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					RECERATIONAL SPORTS
   (Horseshoes and Table Tennis)




 SIX-WEEK UNIT PLAN



       ROD WILSON




          PED III
        DR. COLVIN
         10-26-04
     Table of Contents of the Recreational games Unit Plan
            Subject                         Page number
      Grade level taught                         1
  Number of classes a week                       1
      Length of classes                          1
          VA SOL’s                              1-2
  NASPE content standards                        3
    Horse Shoe Objectives
                         Psychomotor             4
                            Cognitive            4
                            Affective            4
   Table Tennis Objectives
                         Psychomotor            4-5
                            Cognitive            5
                            Affective            5
Equipment and Facilities needed                  6
    Instructional materials                      6
     Safety Consideration                        6
          Horseshoes
                                Rules           7-10
                              Scoring          11-12
                             Etiquette           13
                Special Consideration            13
         Table Tennis
                                Rules          14-18
                              Scoring           19
                             Etiquette         20-21
                Special Consideration           21
            History
                          Horseshoes            22
                         Table Tennis          23-23
        Essential Skills
                          Horseshoes            24
                         Table Tennis           25
     Scope and sequence                        26-27
          Hands-Outs                           28-31
            Rubrics                             32
        Project Outline                         33
         Works Cited                            34
    Unit Plan for Recreational games: Horse Shoes and Table Tennis


        The grade level that will be taught during these six weeks will be 9th grade

students. The size of the class will be thirty students per class, there will be five classes a

day. There will be five classes a week for six weeks, giving us thirty classes throughout

the unit. The classes will all be 50 minutes long; this will give us 1500 minutes to learn

the basic skills for horseshoes and table tennis.



                                VA SOL’S for 9th grade

Grade Nine
In grade nine, students complete the transition from modified versions of movement
forms to more complex applications across all types of physical activities — games,
sports, dances, and recreational pursuits. They demonstrate the ability to use basic skills,
strategies, and tactics. Students demonstrate more specialized knowledge in identifying
and applying key movement concepts and principles. They assess and develop a personal
physical activity program aimed at improving their skill performance. They apply their
understanding of personal fitness to lifelong participation in physical activity. Students
demonstrate independence of others in making choices, respect all others, avoid conflict
but are able to resolve it appropriately, and use elements of fair play and ethical behavior
in physical activity settings. Students demonstrate the ability to plan for and improve
components of fitness and achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal
fitness.

Skilled Movement
9.1 The student will perform all basic movement skills and demonstrate competence in
      at least two self-selected, lifetime, skill-related physical activities from individual,
      dual, or team game/sport, dance, and recreational pursuit categories.
      a) Apply competencies in all locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills to
           appropriate game/sport, dance, and recreational activity applications.
      b) Design, implement, evaluate, and modify a plan for at least two self-selected,
           lifetime, skill-related physical activities. Key concepts include analysis of
           performance, application of principles of movement and training, and focus on
           goal setting and improvement of personal skills.
Movement Principles and Concepts
9.2 The student will apply movement principles and concepts to specific sport, dance,
     and recreational skill performance.
     a) Explain and apply selected scientific principles (e.g., physiological [warm-up,
         cool down, overload, specificity, and progression], biomechanical [levers, types
         of muscle contractions, and force]) that aid in the improvement of movement
         skills.
     b) Use movement principles and concepts to improve the movement performance
         of self and others.
Personal Fitness
9.3 The student will demonstrate achievement and maintenance of a health-enhancing
     level of personal fitness by designing, implementing, self-assessing, and modifying
     a personal fitness program.
     a) Demonstrate program-planning skills by setting goals, devising strategies, and
         making timelines for a personal physical activity plan.
     b) Apply the FITT (Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type) principle and other
         principles of training such as overload, specificity, and progression, in
         accordance with personal goals.
     c) Include scientific principles and concepts (e.g., methods of stretching, types of
         muscular contractions) as strategies for improvement of personal fitness.
     d) Use a variety of resources, including available technology, to assess, design,
         and evaluate a personal fitness plan.

Responsible Behaviors
9.4 The student will demonstrate appropriate behaviors in all physical activity settings.
     a) Act independently, and resist negative peer influences in physical activity
        settings.
     b) Exhibit respect for the unique characteristics and abilities of peers.
     c) Act responsibily to avoid conflict.

Physically Active Lifestyle
9.5 The student will participate in school and community health-enhancing physical
     activities that provide opportunities for challenge and social interaction.
     a) Maintain a record of daily participation in physical activities.
     b) Develop and evaluate progress toward personal physical-activity goals within
         and outside of physical education class.
     c) Analyze long-term physiological and psychological benefits that may result
         from regular participation in physical activity.


                    (http://www.pen.k12.va.us/go/Sols/physedsecondary.doc)
                  NASPE Benchmarks and content of learning


National Standards for Physical Education

Physical activity is critical to the development and maintenance of good health. The goal
of physical education is to develop physically educated individuals who have the
knowledge, skills, and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity.

A physically educated person:

Standard 1: Demonstrates competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to
      perform a variety of physical activities.

Standard 2: Demonstrates understanding of movement concepts, principles, strategies,
      and tactics as they apply to the learning and performance of physical activities.

Standard 3: Participates regularly in physical activity.

Standard 4: Achieves and maintains a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.

Standard 5: Exhibits responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and
      others in physical activity settings.

Standard 6: Values physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression,
      and/or social interaction.



