quick and Easy Ways to get your
                     5 a day in!
Toss  fruit into your green salad for extra flavor,
variety, color and crunch (apple slices, pear squares,
dried cranberries).

Expand your colors with green, red, orange, yellow
peppers.

Think Frozen! Frozen fruits and vegetables are just
as healthy as fresh and they‟re ready when you need
them.

Add apples, raisins or pineapple chunks to deli
salads like chicken pasta.

Add frozen or mixed vegetables to canned or dried
soups.

Make a quick smoothie using frozen fruit.


                                                     155
                       On The Move
Closing
   1.Tell participants that you hope that they will enjoy preparing and eating fruits,
   vegetables and healthy dairy products in new ways to benefit themselves and their
   families.
   2.Thank participants for attending the session and for their helpful comments.
   3.Tell participants about the next session, time and place. May offer them a flyer to
   remind about the class and ask for sign-ups for the next class.

   “ At Home” Idea: Ask them to try this recipe at home before the next session or try
   calcium-rich foods and a new fruit or vegetable. Also, if the participants are open
   with discussion ask them to reflect on a new skill they learned this session and make
   sure to follow up next session to hear their feedback. If you are inspired by the new
   idea of tofu try adding it to stir fry, cheesecake or in place of Ricotta cheese in
   lasagna. Check the internet for recipes that use tofu!



Clean up
   1.   Wash dishes, collect trash and place it in the trash can.
   2.   Pack up supplies.
   3.   Clean tables.
   4.   Return tables and chairs to the place where you found them.
   5.   Check to see that everything is packed and cleaned up.




                                                                                       156
   On The Move



Session Five
 Eggalish
Ways to Eat


                 157
                  Your
                 Protein
            Fruitvale on the Move
                   Eggalish way to Eat your Protein
Objectives:
        At the end of the session, participants will be able to
               1. Name 2 benefits of protein.
               2. State the number of servings of protein needed daily.
               3. Follow a recipe.

Schedule:

       Time (minutes)        Activity
       Pre-class             Registration
       11                    Welcome and Introductions
       15                    Discussion/Sharing/Food Safety
       15                    Cooking Demonstration
       10                    Taste Test & Closing
       10                    Post-test, Review & Questions
       60 minutes




                                                                          158
       Post-class              Clean-up




                           On The Move
   Eggalish Ways to Eat Your Protein

Introduction:
Ask if anyone has any questions or comments from the last class. Can they share if they
made the recipe at home? If they didn‟t use it, try to get feedback why not.

Last week we discussed the healthy ways to low-fat dairy foods. Today will learn the
benefits of lean meat and vegetable proteins and how many servings are required to keep
a healthy diet. Also, this is our last class of the series and we will be doing a post-test at
the end of the session. *Remember to use the same tracking as was done on the pre-test,
that way it can be matched appropriately.

Question 1: What are the benefits of proteins?

What to say: Lean meat and vegetable proteins are your health link to wellness and
strength. Proteins help control rise in blood sugar after a meal, and help strengthen your
immune system to help you fight off illness.

Why are lean and low-fat proteins healthier then high-fat choices like bacon and sausage?
Let‟s talk about some of these.

*Handout-Review lean/low-fat protein choices (Also, encourage other sources of
proteins for ex- nuts, legumes, seeds or tofu).


                                                                                           159
Question 2: How many protein servings do we need to eat?

It is good to choose 2-3 servings of protein products a day. Protein is important for
maintaining muscles, your body can‟t live without it. Iron is also found in many protein
rich foods. Iron helps build red blood cells in your body to make you healthy and strong!

What are some examples of servings of protein products? (Show examples of products,
food labels/models and/or measuring cups to aid with visual understanding). Portion
guides to review-3oz = deck of cards, palm of woman‟s hand, etc…Refer to portion
control handout and review the Food Guide Pyramid.

 What to say: Today I am giving you a recipe to help you prepare and enjoy healthy low-
fat protein products. The recipe gives you one or more servings of protein and is easy,
tasty and economical.



                        On The Move
Discussion/ Sharing/Food Safety
Recipe Procedures

This section will show the students how to follow a recipe, they will learn
how to read the directions and understand the serving sizes, which can all be
helpful in making a meal work!
What to say: Today I am giving you a recipe to help you pre-pare and enjoy vegetables
and lean protein foods.
This recipe will give you one or more serving from one the protein and vegetable group.

