Facilities Master Plan

					Facilities Master Plan


    October 31, 2008




                                CSD Architects
                       Facilities Planning Associates
                            Century Engineering
                         Mahan Rykiel Associates
                               Gipe Associates
      Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


 PRINCE GEORGE’S COMMUNITY COLLEGE
        FACILITIES MASTER PLAN

                         CONTENTS

Chapter                   Title                                  Pages


                          Foreword                                  1

                          Introduction                              1

  1                       Overview of the College                1-1 – 1-8

  2                       Background Data                        2-1 – 2-16

  3                       Space Needs                            3-1 – 3-17

  4                       Facilities                             4-1 – 4-79

                          • Buildings

                          • Central Heating & Cooling Plant

                          • Electrical & Lighting Systems

                          • Special Systems

                          • Sustainable Practice and Planning

  5                       Site                                   5-1 – 5-19

  6                       Capital Projects                       6-1 – 6-3

  7                       Site Development Plan                  7-1 – 7-13

  8                       Extension Centers                      8-1 – 8-24




                        October 31, 2008
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                                  FOREWORD

As a compendium of information concerning academic programs, enrollment, and physical facilities, this Facilities
Master Plan establishes a framework for the orderly development of all capital improvements to support the role and
mission of Prince George’s Community College. This document serves as a planning tool that can be used to guide
physical growth and modifications to facilities, and to determine capital improvement priorities. Because of inevitable,
unforeseen changes in programs, priorities, policies, and funding, this Facilities Master Plan should be viewed as a
fluid document for making decisions regarding the College’s physical resources. As facility and site development
needs change or newly identified, they must be incorporated into subsequent plan updates.

The planning process for development of this plan is manifest in a long range planning document that addresses a
broad range of subjects:
    • Review of the College’s vision, mission, functional and instructional program emphases, and organizational
        structure
    • Description of the student clientele in terms of credit and non-credit enrollment and choice of academic
        programs
    • Academic programs and institutional growth
    • Inventory of existing facilities on the main campus and extension centers and patterns of physical
        development
    • Identification of projects that are needed to support the programs, faculty & staff, and students for the next 10
        years (the planning horizon for this plan) and beyond

The information contained herein serves various purposes. It affords the College a reference that can be used to
facilitate communication with the Prince George’s Community College community, with representatives of state review
agencies, and with elected officials. It provides the rationale for physical improvements and serves as the basis for
long range campus and system development. Inventory data provided by the College were consolidated and are
presented in the plan. Alternative site development options were presented and distilled to a preferred scheme
included in this plan. Recommendations are suggested for the renovation, replacement, and new construction as
appropriate.




                                                    October 31, 2008
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                                 INTRODUCTION

Founded in 1958 in temporary facilities, later moving into the Largo campus with its first permanent buildings in 1967,
Prince George’s Community College has grown significantly, now serving more than 40,000 students annually. The
Largo campus continues to operate as the hub of the College system and is supplemented by locations in four
extension centers throughout Prince George’s County. The College reaches many County residents with its face-to-
face programs at the main campus, the extension centers, and its on-line programs. Since the original 1967 buildings,
the College has added several significant buildings, has just begun a major renovation of the library, and has
completed design for a new Health Studies facility. In addition, the College has been regularly upgrading its
infrastructure and is planning more infrastructure projects in its capital improvement program. The grounds of the
College offer pleasing views, and the College community appears to appreciate the efforts of the maintenance staff.

In the past 40 years, the changing character of the campus has reflected the changing character of the County, as the
County has moved from a suburban/rural setting to more urban/suburban. This is most directly visible at the University
Town Center in Hyattsville, one of the extension centers. The Largo campus can accommodate growth for several
more years, certainly within the 10-year planning horizon of the Facilities Master Plan. As the College continues to
serve its population base, it is also witnessing the growing awareness by its students of other higher education choices
and their own improving campuses and facilities. As much as the College has invested in its physical plant in recent
years, there is still much that needs attention.

This plan recognizes several needs, all ultimately related to facilities:
    • Accommodating the academic programs
    • Accommodating the students, faculty, and staff
    • Providing sufficient space of appropriate quality for the most effective delivery of programs
    • Renovating the facilities in need of renovation
    • Building new facilities as needed
    • Serving the community
    • Providing a safe and pleasant campus and facilities for the College community
    • Recognizing the College’s responsibility to be a good steward of the environment

The campus facilities are aging, and several of the main buildings have not undergone significant renovations in many
years; some, never. The largest category of needed improvements is renovations to these buildings, involving over
400,000 square feet of space, not including the current renovations to the library. The plan also identifies
approximately 180,000 square feet of new facilities to be considered for construction, not including the scheduled new
Health Studies facility. Along with this will be necessary infrastructure support, both within and outside the buildings,
and between the main campus and extension centers. Considerable resources will be needed, and, while several of
the needs are immediate, it will take several years simply to obtain funding for all the projects. It will be necessary for
the College to prioritize the projects and, likely, to make partial or temporary improvements until funding is in place.




