Docstoc

MORELAND MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN _MPHP_

Document Sample
MORELAND MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN _MPHP_ Powered By Docstoc
					            MORELAND MUNICIPAL PUBLIC
                HEALTH PLAN 2009 - 2012


                       Background Paper




D09/83374                             1
                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS

1         EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................................................... 4
2         INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 5
    2.1   WHAT IS A MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN? ............................................................................. 5
    2.2   WHAT IS HEALTH AND WELLBEING? ............................................................................................... 5
    2.3   HOW IS A MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN DEVELOPED? ....................................................... 6
    2.4   IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MPHP .................................................................................................... 6
3         WHAT HAS BEEN ACHIEVED? ......................................................................................... 7
    3.1   MORELAND MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN 2003 .................................................................... 7
    3.2   ACHIEVEMENTS 2006 – 2008 ............................................................................................................ 9
4         PUBLIC HEALTH PLANNING .......................................................................................... 11
    4.1   HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH ........................................................................................................ 11
    4.2   CURRENT APPROACH ..................................................................................................................... 11
5         GLOBAL CONTEXT ......................................................................................................... 12
    5.1   SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH ............................................................................................ 12
    5.2   HEALTHY CITIES............................................................................................................................... 13
    5.3   OTHER ............................................................................................................................................... 13
6         FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CONTEXT ............................................................................. 14
    6.1   PREVENTATIVE HEALTH ................................................................................................................. 15
    6.2   CHRONIC DISEASE .......................................................................................................................... 15
    6.3   OTHER ............................................................................................................................................... 15
7         VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT CONTEXT .......................................................................... 16
    7.1   STATE LEGISLATION........................................................................................................................ 16
          7.1.1 Municipal Public Health Plans ............................................................................................... 16
          7.1.2 State Public Health and Wellbeing Plan ................................................................................ 16
    7.2   DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES ........................................................................................... 17
          7.2.1 Health Promotion Priority Setting for 2007-2012 ................................................................... 17
    7.3   HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER ............................................................................................................. 18
8         LOCAL GOVERNMENT CONTEXT .................................................................................. 19
    8.1   COUNCIL PLAN ................................................................................................................................. 19
          8.1.1 Key strategic objectives: ........................................................................................................ 19
    8.2   MAYOR‟S SPEECH............................................................................................................................ 20
    8.3   POLICIES AND STRATEGIES ........................................................................................................... 20
          8.3.1 Life stages strategies ............................................................................................................. 21
    8.4   ECONOMIC PROFILE........................................................................................................................ 22
          8.4.1 Labour force........................................................................................................................... 22
          8.4.2 Industry .................................................................................................................................. 22
          8.4.3 Development activity ............................................................................................................. 22
          8.4.4 Property market activity ......................................................................................................... 23
    8.5   ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE ............................................................................................................ 23
          8.5.1 Moreland Energy Foundation (MEFL) ................................................................................... 23
          8.5.2 Centre for Research and Environment in Environmental Strategies (CERES) ..................... 23
    8.6   BUILT ENVIRONMENT ...................................................................................................................... 24
          8.6.1 The Coburg Initiative ............................................................................................................. 24
          8.6.2 Glenroy Structure Plan .......................................................................................................... 24
          8.6.3 Brunswick Structure Plan ...................................................................................................... 24
9         MODELS FOR INTEGRATED PLANNING ....................................................................... 25
    9.1   SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH ............................................................................................ 25
    9.2   HEALTHY CITIES............................................................................................................................... 26
    9.3   ENVIRONMENTS FOR HEALTH ....................................................................................................... 27




D09/83374                                                                                                                                                       2
10       WORKING TOGETHER .................................................................................................... 28
  10.1   PARTNERSHIPS ................................................................................................................................ 28
  10.2   HEALTH PLANNING NETWORKS .................................................................................................... 28
  10.3   ADVISORY GROUPS......................................................................................................................... 28
  10.4   WHAT COULD WE DO TOGETHER? ............................................................................................... 29
         10.4.1 Integrated planning ................................................................................................................ 29
         10.4.1 Increase health and wellbeing ............................................................................................... 30
11       WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT MORELAND? ................................................................. 31
  11.1 INDEX OF RELATIVE SOCIO-ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE (SEIFA) ........................................... 31
       11.1.1 SEIFA index for Moreland Suburbs ....................................................................................... 31
       11.1.2 SEIFA Index of Moreland compared to surrounding LGAs & lowest & highest SEIFA ......... 32
  11.2 SOCIAL PROFILE OF MORELAND 2008 ......................................................................................... 33
       11.2.1 People .................................................................................................................................... 33
       11.2.2 Cultural diversity .................................................................................................................... 34
       11.2.3 Religion .................................................................................................................................. 35
       11.2.4 Family Types ......................................................................................................................... 36
       11.2.5 Housing .................................................................................................................................. 37
       11.2.6 Employment ........................................................................................................................... 39
       11.2.7 Income ................................................................................................................................... 39
       11.2.8 Benefit recipients ................................................................................................................... 40
       11.2.9 Education ............................................................................................................................... 41
       11.2.10 Occupation and industry ........................................................................................................ 42
       11.2.11 Internet connection ................................................................................................................ 43
  11.3 HEALTH STATUS OF MORELAND ................................................................................................... 44
       11.3.1 Prevalence of disease ........................................................................................................... 44
       11.3.2 Some interesting facts ........................................................................................................... 44
       11.3.3 Burden of disease for each age group in Moreland .............................................................. 45
  11.4 MORELAND‟S COMMUNITY INDICATORS ..................................................................................... 48
       11.4.1 Employment ........................................................................................................................... 48
       11.4.2 Education ............................................................................................................................... 49
       11.4.3 Housing .................................................................................................................................. 50
       11.4.4 Built & Natural Environment .................................................................................................. 51
       11.4.5 Early Years ............................................................................................................................ 52
       11.4.6 Access & Availability of Services ........................................................................................... 53
       11.4.7 Personal Well-being & Safety ................................................................................................ 54
       11.4.8 Social Inclusion & Social Support .......................................................................................... 56
       11.4.9 Social Participation ................................................................................................................ 57
       11.4.10 Recreation, Arts & Leisure ..................................................................................................... 58
       11.4.11 Social & Economic Circumstances ........................................................................................ 59
12       WHERE TO NEXT? .......................................................................................................... 60
  12.1   CONSULTATION AND ENGAGEMENT ............................................................................................ 60
  12.2   DEVELOPMENT OF THE MPHP ....................................................................................................... 60
  12.3   IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MPHP .................................................................................................. 60
  12.4   FOR MORE INFORMATION .............................................................................................................. 60




D09/83374                                                                                                                                                 3
1     EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
A Municipal Public Health Plan (MPHP) is a four year policy document required to be
prepared by each Local Government under the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008. Its
aim is to improve a population‟s health and wellbeing by addressing identified health and
social priorities through changes to the physical, natural, economic and social
environments of a community.

The design of a city, the potential impacts of climate change, people‟s living and working
circumstances, and their access to services can have all have an impact on a community‟s
health and wellbeing.

Moreland City Council is committed to working in partnership with other agencies and
organisations in Moreland to develop the MPHP, implement the actions, monitor the
progress and evaluate the plan between 2009 and 2012.

In Moreland the causes of premature death and years of life lived with disease or injury in
order of prevalence are: mental health disorders, asthma, injuries, diabetes,
cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Lifestyle behaviours such as physical activity,
healthy eating, alcohol intake, tobacco and other drugs usage, and safety precautions are
factors contributing to these health issues.

The population of Moreland is approximately 144,000 and is expected to rise to 169,000 in
2031. One third of residents were born overseas and 45% speak a language other than
English at home. The main languages are Italian, Greek, Arabic, Turkish and Chinese
languages. A high proportion of newly arrived to Moreland are born in India, China,
Pakistan, Lebanon, Sri Lanka, Philippines and Iraq.

Household types in Moreland consist of about 25% each: couples with children, couple
with children and lone person households. About 10% are single parent households and
7% group households. The number of dwellings is rising in Moreland with current numbers
being about 60,000 and is expected to rise to about 75,000 by 2031. About 36% are fully
owned, 26% are being purchased and 29% are rental properties.

Suburbs including: Fawkner, Glenroy, Hadfield and Coburg North are more disadvantaged
than Brunswick, Pascoe Vale and Gowanbrae.

The median individual income is $413 per week. The unemployment rate in Moreland
overall is 6.1% but for people aged 15 – 24 years it is 12.9%. Of the total number of
Centrelink payments 40% are age pensions, 17% rent assistance, 14% Disability Support
and 7% are Newstart Allowance payments.

Moreland has 1,900 children attending pre-school, 8,486 at primary school and 6.502 at
students at secondary school. Moreland is below average in the number of Year 7
students (73%) who remain at school until Year 12. Moreland residents who have non-
school residents has risen from 22% in 1991 to 40% in 2006. The occupation of residents
has increased for managers, professionals, community and personal service workers and
declined for technician and trade workers, clerical and administrative workers, sales
workers, machinery operators, drivers and labourers.




D09/83374                                                                                4
2     INTRODUCTION
This background paper has been prepared to assist to inform the development of the
Moreland Municipal Public Health Plan (MPHP) 2009 - 2012. It provides information about
the achievements of the last MPHP; the global, federal, state and local context for health
planning; and data on the health and wellbeing of Moreland residents.

2.1   WHAT IS A MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN?

A MPHP is a four year policy document required, under the Public Health and Wellbeing
Act 2008, to be prepared by Councils within twelve months of a Council election. Its aim is
to improve a population‟s health and wellbeing by addressing identified health and social
priorities through changes to the physical, natural, economic and social environments of a
community.

The Moreland Municipal Public Health Plan is one of the Council‟s three main plans
outlining Council‟s principles, goals and activities. The Council plan outlines the Council‟s
overall commitments. The Municipal Strategic Statement and the Planning Scheme
emphasis the strategic directions and activities associated with land and the physical
aspects of the city. The Municipal Public Health Plan emphasises the societal aspects.