         Instructor Tip: Ask participants if they had a chance to try the previous
         recipe at home and if they have thoughts about try a new skill at home.
         This may get the group to open up for more discussion and response!

        -Give participants the recipes or ask them to take out their copies to follow (to get
participants involved more, ask a volunteer to point out the variety of vegetables and
identify the nutrient content of that food).

Question 3: How do we follow a recipe?

What to say: Follow a recipe in three steps.


                                                                                         160
   1.The first step is to read the recipe, to become familiar with the ingredients and
   amounts needed, cooking utensils and preparation steps.
   -Look at the different parts of the recipe: recipe name, list of ingredients, directions,
   cooking suggestions, and number of servings. Look at the nutrition information, if
   given.
   -Read the list of Ingredients. Make sure you have all the ingredients before starting
   the recipe.
   -Read the Directions, step by step.
   -Look at the Number of Servings the recipe makes.
       *If more servings are needed, double the amounts of the ingredients. Review
       worksheet on doubling if time allows.
       *If fewer servings are needed, use half of all the ingredients or plan to use
       leftovers.
   -Allow enough time to prepare and cook the recipe and for clean-up.




                               On The Move
   2.The second step is to prepare all the ingredients needed for the recipe.
      -Wash hands with soap and hot water before beginning to prepare any food and
      after handling raw meats while cooking. Remember use paper towels to dry
      hands, dish cloths carry germs.
      -Use a separate cutting board for cutting vegetables and raw meats-color coding
      the cutting boards maybe helpful.
      -Remember to always rinse and wash fruit and vegetables.
      -Get out all the equipment and cooking utensils needed to make the recipe.
      Double check the equipment list to make sure you have everything you need.
      -Measure all ingredients carefully.

       Refer to handout-cooking measurements

*Discuss briefly the handouts of measuring foods with liquid and dry measuring cups and
spoons and review knife skills and pictures. Since this is the last session, make sure to
review all handouts, this can be helpful because the post-test will be give at the end of the
lesson.


             Instructor Tip: May need to prepare chopped items ahead of
             time if class time is short.



                                                                                          161
3.The third step is to make the recipe.
    Follow the directions in the order listed. Don‟t rush-that‟s when mistakes
   happen.
    Before serving-taste the recipe, use a clean spoon and do not reuse after
   tasting. Adjust seasonings to your taste. Watch the salt!
    Serve. May have the option to garnish.
    Cooking suggestions offer other ways to make or serve the recipe.

   Instructor Tip: Some ingredients maybe similar from the last recipe,
   allow each participant to try preparing different ingredients if possible.


                                 On The Move
                             EAT LESS FAT
 Eat Less Red Meat. Eat more fish and poultry instead. When you
  do eat red meat, choose the leanest cuts: round, sirloin and flank
  steaks, tenderloin and ground round.



 Roast, bake, or broil meats instead of frying. Trim the fat off meat and
  the skin off poultry, and avoid adding fat in cooking.



 Eliminate or cut down on high-fat foods like cold cuts, bacon,
  sausage, hot dogs, butter, margarine, salad dressings, lard, and
  shortening.



 Eat less ice cream, cheese, sour cream, cream, and other high-fat dairy
   products. Look for low-fat versions; they're increasingly available
   in grocery stores. Drink skim or low-fat milk instead of whole milk.




                                                                                  162
USDA Food Pyramid




                    163
                 On The Move
                 What is a 5 A Day Serving?
Here are some guidelines for fruits and vegetables.


     1 medium-sized piece of fruit (e.g.        1 cup raw, leafy greens (e.g.
       banana, apple, orange, pear)               lettuce, spinach) or salad




    1/2 cup cut-up fresh fruit or canned
                                                 1/2 cup cooked vegetables
       fruit, canned in its own juices




                                               3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100%
  3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100% fruit juice
                                                      vegetable juice




   1/4 cup dried fruit (e.g. raisins, dried   1/2 cup cooked or canned beans,
             apricots, prunes)                         peas or lentils