      (http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/template.cfm?template=publications-nationalstandards.html )
                                         Horseshoes

Psychomotor Objectives

       1. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct way to toss the horse shoe

       2.   TSWBAT demonstrate the correct place to stand while tossing the shoe

       3.   TSWBAT demonstrate the correct formation for playing horse shoes with

            teams

       4.   TSWBAT demonstrate the correct formation and follow through for tossing a

            horse shoe

Cognitive Objectives

       1. TSWBAT demonstrate knowledge of how to keep score in a game. The will

            be assessed by having them officiate a match between two fellow classmates.

       2. TSWBAT demonstrate the knowledge of the rules of the game of horseshoes.

            This will be assessed with questions from the teacher each day.



Affective Objectives

       1. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct etiquette of the game.

       2. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct rotations during doubles play.

                                        Table Tennis

Psychomotor Objectives

       1. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct form for the receiving the ball

       2. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct skill for serving the ball, they must land in

            the correct square five out of ten times.

       3. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct way to play in a doubles game.
       4. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct perform a backhand return. They must land

          in the ball on the table five out of ten times.

Cognitive Objectives

       1. TSWBAT demonstrate knowledge of the rules of the game. This will be

          assessed with questions from the teacher each day.

       2. TSWBAT demonstrate knowledge of a brief history of the sport of table

          tennis. This will be assessed at the end of the unit with questions from the

          teacher each day.

Affective Objectives

       1. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct etiquette while playing the sport.

       2. TSWBAT demonstrate the correct good sportsmanship while participating in

          the unit.
                       Equipment and Facilities needed

               Horse Shoes                                  Table Tennis

         30 sets of horse shoes                         30 table tennis paddles
        15 sets of horse shoe pits                       15 table tennis tables
      15 pairs of horse shoe stakes          50 table tennis balls (in case some are lost)
     30 note books to keep scores in                      15 table tennis nets


                         Instructional materials needs

Horse Shoes

      Video on basic horseshoe rules and technique
      Handouts on the knowledge and skill of horseshoes

Table Tennis

      Video on basic table tennis rules and technique
      Handouts on the knowledge and skill of ping pong

                              Safety considerations
                                       Horse Shoes

      1. The student should stay clear of the horseshoe pit when others are about to
         toss their shoes
      2. The student should stay clear of someone while they are in their back swing
         before tossing the shoe
      3. The students should not play with the equipment until told so by the teacher
      4. The students should only throw horseshoes into their corresponding pits.

                                         Table Tennis
      1. The student should not hit the table during any part of the unit.
      2. The student should only hit table tennis balls onto their corresponding tables.
      3. The students should not play with the equipment until told so by the teacher
                                   Rules Horseshoes
                        OFFICIAL RULES OF HORSESHOE PITCHING
        Published By The National Horseshoe Pitchers Association of America (NHPA)
                                              (Jan 1, 2004)
RULE 1 - COURT LAYOUT
       See diagram on back of rules pamphlet. (similar sketches are shown following
       this document))
Section A. PERMANENT GROUND LEVEL COURTS
       1. Dimensions - A horseshoe court shall be a level rectangular area 6 ft wide and a
       minimum of 46 ft long. A north-south setting is recommended for outdoor courts
       to minimize the effects of the sun.
       2. Pitcher's Box - The pitcher's box is the square 6 ft by 6 ft area at each end of the
       court. It is composed of 2 parts - 1) the pit, and 2) the pitching platforms.
       a. PIT - The pit is a rectangular area filled with the substance onto which the
       shoes are pitched. Its maximum length (in the direction in which the shoes are
       pitched) is 72 inches and its minimum length is 43 inches. Its maximum width is
       36 inches and its minimum width is 31 inches. The pit must be centered in the
       pitcher's box. If the pit is less than the maximum dimensions, the extra space shall
       be filled with the same material of which the platforms are made, or some other
       material different than the pit substance, and shall be level with the pit and
       platforms.
       3. Stakes - The stake is the target at which the shoe is pitched. Each stake shall be
       centered between the platforms with a minimum of 21 inches from the stake to the
       front and back of the pit. On regulation courts the stakes are 40 ft. apart. This is
       measured from the front of each stake level with the pitching platform. Stakes
       shall be 1 inch in diameter and may be made of cold-rolled steel, mild iron, soft
       metal or synthetic material. Each stake shall be no shorter than 14 and no higher
       than 15 inches above pit level and they shall both have an approximate 3 inch lean
       toward each other.

RULE 2 - PLAYING EQUIPMENT - THE HORSESHOE
     Section A. Legal Shoes The sport of horseshoes is played with specially
     manufactured equipment. Any official (legal) horseshoe must be sanctioned and
     approved by the NHPA and must pass the following maximum weight and
     measurement standards. (there are no minimum standards): 1) It shall not weigh
     more than 2 pounds, 10 ounces; 2) it shall not exceed 7-1/4 inches in width, 7-5/8
     inches in length and, on a parallel line 3/4 inch from a straightedge touching the
     points of the shoe, the opening of the shoe must not exceed 3-1/2 inches. (A 1/8
     inch tolerance to 3-5/8 inches is allowed on used shoes.) No part of the original
     manufactured shoe may exceed one inch in height. Shoes not meeting these
     requirements shall not be used in NHPA sanctioned competition and all games
     pitched with illegal shoes shall be forfeited. All horseshoes used by a pitcher may
     be checked at any time to verify they are legal shoes for weight, measurement and
     altered shoes. This checking will be done by a judge or other tournament official.
RULE 3 - PITCHING DISTANCES
     Section A. Males
     1. Juniors - Junior contestants may pitch from any place on either the full-distance
     or extended platforms. They must observe the 27 foot foul lines. Juniors' age nine
     or under, for the entire calendar year, may observe a 20-foot foul line.
     2. Open Men and Seniors - All Open Men and Senior contestants shall pitch from
     on or behind the full distance platforms adjacent to the pits and observe the 37
     foot foul lines. Physically impaired males in these categories may be given
     permission by the governing NHPA officials to move on to the extended
     platforms and observe the 27 foot foul lines.
     Section B. Females - All female contestants may pitch from any place on the full-
     distance or extended platforms and observe the 27 foot foul lines, except that any
     woman pitching in an Elders class must pitch less than 40 feet.

