Docstoc

Strategic

Document Sample
Strategic Powered By Docstoc
					      STRATEGIC
STATE COMMUNICATIONS
INTEROPERABILITY PLAN




   STATE OF MINNESOTA
        AUGUST 2007
        AUGUST 2007
Executive Overview

This document provides a comprehensive outline of the strategic direction of
Minnesota’s public safety interoperable communication efforts. It establishes the
Strategic Statewide Communications Interoperability Plan (SCIP) required by the
Department of Homeland Security as part of Minnesota’s comprehensive Homeland
Security planning efforts. The SCIP is intended to describe, document and establish the
communications, interoperability and planning initiatives, timelines, responsibilities,
accountabilities and funding available or required by the State of Minnesota to maximize
interoperability between public safety/service agencies through 2010.

The SCIP provides an overview of the current status of interoperable communications in
the State of Minnesota, including a discussion of existing governance structures,
available technology, the existence of standard operating procedures and of
interoperable communications training and exercises. In some cases, it is necessary to
acknowledge the fact that additional information is necessary to fully develop an
assessment of the current status of interoperable communication and alternatives. In
which case, the SCIP plan provides an outline (timelines, assignment of responsibilities
and benchmarks) for the completion.

The underlying plan for a statewide public safety communication system in Minnesota
was adopted by the Minnesota legislature in 2002. Minnesota’s statewide public safety
communications system is referred to as the ARMER system, which stands for Allied
Radio Matrix for Emergency Response (ARMER). A fundamental element of the
ARMER plan is that it provides the opportunity for all public safety/service entities to
achieve the highest level of interoperability by operating upon a shared platform. That
platform is a scalable 800 and 700 MHz trunked radio system that can address the
expanding roles of public safety/service entities and their interoperability needs.

Over $150 million in state and local funds has been invested in the construction of the
ARMER project in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. In 2005, another $45 million in
state funds were allocated for construction of the ARMER system in 23 counties outside
the Twin Cities metropolitan area. In 2007, the legislature provided for construction of
the ARMER backbone in the fifty-five remaining counties of the state over the next four
years by appropriating $186 million to that purpose.

In conjunction with the implementation of the ARMER backbone over the next four
years, this SCIP plan articulates how the backbone of the ARMER system will be used
to support interoperability with legacy public safety communication systems and to
support interoperability with our neighboring states and along Minnesota’s international
border with Canada. Similarly, special attention is given to the participation of
Minnesota’s eleven tribal communities and to the multitude of non-governmental entities
that are essential partners in Minnesota’s comprehensive homeland security response
plans.


                                           ii
Minnesota’s strength in cooperative governing is reflected in the governance structure
developed around the ARMER plan. The governance structure actually began in 1995
when the Metropolitan Radio Board (MRB) was established by the Minnesota legislature
to oversee the implementation of the ARMER backbone in the Twin Cities metropolitan
area. As that regional plan was implemented, the basic structural design of a multi-
discipline body with regional representation provided a model for the evolution to a
Statewide Radio Board from a statewide public safety communication system planning
committee. The model addresses the need for regional planning and regional
participation throughout the state by the existence of ongoing regional advisory
committees and regional radio boards.

Finally, upon identifying the current status of interoperability and Minnesota’s strategic
goals between the present and 2010 (the gap) this SCIP assigns responsibility for
planning initiatives and articulates benchmarks and timelines upon which to measure
progress toward achieving the maximum level of interoperability within the state of
Minnesota.

The document will serve as a resource and guide to Homeland Security regions,
counties, municipalities, non-governmental organizations and tribal jurisdictions in the
development and implementation of interoperable communications and practices
throughout the State. The document will also serve the U.S. Departments of Commerce
and Homeland Security to benchmark and measure progress, performance and
allocation and utilization of funds for interoperability initiatives within the State pursuant
to their guidelines and requirements.

Creation of the SCIP is a requirement of Section I.C.5 of the Homeland Security Grant
Program (HSGP), which states in part that “by the end of 2007, each state 1 must
develop and adopt a statewide communications interoperability plan.”

The Minnesota SCIP was developed in coordination with and the support of Office for
Interoperability and Compatibility’s (OIC) SAFECOM, Disaster Management (DM) and
the Interoperable Communications Technical Assistance Program (ICTAP).




1
 As defined in the Homeland Security Act of 2002, the term “state” means “any State of the United States, the District of Columbia,
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana
Islands, and any possession of the United States

                                                                iii
Table of Contents
Executive Overview..................................................................................................... ii

1 Introduction ............................................................................................................ 1

2 Background ............................................................................................................ 4

    2.1 State Overview .............................................................................................. 10
       2.1.1 NIMS/Multi-Agency Coordination System (MACS) ................................ 24
       2.1.2 Regions/Jurisdictions ............................................................................. 27
       2.1.3 UASI Areas/TIC Plans ........................................................................... 29
    2.2 Participating Agencies and Points of Contact ................................................ 31
    2.3 Statewide Plan Point of Contact (POC) ......................................................... 35
    2.4 Scope and Timeframe ................................................................................... 35

3 Methodology......................................................................................................... 37

4 Current Statewide Assessment .......................................................................... 45

    4.1     Governance Structure .................................................................................... 57
    4.2     Technology .................................................................................................... 62
    4.3     Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) ....................................................... 72
    4.4     Training and Exercise Plan ............................................................................ 77
    4.5     Usage ............................................................................................................ 80

5 Strategy ............................................................................................................... 84

    5.1     Interoperability ............................................................................................... 89
    5.2     Mission .......................................................................................................... 90
    5.3     Goals and Objectives ..................................................................................... 91
    5.4     Strategic Initiatives ......................................................................................... 94
    5.5     National Incident Management System (NIMS) Compliance ......................... 97
    5.6     Review and Update Process.......................................................................... 98

6 Implementation .................................................................................................... 99

7 Funding ............................................................................................................. 101

8 Close            ............................................................................................................. 104

Appendix A ................................................................................................................ 107

Appendix B            Homeland Security Funds ............................................................... 109

Appendix C            Homeland Security Funds ............................................................... 111

                                                                 i
Appendix D             Homeland Security ........................................................................... 113

Appendix E             Key Entities ....................................................................................... 115

Appendix F             800 MHz Executive Team - 2001 ...................................................... 117

Appendix G             Glossary ............................................................................................ 118



Table of Figures
Figure 1-1 Interoperable Continuum................................................................................ 2
Figure 3-1 Strategy and Framework for Development of Statewide Interoperable
    Communications (update graphic) ......................................................................... 43
Figure 4-1 Phased Implementation of the ARMER System in Minnesota ..................... 46

List of Tables
Table 2-1 Stakeholder Agencies ..................................................................................... 9
Table 2-2 ....................................................................................................................... 10
Table 2-3 Freight Shipments ......................................................................................... 16
Table 2-4 Regions/Jurisdictions/Agencies..................................................................... 29
Table 2-5 UASI Areas/TIC Plans ................................................................................... 31
Table 2-6 Regional Agencies and Points of Contact with Planning and Operational
    Authority ................................................................................................................. 34
Table 3-1 SCIP Ad Hoc Core Advisory Group ............................................................... 38
Table 3-2 Strategy and Status for Implementation of SCIP Components...................... 42
Table 4-1 ....................................................................................................................... 47
Table 4-3 Legislative and Executive Orders .................................................................. 57
Table 4-4 Interoperability Channels and Linked VHF/UHF Frequencies ....................... 63
Table 4-5 ....................................................................................................................... 72
Table 4-6 ....................................................................................................................... 73
Table 6-1 – Monitoring Status to Plan - Short to Long Term SCIP Plan Elements, Goals,
    Success and Performance Factors ........................................................................ 99
Table 7-1 ..................................................................................................................... 101




                                                                 ii
1        Introduction

“On September 11, 1996, 5 years to the day before the 9/11 terrorist attack, the Public
Safety Wireless Advisory Committee (PSWAC) released its final report, which stated
that “unless immediate measures are taken to alleviate spectrum shortfall and promote
interoperability, public safety will not be able to adequately discharge their obligation to
protect life and property in a safe, efficient, and cost effective manner.” Several years
later, public safety is still grappling with inadequate spectrum and radio communication
systems that do not communicate with one another.”

The 2001 and 2003 National Task Force on Interoperability2,3 characterized and
documented the current state of communications systems and interoperability across
the United States during times of crisis and the problems affecting public and private
agencies responsible for responding to and mitigating such events. The problems
identified include:

       Incompatible and aging communications equipment
       Limited and fragmented funding to support communications                         systems
        replacement or upgrades
       Limited and fragmented communications system planning
       Lack of or inadequate inter-agency coordination and cooperation
       Inadequate coverage or reliability
       Limited and fragmented radio spectrum availability

While these findings have been identified previously and subsequently, recent acts of
terror and violence, natural and other catastrophic events have continued to
demonstrate, validate and drive home the need for a national initiative and coordinated
approach to facilitate the mitigation of these communications problems.

Closely associated with interoperable communications is development and application
of standardized procedures for incident response, management and the training
necessary to assure fully interoperable response including common communications
language. A governance structure, through which these activities can be fostered,
developed, and consensus achieved and maintained is essential. The “Interoperability
Continuum” visually depicts these elements and enables the rapid assessment of where
a State or region is relative to the desired state of interoperability.




2
  National Institute of Justice, Office of Science and Technology, AGILE Program, Washington, D.C.,
“When They Can’t Talk, Lives Are Lost,” February, 2003.
3
  National Institute of Justice, Office of Science and Technology, AGILE Program, Washington, D.C.,
“Why We Can’t Talk: Working Together To Bridge The Communications Gap To Save Lives, A Guide For
Public Officials,” February, 2003.

                                                1
                            Figure 1-1 Interoperable Continuum

Minnesota has been engaged in the development of a statewide collaborative
communications initiative for well over ten years.            Beginning with the St.
Paul/Minneapolis metropolitan area an advanced trunked digital radio system
infrastructure capable of operating in the 700/800 MHz spectrum was designed and
constructed to overlay the nine-county metropolitan area. The project is now expanded
and involves the design and construction of a core “statewide” radio system to support
essential State public safety and service needs with a capacity to support county and
municipal communications. The system infrastructure provides interoperable capability
for statewide communications serving the entire State, facilitating a system of systems
interfacing varying radio system platforms.

The Minnesota State Legislature acted in 2007 to approve funding for expanded system
design considerations, site acquisition and construction and full build out of the State
supported radio system, known as the Allied Radio Matrix for Emergency Response
(ARMER). This strategic plan serves to focus on and leverage the statewide ARMER
initiative with those of local governments in the State and support the initiatives of the
Departments of Homeland Security and Commerce to develop nationwide seamless
communications interoperability. The outcome of all these processes is to develop,
operate and maintain a statewide and inclusive system of interoperable communications
and field practices in Minnesota.

Minnesota’s ARMER, the Metropolitan Area subsystems and the planning, governance,
technology, training and exercise programs and standard operating procedures that this

                                            2
SCIP expands to the rest of the State, was proved on August 1, 2007 with the
catastrophic collapse of the downtown Minneapolis Interstate 35-W bridge during
evening rush hour traffic.

The immediate public safety response and establishment of incident command,
seamless interoperable communications and capacity to successfully handle the
dramatically increased radio communications volume all contributed to an organized
response to an extremely chaotic and dangerous situation and validated the approach
described in this SCIP.

The lessons learned from this event will be captured and form the basis for any
modifications to the technology in standard operating procedures.

(may add: percentage and performance measurements)

Because of the prior planning and org structure that is govern, planning, training, usage,
the lessons to be learned from this experience will influence the future of systems and
practices within the State.

The structure is in place to ensure that lessons learned will be identified and acted
upon.

A detailed after action report will provide necessary information to make slight
modification to technology and/or policy/procedures governing the use of the system in
events involving multi-agency multi-disciplinary response.

This system allowed seamless transition from day-to-day operation to emergency
response in IC with minimal confusion.

In short, the planning and training allowed the system to perform as designed and
anticipated.




                                            3
2        Background

A statewide plan for the construction and implementation of a Standards Based Shared
System began in 2000 when the Minnesota legislature established a planning
committee to investigate and report on Minnesota’s need for a statewide shared public
safety radio system.4 The planning committee’s report was presented to the legislature
the next year5. Appendix F provides a list of the participants in the 2001 Executive
Planning Committee. The report examined the current status of public safety
communications in Minnesota, articulated alternatives and proposed the construction of
a statewide, shared public safety radio system. In 2002, the planning committee
presented a detailed plan for a statewide, shared public safety radio system to the
legislature.6 That plan and the concept of developing statewide standards - based
shared public safety communications system was adopted by the 2002 legislature. As a
result, the technology element of Minnesota’s strategy to achieve public safety
communications interoperability is aligned with the highest level of interoperability on
the SAFECOM Interoperability Continuum.

MN used the bottom up and inclusive approach early on in the development of the
statewide public safety communications system. And more recently, the state has
recognized the need to formally engage tribal nations and non-governmental agencies
in the planning process.

Prior to the adoption of a statewide plan, over $75 million in state and local funds had
already been invested in the construction of the ARMER system in the Twin Cities
metropolitan area. The continued integration of local governments in the Twin Cities
metropolitan area over the subsequent seven years has increased the state and local
investment to over $150 million. In excess of $38 million of Minnesota’s Homeland
Security funds and Urban Area Security Initiative funds in FY2003, FY2004 and FY2005
have been used to enable local government to migrate to the ARMER backbone.
Exhibit D presents the specific expenditures of Homeland Security funds for FY2003 –
FY 2005. Full integration of all seven counties (local, regional and county governments)
of the Twin Cities metropolitan area will be achieved in 20087. In 2005, another $45
million in state funds were allocated for construction of the ARMER backbone in 23
counties outside the Twin Cities metropolitan area. In 2007, the legislature provided for
construction of the ARMER backbone in the remaining fifty-five counties of the state
over the next four years by appropriating $186 million to that purpose.

4
   Chapter 475, 2000 Laws of Minnesota
5
    800 MHz Executive Team Report to the 2001 Legislature., 800 MHz Statewide Shared Public Safety
Radio System dated February 1, 2001 available at http://www.srb.state.mn.us/pdf/Exhibit-1-
800MHzReport-2001.pdf
6
     A Conceptual and Logical Architect for a Statewide Wireless Communication Plan available at
http://www.srb.state.mn.us/pdf/RevisedCONCEPTUALSTATEWIDEPLAN-09-27-02.pdf
7
        Report to Governor Pawlenty and the Minnesota Legislature, March 2005 available at
http://www.srb.state.mn.us/pdf/SRB%202005%20REPORT%20TO%20THE%20LEGISLATURE%20Revi
sed.pdf

                                                4
A fundamental element of the ARMER plan is that it provides the opportunity for all
public safety/service entities to achieve the highest level of interoperability by operating
upon a shared platform. That platform is a scalable 800 and 700 MHz trunked radio
system that can address the expanding roles of public safety/service entities and their
interoperability needs.

Establishing a credible and representative governance structure has been an essential
element in Minnesota’s plan to build a statewide shared public safety radio system. The
origins of that governance structure go back to 1995 when the Minnesota legislature
created the Metropolitan Radio Board as a unique political subdivision for the purpose
of implementing a regional public safety radio system in the Twin Cities metropolitan
area. Following the adoption of the plan for a statewide shared public safety radio
system, a transition from a metropolitan regional structure to a statewide structure was
appropriate. The creation of a multi-disciplinary board representing state and local
interests occurred in 2004 with the legislative creation of the Statewide Radio Board
(SRB). Tables 4.2 - 4.6 (Appendix F) present the composition and members of the
Statewide Radio Board and its committees. Similarly, the enabling legislation provided
for regional planning and implementation through the permissive establishment of
regional radio boards. To date, two regional radio boards exist. The first one is the
Metropolitan Emergency Services Board, which evolved out of the original Metropolitan
Radio Board and the second is a consolidation of thirteen counties into the Central
Minnesota Regional Radio Board. Membership of the regional radio boards is available
at their respective websites:

http://www.mn-mesb.org/ and http://cmnradio.org/index.html Formation of regional
radio boards is also underway in southeastern Minnesota and northwestern Minnesota.

The original focus of the SRB was the implementation of the statewide shared public
safety radio plan, but as the plan continued to evolve the magnitude of the challenge
and the need to address the short term, mid term and long term public safety
interoperability issues across the state became apparent and the role of the SRB has
been changed. The SRB is designated as Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability
Executive Committee (SIEC) by Executive Order of the Governor (See Appendix A-3).
The SRB has proposed a new committee structure, the SIEC Advisory Committee to
more aptly reflect a broader representation of stakeholders needed for the discussion of
public safety interoperability throughout the state.        This broader stakeholder
representation includes tribal members, non-governmental public safety entities, federal
representatives and others essential to an open and robust discussion of public safety
interoperable needs. Similarly, as Minnesota’s SIEC, the SRB will assume a broader
role in coordinating technical and operational standards and standard operating
procedures necessary to assure the highest level of public safety interoperability
possible with existing resources throughout the short term, mid-term and in the long
term.

Several recent events have advanced the time frame and focused the resources being
applied to develop Minnesota’s Strategic SCIP, including:


                                             5
      U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Department of Commerce
       requirement to submit a completed SCIP by December 3, 2007.
      Minnesota legislative mandate to assess and interface the build out of the
       remaining elements of the statewide radio system (ARMER) with county,
       municipal and tribal radio system plans by June 30, 2008.
      The need to initiate regional interoperable communications assessment
       methodologies in all regions for the development of regional Tactical
       Interoperable Communication (TIC) Plans.
      The need to complete the alignment of interoperability requirements with
       operational and technology solutions, funding requirements and funding sources
       by June 30, 2008.
      Structural need to continue the development and implementation of Regional
       Radio Boards or Regional Advisory Committees in all portions of the state
       including the development of Governance, Standard Operating Procedures,
       Training, Exercises and Radio Usage by June 30, 2008 in preparation for
       construction of the remaining elements of the ARMER system.

The need to renew the public safety wireless communication infrastructure and to
achieve a level of interoperability consistent with the needs and expectations of our
citizens are reinforced on a daily basis. The driving forces behind and supporting the
development of Minnesota’s strategic direction to achieve public safety communications
interoperability and to develop this SCIP are at the highest levels of Minnesota
Government starting with the Governor’s Office and the Legislature and also include the
following:

      Minnesota Statewide Radio Board
      Minnesota Department of Public Safety
      Minnesota Department of Transportation, Office of Electronic Communications
      Minnesota Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board
      U. S. Department of Homeland Security
      U.S. Department of Commerce
      Interoperable Communications Technical Assistance Program
      Local County and Municipal Officials
      Tribal Governments
      Non Governmental Organizations Engaged in Disaster Response

A list of key stakeholders (Table 1) included in the development of Minnesota’s
Strategic SCIP process include the:
      Minnesota Statewide Radio Board (SRB)
      Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS), Homeland Security and
       Emergency Management (HSEM)
      Minnesota Department of Public Safety, ARMER-911
      Minnesota Department of Transportation (MN/DOT), Office of Electronic
       Communications (OEC)


                                          6
      Minnesota Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board (EMSRB)
      Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (MESB)
      Urban Area Administrative Council (UAAC)
      Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board (CMNRRB)
      Southeast Minnesota Regional Radio Committee (SEMNRAC)
Representatives of individual counties, municipalities, tribal governments and non-
governmental organizations and disciplines in Homeland Security Emergency
Management Regions 2 (Northeast MN), 3 (Northwest MN) and 5 (Southwest) currently
participate on a limited basis through professional organizations and affiliations, Division
of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) Regional Program
Coordinators, ARMER-911 outreach and educational initiatives, one to one
communication with the Statewide Interoperability Coordinator and informal sub regional
groups until their respective regions develop and establish a Radio Advisory Committee
or Regional Radio Board.
Of particular import with respect to this process is the fact that Minnesota has been
involved in the implementation of a 700/800 MHz capable system for over twelve years
(the Region 22 700 MHz Plan was filed with and approved by the FCC. The Public
Safety Interoperable Communications (PSIC) grant provides a unique opportunity to aid
local governments, tribal governments and non-governmental entities with the
resources they need to renew their communication resources and to integrate with the
ARMER backbone.
Similarly, factors noted as part of Minnesota’s original public safety communication
reports to the legislature in 2001 continue to drive the need to provide strategic
leadership in the renewal of Minnesota’s public safety communication infrastructure, as
follows:
      Public safety entities continue to use aging and obsolete communication systems
       (many of the law enforcement systems were originally acquired with Law
       Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA) funds in the 1970’s.
      Pending narrow banding of VHF and UHF frequencies.
      Technology advances, including the analog to digital transition, the increased
       importance of interoperable data and the increased need for security in public
       safety communications.
Significant momentum was provided to the Strategic SCIP process when Minnesota’s
Governor adopted a plan to fully fund the construction of the ARMER backbone in all 87
counties of the state as part of his recommended budget and by the Minnesota
Legislature when they approved legislation providing $186 million for that purpose. The
application of U.S. Department of Homeland Security funding between FY2003 to
FY2006 and the availability of U.S. Department of Commerce funds (PSIC grant) have
aided in maintaining the momentum for the planning and implementation of this SCIP
planning process. Of particular note is the substance and depth of the governance
structure created to administer the substantial investment by the state, regions and local
governments in the ARMER system. That structure recognizes the need and

                                             7
encourages the establishment of Regional Radio Advisory Committees or Regional
Radio Boards to address regional planning, operational and technical issues and the
development of Standard Operating Procedures. Similarly, the broad engagement of a
multi-disciplinary public safety community in the governance, including non-
governmental public safety providers, has established a diverse community of interest in
expanding the planning and discussion of interoperable communication issues
throughout the state. Most recently, as part of the SCIP development process, an ad
hoc Core Advisory Group was established as a steering committee to guide key
elements of the Strategic SCIP process and planning.
(May add graphic/flow chart)
The establishment of a strategic SCIP plan for the State of Minnesota provides several
important benefits, including:

      Places the appropriate focus on the public’s safety as well as public safety by
       defining a clear vision, mission, goals and objectives for communications and
       operational interoperability
      Supports a consistent and timely ongoing multi-jurisdictional and multi-
       disciplinary approach and process to maximize the use of limited resources
       (funds, frequency spectrum, personnel, infrastructure, subscriber equipment,
       etc.) and to leverage those limited resources to better serve the public’s interests
       and those of public safety
      Supports optimal response in critical situations due to the training and ongoing
       exercise of planned events coupled with Tactical Interoperability
       Communications (TIC) Plans which establish and reinforce pre-planned response
       and actions
      Enables policy makers at the local, State and Federal levels to have a clearly
       articulated “road map”, bench marks, time frames, accountability and
       responsibility for achieving each key element of the plan and helping assure the
       appropriate application and use of public funds
      Provides HSEM regions with essential information and resources to assist them
       in the development and implementation of communications and field operational
       interoperability, decision making and development of TIC Plans in each region
      Assures opportunities for broad based review, input and operational and
       technical expertise into the ongoing development and maintenance of all
       interoperability capabilities
      Delineates the who, what, where, when and how of various elements of
       communications interoperability across the entire State
      Provides for a system of governance and ongoing perpetuation of the processes

(Tribal government NGOs are members on various committees listed in the following
table)




                                            8
                                     Table 2-1 Stakeholder Agencies


    Region      Jurisdiction        Agency         Point of Contact          Title            Phone
                                Regional Radio                        Rochester, MN
1            Southeast (SE)                        Lt. Tim Heroff                          507-287-7973
                                Board                                 Police Department
                                Homeland
                                Security
                                                                      Regional Program
1            Southeast MN       Emergency          Craig Strand                            612-619-6115
                                                                      Coordinator
                                Management
                                (HSEM)
2            Northeast (NE)     Not Formalized     Not Identified
                                                                      Regional Program
2            Northeast MN       HSEM               Roy Holmes                              218-327-4496
                                                                      Coordinator
                                Regional                              Regional
3            Northwest          Advisory           Brian Holmer       Interoperability     218-686-8252
                                Committee                             Coordinator
                                                                      Regional Program
3            Northwest, MN      HSEM               Mary Hilbrand                           218-634-3356
                                                                      Coordinator
                                Central MN Radio                      Chair, Central
4            West Central                          Don Otte                                877-366-6883
                                Board                                 Radio Board
                                                                      Regional Program
4            West Central, MN   HSEM               Glenn Elvecrog                          218-838-3911
                                                                      Coordinator
5            Southwest          Not Formalized     Not Identified
                                                                      Regional Program
5            Southwest, MN      HSEM               Amy Card                                651-247-6393
                                                                      Coordinator
                                Metropolitan
                                Emergency
6            Metro                                 Myra Peterson      Chairperson          651-430-6014
                                Services Board
                                (MESB)
                                                                      Radio Services
6            Metro              MESB               Jill Rohret                             651-643-8394
                                                                      Coordinator
                                                                      Regional Radio
                                                                      Interoperability
6            Metro              MESB               Charles Jacky                           651-643-8380
                                                                      Training
                                                                      Coordinator
                                                                      Regional Program
6            Metro              HSEM               Kim Ketterhagen                         651-755-1615
                                                                      Coordinator
             State of           Statewide Radio
Statewide                                          Tim Leslie         Chairperson          651-201-7176
             Minnesota          Board
                                Department of
             State Of           Public Safety
Statewide                                          Scott Wiggins      Program Director     651-201-7546
             Minnesota          (DPS) ARMER -
                                911
                                                                      Statewide
             State of           DPS ARMER -
State                                              Vacant             Interoperability     651-201-7552
             Minnesota          911
                                                                      Coordinator
                                Homeland
             State of           Security
State                                              Kris Eide          HSEM Director        651-201-7404
             Minnesota          Emergency
                                Management
                                Emergency
             State of
State                           Medical Services   Mary Hedges        Executive Director   651-201-2806
             Minnesota
                                Board


                                                   9
2.1     State Overview

The State of Minnesota resides is in the north central United States near the geographic
center of North America. Minnesota is bordered on the north by the Canadian
provinces of Manitoba and Ontario, on the west by North Dakota and South Dakota, on
the south by Iowa, and on the east by Wisconsin and Lake Superior. The adjoining
states and Canada have 37 contiguous counties and provinces with Minnesota counties
and 7 state police agencies.

The total area of Minnesota is 86,943 square miles, of which 4,780 square miles is
inland water and 2,546 square miles is a portion of Lake Superior under the state's
jurisdiction; Minnesota ranks 12th in total area among the 50 states. The State
measures 406 miles from north to south, and 358 miles from east to west at its
maximum extent and approximately 180 miles at its narrowest point. The State is
comprised of 87 counties and more than 2700 cities and townships. The State has 11
tribal governments located throughout various regions of the State, as follows:

                                            Table 2-2

                                       Chippewa Tribes
           Bois Forte Band (Nett
                                    Koochiching, Itasca and St. Louis Counties
           Lake)
           Fond du Lac Band of
                                    Carlton and St. Louis Counties
           Chippewa Indians
           Grand Portage Band       Cook County
           Leech Lake Band          Cass, Itaska & Beltrami County
           Mille Lacs Band of
                                    Mille Lacs, Aitkin & Pine County
           Chippewa Indians
           Red Lake Band of         Beltrami, Clearwater, Lake of the Woods, Pennington &
           Chippewa Indians         Roseau Counties
           White Earth Band         Mahnomen, Becker & Clearwater Counties
                                          Sioux Tribes
           Lower Sioux Indian
                                    St. Louis & Koochiching Counties
           Community
           Prairie Island
           Community in the State   St. Louis & Carlton Counties
           of Minnesota
           Shakopee
           Mdewakanton Sioux
                                    Scott County
           Community of
           Minnesota
           Upper Sioux
                                    Yellow Medicine County
           Community

The tribes are sovereign governments with varying degrees of autonomy over
reservation lands based upon treaties and subsequent agreements between the tribal
governments, local communities and the State of Minnesota. The Indian Affairs Council
of the State of Minnesota was established in 1963 and serves as the official liaison of
the Indian Tribes and the State of Minnesota.

                                               10
Minnesota’s Climate Characteristics

Minnesota is often characterized as the State with a “theater of seasons.” Having four
very distinct seasons poses a range of opportunities for residents and visitors, but also
for extremes of weather and weather related emergencies. Severe winter storms
including ice, snow and blizzards along with sustained periods of sub-zero actual
temperatures and “wind chill temperatures even more severe are annual occurrences
across the State posing serious risk to residents, travelers and visitors.

Heavy snow falls, extreme cold temperatures and rapid spring thawing pose
opportunities for wide area as well as localized flooding and storm related damage.
Northwestern, south central and southwestern Minnesota incur frequent flash flooding
and flooding from spring thawing. Recent floods in the Red River Valley area have
resulted in substantial damages and losses.

While some areas sustain flooding, other areas in the far north and northeast Minnesota
continue to have sustained drought and fire risks. The spring of 2007 brought this
problem to the forefront again as a sustained fire in the Ham Lake area of Boundary
Waters Canoe Area required suppression and control resources from multiple states
and agencies and Canada.

As spring moves into early summer, severe and damaging thunderstorms, tornadoes
and straight line winds increasingly result in severe damage and loss of life around the
state requiring the rapid mobilization of government and non-government agencies to
aid and assist local residents. Summer in Minnesota brings more severe weather; heat
and humidity stressing power supply grids, water supplies, the elderly and the young.
The period between Memorial Day and Labor Day results in millions of residents and
visitors making their way to the State’s many lakes, forests, out door multi-day concert
venues and other recreational areas. Late summer and fall thunderstorms and rain can
create conditions for high levels of ground moisture which freezes and sets up the
potential for flooding cycles the following spring.