                               Moreland Council Plan


                         Moreland Council Plan

                         Moreland Council Plan

                         Moreland Council Plan

                         Moreland Council Plan
      Moreland Municipal Public Health                 Moreland Municipal Strategic
      Plan                                             Statement and Planning Scheme
                         Moreland Council Plan
      Moreland Municipal Public Health                 Moreland Municipal Strategic
      Plan               Moreland Council Plan         Statement and Planning Scheme
2.2   WHAT IS HEALTH AND WELLBEING?
                         Moreland Council Plan
      Moreland Municipal Public Health                 Moreland Municipal Strategic
      Plan                                             Statement and Planning Scheme
                         Moreland Council physical,
Health is defined as: A state of completePlan         social and mental well-being, and not
         the absence of disease or infirmity. Within the context of health promotion, health
merelyMoreland Municipal Public Health                Moreland Municipal Strategic
                           Moreland Council Plan      Statement and Planning end, which can
has been considered less as an abstract state and more as a means to an Scheme
       Plan
be expressed in functional terms as a resource, which permits people to lead an
       Moreland Municipal Moreland Council Plan       Moreland Municipal Strategic
individually, socially and Public Health productive life. Health is a resource for everyday
                            economically
                                                      Statement and Planning Scheme
       Plan object of living. It is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal
life, not the              Moreland Council Plan
resources as well as physical capabilities. (Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. WHO,
       Moreland Municipal Public Health               Moreland Municipal Strategic
Geneva, 1986)              Moreland Council Plan
      Plan                                             Statement and Planning Scheme
                         Moreland Council Plan
      Moreland Municipal Public Health                 Moreland Municipal Strategic
      Plan                                             Statement and Planning Scheme
                         Moreland Council Plan
      Moreland Municipal Public Health
D09/83374                                              Moreland Municipal Strategic        5
      Plan               Moreland Council Plan         Statement and Planning Scheme
                         Moreland Council Plan
      Moreland Municipal Public Health                 Moreland Municipal Strategic
Wellness, or wellbeing, is the optimal state of health of individuals and groups. There are
two focal concerns: the realization of the fullest potential of an individual physically,
psychologically, socially, spiritually and economically, and the fulfillment of one‟s role
expectations in the family, community, place of worship, workplace and other settings.
(WHO Health Promotion Glossary 2006)

2.3   HOW IS A MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN DEVELOPED?

The development of a MPHP requires a number of processes to ensure its relevance and
validity. It will be informed by relevant government policy and will also take account of
evidenced based best practice in relation to public health planning from Australia and
internationally. Local issues are identified based on data analysis, community consultation
and stakeholder priorities. An integrated approach is required to establish key priority
areas and avoid repetition. Moreland City Council is committed to working in partnership
with other agencies and organisations in Moreland to develop the plan, implement the
actions, monitor the progress and evaluate the plan between 2009 and 2012. By working
in partnership with key stakeholders to implement projects we can avoid duplication and
concentrate on priorities to achieve the best outcomes.

2.4   IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MPHP

A yearly implementation plan will be developed with partner organisations. Each year the
actions will be evaluated and a report prepared for Council and stakeholders. The policy
will be reviewed accordingly and the next years years action plan developed.




D09/83374                                                                                6
3      WHAT HAS BEEN ACHIEVED?
3.1    MORELAND MUNICIPAL PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN 2003

The 2003 MMPHP comprised a range of strategies and actions addressing fourteen areas
known as the social determinants of health: social and economic circumstances;
employment; education; housing; built and natural environment; early years; personal well-
being and safety; access and availability of services; social inclusion and support; social
participation; political participation; recreation, arts and leisure; transport and information.

During 2006/07 the implementation of the 2003 MMPHP was audited across Council
departments and with external organisations. A report was presented to Council in
February 2008. The achievements of the total 129 actions outlined in the plan are
contained in Appendix 1. It was identified that a number of the actions were ongoing and
continue to be so. Others are complete and require no further action.

Examples of key achievements of the 15 areas since 2003 include:

 1    Social &               Moreland Responsible Gambling Strategy and Action
      Economic                Plan 2005 – 2008 was developed.
      Circumstances
                             Reduced Council rates are available for pensioners.
 2    Employment             Indigenous Employment and Training program
                              commenced at Moreland City Council in 2007.
                             Moreland Community Enterprise Centre Business Plan
                              2006 – 2010 developed.
 3    Education              Coburg Senior High School opened in January 2007.
                             Homework support programs established for secondary
                              school students.
 4    Housing                Housing project completed for 8 vulnerable, low income
                              single households in 2005.
                             Moreland Affordable Housing Strategy 2006
                              completed.
 5    Built & Natural        Structure plans developed for Coburg, Glenroy and
      Environment             Brunswick.
                             Over 20000 new plants planted along both creeks.
                             Continued support of the Moreland Energy Foundation
                              and CERES environmental park.
 6    Early Years:           Completion of Harmony Park „access for all abilities‟
      Birth to                (Dec 2007) Elms Court Gowanbrae playgrounds (May
      Adolescence             2007).
                             Moreland Youth Strategy 2004 – 2009 “Seen, Heard,
                              Valued and Included” was developed in 2004.




D09/83374                                                                                     7
7    Personal Well-        Wiser Driver programs implemented for seniors.
     Being & Safety
                           Older Persons Contact project completed.
8    Access &              Language Services policy & guide developed.
     Availability of
                           Funds allocated to Moreland Community Health
     Services
                            Service for child oral health program.
9    Social Inclusion      Recreation program for young people with a disability
     & Social               at Brunswick Baths
     Support
                           Women‟s only swimming sessions at Fawkner and
                            Brunswick pools.
10   Social                Street Party kit developed.
     Participation
                           Sustainability Street program implemented.
11   Political             Welcome to Country protocol developed with Ian
     Participation          Hunter.

12   Recreation, Arts      Active Fawkner project to increase the awareness of
     & Leisure              local sports clubs.
                           „Art Spots‟ installed in Post Office Place Glenroy.
13   Transport             The implementation of the Walking School Bus.
                           First Riding School Bus in metropolitan Melbourne.
14   Information           Library system upgraded.
                           New website developed.
15   Universal &           Focus on Fawkner incorporated and action plan
     Integrating            developed.
     Programs
                           Glenroy Community Building opened in April 2006 and
                            the Glenroy Taskforce established.




D09/83374                                                                           8
3.2      ACHIEVEMENTS 2006 – 2008

Moreland City Council works collaboratively with community agencies and organisations to
improve the health and wellbeing of the community. Our role is to facilitate with key
organisations to: provide linkages to Council services and staff; provide current data and
research; source current best practice examples; provide expert advise; seek funding and
assist to write funding submissions; assist to design and implement evaluation techniques;
and, consult with local residents and groups.

Partnerships with external agencies have been strengthened to develop initiatives and
implement projects to:

     increase physical activity;
     improve oral health; and,
     increase access to nutritious food.


The following tables outline achievements in partnership with other agencies and
stakeholders.

Projects        Achievements                                                 Partners
Glenroy   Opened in 2006. Includes Maternal Child Health, the                GNLC, MCHS
Community refurbishment of the Glenroy Hall, Glenroy Neighbourhood
Centre    Learning Centre (GNLC), and Moreland Community Health
          Service. (MCHS).
“fun n          A research project with with the university of Melbourne     MCHS
healthy in      involving 23 primary schools across Moreland, with 12
Moreland”       implementing a range of health promoting strategies,
                including education for students, parents & staff, cooking
                classes, vegetable gardens and physical activities, and 11
                comparison schools.
Maternal    Development of a resource kit for use by MCH nurses with         MCHS
Child       their new parent groups.
Health Oral Professional development provided to MCHNurses.
Health
Pre-school A collaborative project with researchers from the University      MCHS,
Oral Health of Melbourne and representatives from local emerging             Spectrum
            communities which aims to explore and trial ways to deliver      Migrant
            culturally competent oral health and children‟s services.        Resource Centre
Food            A needs assessment has been completed and published.         MCHS
Security in     Steering group is now formed to develop an action plan
Moreland        from recommendations in the report.
Grow and        Food is grown in 8 houses (2 Coburg North and 6 Glenroy).    MCHS
Share           5 are from CALD – Japanese, Eritrean, Assyrian, Turkish,
                Kurdish. There have been 3 swaps of 17.5kg produce.
                Glenroy Lions club have donated time and resources.




D09/83374                                                                                9
Projects     Achievements                                                     Partners
Kitchen      Vegetable garden planted at Box Forest Secondary                 Glenroy
Garden       College.                                                         Taskforce,
                                                                              Mission Australia
“Krunch      KODE pre-school Glenroy provided breakfast for an                MCHS
Time”        average 8 students per day during 2007.
Health       Facilitate access to services including dental, mental health    St Vincent De
Time in      and housing, to marginalized citizens including homeless,        Paul
Glenroy      boarding house and Office of Housing residents.
10,000       Pedometers are loaned out through MCC libraries. In 2006         MCHS
steps        – 07 a total of 244 loans. In 2007 – 08 a total of 143. So far
             in 2008 – 09 there have been 231 loaned.
             In 2006 a pedometer challenge between male members of
             sporting clubs, Brunswick Bowls; Coburg Table Tennis;
             West Coburg, Coburg, Moreland and Aust/Lebanese
             Football Clubs, and the CEOs of MCC and MCHS.
Walking      Operate out of a number of Neighbourhood Houses.                 Sussex, GNLC
groups                                                                        Brunswick
Walking      8 walking groups established throughout Moreland                 MCHS
Groups       including 3 pram walking groups in Glenroy, Brunswick and
             Fawkner.
Active       Sporting clubs networked, higher participation at clubs,         Sport clubs and
Fawkner      come n try activities at festivals and during school holidays,   community
             awareness of clubs to the community.                             organisations in
                                                                              Fawkner
Fawkner      Focus changed from passive activities (eg. rides) to more        Focus on
Festival     active participation, including: community parade, table         Fawkner &
             tennis, skateboarding, tennis, little athletics, football,       Active Fawkner
             soccer, basketball, leisure centre activities.                   committees.
Active       Provided a range of accessible physical activities for over      Hume Moreland
Living for   55s and developed a program for free physiotherapy               Primary care
Seniors in   assessments and tailored fitness/lifestyle programs.             Partnership,
Fawkner                                                                       MCHS
Women‟s      Sessions on a Sunday evening at Fawkner Leisure Centre.          Fawkner
swimming                                                                      Community
                                                                              House,
                                                                              Multicultural
                                                                              Women‟s group
Bus route    Bus route was changed in Fawkner for better access to            Focus on
             services.                                                        Fawkner
Walking in   Distributed to every house and the walking groups in             MCHS
Fawkner      Fawkner
map



D09/83374                                                                                 10
4     PUBLIC HEALTH PLANNING

4.1   HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Historically the focus of public health policy was on issues such as clean water and
sewerage that had a major impact on the prevention of diseases affecting populations.
Scientific advances focused on disease prevention and led to the introduction of mass
vaccinations. All these issues are still relevant and local councils and other tiers of
government still provide these services.

Public health broadened to a more population health focus due to the increase in lifestyle
diseases (eg. cardiovascular disease) and behavioural risk factors (eg. smoking). Policy
approaches to these health issues have been based on individual behaviours, education
initiatives and regulations to change behaviours and limit access to certain products.
Whilst still important and a part of public health campaigning this approach places the
responsibility on the individual to change.



4.2   CURRENT APPROACH

Public health planning concentrates on the environments of health model, which
emphasises that the social, economic and environmental factors and conditions of a
community, over which individuals have limited control, can influence people‟s health.

The social determinants of health are concerned with the key aspects of people‟s living
and working circumstances and with their lifestyles. They include the following issues:
social economic status; stress; early life; social exclusion; work; unemployment; social
support; addiction; food; and transport. (Social Determinants of Health: The Solid Facts.
WHO 2003)

The potential impacts of climate change are a relatively new consideration for population
health interventions. The equity and social issues associated with climate change and
drought have only recently being identified in research and policy development. The most
significant of these are: energy and water pricing and household efficiency; heat waves
and health inequalities; responses to increased food costs; domestic water security; social
and economic support policies associated with drought; and housing standards and
insurance. (Climate change and drought policy in Victoria. VCOSS December 2007)

A municipal public health plan needs to consider all of the social issues and the
environmental impacts when developing strategies to plan changes to the built, natural,
economic and social environments.