                                                     October 31, 2008
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                             CHAPTER 1
                                   Overview of the College
                                      Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                                 CHAPTER 1
                                          OVERVIEW OF THE COLLEGE

Founded in 1958, Prince George’s Community College (PGCC) is a public, open-admissions, two-year degree-granting
institution primarily serving the residents and business community of Prince George’s County, Maryland by offering
high quality learning opportunities and community outreach. A comprehensive suburban institution serving a broad
constituency, PGCC is the fourth largest of Maryland’s 16 public two-year colleges. PGCC offers a wide range of
transfer, career, continuing education and personal development education programs to more than 40,000 students
annually. The College plays a vital role in the economic development initiatives of Prince George’s County and the
State of Maryland.

The College’s main campus is located on a 150-acre site in Largo near the geographic center of Prince George’s
County, and only minutes from the nation’s capital. PGCC has extension centers at Andrews Air Force Base, the
Laurel College Center, the Skilled Trades Center in Camp Springs and the University Town Center in Hyattsville.

Figure 1-1
Prince George’s Community College Vicinity Map




                                                                                Prince George’s
                                                                                Community College (Largo)




PGCC awards associate of arts, associate of arts in teaching, associate in applied science and associate of science
degrees and certificates of accomplishment and letters of recognition in 87 fields of study. Many students select
transfer programs that allow them to continue on to a four-year college for a baccalaureate degree. The College offers
an array of career-oriented programs that prepare students for immediate employment after graduation. Workforce
Development and non-credit courses are offered in the allied health professions, computer training, languages and
communication as well as offerings designed specifically for special populations such as senior citizens and youth.

As reported by the Maryland Association of Community Colleges, “the College was named as a top performer in the
national Community College Survey of Student Engagement and was recognized by the American Association of
Colleges and Universities as one of 16 institutions in the country serving as a national model of best practices and
innovation in undergraduate education.”

Prince George’s Community College is fully accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary
Schools.




Chapter 1 Overview of the College                        October 31, 2008                                              1-1
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


MISSION

Prince George’s Community College offers opportunities for individuals to realize their potential in a challenging,
learning-centered environment. The college provides cost effective, high-quality programs and services that respond to
student and community needs.


VISION

Prince George’s Community College will excel as a national leader, recognized for the quality of its programs and
students in an intellectually vibrant, technologically enhanced, learning-centered environment that is responsive to
community and workforce needs.


STATEMENT OF VALUES

Prince George’s Community College values learning centeredness in an environment that emphasizes high standards,
collaboration and engagement, and pride in the leadership and accomplishments of all members of the college
community. As a learning community, we value:

    Excellence: We strive to ensure quality outcomes through rigorous learning and training programs designed to
       develop the mind as well as build character.

    Success: We believe all individuals have the potential to realize their goals.

    Diversity: We promote opportunities to expand our world view through exposure and greater understanding of all
        peoples, cultures, and lifestyles.

    Respect: We treat every person with the same humanity and courtesy that we expect for ourselves.

    Professionalism: We believe all individuals will approach their responsibilities ethically, fairly and with high
        standards.

    Lifelong learning: We promote learning and development at all stages of life. We believe learning takes place at
         all times both inside and outside of the classroom. We honor and embrace all forms of learning both formal
         and informal.


STRATEGIC GOALS

PGCC’s Strategic Plan for 2006–2010, “Realizing Dreams through a Culture of Learning,” defines the Institution’s
commitment to:

         Lifelong Success for All Students

         Academic and Career Pathways through Collaborations

         Technological Investment in People and Solutions

         An Institutional Culture that Embraces Learning Centeredness

Chapter 1 Overview of the College                      October 31, 2008                                                1-2
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


         An Enhanced Total Work Environment

         An Enhanced Physical Environment

         Increased Sources of Revenue


GOVERNANCE AND ORGANIZATION

PGCC’s governance is vested in the eight-member Board of Trustees of the College. Seven of its members are
appointed, by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate, to six-year terms. Each academic year a
student is selected to serve as a voting member of the Board. Student representation is achieved through a
comprehensive application and selection process, coordinated by the Office of College Life.

The Board is responsible for setting policy for the institution and the selection of the President of the College. The
President has overall operational authority and responsibility for Prince George’s Community College and as such,
exercises general supervision of all divisions. The President shares administrative responsibility with vice-presidents
and the Executive Assistant to the President each with a broad range of responsibilities for Academic Affairs,
Administration and Finance, President’s Office Staff, Student Services, Technology Services, and Workforce
Development and Continuing Education. These officers comprise the “Senior Team” which administers the day-to-day
operations of the College. Faculty, staff and students also participate in the governance of the College through the
College-wide Forum and various standing and ad hoc committees. The faculty, administrative staff, classified staff,
and student governance organizations represent the four distinct constituent populations.


STUDENT GOVERNMENT

The College encourages students to assume the responsibilities of self-government recognizing this is an important
facet of higher education. The student body is known as the Student Governance Board (SGB). The SGB is the
governing body for the Associated Students of Prince George’s Community College, whose purpose is to facilitate
student involvement in the administrative, legislative, and judicial processes of the institution.


STUDENT BODY CHARACTERISTICS

The student body of Prince George’s Community College is comprised of individuals with a wide variety of
experiences, goals and educational backgrounds. The College is a community of 17,700 credit and 22,400 non-credit
learners. The following table shows the diversity of the student body in the fall semester of 2007.