                                                                          164
165
                                         On The Move
Measure Equivalents
1 tablespoon        3 teaspoons (tsp)
(tbsp) =
1/16 cup (c) =      1 tablespoon
1/8 cup =           2 tablespoons
1/6 cup =           2 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
1/4 cup =           4 tablespoons
1/3 cup =           5 tablespoons + 1
                    teaspoon
1/2 cup =           8 tablespoons
2/3 cup =           10 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
3/4 cup =           12 tablespoons

1 cup =             48 teaspoons
1 cup=              16 tablespoons
8 fluid ounces      1 cup
(fl oz) =
1 pint (pt) =       2 cups

1 quart (qt) =      2 pints
4 cups =            1 quart
1 gallon (gal)      4 quarts
=
16 ounces           1 pound (lb)
(oz) =
1 milliliter (ml)   1 cubic centimeter
=                   (cc)
1 inch (in) =       2.54 centimeters
                    (cm)




                                                       166
                              On The Move
                               Measuring food

Dry measuring cups




Liquid measuring cups




Measuring spoons




¼ tsp, ½ tsp, 1 tsp, 1 tbsp




                                                167
                           On The Move

                             Measuring Dry Foods

-Measure dry foods in cups, use cups marked with amounts.
-Use cups that you can level off across the top ledge.




-Spoon dry foods into measuring cup.
-Use the flat side of a knife or spatula to level off top of measure.
-Use a dry measuring cup to measure flour, sugar, cornmeal, etc…




                                                                        168
                           On The Move
                                    Measuring Liquids


Measure liquids in cups or glass jars that you can see through.




Use a liquid measuring cup to measure water, salad oil, fluid milk, juices and syrup.


Measure the correct amount. Hold measure at eye level to check amount.




                                                                                        169
                         On The Move
                           Cooking Demonstration
Before the class prepares the recipe, the instructor demonstrates the steps in the recipe
preparation. While presenting, highlight critical methods, procedures and nutrition
information to reinforce the previous class discussion, as well as food and kitchen safety.

Sample Narrative:

“First, I always wash my hands before preparing any food “.
         -Wash and dry hands, then continue.
“Now I‟m going to show you how to make Veggie Egg Scramble”.

“The ingredients for this recipe are” refer to recipe handout. “Depending on what season
it is, you may need to adjust recipe ingredients for availability, and to keep the cost
down ”.

       Show the participants each ingredient as you name it, you may discuss what
vitamins or minerals are specific to the Veggie Egg Scramble Recipe, for example-
Vitamin C (tomato), Vitamin A (squash), Protein (eggs), Iron (eggs), Calcium (cheese)
and Fiber (onion and all vegetables).


Here are the steps to follow:
       Prepare the recipe, following the directions in order.
   1.The first step in making The Veggie Egg Scramble is….refer to recipe handout.
   2.The second step is….
   3.The third step is…..


While doing the cooking demonstration:

       Show how to use knives safely- again refer to handouts. Review washing knives
       immediately and storing properly.
       Give cooking tips or tell why some ingredients in the recipe make it healthier;
       for example, olive oil, reduced salt products and egg beaters.
       Food Safety: Serve meal immediately or divide into small containers and chill
       immediately. Will keep 3-4 days in refrigerator.




                                                                                        170
                          On The Move
                               Veggie Egg Scramble
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon Olive oil
3 Eggs- 2 egg whites & 1 yolk (may use 3/4c of egg beaters)
dash of pepper
½ teaspoon Minced garlic
1 tablespoon Non-fat milk
½ cup Grated Swiss cheese (optional)
¼ cup Minced green onions
2 Medium tomatoes, chopped
1cup Sliced zucchini or summer squash
Directions:
    198. Turn on stove to medium heat, heat oil in skillet/fry pan.
    199. With a fork beat together eggs, pepper, garlic and milk until fluffy in a medium bowl;
         pour into skillet and cook over medium heat, continually stirring (scrambling) every 30
         seconds.
    200. Sprinkle onions, sliced zucchini and chopped tomatoes, continue to scramble eggs.
    201. When eggs are done but still glossy, sprinkle Swiss cheese over eggs.
    202. Serve immediately. Make 3 ( 1c servings).

Cooking Suggestions:
Serve with fruit salad or make it into a breakfast burrito with whole wheat
tortillas and salsa.
Nutrition Facts per Serving(each serving provides 1 serving of vegetables):
256 calories, 18 gm Fat, 236 mg Cholesterol, 150 mg Sodium, 5 gm Carbohydrates, 2 gm Fiber
14 gm Protein

Recipe source: “Where‟s mom now that I need her”( refer to reference page for full reference
description).