D09/83374                                                                               11
5        GLOBAL CONTEXT


The World Health Organisation (WHO) is the directing and coordinating authority for health
within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health
matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating
evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and
assessing health trends.

To deal with some of the underlying determinants of health, a global framework for health
promotion is needed. The WHO agenda highlights seven priority areas for all stakeholders
and includes:

1.    Investing in health to reduce poverty;
2.    Building individual and global health security;
3.    Tackling the determinants of health;
4.    Strengthening health systems and equitable access;
5.    Harnessing knowledge, science and technology; and
6.    Strengthening governance, leadership and accountability.

The recent influenza A (H1N1), or „swine flu‟, epidemic is an example of how the WHO
informs local planning by providing information from countries around the world that
assists in local area emergency management planning. Up to date information is available
on a daily basis and level of risk is determined which provides a guide for all countries
around the world to contain the spread of a disease.



5.1      SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

The social determinants of health are the conditions in which people are born, grow, live,
work and age, including the health system. (see page….) These circumstances are
shaped by the distribution of money, power and resources at global, national and local
levels, which are themselves influenced by policy choices. The social determinants of
health are mostly responsible for health inequities - the unfair and avoidable differences in
health status seen within and between countries. Responding to increasing concern about
these persisting and widening inequities, WHO established the Commission on Social
Determinants of Health (CSDH) in 2005 to provide advice on how to reduce them. The
Commission's final report was launched in August 2008, and contained three overarching
recommendations:

     Improve daily living conditions
     Tackle the inequitable distribution of power, money and resources
     Measure and understand the problem and assess the impact of action


For more information: http://www.who.int/social_determinants/en/




D09/83374                                                                                 12
5.2      HEALTHY CITIES



A healthy city is one that is continually creating and improving those physical and social
environments and expanding those community resources which enable people to mutually
support each other in performing all the functions of life and developing to their maximum
potential.

The Healthy Cities programme is a long-term international development initiative that aims
to place health high on the agendas of decision makers and to promote comprehensive
local strategies for health protection and sustainable development. Basic features include
community participation and empowerment, intersectoral partnerships, and participant
equity. (see page…)

A Healthy City aims to:
 to create a health-supportive environment,
 to achieve a good quality of life,
 to provide basic sanitation & hygiene needs,
 to supply access to health care.

Being a Healthy City depends not on current health infrastructure, rather upon, a
commitment to improve a city's environments and a willingness to forge the necessary
connections in political, economic, and social arenas.

For more information: http://www.who.int/healthy_settings/types/cities/en/index.html




5.3      OTHER

Internationally other initiatives have been developed that address health planning relating
to life stages, including:

     Child Friendly Cities (UNICEF)
     Age - Friendly Cities (WHO)




D09/83374                                                                               13
6      FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CONTEXT


In February 2008 the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission was established
by the Prime Minister and Health Minister to develop a long-term health reform plan for
Australia. The purpose is to take into consideration that the health of people, their families
and communities not only impacts on their welfare and their opportunities in life, but also
underpins the economic and social wellbeing of Australia.

The Federal Government believes it is important to match national action on social
determinants and health inequity with local participation and action to tackle problems that
influence the health of our local communities. The government supports the development
of accessible information on the health of local communities. This information should take
a broad view of the factors contributing to healthy communities, including the „wellness
footprint‟ of communities and issues such as urban planning, public transport, community
connectedness and a sustainable environment.

The approach to building healthier communities is through building health promotion and
prevention capacity at a national level using three elements. First, it is proposed that
governments commit to establishing a rolling series of ten-year goals for health promotion
and prevention, commencing with Healthy Australia 2020 Goals. The goals would be
developed to ensure broad community ownership and commitment, with regular reporting
by governments on progress towards achieving better health outcomes under the ten year
goals. Second, it is proposed to establish an independent national health promotion and
prevention agency. The third element for building health promotion and prevention
capacity is about financing prevention. Currently, there is no readily identifiable funding
mechanism for prevention and health promotion, partly because there is not a systematic
process to assess the evidence on prevention interventions and health promotion.

Businesses and employer groups have also become increasingly engaged in health
promotion and prevention. This makes sense given the close relationship between a
healthy workforce and economic productivity. At the level of individual businesses, the
traditional focus of workplace health on occupational health and safety issues is expanding
to include new programs targeting wellness, health promotion, risk screening and self-
management for workers with chronic diseases. The federal government supports the
delivery of wellness and health promotion programs by employers and private health
insurers, and suggests that any existing regulatory barriers to increasing the uptake of
such programs should be reviewed.




D09/83374                                                                                  14
6.1      PREVENTATIVE HEALTH

The National Preventative Health Taskforce was created in April 2008 by the Minister for
Health and Ageing. Established initially for a three-year period, the Taskforce will produce
the National Preventative Health Strategy in June 2009, focusing on the primary
prevention of obesity, tobacco and harmful consumption of alcohol. Because of the need
to prioritise these concerns, other important areas of preventative health such as mental
health, injury, immunisation, sexual and reproductive health, and illicit substance use will
be considered in the next phase of the Taskforce‟s work in 2009. The Taskforce has
prepared a discussion paper titled: Australia: the Healthiest Country by 2020. The
Taskforce states that we can achieve the following targets by 2020:

     Halt and reverse the rise in overweight and obesity
     Reduce the prevalence of daily smoking to 9% or less
     Reduce the prevalence of harmful drinking for all Australians by 30%
     Contribute to the „Close the Gap‟ target for Indigenous people, reducing the 17-year life
      expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people


For further information: http://www.preventativehealth.org.au/

6.2      CHRONIC DISEASE

The National Chronic Disease Strategy has been developed to provide national policy
directions to improve chronic disease prevention and care across Australia. Five
supporting National Service Improvement Frameworks have been developed for:

     Asthma
     Cancer
     Diabetes
     Heart, stroke and vascular disease
     Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

The Frameworks outline opportunities for improving prevention and care in relation to
these diseases.

For further information: http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/pq-
ncds

6.3      OTHER

The Department of Health and Ageing have a number of policies that relate to the MPHP,
including:

     National Men‟s and Women‟s Health Strategies
     National Tobacco Strategy
     National Drug Strategy
     National Mental Health Strategy

For further information: http://www.health.gov.au



D09/83374                                                                                   15
7       VICTORIAN GOVERNMENT CONTEXT
7.1     STATE LEGISLATION

7.1.1   Municipal Public Health Plans

A new Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 comes into effect on 1 January 2010.
Councils are required under the Health Act to develop a four year Municipal Public Health
Plan within 12 months of general council elections. (Appendix 2). The Health Act specifies
that issues impacting on the health of people in a municipality need to be identified and
strategic responses implemented to maximise the health and wellbeing of the community.

In summary the requirements for Municipal Public Health Plans are to:

include an examination of data about health status and health determinants in the
municipal district;
identify goals and strategies based on evidence for creating a local community in which
people can achieve maximum health;
provide for involvement of people in the local community in the development,
implementation and evaluation of the public health plan; and,
specify how the council will work in partnership with the Department of Human Services
and other agencies undertaking public health initiatives, projects and programs to achieve
the goals identified in the plan.

For further information: http://www.dms.dpc.vic.gov.au/



7.1.2   State Public Health and Wellbeing Plan

The Minister for Health must ensure that a State Public Health and Wellbeing Plan is
prepared by 1 September 2011, and then every four years subsequently.

The Health and Wellbeing Act (section 26(3)) provides that councils must have regard to
the State Plan when they are preparing their subsequent Municipal Public Health and
Wellbeing Plans with effect from 2013. The Act sets out what must be included in the State
Plan. The Plan must specify how Government will work with other bodies undertaking
public health initiatives, projects and programs to achieve the objectives and policy
priorities in the State Plan (section 49(2)(e)).

Local Government is key to the development of an effective State Plan. The department
intends to engage Local Government and other key players shortly in its development.

For further information: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/phwa




D09/83374                                                                              16
7.2      DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

The Department of Human Services (DHS) is the state government department that is
responsible for the MPHP and health promotion programs.

To support integrated health promotion programs DHS aims to:

     Develop and implement statewide policy to support quality and effective health
      promotion;
     Build on the capacity of the service system to plan and deliver effective quality
      integrated health promotion programs;
     Enable communities and individuals to increase control over and improve their health;
     Support the reorientation of the primary health care system to a population focus
      underpinned by the social model of health;
     Consolidate and enhance the integrated health promotion infrastructure and resources;
     Reduce duplication and fragmentation of integrated health promotion effort;
     Contribute to the evidence base for integrated health promotion around specific issues
      and population groups;
     Increase the potential to involve sectors other than health in quality integrated health
      promotion service delivery; and
     Contribute to a reduction of preventable hospital admissions.

For further information: http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au



7.2.1    Health Promotion Priority Setting for 2007-2012

The overarching aim of the health promotion priorities is to improve overall health and
reduce health inequalities. To achieve this aim the seven priority issues are:
1. Promoting physical activity and active communities.
2. Promoting accessible and nutritious food.
3. Promoting mental health and wellbeing.
4. Reducing tobacco-related harms.
5. Reducing and minimising harm from alcohol and other drugs.
6. Safe environments to prevent intentional injury.
7. Sexual and reproductive health.
(Promoting Health and Wellbeing in Victoria. Department of Human Services 2007)

For further information: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/healthpromotion




D09/83374                                                                                   17
7.3      HUMAN RIGHTS CHARTER

Victoria was the first state to introduce a Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities
(the ACT also has a Charter). Promoting and advancing health and respecting, protecting
and practising human rights are inextricably linked. This link can be demonstrated in three
major ways.

     Violations or lack of attention to human rights (eg harmful traditional practices; slavery;
      torture and inhuman and degrading treatment; violence against women) can have
      serious negative health consequences - physical, mental and emotional.
     Health policies and programs can promote or violate human rights in their design and
      implementation (eg freedom from discrimination; cultural rights; rights to participation;
      privacy; and freedom of information).
     Vulnerability to ill health can be reduced by taking steps to respect, protect and fulfil
      human rights (eg freedom from discrimination on account of ethnicity, sex and social
      status and the rights to food and nutrition, water, education and adequate housing).


Positive links between health outcomes and human rights can occur at the global, national,
state, local and neighbourhood level.

At the global level, health and wellbeing is recognised as a fundamental human right. Sixty
years ago, when the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was being developed by
representatives of almost all the countries of the world this right became Article 25 –
Everyone has the right to a decent life, including enough food, clothing, housing, medical
care and social services.

At the national level, the Australian Constitution does not specifically protect the right to
health. Currently, the Federal government is consulting on human rights. Australians are
being asked which human rights are important to them and how can these rights be
protected.