The extent of climate diversity throughout the year is displayed in the table that follows,
keeping in mind that the “averages” presented mask significant extremes of conditions
well known to residents. The three sample cities reflect a far north central portion of the
State (Bemidji), the central east (Twin Cities) and far south central (Albert Lea.)




                                            11
                                  Average Temperature- High/Low Fahrenheit
          Jan     Feb     Mar      Apr     May     Jun     Jul    Aug      Sep       Oct     Nov     Dec
Albert    23/5    26/8    39/21    55/36   68/46   78/57   84/62  82/59    73/51     60/39   42/24   28/12
Lea
Twin      21/3    26/8    39/21    55/36   69/48    78/57    82/62   80/60   71/50   59/39   39/24   26/10
Cities
Bemidji   16/ -   21/ -   33/8     51/26   66/39    73/51    80/55   78/53   66/44   55/34   35/17   21/1
          5       4
                                  Average Precipitations- Snow/Rain (inches)
Albert    7.5     7.3     10.0     1.9     0.1      -       -       -        -       0.6     5.4     8.1
Lea
          0.8     0.9     1.5      2.5     4.1      4.4      3.7     3.6     3.5     2.0     1.4     0.9

Twin      9.8     8.4     10.7     2.8     0.0      -        -       -       -       0.5     7.9     9.3
Cities
          0.8     0.8     1.8      2.2     3.1      4.1      3.7     3.6     2.7     1.9     1.5     1.0

Bemidji   9.1     6.9     8.4      4.1     0.4      -        -       -       -       1.3     6.1     7.9

          0.6     0.6     1.0      1.7     2.6      3.9      3.4     3.3     2.4     1.7     1.0     0.7

     Topography

     Topographically the State’s highest point is Eagle Mountain in the Superior National
     Forest at 2,301 feet (701 m) above sea level. It is located in northeastern Minnesota
     along the north shore area of Lake Superior not far from the Canadian border. The
     lowest point is Lake Superior at 602 feet above sea level. The mean elevation for
     Minnesota is approximately 1200 feet. The southern one third of the State is
     characterized by significant agricultural development and related business and industry,
     the middle one third by major population areas, industry, high tech, medical and
     agricultural development and the northern one third by recreation and tourism,
     agricultural, forestry and forest products, iron mining and significant areas of state and
     federal lands including the Boundary Waters Wilderness Canoe Area.

     Major Features

     The Twin Cities Metropolitan area, located along the east central part of the State and
     bordering Wisconsin is a major United States urban area boasting of professional sports
     teams in football, baseball, basketball, hockey and soccer. These events routinely draw
     15,000 – 65,000 persons to a single location to attend or participate in the event.
     Minnesotans and visitors alike also enjoy internationally recognized arts, music and
     entertainment facilities, two convention centers and multiple amateur sports venues
     throughout the region with supportive accommodation capacities to host national and
     international competitions and conventions, including the 2008 National Republican
     Convention in the City of St. Paul.


                                                        12
Minnesota is a major tourist destination point from around the world with internationally
known retail operations such as the Mall of America (with 4.2 million square feet of
space, 20,000 parking spaces and over 40 million visitors annually), numerous large
indoor shopping centers, Water Park of America in the Twin Cities along with the
numerous four seasons’ tourism and sporting destinations throughout the State.

The Minnesota State Fair, located on 320 acres adjacent to the City of St. Paul and the
University of Minnesota St. Paul Campus, attracts over 1.6 million visitors (ranging from
over 100,000 to close to 200,000 per day) over its twelve days of operation ending on
Labor Day of each year. The 2008 Minnesota State Fair will coincide with the 2008
National Republican Convention in St. Paul.

Anchored by Northwest Airlines corporate and airline hub operations, Minneapolis St.
Paul International Airport is truly an international airport for the metropolitan area with
daily flights originating to and arriving from all parts of the world. Home to several
Fortune 500 and the Forbes top 100 Best Companies, Minnesota maintains a solid
economic, business and employment base. Talent for these companies is provided in
part by a network of highly ranked private and state colleges and universities anchored
by the multiple campuses of the University of Minnesota and its 50,000+ students.

Demographics

Minnesota’s population is approximately 5,167,000 (2005 estimate). The state’s five
most populous cities comprise almost 18% of the states population.

      Minneapolis – 372,800
      St. Paul (Capital) – 275,150
      Rochester (Mayo Clinic) – 94,950
      Duluth (Port of Duluth) – 84,900
      Bloomington (Mall of America and MSP) – 81,150

The seven county Minneapolis St. Paul Metropolitan area has a total population of
2,642,100 and comprises 53% of the State’s population (2000 census figures).

County        Population   Housing     Total     Water     Land    Population Housing
              (2000        Units       Area      Area      Area    per        per
              census)                  (Miles)   (Miles)   (miles) square     square
                                                                   mile       mile
Anoka            298,084    108,091     446.26     22.65   423.61       703.7    255.2
Carver            70,205     24,883     376.15     19.11   357.04       196.6      69.7
Dakota           355,904    133,750     586.33     16.75   569.58       624.9    234.8
Hennepin       1,116,200    468,824     606.38     49.77   556.62     2,005.3    842.3
Ramsey           511,035    206,448     170.13     14.36   155.78     3,280.6 1,325.3
Scott             89,498     31,609     368.56     11.88   356.68       250.9      88.6
Washington       201,130     73,635     423.16     31.46   391.70       513.5    188.0



                                            13
2005 Metro County Population Estimates approach 2,746,800

      Anoka – 324,000
      Carver – 84,800
      Dakota – 383,600
      Hennepin - 1,119,000
      Ramsey – 495,000
      Scott – 120,000
      Washington – 220,400

Hennepin County, the state’s largest county, had a population in 2000 of 1,116,200
(22.5% of entire State population). The growth rate in the Metro area from 1990 to 2000
was approximately 15.4%. The metro area is located in the east central portion of the
State, on the Minnesota/Wisconsin border. The neighboring Wisconsin counties of Polk,
St. Croix, and Pierce, are also experiencing rapid growth. St. Croix County is most
accessible to the metro area via I-94, and has seen an 11% population growth in the
last three years. The 2005 population estimates presented previously for the seven-
county Metro area show significant changes in six of the counties. Statewide data will
be presented later in the plan that illustrates significant demographic differences among
counties resulting in significant implications for the development and maintenance of
interoperable communications and field services on a statewide basis.

Minnesota is well known nationally for its many lakes, stream and river assets. The
State has 6,564 rivers and streams totaling 92,000 miles and 11,842 lakes over 10
acres in size, for a total of 4,967,510 acres of water. The implications of these water
resources within counties will also be presented later in the plan. Likewise the presence
of large tracts of federal and state lands (parks) in some areas of the State poses
significant implications for radio system design and funding.

Public Safety and Services

The State of Minnesota has 87 Sheriff’s Offices and just fewer than 400 local law
enforcement agencies (cities and townships). Of the 486 county and municipal law
enforcement agencies within the State, 400 of the agencies have fewer than 25 officers
or deputies within their agency; 13 agencies have more than 100 licensed personnel.
The total number of full time licensed peace officers in the State is approximately 9,295.
There are 791 fire departments in Minnesota comprised of 738 volunteer/paid on call
departments, 42 combinations paid and paid on call departments and 11 full time career
departments. Only 21 departments have a paid chief and administrative staff or staff
person. The Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board (EMS-RB) identifies 170
medical response units who voluntarily register their programs with the EMS-RB. The
medical response units are supported by over 300 licensed ambulance transportation
services. The public safety community is supported through 114 public safety answering
points (PSAP’s) throughout the State.           Statewide, Minnesota has over 1000
maintenance and public works organizations; there are over 13,500 school districts



                                           14
operated and contracted school buses. The Minnesota Department of Education
maintains a statewide listing of school bus resources.

Of the eleven tribal jurisdictions within the State a number provide their own public
safety services; the extent to which tribal communities provide these services or rely on
assistance for mutual aid from State, local or private agencies varies among the tribal
jurisdictions. All tribal governments are engaged with the Minnesota Department of
Public Safety, Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) in
comprehensive disaster planning on a regional and state basis. Each of the eleven
tribal jurisdictions are invited and several have participated in quarterly HSEM regional
meetings.

Minnesota’s Infrastructure

Over the past twenty-five years the definition of “infrastructure” has expanded,
particularly in light of world-wide events, including those in the United States. The terms
“critical infrastructure”, “critical assets” and “key resources” are used by federal, state
and local governments to characterize, prioritize and address their respective areas of
security concern. Historically, infrastructure referred to and focused on the public works
areas of water supply, waste-water treatment and disposal and transportation. In
today’s world, while consensus may not have been fully achieved, clearly the areas of
telecommunications, energy, banking and finance, emergency services, government
continuity and information systems have joined the original public works categories of
infrastructure and are priorities in Minnesota.

Considered a “high tech” State, Minnesota is the home of many high tech companies
and companies utilizing technology in a wide range of fields. The State of Minnesota
and many of its political subdivisions have invested in linked high speed data systems
using fiber optics, microwave and T1 lines. Supporting these and other infrastructures
are the State’s energy providers. Over the past twenty years no new energy producing
facilities have been built or brought on line in Minnesota. Minnesota has two nuclear
powered electricity generating facilities, both within approximately 50 miles of the Twin
Cities Metropolitan area. The State is currently investing millions of dollars to rebuild,
redesign and upgrade roadway systems, capacity and bridges across the State to
address ever increasing demand. The catastrophic collapse of the I-35W Bridge and the
subsequent response demonstrates the continuing need to plan for infrastructure
maintenance and replacement. In the aftermath of the collapse, MN DOT, Metro Transit
and the City of Minneapolis immediately responded to establish alternative enhanced
road routes, enhanced ride share coordination, bus and park and ride facilities to assist
commuters around the significant disruption to traffic flow created by the collapse.
Additional temporary lane capacity and traffic management flow practices were being
applied within seven days of the initial collapse. Minneapolis St. Paul International
Airport is well into the completion of major renovations for additional and improved
runway capacity, terminal and parking facilities and security capabilities following the
decision to keep the airport at its historical location near the cities of Minneapolis and
St. Paul. The investment in the State’s public safety infrastructure through equipping,


                                            15
training and coordinating public safety services and personnel has been led by the
Governor and Legislature in communications, training, specific programmatic grants and
by Congress through the Departments of Homeland Security and Commerce. The
investment in public safety services and infrastructure in Minnesota and public works is
substantial.

Transportation is a common denominator supporting and necessary for most if not all
infrastructure needs. The Federal Highway Administration assesses transportation
system utilization for freight shipments and shows the following for Minnesota:

                                    Table 2-3 Freight Shipments

                 Freight Shipments To, From, and Within Minnesota 1998, 2010, and 2020
                                                       Tons                 Value
                                                     (millions)          (billions $)
                                                1998 2010 2020 1998 2010 2020
           State Total                        481       657   801   272   548   932
           By Mode
           Air                                <1        1     2     46    119   218
           Highway                            283       421   538   194   381   645
           Other [a]                          1         2     2     <1    <1    <1
           Rail                               149       184   210   25    39    58
           Water                              47        48    49    7     9     11
           By Destination/Market
           Domestic                           448       609   733   231   446   736
           International                      32        48    68    41    102   195

Note: Modal numbers may not add to totals due to rounding.
a
  The "Other" category includes international shipments that moved via pipeline or by an
unspecified mode.

The implications and importance of freight transportation to Minnesota and other States
and the associated risks or adverse consequences of any disruptions to those systems
cannot be over stated. The table also demonstrates the critical need to plan for and
prepare for the growth in several of the modes.

http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/freight_analysis/state_info/minnesota/profile_mn.ht
m#fig3

Exhibit ____ shows the network of the interstate freeway in the immediate Twin City
Metropolitan area. The network consolidates significantly upon leaving the area with I-
94 going south and east to Wisconsin and Illinois and to the north and west to North
Dakota and Montana. I- 35 goes south through central Minnesota and Iowa all the way
to the Mexico border in Texas; Interstate 90 cuts through southern Minnesota from
Central Wisconsin west through South Dakota, merging with I-94 in Montana and west
to Seattle. These interstate resources are supported by an additional network of federal

                                                   16
and state highways, most notably U.S. 71 originating in International Falls, on the
Canada border and south to Louisiana, U.S. 2 traveling from the upper peninsula of
Michigan, across northern Wisconsin, entering Duluth and going west just south of the
Canadian border to the western border of Montana. U.S. Highways 10, 12 and 14
likewise travel east and west across the middle and lower two thirds of the State to the
western states. While the interstate freeways shoulder most of the heavy traffic, these
significant federal highway assets represent important transportation resources and
infrastructure.

In a similar manner, the navigable waters of Lake Superior, the Mississippi and
Minnesota rivers represent significant shipping resources for coal, grain, minerals,
energy, sand and gravel and container shipping from U.S. and foreign ports. The lock
and dam system on the Mississippi is equally important infrastructure to support the
river shipping, flood control and electrical power generation.

[John- I have asked HSEM to come up with some language they have used in past
Strategic Planning work to describe Critical Infrastructure and their process of
evaluation.]

Current Initiatives in Interoperability

ARMER- Statewide Public Safety Radio System

As previously noted, Minnesota is currently implementing a statewide public safety
communications system known as the ARMER system. The regional backbone was
implemented in the metropolitan area in 2001. The plan for a statewide build out was
adopted by the legislature in 2002. Homeland security grants, law enforcement grants
and urban areas security initiative funds have been used to supplement local funds
used to advance local government integration onto the ARMER system backbone in the
Twin Cities metropolitan area. The outcome of those initiatives is that the entire seven
county Twin Cities metropolitan area will be fully integrated onto a single public safety
communication system providing the highest level of interoperability by the third quarter
of 2008.

As a result of the integrations to date and the planning efforts related to interoperable
communications, the Twin City Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) region received a
perfect scorecard upon exercise of their Tactical Interoperability Communication plan
(TIC Plan).

The continued implementation of the ARMER system into 23 additional counties of the
state was funded by the Minnesota legislature in 2005. The plan provides for
construction of a communication backbone in central and southeastern Minnesota.
That implementation is currently underway and scheduled for substantial completion by
the end of 2007. (spring of 2008)




                                           17
Funding for the expansion of the ARMER system into the remaining 55 counties was
approved by the legislature in 2007 and will become available in July 2008. Targeting
substantial completion by 2012 so the infrastructure will be available for consideration
as a local alternative as local governments are required to replace their infrastructure by
the 2013 narrow banding requirements. As a result, the ARMER system continues to
be the backbone for Minnesota’s strategy to achieve interoperable communications
within the state, but not the only strategy. The existence of a common statewide
infrastructure provides the opportunity to link existing communication systems into the
700/800 MHz trunked environment and the opportunity to coordinate VHF and UHF
interoperability resources into that backbone and among legacy system users allowing
enhanced interoperability with systems that have not reached the end of their lifecycle.
It also provides a capacity upon which to develop strategies for enhanced interoperable
data.

Without a doubt, full integration of the Twin Cities metropolitan area was a fundamental
piece of Minnesota’s comprehensive interoperable communication planning. With that
objective effectively achieved, and a reassessment of Minnesota’s timeline for the
broader strategy for a statewide implementation certain adjustments to Minnesota’s
strategy for interoperable communication are underway. Those adjustments are as
follows:

   Interoperability planning, training and exercising must be a fundamental piece for all
    public safety entities and officials.
   There must be an expansive view of public safety entities, which includes all
    government and a multitude of non-governmental entities that will be a critical part of
    any public safety response.
   Resource development (common talk groups, VHF and UHF mutual aid channels
    and links between discrete systems) must be comprehensive.
   The scope of public safety communication requirements is continually changing and
    opportunities to coordinate strategies and efforts for broader communication
    requirements must be part of the process.
   A broad public safety governance structure is required to coordinate resources, to
    establish common standard operating procedures and rules of use, common
    language, to set and promote standards and to coordinate planning, training and
    exercising all of which are important to interoperability.

At the structural level, the Statewide Radio Board is presently expanding its role to
include the responsibility as Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability Executive
Committee (SIEC). The implementation of the ARMER plan will continue to be a
fundamental piece of Minnesota’s interoperable communication strategy, but that
strategy will be enlarged to incorporate a much broader range of strategies necessary to
ensure short term, mid term and long term public safety communication interoperability
within the state of Minnesota and with the adjoining states. Similarly, consideration of
whether there are opportunities to leverage other public safety communication needs
(data, IP connectivity and the 9-1-1 network) are being discussed with the Statewide
Radio Board and among stakeholders.

                                            18
In 2006, the Statewide Radio Board funded a position for a State Interoperability
Coordinator in the department of public safety. The person in that position has
responsibilities in the following areas:

        Developing interoperable communication training curriculum.
        Providing basic communication training.
        Coordinating and encouraging communication interoperability planning
         statewide.

The need for comprehensive interoperability coordination was so clearly demonstrated
that Public Safety Interoperability Coordination is currently in the process of evolving
into a distinct program, with a program administrator and regional interoperability
coordinators.

Basic Radio System- RF Voice component

Minnesota’s statewide public safety communication plan provides for the statewide build
out of a trunked 700/800 MHz voice communication backbone throughout the state with
the capacity for local units of government to enhance the backbone (add coverage or
capacity) to address local needs. Where local integration to the common backbone
occurs, the ARMER system provides the maximum flexibility at the highest level of
interoperability to the broadest range of participants. The ARMER system operates in
the 700/800 MHz spectrum where spectrum has been allocated to state and local public
safety users for future public safety communication needs.

VHF-UHF Interoperability

An essential part of the ARMER backbone is the ability to flexibly link to existing VHF
and UHF systems. Simply stated, where there is overlapping coverage, communication
systems can be linked together through system level and audio gateway patches.
Enhancing this VHF/UHF interoperability ability in the ARMER system and coordinating
those resources with public safety users operating in the VHF/UHF spectrum provides
the best opportunity to enhance public safety interoperability on the short term, mid term
and long term. Similarly, it provides the best opportunity to coordinate interoperability
with adjoining states’ public safety entities, federal agencies and Canadian public safety
officials where VHF systems may remain predominate.

Emphasizing the development and coordination of VHF and UHF resources can provide
multiple benefits. It will assure interoperability between ARMER system users and
legacy communication system users, it establishes a baseline for the same
interoperability between separate VHF and UHF systems; it provides a vehicle for
interoperability with adjoining states and federal agencies and is capable of providing
cross-spectrum interoperability between VHF and UHF users.




                                           19
Interoperable Data

In its current configuration, the ARMER plan does not provide for a data component.
However, the opportunity to leverage the infrastructure to provide wireless data
throughout the state has been noted to the degree that current implementation
decisions are calculated to maintain maximum flexibility to incorporate wireless data into
the basic RF design. Phase three (23 counties outside the metropolitan area) is being
implemented on a RF platform that can be upgraded to provide wireless data over the
common RF components of the ARMER system. Similarly, the need to articulate and
coordinate a strategy to provide interoperable wireless data for public safety users
throughout the state is currently being evaluated by the Statewide Radio Board.

To that end, three distinct approaches to interoperable public safety data have been
identified, as follows:

1. Regional Enhancements - The Metropolitan Emergency Services Board
   (subordinate regional radio board covering the metropolitan area) is working with
   Hennepin County to implement a region wide wireless public safety data network
   over the ARMER backbone in the metropolitan area. Hennepin County was the
   recipient of a Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant, which provided
   funding for this implementation as a regional enhancement to the ARMER
   backbone. The RF component of the data network is distinctly separate from the RF
   component of the voice network but they are compatible systems that might be
   integrated into one voice and data network at some future point.
2. Minnesota State Patrol Data System - Similarly, the Minnesota State Patrol has a
   mobile data system across major portions of the state utilizing towers and
   microwave capacity that are or will be part of the ARMER infrastructure. As it exists,
   that system is not capable of providing significant wireless IP connectivity for a broad
   category of public safety users but it may provide a foundation for the evolution of
   wireless data as part of Minnesota’s broader wireless interoperable data initiatives
   necessary to strengthen information sharing and collaboration capabilities. The SRB
   is only beginning to acquire background information on data system development as
   the focus is on the ARMER build out and implementation.
As provided in the funding as the build up for the ARMER system, we have the
requirement to do the detailed design work, as part of the funding requirement; we are
required to study how data can be integrated into the ARMER backbone.
3. Local Data Systems - A number of counties have implemented local wireless data
   systems. As part of the Statewide Radio Board’s evolving strategy for wireless data,
   the comprehensive ARMER backbone provides a great opportunity to coordinate
   and enhance interoperable data through various strategies, such as, linking various
   data systems together through a message switch.

It is important to note that the ARMER system backbone provides the common network
element upon which each of these approaches might be expanded.


                                            20
IP Infrastructure

At the present time there are three distinct point-to-point communications infrastructure
systems connecting the public safety community throughout Minnesota. One of these
systems is MnNet, the second is the 9-1-1 network and the third is the ARMER (Allied
Radio Matrix for Emergency Response) system.

The MnNet system is maintained by the Minnesota Office of Enterprise Technology and
consists of a robust Internet Protocol (IP) network connecting all law enforcement
agencies to state and federal criminal justice databases.

Minnesota’s 9-1-1 network provides connectivity for landline and wireless
telecommunications through a broad network of telephone trunks, and is maintained by
the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

The ARMER system provides connectivity between radio towers, control sites and
Public Safety Answering Points. In addition to the basic RF (radio frequency)
component of the ARMER system, there is a microwave backbone used to provide the
connectivity between antenna sites and to the major system elements of the trunked
communication system. This microwave backbone can carry an IP network designed to
a very high level of reliability to provide the connectivity necessary to support the
trunked communication system.

The opportunity to leverage the existing and excess capacity to enhance the availability
and reliability of IP based connectivity between public safety communication systems
has not gone unnoticed. Similarly, there is an active discussion of the opportunity to
coordinate and leverage this IP backbone with the broader public safety communication
needs used to strengthen information sharing and collaboration capabilities.

As previously noted, the Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (MESB) is
coordinating the implementation of a wireless data system throughout the Twin Cities
metropolitan area over the ARMER system backbone. Although a discrete RF system,
the MESB data system uses the same tower sites and microwave backbone (IP
network) to provide connectivity between sites and to provide the IP network
connectivity. The MESB has also initiated a promising discussion on the feasibility of
merging various public safety functions (ARMER, 911 and M-Net) onto a common IP
infrastructure.

Greater Minnesota also has a large challenge to provide interconnection of voice and
data communications systems for interoperability. This interconnection is between
divergent analog and digital radio systems or sites and between PSAPs and EOCs.
This challenge crosses vast distances and many political boundaries.

This challenge can be met with new funding for infrastructure in partnership with MN-
DOT, Statewide Radio Board, ARMER, local Law Enforcement and jurisdiction decision
makers. This partnership would enhance the IP system for ARMER and would provide

                                           21
local users access to microwave IP systems independent from commercial
infrastructure. The excess capacity could be used for MN-NET redundancy.

The broader strategic view of public safety interoperability has necessitated a
discussion of the expansion of the scope of the Statewide Radio Board (SRB). The
membership of the SRB is specified in statute (M.S. 403.36), as follows:

May consolidate with the appendix - reference tribal gov participations

State Representatives

                Commissioner of Public Safety (Chair)
                Commissioner of Transportation
                State Chief Information Officer
                Commissioner of Natural Resources
                Chief of the Minnesota State Patrol
                Commissioner of Finance
                Chief of the Metropolitan Council

Local Representatives

              2 elected city officials - appointed by League of Cities
              2 elected county officials - appointed by the Association of Counties
              2 elected sheriffs - appointed by the Sheriff’s Association
              2 chiefs of police - designated by Police Chief’s Association
              2 fire chiefs - designated by Fire Chief’s Association
              2 emergency medical service providers - designed by ambulance association
              Chair of the Metropolitan Emergency Services Board
              Representative of regional radio boards outside the metropolitan area

Local representation is evenly divided between members from the metropolitan area
and members from outside the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Table 4.2 presents the
representation and membership of the Statewide Radio Board.

An essential element of this structure is the presumption that regional radio boards will
evolve to represent regional interests. To date, the following regional radio boards have
been formed to address and coordinate regional interoperability issues:

              Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (MESB) - A joint powers board
               representing eight counties in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area.
               The MESB was created as the Metropolitan Radio Board transferred
               responsibility for the ARMER project to the SRB.
              Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board (CMNRRB) – A joint powers board
               representing 19 counties and one city in central Minnesota.



                                              22
Formation of regional radio boards is currently underway in other parts of the state,
including southeastern, southwestern, northeastern and northwestern Minnesota.

NIMS

Minnesota has used a formalized Incident Command/Management system for a number
of years. In 1991 the Minnesota Legislature adopted Minn. Stat. Chapter 115E, known
as the “Spills Bill,” which required the commissioner of public safety to establish and
implement an Incident Command System (ICS) within the state. Minnesota Incident
Management System (MIMS) as it was known, was institutionalized in state training in
1996 and has been embedded in training throughout the State ever since.

The 2005 Governor’s, Executive Order 05-02 entitled “DESIGNATION OF THE
NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (NIMS) AS THE BASIS FOR ALL
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT IN THE STATE OF MINNESOTA”, established NIMS as the
only recognized system for incident management and response within the State. The
executive order states in part, "It is necessary and desirable that all federal, state, local
and tribal emergency agencies and personnel coordinate their efforts to effectively and
efficiently provide the highest levels of incident management. The NIMS standardized
procedures for managing personnel, communications, facilities and resources will
improve the state's ability to utilize federal funding to enhance local and state agency
readiness, maintain first responder safety, and streamline incident management
processes."

Because of Minnesota’s long-standing investment in ICS and MIMS, the State is well
ahead of many states when it comes to implementing the NIMS ICS requirements.
Incident Command and Management System training has been embedded in the
training curriculum for almost ten years and MIMS training program is consistent with
NIMS. Minnesota has met the baseline ICS requirements. The updated MIMS
curriculum is ICS 100, 200, 300, and 400 levels compliant. Local responders who have
already taken the former MIMS course were in good position for initial compliance with
the basic ICS requirements in NIMS. The only additional requirement was for this group
of personnel to take the "Bridge" course, which incorporates the few items not included
in the old MIMS course. Upon completion, the responders are fully compliant in the ICS
portion of NIMS. Virtually all Minnesota responder have completed this core training.
Section 2.1.1 describes NIMS training requirements, timelines and status in the State.
The following list denotes the categories of personnel for state and local government
and tribal jurisdictions subject to the NIMS training for : (check for availability and check
compliance data)

      Emergency Management Agency (EMA) Personnel
      Law Enforcement (LE) Personnel
      Fire Service (FS) Personnel
      HAZMAT Responders
      Public Works (PW) Personnel
      Health Care (HC) Personnel


                                             23
       Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Personnel
       Public Safety Communications (PSC) Personnel
       Public Health (PH) Personnel
       Government Administration Personnel

Strategic Interoperability Planning

Interoperability planning has been a part of the ARMER project since its beginning. The
Statewide Interoperable Public Safety Radio and Communication System Plan was
developed in 2001 and adopted by the legislature in 2002. NIMS provides a more
recent focus and broader emphasis on the need for operational interoperability in field
operations coupled with two way wireless radio and data interoperable communications
in all 87 counties and with bordering states and Canadian provinces.

While planning efforts have occurred previously, the emphasis and focus on
interoperability on a multi-regional, cross-disciplinary basis statewide was not as
prevalent. The severe shortage of radio frequency spectrum, aging and increasingly
unreliable radio system infrastructure, the limited number of 800 MHz radio frequencies
available for new digital trunked or analog radio applications, the lack of seamless
communications interoperability between jurisdictions and public safety disciplines and
the high cost of advanced technology radio systems brought policy makers and public
safety officials to the same table in the early 1990’s in order to begin to address the
serious issues facing the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area public safety community. The
result of these efforts has been to address and successfully resolve these problems in
the metro where 50% of the State’s population resides.

The completion of the metropolitan area radio system serves as a starting point for
communications and interoperability development throughout the remainder of the
State. U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Commerce funds leveraged with
funds provided by the Minnesota Legislature have enabled the engagement of
additional resources to expedite the development and implementation of interoperable
communications planning on a statewide basis. This current process and initiatives will
not resolve all the interoperability issues within the State in the Strategic SCIP.
However the Plan will provide a substantive framework, process, timeframe and
expected outcomes for those elements of the Plan not completed by the submission
date. Funding required to support interoperability initiatives contained in the Plan will be
identified wherever possible and whether or not funds are currently available or the
strategies needed to obtain them fully developed. This approach enables policy makers
and agency personnel to continuously monitor the progress of the plan, identify
responsibilities and accountabilities within the process and to move forward at the local
level statewide in an organized and coordinated approach.

2.1.1    NIMS/Multi-Agency Coordination System (MACS)

The 2005 Governor’s, Executive Order 05-02 entitled, “Designation Of The National
Incident Management System (NIMS) As The Basis For All Incident Management In

                                            24
The State Of Minnesota” establishes NIMS as the only recognized system for incident
management and response within the State. The Minnesota Division of Homeland
Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) maintains the leadership role and
responsibility for assuring the adoption, implementation, training and conduct of
exercises within the scope of the national initiatives under Homeland Security
Presidential Directives 5 (Management of Domestic Incidents) and 8 (National
Preparedness). The presidential actions establish the national initiatives that develop a
common approach to domestic incident management, including the National Response
Plan (NRP), National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) and the National
Preparedness Goal.