                                                                                               171
                      On The Move
                                   Knife Skills

   7. Make sure knives are not left at the edge of the counter to avoid
      accidents.
   8. Cut carefully on a cutting board, moving your fingers as you cut (
      remember to curl your fingers to avoid injury).
   9. If the knife drops, let it fall and then pick it up and wash it before
      continuing. Never try to catch a falling knife.
   Source: Mission Latino Families Partnership, San Francisco City and County Public
   Health Department.

                                 Knife Safety
1. Use the correct size and type of knife for the job.
2. Hold the knife firmly in your hand and cut away from your body.
3. Make sure knives placed on flat surfaces are never covered with towels,
napkins, or other materials.
4. Reach deliberately for the handle. Do not grab blindly for a knife;
5. When handling a knife to another person, point the handle toward him or
her.
6. Wash knives immediately, don‟t put knife into the sink,

Source: Cooking a World of New Tastes-USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, 98‟




                                                                                  172
                       On The Move
                                       Uses of Knives




Paring Knife-small knife used for trimming and shaping vegetables.




Scalloped Knife-used to slice bread.




Chef Knife-an all purpose knife used for most cutting and dicing.




                                                                     173
                        On The Move
                                        Taste Test

What to say: Now lets try the finished dish. Please tell me how you like the taste(s). Do
you think you will try this recipe(s) at home?
   - Ask participant‟s opinion of recipe and use at home. Encourage participants to rate
   the taste test with a number of satisfaction, for example:1= good through 4=bad. This
   can allow each participant to give their own opinion about different taste perceptions.
       -Put on food handler‟s gloves and serve a portion of the recipe to each participant.
       -Ask others who help serve to put on food handlers gloves.


Question 4: Why is it good to know how to prepare vegetables and fruits that may
be part of side dishes of other food groups?

What to say: If we know how to prepare fruits and vegetables, we are more likely to eat
them. As we learned today, we get many benefits from eating fruits and vegetables. We
get a variety of flavors, nutrients and colors; we also get better health for families and
ourselves.

       *Handout: Easy Ways to Eat Fruit and Vegetables.


                         Session Evaluation Form
The evaluation provides the instructor immediate suggestions for changing or improving
future classes.
        1. Distribute the Session Evaluation Forms.
        2. Give class directions for completing the forms.
        3. Collect completed evaluations and place in a folder.

Sample narrative:

   1.Ask participants to complete the session evaluation form.
   What to say: These questions will help us to make this session better, no need to put
   your name on it. Thank you for answering them.
   2.Place completed evaluations in folder.




                                                                                        174
                    On The Move

            Quick and Easy Ways to get your
                     5 a day in!
Toss  fruit into your green salad for extra flavor,
variety, color and crunch (apple slices, pear squares,
dried cranberries).

Expand your colors with green, red, orange, yellow
peppers.

Think Frozen! Frozen fruits and vegetables are just
as healthy as fresh and they‟re ready when you need
them.

Add apples, raisins or pineapple chunks to deli
salads like chicken pasta.

Add frozen or mixed vegetables to canned or dried
soups.

Make a quick smoothie using frozen fruit.



                                                     175
                       On The Move

Closing
   1.Tell participants that you hope that they will enjoy preparing and eating fruits,
   vegetables and lean/healthy proteins in new ways to benefit themselves and their
   families.
   2.Thank participants for attending the session and for their helpful comments.
   3.This is the last session, they will receive certificates of completion for attending all
   sessions.


                                         Clean up
   1.Wash dishes, collect trash and place it in the trash can.
   2.Pack up supplies.
   3.Clean tables.
   4.Return tables and chairs to the place where you found them.
   5.Check to see that everything is packed and cleaned up.




                                                                                          176
  On The Move



Handouts




                177
                                 On The Move



      Teacher Resource Guide for Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and Vegetables all have many vitamins and minerals. In most of these recipes
Vitamin C and Vitamin A are specifically focused on. You will find Vitamin C and A
definitions in the Key Terms page. Fruits and Vegetables are low-calorie foods that
should be eaten frequently; recommend 5-9 servings of fruit and vegetables in one day!