For more information:
http://www.justice.vic.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/DOJ+Internet/Home/Your+Rights/Human+
Rights/Human+Rights+Charter/




D09/83374                                                                                      18
8        LOCAL GOVERNMENT CONTEXT
8.1      COUNCIL PLAN

Moreland City Council is committed to providing good governance and effective leadership
to support and enrich community life. The Council Plan is a comprehensive overview of
Council's values, commitments and activities. It includes clear goals and objectives against
which Council and its administration measures its performance.

The Local Government Act requires a Council Plan to be developed within 6 months after
the election of a new Council. The last election was November 2008 therefore the Council
Plan will be available in June 2009. It is a four year plan that is revised annually. Each year
the incumbent Mayor provides a speech that informs that year‟s Council Plan and the
Annual Report.

The current proposed Council Plan 2009 – 2013 outlines the following:

Purpose: Moreland City Council delivers good governance to achieve a more socially and
environmentally just and sustainable city.

Vision: Moreland City Council will partner the community to be a city that is lively, proud
and celebrates its diversity and cares for and respects all of its citizens.

Strategic Statement: Moreland City Council will be recognized as an accountable,
innovative and collaborative organisation that delivers Council‟s vision for the city.

Strategic Focus Areas:

     A sustainable and just city
     A proud city
     A healthy and educated community
     A responsive organisation.


8.1.1    Key strategic objectives:

1. Collaborate with the community and respond actively to climate change.
2. Facilitate the development of the local economy and jobs
3. Improve transport and mobility
4. Maintain and enhance appropriate infrastructure and open space
5. Effective use of our land use and development policies for outcomes appropriate to the
   long term needs of communities
6. Facilitate housing that meets the needs of the community
7. Engage the organisation and community to make Moreland a proud and cleaner city
8. Foster greater community resilience
9. Celebrate what makes Moreland great
10. Foster community creativity
11. Appropriately respond to the population health needs of people at all stages
12. Ensure appropriate aged services
13. Ensure that the community has access to a range of sporting and recreational
     opportunities to maximise their potential


D09/83374                                                                                   19
14. Ensure that community has access to a range of educational opportunities to maximize
their potential
15. Facilitate community connection and engagement
16. Facilitate peoples access to an appropriate range of services that meet their needs
17. Invest in our young people
18. Improve services to citizens
19. Align financial resources of Council to meet the needs of the community now and into
      the future
20. Leverage technology to improve service delivery
21. Align and implement organisational plans
22. Foster a motivated, responsive, innovative and performance oriented workplace
      culture
23. Maintain a clear, transparent and ethical decision-making process.


8.2      MAYOR’S SPEECH

The 2009 Mayor, Cr Lambros Tapinos, highlights in his speech some initiative and policy
directions for 2008 – 2012 relating to community health and wellbeing. Council believes
that the health, safety and well-being of the Moreland community is council‟s first priority.

Local Government has a key role to play in the provision of some health services and a
critical role in the identification of needs. Council believes that the maintenance of quality,
independent community health services is essential in promoting the health, safety and
well-being of the Moreland community. Council will:

     Update the Municipal Public Health Plan in consultation with the community and
      implement its recommendations;
     Support the development of a new major community health facility in Coburg and local
      outreach services;
     Support efforts to increase State and Federal funds to reduce the waiting lists at the
      Moreland Community Health Centre for services such as physiotherapy, podiatry and
      dental care;
     Continue community strengthening programs in Fawkner and Glenroy;
     Investigate and support creation of “men‟s sheds”; and
     Negotiate our Primary Care Partnership to reflect strategies that address social
      inequities, family violence, climate change, food security and mobility.


8.3      POLICIES AND STRATEGIES

Staff across departments collaborate to plan strategies and implement projects. Moreland
City Council is committed to achieving high standards of project management and project
delivery. In 2006 the executive adopted a project management process that provides a
method for project management and project delivery. Various stakeholders, internal and
external, are engaged in the development, implementation and evaluation of projects.

The MPHP provides one framework for integrated planning across departments that spans
the social, economic, built and natural environments.




D09/83374                                                                                   20
A number of policies and plans link to the MPHP, including those targeting specific age
groups, issues and services. The list below provides some examples of other Moreland
City Council strategies and policies that address specific life stages and community issues.
Council‟s policies, strategies and plans are developed using a collaborative approach to
ensure alignment.



           Arts Strategy                         Affordable Housing Strategy
           Early Years Strategy                  Bike Plan
           Family Violence Strategy              Climate Action Plan
           Later Years Strategy 2007 - 2012      Economic Development Strategy
           Leisure Plan                          Food Safety Management
           Library Services Strategy             Integrated Transport Strategy
           Multicultural Policy                  Pedestrian Strategy
           Reconciliation Policy                 Open Space Strategy
           Responsible Gambling Strategy         Public Lighting Policy
           Safety Plan                           Street Landscape Strategy
           Youth Strategy


For more information:
http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/aboutcouncil/publications/home_policies-and-
strategies.html



8.3.1   Life stages strategies

In December 2008 the inaugural Child Friendly City summit was conducted with six local
Moreland Primary Schools. The views expressed will form part of the consultations for the
MPHP. An Early Years Strategy 2009 – 2012 is currently being written.

Moreland City Council‟s Youth Services team is currently undertaking the project oxYgen:
breathing space for young faces. It is guided by a steering commitee of fifteen young
people working to build a better Moreland for young people. The oxYgen project will
research the needs and aspirations of Moreland‟s young people, through widespread
community consultation to help determine the feasibility of youth spaces in Moreland, as
well as the delivery of services to young people.

For more information:

http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/community-services/young-people/youth-facilities-
index.html

or facebook site:

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/group.php?gid=76516698894&ref=ts

The Moreland Later Years Strategy 2007 – 2012 was adopted by Council in August 2008
and is currently being implemented.


D09/83374                                                                                21
8.4     ECONOMIC PROFILE

The Moreland Economic Profile 2008 summarises economic data about Moreland such as
industry, employment, construction and property.

8.4.1   Labour force

A relatively low proportion of Moreland working residents actually work in the Moreland
LGA – around 17% or one in six, as compared with one in three in Wyndham or one in four
in Bayside, for example.

Industry in Moreland has a relatively high proportion of people employed in „Manufacturing‟
(18% of all persons employed in Moreland industry), „Retail Trade‟ (13%) and „Health Care
and Social Assistance‟ (13%) jobs. On the other hand, Moreland industry has a relatively
low proportion of people employed in „Financial and Insurance Services‟ (2%) and
„Professional, Scientific and Technical services‟ (5%).

8.4.2   Industry

Moreland has a relatively high proportion of „Retail Trade‟ (11%) and „Transport and
Storage‟ (12%) businesses and, conversely, a relatively low proportion of „Agriculture,
Forestry and Fishing‟ (1%) businesses and „Finance and Insurance‟ businesses (5%).

The majority of businesses (62%) in Moreland are non-employing businesses (i.e. are
comprised of self-employed persons). Most employing businesses in Moreland employ
only 1-4 persons. The number of large employing businesses in Moreland has gradually
declined over the past several decades. There are now only 48 businesses that employ
100 or more people.

8.4.3   Development activity

In 2007, Moreland ranked 9th out of 15 inner city Local Government Areas (LGAs) and 21st
out of 31 LGAs in metropolitan Melbourne in terms of the total value of building work
approved. The total value of construction investment in Moreland of $292m represents 4%
of total investment in the Inner Melbourne region (the City Of Melbourne attracted by far
the largest proportion (31%).

The majority (88%) of building approvals in Moreland are „Domestic‟ in nature. In 2007,
Moreland attracted around $160m of „domestic‟ construction investment. This amounts to
6% of all „domestic‟ construction investment in the Inner Melbourne area.1 The number of
„domestic‟ construction approvals has declined since 1999, but has remained steady since
2005 at around 1,600 approvals per annum.




1 Includes: Banyule (C), Bayside (C), Boroondara (C), Darebin (C), Glen Eira (C), Hobsons Bay
(S), Maribyrnong (C), Melbourne (C), Monash (C), Moonee Valley (C), Moreland (C), Port Phillip
(C), Stonnington (C), Whitehorse (C), Yarra (C),


D09/83374                                                                                        22
8.4.4   Property market activity

The median house price in Moreland has been steadily increasing since 1996, overtaking
that for the Melbourne Statistical District (MSD) in 1998. At $420,000, the median house
price in Moreland in 2007 was around $45,000 above the MSD median. In the case of
units and apartments, a fairly constant gap (averaging around $29,000 since 1995)
persists between the Moreland and the MSD median price.

The value of industrial building activity approved across Moreland in 2007 was $4.4m, up
115% on 2006. This $4.4.m represents 6% of such investment in the Inner Melbourne area
(as defined by the Building Commission).

Since 1995, the consumption of industrial land - the take-up of industrial land for industrial
purposes - in Moreland has been either very low or, in some years, negative rather than
positive (i.e. more land vacated than consumed). In the period from 2000 to 2007,
Moreland accounted for zero percent of the average annual consumption of industrial land
in metropolitan Melbourne. By contrast, nearly all of the industrial land in Moreland,
Darebin and Nillumbik has been consumed, with only very small supplies remaining in
these municipalities.

For more information:

http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/about-moreland/demographics/research-reports.html



8.5     ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE

The Environmental Indictors for Metropolitan Melbourne Bulletin is produced by the
Australian Institute of Urban Studies and the City of Melbourne, and supported by over half
of Melbourne's local councils. It presents Melbourne‟s environment as a series of
indicators under different themes. Indicators are chosen on their effectiveness to measure
important elements in the environment, the availability of data and their relevance at a
local level.

For more information: http://www.aius.org.au/indicators/index.cfm

8.5.1   Moreland Energy Foundation (MEFL)

Moreland Energy Foundation is an independent not-for-profit organisation set and
supported by Council to help the Moreland community reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

For more information: http://www.mefl.com.au/

8.5.2   Centre for Research and Environment in Environmental Strategies (CERES)

In 1981, Council gave money and land to help set up CERES. CERES is a non-profit
community environment park beside Merri Creek in Brunswick East. CERES wants to
make people more aware and take action on the environmental and social issues that
affect cities. Council is still a principal supporting partner of CERES.

For more information: http://www.ceres.org.au/


D09/83374                                                                                  23
8.6     BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Moreland City Council has developed structure plans for Coburg, Glenroy and Brunswick.
A structure plan is a long-term guide for changes to land use, buildings and public spaces
in an activity centre.

8.6.1   The Coburg Initiative

The Coburg Initiative is a $1 Billion plan for new jobs, housing, services and retail. It will
lead to improvements to the public realm and will address safety and accessibility issues.
It will celebrate and preserve the things that make today‟s Coburg great. The Coburg
Initiative focuses on new connectivity between people and their places of work, culture,
sport and leisure.

For more information: http://www.thecoburginitiative.com.au/

8.6.2   Glenroy Structure Plan

Council adopted the Glenroy Structure Plan in 2008. The Glenroy Structure Plan outlines
an exciting vision for Glenroy, and provides a framework for the Glenroy Activity Centre
over the next 15 to 20 years

For more information:

http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/building-and-planning/structure-planning/glenroy-structure-
plan.html

8.6.3   Brunswick Structure Plan

The Brunswick Structure Plan was adopted in 2008 by Council in principle with changes to
be made based on the need for some further work identified following the community
consultation period.