Chapter 1 Overview of the College                      October 31, 2008                                              1-3
                                        Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 1-1
Headcount Credit Enrollment Characteristics: Fall 2007


                                                             Percent                                        Percent
          Characteristic                   Number            of Total         Characteristic       Number   of Total

      Full-Time/Part-Time                                                            Age
Full-Time                                    3,007              25% Under 20                        2,930      25%
Part-Time                                    8,854              75% 20-29                           4,797      40%
              Total                         11,861                  30-39                           2,006      17%
             Gender                                                 40-59                           1,828      15%
Female                                       7,596              64% 60+                               300       3%
Male                                         4,265              36% Mean Age                           29
            Ethnicity                                                           Program
African-American/Black                       9,197              78% Transfer                        5,134      43%
American Indian                                 57               0% Career                          5,453      46%
Asian or Pacific Islander                      501               4% Letter of Recognition/Other     1,274      11%
Hispanic/Latino                                475               4%
White                                          981               8%
Other                                          650               5%



FACULTY AND STAFF

During the academic year 2007-2008, PGCC employed 735 full-time faculty, administrative, and support staff. In
addition, the College employed 1,399 part-time faculty and staff. The following table illustrates the distribution of
personnel who are critical to the mission, strategic priorities and learning experience at Prince George’s Community
College.

Table 1-2
Current Faculty and Staff


                                                     2007 (Authorized)
         Category                     FT                PT        Total         FTEF
Faculty (Credit)                     244               451          695          357
Faculty (Non-Credit)                   0               354          354           89
    Sub-Total Faculty                244               805        1,049          445

Administrative                        55                 1             56            na
Other Professional                    97                52            149            na
Support                              339               541            880            na
     Sub-Total Staff                 491               594          1,085            na

  Total Faculty and Staff            735             1,399          2,134            445

Source: Maryland Association of Community Colleges




Chapter 1 Overview of the College                                 October 31, 2008                                      1-4
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

As a public comprehensive, open admissions two-year suburban community college, PGCC offers a wide range of
transfer, workforce development, continuing education and personal development education programs. These
programs lead to the Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.), and
Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) degrees and certificates and letters of recognition in specialized areas. During
the 2007-2008 academic year, the College offered 87 programs in transfer and career areas plus an array of non-credit
courses and community service programs. In addition to programs offered at the Largo Campus, programs are offered
at various off-campus sites throughout Prince George’s County. A more detailed examination of PGCC’s instructional
programs is presented in Chapter 2.

As of fall semester 2007 Prince George’s Community College is fully accredited by the Middle States Commission on
Higher Education. Programs within the College are currently fully approved or accredited as follows:

                 Program                                                    Accreditation
 Early Childhood Education                        National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
 A.A.S. and A.A.T.

 Electronic Engineering Technology                The Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc.
 A.A.S.                                           (TAC/ABET)

 Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic           Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems
 A.A.S. and Certificate                           (MIEMSS), The Emergency Medical Services Board

 Health Information Management                    Commission of Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information
 A.A.S.                                           Management Education (CAHIM)

 Nuclear Medicine                                 Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear
 A.A.S. and Certificate                           Medicine Technology (JRCNMT)

 Nursing LPN                                      Approved by The Maryland Board of Nursing
 Certificate

 Nursing RN                                       The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC)
 A.S.                                             Approved by The Maryland Board of Nursing

 Radiography                                      Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology
 A.A.S.                                           (JRCERT)

 Respiratory Therapy                              Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC)
 A.A.S.




Chapter 1 Overview of the College                      October 31, 2008                                                1-5
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


LARGO CAMPUS

The Largo Campus is located on a 150-acre site at the intersection of Maryland Route 202 and Campus Way South in
Largo, Maryland. Accessible by public bus transportation, Prince George’s Community College enjoys a campus that
has both a suburban character and physical environment. The campus consists of sixteen permanent buildings and
eighteen temporary modular buildings that were built for use as overflow space. Total campus facilities contain
approximately 831,000 gross square feet (GSF) and 569,000 net assignable square feet (NASF) of space. Eighteen
designated parking areas, which fan out from the campus core, provide parking for approximately 3,000 vehicles.

Figure 1-2
Largo Campus Map




Chapter 1 Overview of the College                      October 31, 2008                                       1-6
                                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


The following table contains a programmatic description of each of the campus buildings. Further detailed information
relative to each building is provided in Chapter 4.