RULE 4 - PIT PREPARATION AND MAINTENANCE
     Section A. Every effort shall be made to keep the substance in the pit in soft
     putty-like condition so the shoes will not bounce or move around after coming in
     contact with the substance. The substance in the pit shall be watered (if necessary)
     and leveled to the top of the surrounding platforms (unless the pits are raised)
     before a game starts. Each contestant is responsible for one pit, but a contestant
     may have someone else do the preparation. During a game, a contestant shall not
     step on, mash, or otherwise repair any of the substance in the scoring area of the
     pit without the consent of the opponent or a tournament official. Repair needed
     because of a measured shoe or a shoe which was "buried" shall be handled using
     the same guidelines.



RULE 6 - PLAY OF THE GAME AND VALUE OF THE SHOE
     Section A. Innings The game is broken down into innings. Each inning consists of
     four pitched shoes, two by each contestant.
     Section B. Value of the Shoe
     1. Ringer - A ringer is a shoe which comes to rest encircling the stake. A
     straightedge touching both points or any part of the heel calks of the shoe must
     clear (not touch) the stake in order for a shoe to be declared a ringer. A ringer has
     a value of three points.
     2. Shoe in Count - A shoe which is not a ringer but comes to rest with any portion
     of it within 6 inches of any part of the stake is a shoe in count. A shoe in count
     has a value of one point. A "leaner", or any other shoe which is touching the stake
     (but not a ringer), is considered a shoe in count and has a value of one point.
     3. Shoe Out of Count - A shoe which comes to rest further than 6 inches from the
     stake is a shoe out of count and has no scoring value. A shoe which is declared to
     be a foul shoe (see Section H) is considered to be a shoe out of count (no matter
     where it comes to rest).
RULE 9 - PITCHING ROTATION DURING THE GAME
     Section A.
     If the game is to be played under cancellation scoring, there are two ways to
     determine who shall pitch first in the next inning once the game has started. The
     method to be used shall be determined before play begins.
     1. The contestant who scored in the preceding inning shall pitch first in the next
     inning. If neither pitcher scores,the contestant who pitched second (last) in the
     preceding inning shall pitch first in the next inning. .

RULE 10 - DOUBLES PLAY
     In doubles play, two contestants are partners against another team of two
     contestants. One contestant from each team shall be at each end of the court and
     the contestants shall be matched by the tournament officials to that the highest
     rated contestant (by percentage) from each team shall be at the same end. The
     tournament committee shall determine the length of game and type of play and
     the scoring shall be done on one score sheet, just like for singles play. When
     contestants are pitching their shoes, the contestants at the other end shall be well
     behind and to the side of the pitcher's box (for their own safety) and in a
     stationary position so as not to disturb the contestants on their own and adjacent
     courts. Otherwise, all rules for singles play shall apply.
     Section A Regular Doubles
     In regular doubles, each team uses one pair of shoes and the contestants stay at the
     same end of the court for the entire game. To begin the game, the highest rated
     contestants shall decide first pitch and pitch their shoes, just as in singles
     competition. Their partners at the other end shall decide and call the score,
     retrieve the shoes and pitch them back and the same procedure is followed. The
     decision on who pitches first in each inning is contingent upon the scoring system
     being used, following the rules of singles play.




                  This is similar to drawing in NHPA rules pamphlet)
           This is similar to drawing shown in NHPA rules pamphlet.




This drawings is partially similar to drawing shown in NHPA rules pamphlet.


 BACKBOARDS
 1. Height.........................................12 INCHES
 2. Width.................................................3 feet
 3. Distance behind stake.......................4 feet
 4. Material..............................2x12 hardwood
 5. Paint Color...................contrast stake color