For more information:

http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/building-and-planning/structure-planning/brunswick-
structure-plan.html




D09/83374                                                                                  24
9     MODELS FOR INTEGRATED PLANNING
9.1   SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

Why treat people………… Without changing what‟s making them sick
The social determinants is a term given to the social, economic, and environmental factors
and conditions, over which individuals have limited direct control, and which influence
health and wellbeing.




The social determinants of health as described by the World Health Organisation include:

1. Social gradient - poor social and economic circumstances.
2. Stress - people feel worried, anxious and unable to cope.
3. Early life - a good start in life by supporting mothers and young children.
4. Social exclusion - due to poverty, unemployment, disability, or minority groups.
5. Work - stress in the workplace including type of work, management styles and social
   relationships.
6. Unemployment - including insecure jobs and underemployment.
7. Social support - lack of social supports, family and friendship networks.
8. Addiction - alcohol dependence, illicit drug use and cigarette smoking are often an
   escape from adversity and stress.
9. Food - the cost of food and the access to fresh and healthy food.
10. Transport - less driving and more walking and cycling as well as better public transport.


The 2003 MMPHP was based on the social determinants of health. It comprised a range of
broad strategies and actions addressing the following fourteen areas: social and economic
circumstances; employment; education; housing; built and natural environment; early
years; personal well-being and safety; access and availability of services; social inclusion
and support; social participation; political participation; recreation, arts and leisure;
transport and information.



D09/83374                                                                                 25
9.2      HEALTHY CITIES

The WHO Healthy Cities program engages local governments in health development
through a process of political commitment, institutional change, capacity building,
partnership-based planning and innovative projects. It promotes comprehensive and
systematic policy and planning with a special emphasis on health inequalities and urban
poverty, the needs of vulnerable groups, participatory governance and the social,
economic and environmental determinants of health. It also strives to include health
considerations in economic regeneration and urban development efforts.

Eleven Parameters of a Healthy City

      1. A clean, safe, high quality physical environment (including housing
          quality).
      2. An ecosystem which is sustainable now and sustainable in the long
          term.
      3. A strong, mutually-supportive and non-exploitive community.
      4. A high degree of public participation in and control over the decisions
          affecting one‟s life, health and well-being.
      5. The meeting of basic needs (food, water, shelter, income, safety, work)
          for all the City‟s people.
      6. Access to a wide variety of experiences and resources with the
          possibility of multiple contacts, interaction and communication.
      7. A diverse, vital and innovative city economy.
      8. Encouragement of connectedness with the past, with the culture and
          biological heritage and with other groups and individuals.
      9. A city form that is compatible with and enhances the above parameters
          and behaviours.
      10. An optimum level of appropriate public health and sick care services
          accessible to all.
      11. High health status (both high positive health status and low disease
          status).


Healthy Cities programmes have proven them successful in increasing understanding of
health and environment linkages and in the creation of intersectoral partnerships to ensure
a sustainable, widespread programme. The most successful Healthy Cities programmes
maintain momentum from:

     the commitment of local community members;
     a clear vision;
     the ownership of policies;
     a wide array of stakeholders;
     a process for institutionalising the programme.




D09/83374                                                                               26
9.3   ENVIRONMENTS FOR HEALTH

The Environments for Health framework developed by the Department of Human Services
in 2001 recognises the impact of the social, built, natural and economic environments on a
community‟s health and wellbeing. This framework ensures that MPHPs can inform other
planning processes effectively and prevent duplication of planning efforts at a local level
both within local government and across a wide range of other local plans, including
community health, mental health and other organisations strategic plans.

To achieve municipal level change, the framework offers mechanisms for public health
programs to improve the health of populations through personal, social and environmental
action, rather than individual treatment. (Environments for Health: Promoting health and
Wellbeing through Built, Social, Economic and natural Environments. DHS 2001)




In 2006 the Environments for Health was evaluated to find out how useful the framework
has been and if it made any real difference to the way local governments plan. The
framework was evaluated using four approaches: document analysis (reviewing 62
MPHPs), one-to-one interviews (with 73 key informants), an online survey (eliciting 108
responses) and community forums at five councils. The results showed that Environments
for Health has had a major impact on the way local government thinks about and plans for
health and wellbeing. Local councils are starting to consider the actions they can take in
each of the built, social, economic and natural environments to improve the health and
wellbeing of their local community.

Respondents identified the types of resources and support they felt they needed to keep
moving forward with Environments for Health. These included:
• more help with the transition from planning into implementation, monitoring and review;
• ongoing training, induction and networking for councillors, senior management and other
staff to support the social model of health and integrated planning;
• resources and activities that speak the language of other sectors, and communicate
effectively with all levels within council;
• more practical examples of actions that could be taken under each of the four domains,
particularly economic; and
• skills to help raise the status of MPHPs.

The full report is available at http://www.health.vic.gov.au/localgov/mphpfr/eval.htm

Moreland Council endorsed this framework for the development of the Moreland Municipal
Public Health Plan 2009 – 2012 at the Council meeting in 2008.



D09/83374                                                                               27
10      WORKING TOGETHER
10.1    PARTNERSHIPS

Partnerships are an important vehicle for bringing together a diversity of skills and
resources for more effective health promotion outcomes. Partnerships can increase the
efficiency of the health and community service system by making the best use of different
but complementary resources. Collaborations, joint advocacy and action can also
potentially make a bigger impact on policy-makers and government. If partnerships are to
be successful, however, they must have a clear purpose, add value to the work of the
partners and be carefully planned and monitored. (The Partnership Analysis Tool. Vic
Health)

The development and implementation of the MPHP will be done in partnership with
stakeholders including the community, local organisations and other levels of government.
The steps in collaboration to do this include:

    Commitment to partnerships;
    Planning with partners;
    Community consultations;
    Sharing of data and evidence;
    Establishment of key priority areas;
    Development of strategies;
    Agreement of deliverables;
    Implementation of strategies;
    Monitoring progress; and
    Evaluation of strategies.


10.2    HEALTH PLANNING NETWORKS

Moreland City Council is a member of a number of local and regional reference groups
and networks, including:

    Planning for a Healthier North;
    Northern Health Primary Care and Population Health Advisory Committee;
    Melbourne Health Primary Care and Population Health Advisory Committee;
    Hume Moreland Primary Care Partnership;
    North West Area Mental Health Service; and
    Northern Region Local Government Health Planners Network.


10.3    ADVISORY GROUPS

Moreland City Council (MCC) has a joint planners network that meets monthly. The
planners include staff across all Council departments responsible for the planning of the
built, natural, economic and social environments.




D09/83374                                                                             28
MCC hosts a steering group for the purpose of developing and implementing the MPHP. It
includes members from: Moreland Community Health Service, Hume Moreland Primary
Care Partnership, North West Area Mental Health Service, Victoria Police, Moreland Hall,
Northern Health, Division of General Practice, Vic Roads, Neighbourhood Houses, and
Department of Human Services.

MCC officers meet regularly with partners from other agencies to plan, share, support and
develop strategic directions for each organisations current health planning initiatives.
Moreland Community Health Service, North West Mental Health Service and the Hume
Moreland Primary Care Partnership are also currently developing health plans and are
working cooperatively to consult the community to ensure our citizens are not „over-
consulted‟ about the same issues.



10.4     WHAT COULD WE DO TOGETHER?

Planners of a range of services that aim to improve health and wellbeing and reduce the
burden of disease, need to be concerned not only with the individual, family, or community,
but also with the context of broad public policies and environmental influences.



10.4.1 Integrated planning

An integrated approach to planning within local governments and with stakeholders and
partners is achieved by thinking about all four environments for health. The following
diagram illustrates examples of areas for inclusion in planning a policy or strategy.


 Altering our surroundings                    Creating opportunities for people to
                                              participate in the life of the community
      buildings
      parks
      facilities                                                            arts and
      roads              Built                        Social                  culture
      paths           Environment                  Environment             sport
                                                                           support
                                                                              services
                                                                            information
                                    Integrated
 Looking after
                                      Action                             Encouraging
 our natural                                                             economic
 surroundings                                                            development
                         Natural                     Economic
                       Environment                  Environment
      natural                                                              job creation
      heritage                                                             mentoring
      land care                                                             subsidies
      waste recycling                                                      incentives
      energy consumption                                                  training


D09/83374                                                                                   29
10.4.1 Increase health and wellbeing

The table below from the Department of Human Services Integrated Health Promotion
Resource Kit lists ways to increase health and wellbeing and the risk factors associated
with poor health.

                                               Protective factors

Healthy conditions &          Psychosocial Factors       Effective health           Healthy Lifestyles
environments                                             Services
                                  Participation in                                    Decreased use
   Safe physical                  civic activities         Provision of               of tobacco and
    environments                   and social                preventative               drugs
   Supportive                     engagement                services                  Regular
    economic and social           Strong social            Access to                  physical activity
    conditions                     networks                  culturally                Balanced
   Regular supply of             Feeling of trust          appropriate health         nutritional intake
    nutritious food and           Feeling of power          services                  Positive mental
    water                          and control over         Community                  health
   Restricted access to           life decisions            participation in the      Safe sexual
    tobacco and drugs             Supportive family         planning & delivery        activity
   Healthy public                 structure                 of health services
    policy and                    Positive self-
    organisational                 esteem
    practice
   Provision for
    meaningful, paid
    employment
   Provision of
    affordable housing


                             Increase quality of life, functional independence, wellbeing
                                      Decrease mortality, morbidity, disability


                                                    Risk factors

Risk conditions                Psychosocial       risk   Behavioural        risk    Physiological        risk
                               factors                   factors                    factors
   Poverty
   Low social status             Isolation                Smoking                   High blood
   Dangerous work                Lack of social           Poor nutritional           pressure
   Polluted                       support                   intake                    High cholesterol
    environment                   Poor social              Physical inactivity       Release of stress
   Natural resource               networks                 Substance abuse            hormone
    depletion                     Low self-esteem          Poor hygiene              Altered levels of
   Discrimination (age,          High self-blame          Being overweight           biochemical
    sex, race, disability)        Low perceived            Unsafe sexual              markers
   Steep power                    power                     activity                  Genetic factors
    hierarchy (wealth,            Loss of meaning
    status, authority)             or purpose
    within a community            Abuse
    and workplace




D09/83374                                                                                                       30
11        WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT MORELAND?

11.1      INDEX OF RELATIVE SOCIO-ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE (SEIFA)

SEIFA data measures the socio-economic wellbeing of Australian communities and
identifies areas of advantage and disadvantage. The Index of Relative Socio-Economic
Disadvantage is derived from attributes such as low income, low educational attainment,
high unemployment, jobs in relatively unskilled occupations and variables that reflect
disadvantage (e.g. figures for Indigenous residents, Separated/Divorced etc).