Table 1-3
Buildings (Largo Campus)


              Building                              Built        Renovated          GSF       NASF                   Primary Use
Accokeek Hall                                       1985                          74,626     58,318   Library/Study
Bladen Hall                                         1967          2004/2007      103,817     64,982   Office, Instruction, Study
Center for Advanced Technology                      2007                          73,080     50,478   Instruction, Office, Study
Chesapeake Hall                                     1999                          65,327     38,011   Instruction, Office, Study
Childtime Children's Center                         1976                          12,826     10,008   Childcare
Continuing Education                                1998                          15,315     11,332   Instruction
Facilities Management                               1976                          13,945     11,632   Shops, Storage
Kent Hall                                           1967                          30,738     18,939   Office
Lanham Hall                                         1969                          77,175     48,708   Instruction, Office, Study
Largo Student Center                                1973                          69,116     50,742   Dining, Bookstore, Meeting
Marlboro Hall                                       1975                         129,963     77,564   Instruction, Office
Novak Field House                                   1967                          35,327     26,013   Athletics, Physical Education/Wellness
Queen Anne Fine Arts                                1967                          33,235     22,632   Assembly, Office
R.I. Bickford Natatorium                            1991                          47,139     39,254   Athletics, Physical Education/Wellness
Sculpture & Ceramics                                1972                           4,866      4,324   Instruction
Warehouse Building                                  1967                           9,290      9,236   Storage
Sub-Totals: Permanent                                                            795,785    542,173

Temporary      Buildings (15)                       1974                          11,520     10,415   Instruction, Office
Temporary      Office (1)                           2002                           7,122      4,823   Office
Temporary      Service (1)                          2002                           2,821      2,581   Office
Temporary      Classroom (1)                        2002                          13,395      9,472   Instruction, Office
Sub-Totals: Overflow                                                              34,858     27,291

Totals: Largo Campus                                                             830,643    569,464

Data Sou rce: Prince Geo rge' s Comm unity Colleg e F acil iti es Man agemen t




EXTENSION CENTERS

In addition to the facilities at Largo, the College also has a presence at four additional county locations. It occupies
over 45,000 net square feet of space at Andrews Air Force Base, Laurel College Center, Skilled Trades Center and
University Town Center. The College offers both credit and non-credit continuing education courses at these locations.

Andrews Air Force Base is located near Suitland Parkway and Maryland Route 4 in Morningside. A total of 6,913 net
square feet of space, in two adjacent buildings, is used for the following purposes: Classroom (3,845), Laboratory
(1982) and Office (1,086).

Laurel College Center is located at 312 Marshall Avenue in Laurel. This site is unique in that it is occupied in
partnership between Prince George’s Community College and Howard Community College. Of the 23,256 net square


Chapter 1 Overview of the College                                        October 31, 2008                                                  1-7
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


feet of space assigned to the two colleges, Prince George’s uses 11,630 net square feet for the following purposes:
Classroom (6,623), Laboratory (2,983), Office (1,743) and Food Facility (281).

Skilled Trades Center, PGCC’s newest extension center, is located at 6400 Old Branch Avenue in Temple Hills. Unlike
the other extension centers, this 8,244 GSF building is owned by the College. Dedicated to meeting the training needs
of the skilled construction trades industry, these facilities are used in a cooperative joint venture arrangement with
Southern Management Corporation. Skilled Trades contains a total of 5,397 net square feet of space of which 82% is
dedicated to primary instruction. The remainder is used for instructional support activities.

University Town Center is located at 6505 Belcrest Road in Hyattsville. A total of 21,439 net square feet of space is
used for the following purposes: Classroom (8,977), Laboratory (6,859), Office (3,003), Study (756), Lounge (1,367),
Data Processing (280) and Storage (197).


A more detailed discussion of these extension centers is found in Chapter 8.




Chapter 1 Overview of the College                      October 31, 2008                                               1-8
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                     CHAPTER 2
                                                 Background Data
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                                CHAPTER 2
                                             BACKGROUND DATA
GLOSSARY

This glossary contains brief definitions of generic terms related to educational facilities planning and explanations of
the acronyms and abbreviations referred to in the remainder of this document.

Bound Volume                      The physical space required to accommodate a variety of library materials in amounts
Equivalent (BVE)                  equal to one single typical book.

Class Laboratory                  Spaces that are used primarily for formally or regularly scheduled classes that require
                                  special purpose equipment for a specific room configuration for student participation,
                                  experimentation, observation, or practice in an academic discipline.

Classroom                         Spaces that are not tied to as specific subject or discipline by equipment or room
                                  configuration.

Core Space                        Space necessary because of existence of the institution or program without regard to other
                                  factors.

Credit Hour                       A numerical value awarded a student for successfully completing a course.

Facilities Inventory              Room-by-room and building-by-building listing of assignable spaces, their primary use,
                                  their size and their capacity.

Full-Time Equivalent Faculty      A base factor statistic equal to full-time faculty plus 25% of all part-time faculty. Note: This
(FTEF)                            statistic is used in this document for facilities planning purposes only, and the
                                  calculation may differ from the FTEF computed for budgetary or other reporting
                                  purposes.

Full-Time Equivalent Student      The total number of on campus credit hours taught during a given semester, divided by 15.
(FTE or FTES)                     Note: This statistic is used in this document for facilities planning purposes only,
                                  and the calculation may differ from the FTE computed for budgetary or other
                                  reporting purposes.

Full-Time Day Equivalent          The total number of on campus credit hours taught before 5:00 p.m. during a given
Student                           semester, divided by 15. Note: This statistic is used in this document for facilities
(FTDE or FTDES)                   planning purposes only, and the calculation may differ from the FTDE computed for
                                  budgetary or other reporting purposes.