The State of Minnesota has a long history of incorporating incident command system
(ICS) planning into local emergency management plans and public safety response.
HSEM has led the initiatives to bring Minnesota agencies into compliance with the NIMS
requirements. Commencing in 2005, HSEM as the State Administrative Agency
planned, developed and implemented specific strategies, programs and timelines to
bring Minnesota into compliance and in doing so, lead the way nationally through the
following actions:

      Assure the Minnesota Incident Management System (MIMS) was fully NIMS
       compliant by fall of 2005
      Early compliance with baseline ICS training using MIMS as the implementation
       vehicle
      MIMS curriculum compliant with requirements for ICS 100, 200, 300 and 400
       training
      Working with county, city, township and tribal community officials to assure their
       eligibility to receive or apply directly to the federal government for preparedness
       grant funds including:
           o Adoption of resolutions formally recognizing NIMS principles and policies
           o Incorporating NIMS into existing training and exercise programs
           o Incorporating NIMS principles, policies and terminology into operations
                and response plans
           o Institutionalizing the use of ICS across all agencies or disciplines
           o Adoption of resolutions, memorandums of understanding or agreement
                where appropriate promoting mutual aid agreements or arrangements
           o At least one agency “leader” IS-700 trained
           o Department heads in emergency management or response are IS 800
                trained
           o Agency self assessment conducted to determine and manage required
                training of various personnel and establishing time frames to successfully
                complete training
           o Encouraging the use of the National Integration Center’s (NIC) NIMS
                Compliance Assistance Support Tool (NIMSCAST) to track and evaluate
                their incident response and management capabilities.




                                           25
Minnesota through the adoption, training and implementation of NIMS and NRP
practices into local emergency management planning has largely incorporated NIMS
command and management concepts and principles and ICS into local emergency
response plans on a statewide basis. HSEM Division personnel as well as HSEM
Regional Project Coordinators are specifically charged with working with local officials in
training and developing local plans and exercises, including cross-disciplinary and
cross-jurisdictional exercises utilizing the NIMS and NRP practices.

The foundation for working with and incorporating the concepts and principles of NIMS
Command and Management resides with the Minnesota Office of Homeland Security
and Emergency Management (HSEM), Regional Project Coordinators within HSEM and
the emergency managers of each county. Each county’s emergency manager works
with their respective county department heads to prepare the appropriate sections
consistent with NIMS in general and Command and Management specifically. The
development of each County emergency management plan is facilitated by HSEM by
providing training and resources to county agencies directly and through the Regional
Project Coordinators. Building the knowledge and operational base has been facilitated
by establishment of specific deadlines by which all personnel who have a role in each
emergency response plan or the emergency operations plan for a jurisdiction (State,
county, municipality, township or tribal jurisdiction) must have completed NIMS and
NRP training applicable to their responsibilities. Training and exercises overseen and
assisted by county emergency managers and HSEM Regional Project Coordinators
reinforce, modify and build upon the core training that has been completed. The
schedule for Minnesota Training Requirements is as follows:

(add other entry here) Existing first responders must have completed IS-700,
Introduction to NIMS and be reported to EMI and ICS-100 (Entry Level ICS) and ICS-
200 (Basic Level IC) and be reported to the National Integration Center (NIC) all by
October 1, 2006. In addition, supervisors and commanders must have completed IS-
800, National Response Plan (NRP) and reported to EMI by October 1, 2006. These
two goals have been achieved. Training initiatives for supervisors and command staff
are currently underway for ICS-300 (Intermediate Level ICS) and ICS-400 (Advanced
Level ICS) training with a target completion date of October 1, 2007. This goal is
expected to be substantially achieved.

Multi agency command is an integral part of State, county and local emergency
response planning and is incorporated into larger scale, cross-jurisdictional and cross-
disciplinary training exercises. Modular organization is practiced depending upon the
size and scope of the scenario and number and kinds of agencies. Elements of ICS are
engaged and scaled up or down depending upon the nature and scope of the event.
Emergency Management and HSEM Regional Project Coordinators are available to
coach, assist, evaluate and critique field exercises as well as actual events. The
lessons learned (what went right or well, what went wrong, did not occur, etc) from
these exercises or actual events are incorporated into revisions to local response plans
and also result in scheduling any additional training that might be appropriate.



                                            26
NIMS and multi-agency coordination is further reinforced on a local and statewide basis
through the initiatives of related professional groups and agencies, such as the
Association of Minnesota Emergency Managers, Minnesota Sheriff’s Association,
Minnesota Chief’s of Police Association, Minnesota Fire Chiefs Association, Minnesota
Ambulance Association, Minnesota Hospital Association, Regional EMS Committees,
Minnesota Organizations Active in Disasters and others. These organizations provide
training, professional meetings, conferences and organization resources to provide
assistance in developing mutual aid agreements and memos of understanding or
agreement. They also facilitate development of equipment and resource inventories
and work collectively to achieve effective, timely and efficient multi-agency coordination.
The recent 2007 spring fires in the forests along the Minnesota and Canadian borders
and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area demonstrates the ability of federal, state, local
and Canadian officials to work collectively together in a short window of time to better
utilize very limited resources to mitigate a major natural disaster, protect and minimize
property loss and protect human life. Similar results involving coordination, utilizing pre-
designated incident facilities, unified command and communications, personnel and
resource accountability can be documented in the responses to spring snow melt
flooding and storm related events throughout the State the past several years, and more
dramatically during the I-35W bridge collapse on August 1, 2007 since the focus on
incident command and management has been stressed. The development and
refinement of Tactical Interoperable Communications Plans on a regional and statewide
basis will further foster and reinforce the elements of incident and event management.
Regional radio boards or radio committees will have the responsibility of developing TIC
Plans consistent with their communications systems interoperability requirements. (see
Section 4 of this plan)

2.1.2   Regions/Jurisdictions

The State of Minnesota is divided into six Homeland Security and Emergency
Management (HSEM) Regions. Each region is comprised of varying numbers of local
political subdivisions of the state (counties, cities, and townships) and tribal jurisdictions.
Each HSEM Regions has a designated HSEM Regional Project Coordinator working
with county, city and tribal emergency managers and is a key liaison for NIMS planning,
development and training. Each region is also supported by a Regional Interoperability
Coordinator to assist them in regional interoperability communications planning.




                                              27
Figure 2-1


    28
Section 2.1, Public Safety and Services provides a high level overview of the aggregate
public safety and service provided statewide. Detailed information on the various public
safety agencies within each region are found in Exhibit __________. The Twin Cities
Urban Area is included in Region 6. (may need to revise this, because the HSEM
region do not always reflect how the relationships actually work)

The following table provides a list of the regions within the state, jurisdictions and/or
counties that comprise the entire state, and emergency response agencies included in
each region, county or jurisdiction.

This table if populated here will take up a lot of space in the body of the
report; if added as an attachment, it will likewise be very large; reference
websites? (may include this in the appendix/may point to a website link)
                          Table 2-4 Regions/Jurisdictions/Agencies


Region     Jurisdiction         Agency             Name              Title     Phone




2.1.3    UASI Areas/TIC Plans

The State of Minnesota has one Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), the Twin Cities
area. The UASI currently includes the counties of Dakota, Hennepin and Ramsey and
the core cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. The governance structure for the Twin
Cities UASI was established at the initial meeting held in November 2003. State and
local officials were in attendance and make up the Urban Area Administrative Council
(UACC). The UACC is established to make key decisions and recommendations
relative to funds, distribution, policy, training, exercise, compliance, establishment of
special committees and operation issues within the region. The UACC Communications
Subcommittee is designated to develop and administer the “Tactical Interoperability
Communications (TIC) Plan.” The first Twin Cities Urban Area TIC Plan was adopted in
April, 2006 and was defined to include the cities of St. Paul, Minneapolis and all cities,
townships and political subdivisions within and including the counties of Dakota,
Hennepin and Ramsey. Policies and procedures adopted by the UAAC leverage and
build upon the existing region-wide interoperability standards established by the
Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (MESB) and the Minnesota Statewide Radio
Board (SRB.)




                                            29
The Twin Cities metropolitan area is made up of the seven counties of Anoka, Carver,
Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott and Washington Counties. The MESB, which is the
regional radio board for all seven counties plus Chisago County, has undertaken to
incorporate the five additional counties into the UASI TIC plan.??? The following
Minnesota communities are designated as Metropolitan Statistical Areas:

      (Correct this) Duluth (Minnesota and Wisconsin)
      Moorhead, part of the Fargo, ND Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) (Minnesota
       and North Dakota)
      Part of the La Crosse, WI MSA (Minnesota and Wisconsin)
      Rochester, MN
      St. Cloud, MN (check on this)

Regional radio boards or radio committees will assume the responsibility for developing
TIC Plans within and between the regions. This will not occur until after the regional
body is substantially defined and established, communications assessments are
complete and decisions on operability and interoperability have been made. Rochester
and St. Cloud were part of the phase three ARMER system build out and are fully
integrated onto the ARMER backbone. Additional emphasis will be given to the
remaining metropolitan areas where legacy systems exist and remain a critical piece of
their public safety communication planning.

The Twin Cities UASI TIC Plan was the subject of a test and evaluation as part of the
National Baseline Assessment project of SAFECOM in 2006. The SAFECOM
assessment and evaluation gave the area the highest marks available in the three
categories that were evaluated:

       Governance, Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) and Usage were all rated
       at “Advanced Implementation Levels” by the evaluation team.

Results of the National Baseline Assessment, recommendations and next steps for
Minnesota and the nation, are documented in the “Tactical Interoperability
Communications Scorecards, Summary Report and Findings,” January, 2007, U.S.
Department of Homeland Security

Specific information or requests concerning the Twin Cities UASI TIC Plan should be
made directly to the TIC Plan Point of Contact in Table 2-3.




                                          30
                                            Table 2-5 UASI Areas/TIC Plans

                          Regions /           TICP Title/ Completion
 UASI Area                                                              POC Name              POC Email
                       Jurisdictions                   Date
                  Cities of Minneapolis
                                              Tactical Interoperable
Minneapolis -     and St. Paul, political
                                              Communications Plan      Primary:        Marita.nelson@state.mn.us
St. Paul Urban    subdivisions within and
                                              (TIC Plan) Version       Marita Nelson
Area              counties of Dakota,
                                              1.1_042706 April, 2006
                  Hennepin and Ramsey


     2.2         Participating Agencies and Points of Contact

     The development of the Minnesota Strategic SCIP relies on five primary strategies:

            Building upon and leveraging the work and findings accomplished to date to
             address communication systems development and interoperability within the
             State (ARMER)
            Building upon the findings and lessons learned from SCIP initiatives and the
             assessments conducted in other and neighboring states
            Building upon and leveraging the multiple reports and recommendations of the
             Departments of Homeland Security and Commerce and SAFECOM initiatives
            Involving subject matter experts from throughout Minnesota
            Building on emerging consensus approaches for effective communications
             interoperability
            Establishing the SRB as the MN Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee
             (SIEC)

     The development of interoperable communications capabilities technically and
     operationally has reached an advanced level in the nine counties (add county names/for
     consistency, do this thru out) around the Minneapolis/ St. Paul area. The region enjoys
     this capability in large part due to the region wide area, advanced, trunked digital radio
     system (ARMER). The local processes in place draw from the users of the radio
     system and a governance system that incorporates all stakeholders. These include
     policy makers, sheriffs, fire services, local police, EMS, school districts, public works,
     PSAP’s, volunteer agencies, state agencies, community corrections, hospitals, health
     departments, emergency management, radio system technical personnel, tribal
     jurisdictions, public transportation services (buses, special transportation, school
     buses), radio manufacturers and suppliers, etc. The project to develop these
     incorporated all of the elements of the SCIP’s methodology over the course of ten
     years. The Metropolitan Area Radio Systems has now become a system within the
     “ARMER” project. The ARMER project is currently expanding out of the Minneapolis-St.
     Paul Metropolitan area. The Strategic SCIP develops the specifics of the over arching
     strategy, involvement, process, time lines, deliverables and to the extent possible, costs
     and funding to complete the statewide communications interoperability planning
     process.

                                                          31
The development of the current Strategic SCIP engages the key stakeholders identified
in Table 2-1. The Strategic SCIP provides for a longer-term strategy and process that
will subsequently provide the opportunity for all individual responder groups in each of
the counties within each of the State’s HSEM regions to engage in the SCIP
methodology. The implementation of the SCIPS Methodology is scheduled to
commence the fourth quarter, 2007. Prior to initiating the local processes, a series of
informational, Town Hall meetings were held in each of the six HSEM regions during
July through September, 2007 for policy makers and interested professionals, federal
agencies, volunteer and civilian entities and tribal jurisdictions to receive an overview of
the Strategic SCIP process, the status of the ARMER project and build out including
funding, provide input and begin to plan for their engagement in the regional
communications interoperability planning processes. While not specifically a focus
group process, attendees had the opportunity for input, were encouraged to indicate
high level concerns and issues unique to a region and to follow through to develop a
regional radio committee as a local starting point. Participants were also asked to
complete an “Input and Interest” card so they could be followed up with for further
participation. The input and remarks provided during the meeting were documented
during the sessions to be addressed within the process going forward. Appendix ___
summarizes the meetings and agencies represented. (reference online source of the
description of the SCIP process)

Development of the strategic SCIP has also relied on the input of representative
individuals of various jurisdictions, disciplines, experiences and expertise in
communications generally including HSEM and ARMER. This has occurred in the
format of “Expectations” interviews regarding the strategic SCIP as well as informational
interviews with content experts or key stakeholders on content elements and criteria.
This practice and process will continue as the SCIP is implemented. Table 2-1
identifies these individuals and groups. Input was also received through participation at
regional radio board meetings and the Statewide Radio Board. As the Strategic SCIP
leads to the continuation of planning processes, subsequent revised plans will identify
the additional agencies and individuals involved. A work session was held in
conjunction with ICTAP on August 22 and 23 rd, 2007 to review the draft SCIP, identify
gaps, changes and address the changes real time. Participants in the meeting included
the Core Advisory Group and other key stakeholders including…..

To further coordinate interoperability efforts, the Governor will establish by Executive
Order (signature on order pending) a Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee
(Appendix A-3) that in addition to other responsibilities provided for in Minnesota
Statutes Section 403.36 shall be responsible for the following:

      Develop and adopt a statewide plan and standards for local and private public
       safety communications interoperability in the State of Minnesota
      Recommend guidelines and operational standards of operation for local and
       private public safety communications systems within Minnesota




                                            32
      Promote coordination and cooperation among local, state, federal, tribal public
       safety agencies and NGOs in addressing statewide public safety
       communications interoperability within Minnesota
      Advise the Department of Public Safety, Division of Homeland Security and the
       Homeland Security Advisory Committee upon all matters related to public safety
       communications interoperability and upon the allocation of homeland security
       funding and other funding that may be come available from the federal
       governments for the purpose of supporting public safety communications
       interoperability
      Request the assignment of the interoperability responsibilities of the SIEC to the
       Statewide Radio Board from the Region 22 700 MHz Regional Planning
       Committee
      Develop guidelines and standards for the use of interoperability frequencies on
       all frequencies spectrums assigned to public safety users to the extent permitted
       by federal law and regulations of the Federal Communications Commissioner
       and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration
      Develop guidelines and standards that support interoperability with adjoining
       states and with Provinces of Canada along Minnesota’s northern border to the
       extent permitted by federal law and treaties with Canada
      Develop guidelines and standards that support interoperability with adjoining
       recognized sovereign Tribal Nations

In fulfilling these responsibilities the commissioner of public safety will seek input and
participation from federal, local and tribal public safety officials, including emergency
management officials within the state and assure that all regions of the state are
represented.

Additionally, each region and participating county is responsible to assure the
opportunity for participation and representation in the local process of the following
categories of personnel for state and local government and tribal jurisdictions:

      Emergency Management Agency Personnel (EMA)
      Law Enforcement Personnel (LE)
      Fire Service Personnel (FS)
      HAZMAT Responders (HZ)
      Public Works Personnel (PW)
      Health care Personnel (HC)
      Emergency Medical Services Personnel (EMS)
      Public Safety Communications Personnel (PSC)
      Public Health Personnel (PH)
      Volunteer Organizations Personnel Active in Disasters (VOAD)
      Government Administration Personnel




                                            33
 The interoperability assessment phase of the project utilizing the interoperability
 continuum applied at the local level will include participation of individuals engaged in
 the day to day direct provision of response and mitigation services to an event. Their
 input in the early phases is particularly important to understanding the current world of
 their communications and operations, problems and operational disconnects. The
 identification of disconnects will enable the development of alternative operational,
 procedural or technical options which will help drive consensus-based solutions. The
 process will also enable education in the various options, their pros, cons and costs.
 One solution may not fit all situations or best serve the impacted provider or response
 community.

     Table 2-6 Regional Agencies and Points of Contact with Planning and Operational Authority

    Agency Name           Agency POC                   POC Email                POC Telephone (s)
Statewide Radio
                       Tim Leslie          Tim.Leslie@state.mn.us              651-201-7176
Board
MN Department of
                       Michael Schwab      Mike.schwab@state.mn.us             651-201-7407
Public Safety, HSEM
MN Department of
Public Safety,         Scott Wiggins       Scott.wiggins@state.mn.us           651-201-7546
ARMER-911
MN Emergency
Medical Services       Mary Hedges         Mary.hedges@state.mn.us             651-201-2806
Regulatory Board
Southeast Regional
                       Lt. Tim Heroff      THeroff@SEMNRadio.org               507-287-7973
Radio Committee
Northeast Regional
Radio Advisory
Committee (under
development)
Northwest Regional     RAC development
Radio Advisory         in process          bholmer@mncable.net                 218-606-8252
Committee              Brian Holmer
Central Minnesota                          Don.Otte@co.stearns.mn.us
                       Don Otte                                                320-650- 410
Regional Radio Board                       micah.myers@ci.stcloud.mn.us
Southwest Regional
Radio Advisory
Committee (under
development)
Metropolitan
Emergency Services     Jill Rohret
Board
Northeast Region
                       Karla McKenzie      kmckenzie@arrowheadems.com          218-726-007
EMS
Northwest EMS
                       Tom Vanderwal       tvander@paulbunyan.net              218-759-8915
Region
West Central EMS
                       Mark McCabe         wcmnems@gctel.com                   320-762-1881
Region
Central EMS Region     Scott Miller        scott.miller@co.stearns.mn.us       320-656-6122
Southwest EMS          Imogene
                                           sw-ems@earthlink.net                320-564-4660
Region                 Sunderland


                                                34
   Agency Name           Agency POC                     POC Email           POC Telephone (s)
Metropolitan EMS
                      Ron Robinson          rrobinson@emsmn.org             651-643-8378
Region
South Central EMS
                      Paul Stelter          stelterp@hickorytech.net        507-387-1231
Region
Southeast EMS
                      Linda Horth           horth.linda@mayo.edu            507-536-9333
Region


 2.3       Statewide Plan Point of Contact (POC)

 Point of contact for Statewide Communications Interoperability Plan:

 Name:          Scott Wiggins
 Title:         Director
 Agency:        Department of Public Safety, ARMER - 911
 Phone:         651-201-7546
 E-mail:        scott.wiggins@state.mn.us

 Point of contact for Statewide Interoperability Coordination:

 Name:          Position Currently Vacant
 Title:         Statewide Interoperability Coordinator
 Agency:        Department of Public Safety, ARMER - 911
 Phone:         651-201-7552
 E-mail:

 The interoperability POC is operating as a full time interoperability coordinator.

 2.4       Scope and Timeframe

 The scope of the Strategic SCIP is broadly inclusive of participants and communications
 elements essential to developing statewide communications and operational
 interoperability including:

        Governance
        Standard Operating Procedures
        Technology
        Training and Exercises
        Usage of Interoperable Communications

 No elements directly related to interoperable voice and data communications are
 considered “out of scope” or “off the table” however, recognizing that support for and
 funding of initiatives are essential to attaining successful interoperability outcomes.

 The timeframe for the Strategic SCIP is from June 1, 2007 through December, 2012
 and coincides with the build out and implementation of the ARMER system. The
 development of specific elements for statewide interoperability will take into

                                                 35
consideration the time frames and specific progress of the build out and implementation
of ARMER and what individual counties will or propose to do relative to utilizing or
interfacing with the ARMER system over the next three years. The decisions made by
local counties on the wireless technology that will be used by their public safety
community short and longer term will directly impact the key elements of interoperability
as they apply to a specific county and a region.




                                           36
3       Methodology

The basic structure for Minnesota’s public safety communication planning can be traced
to the creation of the Metropolitan Radio Board (MRB) in 1995. The MRB was
legislatively created as an independent political subdivision to implement the backbone
for a regional public safety communication system, the ARMER system, in the Twin
Cities metropolitan area. Although most members of the MRB were elected officials,
there were also representatives of various public safety disciplines (police, sheriff, fire
and emergency medical services,) and MN/DOT. As the regional public safety
communication system plan evolved into the ARMER plan, the responsibilities for the
statewide implementation were transitioned to the Statewide Radio Board (SRB). The
basic structure of the SRB was to balance state interests against local interests and
then to balance those local interests with one half the local participants from the Twin
Cities metropolitan area and one half from outside the metropolitan area (reflecting the
state’s population distribution). The basic membership of the SRB reflects Minnesota’s
desire to institutionalize a multi-disciplinary governance structure, as follows:

State Members

      -   Commissioner of Public Safety
      -   Commissioner of Transportation
      -   Chief of Minnesota State Patrol
      -   Commissioner of Finance
      -   Commissioner of Natural Resources
      -   State Chief Information Officer
      -   Chair of Metropolitan Council - Metro Transit Authority

Local Members

(In each category one member is from the Twin Cities metropolitan area and the other is
from outside the metropolitan area)

      -   2 elected county official
      -   2 elected city officials
      -   2 elected sheriffs
      -   2 police chiefs
      -   2 fire chiefs
      -   2 emergency medical service providers
      -   2 representatives of regional radio boards

Particular note is made of the fact that non-governmental public safety is represented
on the SRB by the emergency medical service providers, both of whom are nominated
by the Minnesota Ambulance Association and both of whom represent private and
public ambulance services. In addition to this, the various committees of the SRB are


                                            37
broadly composed of users from all public safety disciplines, including governmental
and non-governmental providers.

Similarly, Minnesota’s interoperability structure provides for and anticipates the creation
of regional radio committees and regional radio boards where a multi-disciplinary
approach to participation is clearly anticipated. There are currently two Regional Radio
Boards in place, the Metropolitan Emergency Services Board, which covers the seven
counties making up the Twin Cities metropolitan area plus Chisago County and the
Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board which incorporates 19 counties in central
Minnesota. The continued formation of regional radio committees and regional radio
boards is a key element in Minnesota’s comprehensive interoperable communication
planning. The objective is to have all 87 Minnesota counties, interested tribal
jurisdictions and appropriate non-governmental organizations participating in a regional
radio board or regional radio committee by July, 2008. In the preliminary development
of the SCIP, a multi-disciplinary Core Advisory Group was formulated representing
different regions of the state. The Core Advisory Group and their disciplines are
identified in Table 3-1.

                        Table 3-1 SCIP Ad Hoc Core Advisory Group

            Name                  Agency                               Discipline
Scott Wiggins          ARMER-911                    ARMER Program Director

Ron Whitehead          ARMER-911                    ARMER System Director

                       Hennepin County Sheriff’s
Roger Laurence                                      Communications System Manager
                       Office

Tom Cherney            MN BCA                       BCA Operations Center Director

Bob Prudhomme          MN DOT OEC                   Communications System Maintenance Manager

Scott Mattison         Swift County                 Sheriff

Bill Mund              Statewide Radio Board        City of St. Cloud Fire Chief

Pat Medure             Statewide Radio Board        Itasca County Sheriff

                       Central MN Regional Radio
Tom Hannon                                          Regional Radio Board
                       Board

Brian Holmer           Great Plains EMS             Emergency Medical Services

                       St. Louis County Sheriff’s
Scott Camps                                         Emergency Management
                       Office
                       Homeland Security and
Mike Schwab                                         Branch Manager, HSEM
                       Emergency Management

Mike Johnson           Owatonna Fire                Fire Chief




                                               38
In developing this SCIP, further outreach was coordinated through the Department of
Public Safety, Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM)
regions. These regions are the basis of emergency management planning and multi-
discipline engagement of traditional and non-traditional public safety providers
throughout the state of Minnesota. As part of the SCIP process, informational meetings
were held in each HSEM Region to establish contact and to engage broad discussion of
public safety agencies. Although HSEM routinely interfaces with Minnesota’s tribal
communities, special invitations were sent to each tribal community asking them to
participate in the SCIP process. Similar efforts were made to reach non-governmental
agencies involved in Minnesota’s emergency planning and response in each region.

The Twin Cities UASI region TIC Plan was formulated through a multi-disciplinary
collaboration in 2006. That UASI TIC Plan is now in the process of being enlarged to
include all ten counties in the Twin Cities metropolitan area (UASI only includes three
counties). As part of this SCIP process, the completion of regional TIC Plans is
anticipated and will be discussed in greater detail.

As previously noted, Minnesota’s Statewide Radio Board and Regional Radio Boards
are formal and permanent structures designed to sustain the planning and
implementation processes necessary to institutionalize the TIC Plan and SCIP process.

The implementation of the ARMER and subsystems is at significantly different stages
throughout the state and until this year, completion of the ARMER backbone throughout
the state was not a certainty. The extent to which the ARMER system may meet the
needs of and be utilized by counties within some of the HSEM regions has not been
fully assessed at this time. As part of the legislative funding for the completion of the
ARMER system, funding was provided to expand local communications assessments.
During the next twelve months the SCIP Methodology will be utilized to address and
help resolve interoperability options for local and statewide decision-making as regional
bodies are formalized statewide.           Preliminary discussion to organize regional
committees has been set for the Northeast, Northwest (August 22), Southeast and
Southwest regions. The initiatives are being lead by local leaders supported by HSEM
and ARMER-911 resources. The process will gain leadership commitment from all
disciplines (Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Fire, and Law Enforcement) to:

      Foster collaboration across disciplines through leadership support.
      Interface with policy makers to gain leadership commitment and resource
       support.
      Use interoperability solutions on a regular basis.
      Plan and budget for ongoing updates to systems, procedures, and
       documentation.
      Ensure collaboration and coordination across all elements [Governance,
       Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), Technology, Training and Exercises,
       Usage].




                                           39
Finally, as the role of the SRB has evolved into a broader interoperability discussion
(SRB to become Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee), the SRB
has established an advisory committee (SIEC Advisory Committee, appointments
pending) with multi-discipline representation, regional representation, tribal
representation, federal agency representation and non-governmental representation to
blend these perspectives and to give voice to the varied participants in this process.
This will have primary responsibility for this SCIP and for coordinating the multiple and
varied issues of statewide interoperability in the state of Minnesota.

Strategic Approaches

The over arching strategy for the development               of   statewide   interoperable
communications is based upon the following framework:

      The Statewide Radio Board with Finance, Operational and Technical, Legislative,
       Steering and SIEC committees overseeing the funding, development,
       construction, operation and maintenance of the statewide ARMER radio system,
       developing statewide minimum standard operating procedures, standards for
       interoperable communications equipment to interface with ARMER and other
       radio systems and statewide interoperable communications planning, including
       the SCIP and TIC Plans
      Development of regional radio boards or committees with appropriate
       subcommittees and structures responsible for identifying solutions within each
       region for interoperable communications that support the statewide SCIP and
       present recommendations to the Statewide Radio Board on a broad range of
       interoperability communications issues (Figure 3-1)
      Creation of a SIEC Advisory Committee to the SRB with broad regional and
       multi-disciplinary representation
      HSEM Regional Program Coordinators (RPC) and Regional Interoperability
       Coordinators (RIC) who provide input and assistance to the regional radio board
       or committee, counties, municipalities and tribal jurisdictions on NIMS, NRP, ICS,
       interoperability planning, training and exercises, usage, etc.

Participation, Engagement and Perpetuation

Multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary input that includes the needs of non-governmental
organizations (NGO) and tribal jurisdictions is achieved through local county
communications processes including regular countywide informational and focus group
type meetings that include all the impacted groups. Additionally, regional radio boards
or committees will have governance structures that specifically include the
representation of the impacted groups on a region-wide basis, regularly scheduled
meetings, committees and discipline-specific work groups as needed or appropriate.

Public Safety Interoperability Communications (PSIC) grant requests are reviewed by
the Department of Public Safety HSEM and ARMER-911 in consideration of the SCIP,
the priorities of the Statewide Radio Board and those of the Regional Radio Board or


                                           40
Committee if the grant request is received on behalf of a specific County or tribal
jurisdiction. If the grant request is submitted by an individual County, the Department of
Public Safety will request the regional radio board or committee for the region the
county is located in to review, comment and offer their level of support for the request
as it relates to supporting or furthering interoperable communications within the region
or neighboring states, Canada and tribal governments if the regional group has not
been engaged in the development of the grant request.