Fruits and Vegetables are also high in fiber. Fiber is needed everyday to keep your body
regular and also helps fight against heart disease and many cancers. To find out more
information on Fiber, refer to the Teacher Fiber Information.

Fruits and Vegetables are seasonal; so many participants may comment, “It‟s too hard to
eat fruits and vegetables because they are too expensive”. However, if they shop in
season and go to the Farmers‟ markets they can find inexpensive fresh fruit and
vegetables.




                                                                                      178
                       On The Move
A Guide to Fruits and Vegetables in Season
Spring
Fruits: Apricots, Blueberries, Mangos, raspberries and Strawberries
Vegetables: Artichokes, Asparagus, Green Beans, Kale, Peas, Snow Peas and Turnips

Summer
Fruits: Apricots, Blackberries, Blueberries, Cherries, Figs, Guavas, Mangoes, Melons,
Nectarines, Passion Fruit, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Raspberries, Strawberries and
Watermelon.
Vegetables: Black Eyed Peas, Corn, Green Beans, Kale, Okra, Peas, Snow Peas and
Summer Squashes.

Fall
Fruits: Starfruit, Coconuts, Cranberries, Figs, Guavas, Melons, Pears, Persimmons,
Pomegranates, Strawberries and Tangerines.
Vegetables: Blacked Peas, Brussel Sprouts, Chayote, Pumpkins, Sweet Potatoes and
Winter Squashes.

Winter
Fruits: Starfruit, Coconuts, Cranberries, Passion Fruit, Pears, Persimmons, Pomegranates
and Tangerines.
Vegetables: Brussel Sprouts, Green Beans, Pumpkins, Sweet Potatoes and Winter Squash




                                                                                        179
                 On The Move
            Why Eat Fruits and Vegetables?


                        Taste Good
        High in Vitamins: like A, C and Folic Acid
High in minerals: like Calcium, Potassium and Magnesium
                       High in fiber
                  Help lower cholesterol
Help keep you regular
         Give you a variety of colors and flavors
    Rich in phytonutrients, protectors against disease
 Lower risk of cancer, heart disease, blood pressure and
                           stroke
                   Help control diabetes
                  Low in fat and calories
                    Help control weight
                      Easy to prepare




                                                      180
USDA Food Pyramid




                    181
                 On The Move
                 What is a 5 A Day Serving?
Here are some guidelines for fruits and vegetables.


     1 medium-sized piece of fruit (e.g.        1 cup raw, leafy greens (e.g.
       banana, apple, orange, pear)               lettuce, spinach) or salad




    1/2 cup cut-up fresh fruit or canned
                                                 1/2 cup cooked vegetables
       fruit, canned in its own juices




                                               3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100%
  3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) 100% fruit juice
                                                      vegetable juice




   1/4 cup dried fruit (e.g. raisins, dried   1/2 cup cooked or canned beans,
             apricots, prunes)                         peas or lentils




                                                                          182
                    On The Move

            Quick and Easy Ways to get your
                     5 a day in!
Toss  fruit into your green salad for extra flavor,
variety, color and crunch (apple slices, pear squares,
dried cranberries).

Expand your colors with green, red, orange, yellow
peppers.

Think Frozen! Frozen fruits and vegetables are just
as healthy as fresh and they‟re ready when you need
them.

Add apples, raisins or pineapple chunks to deli
salads like chicken pasta.

Add frozen or mixed vegetables to canned or dried
soups.

Make a quick smoothie using frozen fruit.



                                                     183
                    On The Move

            Quick and Easy Ways to get your
                     5 a day in!
Toss  fruit into your green salad for extra flavor,
variety, color and crunch (apple slices, pear squares,
dried cranberries).

Expand your colors with green, red, orange, yellow
peppers.

Think Frozen! Frozen fruits and vegetables are just
as healthy as fresh and they‟re ready when you need
them.

Add apples, raisins or pineapple chunks to deli
salads like chicken pasta.

Add frozen or mixed vegetables to canned or dried
soups.