 FENCE
 1. Minimum Distance from stake............8 feet


                   (http://www.horseshoepitching.com/rules/nhparul.shtml)
                                       Scoring
                                      Horseshoes
RULE 8 - SCORING THE GAME - SINGLES PLAY
     There are two methods of scoring in horseshoes - cancellation and count-all.
     Section A. Cancellation Scoring
     1. In cancellation scoring, only one contestant can score in each inning.
     a. Ringers - Ringers cancel each other. A ringer of one contestant shall cancel a
     ringer of the other contestant those shoes shall not score any points. Any
     uncancelled (live) ringer scores three points.
     b. Shoes in Count - A shoe in count shall score one point under the following
     conditions:
     1. If there are cancelled ringers and no live ringer, the closest shoe in count to the
     stake shall score one point.
     2. If there are no ringers, the closest shoe in count shall score one point. If the
     other shoe of that same contestant is the second closest shoe in count, it shall also
     score one point.
     3. If there is one uncancelled ringer and the other shoe of the scoring contestant is
     the closest shoe in count to the stake, it shall score one point (four points total).
     NOTE: Opposing contestant's shoes in count that are touching the stake or are
     determined to be an equal distance from the stake shall cancel each other and, like
     cancelled ringers, shall score no points. In that situation, the next closest shoe in
     count, if there is one, shall score one point.
     2. Calling the Score
     a. Points shall be awarded in the following situations. The contestant scoring the
     points shall call the score.
     1. No ringer with the closest shoe in count - call "one point".
     2. No ringer with the two closest shoes in count - call "two points".
     3. One ringer with either no shoe in count or the other contestant having the closes
     shoe in count - call "one ringer, three points".
     4. One ringer with the closest shoe in count - call "one ringer, four points".
     5. Two canceled ringers with the closest shoe in count - call "one ringer each, one
     point".
     6. Two cancelled ringers with one uncancelled ringer - call "three ringers, three
     points".
     7. Two uncancelled ringers - call "two ringers, six points".
     b. No points shall be awarded in the following situations. The score shall be called
     by the contestant who pitched second.
     1. All four shoes out of count - call "no score".
     2. Two cancelled ringers with no shoes in count or with the other two shoes an
     equal distance from the stake - call "one ringer each, no score".
     3. Four cancelled ringers - call "four dead".
     Section B. Count-all Scoring
     1. Count-all Scoring can be where both contestants receive credit for all of their
     shoes that are scored in each inning. Each contestant can score zero, one, two,
     three, four or six points
2. Count-all scoring can be where both contestants receive credit for only ringers
pitched in each inning (Ringers Only). Each contestant may score zero, one or
two points per inning. This type of scoring should generally be limited to upper
percentage classes.
3. Care should be taken in reporting the scores to the scorekeeper so that the
proper score is recorded for each contestant.

             (http://www.horseshoepitching.com/rules/nhparul.shtml)
                                        Etiquette
                                       Horseshoes
RULE 11 - APPROPRIATE NHPA MEMBER CONDUCT

       Section A. On the Courts
       An NHPA member, while in competition, shall make no disturbing noises or
       movements that would distract the opponent or competitors on adjacent courts.
       The first offense shall call for a warning from the judge or tournament official. A
       second offense shall call for a forfeiture of the game being played. Any further
       offenses shall call for a forfeiture of all games.
       Section B
       Any NHPA member who indulges in heckling, unfair rooting, or any other form
       of unsportsmanlike conduct toward any NHPA member or tournament official,
       shall be subject to expulsion from the tournament and the tournament site. This
       covers any inappropriate behavior (including profane or abusive language) in, or
       around, the court area. The member shall also be subject to a one year suspension
       from the NHPA.

                    (http://www.horseshoepitching.com/rules/nhparul2.shtml)

                                Special Consideration
                                        Horseshoes

       If the student has any problems, you may do one or more of the following in order
to accommodate that student.

            You may move the horseshoe pits closer together
            You may make the pit larger than the regulation size
            If you have a child with any muscular disability you may use lighter
             rubber shoes, and also making the distance between pins smaller
                               Rules for Table Tennis
1. The Table

      1.1 The table shall be in surface rectangular, 274 cm. (9 ft.) in length, 152.5 cm.
      (5 ft.) in width. It shall be supported so that its upper surface, termed the playing
      surface, shall lie in a horizontal plane 76 cm. (2 ft. 6 in.) above the floor.

      1.2 It shall be made of any material and shall yield a uniform bounce of about 23
      cm. (8 3/4 in.) when a standard ball is dropped from a height of 30 cm. (12 in.)
      above the surface.

      1.3 The playing surface shall be dark colored and matt, with a white line 2 cm.
      (3/4 inch) wide along each edge.

               1.3.1 The lines along the 152.5 cm. (5 ft.) edges or ends shall be termed
               end lines, and they shall be regarded as extending indefinitely in both
               directions.

               1.3.2 The lines along the 274 cm. (9 ft.) edges or sides shall be termed side
               lines.

      1.4 For doubles, the playing surface shall be divided into halves by a white line 3
      mm. (1/8 in.) wide, running parallel with the side lines, termed the center line.
      Permanent marking of the center line shall not invalidate the table for singles
      play. The center line shall be regarded as part of each right half court.

      1.5 The playing surface shall be considered to include the top edges of the table,
      but not the sides of the table top below the edge.

2. The Net Assembly

      2.1 The playing surface shall be divided into two "courts" of equal size by a
      vertical net running parallel to the end lines.

      2.2 The net assembly shall consist of the net, its suspension, and the supporting
      posts, including the clamps attaching them to the table.

      2.3 The net shall be suspended by a cord attached at each end to an upright post
      15.25 cm. (6 in.) high, the outside limits of the post being 15.25 cm. outside the
      side lines.

      2.4 The net, with its suspension, along its whole length, shall be 15.25 cm. (6 in.)
      above the playing surface. The bottom of the net, along its whole length, shall be
       as close as possible to the playing surface and the ends of the net shall be as close
       as possible to the supporting posts.