Gross Square Feet (GSF)           The sum of square feet of space in a building included within the outside faces of exterior
                                  walls for all stories or areas that have floor surface. Included are all structural, mechanical,
                                  service and circulation areas.

Net Assignable Square Feet        The sum of all areas on all floors of a building assigned to, or available for assignment to
(NASF)                            an occupant for specific use. Excluded are those spaces defined as structural,
                                  mechanical, service and circulation areas.

On-Campus                         Refers to PGCC’s Largo campus only.

Student Contact Hour              A measure of time of scheduled interface between students and teacher. Usually
                                  expressed in terms of Weekly Student Contact Hour (WSCH), which is the number of hours
                                  per week of required interface.

Chapter 2 Background Data                              October 31, 2008                                                              2-1
                                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


INSTRUCTIONAL ORGANIZATION

Prince George’s Community College’s instructional organization is tailored to specifically meet the demands and
challenges of the county’s increasingly vibrant and diverse population, and is responsive to the needs of the Prince
George’s County community, businesses and workforce.


Academic Affairs

Five academic divisions and an academic support division, each headed by a dean, offer the credit instructional
programs for Prince George’s Community College: Liberal Arts; Health Sciences; Sciences, Technology, Engineering
and Mathematics; Educational Development; Behavioral, Social and Business Studies; and Learning Resources. Each
division is comprised of several departments and/or programs. This instructional organization is administered by the
Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Figure 2-1
Prince George’s Community College Instructional Organization (Academic Affairs)




                                                     Academic Affairs




                                Liberal Arts                                 Health Sciences




                         Sciences, Technology,
                             Engineering                               Educational Development
                             & Mathematics



                           Behavioral, Social                              Learning Resources
                           & Business Studies




Chapter 2 Background Data                                      October 31, 2008                                        2-2
                                      Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Workforce Development and Continuing Education

Workforce Development and Continuing Education (WDCE) serves both the residents and business community of
Prince George’s County. Administered by a vice president and two deans (WDCE Operations and WDCE Programs),
this functional organization of four divisions, each headed by a director, offers courses and programs that focus on the
learning needs of a specific student market.

Figure 2-2
Prince George’s Community College Instructional Organization (Workforce Development and Continuing Education)



                                        Community Education
                                   Workforce Development Institutes




                       WDCE                                                  WDCE
                      Programs                                             Opeerations




             Workforce Development                                        Adult Eduction




             Workforce Development                                         Center for
                    Institute                                          Business & Industry




Chapter 2 Background Data                                     October 31, 2008                                        2-3
                                     Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS OVERVIEW

Prince George’s Community College directly contributes to the quality of life, not only in Prince George’s County, but
also throughout the State of Maryland. It does so by preparing its graduates for careers in a global economy, as well
as preparing its students to become productive members of society. PGCC serves the needs of students with a varied
curriculum and other learning opportunities that will help each student to begin focusing on a lifetime of independent
learning.

Associate degree programs require completion of a minimum of 60 credits including an established set of requirements
for graduation. The Associate degree often parallels the first two years of study at a four-year college or university.
Students need only two additional years of study to complete a Bachelor degree. The Associate degree is also
suitable for career exploration, advancement and skills upgrading.

The Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree focuses on specific occupational areas, and is intended to provide
students with entry-level employment skills, instruction for employed students seeking to upgrade skills, and training for
students preparing for a career change. The Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree focuses in the liberal arts, humanities,
and fine arts. Scientific and technical studies are the focus of students pursuing the Associate of Science (A.S.)
degree. The Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.) degree focuses in early childhood education, elementary
education and secondary education.

Programs are designed to provide the first two years of baccalaureate education (transfer programs) in preparation for
transfer in addition to programs of study designed to prepare the students for direct entry into the workforce (career
programs).

The College offers 58 transfer and career programs, in the fall of 2007, leading to associate degrees; 23 career
programs leading to certificates of proficiency; and six career programs which award letters of recognition.

Transfer Programs

Transfer programs are designed to prepare students for transfer to the upper division of a college or university upon
completion of an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, or Associate of Arts in Teaching degree. Prince George’s
Community College offers transfer programs in the following areas:

                Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.)
                  African-American Studies                English                             Pre-Law
                  Art                                     Food Science                        Pre-Medicine
                  Arts and Sciences                       General Studies                     Pre-Pharmacy
                  Biology                                 Health Education                    Pre-Physical Therapy
                  Chemistry                               Historical Fieldwork and Research   Psychology
                  Communication                           International Studies               Sociology
                  Criminal Justice Transfer               Mathematics                         Theatre
                  Dietetics                               Music                               Women's Studies
                  Economics                               Physical Education

                Associate of Science Degree (A.S.)
                  Accounting                              Computer Science                    Forensic Science
                  Business Administration                 Engineering                         Nursing


                Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree (A.A.T.)
                  Early Childhood Education                Teacher Education




Chapter 2 Background Data                                     October 31, 2008                                          2-4
                                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Career Programs

Career programs are designed to meet increasing demands for technicians, skilled workers, and craftsmen for
employment in industry, business, the professions, and government. These programs provide students technical skills
necessary for employment and career advancement in their chosen field. The following career programs lead to
Associate of Applied Science degrees, certificates, and letters of recognition:

Associate of Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.)
  Accounting                              Electrical Construction Technology     Nuclear Medicine Technology
  Business Management                     Electronic Engineering Technology      Paralegal/Legal Assistant
  Computer Engineering Technology         Emergency Medical Technician           Radiography
  Computer Information Systems            Engineering Technology                 Residential Property Management
  Construction Management                 Health Information Management          Respiratory Therapy
  Criminal Justice                        Hospitality Services Management        Space Engineering Technology
  Culinary Arts                           Information Security                   Technical Studies
  Early Childhood Education               Marketing Management                   Visual Communication

Certificate (Cert.)
  Accounting                               Electrical Construction Technology    Nursing
  Business Management                      Electronic Engineering Technology     Paralegal/Legal Assistant
  Computer-Aided Drafting                  Emergency Medical Technician          Residential Property Management
  Computer Engineering Technology          General Studies                       Space Engineering Technology
  Computer Information Systems             Health Information Management         Technical Studies
  Construction Management                  Information Security                  Theatre
  Criminal Justice                         Marketing Management                  Wisual Communication
  Early Childhood Education                Nuclear Medicine Technology

Letter of Recognition (LOR)
  Accounting                               Consturction Management               Ornamental Horticulture
  Business Management                      Hospitality Services Management       Real Estate


Non-Traditional Studies

Prince George’s Community College students have a variety of opportunities to earn college credits through non-
traditional course formats and individualized program advising. These formats are oriented toward self-directed
students who either have encountered obstacles in meeting their educational goals through conventional academic
scheduling, or who prefer the flexibility afforded through these options. Through non-traditional course formats,
students can access a broadened learning environment, develop a new kind of relationship with academic faculty, and
pursue a personalized approach to study which is tailored to fit their individual situations and learning styles. Examples
of non-traditional learning formats are available at PGCC include: online courses, Campus Web courses (combined
classroom and online), interactive television courses, and intensive one-week workshops.

In addition to the program formats offered by Prince George’s Community College, various statewide programs are
available to county residents at other Maryland community colleges. County students enrolled in these programs are
eligible for in-county tuition rates at the host institution. Also, Maryland residents who do not live in Prince George’s
County but who are formally admitted to one of the following PGCC Statewide Instructional Programs are eligible for in-
county tuition:

                        Forensic Science (A.S.)
                        Nuclear Medicine (A.A.S. and Certificate)
                        Theatre and Entertainment Technology (Certificate)

And finally, eligible Prince George’s County high school students may earn college credits while still in high school
under PGCC’s Early Admission Program.




Chapter 2 Background Data                                              October 31, 2008                                 2-5
                                        Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Workforce Development and Continuing Education

Workforce Development and Continuing Education (WDEC) provides programs and non-credit course offerings
designed to create opportunities for personal growth, professional development, and lifelong learning opportunities.
Workforce Development course offerings address licensure/certification requirements of various professions, and to
meet the specific training needs of employers throughout the county. A wide range of courses to upgrade skills,
develop new skills, or just for special interest are offered throughout the year at more than 60 county locations.

Courses are offered in areas such as: allied health professions, aquatics, business, child care, computer training,
construction, culinary, GED preparation, human services, industrial technology, insurance, languages and
communication, law enforcement, food services/hospitality, personal finance, plumbing, real estate, transportation,
travel, welding, and more. Some course offerings are designed specifically for special populations, such as senior
citizens, or talented and gifted youth. As one of the Adult and Community Education programs, the English Language
Institute prepares non-native English speaking students for academic success in their major field of study.

The following table represents Maryland Association of Community Colleges (MACC) data showing that non-credit
courses accounted for over a third (34%) of PGCC’s state-funded FTE enrollment In Fiscal Year 2007.

Table 2-1
State-Funded FTE Enrollment (FY 2001 – FY 2007)


                                                                          Fiscal Year
                                         2001         2002         2003          2004     2005      2006     2007
Credit FTE                              6,074        6,673        6,950         7,115    6,915     6,703    6,697
Continuing Education FTE                2,547        2,650        2,681         2,716    2,720     2,747    3,446
Total FTE                               8,621        9,323        9,631         9,831    9,635     9,450   10,143

Non-Credit %                           29.5%         28.4%       27.8%          27.6%    28.2%     29.1%   34.0%

Source: Maryland Association of Community Colleges


Although Maryland space planning models do not provide for consideration of continuing education student enrollment
data when computing space needs, it is rather obvious that the implications of this student population on PGCC’s
facilities needs could be significant.




Chapter 2 Background Data                                    October 31, 2008                                          2-6
                                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


ENROLLMENTS

Historical Trends

By analyzing an institution’s student body composition during the past few years, it is possible to deduce trends in the
numbers and types of students enrolled, number of credit hours generated, and choices among continuing programs.

A preliminary examination of the table below shows fall total credit headcount enrollment trends for students attending
Prince George’s Community College during the past ten years to be relatively flat for most of that period with a slight
drop off and rebound in 2006 and 2007.

There has been virtually no change in the mix of full-time to part-time students since 1997 when three-fourths of
PGCC’s students were classified as part-time. In the fall semester of 2007, 75% of the students are part-time.