The operation of regional radio boards or committees provides the ongoing opportunity
through regularly scheduled meetings to foster continued communications-related
discussion, problem identification and resolution and input into the regional and
statewide communications plan activities. (consider moving this in the beginning)

Implementation and Statewide Status

Major goals to be achieved by the end of 2008 for implementing SCIP process is:

      A regional radio committee or board is established and covers each HSEM
       region
      Communications technical assessments are completed or contracted for in all
       counties
      Each HSEM region will have a designated interoperability coordinator
      The initial SCIP Methodology will have been applied in Regions 1 - 5 to identify
       current interoperability issues
      Each County will have developed option(s) for providing interoperability with
       contiguous radio systems and the regional board or committee will have
       developed a region-wide strategy or options for further technical assessment

Table 3-2 summarizes the strategy and status of SCIP components in Minnesota:




                                           41
                                Table 3-2 Strategy and Status for Implementation of SCIP Components



                 Process Used for




                                                      or Subject Matter




                                                                                                                                                           Process in Place

                                                                                                                                                           Participant Input
                                                      Key Stakeholder




                                                                           Process Used to
                  Regional Group




                                                                            Align TIC Plan




                                                                                                                                                            for Continued
                                      (Governance)
                                      Committee or




                                                                                                                                Training and
                                                         Expert Input
                                       Board Input




                                                                                                                  Technology
                                                                                               Procedures
                    County or




                                                                                                Operating




                                                                                                                                 Exercises
                                                                               with SCIP



                                                                                                Standard




                                                                                                                                                 Usage
                       SCIP
     Area




Statewide
Radio Board      Yes                Yes              Yes                  Yes                Yes            Yes                Yes             Yes       Yes
Southeast -                                                                                                 Not
Region 1         Limited            Yes,             Yes                  N.A.               Early Stages   Documented         Yes             Partial   Yes
                                    Meeting to
Northeast -                         establish                                                Not
Region 2         Limited            8/22/07          Yes                  N.A.               Documented     In Process         Yes             N.A.      Partial
Northwest -                         Yes, early                                               Not
Region 3         Limited            stages           Yes                  N.A.               Documented     In Process         Yes             N.A.      In Process

                                                                                             Yes and
Central -                                                                                    Being
Region 4         Yes                Yes              Yes                  N.A.               Developed      In Process         Yes             Partial   Yes
                                    Not in
                                    place,
Southwest -                         discussion                                               Not            Not
Region 5          Limited           begun            Yes                  N.A.               Documented     Documented         Yes             N.A.      Partial
Metro -
Region 6         Yes                Yes              Yes                  Yes                Yes            Yes                Yes             Yes       Yes
            N.A. – Not available or identified at this time    (may need to update this/add when
            updated last/maybe in section 4 (current status)) (add explanation of labels that refer to
            the continuum)

            Figure 3-1 presents the overall process approach recommended for implementing the
            SCIP within each Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) Region. In
            regions with radio boards, the boards have developed mechanisms to implement the
            SCIP and may add to or modify their existing structures to assure all elements of the
            SCIP are addressed. The HSEM regions are utilized for purposes of the SCIP process
            and funding but are not prescriptive for the formation of radio boards. A member county
            of a regional radio board may reside in a different HSEM region than the majority of
            members of a regional radio board. This may be necessary as a result of historical,
            operational or legal inter agency and inter governmental relationships. It is not the
            intent of the SCIP process to disrupt the radio board configurations but to assure that all
            87 counties, tribal jurisdictions and appropriate non-governmental organizations are
            represented or participate.




                                                                                        42
Figure 3-1 Strategy and Framework for Development of Statewide Interoperable Communications
(update graphic)

Supporting the regional radio process are the following resources:

   •   Statewide Public Safety Communication Interoperability Program Administrator
          – Coordinates Minnesota’s comprehensive communications interoperability
             programs
          – Coordinates development of TIC plans
          – Coordinates ARMER/Legacy system interoperability
   •   Regional Interoperability Coordinators
          – Support RAC/RRB planning
                 • Education
                 • Coordination with Emergency plans/HS goals
   •   Regional Program Coordinators
          – Support Communities in emergency planning efforts

                                            43
         –   Close coordination between RIC and RPC

A further delineation of roles and responsibilities of key elements and resources of
ARMER and regional radio processes is presented in Appendix E.




                                        44
4          Current Statewide Assessment

A comprehensive assessment of the status of interoperable communication in
Minnesota evolves around the status of the ARMER system implementation. A
summary of that implementation follows:

                       ARMER Phase                   Counties   Funded      Start   Complete

     Phase One - ARMER Backbone Metro Area          9- Metro    1997      2000      2001
                   8
     Phase Two - Metro area local integration
                                                    Same        Ongoing   2001      2008
     (new footnote to exclude Chisago and Isanti)
     Phase Three                                    23          2005      2006      2008

     Phase Four, Five & Six                         55          2007      2008      2012


The ARMER plan originally anticipated a phased implementation of the ARMER project
as it was expanded from the Twin Cities metropolitan area into the remaining portions of
the state. Phase Three was funded in 2005 and is currently being implemented and
completed as a distinct phase. In the remaining 55 counties of the state, the phased
implementation was eliminated in 2007 when the project was funded by the legislature.
The Phase Three implementation will be substantially completed by spring 2008. In
addition, it is anticipated there will be substantial local integration upon the Phase Three
backbone in place by the end of 2008 (Central Minnesota - Stearns, Sherburne and
Wright Counties; Southeastern Minnesota - Olmsted and Goodhue Counties). (County-
by-county specifics)

It is significant to note that two questions have plagued the ARMER project over the last
five years. The first question was whether the ARMER backbone would be available
throughout the state and the second question was how much it would cost to participate
on the system (user fees). Both questions were addressed in the 2007 Public Safety
Omnibus Bill9 enacted by the Minnesota Legislature in 2007. The legislation included
an appropriation to complete the ARMER system in the remaining 55 counties of the
state over the next four years. In addition to funding the backbone capital costs, the
legislature also made a commitment to fund backbone operating costs thus eliminating
the allocation of backbone cost to users.




8
  Phase Two actually refers to the integration of local users onto the Phase One backbone. All
other phases refer to the implementation of the ARMER backbone only.
9
    Chapter 54, 2007 Laws of Minnesota.

                                                     45
The following diagram represents the original planned phased implementation of the
ARMER system in Minnesota. It is necessary to understand the current status of
Minnesota’s public safety communication infrastructure, planning and standards:




            Figure 4-1 Phased Implementation of the ARMER System in Minnesota

Based upon this historical development of the ARMER plan, the status of Minnesota’s
statewide interoperable communication planning and system supporting interoperable
communications can be divided into the following three distinct categories:




                                           46
                                                 Table 4-1


        Categories                      Definition                                 Status

Metro Area- Phase One &       Twin Cities Metropolitan area   Seven counties of the Twin Cities metropolitan
Two of the ARMER plan         plus Chisago and Isanti         area will be fully integrated onto a common
                              Counties.                       infrastructure in 2008. Substantial planning
                                                              related to the common backbone and
                                                              infrastructure use has taken place.
Phase Three                   23 counties in central and      The ARMER backbone will be in place by the end
                              southeastern Minnesota. The     of 2008. Regional governance structures are in
                              ARMER backbone in currently     place with planning to use the ARMER backbone
                              being implemented.              to facilitate operability and interoperability.
Remainder of the State-       55 counties in the remaining    No ARMER backbone is in place upon which to
Phases Four, Five and Six     portion of the state.           coordinate interoperability. Interoperability
                                                              planning is more localized and there has not
                                                              been any discussion of how the backbone will be
                                                              used to provide interoperability.(been funded and
                                                              detailed design work is underway)

     1. Phase One (Metropolitan Area) - Status of Interoperable Communication

     The status of public safety interoperability in the Twin Cities metropolitan area can be
     typified as follows:

             A 700/800 MHz standards based shared system is in place and all local and
              regional governments in the seven counties of the traditional Twin Cities
              metropolitan area will be fully integrated onto that system in 2008.
             A substantial VHF and UHF interoperable infrastructure is in place to provide
              interoperability with legacy system users. Standard operating procedures cover
              the usage and application of these interoperability resources.
             A portion of the region is part of the Urban Area Security Initiative where a
              Tactical Interoperability Communication Plan (TIC Plan) was completed in 2006
              and exercised in November, 2006. The Twin Cities UASI area received a perfect
              score in all rated categories (Governance, Standard Operating Procedures and
              Usage).
             The region is developing a common data infrastructure using elements of the
              ARMER system to support region wide interoperable data communications. The
              common data infrastructure project is regionally based and lead by Hennepin
              County.
             A regional radio board (MESB) is in place to aid in expanding regional planning
              and to further expand the TIC Plan to include all counties in the Twin Cities
              metropolitan area.


                                                     47
2. Phase Three- Status of Interoperable Communication - (Central and
Southeastern Minnesota)

      The backbone for a 700/800 MHz standards based, shared system is under
       construction in the twenty three counties of Minnesota making up the Phase
       Three implementation area. Stearns County and the City of St. Cloud are fully
       integrated onto the ARMER backbone in central Minnesota and it is anticipated
       that Wright and Sherburne Counties will integrate onto the ARMER backbone in
       2008. A regional radio board has been established in central Minnesota and
       there is substantial discussion of local integration and interoperability planning
       occurring in central Minnesota. The development of a governance structure in
       southeastern Minnesota is a bit less developed, but those discussions are
       underway. Olmsted County and the City of Rochester are fully integrated onto
       the ARMER backbone in southeastern Minnesota and it is anticipated that
       Goodhue County will integrate onto the ARMER backbone in 2008.
      The VHF and UHF interoperable infrastructure is not yet in place in the Phase
       Three implementation region to provide interoperability with legacy system users.
       That issue will be developed further as the regional governance structures
       continue to expand. Operational and technical standards developed by the
       Statewide Radio Board are applicable to this region, however, many regional
       interoperability issues have not yet been resolved.
      There is no TIC Plan in place for any of the local public safety entities in Phase
       Three. The details of planning for that process will be outlined later.
      Aside from local county based data networks, there is no common data
       infrastructure. In many portions of this region, there is no commercial data
       network available.

A regional radio board (Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board) is in place in central
Minnesota to aid in expanding regional planning and to further expand the TIC plan to
include all counties.

3. Rest of the State- Status of Interoperable Communication - 55 Counties of
Northern and Southwestern Minnesota

      The backbone for 700/800 MHz standards based, shared system was not funded
       until 2007. It was not possible to plan for integration with the ARMER system
       prior to that date. Itasca County in north central Minnesota is actually
       implementing local infrastructure that will be integrated into the ARMER system
       as ARMER is expanded to that region. The vast majority of counties in the
       region currently operate on legacy communication systems. The counties have
       not fully assessed their alternatives and future course with respect to public
       safety communications. A few notable exceptions to this exist, where counties,
       such as Mower County and Waseca County have acquired new analog VHF
       radio systems for local law enforcement and Redwood and Clay Counties which
       have acquired new digital VHF radio systems for local law enforcement. As

                                           48
       previously noted, there was no commitment to expand the ARMER backbone to
       this region prior to 2007 so there was no anticipation that the ARMER system
       backbone could provide the basis to expand interoperability throughout the
       region. (see note (Toni’s))
      The VHF and UHF interoperability is limited to shared channels, including
       traditional interoperability channels among law enforcement and fire services,
       and deployable gateways and radio caches. One notable exception is the
       northern counties along the Canadian border, where some discussion of
       international communication has occurred. The acquisition of radio caches and
       gateways was funded as part of the 2003 homeland security grant process, but
       most planning and standard operating procedures continue to evolve on a sub-
       regional and county to county basis. (may expand on this…discussion on VHF
       and UHF interoperability has occurred at a local basis, each county has a
       communications annex to their counties emergency plan)
      There is no TIC Plan in place for any of the local public safety entities in this
       region. The details of planning for that process will be outlined later.
      Aside from local county based data networks, there is no common data
       infrastructure. In many portions of this region, there is no commercial data
       network available.

Current Statewide Assessment-Tactical Communications Interoperability
Planning

Minnesota’s primary focus has been upon the formulation of a statewide inclusive plan
to broadly transition all public safety agencies to a common communication system to
achieve the highest level of interoperable communication. As applied to the Twin Cities
metropolitan area its success is demonstrated by the fact that in 2008 all government
agencies in the seven county metropolitan areas will be operating upon the ARMER
system.

In much of Minnesota, interoperability capabilities are achieved on a much more
localized basis through the following approaches:

      Use of dedicated statewide UHF, VHF and 800 MHz frequencies for inter agency
       or discipline-specific communications, or
      Maintenance of agreements (formal or informal) between agencies or
       jurisdictions to share frequencies between their respective agencies or
       jurisdictions.
      Deployable Gateways
      Radio Caches




                                           49
        Cell Phones10
        Commercial Radio Services11

The effectiveness of these approaches can be limited due to location of tower and
receiver sites; coverage and capacity of the technology; the number of frequencies
available; the number of other users on the same frequency (congestion); and the
number of agencies sharing the frequencies or other interoperability resources.

It should be noted communications is a standard element of every county’s emergency
operation plan. The maintenance of those plans is coordinated with the Department of
Public Safety through the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.
Incident command training and the routine exercise of county emergency operation
plans all include elements of communication interoperability. Although this SCIP seeks
to define the state’s strategy concerning the implementation of public safety
communication interoperability, the past, present and future role of the local emergency
management personnel in developing standard operating procedures and resources
has been and will continue to be significant,

Metropolitan Area - A comprehensive TIC Plan was developed for the Twin Cities
UASI region (Dakota, Hennepin and Ramsey Counties and the core Cities of
Minneapolis and St. Paul) in 2006. In the follow up exercise of the TIC Plan the Twin
Cities UASI region received a perfect score. That TIC Plan is currently being expanded
to include all counties in the ten county Twin Cities metropolitan areas. Included in the
expansion process is an inventory of communication resources, including
interoperability equipment and resources that will be collected from all governmental
entities in each of the four remaining counties of the metropolitan area, entered into the
CASM database and added to the comprehensive Twin Cities metropolitan area TIC
Plan. Completion of this portion of the statewide TIC Plan is anticipated at the end of
calendar year 2007.

Outside Metropolitan Area - From a statewide perspective, Minnesota has conducted
two surveys of the status of local public safety communication systems over the last
seven years. The first such survey was conducted as part of the report to the
Minnesota legislature proposing the adoption of a plan for a statewide shared public
safety system. The results of that survey can be found in the 800 MHz Executive Team
Report to the 2001 Legislature, 800 MHz Statewide Shared Public Safety Radio
System. On the whole, the survey found that a large portion of Minnesota’s public
safety communication infrastructure did not satisfactorily provide operable and
interoperable communications and was in need of replacement. A similar survey was


10
   Nextel’s Direct Connect feature was routinely used by taskforces in the metropolitan area at one time.
Usage of other cell phone services to provide similar services may in fact be common place in other parts
of the state.
11
   Raycom operates a commercial radio service in the southern portion of the state that is used by some
taskforce members. It is a M/A-COM EDACS 800 MHz trunked system. Other commercial services are
utilized to provide cross jurisdictional communication within the state.

                                                   50
conducted in 2005 as part of a Risk Assessment and Risk Mitigation Study conducted
with respect to the ARMER plan. The primary results of that survey essentially
validated the original survey and noted that no substantial improvements had been
made over the subsequent four years.

Within the ARMER Phase Three region, a portion of the public safety communication
resource inventory work is being accomplished as part of the local ARMER planning
process. In central Minnesota, this planning process has been facilitated by the Central
Minnesota Regional Radio Board. A detail inventory of public safety communication
systems and of interoperability resources has not yet been conducted across the
remaining portions of the state. However, there is a plan to collect the information
necessary to develop a regional TIC Plans as follows:

      A statewide interoperable communication program within the ARMER/911
       Program was funded as part of the 2007 legislation package.
      A statewide public safety interoperable communication program administrator is
       currently being hired.
      The department of public safety will hire or contract with, at least three regional
       interoperable communication coordinators to aid local governments in the
       collection of resource information.
      2007 appropriations to the ARMER program provides funding for detail design
       work related to the project, including an assessment of local resources and
       developing estimates of the cost to integrate local users onto the ARMER
       system. Technical contractors will be required to collect detail information
       concerning local communication resources, interoperability equipment and
       capabilities as part of that process.
      The information gathered as part of this detail planning process will be entered
       into the CASM database and made available for regional TIC Plan development
       and planning.
      Regional interoperability coordinators will work with regional radio boards or
       committees and with the various Homeland Security and Emergency
       Management regions to develop regional TIC Plans and to develop training and
       exercises that support the maintenance and viability of tactical interoperability
       planning.
      The Statewide Public Safety Interoperable Communication Program
       Administrator will coordinate TIC Plans between regions and will provide
       oversight and assistance with coordination with neighboring states and with
       Canada, to the extent permitted by law.

Substantial completion of this project is anticipated by the end of 2008. 2007 Homeland
Security funds were allocated to partially achieve this outcome. Additional resources
have been provided in connection with the ARMER plan build out and it is anticipated
that 2008 Homeland Security funds will be allocated to the planning, training and
exercise requirements necessary to sustain and validate the TIC Plan process.



                                           51
An essential element of the ARMER backbone is the ability to flexibly link to existing
VHF and UHF radio systems. Where there is overlapping coverage of ARMER and a
local communication system, the two systems can be and are linked together at the
system level and through audio gateway patches.              Enhancing this VHF/UHF
interoperability feature in the ARMER system and coordinating those resources with
public safety users operating in the VHF/UHF spectrum provides the best opportunity to
enhance public safety interoperability on the short term and mid term. Similarly, it
provides the best opportunity to coordinate interoperability with adjoining states public
safety entities, federal agencies and Canadian public safety officials where VHF
systems may remain the predominate approach.

Emphasizing the development and coordination of VHF and UHF resources can provide
multiple benefits. It will assure interoperability between ARMER system users and
legacy communication system users, it establishes a baseline for the same
interoperability between separate VHF and UHF system, and it provides a vehicle for
interoperability with adjoining states and federal agencies and is capable of providing
cross spectrum interoperability between VHF and UHF users.

On a statewide basis the ARMER system specifically provides for “Shared Channels”
within the ARMER infrastructure that enables access to the trunked radio system by
conventional radio users through frequencies or channels that have been established
for specific multi-agency or multi-jurisdictional use (applicable to the metropolitan area
and with phase three as the backbone is established). These shared resources are
available for use on a local, statewide or national basis and when programmed into a
radio enable interoperable communications and include:

      EMS HEAR – VHF statewide emergency medical services frequency
      FIRESWMA – VHF statewide fire service frequency and system
      MIMS – VHF statewide incident management frequency
      MINSEF – VHF statewide law enforcement frequency
      ICALL_CV – National 800 MHz hailing frequency for public safety
      ITAC1_CV, ITAC2_CV, ITAC3_CV, ITAC_4 – National 800 MHZ shared tactical
       frequencies

(may add a footnote here on nomenclature/national names)

In addition, the Metro area project has added and made available additional
conventional frequencies which when programmed into radios enables additional
communications interoperability, and includes:

      METRO-EMRG – UHF – region wide UHF law enforcement agency frequency
      METTAC A – VHF region wide inter agency coordination
      METTAC P – VHF region wide public safety inter agency coordination
      HCOMMON – VHF, UHF, 800 MHz frequencies used within or when transiting
       through Hennepin County


                                           52
      H-TAC-3 – VHF frequency available to all public safety within Hennepin County
       and other public safety entering the County with permission

The process and approach used in Phases 1, 2 an 3 will be applied in other areas of the
State as the ARMER system is built out over the next three to four years. However, as
the other regions of the State are at substantially different stages of interoperability
planning and decision making regarding longer term communications system
investment, there may be multiple approaches and systems to interface. (allow room for
unforeseen problem)

Current Status Data Communications and Interoperability

The ARMER system and plan in its current configuration does not provide for a data
component. The opportunity to leverage the ARMER infrastructure to provide wireless
data throughout the state has been noted to the degree that current implementation
decisions are calculated to maintain maximum flexibility to incorporate wireless data into
the basic radio frequency (RF) design. Phase three (23 counties outside the
metropolitan area) is being implemented on a RF platform which can be upgraded to
provide wireless data over the common RF components of the ARMER system.
Concurrently, the need to articulate and coordinate a strategy to provide interoperable
wireless data for public safety users throughout the state will be developed as part of
the detail planning process for the ARMER implementation.

Three distinct approaches to interoperable public safety data currently exist in the state,
as follows:

   1. Regional Enhancements - The Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (regional
      radio board covering the metropolitan area) is working with Hennepin County to
      implement a region wide wireless public safety data network over the ARMER
      backbone in the metropolitan area. Hennepin County is the recipient of a COPS
      grant which provides funding for the implementation of a regional enhancement
      to the ARMER backbone. The RF component of the data network is distinctly
      separate from the RF component of the voice network. The two are compatible
      systems that might be integrated into one voice and data network at some future
      time.
   2. Minnesota State Patrol Data System - Similarly, the Minnesota State Patrol has a
      mobile data system across major portions of the state utilizing towers and
      microwave capacity that are or will be part of the ARMER infrastructure. The
      State Patrol system as it currently exists is not capable of providing significant
      wireless IP connectivity for a broad category of public safety users. The State
      Patrol system may provide a foundation for the evolution of wireless data as part
      of Minnesota’s broader wireless interoperable data initiatives necessary to
      strengthen information sharing and collaboration capabilities.
   3. Local Data Systems - A number of counties have implemented local wireless
      data systems. As part of the Statewide Radio Board’s evolving strategy for


                                            53
       wireless data, the comprehensive ARMER backbone provides a greater
       opportunity to coordinate and enhance interoperable data through various
       strategies, such as, linking various data systems together through a message
       switch.

The ARMER system backbone provides the common network element upon which each
of these approaches might be expanded.

Current Status Internet Protocol Based Infrastructure

There are currently three distinct point to point communications infrastructure systems
connecting the public safety community throughout Minnesota. One of these systems is
MnNet, the second is the 9-1-1 network, and the third is the ARMER (Allied Radio
Matrix for Emergency Response) system:

   The MnNet system is maintained by the Minnesota Office of Enterprise Technology
    and consists of a robust Internet Protocol (IP) network connecting all law
    enforcement agencies to state and federal criminal justice databases.
   Minnesota’s 9-1-1 network provides connectivity for landline and wireless
    telecommunications through a broad network of telephone trunks, and is maintained
    by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.
   The ARMER system provides connectivity between radio towers, control sites and
    Public Safety Answering Points. In addition to the basic RF (radio frequency)
    component of the ARMER system there is a microwave backbone system used to
    provide the connectivity between antenna sites and to the major system elements of
    the trunked communication system. This microwave backbone is capable of
    carrying an IP based network with a built in very high level of reliability to provide the
    connectivity necessary to support the trunked communication system.

The opportunity exists to leverage the existing and excess capacity to enhance the
availability and reliability of IP based connectivity between public safety communication
systems which has not gone unnoticed. Similarly, there is active discussion of the
opportunity to coordinate and leverage this IP backbone with the broader public safety
communication needs used to strengthen information sharing and collaboration
capabilities.

The Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (MESB) is coordinating the
implementation of a wireless data system throughout the Twin Cities metropolitan area
over the ARMER system backbone. Although a discrete RF system, the MESB data
system uses the same tower sites and microwave backbone (IP network) and its
capacity to provide connectivity between sites and to provide the IP network
connectivity. The MESB has also initiated a promising discussion on the feasibility of
merging various public safety functions (ARMER, 911 and M-Net) onto a common IP
infrastructure.



                                              54
Greater Minnesota also has an equally large need and in several ways a more difficult
challenge to provide interconnection of voice and data communications systems for
interoperability. The interconnection is between divergent analog and digital radio
systems or sites and between Public Safety Answering Point’s (PSAPs) and Emergency
Operating Centers (EOC’s). The technical approach crosses vast geographic distances
and many political boundaries. This challenge might be met with new funding for
infrastructure in partnership with MN-DOT, Statewide Radio Board, ARMER, local law
enforcement and local policy and decision makers. A partnership of this nature would
enhance the IP system for ARMER and would provide local users access to microwave
IP system independent from commercial infrastructure. The excess capacity could be
developed to provide for MnNET redundancy.

Current Status 700 MHz Frequency Planning

700 MHz planning for the State of Minnesota was conducted by the Region 22 700 MHz
Planning Committee (RPC). The geographic coverage of the RPC corresponds with the
geographic borders of the State of Minnesota. A plan for the use of 700 MHz channels
was submitted to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) on October 14, 2005
and was approved by the FCC on June 27, 2006. As there were no primary users of
UHF television channels 63/64 or 68/69 in Minnesota, 700 MHz channels were available
for licensing once the Region 22 plan was approved by the FCC. A copy of the Region
22 700 MHz plan is available on the Minnesota Statewide Radio Board website at
www.srb.state.mn.us.

(Roger and John to reword) It should be noted that at the time of this SCIP process, the
allocation and use of the 700 MHz wide band data channels provided for in the Region
22 RPC plan is under reconsideration, FCC Docket No. 86-96. It should also be noted
that Hennepin County has a pending application for the use of the 700 MHz data
channels in the eight county metropolitan areas. Similar applications are pending for
the use of 700 MHz data channels in Mower County and Clay County, Minnesota.
Those applications have been pending for over one year, and in the case of Hennepin
County it was necessary to proceed with their regional data system implementation
using traditional 25 KHz 700 MHz channels.

The ARMER system is a Motorola Smart Zone system that supports operation in both
the 800 MHz spectrum and the 700 MHz spectrum allocated through the Region 22 700
MHz Plan. Although some early subscriber units on the ARMER system are not
capable of operating in the newly allocated 700 MHz spectrum, subscriber equipment
acquired after the initial implementation is capable of operating in both the 800 MHz
spectrum and in the newly allocated 700 MHz spectrum. Utilizing 700 MHz spectrum as
part of the ARMER implementation is anticipated as part of the continued
implementation of that project. Spectrum allocated as part of the Region 22 700 MHz
Plan may also be used by local units of government to create independent local
communication systems. However, there does not appear to be any local plans to use
700 MHz spectrum for voice communications outside the ARMER project at this time.



                                          55
Current Status 800 MHz Rebanding

The MN DOT, Office of Electronic Communications and local radio system owners,
such as Hennepin County, Minneapolis, Stearns County, Ramsey County and other
system and subsystem owners are working independently but collaboratively to prepare
and submit 800 MHz rebanding proposals and cost estimates to Nextel-Sprint and to
the 800 MHz Transition Authority. It is anticipated that substantial completion of the 800
MHz rebanding process will be accomplished by all effected entities in Minnesota by the
end of the July 2008.

Current Status Narrow-Banding of Frequencies below 512 MHz

A significant factor impacting decisions to invest in the upgrade or replacement of
existing local radio systems is the narrow banding requirement for public safety radio
frequencies set to go into effect January 1, 2013. Public safety radio users on systems
operating on frequencies below 512 MHz will have to utilize radio system equipment
that operates on the 12.5 kHz band width rather than the current 25 kHz allowed and
licensable up until January 1, 2010 after which, the FCC will no longer accept license
applications using 25 KHz band width use. The FCC will accept application for
modification of operations that expand the contour of existing 25 kHz channels until
January 1, 2011. As a result of FCC actions, local agencies must make decisions
regarding the frequencies and equipment they will use going forward as well as how the
decisions impact their interoperability with their communication partners. In 2006,
approximately 66 counties maintained wideband (25 KHz) VHF radio systems. Another
12 counties maintained a combination of wide and narrow band radio systems.

The SCIP process will closely examine and consider the short, mid and long term
communications needs and plans of the counties and municipalities within the HSEM
regions. The process within each region is designed to result in an understanding of the
best radio system option(s) or fit as well as the implications of options for technical and
operational interoperability. (Toni’s note) A substantial issue in this plan is developed of
VHF/UHF interoperable resources as narrow banding is accomplished. Currently county
and municipal governments can continue to make independent design and purchasing
decisions regarding the upgrade or replacement of their existing radio capabilities.
Where applicable local governments seeking state or federal funds for their
enhancements, the enhancements will need to be consistent with the radio system and
interoperability objectives within the SCIP. The development of Regional Radio Boards
and implementation of the SCIP methodology and processes will assist local
governments and radio system users to make informed radio technology decisions that
make sense for their jurisdictions and disciplines within the framework of mutually
agreed upon state-wide standards.

(may want to reword the above para)




                                            56
4.1      Governance Structure

The Statewide Radio Board was created by the Minnesota legislature in 2004 as the
ARMER plan implementation moved from a metropolitan area implementation to the
statewide implementation. 12 At that same point, the concept of regional advisory
committees and regional radio boards13 was established as a transition path for the
Metropolitan Radio Board that had implemented the region wide interoperable radio
system in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. The project was given the name of Allied
Radio Matrix for Emergency Response (ARMER). The SRB meetings are held on the
last Thursday of every month, they are open to the public and both the agenda and
minutes are published and maintained upon a web site at www.srb.state.mn.us.

The following table provides the legislative and executive orders relevant to the
existence and operations of the Statewide Radio Board and Minnesota’s communication
interoperability governance structure:

                             Table 4-2 Legislative and Executive Orders

                      Item                              SCIP                      Authority

Statewide Radio Board and ARMER legislation.     Appendix A-1           Minn. Stat. §403.21 to 403.40.

SRB Bylaws                                       Appendix A-2           Adopted by the SRB
Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee
                                                 Appendix A-3           Executive Order
(SIEC)
                                                                        Membership is specified in
SRB Membership                                   Table 4.2
                                                                        Minn. Stat. §403.36.
                                                                        Committees are based upon
SRB Committee Membership                         Tables 4.3, 4.4, 4.5
                                                                        statute and SRB Bylaws

This structure is particularly important as it relates to the primary technology of the
ARMER backbone (a standards based shared system) where the SRB is responsible
for providing a platform which maximizes interoperability throughout the state. The
ARMER platform, and Minnesota’s governance structure provides the framework and
infrastructure that can be adapted to a variety of local and regional approaches to
interoperability. The regional radio boards are the cornerstone of the structure for multi-
discipline user based support of regional participation.