3. The Ball

       3.1 The ball shall be spherical, with a diameter of 40 mm. The ball shall weigh 2.7
       gm.

       3.2 The ball shall be made of celluloid or similar plastic material and shall be
       white or orange and matte.

4. The Racquet

       4.1 The racquet may be of any size, shape, or weight but the blade shall be flat
       and rigid.

5. Definitions

       5.1 A rally is the period during which the ball is in play.

       5.2 The ball is in play from the last moment at which it is stationary on the palm
       of the free hand before being intentionally projected in service until it touches
       anything other than the playing surface, the net assembly, the racquet held in the
       racquet hand or the racquet hand below the wrist, or until the rally is otherwise
       decided a let or a point.

       5.3 A let is a rally of which the result is not scored.

       5.4 A point is a rally of which the result is scored.

       5.5 The racquet hand is the hand carrying the racquet.

       5.6 The free hand is the hand not carrying the racquet.

       5.7 A player strikes the ball if he touches it in play with his racquet, held in the
       racquet hand, or with his racquet hand below the wrist.

       5.8 A player obstructs the ball if he or anything he wears or carries, touches it in
       play when it is above or traveling toward the playing surface and has not passed
       beyond the end line, not having touched his court since last being struck by his
       opponent.

       5.9 The server is the player due to strike the ball first in a rally.

       5.10 The receiver is the player due to strike the ball second in a rally.
6. Service

        6.1 Service shall start with the ball resting freely on the open palm of the server's
        stationary free hand.

        6.2 The server shall then project the ball near vertically upwards, without
        imparting spin, so that it rises as least 16 cm after leaving the palm of the free
        hand and then falls without touching anything before being struck.

        6.3 As the ball is falling, the server shall strike it so that it touches first his court
        and then, passing directly over or around the net assembly touches the receiver's
        court. In doubles the ball shall touch successively the right half court of the server
        and receiver.

        6.4 From the start of service until it is struck, the ball shall be above the level of
        the playing surface and behind the server's end line, and it shall not be hidden
        from the receiver by any part of the body or clothing of the server or his doubles
        partner. As soon as the ball has been projected, the server’s free arm shall be
        removed from the space between the server’s body and the net.

7. A Good Return

        7.1 The ball, having been served or returned in play, shall be struck so that it
        passes directly over or around the net assembly and touches the opponent's court,
        either directly or after touching the net assembly.

                7.1.1 If the ball, having been served or returned in play, returns with its
                own impetus over the net, it may be struck so that it touches directly the
                opponent's court.

8. The Order Of Play

        8.1 In singles, the server shall first make a good service, the receiver shall then
        make a good return, and thereafter, server and receiver alternately shall each make
        a good return.

        8.2 In doubles, the server shall first make a good service, the receiver shall then
        make a good return, the partner of the server shall then make a good return, the
        partner of the receiver shall then make a good return, and thereafter, each player
        alternately in that sequence shall make a good return.

9. A Let - A rally is a let

        9.1 If in service the ball, in passing over or around the net assembly, touches it,
        provided the serve is otherwise good or is obstructed by the receiver or his
        partner.
9.2 If the service is delivered when the receiving player or pair is not ready,
provided that neither the receiver nor his partner attempts to strike the ball.

9.3 If, the failure to make a good service or a good return or otherwise to comply
with the Laws is due to a disturbance outside the control of the player.

9.4 If play is interrupted by the umpire or assistant umpire.

       9.4.1 To correct an error in the order of serving or receiving or ends.

       9.4.2 To introduce the expedite system.

       9.4.3 To warn or penalize a player.

       9.4.4 Because the conditions of play are disturbed in a way which could
       affect the outcome of the rally.

22. Playing Conditions

       22.1 Space. The normal playing space for each table should be 14 m. (46
       ft.) long, 7 m. (23 ft.) wide and 5 m. (16 ft.) high.

       22.2 For further information on Playing Conditions, please refer to the
       USATT Tournament Guide.

                     (http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml)
                                    Table Tennis Scoring

10. A Point - Unless the rally is a let, a player shall score a point:

        10.1 If his opponent fails to make a good service.

        10.2 If his opponent fails to make a good return.

        10.3 If, after he has made a good service or a good return, the ball touches
        anything other than the net assembly before being struck by his opponent.

        10.4 If the ball passes beyond his end line without touching his court, after being
        struck by his opponent.

        10.5 If his opponent obstructs the ball, except as provided in Rule 9.1.

        10.6 If his opponent strikes the ball twice successively.

        10.7 If his opponent strikes the ball with a side of the racquet blade having an
        illegal surface.

        10.8 If his opponent, or anything he wears or carries, moves the playing surface.

        10.9 If his opponent, or anything he wears or carries, touches the net assembly.

        10.10 If his opponent's free hand touches the playing surface.

        10.11 If, in doubles, his opponent strikes the ball out of sequence established by
        the first server and first receiver.

        10.12 As provided under the expedite system.

        10.13 If the umpire assesses a penalty point against his opponent.

11. A Game

        11.1 A game shall be won by the player or pair first scoring 11 points unless both
        players or pairs score 10 points, when the game shall be won by the first player or
        pair subsequently gaining a lead of 2 points.

12. A Match

        12.1 A match shall consist of the best of any odd number of games

        12.2 Play shall be continuous throughout, except for authorized interval
                                 (http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml)

                                       Etiquette
                                      Table Tennis


                                     19.2 Misbehavior.

19.2.1 Players and coaches shall refrain from conduct that may unfairly affect an
opponent, offend spectators or bring the game into disrepute. Examples are: abusive
language, deliberately breaking the ball or hitting it out of the playing area, kicking the
table or surrounds or disrespect to match officials.