High scores on the SEIFA Index occur when the area has few families of low income and
few people with little training and in unskilled occupations. Low scores on the Index
indicate occur when the area has many low-income families or people with little training
and in unskilled occupations. It is important to understand that a high score reflects a lack
of disadvantage, rather than high advantage.



11.1.1 SEIFA index for Moreland Suburbs


                                            SEIFA index of disadvantage 2006


 1100

 1050

 1000

  950

  900

  850

  800
                                                                                                                     Pascoe
                                         Coburg    City of            Brunswic   Pascoe Brunswic Brunswic                     Gowanbr
          Fawkner   Glenroy   Hadfield                       Coburg                                       Oak Park    Vale
                                          North   Moreland             k West     Vale     k      k East                        ae
                                                                                                                     South
Series1    905.7    922.6       937      945.3     987.1     995.5     1004.8    1004.9   1021.7   1031.8   1032.1   1038.3   1075.2


Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006, Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA 2006)




D09/83374                                                                                                                      31
Of the thirty one Metropolitan Melbourne Local Government areas, Moreland is the
seventh most disadvantaged.



11.1.2 SEIFA Index of Moreland compared to surrounding LGAs & lowest & highest SEIFA




              SEIFA index of disadvantage 2006: Selected LGA
                                 in the MSD

  1150

  1100

  1050

  1000

   950

   900

   850

   800         Greater                                      Monnee
                          Hume      Darebin     Moreland                Yarra     Melbourne   Boroondara
              Dandenong                                      Valley
    Series1     893.9     965.2      971.6       987.7      1015.6      1019.5     1049.2       1104.5


Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006, Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA 2006)




D09/83374                                                                                                32
11.2      SOCIAL PROFILE OF MORELAND 2008

The following is a summary of the Social Profile 2008 that highlights areas of interest for
the MPHP.



11.2.1 People

In June 2007, the Estimated Resident Population for the City of Moreland was 144,015
people. The population of Moreland has increased by 7,634 people over the past six
years. Moreland‟s total population is expected to rise to 169,012 residents in 2031. This
increase is expected to occur fairly evenly between 2006 and 2031.

Moreland‟s population is ageing and there are a greater proportion of older people in
Moreland when compared to the Metropolitan Statistical Division (MSD). The proportion of
25-44 year olds is higher in Moreland and the proportion of people over 65 years in
Moreland is significantly higher.

The total number of indigenous residents in Moreland increased to 627 people in 2006
from 487 in 2001. The indigenous profile is similar to the non-indigenous profile, however
there are notable differences in education levels, the age profile of the community, housing
tenure and unemployment in the indigenous community.



                       Enum erated population count of Moreland by age 2001 and 2006


  40.0%


  30.0%


  20.0%


  10.0%


   0.0%
              0-4yrs     5-14yrs       15-24yrs      25-44yrs      45-64yrs      65-84yrs   85yrs+

       2001   6.1%        10.8%         13.7%         33.8%         19.1%         14.9%     1.6%
       2006   6.2%        10.3%         13.2%         34.1%         19.8%         14.6%     1.8%




D09/83374                                                                                            33
11.2.2 Cultural diversity



Residents in Moreland come from a range of culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds. Just under one third (32.3%) of Moreland residents were born overseas.
More than half (59%) of all Moreland residents had both parents born overseas which is
significantly higher than the MSD average (52%). The main countries of birth of Moreland
residents, apart from Australia, are similar to those in the previous census and represent
the traditional migrant groups from Europe, including Italy, Greece and the United
Kingdom. The proportion of residents born overseas is decreasing in the Moreland -
Brunswick Statistical Local Area (SLA) and increasing in the Moreland – North SLA.

Just over half of residents (55%) in Moreland speak English at home compared with
almost 68% across the MSD. The main languages other than English spoken at home are
Italian, Greek, Arabic, Turkish and Chinese languages.

The main countries of birth of new arrivals to Moreland differ from the traditional migrant
groups who have settled in Moreland. A high proportion of new arrivals to Moreland are
born in India, China, Pakistan, Lebanon, Sri Lanka, Philippines and Iraq. The majority of
new arrivals (53%) to Moreland arrived under the skilled migration program (nearly double
the 2001 figure), whilst one-third (37%) arrived under the family visa category, and 7%
arrived under the humanitarian program (a decrease of 8% from 2001).




                      Country of birth (excluding Australia): Moreland 2001- 2006 & MSD 2006



             10.0%

              8.0%

              6.0%

              4.0%

              2.0%

              0.0%
                                         United                              New
                       Italy   Greece           Lebanon   China     India             Turkey   Malta   Vietnam
                                        Kingdom                             Zealand
    Moreland - 2001   8.7%     3.4%      2.2%     2.2%     1.1%     0.6%     1.2%     1.4%     1.0%     0.7%
    Moreland - 2006   7.4%     3.0%      2.1%     2.1%     1.4%     1.4%     1.3%     1.2%     0.9%     0.7%
    MSD - 2006        2.1%     1.5%      4.3%     0.4%     1.5%     1.4%     1.5%     0.4%     0.5%     1.6%




D09/83374                                                                                                        34
11.2.3 Religion



In Moreland 72% of the total population are affiliated with a religious faith, which is slightly
higher than the MSD average (68%). Seventeen per cent profess to „no religion‟, which is
slightly lower than the MSD average (20%). The most common religion in Moreland is
Christianity with 61% of residents affiliated with Christianity and the majority of those are
Catholics (37.2%). Those belonging to the Islamic faith have increased over the past
decade from 6% in 1996 to 8% in 2006 and Moreland‟s proportion of followers is 2.5 times
higher than the MSD average.




                       Religious Affiliation: Moreland 2001 - 2006 & MSD 2006

          45.0%

          40.0%

          35.0%

          30.0%

          25.0%

          20.0%

          15.0%

          10.0%

           5.0%

           0.0%
                                                              Uniting              Presbyterian
                     Catholic   Orthodox   Islam   Anglican             Buddhism                  No religion
                                                              Church               & Reformed
   Moreland - 2001   40.2%       9.4%      7.2%     8.1%       2.8%      1.8%         1.8%          13.6%
   Moreland - 2006   37.2%       9.0%      7.9%     6.8%       2.4%      2.0%         1.4%          17.1%
   MSD - 2006        28.4%       6.0%      2.9%     12.0%      4.0%      3.5%         2.3%          20.0%




D09/83374                                                                                                       35
11.2.4 Family Types



In Moreland the proportion of couple families without children remained stable in the
previous ten years at 23% of households and is similar to the metropolitan average.
However the proportion of couple families with children has decreased over the past fifteen
years in Moreland and is notably lower than the metropolitan average. Nearly one third of
households in the Moreland North SLA and Moreland Coburg SLAs are couple families
with children whilst there is a significantly lower proportion in the Moreland Brunswick SLA.

In 2006 the proportion of one-parent family households in Moreland has decreased to
10%, down from 11% in 2001 and is the same as the proportion in the MSD (10%).

The proportion of lone person households in Moreland has increased notably over the past
fifteen years to 27% of all occupied private dwellings in 2006, which is higher than the
metropolitan average. There is a significant difference in the proportion of lone person
households across the municipality and make up almost one third of households in the
Moreland Brunswick SLA. This compares to one quarter in the Moreland North and
Moreland Coburg SLAs.




                                    Household types: Moreland 2001-2006 & MSD 2006

            80.0%

            70.0%

            60.0%

            50.0%

            40.0%

            30.0%

            20.0%

            10.0%

             0.0%
                                          Couple w /o   Couple w ith   Single parent   Lone person
                      Family households                                                              Group households
                                           children      children       households     households

    Moreland - 2001        65.1%            23.5%         28.7%           10.6%          26.5%            6.0%
    Moreland - 2006        62.1%            23.3%         27.4%           10.5%          26.7%            6.7%
    MSD - 2006             68.6%            23.8%         33.9%            5.5%          22.7%            4.3%




D09/83374                                                                                                  36
11.2.5 Housing



There has been an increase in the number of houses in Moreland, rising from 56,450 in
2001 to 59,291 in 2006, or +5.1%. Of these dwellings, 59,231 are private dwellings and
60 are non-private dwellings. The proportion of separate houses in Moreland has
decreased over the past decade while the proportion of flats, units or apartments has
increased over the past fifteen years and the proportion of semi-detached, row or terrace,
townhouses has also increased.




                 Dwelling structure: Moreland 2001 - 2006 & MSD 2006

             80%

             70%

             60%

             50%

             40%

             30%

             20%

             10%

               0%
                                          Semi-detached, row or
                       Separate house                             Flat, unit, apartment
                                           terrace, townhouse
    Moreland - 2001         71%                   17%                     11%
    Moreland - 2006         67%                   14%                     19%
    MSD - 2006              73%                   11%                     15%




D09/83374                                                                                 37
Housing tenure in Moreland varies significantly across the municipality and differs from the
metropolitan average. Moreland has a higher proportion of dwellings that are fully owned
but a lower proportion of dwellings being purchased. However, the proportion of fully
owned dwellings in Moreland has decreased in the last fifteen years, whilst the proportion
of dwellings being purchased has increased.

Moreland has a higher proportion of rented dwellings than compared with the MSD,
especially in the southern end of the municipality where the proportion of rented dwellings
in the Brunswick SLA is nearly double that of the Coburg and North SLAs.




                      Housing tenure: Moreland 2001 - 2006 & MSD 2006

             50%
             45%
             40%
             35%
             30%
             25%
             20%
             15%
             10%
               5%
               0%
                         Fully owned         Being purchased            Rented
    Moreland - 2001         45%                   19%                    28%
    Moreland - 2006         36%                   26%                    29%
    MSD - 2006              33%                   35%                    25%




D09/83374                                                                                38
11.2.6 Employment



Males and females in Moreland have very different employment patterns. Females are
much more likely to work part-time or not to work at all, and they tend to have lower
unemployment rates compared to males in Moreland.

Unemployment in Moreland has always been a significant issue, particularly for young and
mature people. Despite the unemployment rate in Moreland declining to 6.1% in 2006,
Moreland‟s unemployment rate remains slightly higher than the metropolitan average.
Young people in Moreland aged 15-24 years have a significantly higher unemployment
rate at 12.9%.




                      Unemployment rate by age: Moreland 2001-2006 & MSD 2006

            25.0%



            20.0%



            15.0%



            10.0%



            5.0%



            0.0%
                     15-19yrs   20-24yrs   25-34yrs   35-44yrs   44-54yrs   55-64yrs   65yrs+   Total
   Moreland - 2001    20.1%      12.6%      7.8%       7.1%       6.4%       8.6%      4.7%     8.7%
   Moreland - 2006    15.8%      9.9%       5.6%       4.3%       4.6%       5.8%      2.4%     6.1%
   MSD - 2006         14.4%      8.9%       5.0%       4.2%       3.7%       4.0%      2.1%     5.3%




11.2.7 Income

The median individual income of people in Moreland is $413 per week. Moreland residents
have a notably lower median individual weekly income compared to the MSD where the
median is $481 per week. The median individual weekly income varies across the
municipality with the individual weekly income notably higher in the Brunswick SLA ($503)
compared to a lower $418 in the Moreland Coburg SLA and a significantly below average
$351 in the Moreland North SLA.