As originally constituted, the focus of the SRB was the implementation of Minnesota’s
long term strategy to provide the basic backbone for public safety communications upon
a standards based shared platform. As the focus of interoperability has grown, it was
necessary to adapt the committee structure of the SRB to include a much broader range
of participants. This outcome is currently underway and is reflected in the designation


12
    Minn. Stat. §403.36& 403.37 provides the basic framework for the Statewide Radio Board and the
structure of the ARMER implementation.
13
    Minn. Stat. §403.39 & 403.40.

                                                 57
of the SRB as Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee (SIEC) and
the creation of a SIEC Advisory Committee with broad representation, to include federal
participants, tribal representatives and non-government entities engaged in the public
safety mission.       Executive Order __________ reflects the assignment of that
responsibility.14

(include org chart and add pointers elsewhere in the document)

Metropolitan Emergency Services Board

The first regional radio board was created in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. The
structure of that regional radio board capitalized upon the successes of the Metropolitan
Radio Board (MRB) with some adjustments to accommodate the changing role of
transitioning from the regional implementation of the backbone in the metropolitan area
to the role of administering the vast communication network, coordinating
interoperability on a regional basis and participating in the larger picture of statewide
interoperability. The MRB was ultimately merged into the Metropolitan 911 Board to
create the Metropolitan Emergency Services Board (MESB) where a similar user based
committee structure with a representative board of elected officials had provided the
basis of participatory governance for many years. Many of the details of the overall
mission and membership of the MESB are available at www. http://www.mn-mesb.org.
The committee structure is as follows:

         Radio Technical Operations Committee (R-TOC) - This committee is a user
          based multi-disciplinary committee representing local governments and non-
          governmental public safety entities from across the region. Their role is to
          address technical and practical issues related to the configuration of both
          regional and local infrastructure and to effectively bridge the link between users
          (practical needs) and technicians (what the technology can provide). There is
          also an Interoperability Sub-Committee to the R-TOC that has become more
          broadly focused upon the standard operating procedures (SOP), integration of
          legacy systems into the backbone (system of system issues), and tactical
          interoperability planning and exercising.
The System Manager’s Group (SMG) is an informal group that is more specifically
related to administration of the state, regional and local infrastructure among various
system administrators. The participants here are a more technical group needed to
assure the implementation of interoperability measures from a technical perspective.
(Toni’s note)

Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board

With the implementation of the ARMER backbone in central and southeastern
Minnesota, the basic model for the development of regional advisory committees and


14
     Appendix A-3

                                              58
regional radio boards was replicated in Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board
CMNRRB), which is composed of 18 counties in central Minnesota. Detail information
about the CMNRRB can be found at www.cmnradio.org. The following committee
structure of the CMNRRB reflects this participatory model and structure:

         Regional Advisory Committee – The regional advisory committee is a
          continuation of the original regional advisory committee that formed the
          CMNRRB and addresses the organizational structure and its continued
          development.
         Owners and Operators Committee – Is the equivalent of the System Manager’s
          Group under the MESB. (may want to iterate on this or delete)
         User’s Committee – This committee is a user based multi-disciplinary committee
          representing local governments and non-governmental public safety entities from
          across the region and is the equivalent of the R-TOC in the metropolitan area.

The implementation of the ARMER backbone has not resulted in a focus upon the
ARMER system as Minnesota’s only solution to interoperability. It has simply provided
the framework for comprehensive engagement of all disciplines across a region with the
tools, the ARMER backbone as the system of systems, around which to plan and
develop interoperability solutions. Central Minnesota Radio Board organizational and
structural documents are provided in Appendix A-4 and A-5. (may want this to be
separated)

Regional Advisory Committees15 are currently being formed in other regions of the
state. The focus for regional radio board development was originally designed to
accommodate the phase’s implementation of the ARMER system. The elimination of
the phased implementation by the 2007 legislature and legislative funding to complete
the build out of the system statewide has shifted the focus to the Division of Homeland
Security and Emergency Management planning regions.16 The change of focus is
based upon the need to integrate interoperability planning as an element of Minnesota’s
broader emergency planning efforts. Regional Advisory Committees have been formed
in the following regions:

                  Southeastern Minnesota (HSEM Region 1)
                  Northwestern Minnesota (HSEM Region 3)

Similarly, discussion is underway in the following portions of the state for the
development of regional advisory committees:

                  Northeast Minnesota (HSEM Region 2)
                  Southwest Minnesota (HSEM Region 5)



15
     Minn. Stat. §403.40, subdivision 1.
16
     [Previous HSEM regional map]

                                             59
Statewide Communications Interoperability Authority and Responsibilities

Having the processes and participants in place to assure ongoing local input and for
building and maintaining strong local support of the communications plan is essential to
the short term and to the long term success of interoperable communications. The
Strategic SCIP process provides for the continued creation of regional advisory
committees and regional radio boards throughout the state.              The continued
development of the boards and committees will be supported by ARMER/911
Interoperability Program and will be coordinated with HSEM Regional Program
Coordinators. Contracted resources can be engaged to assist in technical assessment
and planning and process support to regional radio boards and regional advisory
committees until they are able to sustain themselves. The regional radio boards and
committees provide for multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary engagement of public
safety officials. They establish committees, work groups or task teams to engage the
individuals that work day to day within the respective public safety or public works
disciplines. Likewise, individual counties are encouraged to create communication
committees and workgroups that are broadly representative and inclusive of radio
users. (update)

The membership of the Statewide Radio Board and its committees and the two existing
regional radio boards demonstrate the commitment in Minnesota’s process to assure
multi-agency, multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary involvement and engagement in
the public safety interoperable communication process. A clear example of this
commitment is the fact that the current chair of the Operations and Technical
Committee of the Statewide Radio Board is and has been a representative of a non-
governmental organization responsible for providing emergency medical services in
several regions of the state. This broad engagement of eligible users of the ARMER
system has been a hallmark of the project since its inception.

Alignment of PSIC Grants and Other Funding Sources with SCIP

The Statewide Radio Board is the statutory entity charged with the responsibility to
oversee the ARMER system with its expanding role in communication interoperability as
Minnesota’s SIEC it will assure that Minnesota continues the development of
interoperability requirements as provided for in the SCIP. These responsibilities
include:

      The authority to allocate funds made available to the Statewide Radio Board
       among regional radio boards or to local entities within a region to encourage local
       and regional participation in the system including tribal jurisdictions and non-
       governmental organizations, and
      The authority to establish technical and operational standards (including those
       applicable to 700 MHz frequencies) necessary to provide for the development
       and implementation of a statewide backbone that maximizes the integration of
       the public safety radio communication system throughout the state.

                                           60
      The authority to coordinate interoperability frequencies.

As previously noted, the governance role of the SRB involving interoperability has been
recently enhanced as a result of the Governor’s Executive Order designating the SRB
as Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee (SIEC). The SRB has
established a SIEC Advisory Committee to assure broad engagement of all entities
engaged in responding to the public safety needs of Minnesota. The SIEC Advisory
Committee will assume the responsibility for maintaining the SCIP. This action will
further assure the appropriate alignment of communications funding, including PSIC
grants with the SCIP. While PSIC grants are not singled out in the SRB statutes and
by-laws, the Commissioner of Pubic Safety is responsible for assuring that PSIC and
other grants administered by the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency
Management are aligned with the state’s broader public safety interoperable
communication strategy provided for in the SCIP. In summary, the Statewide Radio
Board provides policy level oversight, and accountability for assuring the following
elements of Minnesota’s comprehensive interoperability planning and implementation:

      Statewide Communications Interoperability Plan
      Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee
      ARMER Backbone
      Interoperability of the ARMER backbone with other public safety radio systems
      Promoting interoperability between legacy systems, across state borders and
       along Minnesota’s Canadian border
      Use of State, Federal or other funds that impact statewide communications
       system and systems interoperability, including PSIC grant requests
      Operational and technical standards that support the continued development of
       multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary agreements and standard operating
       agreements. These agreements are an integral part of effective regional
       planning and implementation of communications systems, including systems
       using the 700 MHz frequencies and to the involvement of tribal jurisdictions and
       non-governmental organizations (may want to have a pointer)

The work of the Statewide Radio Board is reinforced and built upon the development
and operation of Regional Radio Boards or Committees. Regional radio boards,
through their membership and through the committee processes will engage field level
radio users to provide:

      Broad cross functional and cross jurisdictional participation which includes field
       personnel;
      Engage tribal jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations;
      Define radio equipment and interoperability needs of participating entities,
       including equipment operating in the 700 MHz spectrum;
      Address technical and operational interoperability requirements and continuously
       validated those requirements;
      Devise training, exercises that are supported by routine usage;


                                            61
        Develop local standard operating procedures that interface with those of the
         Statewide Radio Board and assure timely updated, as needed.

4.2       Technology

ARMER Backbone

The backbone of the ARMER communications system is a Motorola ASTRO, digital,
narrowband, trunked, APCO Project 25 compliant, digital simulcast and multicast
system capable of operating 700 and 800 MHz frequencies. Sites are interconnected
by a digital microwave system, fiber optic cable or T-1 lines depending upon the
situation. The system is capable of providing cross interoperability with VHF, UHF and
other 800 systems where there is overlapping coverage.

Other Systems

The vast majority of public safety communications equipment in service throughout the
portions of the State not supported by the ARMER backbone are stand alone VHF wide
band, analog radio systems. There are a few instances where local agencies have
completely replaced their communications systems with new narrowband digital VHF
systems. Similarly, there are a number of agencies that have replaced a portion of their
communication infrastructure after 1996 with dual mode VHF equipment that is capable
of narrowband analog operation. Surveys conducted as part of the 2001 report to the
Minnesota legislature17 and the 2005 ARMER Risk Assessment and Risk Mitigation
Plan18 continue to demonstrate that substantial portion of this public safety equipment is
still in use long after its projected life cycle. This is also the situation in Phase Three
counties that have not yet migrated to the ARMER system. In most counties the
Sheriff’s Office maintains lead responsibility for operating and maintaining the primary
public safety two-way voice communications system(s) within a county. It is not
uncommon for municipal police agencies to be dispatched on the sheriff’s VHF system.
Local fire services often have a countywide VHF system dedicated to their dispatch
operations while relying on simplex (direct radio to radio) communications at the scene
of a fire or other response event. EMS communications vary depending upon the
organizational affiliation of the service provider (public or non-governmental agency.)
EMS communications also rely primarily on VHF radio. (add pointer)

Interoperability Resources and Assets

An understanding of the current status of public safety communication and
interoperability in Minnesota and the gaps to be filled can be aligned into three
categories based upon the status of the ARMER implementation, as follows:


17
   800 MHz Executive Team Report to the 2001 Legislature, 800 MHz Statewide Shared Public Safety
Radio System.
18
   Citation here to web site.

                                              62
      ARMER backbone in place with substantial local integration and full
       interoperability (Phases One/Two – 9 counties)
      ARMER backbone currently being constructed and implemented, limited
       interoperability (Phase Three - 23 counties)
      No ARMER backbone, fragmented interoperability (Remaining 55 counties)

The following core interoperability frequencies used by public safety agencies operating
upon in the VHF spectrum continue to provide the basis of interoperability throughout
the state of Minnesota:

      EMS HEAR – VHF statewide emergency medical services frequency
      FIRESWMA – VHF statewide fire service frequency and system
      MIMS – VHF statewide incident management frequency
      MINSEF – VHF statewide law enforcement frequency

Metropolitan Area - ARMER Backbone

In the Twin Cities metropolitan area a substantial interoperability infrastructure,
including linked VHF/UHF channels, was built into the backbone to provide
interoperability with non-participating public safety radio system users and other public
safety entities coming into the metropolitan area. The interoperability channels and
linked VHF/UHF frequencies are reflected in the following table.

                Table 4-3 Interoperability Channels and Linked VHF/UHF Frequencies

        Channels               TX Frequency         RX Frequency        Statewide/Regional
  EMS HEAR                  155.34               155.34                Statewide
  FIRESWMA                  154.295              154.295               Statewide
  H-TAC3(TG &CV)            155.82               154.995               Sub Regional
                            155.61               150.79
  HCOMMON                   460.525              465.525               Sub Regional
                            868.0125             823.1025
  ICALL_CV                  866.0125             821.1025              Statewide
  ITAC1_CV                  866.5125             821.5125              Statewide
  ITAC2_CV                  867.0125             822.0125              Statewide
  ITAC3_CV                  867.5125             822.5125              Statewide
  ITAC4_CV                  868.0125             823.0125              Statewide
  METEMRG                   460.275              465.275               Regional
  METTAC-A                  159.345              153.755               Regional
  METTAC-P                  151.445              153.815               Regional
  MIMS                      155.37               155.37                Statewide
  MINSEF                    155.475              155.475               Statewide

(Toni’s note)



                                               63
The ARMER system is also able to provide additional cross band patches at the local
level through console based patches. Permanent cross band patches are referred to as
“hard patches” and ad hoc selectable patches are referred to a “soft patches.” Many
communities provide hard patches between VHF fire pager frequencies and ARMER
talk groups to simulcast upon both systems.

Phase Three ARMER Backbone (Central & Southeastern Minnesota)

The specific details of the interoperability infrastructure to be provided as part of the
Phase Three ARMER backbone has not yet been determined. Consideration is being
given to include traditional public safety interoperability frequencies as part of the
ARMER backbone. Input will be sought from stakeholders through the regional radio
boards and other forums.

      EMS HEAR – VHF National emergency medical services frequency
      FIRESWMA – VHF National fire service frequency and system
      MIMS – VHF statewide incident management frequency
      MINSEF – VHF National law enforcement frequency
      ICALL_CV – National 800 MHz hailing frequency for public safety
      ITAC1_CV, ITAC2_CV, ITAC3_CV, ITAC_4 – National 800 MHz shared tactical
       frequencies.
      Add the UTAC and VTAC freqs

Soft and hard patching capability provides additional ad hoc interoperability at the local
level for ARMER system users. Similarly, a soft patch capability providing ad hoc
linking of legacy system users into the ARMER backbone can be easily provided
through radio control stations located at public safety agency dispatch centers.

Radio users in areas where the ARMER backbone is currently being implemented are in
a transitional stage. Public safety officials in those regions sense that interoperability
has been reduced as agencies transition from their legacy systems to the ARMER
backbone. Similarly, the availability of traditional solutions for interoperability (sharing
proprietary frequencies and using shared interoperability frequencies) can be reduced
by the dynamics of replicating those traditional interoperability solutions into a statewide
backbone.

As the ARMER backbone is under construction in the Phase Three region, a large
portion of the public safety agencies continues to operate on their legacy VHF radio
systems. The following comments about interoperability in areas where no backbone
exists are equally applicable to these public safety entities.

Remaining 55 Counties-No ARMER Backbone

There are two basic approaches to interoperability for public safety users in those
portions of the state where no ARMER backbone exists. As previously noted, virtually


                                            64
all public safety communications systems in those portions of the state are stand alone
radio systems. The basic approaches are as follows:

      The core interoperability frequencies listed above provide the basic framework
       for public safety interoperability in those regions.
           o EMS HEAR – VHF National emergency medical services frequency
           o FIRESWMA – VHF National fire service frequency and system
           o MIMS – VHF statewide incident management frequency
           o MINSEF – VHF National law enforcement frequency
           o Add VTAC UTAC
      Interoperability is derived by allowing use of proprietary frequencies to other
       public safety users. (Example: Ambulance services are allowed to use the
       sheriff’s frequencies adjoining sheriff’s offices are allowed to talk on each others
       frequencies).

It should be noted that based upon surveys conducted in 2001 and 2006, the core
interoperability frequencies generally are not broadly available to all public safety users
at the operational level for cross disciplinary communications and interoperability. As a
general rule, law enforcement will have the MINSEF channel available to them, the fire
services will have the Statewide Fire frequency available to them, EMS providers will
have the EMS-HEAR frequency available to them and emergency management will
have the MIMS frequency available.

Deployable Resources- Statewide

There is a variety of deployable communication resources available to public safety
throughout the state of Minnesota to include the following:

      Gateways–Used to link different radio systems together. These solutions can be
       limited by the underlying coverage of the systems to be linked. Two repeater
       based VHF systems must have overlapping coverage to the most effective.
       Linking simplex (radio to radio) systems can provide additional scene of action
       resources.
      Radio Caches-A cache of extra radios is maintained to deploy in connection with
       a specific public safety response.
      Commercial communication services
      Cell Phones
      Amateur Radios

Appendix A provides information concerning application of Law Enforcement Terrorism
Grant funds in 2004 to provide equipment for this purpose within the various regions of
Minnesota. Additional resources have been provided with locally directed Law
Enforcement Terrorism Grant funds. (See “Capability Assessment” for the status of
Minnesota’s Capability Assessment process).



                                            65
Capability Assessment

Metropolitan Area

A thorough capability assessment was conducted in the Twin Cities UASI region as part
of the preparation of a Tactical Interoperable Communication (TIC) Plan in 2006. The
assessment information was loaded into the Communications Asset Survey and
Mapping (CASM) tool. At that time, the assessment was limited to three counties of the
seven metropolitan area counties. The metropolitan area is now in the process of
completing an assessment of communication equipment and of the operational
environment for ten counties in the metropolitan area. The region has also contracted
to have the capabilities assessment information loaded into the CASM tool with
completion anticipated by December, 2007

Phase Three and Remainder of the State

As the ARMER system is expanded throughout the state, the capabilities of the
standards based shared system be will documented. Similarly, as part of the planning
process for local integration onto the ARMER backbone a detailed assessment of
current capabilities is required. A portion of this assessment has occurred in some
portions of the Phase Three implementation area, however, it is anticipated that further
assessment will be necessary to acquire a thorough assessment of equipment and
capabilities throughout the region and state.

The plan for completing an assessment of communications equipment and of the
operational environment is as follows:

      The 2007 Minnesota legislature provided funding for the detail design work
       needed to complete the ARMER system, including an assessment of the cost of
       local enhancements throughout the system. As part of that process, it will be
       necessary for the Department of Public Safety to contract with technical
       consultants to provide an assessment of local needs and equipment on a county
       by county basis.
      The Department of Public Safety is creating a Statewide Public Safety
       Interoperability program. That program will be staffed by a program administrator
       and three Regional Interoperability Coordinators (RIC). A primary function of the
       RIC’s will be to work with and assist counties and local governments in the
       collection of information necessary for the ARMER local enhancement study and
       for the statewide capability assessment.
      The Department of Public Safety will contract for data entry services to assure
       the capability assessment information is incorporated into the CASM tool by the
       end of 2008.
      In conjunction with this process, the RIC’s will be further developing the regional
       TIC Plans.


                                           66
ARMER and Legacy System Planning and Migration Strategies

With the legislative appropriation of funds to complete the build out of Minnesota’s
700/800 MHz trunked backbone across the state, the strategy to support and enhance
public safety communications throughout the state has become much more certain.
Similarly, the extensive experience developed from the implementation of the ARMER
system in the metropolitan area and in Phase Three will be used to develop practical
solutions to the evolution and migration planning, life cycle issues for legacy systems
and continued interoperability with systems operating in different spectrum (intrastate,
interstate and nationally).

ARMER backbone as the System of Systems

The long term strategy has always been to build a shared standard common platform
across the state that is capable of providing the scalable public safety communication
resources needed for state, regional and local public safety responders. The
comprehensive proposal and technical details of that statewide plan are available at the
following web site: www.srb.state.mn.us. Although the ARMER plan continues to be
the bedrock of Minnesota’s public safety interoperable communication planning,
experience has demonstrated the following:

      A statewide backbone of the ARMER system can provide the resources for
       interoperability among disparate systems.
      That as the system is advanced and public safety officials see the potential
       benefits of the new technology and its benefits their resistance to change will
       diminish.
      The local and regional governance structure and planning structure focused upon
       utilizing the backbone to enhance interoperability among all public safety entities
       is a critical piece of the interoperability process.
      Local and regional participation in the ARMER system is a local decision based
       up a multitude of economic, operational and political needs.

In essence, Minnesota’s extensive experiences with the implementation of the ARMER
system and the multitude of issues related to changing spectrum and implementing new
technology in the metropolitan area and in the Phase Three region have reinforced the
need to view the ARMER project and the ARMER backbone as the “system of system.”

Supporting Legacy Systems

A description of how resources are applied through the ARMER backbone to support
interoperability and operations with legacy systems is as follows:

      Hard and Soft Patches- The flexibility of a trunked radio system provides the
       opportunity to define interoperability talk groups that can be patched to legacy
       systems. As a general rule, hard patches (permanent) are limited to fire
       frequencies where VHF pagers are an essential part of the communication

                                           67
       network. Ad hoc soft patches at the dispatch center console level provide the
       opportunity to easily link legacy systems into the ARMER backbone. (Patches
       essentially create a simulcast system where overlapping coverage exists).
      VHF/UHF/800 MHz interoperability resources provided as part of the backbone -
       As previously noted an extensive VHF/UHF and 800 MHz interoperability
       backbone was built into the ARMER system in the metropolitan area. Regional
       planning for that interoperability backbone is underway with the implementation
       of the ARMER system in Phase Three.

As part of the discussion of the cross spectrum interoperability to be incorporated into
the statewide backbone, it has become clear that a much higher level of coordination is
required across the state. The planning necessary to provide appropriate interfaces
and to support legacy systems will be developed as follows:

      Additional information upon existing legacy systems will be collected as part of
       the capability assessment process.
      The development of Regional Advisory Committees and Regional Radio Board’s
       more thoroughly described under governance will provide the focal point for
       regional planning of approaches necessary to support legacy systems, including
       the expanding VHF to VHF interoperability among legacy system users.
      A Statewide Public Safety Interoperability Program has been created in the
       Department of Public Safety. That program will be staffed by a program
       administrator and at least three regional interoperability coordinators (RIC). The
       regional interoperability coordinators interface with the RAC and/or RRB to
       facilitate this planning process.

Migration Process

With the legislative appropriation of funds to complete the ARMER system, the
statewide 700/800 MHz trunked backbone provides the basis for Minnesota’s migration
strategy. The ARMER backbone will be the principle communication system for State
users. However, that backbone is also designed as a scalable system that can be
adopted by local and regional public safety users as they are faced with the requirement
to replace their aging communication infrastructure. Funding of the project in the 2007
legislative session provided the resources necessary to assure the backbone be
substantially completed and available for local integration and use in all counties of
state within the next four years. Similarly, that legislation provided funding for backbone
operating costs thus answering the equally pressing and standing questions over the
cost of participation.

In addition to the implementation of the basic ARMER backbone across the state, past
legislation has provided partial funding of local infrastructure costs. Eight million was
provided for up to 50% of local infrastructure costs in the metropolitan area (Phase One
and Two) and $9.5 million were provided for up to 50% of local infrastructure costs in a
portion of the Phase Three implementation.

                                            68
A key element of the SCIP is to layout the processes and work flows to finally determine
the following:

      Which entities will maintain existing legacy systems and how interoperability with
       them will be supported.
      Identify the best approaches and solutions on a regional basis to assure
       interoperability between legacy systems and plan interoperability with bordering
       states and Canada.
      Establish the timelines and sequences for the continued build out of the ARMER
       system.
      Engage public safety officials in the governance structure, migration plans and
       strategies consistent with the time lines for implementation in Phase Three and
       the remaining 55 counties of the state (Phases Four, Five and Six).

The Statewide Radio Board (SRB) plays a key role in assuring new radio equipment
acquired, in whole or in part, with State or Federal funds comply with and are consistent
with the SCIP and ARMER plan in the following three ways:

      The SRB has overall responsibility for maintaining the SCIP Plan. The
       mechanics for the continued maintenance of the SCIP plan are documented in
       other portions of this plan.
      The investment justifications developed as part of the SCIP Plan provide the
       basis for assuring that PSIC funds and DHS funds made available for
       interoperable communication are used consistent with the SCIP.
      Where possible, the SIEC Advisory Committee will be asked to participate in and
       review the allocation of available funds to assure consistency with the SCIP.

The Department of Public Safety has overall responsibility for administering PSIC and
DHS grants and in assuring that funds are applied consistent with Minnesota’s SCIP.
(See note/add here) digital v analog, P25 compliant v has to be a digital system, Freq
range, narrow banding issues, plain language piece in here also… etc. use of interop
freqs, data??? This is a place that we may need to visit…

With respect to the ARMER system (backbone and local enhancements), the SRB has
absolute authority to determine the technical and operational standards of the shared
system. The ARMER administrative standards document the processes to assure that
local enhancements are thoroughly vetted prior to implementation. Similarly, the SRB
has established standards for subscriber equipment that will be used on the system.
Those standards and approved equipment lists are available on the SRB website at
www.srb.state.mn.us.

Interoperability Training

Training in the use of communication equipment has been a significant focus as the
ARMER backbone has been implemented in the metropolitan area and in Phase Three.


                                           69
The following training standards have been adopted by the SRB for ARMER system
participants:

        Standard 1.10a     Training of Local System Administrator
        Standard 1.10b     Training of Technical Staff
        Standard 1.10c     Training of Dispatchers
        Standard 1.10d     Training of Radio Users

Copies of these standards are attached as Appendix A-6.

To that end, it was necessary for the Department of Public Safety to develop a training
package for radio users. That package has been approved by the Grants and Training
Division of the DHS and is currently being funded with DHS funds. A key element of
that training was to incorporate scenario based NIMS exercises into the training to
assure that users are capable of utilizing the equipment in a demanding interoperability
environment. Copies of that training package are available on a two CD-Rom package
which is available upon request.

The following additional measures are currently in place or under consideration:

       $200,000 in 2005 DHS funds were allocated to the MESB to support a training
        program and training coordinator.
       The SRB Finance Committee is considering whether to fund from appropriated
        state funds the expansion of the MESB training program into a statewide “train
        the trainer” program to support uniformity statewide.

It should be noted that training programs discussed here include training of legacy
system interoperability users, such as the operation of radio control stations at dispatch
centers and portable and mobile radios acquired by legacy system users for
interoperability purposes.

Equipment based interoperability was also part of the process in developing and
exercising the TIC Plan for the Twin Cities UASI region. It is anticipated that continued
training and exercising will be part of the expansion and maintenance of the TIC Plan
for the entire metropolitan area. A proposal for allocation of 2007 DHS funds is
anticipated for that purpose. In addition to equipment based exercises and training,
additional training of Communication Unit Leaders (COML) will be provided.

A similar pattern of training is anticipated as part of the development of regionally
anchored TIC Plans. The creation of a Statewide Public Safety Interoperability position
within the Department of Public Safety anticipates that the regional interoperability
coordinators will be involved in developing, training and exercising regional TIC Plans
and that equipment based training will be an essential element of that training. With the
implementation of the ARMER backbone throughout the State and Minnesota’s
objective to use the backbone to facilitate interoperability across the state, training on


                                           70
interoperability with the public safety spectrum in the 700 and 800 MHz spectrum will be
a key feature of any training.

Technology and Equipment in the State of Minnesota

The ARMER-911 project 2006 follow up survey of radio users received 647 responses
completed to widely varying degrees. The survey identified local systems operating in
the following spectrum:

               Low Band       - 61
               High Band      - 1,136
               UHF            - 168
               800 MHz        - 80
               Other          - 48

A number of responding agencies did not identify the spectrum of their communication
systems. However, the data suggests that high band VHF is the predominate frequency
band used in most public safety communication systems and that many of the public
safety radio systems have reached or exceeded the lifecycle expectations (over 15 – 30
years). In addition to these stand alone systems, the following shared systems are
known to exist:

        ARMER System - Standards based shared system operating in the 700/800 MHz
         spectrum (700 MHz frequencies have not yet been used in the voice system but
         the system is fully capable of operating upon those frequencies).
            o Metropolitan area - The original ARMER backbone was installed in seven
              counties of the Twin Cities metropolitan area in 200119. At that time, the
              state agencies operating within the metro areas (DPS, MN/DOT, DNR,
              and MPCA), Metro Transit, North Memorial Medical Transport, Carver
              County, Hennepin County and the Cities of Minneapolis and Richfield
              transitioned to the ARMER backbone. Additional county integrations have
              occurred between 2001 and the present (Anoka - 2005, Ramsey – 2007,
              Dakota – 2007) and with the addition of Washington and Scott County in
              2008 the seven county metropolitan area will be fully integrated onto the
              ARMER system.
            o Phase Three - Implementation of the ARMER system in central Minnesota
              and Southeastern Minnesota – Phase Three was funded in 2005 and with
              that implementation the backbone will be substantially completed by the
              end of 2007. In central Minnesota, Stearns County is fully integrated onto
              the ARMER backbone. In southeastern Minnesota, Olmsted County is
              fully integrated onto the ARMER backbone. Additional integrations onto



19
  The backbone was actually installed in nine counties. Chisago and Isanti Counties were included but
are not part of the traditional metropolitan planning region.

                                                 71
             the ARMER backbone are anticipated in Sherburne and Wright County in
             central Minnesota and in Goodhue County in southeastern Minnesota in
             2008.
          o Remaining 55 counties of Minnesota - The completion of the ARMER
            backbone in the remaining 55 counties of the state was funded by the
            legislature in 2007. Substantial completion of the backbone in the
            remaining counties of the state is anticipated by the end of 2012. Itasca
            County in the northern region of the state is currently implementing an 800
            MHz trunked system that is fully compatible with the ARMER system and
            will be incorporated into the backbone as the ARMER implementation
            proceeds.

       Structurally, the backbone of the ARMER system is owned, operated and
       maintained by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT). Local
       enhancements are owned by the local government they are designed to benefit.
       Local governments can provide for the maintenance of their local infrastructure
       through private vendors or through a cooperative agreement with Mn/DOT.