                                                     184
                                         On The Move
Measure Equivalents
1 tablespoon        3 teaspoons (tsp)
(tbsp) =
1/16 cup (c) =      1 tablespoon
1/8 cup =           2 tablespoons
1/6 cup =           2 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
1/4 cup =           4 tablespoons
1/3 cup =           5 tablespoons + 1
                    teaspoon
1/2 cup =           8 tablespoons
2/3 cup =           10 tablespoons + 2
                    teaspoons
3/4 cup =           12 tablespoons

1 cup =             48 teaspoons
1 cup=              16 tablespoons
8 fluid ounces      1 cup
(fl oz) =
1 pint (pt) =       2 cups

1 quart (qt) =      2 pints
4 cups =            1 quart
1 gallon (gal)      4 quarts
=
16 ounces           1 pound (lb)
(oz) =
1 milliliter (ml)   1 cubic centimeter
=                   (cc)
1 inch (in) =       2.54 centimeters
                    (cm)




                                                       185
                              On The Move
                               Measuring food

Dry measuring cups




Liquid measuring cups




Measuring spoons




¼ tsp, ½ tsp, 1 tsp, 1 tbsp




                                                186
                           On The Move

                             Measuring Dry Foods

-Measure dry foods in cups, use cups marked with amounts.
-Use cups that you can level off across the top ledge.




-Spoon dry foods into measuring cup.
-Use the flat side of a knife or spatula to level off top of measure.
-Use a dry measuring cup to measure flour, sugar, cornmeal, etc…




                                                                        187
                           On The Move
                                    Measuring Liquids


Measure liquids in cups or glass jars that you can see through.




Use a liquid measuring cup to measure water, salad oil, fluid milk, juices and syrup.


Measure the correct amount. Hold measure at eye level to check amount.




                                                                                        188
                      On The Move
                                   Knife Skills

   10.Make sure knives are not left at the edge of the counter to avoid
      accidents.
   11.Cut carefully on a cutting board, moving your fingers as you cut (
      remember to curl your fingers to avoid injury).
   12.If the knife drops, let it fall and then pick it up and wash it before
      continuing. Never try to catch a falling knife.
   Source: Mission Latino Families Partnership, San Francisco City and County Public
   Health Department.

                                 Knife Safety
1. Use the correct size and type of knife for the job.
2. Hold the knife firmly in your hand and cut away from your body.
3. Make sure knives placed on flat surfaces are never covered with towels,
napkins, or other materials.
4. Reach deliberately for the handle. Do not grab blindly for a knife;
5. When handling a knife to another person, point the handle toward him or
her.
6. Wash knives immediately, don‟t put knife into the sink,

Source: Cooking a World of New Tastes-USDA, Food and Nutrition Service, 98‟




                                                                                  189
                       On The Move
                                       Uses of Knives




Paring Knife-small knife used for trimming and shaping vegetables.




Scalloped Knife-used to slice bread.




Chef Knife-an all purpose knife used for most cutting and dicing.




                                                                     190
                          On The Move

                                 Teacher Resource on Fiber


WHAT IS DIETARY FIBER?
Fiber is a substance found in foods that come from plants. Dietary fiber is found only in plant
foods. Good sources of dietary fiber include whole grains, vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds.
Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, fats, oils and sugar contain no dietary fiber.

WHY SHOULD WE INCLUDE DIETARY FIBER IN OUR DIETS?
Consuming high fiber foods may help prevent and treat constipation. In addition, researchers
have shown that dietary fiber can play an important role in the prevention or treatment of various
diseases and disorders. These include obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, colon cancer,
diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as constipation.


WHAT ARE SOME SOURCES OF SOLUBLE AND INSOLUBLE FIBERS?
Ideally, we should incorporate both soluble and insoluble fibers in our diets. Good
sources of soluble fiber include oats, barley, legumes (dried beans and peas) and some
vegetables and fruits. Good sources of insoluble fiber include whole grain products
(breads, cereals, rice, pasta), nuts, seeds and some vegetables.

HOW MUCH DIETARY FIBER SHOULD WE CONSUME EACH DAY?
Experts are now recommending a dietary fiber intake in the range of 20 - 35 grams/day
for the healthy adult. The average American consumes between 10 - 20 grams/day - well
below the current recommendations. By eating 5-9 servings of fruit and vegetables a day
and 3-5 servings of whole grains we can easily adhere to the recommendations.