D09/83374                                                                                               39
11.2.8 Benefit recipients



There were 48,824 Centrelink payments made to Moreland residents as of October 2008.
However this does not mean that 75,332 residents received Centrelink payments as many
people could be in receipt of multiple payments, for example, rent assistance and
Newstart. More than 40% of payments in Moreland are age pension payments.
Approximately 17% of payments are rent assistance payments, 14% are Disability Support
pensions whilst 7% are Newstart Allowance payments.



                                    Benefit recipients: Moreland October 2008


   50.00%

   40.00%

   30.00%

   20.00%

   10.00%

    0.00%
                          Rent                                             Parenting -   Parenting -
               Age                     Disability   New start    Carer                                 Austudy
                       assistance                                            single      partnered

    Series1   42.70%    16.50%         13.90%        6.80%      3.20%           4.00%      3.20%        0.90%




D09/83374                                                                                                        40
11.2.9 Education



There were just over 1,900 children Moreland attending pre-school in 2006 whilst 8,486
children were attending primary school and 6,502 young people were attending secondary
school. Moreland has a considerably below average level of Year 7 students who remain
at school (73%) until Year 12 compared with the MSD (83%).

The proportion of residents in Moreland who have non-school qualifications is increasing
with many more residents in 2006 having completed a non-school qualification compared
to 1991 data (40% compared to 22%).




            Education institution attended: Moreland 2001 - 2006 & MSD
                                        2006

            70.0%

            60.0%

            50.0%

            40.0%

            30.0%

            20.0%

            10.0%

             0.0%
                       Primary:    Primary:     Primary:  Secondary: Secondary: Secondary:
                      Government   Catholic   Independent Government  Catholic  Independent
    Moreland - 2001     56.1%      36.5%         7.4%       58.6%      30.5%       10.9%
    Moreland - 2006     55.9%      34.6%         9.5%       57.9%      29.8%       12.3%
    MSD - 2006          66.2%      22.6%        11.2%       55.5%      23.0%       21.5%




D09/83374                                                                                     41
11.2.10            Occupation and industry



The occupation of residents in Moreland has changed over the past ten years. There has
been an increase in the proportion of managers, professionals, and community and
personal service workers, while there has been a decrease in the proportion of technician
and trades workers, clerical and administrative workers, sales workers, machinery
operators and drivers and labourers.


            Occupation of employed residents: Moreland 2001-2006 & MSD 2006

           30.0%


           25.0%


           20.0%


           15.0%


           10.0%


            5.0%


            0.0%
                                                  Technicians & Community & Clerical &                    Machinery
                      Managers    Professionals      trades       personal administrative Sales workers   operators &    Labourers
                                                     workers       service   workers                        drivers
   Moreland - 2001     9.5%            23.0%         13.6%         8.1%         17.1%         9.5%          7.6%           9.2%
   Moreland - 2006     10.6%           26.1%         12.7%         8.6%         16.5%         9.4%          5.9%           8.1%
   MSD - 2006          12.5%           22.6%         13.6%         8.1%         15.9%        10.2%          6.4%           8.7%



                          Industry of employment: Moreland 2001-2006 & MSD 2006

            16.0%

            14.0%

            12.0%

            10.0%

              8.0%

              6.0%

              4.0%

              2.0%

              0.0%
                       Health care &                                                            Professional,
                                                                               Education &                       Accommodation
                          social         Manufacturing        Retail trade                       scientific &
                                                                                 training                        & food services
                        assistance                                                                technical

    Moreland - 2001        9.4%                13.9%            10.2%             8.7%               7.9%               6.5%
    Moreland - 2006       10.2%                10.0%            10.0%             9.8%               8.5%               6.5%
    MSD - 2006            10.0%                12.9%            11.4%             7.6%               8.3%               5.6%




D09/83374                                                                                                                            42
11.2.11       Internet connection



The 2001 census gathered data on individual computer and Internet usage. In 2006,
however, data was gathered on Internet connectivity within households. The 2006 census
highlights the difference between the Moreland and the MSD. Moreland has a higher
proportion of households without an Internet connection when compared to the MSD.
There are similar proportions of dial-up Internet subscribers in both Moreland and the
MSD. However, the MSD has a higher proportion of Broadband Internet users (44.7%)
compared with Moreland (36.9%).




                 Household internet connection: Moreland & MSD 2006

            50.0%

            45.0%

            40.0%

            35.0%

            30.0%

            25.0%

            20.0%

            15.0%

            10.0%

             5.0%

             0.0%
                      No Internet connection   Broadband           Dial-up
    Moreland - 2006          41.1%              36.9%              17.4%
    MSD - 2006               32.9%              44.7%              18.5%




For more information:
http://www.moreland.vic.gov.au/about-moreland/demographics/research-reports.html




D09/83374                                                                          43
11.3   HEALTH STATUS OF MORELAND

In 2006 data was gathered for the “Health Status in Moreland” report. Information is from
the Burden of Disease estimates produced by the Department of Human Services (2001)
and HealthWiz data prepared by the Department of Health and Ageing.



11.3.1 Prevalence of disease

The National Health priority areas (see page 14) that affect the highest numbers of
residents in Moreland are:

   Mental health disorders (prevalence: 19,393 cases in 2001);
   Injuries (incidence: 10,484 cases);
   Diabetes mellitus (prevalence: 8,818 cases); and
   Asthma (prevalence: 9,535 cases).

The diseases that have the greatest impact on the Moreland community in terms of
premature deaths and years of life lived with disease or injury (Disability-adjusted life
years, DALY rates) are:

   Cancer (DALY rate of 29.5 for males and 24.4 for females in 2001); and
   Cardiovascular disease (26.1 for males and 21.2 for females).

There are some conditions that show significantly higher rates (DALY rates) amongst
Moreland residents than the Victorian average. These are:

   Arthritis and musculo-skeletal diseases in both males and females;
   Asthma in females;
   Cardiovascular diseases in males;
   Diabetes mellitus in females; and
   Mental disorders in both males and females.


11.3.2 Some interesting facts

   Since 2005 the number of births have increased by about 200 per year above the
    average of 2000 each year;
   The age of mothers giving birth is similar to the rest of Melbourne, except for those
    aged under 25 where it is a higher proportion;
   Life expectancy is increasing, 83.8 years for females and 78.3 years for males, but is
    below the state average and that of the northern metropolitan area;
   Disability is estimated to affect almost one in four (22%) of Moreland residents;
   Moreland recorded the 11th highest number of drug related incidences attended by an
    ambulance in the Melbourne Local Government Areas. Alcohol related and heroin
    overdoses are higher in males and other drug overdoses are higher in females;
   The average annual deaths for the 2002 – 2005 period was 1,066.
   Smoking caused 129 of these deaths. Alcohol 21 deaths. Other drugs 4 deaths; and
   Of the 1,066 deaths 7 (0.7%) were due to road accidents. The Victorian average is
    1.2%.

For more information: www.moreland.vic.gov.au
D09/83374                                                                                44
11.3.3 Burden of disease for each age group in Moreland

The following graphs are a summary of the Burden of Disease Study 2001 which is a
comprehensive assessment of the health status of the Victorian population. Oral health,
including dental caries, has the highest percentage for all age groups and has been placed
onto a separate graph. The following graphs highlight the prevalence of disease in
specified age groups.


                                            Burden of disease: Oral health

         100
                                                                                         91.1
         90

         80

         70

         60
                                                                           44.9
         50
                     40              41.2                  39.6
         40

         30

         20

         10

          0
               0 - 4 years        5 - 14 years         15 - 24 years   25 - 64 years   65+ years




                                     Burden of disease: 0 - 4 years

                   9.2
  10.0
   9.0                                           8.2
   8.0
   7.0
   6.0
   5.0
   4.0
   3.0
                                                                          1.9
   2.0
                                                                                                   0.1
   1.0
   0.0
                  abnormalities




                                                                           Asthma




                                                                                                   Epilepsy
                                              incidence
                   Congenital




                                                Injury




D09/83374                                                                                                     45
                                                                                                                                                                      0.0
                                                                                                                                                                                    2.0
                                                                                                                                                                                            4.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                  6.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                        8.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                              10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      12.0




                             0.0
                                   1.0
                                           2.0
                                                     3.0
                                                           4.0
                                                                   5.0
                                                                         6.0
                                                                               7.0
                                                                                     8.0
                                                                                           9.0
                                                                                                       10.0




D09/83374
                  Asthma




                                                                                                 8.9
                                                                                                                                                           Asthma

                                                                                                                                                                                                                9.8
            Alcohol abuse




                                                                 4.0
             dependence                                                                                                                                        Falls




                                                                                                                                                                                          3.1
            Social phobia




                                               1.8
                                                                                                                                                     Road & traffic




                                                                                                                                                                              0.5
                     Falls




                                               1.8
                                                                                                                                                       Vision loss:




                                                                                                                                                                             0.4
                                                                                                                                                       spectacles

              Depression




                                               1.7
                                                                                                                                                       Depression
                                                                                                                                                                             0.3

            Road & traffic




                                         1.3
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Burden of disease: 5 - 14 years




                                                                                                              Burden of disease: 15 - 24 years
                                                                                                                                                     Social phobia
                                                                                                                                                                             0.3




               Borderline
               personality




                                    0.7
                disorder


                                                                                                                                                 Intentional injuries
                                                                                                                                                                            0.1




                  Suicide




                                    0.5
                                                                                                                                                           Anxiety
                                                                                                                                                                            0.1




            Heroin abuse




                                    0.3




46
                                                                                                                                                                0.0
                                                                                                                                                                        1.0
                                                                                                                                                                                    2.0
                                                                                                                                                                                          3.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                4.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                        5.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                              6.0
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          7.0




                               0.0
                                             10.0
                                                                 20.0
                                                                          30.0
                                                                                 40.0
                                                                                        50.0
                                                                                                      60.0




D09/83374
                                                                                                                                                Hearing loss

                                                                                                                                                                                                                           6.6
               Hearing loss




                                                                                               50.5
                                                                                                                                              Alcohol abuse                                                                6.5
                  Diabetes                                                                                                                     dependence




                                                                        25.4
                                                                                                                                                     Asthma
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    6.0

              Osteoarthritis




                                                          12.8
                                                                                                                                                 Depression
                    Asthma                                                                                                                                                                        3.9




                                                    7.0
                                                                                                                                                    Diabetes
                                                                                                                                                                                                  3.8


              Heart disease




                                                    5.9
            Emphesysema &                                                                                                                               Falls
                                                                                                                                                                              1.1




                                                5.9
              bronchitis

                                                                                                                                             Emphesysema &                  0.9
                  Dementia




                                                5.3
                                                                                                                                               bronchitis


                       Falls                                                                                                                   Osteoarthritis
                                                                                                                                                                            0.8




                                                3.9
                                                                                                                                               Road & traffic
                                                                                                                                                                            0.5




                    Anxiety




                                       3.0
                                                                                                             Burden of disease: 65 + years
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Burden of disease: 25 - 64 years




                Depression                                                                                                                   Benign prostate
                                                                                                                                                                      0.4




                                      2.0
             Alcohol abuse
                                                                                                                                               Heart disease
                                                                                                                                                                      0.3




                                      2.0
              dependence


              Social phobia                                                                                                                          Suicide
                                                                                                                                                                      0.3




                                      1.6
                                                                                                                                                 Rheumatoid
               Road traffic




                                     0.3
                                                                                                                                                                      0.3




                                                                                                                                                  arthritis




47
11.4   MORELAND’S COMMUNITY INDICATORS

Since 2005 Moreland City Council has undertaken the “Community Indicators Survey:
Triple Bottom Line”. This is a telephone survey with approximately 600 residents across
Moreland.