Table 2-2
Historical Fall Enrollment Headcount Trends (1997 – 2007)

                                            Full-Time           Part-Time              Total
          Fall Semester                    Headcount           Headcount          Headcount
               1997                              3,165               8,797           11,962
               1998                              3,048               9,387           12,435
               1999                              3,013               9,285           12,298
               2000                              2,833               8,730           11,563
               2001                              3,144               9,143           12,287
               2002                              3,287               9,406           12,693
               2003                              3,352               9,212           12,564
               2004                              3,317               9,142           12,459
               2005                              3,159               9,233           12,392
               2006                              3,027               8,795           11,822
               2007                              3,007               8,854           11,861
            % Change
           1997 - 2007                            -5.0%                0.6%               -0.8%

       Average Enrollment
          1997 - 2007                             3,123               9,089               12,212

    Average Annual Growth
         1997 - 2007                              -0.5%                0.1%               -0.1%

Source: Prince George's Community College Office of Planning and Institutional Research


The following figure graphically illustrates full-time relative to part-time credit enrollment over the past ten years.




Chapter 2 Background Data                                          October 31, 2008                                       2-7
                                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Figure 2-3
Historical Fall Enrollment Headcount Trends (1997 – 2007)



                                                     Fall Enrollment Headcount

      14,000

      12,000

      10,000

       8,000
                                                                                                                      Part-Time
       6,000                                                                                                          Full-Time

       4,000

       2,000

            0
                 1997      1998       1999      2000      2001       2002      2003       2004   2005   2006   2007




Current Enrollment

During the fall semester of 2007, 6,346 FTE Prince George’s Community College students generated 95,192 credit
hours of enrollment. The table below shows the credit hour/credit FTES enrollment distribution in terms of on-campus
(Largo Campus), off-campus (Extension Centers) and distance learning (Online), followed by a graphic illustration.

Table 2-3
Current Credit Enrollment Distribution (Fall 2007)


                                                                    Total                Total
                      Location                              Credit Hours          Credit FTES
Largo Campus                                                      73,375                 4,892
Extension Centers                                                 11,596                   773
Distance (Online)                                                 10,221                   681
Total PGCC                                                        95,192                 6,346

Source: Prince George's Community College Office of Planning and Institutional Research




Chapter 2 Background Data                                          October 31, 2008                                           2-8
                                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Figure 2-4
Current Credit FTE Enrollment Distribution (Fall 2007)



                                       PGCC Credit Enrollment Distribution (FTE)
                                                      Fall 2007




                                                                      Distance (Online)
                                                                            11%
                     Extension
                      Centers
                       12%



                                                                                                   Largo Campus
                                                                                                       77%




A comprehensive summary of actual on-campus credit hours generated at Largo and the extension centers is provided
in the table below. The data are further organized by Day before 5:00 p.m., Evening after 5:00 p.m., and Weekend
(Saturday and Sunday). The majority (75%) of PGCC’s on-campus (Largo) enrollment is concentrated during the day,
while the off-campus sites (Extension Centers) enroll over half (52%) of their students during the evening hours after
5:00 p.m. This table reflects face-to-face instruction only; therefore, online data is not included.

Table 2-4
Comparative Summary: Day, Evening, Weekend
On-Campus Credit Hour Generation (Fall 2007)



                                             Largo Campus                   Extension Centers          PGCC Totals
         Generations                      Credit Hrs     FTES              Credit Hrs      FTES    Credit Hrs      FTES
Credit Hours/FTES: Day                       54,951      3,663                 5,509         367      60,460       4,031
Credit Hours/FTES: Evening                   15,746      1,050                 6,087         406      21,833       1,456
Credit Hours/FTES: Weekend                    2,678        179                      0          0       2,678         179
Credit Hours: Total                          73,375      4,892                11,596         773      84,971       5,665

% Day                                            75%              75%              48%      48%         71%         71%
% Evening                                        21%              21%              52%      52%         25%         25%
% Weekend                                         4%               4%               0%       0%          3%          3%
% Total                                          86%              86%              14%      14%        100%        100%

Source: Prince George's Community College Office of Planning and Institutional Research




Chapter 2 Background Data                                          October 31, 2008                                        2-9
                                     Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


One factor in identifying the academic thrust of an institution is the student subject selection distribution among
disciplines. For purposes of establishing the integrity and substance of parameters required for providing appropriate
rationale for educational space planning and thorough consideration and application of the Maryland Higher Education
Commission (MHEC) Space Allocation Guidelines for Community Colleges, analysis of student subject selection
distribution among disciplines is fundamental to the application of these guidelines for determining quantitative
indicators of space need.

In the table below, a more detailed representation of student program participation is presented. This table provides
the number of credit hours by discipline and the rate of participation expressed as a percentage of the total credit hours
earned during the day (before 5:00 p.m.) at Largo.