                                                                                                  191
                    On   The           Move

                  Fiber Content in Common Foods
Grain Products                Amount     Dietary Fiber   Calories
                                              (g)


Bran Muffins                  1 muffin     0.0 - 4.0      ~104


Bread, Whole Wheat            1 slice         1.6          61


Rice, Brown (cooked)           1 cup          3.3          216


Spaghetti, Whole Wheat         1 cup          4.5          174


Tortilla (Corn)                  1            1.0          67


Bran Chex™                      2/3           6.1          90


Corn Flakes                      1            1.0          100


Oatmeal                         3/4           1.6          108


Black Beans (cooked)             1            7.2          227


Pinto Beans (cooked)             1            6.8          235


Spinach (boiled)              1/2 cup         2.0          21


Apple (with skin)            1 medium         3.0          81


Strawberries                   1 cup          3.9          45




                                                                    192
                            On The Move
               Teacher Resource Guide on the Importance of Calcium

Calcium is the foundation on which strong bones and teeth are built; over time a diet low
in calcium can increase your risk of developing brittle bone disease.


Most individuals don‟t get enough calcium because they aren‟t drinking or eating enough
servings of the dairy group from the Food Guide Pyramid. Many Americans are
consuming too much soda, which can replace milk in their diet. Encourage participants
to get the recommended 2-3 servings of milk or dairy in their diet.


Some people aren‟t able to eat dairy products because they are lactose intolerant. Lactose
intolerant means certain people‟s stomachs can‟t digest the milk sugar called lactose.
This can cause great discomfort to many people such as bloating, cramping, diarrhea,
etc… If someone is lactose intolerant then other sources of calcium is recommended like
spinach, broccoli, fortified orange juice, sardines, tofu, etc…




                                                                                      193
                             On The Move
2005 Dietary Guidelines Recommend for Calcium
4-8 year old= 800 mg Calcium
8-10 year old= 800-1200 mg Calcium
11-18 year old= 1200-1500 mg Calcium
19-50 year old= 1000 mg Calcium
50+ year old=1200 mg Calcium


                                  Calcium Rich Foods


300 mg of Calcium
1cup of Skim Milk
1cup of Non-fat yogurt
1 cup of Calcium fortified 100% Orange Juice
4 oz of sardines, solids


200 mg of Calcium
1 oz of Cheddar cheese
1 cup of low-fat ice-cream



100 mg of Calcium
1 cup of non-fat cottage cheese
1/2c of cooked greens
1cup of dried beans
1/2c of tofu




                                                       194
                             On The Move

          Teacher Resource Guide for Good Fat Bad Fat

When choosing healthy protein choices, you need to watch the amount of fat that is found
in meat products. Choose lean meats with little amount of marbling and remove the skin
from chicken, turkey and fish before eating.

There are four different kinds of fats that are found in some vegetable and protein foods.

2 BAD FATS:
   1. Saturated Fats: found in all animal products, i.e.: cheese, milk, bacon, butter,
      pork, etc. High amounts of saturated fats can increase cholesterol and LDL, which
      cause heart disease. Chose a low-fat or non-fat option for a healthier diet.
   2. Trans Fats: found in many prepared store bought items. Trans fats are not on the
      food labels but soon will be required. Trans Fats are worse then saturated fats;
      they also cause heart disease and raise cholesterol and LDL‟s (both lab values that
      are done to see if someone is high risk for heart disease). Until trans fats are listed
      on the labels, avoid foods with Partially Hydrogenated Oils listed in the
      ingredients.

2 GOOD FATS:
   1. Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fats: found in many plant sources, i.e.:
      avocados, almonds, olive oil/canola oil, etc. Moderate amounts of these fats help
      lower cholesterol and clear out the LDL to help lower risk of heart disease. These
      are the type of fats that you want in your diet!




                                                                                         195
                           On The Move

                        EAT LESS FAT
 Eat Less Red Meat. Eat more fish and poultry instead. When you
  do eat red meat, choose the leanest cuts: round, sirloin and flank
  steaks, tenderloin and ground round.



 Roast, bake, or broil meats instead of frying. Trim the fat off meat and
  the skin off poultry, and avoid adding fat in cooking.



 Eliminate or cut down on high-fat foods like cold cuts, bacon,
  sausage, hot dogs, butter, margarine, salad dressings, lard, and
  shortening.



 Eat less ice cream, cheese, sour cream, cream, and other high-fat dairy
   products. Look for low-fat versions; they're increasingly available
   in grocery stores. Drink skim or low-fat milk instead of whole milk.