19.2.2 If at any time a player or coach commits a serious offence the umpire shall
suspend play and report immediately to the referee. For less serious offences the umpire
may, on the first occasion, hold up a yellow card and warn the offender that any further
offence is liable to incur penalties.

19.2.3 If a player who has been warned commits a second offence in the same individual
or team match, the umpire shall award one point to the player's opponent and after a
further offence he shall award two points to his opponent, each time holding up a yellow
and a red card together.

19.2.4 If a player against whom 3 penalty points have been awarded in the same
individual or team match continues to misbehave the umpire shall suspend play and
report immediately to the referee.

19.2.5 A warning or penalty incurred by either player of a doubles pair shall apply to the
pair, but not to the non-offending player in a subsequent individual match of the same
team match. At the start of a doubles match the pair shall be regarded as having incurred
the higher of any warnings or penalties incurred by either player in the same team match.

19.2.6 If a coach who has been warned commits a further offence in the same individual
or team match the umpire shall hold up a red card and send him away from the playing
area until the end of the team match, or in an individual event, the end of the individual
match.

19.2.7 The referee shall have power to disqualify a player from a match, an event, or a
competition for seriously unfair or offensive behavior whether reported by the umpire or
not. As he does so he shall hold up a red card.

19.2.8 A player who is disqualified from 2 individual matches of a team or individual
event shall automatically be disqualified from that team event or individual competition.

19.2.9 The referee may disqualify for the remainder of a competition anyone who has
twice been sent away from the playing area during that competition.
19.2.10 Cases of serious misbehavior shall be reported by the referee to the USATT
disciplinary committee

                           (http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml)


                      Special considerations for the sport

       21. Disabled Competition

              21.1 Disabled table tennis players are divided into ten divisions or classes
              using a functional classification system.

              21.2 Classes one to five compete in wheelchairs and classes six to ten play
              standing.

              21.3 Separate events may be held for each class and sex or various
              combinations may be used.

              21.4 For more information on classification of disabled athletes, contact
              the USATT Disabled Players Committee.

              21.5 Standing disabled players follow all standard rules; there are a few
              modifications for wheelchair play.

              Wheelchair Rules

              21.6 The table shall allow access to wheelchairs without obstructing
              player's legs and shall allow access to two wheelchairs for doubles
              matches (no cross bars between end legs).

              21.7 The court length may be reduced, but should not be less than 8 meters
              long and must be enclosed by surrounds.

              Wheelchair Doubles

              21.19 Service shall be as above for singles play, but the ball may leave the
              table by the side line of the receiver's right half-court.

              21.20 The server shall first make a good service and the receiver shall
              make a good return, and thereafter either player of a pair may return the
              ball.

                           (http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml)
                                History of Horseshoes
Sports Origin
  The origin of this sport goes back to the days of the Roman Empire. Roman soldiers
pitched horseshoes discarded from the horses used to drive their chariots.
  Soldiers in the American Revolutionary War pitched horseshoes for recreation on the
Boston Common. The Duke of Wellington in history said that the war was won by the
pitchers of the steel (horseshoes).

                   (http://www.horseshoepitching.com/gameinfo/aboutus.shtml)

                               History of Table Tennis

Like many other sports, table tennis began as a mild social diversion. Descending, along
lawn tennis and badminton, from the ancient medieval game of tennis. It was popular in
England in the second half of the nineteenth century under its present name and various
trade names such as Gossima and Whiff-Whaff. After the name Ping-Pong (an imitation
of the sound made by the ball striking the table and the vellum bats that were used) was
introduced by J. Jaques & Son, the game became a fashionable craze. There are many
contemporary references to it and illustrations of it being played, usually in domestic
surroundings.

By the early years of this century, Ping-Pong had already acquired some of its present
day complexities, though it was still seen by many as an after -dinner amusement rather
than a sport. An account published in 1903 found it necessary to warn against wearing a
dress suit and stiff shirt-or, for ladies, a white satin gown-but went on to give detailed
technical advice about pimpled rubber, the penholder grip and tactics.

The game was popular in Central Europe in 1905-10, and even before this is a modified
version had been introduced to Japan , where it later spread to China and Korea.

After a period when it had dropped out of favor in Europe, the game was revived in
England and Wales in the early twenties. by that time 'Ping-Pong' had been registered as
a trademark, so the earlier name of table tennis was re-introduced. National associations
were formed and standardization of the rules began, both in Europe and the Far East.

Then, over the next sixty years, table tennis developed into a major worldwide sport,
played by perhaps thirty million competitive players and by uncountable millions who
play less seriously. However, the game itself has not changed in essence since its earliest
days, though it is faster, more subtle and more demanding than it was even only twenty
years ago. a constant concern of the ITTF has always been to insure that table tennis
remains a contest of human skills and that technological developments which add a new
factor to the game do not give too great an advantage to the players who have the first
opportunity of making use of them. Thus, equipment specifications are carefully laid
down, and rigorously enforced.
Other changes-a lowering of the net, a rule to avoid protracted games between defensive
players, and rules preventing excessive advantage being gained by the server-were
introduced in the thirties and further minor changes are made from time to time. Changes
to the rules of the sport can only be made only at the ITTF's Biennial General Meeting,
and are never made without the agreement of a substantial majority of the hundred or so
member Associations represented at the BGM, all of whom have an equal vote.