      Clay County, Minnesota/Cass County North Dakota

       Clay County Minnesota and Cass County North Dakota installed a shared digital
       VHF system in 2006. The details of the interstate governance structure owning,
       operating and maintaining this shared system will be reviewed as part of the local
       regional process.

      Polk County MN, Grand Forks County ND, Crookston, East Grand Forks MN
       (see Toni’s note)

Previous sections of this SCIP demonstrate the benefits achieved by Minnesota through
the implementation of the advanced technology of a standard based shared system.
Through the statewide implementation of the ARMER backbone, Minnesota anticipates
significant increases in efficiently and effectiveness for emergency response operations
throughout the state.

4.3     Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s)

Standard Operating Procedures - General

Minnesota has long standing plans for the use of conventional statewide VHF mutual
aid frequencies for law enforcement, fire service, emergency medical services (EMS)
and emergency management as follows:

                                        Table 4-4

          Channels       Frequency   Discipline                Statewide/National


                                           72
         Channels       Frequency      Discipline              Statewide/National
       EMS HEAR        155.34          EMS                    National
       FIRESWMA        154.295         Fire                   National
       MIMS            155.37          Emergency Management   Statewide
       MINSEF          155.475         Law Enforcement        National

The plans for the use of these interoperability resources are administered by the
following entities:

        EMS HEAR                             Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board
        Statewide Fire (FIRESWMA)            MN Fire Chief’s Association
        MIMS                                 Department of Public Safety
        MINSEF                               MINSEF Board

As previously noted, as substantial interoperability infrastructure has been implemented
as part of the backbone to the ARMER system in the metropolitan area, as follows:



                                          Table 4-5

          Channels           TX Freq          RX Freq    National/Statewide/ Regional

     EMS HEAR              155.34          155.34       National
     FIRESWMA              154.295         154.295      National
     H-TAC3
     (TG &CV)              155.82          154.995      Sub Regional
                           155.61          150.79
                           460.525         465.525
     HCOMMON               868.0125        823.1025     Sub Regional
     ICALL_CV              866.0125        821.1025     National
     ITAC1_CV              866.5125        821.5125     National
     ITAC2_CV              867.0125        822.0125     National
     ITAC3_CV              867.5125        822.5125     National
     ITAC4_CV              868.0125        823.0125     National
     METEMRG               460.275         465.275      Regional
     METTAC-A              159.345         153.755      Regional
     METTAC-P              151.445         153.815      Regional
     MIMS(TG & CV)         155.37          155.37       Statewide
     MINSEF(TG & CV)       155.475         155.475      National

Check previous table for TG & CV, is MIMS national or not???



                                             73
As part of the standard based shared infrastructure, the operation and technical
standards implementing those resources are defined by the Statewide Radio Board or
in the case of regional resources and some statewide resources, by the MESB. Section
Three of the SRB Standards specifically define the technical and operational standards
for the use of interoperability resources. Those standards can be found at the SRB web
site at www.srb.state.mn.us and are attached at Appendix A-7. Additional authority for
the SRB to coordinate interoperability through its technical and operations standards
can be found in Minn. Stat. 403.37, subdivision 11 which reads as follows:

       “The board shall coordinate the integration of the statewide, shared radio and
       communication system among regions, adjoining states, federal entities, and to
       the extent permitted by law, with Canadian public safety entities.”

It is significant to note that establishing the SRB as Minnesota’s Statewide
Interoperability Executive Committee (SIEC) was designed to give the SRB broader
mandate to coordinate all interoperability resources used in Minnesota. As such, the
SIEC Advisory Committee will liaison with and in some instances, may assume
responsibility for overseeing existing plans for traditional interoperability resources.
Similarly, the creation of an SIEC Advisory Committee under the SRB with its broad
multi-disciplined representation including federal agencies, tribal governments and non-
governmental entities is designed to give broad voice to the multitude of disciplines and
jurisdictions providing public safety services in the state.

Technical and operational standards of the SRB are developed through an open
process with broad multi-disciplinary multi-jurisdictional participation. As a general rule,
standards related to interoperability are presented to the SRB Operations and Technical
Committee (OTC). They can be presented by any person and are frequently presented
by local users groups or regional radio board user committees. Following a discussion
of the operational and technical issues related to the standard, the OTC may
recommend adoption of the proposed operational standard or may refer it for further
discussion and comment. A proposed technical and operations standard establishing
standard operating procedure is finally adopted when adopted and approved by the
SRB during which occasion there is also an opportunity for additional discussion,
amendment and adoption or rejection.

(Insert information from Toni’s Note)

Items on the agenda for the SIEC Advisory Committee would include the adoption of
standardized naming conventions for all nationwide interoperability channels
(http://www.npstc.org/channelNaming.jsp) and the adoption of a plain language
standard consistent with NIMS requirements. (Insert information from Toni’s Note)

In addition to the establishment of the SRB and Minnesota’s SIEC, the Department of
Public Safety has created a Statewide Public Safety Interoperability Program which will
be staffed by a program administrator and three regional interoperability coordinators.
A major focus of the program will be to develop and document standard operating


                                            74
procedures related to interoperable communication locally, regionally and statewide.
Those efforts will include consideration of interoperability planning in neighboring states
and to the extent permitted by law interoperability along the Canadian border.

In a process very similar to that of the SRB, regional radio boards are further authorized
by state statute “to set or adopt regional performance and technical standards, subject
to review by the Statewide Radio Board, that do not interfere with the backbone or
interoperability infrastructure administered by the Statewide Radio Board”.20

Based upon the SRB’s authority to determine the technical and operational standards of
the shared system, entities seeking to use PSIC funds to acquire equipment for
operation on the ARMER system or to create interoperability with the ARMER system
will necessary be required to comply with all statewide standards and any technical
standards adopted by a regional radio board.           The administrative standards
documenting the processes for participation on the system assure that local
enhancements are thoroughly vetted prior to implementation. Similarly, the SRB has
established standards for subscriber equipment that is permitted to operate on the
system. Those standards and approved equipment lists are available on the SRB
website. Participants are required to execute contracts agreeing to abide by all
technical and operational standards of the SRB.

Standard Operating Procedures, National Incident Management System and
Incident Command

The websites for the SRB and regional radio boards enable immediate access to the
SOP’s developed with statewide application as well as regionally and are accessible to
all emergency responders, disciplines and agencies whether governmental, tribal
jurisdictions or non-govenrmental entities:

         Statewide Radio Board: http://www.srb.state.mn.us/ARMERDispArt.asp?aid=99
         Metro Emergency Services Board: http://www.mn-
          mesb.org/Default.aspx?tabid=449
         Central MN Radio Board: http://www.cmnradio.org/Documents.html
         Southeast MN Radio Board: http://www.semnradio.org/

The SOP’s developed by the former Metropolitan Radio Board and transferrd by statute
to the SRB were created begining in 2001. Regional radio boards and the SRB have
continued to review and build upon the original standards on an ongoing basis and as a
specific need or issue requires review and resolution. All SOP’s have a binding
authority on the components they cover.

Curently there is no central collection point for Memo’s of Understanding or Agreement
that non-ARMER system radio users may have with other agencies. Participants in the


20
     Minn. Stat. 403.39

                                            75
ARMER system that have agency “owned” talkgroups or frequencies for interoperabilty
have a process they can complete and file with the system or subsystem owner that
indicates their authorizaiton and conditions for use of a talkgroup or conventional
frequency. Mutual aid and assistance agreements are entered into between agencies.
The records of such agreements between agencies are not centrally kept and the extent
to which they address communications practices and how they communicate are not
centrally documented but are a part of the communications assessment process
currently part of the ARMER project.

Each region and system/subsystem owner is responsible for establishing their training.
The key to the successful implementation of shared system or interoperable radio is:

      Training on the end user radio equipment
      Key radio system features a user needs to be aware of, and
      SOP’s (operational and technical)

Each user discipline receives a minum number of hours of training on their end user
equipment and procedures. Each user agency has training personnel attend radio
system sponsored and approved “train the trainer” classes. New trainiers work in
tandem with experienced trainers covering state, system/regional and local policy and
procedures. Trainee’s receive printed summary information and quick reference guides
(”cheat” cards) in many cases that highlight essential operational information.
Continuing education is strongly encouraged as a part of routinely scheduled in service
training as well as practical exercises and demonstrations. This is particularly essential
for part time personnel and personnel who “handle” or use the radio and system
infrequently. SOP’s are reinforced and practiced at the agency user level and as a part
of table top and field training exercises. The application and use of SOP’s are
monitored and managed by the user agencies through their communications centers
and dispatch operations as well as through reports to their dispatch and
communications centers from radio users in the field. Follow up and follow through on
SOP concerns or problems are addressed agency to agency. If a situation or
application of an SOP requires higher level review, consideration or resoluton the
particular item will be addressed at the regional or Statewide Radio Board level
depending upon the issue or to a joint user group if that is the origin of or solution to the
concern. In some cases, a frequency related issue will be communicated to the Region
22 Planning Committee action. The preceding process and follow through applies to all
situations involving SOP’s, SOP conflicts or concerns for an SOP being consistent with
NIMS.

ICS training in Minnesota includes communications training and is the role of the
Communicaitons Unit and Communications Unit Leader. The TIC Plan for the St.
Paul/Minneaplis Urban Area specifically addresses plans and training for tactical
communications during an incident. The Metro Emergency Services Board (MESB) is
scheduled to have a training program to ensure adequate staff members are trained as
Communications Unit Leaders as defined by NIMS within one year of adoption of the
TIC Plan and certified in accordance with NIMS/ICS standards. The training program

                                             76
and processes should be complete by late 2007 or early 2008. The Metro Region will
work with the Homeland Security and Emergency Management to assure training and
certification meets NIMS/ICS standards. (Additional discussion of NIMS/ICS is
presented in Section 2.1.1 of the Plan.) The Metro TIC Plan provides the names of
Communications Unit Leaders and is available through the Metro Emergency Services
Board (http://www.mn-mesb.org/). The training and model for communications unit
operations will be used as a reference point for the other HSEM regions within the
State. The Central and Southeast Regions may be able to commence this process in
2008 depending upon the status and particiaption in their local radio boards.

4.4        Training and Exercise Plan

Interoperable Communications Training and Exercising

Training in the use of communication equipment has been significant focus as the
ARMER backbone has been implemented in the metropolitan area and in Phase Three.
The following training standards have been adopted by the SRB for ARMER system
participants:

          Standard 1.10a     Training of Local System Administrator
          Standard 1.10b     Training of Technical Staff
          Standard 1.10c     Training of Dispatchers
          Standard 1.10d     Training of Radio Users

          Copies of these standards are attached as Appendix _____.

To that end, it was necessary for the department of public safety to develop a training
package for radio users. That package has been approved by the Grants and Training
Division of the DHS and is currently being funded with DHS funds. A key element of
that training was to incorporate scenario based NIMS exercises into the training to
assure that users are capable of utilizing the equipment in a demanding interoperability
environment. Copies of that training package are available on a two CD-Rom package
which is available upon request.

The following additional measures are currently in place or under consideration:

         $200,000 in 2005 DHS funds were allocated to the MESB to support a training
          program and training coordinator.
         The SRB Finance Committee is considering whether to fund from appropriated
          state funds the expansion of the MESB training program into a statewide “train
          the trainer” program to support uniformity statewide.

It should be noted that training programs discussed here include training of legacy
system interoperability users, such as the operation of radio control stations at dispatch
centers and portable and mobile radios acquired by legacy system users for
interoperability purposes.

                                             77
Equipment based interoperability was also part of the process in developing and
exercising the TIC Plan for the Twin Cities UASI region. It is anticipated that continued
training and exercising will be part of the expansion and maintenance of the TIC Plan
for the entire metropolitan area. A proposal for allocation of 2007 DHS funds is
anticipated for that purpose. In addition to equipment based exercises and training,
additional training of Incident Command-Communication Leaders will be provided.

A similar pattern of training is anticipated as part of the development of regionally
anchored TIC Plans. The creation of a Statewide Public Safety Interoperability position
within the department of public safety anticipates that the regional interoperability
coordinators will be involved in developing, training and exercising regional TIC Plans
and that equipment based training will be an essential element of that training. With the
implementation of the ARMER backbone throughout the State and Minnesota’s
objective to use that backbone to facilitate interoperability across the state, training on
interoperability with the public safety spectrum in the 700 and 800 MHz spectrum will be
a key feature of any training.

Incident Management (NIMS) Training

The HSEM plays a major role in the training and exercise development and assistance
for NIMS, ICS and communications training. All training is NIMS compliant including for
communications. The HSEM has implemented the use of an HSEM web based
training, tracking and registration system for all courses and attendees. Training and
exercise opportunities and information on participation are posted by HSEM at:
https://www.dps.state.mn.us/dhsem/hsem_training/hsemIndex.asp . Training is open to
all state, local and tribal agencies and federal agencies if appropriate. The HSEM is
responsible for and assures statewide training and exercise programs are available and
carried out. The HSEM utilizes the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation
Program (HSEEP) of the Department of Homeland Security and is a HSEEP compliant
agency. Application of HSEEP to training and exercises in Minnesota has assured
standardized policy, methodology, and terminology for exercise design, development,
conduct, evaluation, and improvement planning. Adherence to the policy and guidance
presented in the HSEEP Volumes ensures that exercise programs conform to
established best practices, and helps provide unity and consistency of effort for
exercises at all levels of Minnesota government.

Each of the six HSEM regions has a designated local HSEM Regional Project
Coordinator who works directly with County, municipal and tribal jurisdictions to assist
with training and exercises. Certifications for mandatory training verifying appropriate
personnel have successfully completed a course or series of courses is the
responsibility of the local agency, and in the case of radio system operations, the radio
system manager.         Major multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary exercises are
conducted approximately every two years across the State. The HSEM maintains a two
year exercise plan and will be moving to a three year and subsequently five year. HSEM
conducts an annual training and exercise development process to develop its multi-year
training and exercises objectives and schedule. Local agencies are allowed to add to


                                            78
the schedule provided the training and exercise is HSEEP compliant (all training and
exercises which utilize or are supported by federal funding must be HSEEP compliant.)
Over the past several years, exercises have moved the direction of fewer exercises to
involving a more regional approach, with greater complexity and larger scale. The
“average” exercise currently includes seven disciplines. The result of this approach is to
increasingly recognize the need for and to utilize interoperable communications and
operational capabilities required under ICS. Tribal jurisdiction involvement in exercises
varies significantly depending largely upon the local resources available, trained and
staffed within the specific tribal jurisdiction. Tribal jurisdictions are invited and strongly
encouraged to participate but as sovereign entities, they make the final decision on all
aspects of participation. Feedback on exercises concerning what went well, what did
not go well, what needs to be improved is obtained through formal review or debriefing
sessions and the reports of trained observers who critique and check for specific
activities, actions, functions, etc. follows the criteria for HSEEP exercise planning and
conduct. The information and results are shared in constructive, non-confrontational
approaches to be learning and coaching opportunities not “blame” or criticism sessions.
Emergency managers, subject matter experts, system managers and others are used to
observe and evaluate exercises and focus on their areas of knowledge, experience and
expertise to assist in the response improvement process.

Training is available through a range of locations and settings including online, self
study, classroom, tabletop and field exercises and specialized facilities. Classes are
offered statewide with HSEM or contracted certified instructors to out state locations to
conduct training or oversee exercises. Over the past several years over 900 various
public safety personnel have attended out of state training opportunities in addition to
those offered through HSEM. Federal funding has enabled HSEM to off set the costs of
sending personnel to training by public safety departments by covering travel expenses,
course registration cost and sometimes over time for replacement personnel to cover
the work hours of the personnel in training. Part of the success of training and
exercises in Minnesota is due to the efforts of HSEM to assist local agencies stretched
thin for personnel and financial resources. First responders often utilize Department of
Homeland Security training opportunities.

Both the HSEM and SRB maintain information or a matrix on the minimum training
required for various personnel, including communications personnel (previously
referenced in Plan.) Interoperability training requirements are specified by the SRB.
The specific interoperability an ARMER system agency may have will be tailored to their
agency and disciplines within the training tailored to them. Instructors are coached on
the interoperability capabilities that are different and use agency personnel to build or
expand upon the capabilities during training. Agencies receiving PSIC funds for
interoperability of their conventional radio to other conventional systems or into ARMER
will work with the specific system owners to develop training on the use and application
of the interoperable equipment and capabilities.




                                             79
4.5        Usage

[This section needs to be redrafted to incorporate the role of communication planning
provided for in each county’s Emergency Plan. Planning is much more local and much
more county to county- but it has always been significant issue for them and they have
done an excellent job with the resources they have.]

Historically, radio usage planning has been done at the local government (county, city)
levels and often part of emergency management planning as well as day to day
operational necessity. Because most existing conventional radio system are designed
and engineered to support individual county and city communications, the coverage foot
prints of the systems are geographically limited. Where coverage foot prints over lap or
similar technology is in use and agreements or understandings are in place, then, inter
agency communications can occur. Many local agencies have done an excellent job
with the limited resources they have. Through the current initiative to more rapidly
develop and employ regional radio committee’s and boards, the user communities now
have an expanded opportunity to work together, make decisions and access funding
which can further advance local interoperability on a much broader basis. Radio usage
can generally be viewed in three levels paralleling the three distinct communications
regions in the current communications and interoperability environment.

   ARMER backbone in place with substantial local integration and full interoperability
    (Phase One/Two – 9 counties)
           Wide area coverage, layered system of radio systems, significant redundancy
            and back up system
           Full interoperability is in place within counties, between municipalities,
            between counties and with the State operations and utilized on a daily basis
           Comprehensive SRB, Regional and local SOP’s in place and in use for ease
            and consistency of usage
           Formalized initial training in place, mandatory and complete for all system
            users which is usage focused
           Follow up, new hires and continuing training in place within each user agency,
            tailored to specific day to day operational requirements and usage
           Agency specific, multi-agency, multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary, cross
            jurisdictional exercises planned and conducted along with HSEM guidance,
            assessment, assistance and feedback to assure planning and usage are
            consistent
           Daily usage of interoperable procedures and technology is applied throughout
            the region
           Tactical Interoperability Plan in place, successful exercises conducted
   ARMER backbone currently being constructed                and   implemented,      limited
    interoperability (Phase Three - 23 counties)

                                             80
          AMER backbone (build out to be complete in 2007) provides basic structure
           upon which local interoperability systems can be built and expanded upon
          Incremental interoperability is in place within counties, between municipalities,
           between counties and with the State in those geographic areas where
           ARMER has been constructed and local agencies have transitioned over.
           Other counties use traditional UHF and VHF conventional interoperability
           resources to communicate with one another and to increasingly access
           ARMER system users as those gateways are placed on line or within agency
           systems enabling increasing daily usage
          Comprehensive SRB SOP’s in place for ARMER users; Regional and local
           SOP’s are being developed and some are in place and in daily use
          Formalized initial training in place, mandatory and complete for all ARMER
           system users; additional training support and assistance will be required for
           existing and new ARMER users as gateways for increased interoperability
           come on line. Training for interoperability for conventional to conventional
           users is accomplished between agencies and with RRB if provided with over
           lapping coverage and interoperability with ARMER users
          Follow up, new hires and continuing training in place within each user agency,
           tailored to specific day to day operational requirements. As the regional radio
           board participation increases and local government agencies work together to
           define longer term interoperability training and usage will increase
          Agency specific, multi-agency, multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary, cross
           jurisdictional exercises are planned and conducted along with HSEM
           guidance and assistance. Exercises rely on the local radio system(s)
           available to public safety agencies within the exercise area. Gateways,
           mobile repeater resources, shared channels; radio caches, etc. are required
           to provided limited interoperability as agencies move further away from the
           ARMER infrastructure or rely on the coverage and overlapping coverage
           available with stand alone radio systems.
          Use of Interoperable procedures and technology occur frequently to daily
           depending upon the area, volume and nature of responses
          Tactical Interoperability Plan not developed
   No ARMER backbone, interoperability locally (Remaining 55 counties)
          Interoperability can be widely variable depending upon local communications
           resources.       Counties and municipalities work together to provide
           interoperability through shared channels, gateways, local repeaters but may
           be subject to significant geographic coverage limitations due the design of
           each system and their over lapping coverage footprints
          Statewide SOP’s apply for conventional VHF, UHF and 800 MHz
           interoperability on the statewide mutual aid frequencies. Local agreements or
           understandings determine use and sharing of other agencies frequencies or


                                             81
          access to their communications system. A systems approach is not present
          across a large geographic or regional area
         Agency specific, multi-agency, multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary, cross
          jurisdictional training and exercises are planned and conducted along with
          HSEM guidance and assistance. Exercises rely on the local radio system(s)
          available to public safety agencies within the exercise area. Gateways,
          mobile repeater resources, shared channels; radio caches, etc. are required
          to provided limited interoperability as agencies move further away from their
          own radio system. The extent of these interoperability resources is not
          centrally recorded.
         Use of Interoperable procedures and technology occur frequently to daily
          depending upon the area, volume and nature of responses and the
          interoperability resources available to the radio users
         Tactical Interoperability Plans not developed
         Significant efforts are underway in these counties to develop and organize
          regional radio committees and boards. These groups will enable local radio
          users to effectively plan how interoperability and radio usage will develop in
          conjunction with ARMER and legacy radio systems

The SCIP ultimately develops out of collective efforts of regional radio boards, their
internal committees and work groups with support and guidance of the SRB, ARMER-
911, HSEM and MN/DOT-OEC. The SCIP is a plan of plans, comprised of a system of
communications systems in Minnesota. The lead responsibility for ensuring regular
usage of relevant equipment, the development and use of SOP’s resides at the local
level. Assuring the highest levels of the Interoperability Continuum are developed and
achieved likewise resides within the regional radio board processes under the direction
provided by the SRB. How interoperability will be used in specific incidents or events,
how and who will determine when escalation and outside support, resources and
assistance will be achieved is determined within the regional radio board and local
processes.      Currently only the Metro Region Emergency Services Board has
substantially addressed these issues; Central and Southeast Radio Boards are working
towards these outcomes. The remaining counties will commence work in these areas
upon establishment of regional advisory committees or a regional radio board.
Currently, in all areas of the State, the first responding discipline to the scene is
responsible for scene control and will make the incident assessment and in conjunction
with their communications center will act to initiate additional resource response, mutual
aid, etc. or transfer that responsibility to subsequent responding agency or discipline
when appropriate.

Decision making in Minnesota concerning mutual aid response to a specific occasion or
event primarily resides with local agencies absent fore warning of the eminent threat.
Intra and inter county and inter state agreements exist outside of a central point. Some
of these arrangements are formal, such as in the Metro, Central and Southeast regions,
others may or may not be. The communications assessment process will document
these by June 30, 2008. Response plans are in place in many situations where

                                           82
response to a large scale event may be likely for law enforcement, fire, rescue,
emergency medical and NGO response for situations that may occur such as at the Mall
of America, Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, State Capital, Montecello and
Prairie Island nuclear facilities, Metrodome, Minnesota State Fair, out door consecutive
day concerts, the Minneapolis Aquatennial, 2008 Republican National Convention, etc.

Natural or manmade disasters that can impact a much wider geographic or population
base currently pose additional interoperability challenges in much of the State.
Incidents likely impacting Minnesota include refining or chemical facilities, airline crash,
railway or truck incident involving toxic chemicals or fire, nuclear facility radioactive
release or fire, forest and grass fires, tornadoes, blizzards or flooding result in the
engagement of multiple levels of government, government agencies and radio
capabilities. The ability of some geographic areas to maintain effective communications
and to mobilize with supportive resources to provide immediate area and wider area
communications varies with the Metro, Sherburne and Olmsted county areas being in
the best interoperability situation currently. These same areas currently maintain
multiple mobile communications response resources that can be mobilized and
deployed within hours of notification anywhere in the State. The specific Metro area
resources are identified in the St. Paul/Minneapolis Urban Area TIC Plan. Section 4.2
(Technology) of the Plan references recent initiatives to build the interoperability
capacity in other areas of the State utilizing PSIC funding. Following the aftermath of
hurricane Katrina in 2005 and in response to local requests, the Hennepin County
Sheriff’s Office deployed its communications van equipped with portable VHF, UHF and
800 MHz repeater capabilities, a cache of radios and technical communications support
personnel to assist local public safety officials in the New Orleans area. The New
Orleans response reflects the reality of interoperable communications equipment,
planning, training, exercising and operations coming together rapidly to assist another
region of the country suffering a catastrophic loss of core communications capabilities
essential to the support of public service, safety and response needs.




                                            83
5          Strategy

                                         VISION

All agencies supporting public safety in the State of Minnesota (local, regional, tribal and
non-governmental) will have routine access to a communication infrastructure (voice
and data) and participate in a governance structure supporting that infrastructure that is
able to provide seamless communication interoperability between jurisdictions, across
public safety disciplines necessary to support day to day operations, regional
operations, statewide operations and across state and national borders, when
necessary, that is capable of supporting National Incident Management System.

                                         MISSION

To provide a communication backbone throughout the State of Minnesota (the system
of systems) and the appropriate organizational structure needed to support the highest
level of interoperability between all agencies supporting public safety in Minnesota
through the sharing of resources, the integration and coordination of local systems
where appropriate and through routine planning, training and usage of all
communication resources within the state.

                                         GOALS

1.     Complete a blended (regionally based) statewide tactical interoperable
       communication “TIC” Plan for the state of Minnesota.

       Objectives:

           To collect communication infrastructure information from all local and county
            agencies supporting public safety in Minnesota needed as part of the TIC
            Plan development and enter that information into the CASM tool by
            December 31, 2008.
           Develop preliminary TIC Plans for each region of the state (HSEM regions or
            other appropriate regions as regional radio boards are developed) by
            December 31, 2008.
           Coordinate and blend regional TIC Plans into a broader statewide strategy
            and where possible, factor in approaches of bordering states and countries by
            June 30, 2009.

2.     Develop regional public safety interoperable communication governance
       structures that provides the opportunity for appropriate and timely input from all
       agencies supporting public safety in Minnesota (including tribal governments and
       non-governmental agencies) into integration and coordination of resources,
       standard operating procedures and all TIC Plan development, planning,
       exercising and evaluation.

                                            84
         Objectives:

        Establishment of the regional interoperable communication governance structure
         established in Minn. Stat. §403.39 & 403.40 (Regional Advisory Committees or
         Regional Radio Boards) by December 31, 2008.
        Engage regional radio governance structures and emergency management
         personnel in regional TIC Plan development, training and exercising by June 30,
         2008.
        Provide initial Communication Unit Leader Training for selected regional
         representatives by December 31, 2008.
        Conduct at least one regional Tactical Interoperable Communication exercise in
         each regional and provide for formal evaluation of the exercise by June 30, 2009.
        Establish the Statewide Radio Board as Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability
         Executive Committee and fully integrate an advisory committee that represents
         all disciplines and regions (including tribal and non-governmental agencies) of
         the state to broadly address public safety communications interoperation
         procedures and resources in all spectrums by December 31, 2007.

3.       Complete the construction of the shared public safety communication system
         (ARMER).

         Objectives:

            Complete preliminary design (finalize tower sites and backbone coverage) for
             the ARMER backbone by December 31, 2007.
            Complete the detail design and backbone cost evaluation by April 30, 2008.
            Develop detail implementation plan and timeline for the ARMER backbone by
             March 31, 2008.
            Substantially complete (95% of base radio sites operational) the construction
             of the ARMER backbone by December 31, 2012.
            Engage consultants necessary to begin regional based local enhancement
             studies and begin the process of conducting local studies and evaluations by
             December 31, 2007.
            Complete local enhancement studies by December 31, 2008 (note: vendors
             will assist in collecting baseline capability and resources for TIC plans as part
             of this process).
            Develop a preliminary plan for VHF and/or UHF interoperability for the
             ARMER backbone by December 31, 2007 (Integrates with broader
             interoperability initiatives Goal #4).
            Develop and document potential alternatives to integrate interoperable data
             into the ARMER backbone as part of the core RF infrastructure or as a
             separate system by June 30, 2008 (Integrates with a broader data
             interoperability initiative Goal #4).




                                               85
4.       Develop a plan to provide the highest practical level of interoperability between
         the ARMER backbone and independent public safety communication systems,
         between other existing public safety communication systems within the state
         (local, regional, state, tribal and federal) and with appropriate public safety
         agencies bordering states and countries.

         Objectives: (may want to look at repeated information)

        Fully staff a Statewide Public Safety Interoperability program within the
         department of public safety, ARMER/911 division (Administrator and at least
         three regional coordinators) by December 31, 2007.
        Establish routine contact with key interoperable communication networks in
         bordering states and countries and thoroughly document interoperable
         communication strategies and resources from those bordering states and
         countries into the by March 31, 2008.
        Establish routine contact and maintain a dialog with regional and national efforts
         to coordinate public safety interoperable communications and report the status of
         interoperable communications regionally and nationally to the appropriate
         agencies and organizations by June 30, 2008.
        Investigate, develop and test specific plans on how existing VHF and UHF
         interoperable resources might be organized and integrated into public safety
         communication systems (ARMER and independent systems) by December 31,
         2008.
        Develop specific plans identifying how deployable resources (gateways, radio
         cashes and other deployable technologies) might be integrated into Minnesota’s
         public safety communication network to provide enhanced interoperability by
         December 31, 2008. (

5.       Investigate and determine that most appropriate way to address the expanding
         need for interoperable wireless data between all agencies supporting public
         safety.