                                                                       196
                                       On The Move

Key terms

Diabetes: There are two types of diabetes- Type 1 and Type 2. Individuals with Type1
diabetes do not produce or may produce insufficient amounts of insulin. Those with type
2 diabetes produce insulin however their cells do not respond efficiently. In both types of
diabetes the amount of blood sugar rises because of lack of or a poor response to insulin.

Calcium: a mineral that helps build strong bones. Each adult needs 2-3 servings of dairy
products; older adults-primarily women need 3-4 servings of dairy products.

Saturated Fat: a fat that comes from animal products, it builds up in your arteries raising
your cholesterol and increasing your risk for heart disease, e.g., butter or lard.

Unsaturated Fat: a fat that comes from plant products, that will help carry away saturated
fat and will lower your cholesterol and other lipid labs, e.g., olive oil or canola oil.

Vitamin C: a vitamin found in many fruits and vegetables that helps with skin and overall
healthy growth.

Vitamin A: a vitamin found in many fruits and vegetables that helps with vision and
overall healthy growth.

Splenda: an artificial sweetener, use in place of sugar.

Cholesterol: found in animal products, if too much cholesterol builds up in your blood,
this can lead to heart disease.

Lactose free: free of the sugar in milk called lactose, that some people have trouble
digesting.

Fortified: has added vitamins and minerals.

Iron: a mineral that carries oxygen within red blood cells.

Phytochemicals: a plant chemical found in fruit and vegetables that may help prevent
cancer, diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure.




                                                                                         197
             On The Move


   Excellence Award

 Native American Health Center

presents this award
to:_______________________




                                 198
                       On The Move
                            Resources
1. Cooking Healthy! (Cocinando Saludable!)- San Diego California
   Nutrition Network Cooking Class Manual. www.sdnnonline.org.
   Retrieved November 2003- November 2004.
2. American Institute for Cancer Research. www.aicr.org. Retrieved
   November 2003-November 2004.
3. Cooking Tips: Knife Safety. Diabeteic-Lifestyle.2001. www.diabetic-
   lifet\style.com/articles/oct01_cooki_1.htm Retrieved November 2003-
   November 2004.
4. Dole 5 a day.www.dole5aday.com Retrieved November 2003-
   November 2004.
5. Food Guide Pyramid. www.usda.gov Retrieved October 2004.
6. Food Stamp Nutrition Connection.
www.nal.usda.gov/foodstamp/index.html Retrieved November 2003-
November 2004.
7. USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service ( NRCS). “Native uses
   of Native Plants”. NRCS.




                                                                   199
  On The Move



Evaluation
  Forms



                200
                               On The Move
Session Evaluation Form

Name of Session
Place
Date


What was the most interesting to you about this session?

What was the least interesting to you about this session?

Any changes to add or remove from the session?

Please circle the number that best describes your opinion about the session:
Poor=1                                        Very Good=4
Fair=2                                        Excellent=5
Good=3
                          Poor                              Excellent
Organization               1         2        3       4        5

Clarity of information     1        2        3        4        5

Session discussion         1        2        3        4        5

Cooking demonstration      1        2        3        4        5

Overall rating             1        2        3        4        5

Will you use this recipe at home? Yes or No and if not why not?

Would you share this recipe with a friend? Yes or No and if not why not?

Please use the back of this page for any other comments you may wish to share.

Thank you for your time!




                                                                                 201
                            On The Move
Pre/post test                                 Name:________________
                                              # of sessions attended________

1. In the past three days, how many servings of fruit or 100% fruit juice on average do
you eat in a full day? (Circle one)

None     1      2   3   4   5or more

2. In the past three days, how many servings of vegetables or 100% vegetable juice do
you eat in a full day? (Circle one)

None 1       2      3   4   5 or more


3. Name one benefit of eating whole grains.


4. Name one benefit of eating lean/low-fat proteins.


5. Name one benefit of eating low-fat dairy/non-dairy products.


6. Name one reason why you would use a dry measuring cup for flour instead of liquid?


7. Name one safety tip when using knives in the kitchen.


8. What measuring spoon is smaller? Tbsp or tsp




                                                                                          202
Answers:

3, 4, 5.-high fiber, iron, calcium
6. able to level off across top edge, not able to with liquid measuring cup
7. Any answers, ex- always use a sharp knife
8. tsp
7. 4 tbsp=1/4c




                                                                              203

				
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