Modern table tennis at national and international level is a rigorous as any sport in its
demands for the highest degree of physical fitness and mental concentration, attained
only by arduous training to develop natural skill. Fred Perry, World Men's Singles Table
Tennis Champion in 1928-29, later achieved even greater fame at Wimbledon; perhaps it
would not be quite true to say that he moved to the larger court when his play became too
slow for the table, but it is certainly true that no sport requires faster reactions and more
delicate muscular co-ordination than table tennis.

                         (http://www.robbinstabletennis.com/history.htm)
                          Skills essential for Horseshoes
The skills essential for horseshoes go as follows

            Pitching the shoe
            Aiming the shoe
            Learning to loft the shoe for better scoring

The skills will broken down in the flowing ways

       Pitching the shoe
                   Pitch with your dominate hand
                   Keep arm on the dominate side of your body
                   Keep your wrist straight when pitching the shoe
                   Release the shoes with your fingers

       Aiming the shoe
                  Aim with the stake in the middle of the shoe
                  Keep your wrist straight when aiming the shoe
                  Release with your fingers and aim toward the stake

       Learning to loft the shoe for better scoring
                   Toss so that you have one rotation of shoe for better landing
                   Arch the toss so it will land better in the pit for less movement
                   Release with arm parallel to the ground
                          Skills essential for Table Tennis
The skills that are essential for table tennis go as follows

            Serving the ball
            Receiving the ball
            Volleying the ball

The skills are broken down in the following ways

       Serving the ball
           Serve from the right side of the table
           Keep the serve on the table
           Make sure the serve goes the opposite area on your opponents side
           After the serve get in a ready position on receive the ball

       Receiving the ball
           When you receive the ball let the paddle give
           Aim the paddle to where you want the ball to land on your opponents side
           Hit the ball to the area you aimed to
           Keep the ball on the table

       Volleying the ball
           Use skills for receiving the ball
           Keep the ball on the table and in play
           Ball may land anywhere on the table during the volley
           Keep the ball above the net
         Scope and sequence for a six-week recreational sports unit

                                                 Week 1
     Lesson 1              Lesson 2              Lesson 3              Lesson 4              Lesson 5
Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts
Rules, etiquette,     Set up for            Releasing the         Aiming the shoe       Aiming at the
scoring, and brief    pitching the shoe     shoe and aiming       toward the stake      stake from the
history                                     for the pit                                 front of the pit


Extension: ask        Extension: have       Extension: have       Extension: have       Extension: have
the students          students set on       the students line     the students line     students aim from
questions about       both sides of the     up at different       up at different       both the right and
the rules and         pit                   angles on the pit     angles on the pit     left side of the
scoring                                                                                 stake


                                                 Week 2
     Lesson 6              Lesson 7              Lesson 8              Lesson 9             Lesson 10
Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts
Aiming from the       Working on            Scoring in singles Rotation in              Scoring in
both sides of the     lofting the shoe                         doubles                  doubles
pit


Extension: line       Extension: see        Extension: have       Extension: play  Extension: have
up from different     who can make          students call out     Canadian doubles them call out
angles                the shoe land         scores                                 their scores
                      without any
                      movement


                                                 Week 3
    Lesson 11             Lesson 12             Lesson 13             Lesson 14             Lesson 15
Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts
Singles               Round robin of        Round robin of        Round robin of        Finishing the
tournament, have      singles               doubles               doubles               doubles
the teacher pick      tournament            tournament            tournament            tournament and
partners                                                                                some singles
                                                                                        games

Extension: write      Extension: play       Extension: write      Extension: play a     Extension: play
down scores           someone you           down scores           team you have         someone new
                      have not played                             not played
                                                 Week 4
Lesson 16             Lesson 17             Lesson 18             Lesson 19             Lesson 20
Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts
Rules, etiquette,     Set up for serving Serving the ball         Serving the ball      Receiving the
scoring for table                        to opponent              from different        ball from
tennis                                                            angles                opponent

Extension: ask        Extension: show       Extension: how        Extension: have       Extension:
the students          students different    close to the back     the students serve    receive three
questions about       types of serves       line of net can       softly                times in row
the rules and                               they make the
scoring                                     serve land


                                                 Week 5
Lesson 21             Lesson 22             Lesson 23             Lesson 24             Lesson 25
Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concept    Skills and concepts
Receiving the         Volleying the         Volleying the         Scoring in singles Scoring in
ball on different     ball to each other    ball with a serve                        doubles
parts of the table

Extension:            Extension: try to     Extension: try to     Extension: have       Extension: have
receive close to      volley as long as     volley the ball 3     students call out     students call out
table as you can      you can               times                 scores                scores



                                                 Week 6
Lesson 26             Lesson 27             Lesson 28             Lesson 29             Lesson 30
Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts   Skills and concepts
Singles               Round robin           Doubles games         Doubles games         Turn in project,
tournament, have      singles games         with teacher          continued             and singles
the teacher pick                            picking teams                               games
partners

Extension: write      Extension: play       Extension: write      Extension: play a     Extension: play
down scores           someone you           down scores           team you have         someone you
                      have not played                             not played            have not played
                                                                                        before
             Handouts for the unit

        Horseshoe pit lay out




 (http://www.horseshoepitching.com/rules/nhparul2.shtml)




THE STAKES ARE FORTY FEET APART

THE PITS ARE 3 FEET BY 3 FEET IN SIZE
                How to keep score in horseshoes
Ringer- when the horseshoe goes around the stake

      3 points

When the shoe lands within one shoe length of the stake

      1 point

Whoever’s shoe is closest to the stake will get the point and cancel out the
    Others

If your shoe lands on your opponents when they have a ringer then you
      cancel it out
                           Table Tennis Diagram




The table is 9 feet long and 5 feet wide
Each service box is 4.5 feet by 2.5 feet
The table should be 2 feet 6 inches off the ground while playing
                        (http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml)
                           Scoring in table tennis
A Point - Unless the rally is a let, a player shall score a point:

        If his opponent fails to make a good service.