         Objectives:

            Investigate and document the current status of public safety data
             interoperability by June 30, 2008, including the following issues:
                 o Status of the adoption of a national protocol for wireless data
                    communications.
                 o Status of any FCC Docket related to a national public safety data
                    network (FCC Docket# 96-86 related to 700 MHz spectrum) and the
                    implications upon local system development.
                 o Current status of wireless public safety data communications in
                    Minnesota.
            Investigate and document how expanded interoperable data (access to
             databases and information) will enhance and support public safety operations
             and interoperability by June 30, 2008.

                                              86
   Strategic Initiatives (Move this up. Strategic Initiatives, Goals and
                            Objectives, etc…)

Strategic Initiative One

Fund and construct the backbone for a 700/800 MHz scalable statewide shared public
safety communication backbone that can support present and future public safety
communication needs within the State of Minnesota.

Insert new write up from Roger’s information (Toni’s notes) (suggest: will build it to a
certain level, build a backbone with local participation, capable of being
increased/expanded, get the initiative to get the local enhancement constructed,
(Federal, State and local funding, identify local funding…) may do a separate strategic
initiative), building a backbone that will take care of everyone’s concerns/local needs,
can we put in additional channels for the capacity, come up with a basic
design…suggest leaving Roger’s additional wording with the above para.

Strategic Initiative Two

Develop a collaborative governance structure that supports the partnerships, shared
planning and resources for public safety and public service communication needs
among all entities supporting public safety in the state of Minnesota and provide for
regional differences and autonomy, wherever possible.

Strategic Initiative Three

To identify and implement comprehensive public safety communication interoperability
solutions that provide for all levels of interoperability (local operability, regional
interoperability and statewide interoperability), provide for all public safety responders
(including tribal and non-governmental), provide for agencies that might not be
participating in the state’s core strategy, and strike a balance between the immediate
and future needs of public safety interoperability.

This may be a catch all… suggest adding comprehensive, needs to show and alignment
with the Investment Justification, cycle of improvement, including training and
performance measurement, specific to this grant.. advanced technology, improve
spectrum efficiency, collecting data for the performance measures (TICP reference on
how this was laid out) , what the management for this investment… milestones, setting
up management and operations system, (suggest move Initiative # Three up to # One),

To support achieving interop in MN, we will include performance measures, advanced
tech, spectrum efficiencies, cost effective measures, operational and maintenance
system…can be placed in the narrative. (suggest having this as a place holder, needed
to use specific wording/terms…)

Strategic Initiative Four

                                           87
Maintain and further develop high level elected official support (State and local) for
interoperable communication and its expanding role in the public safety response to
routine activities, regional incidents and major statewide incidents.

Strategic Initiative Five

Identify opportunities to leverage resources and seek more efficient ways to deliver
public safety services (look at the public safety communication network more broadly).




                                         88
5.1    Interoperability

                                         VISION

All agencies supporting public safety in the State of Minnesota (local, regional, tribal and
non-governmental) will have routine access to a communication infrastructure (voice
and data) and participate in a governance structure supporting that infrastructure that is
able to provide seamless communication interoperability between jurisdictions, across
public safety disciplines necessary to support day to day operations, regional
operations, statewide operations and across state and national borders, when
necessary, that is capable of supporting National Incident Management System.

Minnesota’s vision for communications interoperability in Minnesota is one in which
there is seamless communications regardless of agency or geographic location. It
builds upon the technical successes and the governance structures and processes that
were developed in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Successes upon which the Twin
Cities UASI TIC Plan exercise received a perfect score. Those successes have been
replicated as the backbone of the ARMER system has been expanded beyond the
metropolitan area. The reality is that there continues to be widely disparate
communication systems, a lack of significant regional governance, standard operating
procedures, technologies, usage, training and exercises in a significant portion of the
state. The vision anticipates that many of these issues will be brought into alignment by
engaging a broad range of public safety official in the discussion of interoperability and
having the Statewide Radio Board set broad standards that will allow Regional Radio
Board’s to craft interoperable solutions that meet the needs for local agencies, ranging
from day-to-day operations, mutual aid operations through task force operations. The
strategic approaches developed in this plan identify the framework, processes,
resources and funding necessary to address current and future challenges facing public
safety interoperable communications. The foundation of the process is based upon the
engagement of those personnel who routinely provide as part of their job urgent and
emergent services and understand the communications and operational challenges
faced on a daily basis. Commencing on a county-by-county basis, working within a
framework of regional radio boards and committees, the body of emergency services
providers provide the direction and input through their regional bodies to the Statewide
Radio Board to continue to develop, maintain and finance a statewide interoperable
communications system of systems that in real ways in real time will meet the needs of
emergency services workers.

Utilization of PSIC Funds for Special Roles or Solutions

Minnesota counties outside of the Twin Cities metropolitan area face increasing
challenges to provide basic public services. Many of the counties and cities rely on
communications system constructed in the 1970’s with Law Enforcement Assistance
Administration (LEAA) funds.       Achieving Minnesota’s vision for communications
interoperability in these counties and elevating them on the continuum of
communications interoperability will be very challenging as these counties face:

                                            89
      Significantly changing demographics and declining populations
      Ongoing loss of family owned farms and businesses
      Widely varying tourism and industry revenues and concurrent tax revenues
      Significant square miles of water or government and tribal lands that do not
       produce local tax revenues
      Substantial acreages that can produce or support only very limited property tax
      A generally lower income and economic situation
      Increasing cost pressures in health, corrections, education and social services
       areas

These conditions exist in varying degrees in over 70 Minnesota counties. The funding
challenges rural counties face, make it very difficult to take advantage of the ARMER
system or to replace even their existing mission critical radio function. Migration to
narrow band, digital or digital trunked radio will be very difficult even with the financial
incentives made available by the 2007 Minnesota legislature. The problem will be
exacerbated for many volunteer and non-governmental public safety or public service
providers within these areas.

One of the options to help mitigate this problem may be the application of PSIC grant
funds to enable these counties and agencies to better provide for 700/800 MHz
interoperability with their existing legacy systems and/or to assist them in the acquisition
of subscriber radios to utilize the ARMER system or to interface with it. The SIEC when
it convenes later in 2007 will be considering these and other issues regarding the use of
PSIC funds. (do we want to delineate issues here) May add a pointer back to the other
issues.

In several cases, counties have already acted to enhance or replace elements of their
existing radio systems and in doing so have resulted in degradation of elements of the
interoperability continuum. This degradation occurs when radio system replacement
decisions are made absent a consideration of the impact of the change on other
agencies their radio users must interoperate with.             Absence of county, multi-
jurisdictional or regional radio committee’s or boards simply compounds the problems of
basic operability and interoperability. Local actions independent of the consideration of
their impact on the overall statewide vision for interoperability reduces or stops progress
on the achievement of the statewide vision.

5.2    Mission

                                         MISSION

To provide a communication backbone throughout the State of Minnesota (the system
of systems) and the appropriate organizational structure needed to supports the highest
level of interoperability between all agencies supporting public safety in Minnesota
through the sharing of resources, the integration and coordination of local systems
where appropriate and through routine planning, training and usage of all
communication resources within the state.

                                            90
The primary technological solution to achieving Minnesota’s vision is completing and
utilizing the ARMER system. ARMER is the common denominator that enables any
legacy radio system that is within the coverage foot print of ARMER to be linked into the
backbone, which will enable interoperability between disparate users. Focusing on
ARMER and the interfacing of non-ARMER compatible systems the state will reach its
vision through interoperability gateways. State funds have been appropriated to
complete the build-out of ARMER in the remaining 55 counties in Minnesota. The
state’s financial commitment along with PSIC and DHS funds will all be utilized to
develop, design and implement the steps required to achieve the mission thereby
providing the pathway to realize Minnesota’s statewide communications vision.

5.3      Goals and Objectives

                                          GOALS

1.       Complete a blended (regionally based) statewide tactical interoperable
         communication “TIC” Plan for the state of Minnesota. (strategic stock pile of
         deployable equipment.. goals, how much will we do PSIC funding?...this might fit
         in Strategic Initiative in the new number one)

         Objectives:

            To collect communication infrastructure information from all local and county
             agencies supporting public safety in Minnesota needed as part of the TIC
             Plan development and enter that information into the CASM tool by
             December 31, 2008.
            Develop preliminary TIC Plans for each region of the state (HSEM regions or
             other appropriate regions as regional radio boards are developed) by
             December 31, 2008.
            Coordinate and blend regional TIC Plans into a broader statewide strategy
             and where possible, factor in approaches of bordering states and countries by
             June 30, 2009.

2.       Develop regional public safety interoperable communication governance
         structures that provide appropriate and timely input for all agencies supporting
         public safety in Minnesota (including tribal governments and non-governmental
         agencies) into integration and coordination of resources, standard operating
         procedures and all TIC Plan development, planning, exercising and evaluation.

         Objectives:

        Establishment of the regional interoperable communication governance structure
         established in Minn. Stat. §403.39 & 403.40 (Regional Advisory Committees or
         Regional Radio Boards) by December 31, 2008.



                                             91
        Engage regional radio governance structures and emergency management
         personnel in regional TIC Plan development, training and exercising by June 30,
         2008. (Include Roger’s write-up here)
        Provide Communication Leader Training for selected regional representatives by
         December 31, 2008.
        Conduct at least one regional Tactical Interoperable Communication exercise in
         each regional and provide for formal evaluation of the exercise by June 30, 2009.
        Establish the Statewide Radio Board as Minnesota’s Statewide Interoperability
         Executive Committee and fully integrate an advisory committee that represents
         all disciplines and regions (including tribal and non-governmental agencies) of
         the state to broadly address public safety communications interoperation
         procedures and resources in all spectrums by December 31, 2007.

3.       Complete the construction of the shared public safety communication system
         (ARMER). (may include Roger’s write-up here) (acquisition of radios, subscriber
         radios etc..) discussion on keeping write-up here or move elsewhere…

         Objectives:

            Complete preliminary design (finalize tower sites and backbone coverage) for
             the ARMER backbone by December 31, 2007.
            Complete the detail design and backbone cost evaluation by April 30, 2008.
            Develop detail implementation plan and timeline for the ARMER backbone by
             March 31, 2008.
            Substantially complete (95% of base radio sites operational) the construction
             of the ARMER backbone by December 31, 2011.
            Engage consultants necessary to begin regional based local enhancement
             studies and begin the process of conducting local studies and evaluations by
             December 31, 2007.
            Complete local enhancement studies by December 31, 2008 (note: vendors
             will assist in collecting baseline capability and resources for TIC Plans as part
             of this process).
            Develop a preliminary technical and operational plan for VHF and/or UHF
             interoperability for the ARMER backbone by December 31, 2007 (Integrates
             with broader interoperability initiatives Goal #4).
            Develop and document potential alternatives to integrate interoperable data
             into the ARMER backbone as part of the core RF infrastructure or as a
             separate system by June 30, 2008 (Integrates with a broader data
             interoperability initiative Goal #4).
            (Include Roger’s write-up here)

4.       Develop a plan to provide the highest practical level of interoperability between
         the ARMER backbone and independent public safety communication systems,
         between existing independent public safety communication systems within the
         state (local, regional, state, tribal and federal) and with appropriate public safety
         agencies bordering states and countries.

                                               92
         Objectives:

        Full staff a Statewide Public Safety Interoperability program within the
         department of public safety, ARMER/911 division (Administrator and at least
         three regional coordinators) by December 31, 2007.
        (Add Roger’s additional write up here) additional write-up will be a separate bullet
         point. (metro region initiatives, “position (capacity)” discussions… the objective is
         to secure grant funding…need to re-word this. ---- Develop the expertise and
         staffing a capacity to encourage development, manage, and support
         interoperability coordination efforts in regions throughout the State.
        Establish routine contact with key interoperable communication networks in
         bordering states and countries and thoroughly document interoperable
         communication strategies and resources from those bordering states and
         countries into the by March 31, 2008.
        Establish routine contact and maintain a dialog with regional and national efforts
         to coordinate public safety interoperable communications and report the status of
         interoperable communications regionally and nationally to the appropriate
         agencies and organizations by June 30, 2008.
        Investigate and develop specific plans on how existing VHF and UHF
         interoperable resources might be organized and integrated into public safety
         communication systems (ARMER and independent systems) by December 31,
         2008.
        Develop specific plans identifying how deployable resources (gateways, radio
         cashes and other deployable technologies) might be integrated into Minnesota’s
         public safety communication network to provide enhanced interoperability by
         December 31, 2008. (Add Roger’s additional write up here)
        (Include Roger’s next three bullet write-ups here) National Public Safety
         Telecommunications Council (NPSTC) (interop with the federal gov??)VoIP
         network design, look at all the possible solutions,

5.       Investigate and determine the most appropriate way to address the expanding
         need for interoperable wireless data between all agencies supporting public
         safety.

         Objectives:

            Investigate and document the current status of public safety data
             interoperability by June 30, 2008, including the following issues:
                 o Status of the adoption of a national protocol for wireless data
                    communications.
                 o Status of any FCC Docket related to a national public safety data
                    network (FCC Docket# 96-86 related to 700 MHz spectrum) and the
                    implications upon local system development.
                 o Current status of wireless public safety data communications in
                    Minnesota.


                                              93
          Investigate and document how expanded interoperable data (access to
           databases and information) will enhance and support public safety operations
           and interoperability by June 30, 2008.

The goals and objectives for the SCIP directly support and link upwards to the
achievement of the mission and vision for interoperable communications in Minnesota.
The focus of the collective goals is to lead to the completion of the mission. Each goal
is supported by outcome based and time sensitive objectives, which correspond to the
achievement of each goal. The specific accomplishments established for the goals and
objectives include: (might want to put this up-front)

      The technical design and construction of the ARMER system statewide are
       complete and agreed upon
      Regional Radio Boards are operating to assure effective local governance
       structures that can achieve the interoperability objectives, goals and mission
      Documentation of the technical, cost and operational options for each county is
       completed, which will enable them to make an informed business decision as to
       how their county, its political subdivisions, tribal jurisdictions and non-
       governmental organizations are going to move forward to achieve interoperability
       solutions within and outside their areas of jurisdiction or responsibility
      The highest levels of each element of the interoperability continuum are achieved
       and continuously exercised with the communications resources available within a
       county or region
      The ARMER system is complete and interoperability gateways for legacy
       systems are in place, operational and part of daily usage, training, exercises and
       standard operating procedures and common language

5.4    Strategic Initiatives

Strategic Initiative One

Fund and construct the backbone for a scalable statewide shared public safety
communication backbone that can support present and future public safety
communication needs within the State of Minnesota.

Strategic Initiative Two

Develop a collaborative governance structure that supports the partnerships, shared
planning and resources for public safety and public service communication needs
among all entities supporting public safety in the state of Minnesota and provide for
regional differences and autonomy, wherever possible.

Strategic Initiative Three

To identify and implement public safety communication interoperability solutions that
provides for all levels of interoperability (local operability, regional interoperability and

                                             94
statewide interoperability), provides for all public safety responders (including tribal and
non-governmental), provide for agencies that might not be participating in the state’s
core strategy, and that strikes a balance between the immediate to future needs of
public safety interoperability.

Strategic Initiative Four

Develop high level elected official support (State and local) for interoperable
communication and its expanding role in the public safety response to routine activities,
regional incidents and major statewide incidents.

Strategic Initiative Five

Identify opportunities to leverage resources and seek more efficient ways to deliver
public safety services (look at the public safety communication network more broadly).

The state of Minnesota has identified several key initiatives essential to the support for
and the accomplishment of the state’s interoperable communications vision. They
include:

   1. Provide for a state funded statewide digital radio and data system infrastructure
      that is available to local governments and other authorized users, built, paid for
      and maintained by the state that operates in the 700/800 MHz frequency range
   2. Provide state financial support for the ongoing maintenance, development and
      operation of a statewide backbone radio system infrastructure that will support
      local government users, tribal jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations
      that elect to use it
   3. Establish a high level state government organization with broad based
      representation, authority and participation to over see the finance, governance,
      operation, maintenance and continued development of a statewide radio, data
      and related communication systems and infrastructure
   4. Utilize the Interoperability Continuum as the key guide to development and
      performance measurement of interoperable communications within the state of
      Minnesota
   5. Provide support and financial assistance for the development and operation of
      regional radio boards and committees comprised of counties and their political
      subdivisions, non-governmental organizations and tribal jurisdictions which are
      cross-jurisdictional, cross-disciplinary and engage communications users in local
      governance, regional collaboration and the state’s vision
   6. Integrate and leverage, to the extent possible, the ARMER infrastructure for 911,
      CriMNet and related data systems to fully capitalize on VoIP opportunities that
      exist within each system

In addition to the strategic initiatives to support the state’s interoperable
communications vision, mission, goals and objectives, a strategic approach to
coordinate interoperability with the states of North and South Dakota, Iowa and

                                            95
Wisconsin, along with the adjoining Canadian provinces has been established. The
position of Statewide Interoperability Program Administrator has been established to be
the conduit between the newly formed SIEC, Regional Radio Board’s, Regional
Advisory Committees and the ARMER program. This individual will work directly with
county’s that are contiguous with neighboring states and Canada to define, develop and
establish interoperability technical capabilities, the agreements necessary to provide for
interoperability and the policy and procedures for the use of the interoperability
capabilities, training, exercises and usage.. This resource will be leveraged further
locally by also utilizing the Regional Project Coordinators of the Homeland Security and
Emergency Management section and the Regional Interoperability Coordinators in the
ARMER program. The State Department will be engaged to the extent they determine
appropriate when working with counties having contiguous borders with Canada.

All five contiguous states to Minnesota and two provinces in Canada rely heavily on
VHF communications systems for statewide communications as well as many local
systems in Minnesota. The state of Minnesota will look to the Departments of
Homeland Security and Commerce to assure that the SCIP Plans of the states
contiguous to Minnesota have clearly articulated how their PSIC funds will be used to
assist in facilitating interoperable communications with Minnesota’s local governments,
tribal jurisdictions, non-governmental organizations and ARMER system where needed.
(look at re-write)

Redundancy and Back Up Systems

The development of the ARMER backbone system to date has included on going
discussions and actions to assure reasonable redundancy and back up capabilities in
the ARMER system as well as in the local subsystems. Virtually all legacy
analog/digital VHF, UHF and 800 MHz radio systems in Minnesota are at high risk of
single point failure scenarios. At best, agencies have a second, switchable transmitter
site they can use to enhance radio coverage in part of their area or to provide limited
back up in the event their primary repeater site is lost. These back up capabilities
provide limited coverage.

In contrast, the ARMER system is constructed to provide, for the most part, a looped
microwave or fiber optic system of receiver and transmitter sites that in the event a
single signal pathway or point of failure, another pathway exists and a site continues to
operate in normal simulcast mode. The redundancy is well demonstrated in the Twin
Cities Metropolitan area. The metro system maintains two zone controllers with
overlapping coverage, back up subsystem controls and a looped microwave system that
backs up ARMER and enables local subsystems to operate independently in several
failure modes prior to a catastrophic loss. In addition, mobile resources and radio
caches are available in the areas served by the ARMER system which enable local,
repeated and non-repeated communications within a reasonable response time.

The ARMER system also enables the reconfiguration of local resources to other
operational dispatch and transmitter and receiver sites within the system. Because


                                           96
ARMER is a “layered” system, communications capabilities can be and are
programmed to migrate to other operational elements of the ARMER system in the
event of site or multiple site failures. This layered and redundant system approach does
not exist in Minnesota outside of the ARMER system. As referenced in Section 3.2 of
the this plan, Homeland Security funds have been used to support the acquisition and
deployment of mobile repeaters and caches of radios in greater Minnesota where back
up, redundancy and interoperable communications are limited. PSIC grant funds will be
utilized in Minnesota to further improve interoperable communications. The specific
allocation and use of PSIC grant funds will be determined through the core advisory
group developed to complete this plan, the Statewide Interoperability Executive
Committee (SIEC) and the Statewide Radio Board.

5.5   National Incident Management System (NIMS) Compliance

The Minnesota SCIP along with regional and local communications and emergency
response planning all integrate the National Incident Management System (NIMS)
elements into their processes. The NIMS is the minimum operating procedures for all
public safety agencies in Minnesota. Sections _____ and ______ of the Plan have
previously described and documented Minnesota’s statewide compliance with NIMS
and the National Response Plan (NRP). The multi-jurisdictional and multi-disciplinary
response (over 75 agencies in total), and the efficacy of the communications processes
and operational flows which occurred during the catastrophic bridge collapse in
Minneapolis on August 1, 2007, is a testimonial to Minnesota’s efforts to plan, develop,
implement and utilize NIMS, NRP and the highest levels of the interoperability
continuum in critical situations.

A significant element, which is also addressed by the SCIP, involves the identification
of, planning for and mitigation of communications interoperability of the safety, security
and response elements for major transportation systems within the state. As noted in
Section 2.1, Minnesota has multiple major transportation modalities within and running
through the state. They include navigable waters to the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic
Ocean (Duluth Seaport), as well as rail, light rail and bus transportation. Within the
seven county metropolitan area, Metro Transit, the public bus company, operates on the
ARMER system and is fully integrated into the regional communications plan and
emergency response (and resources) plan. Law enforcement, fire, EMS, Red Cross,
Salvation Army and others routinely rely on and engage Metro Transit bus resources for
response to critical incidents to hold and transport appropriate victims of urgent or
emergent situations requiring transport or a protected waiting situation. Similarly, Metro
Transit has equipped its new light rail transit vehicles and tunnels with the ARMER
system to enable communications throughout its light rail operations, which include the
Mall of America and Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport.




                                           97
5.6   Review and Update Process

Biannual review and update of the SCIP is an essential element to achieving the vision
for interoperable communications and operations in Minnesota. As Minnesota’s
Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee, the Statewide Radio Board will have
primary responsibility for maintaining the SCIP and updating that document. From a
more substitutive procedural view, the process will be vested in the SRB’s SIEC
Advisory Committee which is designed to broadly represent the multitude of public
safety disciplines (federal, state and local), including representatives form each non-
governmental organizations and tribal governments operating in the State of Minnesota.
The SIEC Advisory Committee is also designed to include representation from each of
the regional radio board and regional advisory committees where a similar multi-
disciplinary approach is reflected in their organizational structure. Administrative
support and coordination for this process will be a significant responsibility of the
Statewide Public Safety Interoperability Program Administrator, who will provide
technical assistance and input reflective of activities throughout the state, of adjoining
states and of interoperability issues along the Canadian border. (describe the process
on how will you review the SCIP, Annual Progress Report)



                           [We can redo the diagram later.]



             Figure 5.6.1 – SCIP Annual Review and Approval Process

The overall process to review, revise and update the SCIP will utilize the same
processes as in the development of this SCIP. The bottom up input from local users,
Regional Radio Boards, Regional Advisory Committees, tribal governments, non-
governmental organizations and the SCIP Core Advisory Group will all play a significant
role in assisting the ARMER program in maintaining the health and vitality of the SCIP.
The review of the SCIP will help assure that goals and objectives are achieved and
barriers or threats to their achievement are mitigated. Because the governance
structure established by the Statewide Radio Board, Regional Radio Boards and
Regional Advisory Committees is a “bottom up” approach starting with the community of
emergency responders, the response community will be continuously part of the
process of integrating changes real-time as they occur or are scheduled and an ongoing
part of SOP development, training, exercises and usage.




                                           98
         6            Implementation

         The overall approach to implementation of the SCIP strategic initiatives, short and long
         term goals and objectives leverages the processes in place and being developed as
         part of the SCIP. The State of Minnesota is committed to the financing, construction,
         implementation and maintenance of the statewide ARMER radio system. The ARMER
         will enable operable and interoperable intra and inter state communications. The SCIP
         implementation builds upon the successes and learning’s of the Twin City Metropolitan
         region. The table which follows summarizes the implementation elements of the SCIP,
         their current status to plan and enables policy makers and others to track progress and
         success of the SCIP. The current status of each region relative to achieving the highest
         levels of the Interoperability Continuum is identified in Table 3-1. (need information on
         a Plan-to-Plan)

           Table 6-1 – Monitoring Status to Plan - Short to Long Term SCIP Plan Elements, Goals, Success
                                               and Performance Factors

Implementation                      ARMER-
  Action Plan         Statewide       911,
 Element, Goal,         Radio        HSEM,     Region 1      Region 2     Region 3      Region 4       Region 5      Region 6
Success Factor          Board       MN/DOT     Southeast     Northeast   Northwest       Central      Southwest       Metro
                                                                             RAC
Radio Committee                                                Strong                                    Strong
                         Yes         N.A.         Yes                    Established       Yes                         Yes
   or Board                                                   Interest                                  Interest
                                                                         with by-laws
Educating Policy        Yes,         Yes,                     Yes, In       Yes, In       Yes,          Yes, In       Yes, On
                                              Yes, Ongoing
    Makers             Ongoing      Ongoing                   Process      Process       Ongoing        Process        Going
                                                                                                                     Complete,
 Overall Action         Yes,         Yes,                      Early
                                                  Yes                    Early Stages      Yes        Early Stages   TIC Plan
     Plan              Ongoing      Ongoing                   Stages
                                                                                                                      Update
     Funding
                                                                                          Year
     (ARMER
                                                                                        Available
   Backbone)
Plan Elements,
      Goals,
   Objectives,                                                 Early
                         Yes         Yes          Yes                    Early Stages      Yes        Early Stages     Yes
Success Factors                                               Stages
 Monitored and
    Supported
Communications
                       Yes With                              Contracts                     Yes,
       and                                     Contracts                  Contracts                      Strong
                       Additional    Yes                       and                       Additional                  Complete
 Interoperability                             and Funding                and Funding                    Interest
                      In Process                             Funding                    In Process
   Assessment
                         In
Technical Design      Process,                                                             Yes,
                                                               Early                                     Strong
  Options and         complete       Yes       In Process                Early Stages    Additional                  Complete
                                                              Stages                                    Interest
     Costs             July 1,                                                          In Process
                        2008
   Emergency
    Responder            Yes         Yes          Yes          Yes           Yes           Yes            Yes          Yes
   Participation
       Non
 Governmental            Yes         Yes          Yes          Yes           Yes           Yes            Yes          Yes
  Organizations
Tribal Jurisdiction      In                                                                In         In Process,
                                     Yes          Yes          Yes           Yes                                       Yes
   Participation      Process,                                                          Process,       Invitations

                                                               99
Implementation                    ARMER-
  Action Plan       Statewide       911,
 Element, Goal,       Radio        HSEM,     Region 1       Region 2      Region 3        Region 4      Region 5        Region 6
Success Factor        Board       MN/DOT     Southeast      Northeast     Northwest        Central     Southwest         Metro
                    Invitations                                                          Invitations    Extended
                     Extended                                                             Extended
  ARMER and                                                  Yes, In
                    In Process                 Yes, In                                    Yes, In
   Local Site                       Yes                     Parts of      Early Stages                 Early Stages     Complete
                     Statewide                 Region                                     Region
  Acquisitions                                               Region
                                                             Yes, In
ARMER Build Out     In Process                 Yes, In                                    Yes, In
                                    Yes                     Parts of      Early Stages                 Early Stages     Complete
Plan & Schedule      Statewide                 Region                                     Region
                                                             Region
                                                              Early
                                                             Stages,
ARMER Build Out
                     Begins                   Regional        One                         Regional
     – Local
                     July 1,        Yes      Build Out In    County       Early Stages    Build Out    Early Stages     Complete
  Integration or
                      2008                     Process      Build Out                    In Process
 Enhancements
                                                             Of Sub
                                                             System
ARMER to Local                                Regional       Yes, In
                    Work In                                                               Yes, In                      Substantiall
 Interoperability                   Yes       Work In       Parts of      Early Stages                 Early Stages
                    Progress                                                              Region                       y Complete
    Identified                                Process        Region
                       In
 Data System                                                 Yes, In                                                   In Process,
                    Process,                  In Process,                   To Be          To Be         To Be
Assessment and                      Yes                      Parts of                                                     Early
                      Early                  Early Stages                 Developed      Developed     Developed
  Integration                                                Region                                                      Stages
                     Stages
                                                                                                                       Yes With
    700 MHz                                                                                                            Additional
                     Yes and                   Yes and       Yes and                      Yes and
  Integration or                    Yes                                   Early Stages                 Early Stages       Work
                    Expanding                 Expanding     Expanding                    Expanding
 Interoperability                                                                                                      Underway
                                                                                                                        re: Data
 Monitoring and
   Managing
                       Yes          Yes          Yes           SRB           SRB            Yes            SRB            Yes
 Expenditure of
  PSIC Funds
                                  Support    Moderate to     Moderate     Moderate to     Moderate     Moderate to
Overall Status on
                     Variable     Through     Variable      to Variable    Variable      to Variable    Variable
 Interoperability                                                                                                        Optimal
                    Statewide     SRB and      Within          Within       Within          Within       Within
   Continuum
                                  Regions      Region         Region        Region         Region        Region
                                    Scott
                                  Wiggins,
                      Scott       ARMER,       Lt. Tim                       Brian
                                                                                           Micah        Joel Dahl,
                     Wiggins,       Mike       Heroff,        Insert       Holmer,                                     Jill Rohret,
Point Of Contact                                                                           Myers,      Sheriff, Lyon
                     ARMER        Schwab      Rochester        POC          Interop                                       MESB
                                                                                           CMRB          County
                       911         HSEM,       Police,                    Coordinator
                                  Tim Lee,
                                  MN/DOT




                                                              100
7         Funding

Funding of interoperable communications, systems and activities within the State of
Minnesota draws from multiple sources. The following table presents the key
communications activities, projects, interoperable communications initiatives and the
sources and amounts of funding where identified:

                                                 Table 7-1

    Activity       Responsibility       Status            Source of    Funding In     Amount of
                                                           Funds         Place         Funds
Metro Area
ARMER
                   ARMER/911        Completed         Legislative     Complete      $150M+,
Backbone
                                    2001              Appropriation                 includes 7
                                                                                    County Metro
                                                                                    Integration
Seven County                                          Legislative
Metro                                                 Appropriation
                   ARMER/911,       Complete 2008                                   Included in
Integration
                   Counties,                          DHS funds                     Metro Area
                                                                      Yes
                   Cities, MESB                                                     ARMER
                                                      County and
                                                                                    Backbone
                                                      City Funds
ARMER Build        Regional Radio
Out Detail         Boards and
                                    In Process,       Legislative                   $1.85M State
Design and         Committees,
                                    Complete by       Appropriation                 Funds
Planning           Counties,                                          Yes
                                    July, 2008
(Including         Cities                             DHS Funds
ARMER and
Local
Subsystem
Costs)
Advanced
Project
                                    In Process,       Legislative
Development
                                    Complete by       Appropriation
(Site              MN DOT                                             Yes           $3.75 M
                                    June 30, 2010
Acquisition and
Development)
Support to         HSEM             In Place and      Legislative                   Up to 5% PSIC
RRB or RRC                          Adding in         Appropriation                 Funds
                   ARMER-911                                          Yes
Planning                            ARMER-911         DHS Funds
                                                                                    $331,500 DHS
                   Local RRB or
                                    MESB,             Local Funds                   Funds ARMER
                   RRC
                                    CMNRRB            for RRB or
                                                      RRC
                                    SEMNRAC
                   ARMER-911        Process           Legislative
                   County and       Commenced         Appropriation
Interoperability                                                      Yes           $14.2 M PSIC
                   Cities                             DHS and PSIC


                                                    101
   Activity       Responsibility       Status            Source of     Funding In       Amount of
                                                          Funds          Place           Funds
Enhancements                                         Funds
ARMER Phase       ARMER            In Process,       Legislative
III Build Out –                    Substantially     Appropriation
                  SERRC
23 Counties                        Complete 2007
                                                     DHS Funds
                  CMRRB                                               Yes           $45M
ARMER Full        ARMER-911        Construction      Legislative
Build Out – 55                     Commences         Appropriation
                  MN/DOT-OEC                                          Yes           $186M
Counties                           July 1, 2008
Local System      County or City   Business          Local Funds
ARMER                              Decision
                                                     Grants           Yes           To Be
Enhancements                       Based Upon
                                                                                    Determined
                                   Detail Design     Up to 50%
                                   Planning          State Funds
                                   Results
                  State for                          911 Fee for
                  ARMER                              ARMER
Ongoing
                  Local                              Local Funds
Operating                          Planning in                        Yes           Varies by Local
                  Government                         and Subscriber
Costs                              Process for                                      Jurisdiction
                  for Subsystem                      Fees for Local
                                   Local                                            and
                  or                                 Subsystem
                                   Enhancement                                      Subsystem
                  Enhancements                       Enhancements
                                   Options
Develop Data      MESB and
Layer for Metro   Hennepin
                                   In Process        COPS Grant       Yes           ?
System            County
Data System
Development,
                  Statewide        Early             Not Identified   No            To Be
VoIP Systems
                  Radio Board      Discussions       At This Time                   Determined
Integration


Full funding is in place to design, construct, build, maintain and operate the ARMER
System until mid-2010. Local governments can use the ARMER backbone without
additional cost but are responsible for the cost of local enhancements. The State will
currently fund up to 50% of local enhancements to the extent funds are available.
Design, planning and cost assessment is underway that will assist counties and cities in
determining their interoperability and communications options and to help make
decisions on business case basis. Coordination and support of local radio boards or
committees through HSEM and ARMER-911 is funded by State and DHS funds at this
time. The local RRB or RRC will have to develop plans for funding regional and local
expenditures as they develop their communication plans. State or federal funds may be
available to assist them in their initial planning efforts along with HSEM and ARMER
personnel.      Longer term funding of ARMER, and support services such as
interoperability coordination, training, exercises will be determined in part by the
continued federal funding of national initiatives and availability of Homeland Security
funds.    The HSEM and ARMER-911 will also address communications and


                                                   102
interoperability funding priorities through the normal State biennial budget and
legislative processes as has been done to successfully develop the ARMER System to
its current state.