In 2005, the first version of the Community Indicators Survey was developed primarily
around the Moreland Public Health Plan. Following the successful development of the
Community Indicators project in 2005, 2006 and 2007, a research consultancy firm
administered a revised version of the survey questionnaire in May and June 2008 to
expand the scope of the survey to be more inclusive of economic and environmental
considerations.

For the purposes of this document a selection of indicators has been included and shows
the comparisons over the last 4 years in most cases.



11.4.1 Employment

In 2008 residents in the workforce strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their
employment although they were less likely to agree that the wages they received were fair
for the job they do. While the majority of residents agreed the local economy was strong,
fewer residents felt that there are good employment opportunities.


                                     Employment

                         100%


                             90%


                             80%


                             70%


                             60%


                             50%


                             40%
                                   2005      2006     2007        2008
       Local economy is strong     70%       69%      74%         76%
       Satisfied with your         88%       93%      89%         92%
       employment
       Good employment             63%       53%      63%         63%
       opportunities
       Wages are fair              83%       80%      78%         79%




D09/83374                                                                             48
11.4.2 Education



In 2008, residents strongly agreed that their area comprised of good quality primary
schools and that there were opportunities for learning and development for all ages. In
contrast, residents were less likely to perceive that their area contains good quality
government secondary schools.




                                    Education
                    100%

                     90%


                     80%

                     70%


                     60%

                     50%

                     40%
                             2005         2006   2007    2008

      Good quality primary   78%           81%   77%     86%
      schools
      Good quality govt      48%           53%   50%     61%
      secondary schools
      Opportunities for      72%           81%   79%     85%
      learning




D09/83374                                                                           49
11.4.3 Housing



In 2008, residents strongly agreed that their area is a good place to live and that their
housing was appropriate to their needs. In contrast, residents were much less likely to
agree that their area is still affordable to live in. Around 1 in 3 surveyed disagreed that the
sort of housing being built in their neighbourhood is appropriate for the area.




                                       Housing
                          100%

                           90%


                           80%

                           70%

                           60%


                           50%


                           40%
                                    2005         2006   2007   2008

       Housing appropriate to       89%          91%    91%    90%
       needs
       Housing built appropriate    68%          60%    71%    68%
       for area
       Your area is a good          95%          95%    94%    93%
       place to live
       Affordable to live in area   68%          66%    61%    51%




D09/83374                                                                                   50
11.4.4 Built & Natural Environment



In 2008, residents reported highly positive perceptions of the built and natural
environment. A majority felt they could cope with the impact of water restrictions, that local
shopping areas provide for their basic needs and that there are good parks and open
areas in their neighbourhood.

Residents were less likely to agree that they could cope with the impact of climate change
and that the environment is being managed for the benefit of current and future
generations.




                              Built & Natural Environment
                        100%

                          90%

                          80%

                          70%

                          60%

                          50%

                          40%
                                    2005       2006         2007   2008

       Environment managed          69%         74%         69%    70%
       for current & future
       Local shopping provides      90%         90%         91%    90%
       basic needs
       Good parks & open            86%         90%         84%    87%
       areas in neighbourhood
       Can cope w ith impact of                             68%    76%
       climate change




D09/83374                                                                                  51
11.4.5 Early Years



The 2008 Community Indicators showed that agreement scores for statements linked to
the early years varied considerably. Although residents strongly agreed that their area was
a good place to raise a family, they were less likely to agree that that there was plenty for
young people to do around their local area or that families have adequate access to
childcare.




                                   Early Years
                       100%

                         90%

                         80%

                         70%

                         60%

                         50%

                         40%
                                 2005       2006   2007      2008

       Good place to raise a     89%        91%    91%       91%
       family
       Govt services provide     72%        80%    78%       80%
       support to families
       Adequate access to        66%        67%    64%       68%
       childcare
       Plenty for young people   53%        57%    56%       58%
       to do




D09/83374                                                                                 52
11.4.6 Access & Availability of Services



On the whole in 2008, residents revealed moderate to high agreement with statements
related to the access and availability of services, indicating highly positive perceptions.
Residents were most likely to agree they could afford the medical services they need and
that their local area has good health and community services. In contrast, they were less
likely to agree that the elderly have adequate access to aged care services.




                            Access & Availability of Services


                    100%

                     90%


                     80%

                     70%

                     60%


                     50%

                     40%
                                 2005         2006         2007   2008

       Good health &              81%          87%          83%   86%
       community services
       Adequate access to         66%          77%          67%   67%
       aged care services
       Can afford medical         81%          81%          83%   87%
       services




D09/83374                                                                               53
11.4.7 Personal Well-being & Safety



In 2008 residents typically reported strongly agreement with all aspects related to personal
well-being and safety, indicating positive perceptions of this area. Residents were most
likely to agree that they can access help from family, friends and neighbours when in need,
that they live a healthy lifestyle and that their area is a safe place to live. In contrast they
were less likely to agree that they can cope with the amount of stress in their family or
home life, that they can cope with hot weather in summer or that they eat the
recommended servings of fresh fruit and vegetables on most days.




                             Personal Well-being & Safety
                        100%


                            95%


                            90%


                            85%


                            80%


                            75%


                            70%
                                   2005        2006         2007   2008

       Your area is a safe         85%         85%          87%    86%
       place to live
       You lead a healthy          95%         89%          91%    90%
       lifestyle
       Get help from friends,      90%         91%          89%    91%
       family & neighbours
       Can cope w ith stress in    90%         89%          85%    84%
       family & home life




D09/83374                                                                                    54
                            Personal Well-being & Safety


                        100%

                           90%

                           80%

                           70%

                           60%

                           50%

                           40%
                                  2005        2006         2007   2008

      Eat 2 serves of fruit & 5                            97%    79%
      serves of veges most
      days
      Can cope w ith hot                                   77%    82%
      w eather in summer
      Spend at least 30 mins a     79%        74%          68%    64%
      day doing some brisk
      physical activity




D09/83374                                                                55
11.4.8 Social Inclusion & Social Support



In 2008 residents strongly agreed that cultural diversity enriches local community life and
that people from different backgrounds are made welcome in their neighbourhood.
However agreement that individuals with disabilities have good access to public transport
was much weaker in comparison. It should be noted that a high number of respondents
could not respond to statements regarding people with disabilities. Although residents
mostly agreed that they were valued by the community, the agreement score for this
statement (79%) was also moderate.




                          Social Inclusion & Social Support
                         100%

                          95%

                          90%

                          85%

                          80%

                          75%

                          70%

                          65%

                          60%
                                  2005        2006        2007   2008

      You feel valued by your      73%         77%        73%    79%
      community
      People w ith a disability    72%         81%        77%    75%
      are included
      People from different        90%         91%        86%    93%
      ethnic backgrounds are
      made w elcome
      Cultural diversity           92%         92%        92%    94%
      enriches community life




D09/83374                                                                               56
11.4.9 Social Participation



Moreland residents strongly agreed they could get to know their neighbours and that there
was a good sense of community in their local area, hence the high overall score for this
area in 2008.




                               Social Participation
                     100%

                       90%

                       80%

                       70%

                       60%

                       50%

                       40%
                               2005         2006      2007   2008

       There is a positive      82%         80%       82%    84%
       sense of community in
       your area
       You can get to know      85%         84%       83%    87%
       your neighbours
       Attended a community     48%         49%       45%    44%
       event in the past 6
       months




D09/83374                                                                             57
11.4.10            Recreation, Arts & Leisure



In 2008 shows residents strongly agreed they could access a variety of recreation and
leisure activities in their local community. However a lower agreement score was recorded
for access to a variety of arts and cultural opportunities.




                             Recreation, Arts & Leisure

                           100%


                            90%


                            80%


                            70%


                            60%


                            50%


                            40%
                                     2005    2006         2007   2008

          Access variety of arts &   86%      89%         88%    92%
          leisure activities
          Access variety of arts &   75%      77%         75%    84%
          cultural opportunities




D09/83374                                                                             58
11.4.11             Social & Economic Circumstances



In 2008 agreement scores for social and economic items were the lowest compared to
other indicator areas, revealing the least positive perceptions were of this area. Residents
somewhat agreed that people had enough money to meet their needs, however they
generally disagreed with the idea of being better off financially compared with the same
time last year.




                              Social & Economic Circumstances
                            100%

                             90%

                             80%

                             70%

                             60%

                             50%

                             40%

                             30%
                                      2005      2006       2007   2008

          You have enough             72%        68%        77%   73%
          money to meet your
          needs
          Number of electronic                   37%        43%   53%
          gaming machines is
          acceptable
          People w ith disabilities              75%        68%   69%
          are able to access
          services
          People w ith mental
          health problems able to
          access services




D09/83374                                                                                59
12     WHERE TO NEXT?
12.1   CONSULTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Community consultations that have been undertaken by Council over the last two years
will be used to inform the MPHP. These include: the Older Years Strategy; the Youth
Summit; the Child Friendly Cities Summit; the Moreland integrated Transport Strategy; the
Coburg, Glenroy and Brunswick Structure plans.

Consultations with the community are being conducted in partnership with Moreland
Community health Service, the North West Mental Health Service and the Hume/Moreland
Primary Care Partnership. They include written surveys, a telephone survey, focus groups
and forums.



12.2   DEVELOPMENT OF THE MPHP

In consultation with Councillors, Council departments and partner agencies key priority
areas for action will be identified and agreed interventions will be developed.

A draft MPHP will be presented to Council for endorsement and release for community
feedback. Any suggested changes additions or amendments will be endorsed by Council
before final adoption in November 2009.



12.3   IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MPHP

The MPHP will be implemented between late 2009 and 2012. Annual action plans will be
developed and reports will be provided to Council each year. The Moreland Health Safety
and Wellbeing Leadership Group and officers across Council Departments will oversee the
implementation of the plan. An evaluation will be conducted in the final year.



12.4   FOR MORE INFORMATION

If you would like to speak to someone at Moreland City Council in regards to the Municipal
Public Health Plan please contact:

Lynn Waters
Community Wellbeing Officer


Phone: (03) 9240 1224
Email: lwaters@moreland.vic.gov.au


Days: Monday to Thursday




D09/83374                                                                              60

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:11
posted:7/26/2011
language:English
pages:60