        If his opponent fails to make a good return.

         If, after he has made a good service or a good return, the ball touches anything
        other than the net assembly before being struck by his opponent.

         If the ball passes beyond his end line without touching his court, after being
        struck by his opponent.

        If his opponent obstructs the ball, except as provided in Rule 9.1.

        If his opponent strikes the ball twice successively.

         If his opponent strikes the ball with a side of the racquet blade having an illegal
        surface.

        If his opponent, or anything he wears or carries, moves the playing surface.

        If his opponent, or anything he wears or carries, touches the net assembly.

        If his opponent's free hand touches the playing surface.

         If, in doubles, his opponent strikes the ball out of sequence established by the
        first server and first receiver.

        As provided under the expedite system.

        If the umpire assesses a penalty point against his opponent.

A Game

         A game shall be won by the player or pair first scoring 11 points unless both
        players or pairs score 10 points, when the game shall be won by the first player or
        pair subsequently gaining a lead of 2 points.

A Match

        A match shall consist of the best of any odd number of games

                                  (http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml)
                                                 Rubrics

                                        Horseshoes
    Student Name:    ________________________________________

     CATEGORY        4                      3                        2                      1
Pitch                Virtually no errors.   An occasional            Some accurate          Very few accurate
                     Pitch is very accurate isolated error, but      pitches, but there are pitches
                                            most of the time pitch   frequent and/or
                                            is accurate.             repeated errors.
Lofting the ball     Virtually no errors.   An occasional            Some accurate lofts, Very few accurate
                     loft is very accurate. isolated error, but      but there are frequent lofts.
                                            most of the time loft    and/or repeated
                                            is accurate and          errors.
                                            secure.
Aiming               Aiming is consistently An occasional            A few inaccurate       Tosses wrong
                     accurate.              inaccurate toss is       tosses are thrown,     consistently detract
                                            thrown, but does not     detracting somewhat    from the
                                            detract from overall     from the overall       performance.
                                            aiming.                  aiming.


     (http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=CustomizeTemplate&use_user_rubric=yes&)



                                      Table Tennis
    Student Name:    ________________________________________

   CATEGORY          4                      3                        2                      1
Receiving the ball   Virtually no errors.   An occasional            Some accurate          Very few accurate
                     receiving is very      isolated error, but      receiving, but there   receptions.
                     accurate.              most of the time         are frequent and/or
                                            receiving is accurate.   repeated errors.


Serves               Serves are             An occasional            A few inaccurate       Wrong serves
                     consistently accurate. inaccurate serve is      serves are played,     consistently detract
                                            played, but does not     detracting somewhat    from the
                                            detract from overall     from the overall       performance.
                                            performance.             performance.
Volleying the ball   Volleys are            An occasional            A few inaccurate       Wrong volleys
                     consistently accurate. inaccurate volley is     volleys are played,    consistently detract
                                            played, but does not     detracting somewhat    from the
                                            detract from overall     from the overall       performance.
                                            performance.             performance.
     (http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=CustomizeTemplate&use_user_rubric=yes&)
   PROJECT FOR RECERATIONAL SPORTS
                  Due Date 12-18-04
Make a poster of either a horseshoe pit or a table
tennis table. Use the handouts given to you during the
unit.

Your poster must have the following items
       Either a horseshoe pit or a table tennis table
        drawn to the correct measurements
       The scoring rules for the sport you picked
       The etiquette rules you want you area to have (at
        least 4 things)
       A one-page paper of what you liked or disliked
        about your sport.

The grading will go as follows
            25% correct diagram of your sport area
            25% correct scoring rules for your sport
            25% four areas of etiquette for your sport
            25% one page paper of your likes or dislikes
             of your sport

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING ABOUT
THIS PROJECT IS TO HAVE FUN. MAKE
YOUR HORSESHOE PIT OR TABLE TENNIS
TABLE LOOK LIKE WHATEVER YOU WANT
IT TO. MAKE SURE YOU KEEP IT
APPROPRIATE FOR SCHOOL. HAVE FUN
WITH IT.
                                      Works Cited
Create rubric for project-based-learning activities. (2004) Retrieved on October 18, 2004,
       from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=CustomizeTemplate&use_user_rubric=yes&

Nation horseshoe pitching association: Official rules of horseshoe pitching. (2004)
       Retrieved on October 17, 2004, from
        http://www.horseshoepitching.com/rules/nhparul2.shtml

National standards for physical education. (n.d). Retrieved on October 14, 2004, from
       http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/template.cfm?template=publications-nationalstandards.html

The history of table tennis. (2004) Retrieved on October 17, 2004, from
       http://www.robbinstabletennis.com/history.htm

The sport of horseshoe pitching. (2004) Retrieved on October 17, 2004, from
       www.horseshoepitching.com/gameinfo/aboutus.shtml

USA table tennis rules. (2004) Retrieved on October 17, 2004, from
      http://www.usatt.org/rules/index.shtml

VA SOL’s ninth grade physical education. (2004) Retrieved October 14, 2004, from
     http://www.pen.k12.va.us/go/Sols/physedsecondary.doc

				
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