                                       103
8       Close

The strategic Statewide Communications Interoperability Plan (SCIP) for Minnesota
documents the history, public policy, determination, leadership, processes, governance,
funding and technology that has led the State to the threshold of implementing a
statewide interoperable communications system. Beginning in the early 1990’s a
successful process and strategy emerged culminating in the first statewide
interoperable communications plan in 2002 to address wireless public safety voice and
data communications beyond the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. This SCIP in response
to local, state and national initiatives elevates the Minnesota process and its
communications planning, development and implementation to the next level. The
SCIP presents a comprehensive framework, plan, timelines, identifies key stakeholders,
funding, processes, responsibilities and accountabilities for moving towards the State’s
interoperable communications vision. In doing so, federal, state and local policy makers
have a clear road map and understanding of where Minnesota is going, how it proposes
to get there, what the costs will be, where funds are coming from, how funds will be
applied and what the specific outcomes will be by 2010. Federal, State and local
officials, tribal jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations have a framework
which includes governance, within which to participate, have a seat at the table and a
voice in the communications decision making process. The actions of the Governor and
Legislature to lead, support and fully fund the construction and build out of the Allied
Radio Matrix for Emergency Response (ARMER) system and to provide incentives to
local governments, tribal jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations to access
and participate on the core ARMER system serves to reinforce and build upon the goals
and objectives set forth in detail in the SCIP. In those cases where local entities for
whatever reasons decide to remain on their legacy communications systems, the
federal government has provided additional funding to support the design and
implementation of interoperability with the ARMER system and systems in neighboring
states and Canada. Almost $200 million dollars has been expended by the State and
local governments to develop the ARMER system and subsystems to date. The
authorization for the expenditure of up to $186M to complete the ARMER build out
assures the opportunity for all public safety/service entities to achieve the highest level
of interoperability by operating upon a shared platform. The ARMER platform is a
scalable 800 and 700 MHz trunked digital radio system that can address the expanding
roles of public safety/service entities and their interoperability needs over time.

The financial commitment of the State to build out the ARMER system statewide by
2010 along with the funding to offset all recurring maintenance and operational costs for
ARMER resolved two key barriers to increased interest in and participation on the
ARMER system by local governments. Additional funding is also provided to review the
technical design of ARMER in each county so as to better assure local coverage,
identify coverage issues, technical issues and to provide cost information for local users
to participate on the ARMER system in order to make informed business decisions
regarding the broad inclusive communications needs of all public safety radio users
within their area. The technical assessment and inventories of existing resources are to

                                           104
be completed by June 30, 2008. The State has provided further incentives to local
governments by offering additional financial assistance of up to 50% of the cost of local
enhancements that may be required as a result of the technical assessment of a
county’s infrastructure requirements to have radio coverage at least as good as what
they have with their existing radio system(s). Combined with PSIC grant opportunities
to facilitate 700 MHz interoperability with conventional radio systems and to enhance
participation of tribal jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations, local
governments have strong incentives to carefully consider what role the ARMER system
can have their existing radio system or as a future or replacement opportunity. Many
agencies may still face financial challenges when looking to upgrade their
communications centers and acquire digital subscriber radios for emergency
responders.

Building upon the financial and technical opportunities the SCIP presents governance
and planning models that enables all jurisdictions and entities to participate and have a
voice in communications operability and interoperability development and address
shared challenges. The SCIP provides for a system of regional communications boards
and committees that engage emergency responders, local governments, tribal
jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations which through inclusive and
participatory processes make local decisions concerning all aspects of voice and data
communications as well as operational interoperability. The local decision making
process occurs within the over arching framework and governance of the Statewide
Radio Board (SRB) which is similarly structured to be inclusive and broadly
representative. The SRB provides the statewide oversight and accountability for the
SCIP, ARMER build out, use of state and federal funds and SCIP implementation,
review and updating. Building upon the success of the SRB, the Metro Area Radio
Board, the Central Minnesota Radio Board and the Southeast Minnesota Radio Board
are used as the models in the SCIP for the remaining three regions of the State
(southwest, northwest and northeast) to engage and develop local equivalents by June,
2008. Further facilitating the development and operation of regional radio boards and
committees, the Homeland Security and Emergency Management and ARMER-911
operations of the Department of Public Safety provide resources to counties, cities and
regional bodies to also assist their development, as well as providing support for
training, exercise, development of interoperability operational and technical options,
standard operating procedures and usage on a day to day basis. These resources will
also assist in the development of regional Tactical Interoperability Plans similar to what
the Twin City Metropolitan Area has. These initiatives will ultimately be assimilated into
the comprehensive statewide interoperability and tactical plan of the SRB.

Minnesota is well positioned to achieve statewide communications operability and
interoperability over the next five years. While the Metro area and adjoining areas are
well underway to the development and operation of interoperable communications, fifty
five counties are just initiating the processes. These new initiatives coincide with the
ARMER build out. Many of these counties face significant financial constraints due to
declining populations, limited tax base, increasing budget pressures for health, human
services and corrections. Faced with aging communications systems and the need to


                                           105
take some action by 2011 as a result of FCC narrow banding requirements, many of
these counties will be faced with making very challenging decisions. The SCIP plan
and processes will help guide counties in making their communications decisions by
providing the forum and processes within which to discuss and develop sound business
decision alternatives. The ARMER system will play a significant role for many agencies,
but will not the only answer. The public safety community, Governor and Legislature
may need to rally once again to assist and support some of the county’s of the state.
ARMER will however provide the common platform for all agencies, regardless of their
radio technology to access and enjoy unprecedented levels of communications
interoperability.




                                         106
  Appendix A

  A.1
                            Minnesota Department of Public Safety Information Sheet- March 2004
                                           Interoperable Radio Proposals
Homeland security grant funding (Law                         • Proposals should seek to
Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Grants and          integrate police, fire, EMS and other
2004 Homeland Security funding) can be used to       public safety resources.
provide for interoperable radio communications               • Interoperability capability
equipment. One million dollars of 2004 Homeland      along interstate or international
Security is specifically allocated for measures      borders should be considered.
that will provide enhancements to interoperability           • Fixed site capability may be
for all public safety responders within a region.    considered at population centers,
The emphasis of this allocation will be upon         however, preference will be given to
proposals that provide interoperability              solutions that can be redeployed
enhancements where the statewide radio system        regionally if the need arises.
backbone does not exist.                                     • Interoperability proposals
An interoperability sub-committee of the Public      should be scaled locally, regionally
Safety Radio and Communication Planning              and statewide (including
Committee will review those grant applications.      consideration of NPSPAC
The sub-committee is composed of the following       interoperability channels, if
members:                                             appropriate).
         − Colonel Beers, MSP Chair                          • Priority will be given to filling
         − Major Al Smith, MSP                       the gap between existing capabilities
         − Tim Lee, DOT/EOC                          and emergency response capabilities
         − Jim Mohn, DOT/EOC                         needed to enhance Homeland
         − Sheriff Randy Willis, MN Sheriff’s        Security within the region first and
           Assn.                                     then response capability beyond the
         − Dennis Delmont, MN Chief’s of Police      immediate region.
            Assn.                                            • A portion of the grant should
         − Ulie Seal, MN Fire Chief’s Association    be allocated to mobile solutions that
         − Bill Dean, Metro Radio Board              can be transported to the vicinity of
         − Aarron Reinert, EMS Regulatory Board      any emergency or disaster.
         − Ron Whitehead, DPS/ARMER                          • The life cycles of a disaster
                                                     or emergency should be considered,
The sub-committee has provided the following         including initial emergency response
suggestions and guidelines for consideration:        of regional assets to statewide asset
        • Equipment must meet the basic              response and along the borders.
requirements of the 2004 Homeland Security                   • There should be a
grants program.                                      commitment to provide start up and
        • Regional approaches to enhancements        reoccurring training for personnel
to interoperable radio communications will be        upon the use of the interoperable
given priority.                                      communication equipment, including
        • One county in the region must agree to     a commitment to integrate the

                                            107
act as the applicant on behalf of the group.         interoperable communication
        • Proposals should include an assessment     equipment in disaster exercises
of current regional resources (Police, Fire, EMS,    within the region.
public health agencies and medical facilities) and           • HSEM (Homeland Security
their communication capability.                      and Emergency Management
                                                     Division) can provide assist with
Suggested approaches:                                training and exercise planning.
        • Assess capabilities to monitor and
communicate upon traditional interop channels,       Interoperability Frequencies
such as MNCEF, Statewide Fire, Statewide EMS         • Statewide Fire 154.295 VHF
and NPSPAC interop channels. (List of interop        • Statewide EMS 155.34 VHF
channels is attached).                               • MIMS (Point to Point)
        • Transportable- Command Post                  155.37 VHF
        • PSAP operations                            • MINSEF 155.475 VHF • Statewide
        • Assess communication capability of         Patrol VHF
regional responders.                                 • NPSPAC (I-CALL & I-TAC) 800
        • Prepare a plan to fill the gap between     MHz
current capabilities and needs:
        • Address traditional interop channels.
        • Address regional response needs,
including inter-state needs where applicable.
        • Address statewide response needs.
        • Deployable resources may include
consideration of the following equipment:
        • Raytheon ACU-1000 Intelligent
Interconnect System or ACU-T tactical unit
(www.jps.com).
        • Vega Viper-8 or Viper-12 equipment
(www.vega-signaling.com)
        • M/A-COM Open Sky Interoperability
Gateway
        • Communications-Applied Technology
(C-AT) Incident Commander's Radio Interface.
(www.c-at.com)
        • Fixed site equipment may include
consideration of the following:
        • Co-location or enhancements to existing
towers to provide interoperable capability.
        • 800 MHz repeaters for interop channels,
including NPSPAC interop channels, with
dispatch center patching capability.
        • 800 MHz intelli-repeater trunked radio
equipment (site trunking equipment).
        • Commenting upon how proposal will
enhance the communication capability of
potential statewide responders may be useful.




                                           108
Appendix B   Homeland Security Funds




                          109
110
Appendix C   Homeland Security Funds




                          111
112
Appendix D   Homeland Security




                        113
114
          Appendix E            Key Entities

                Roles, Responsibilities and Reporting Relationships of Key Entities

             Role                                 Responsibility                                 Reports To
Statewide Radio Board          Administers the Statewide Public Safety                   Commissioner of Public
                               Communication System Plan (ARMER) and the                 Safety, Governor and
                               Technical and Operational Standards related to the        Minnesota Legislature
                               ARMER system. §403.36; Coordinates public safety
                               interoperability as Minnesota’s Statewide
                               Interoperability Executive Committee, Executive Order
                               (pending); Coordinates Minnesota’s Strategic
                               Communication Interoperability Plan.
Statewide Interoperability     Broadly representative committee, multi-discipline with   Statewide Radio Board
Executive Committee Advisory   regional representative, including tribal, non-
Committee                      governmental public safety entity and federal agency
                               representatives to provide input on all public safety
                               interoperability issues across all spectrums.
SRB Operations and             Provides a technical review of the ARMER plan and         Statewide Radio Board
Technical Committee            proposed changes and of technical and operational
                               standards.
SRB Steering Committee         Provides structural review of the SRB processes and       Statewide Radio Board
                               of the broad direction of the ARMER project, including
                               assuring program management principles are applied
                               to the ARMER implementation.
SRB Finance Committee          Recommends the allocation and use of funds                Statewide Radio Board
                               appropriated to the SRB’s use for interoperability.
SRB Legislative Committee      Coordinates the legislative issues related to the         Statewide Radio Board
                               ARMER system and public safety interoperability.
ARMER/911 Program Director     Coordinates the following programs: ARMER                 Assistant Commissioner,
                               implementation, Statewide 911 Program, Statewide          Department of Public
                               Public Safety Interoperability Program and oversees       Safety
                               administrative support of Statewide Radio Board
Statewide Public Safety        Coordinates Minnesota’s comprehensive public safety       ARMER/911 Program
Communication                  communication interoperability programs, including        Director
Interoperability Program       development of Regional Tactical Interoperable
Administrator                  Communication Plans and ARMER legacy system
                               interoperability
Regional Interoperability      Provide regional assistance in public safety              Statewide Public Safety
Coordinators                   communication through education, coordination of          Communication
                               local and regional plan development and in                Interoperability Program
                               development and exercise of regional TIC Plans.           Administrator
                               Note: communication planning must interface with
                               broader homeland security goals and all emergency         Results will all be reported
                               plans.                                                    to and coordinated with
                                                                                         Division of Homeland
                                                                                         Security and Emergency
                                                                                         Management.
Regional Program               Provide support to local communities in the               Homeland Security and
Coordinators                   development of regional and county emergency              Emergency Management

                                                       115
              Role                              Responsibility                             Reports To
                            planning efforts; primary liaison to local emergency    Field Services Branch
                            managers. Anticipates close coordination between        Director
                            RPC and RIC.
                                                                                    Information and results to
                                                                                    be coordinated with and
                                                                                    reported to ARMER-911
Regional Radio Board- see   Promote state, regional and local standard              Regional Radio Board’s
§403.39                     development for public safety communications;           have considerable authority
                            coordinate regional planning for ARMER system           to develop technical and
                            implementation and interoperability with legacy         operational standards
                            systems. RRB used to assist in distribution of DHS      within the region-
                            funds for planning and infrastructure.                  Ultimately report to SRB
                                                                                    and contract with Mn/DOT
Regional Radio Advisory     Precursor to the establishment of Regional Radio        County and local officials
Committee                   Board. RRC can facilitate the development of regional   RRC represents.
                            technical and operational standards pending the
                            implementation of RRB.
Technical Operation         Provides a technical review of regional and local       Regional Advisory
Committee- (Technical       implementation plans and proposed changes and of        Committee
Assessment Infrastructure   technical and operational standards- exists under
Design Committee)           Regional Radio Committee structure and under            Or
                            Regional Radio Board structure.
                                                                                    Regional Radio Board
User Groups                 Surveys, data collection and input of user needs        Technical Operation
                            current needs, Provide input during the design and      Committee
                            implementation process for the ARMER backbone and
                            for significant local enhancements. (Design
                            talkgroups, etc.) General orientation is from the end
                            user perspective including cross jurisdictional and
                            cross disciplinary. Interoperability 700/800 MHz
System Managers Committee   Provide input and recommendations on ARMER              Regional Advisory
                            system design, operation, equipment, and                Committee
                            interoperability procedures system administrators
                            perspective.                                            Or

                                                                                    Regional Radio Board




                                                    116
Appendix F             800 MHz Executive Team - 2001

Commissioners:
David Fisher, Department of Administration
Elwyn Tinklenberg, Department of Transportation
Charles Weaver, Department of Public Safety
800 MHz EXECUTIVE TEAM MEMBERS
Michelle Beeman, Department of Natural Resources,
Legislative Director
Anne Beers, Chief, Minnesota State Patrol
Bill Bernhjelm, Department of Natural Resources, Director,
Enforcement Division
Laura Bishop, Department of Administration,
Director of Legislative Affairs
David Bye, Department of Corrections, Project Manager
Kevin Corbid, Association of Minnesota Counties, Policy Analyst
Joe Cosgrove, Department of Corrections, Security Director
Barbara Cox, Department of Public Safety, Director of Public Affairs
Jeff Davidman, Department of Corrections,
Assistant to the Commissioner
Bill Dean, Metropolitan Radio Board, Executive Director
Michael Hogan, Department of Transportation, Planning Director,
Office of Electronic Communications
Patrick Hughes, Department of Transportation,
Assistant Commissioner, Director, Program Support Group
Tim Lee, Department of Transportation, 800 MHz System Manager
Mancel Mitchell, Department of Public Safety, Deputy Commissioner
Marthand Nookala, Department of Transportation,
Assistant Director, Program Support Group
Betsy Parker, Department of Transportation, Government Relations
Jack Ries, Department of Administration,
Telecom Support Intertechnologies Group
Doug Selbee, Department of Administration, Senior Planner
Andrew Terry, Chair, Department of Transportation, Director,
Office of Electronic Communications
Donald Wicklund, Department of Transportation, Assistant Director,
Office of Electronic Communications
Tim Worke, Department of Transportation, Director,
Government Relations
Jack Yarbrough, Department of Administration,
Assistant Commissioner Intertechnologies Group
Special thanks to the following groups
for their participation in the development
of the communications survey:
Rochester/Olmsted County Communications
Rochester Public Works & Parks Department
St. Cloud Information Technology Group
Owatonna/Steele County Pearl Street
Communications
St. Louis County Communications
Moorhead/Clay County Communications




                                             117
           Appendix G               Glossary

Item/Acronym                        Definition
APCO                                Association of Public Safety Communications Officials

                                    American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/TIA/EIAA-102 Phase 1 (Project 25)
                                    suite of standards. This recommendation is intended for government-owned/leased
(ANSI)/TIA/EIAA-102 Phase 1         land mobile public safety radio equipment, and its purpose is to make sure that such
                                    equipment or systems are capable of interoperating with other public safety land
                                    mobile equipment or systems.

ARMER                               Allied Radio Matrix for Emergency Response

                                    Short-range, line-of-sight communications directly from one radio to another without
“Direct” Communications
                                    benefit of a repeater to extend the range of the transmitted communication.

                                    Fire Service plans developed to ensure that the nearest unit will respond to a call-
“Move-up” algorithm or capability
                                    for-service.

                                    Short-range (a few miles or less), communications directly from one radio to another
“Talk-around” Communications        without benefit of a repeater to extend the range of the transmitted communication.
                                    Generally limited to a few miles of effective coverage.

800 MHz                             FCC channels allocated for public safety use in the 801-860 MHz range.

                                    Audio bridge used in fixed and mobile configurations. Requires radio from each
ACU-1000                            connected communications system. Gateway device used to link disparate radio
                                    systems.
Audio Bridge                        Connects four-wire audio from disparate radio systems to provide interoperability.

CASM                                Communications Asset Survey and Mapping (tool)

CBRNE                               Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive

CERV                                Communications Emergency Response Vehicle

                                    Term used when more than one repeater site collectively covers a large geographic
Cell
                                    area.
CMNRRB                              Central Minnesota Regional Radio Board
COML                                Communications Unit Leader
Console Patching                    Ability to connect dispatch consoles

COPS                                Community Oriented Policing Services

CP                                  Command Post

CriM Net                            Criminal Justice Network

CST                                 National Guard Civil Support Team



                                                          118
CV                Conventional

DFM               Department of Facility Maintenance

DHS               Department of Homeland Security

DHS               U.S. Department of Homeland Security

DOD               Department of Defense

DOH               Department of Health

DPS               Department of Public Safety

DTS               Department of Transportation Services

EMA               Emergency Management Agency

EMC               Emergency Management Command

EMD               Emergency Medical Dispatch

EMS               Emergency Medical Services

EMSRB             Emergency Medical Service Regulatory Board

EMT               Emergency Medical Technician

EOC               Emergency Operations Center

EOD               Explosive Ordinance Disposal

ETA               Estimated Time of Arrival

FBI               Federal Bureau of Investigation

FCC               Federal Communications Commission

FEMA              Federal Emergency Management Agency

FFD               Federal Fire Department

FS                Fire Service

GETS              Government Emergency Telecommunications Service
                  M/A channel used by out-of-area public safety officers to contact local public safety
Hailing Channel
                  dispatch centers.

HAZMAT            Hazardous Material

HC                Health Care

HCA               Health Care Association

HEICS             Hospital Emergency Incident Command System

                                        119
HSEM            Homeland Security and Emergency Management

HSEEP           Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program

IAP             Incident Action Plan

IC              Incident Command

ICALL           Calling Channel for ITAC
                M/A frequency pairs that are reused across the Nation. I-CALL is commonly
I-CALL, I-TAC   referred to as a “hailing” channel used by out-of-area public safety members trying
                to contact local responders.
ICS             Incident Command System

                Interoperable Communications Technical Assistance Program (ICTAP), a technical
ICTAP           assistance program designed to enhance interoperable communications between
                local, state, and federal emergency responders and public safety officials.

IED             Improvised Explosive Device

Inter-agency    Located or occurring between two or more agencies

Interoperable   Ability of a system to use the parts or equipment of another system

IP              Internet Protocol

ITAC            Conventional mutual aid channel 800 MHz

JIC             Joint Information Center

JTTF            Joint Terrorism Task Force

LE              Law Enforcement

LEAA            Law Enforcement Assistance Administration

LMR             Land Mobile Radio
M/A             Mutual Aid
MAA             Mutual Aid Agreement

MARC            Multiple Agency Radio Communication System

MESB            Metropolitan Emergency Services Board

MHz             Abbreviation for megahertz. 5 MHz = 5,000,000 Hz or 5,000 kHz.

MIMS            Minnesota Incident Management System

Mn-NET          Minnesota Network

Mn/DOT          Minnesota Department of Transportation



                                       120
MOA          Memorandum of Agreement

MOU          Memorandum of Understanding

MRB          Metropolitan Radio Board

MSA          Metropolitan Statistical Area

MST          Medical Support Team

Mutual Aid   Personnel, equipment, or services provided to another jurisdiction

NCC          Network Control Center

NECOS        Network Control System

NENA         National Emergency Number Association

NERRTC       National Emergency Response & Rescue training Center

NETC         National Emergency Training Campus

NIC          National Integration Center
NGO          Non-government organizations
NIMS         National Incident Management System

NIMSCAST     National Incident Management System Compliance Assistance Support Tool

             National Public Safety Planning Advisory Committee for public safety channels in
             the 806-824 MHz band. These channels are currently impacted by interference from
NPSPAC
             some cellular providers, primarily Nextel. The FCC is in the process of rebanding
             (reallocating) frequencies in this band to eliminate the interference.

NPTSC        National Public Safety Telecommunications Council

             The National Response Plan is an all-discipline, all-hazards plan that establishes a
             single, comprehensive framework for the management of domestic incidents. It
NRP          provides the structure and mechanisms for the coordination of federal support to
             state, local, and tribal incident managers and for exercising direct federal authorities
             and responsibilities.

NTPI         National Terrorism Preparedness Institute
ODP          DHS Office for Domestic Preparedness
OEC          Office of Electronic Communications
OG&T         Office of Grants and Training

OTC          Operations and Technical Committee

PA           Public Announcement

PH           Public Health


                                   121
PIO                   Public Information Officer

POC                   Point of Contact

PSAP                  Public Safety Anserwing Point

PSC                   Public Safety Communicaitons

PSIC                  Public Safety Interoperable Communications

PW                    Public Works

R-TOC                 Radio Technical Operations Committee

RACES                 Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service
                      Person responsible for distribution, care and maintenance of spare radios retained
Radio Cache Manager   for the purpose of enabling communications with assisting first responders from
                      other jurisdictions
RCC                   Regional Communication Center

RDC                   Naval Regional Dispatch Center
                      High powered radio generally mounted on a tower to amplify and extend the
Repeater
                      geographic coverage area of portable and mobile radios.
                      Mode which prohibits portable or mobile radios from using repeaters, thus limiting
Repeater Disabled     geographic coverage to line-of-sight to the other radio, generally no more than a few
                      miles.
                      Mode which enables the use of a repeater radio to amplify and extend the
Repeater Enabled
                      geographic coverage area of portable and mobile radios.
RF                    Radio Frequency

RIC                   Regional Interoperability Coordinator

RPC                   Regional Project Coordinator

RRC                   Regional Radio Committee

RRB                   Regional Radio Board

RSAG                  Regional Security Advisory Group
                      Oversees all initiatives and projects pertaining to public safety communications and
                      interoperability. Managed by DHS, it is the first national program designed by
SAFECOM
                      public safety for public safety and works cooperatively with more than 50,000 local
                      and state public safety agencies.
SAR                   Search and Rescue

SCIP                  Statewide Interoperable Communications Plan

SEMNRAC               Southeast Minnesota Regional Radio Committee

SIEC                  Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee


                                           122
SMG         System Managers Group

SOP         Standard Operating Procedure

SPAWAR      Space and Naval Warfare

SRB         Statewide Radio Board

SSC SD      Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center San Diego
            Term ususally used with trunked radio systems. A talkgroup is a predefined list of
Talkgroup   radios/users assigned a unique ID which allows them to communicate with each
            other over the trunked radio system.
TAT         Terrorist Advisory Team

TIC Plan    Tactical Interoperable Communications Plan
TICP        Tactical Interoperable Communications Plan
UA          Urban Area
UACC        Urban Area Administrative Council
            The intent of the Urban Areas Security Program is to create a sustainable national
UASI        model program to enhance security and overall preparedness to prevent, respond
            to, and recover from acts of terrorism.
UAWG        Urban Area Working Group
            Ultra High Frequency – Range of 300 to 3,000 MHz. For public safety LMR, usually
UHF
            refers to two bands. 380 to 460 MHz (low) and 460 to 512 MHz (high).
USAFR       United States Air Force Reserves

USAR        Urban Area Search and Rescue

USCG        United States Coast Guard
            Very High Frequency – For public safety LMR, usually refers to VHF High Band
VHF         with a range of 136 to 164 MHz. VHF Low Band has a frequency range below 100
            MHz.
VOAD        Volunteer Organization Active in Disasters

VoIP        Voice Over Internet Protocol
WMD         Weapon of Mass Destruction




                                 123

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:93
posted:7/26/2011
language:English
pages:128