Table 2-5
Largo Campus Program Participation
Fall 2007 (Day Only)

                                                  Course      Credit Hours
                   Discipline                      Code          Day Only     Percent
Behavioral, Social & Business
  Accounting                                       ACC                 784      1.4%
  African-American Studies                         AFA                 129      0.2%
  Anthropology                                     ANT                  84      0.2%
  Business                                         BUS                  99      0.2%
  Criminal Justice Technology                      CJT                 612      1.1%
  Early Childhood Education                        ECE                 210      0.4%
  Economics                                        ECN                 598      1.1%
  Education                                        EDU                 334      0.6%
  Forensic Science                                 FOS                  90      0.2%
  Management                                       MGT                 918      1.7%
  Marketing                                        MKG                  66      0.1%
  Paralegal Services                               PAR                  27      0.0%
  Psychology                                       PSY               2,355      4.3%
  Real Estate                                      RLS                  48      0.1%
  Sociology                                        SOC               1,191      2.2%
Sub-Total: Behavioral, Social & Business                             7,545     13.7%

Educational Development
  Developmental Learning Support                   DLS                 576      1.0%
  Developmental English                            DVE               1,000      1.8%
  Developmental Math                               DVM               5,352      9.7%
  Developmental Reading                            DVR               3,388      6.2%
Sub-Total: Educational Development                                  10,316     18.8%




Chapter 2 Background Data                                October 31, 2008                                             2-10
                                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


                                                              Course          Credit Hours
                       Discipline                              Code              Day Only       Percent
Health Sciences
  Emergency Medicine Technology                                 EMT                       792     1.4%
  Health Information Management                                 HIM                        81     0.1%
  Health Education                                              HLE                       849     1.5%
  Nuclear Medicine Technology                                   NUM                       156     0.3%
  Nursing                                                       NUR                     2,139     3.9%
  Physical Education                                            PED                     1,031     1.9%
  Radiography                                                   RAD                       550     1.0%
  Respiratory Therapy                                           RST                       307     0.6%
Sub-Total: Health Sciences                                                              5,905    10.7%

Liberal Arts
   Arabic                                                       ARB                       42      0.1%
   Art                                                          ART                    1,507      2.7%
   English                                                      EGL                    6,340     11.5%
   English as a Second Language                                 ESL                      882      1.6%
   French                                                       FRN                      102      0.2%
   Geography                                                    GEO                      154      0.3%
   History                                                      HST                    1,416      2.6%
   Artistic & Cultural Experiences (Humanities)                 HUM                       10      0.0%
   MLD English/History                                          MLD                       42      0.1%
   Music                                                        MUS                      524      1.0%
   Philosophy                                                   PHL                      852      1.6%
   Political Science                                            POS                      246      0.4%
   Spanish                                                      SPN                      456      0.8%
   Speech                                                       SPH                    2,322      4.2%
   Theatre                                                      THE                      267      0.5%
   Television, Radio, Film                                      TRF                      201      0.4%
Sub-Total: Liberal Arts                                                               15,363     28.0%

Science/Tech/Egr/Math
  Biology                                                       BIO                    3,804      6.9%
  Chemistry                                                     CHM                    1,266      2.3%
  Computer Information Systems                                  CIS                    1,976      3.6%
  Engineering                                                   EGR                       81      0.1%
  Engineering Technology                                        ENT                      279      0.5%
  Hospitality Services                                          HSM                       60      0.1%
  Mathematics                                                   MAT                    4,442      8.1%
  Nutrition                                                     NTR                      933      1.7%
  Physics                                                       PHY                      443      0.8%
  Physical Science                                              PSC                      240      0.4%
Sub-Total: Science/Tech/Engr/Math                                                     13,524     24.6%

Career Planning                                                 CAP                       605     1.1%
Center for Work-Based Learning                                  WBL                        82     0.1%
Planning for Academic Success                                   PAS                     1,611     2.9%

Total: Largo Campus (Day Only)                                                        54,951    100.0%

Source: Pri nce George's Comm unity College Office of Pl anning and Instituti onal Resea rch


Chapter 2 Background Data                                              October 31, 2008                   2-11
                                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


FACULTY AND STAFF

Prince George’s Community College employed 735 full-time faculty, administrative, and support staff. In addition, the
College employed 1,399 part-time faculty and staff. The current ratio of full-time equivalent students to full-time
equivalent faculty is 17.8 to 1 (6,346 FTES ÷ 357 FTEF). The following table illustrates the distribution of personnel
who are critical to PGCC’s mission, strategic priorities and learning experience.

Table 2-6
Current Faculty and Staff

                                                          2007 (Actual)
         Category                        FT                PT        Total      FTEF
Faculty (Credit)                        244               451         695        357
Faculty (Non-Credit)                      0               354         354         89
   Sub-Total Faculty                    244               805       1,049        445

Administrative                           55                 1          56             na
Other Professional                       97                52         149             na
Support                                 339               541         880             na
     Sub-Total Staff                    491               594       1,085             na
  Total Faculty and Staff               735              1,399      2,134            445

Source: M aryland Association o f Co mm unity Colleges




FACILITIES INVENTORY

A room-by-room inventory of assignable space in each building was prepared by the College and given to the
consultant team. This inventory of existing spaces serves as the baseline data against which computed space needs
are compared. The inventory utilizes the Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) space taxonomy
found in the 1992 Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual published by the U.S.
Department of Education in cooperation with the National Center for Education Statistics. Furthermore, the space
inventory data in this chapter is presented in such a way as to satisfy the requirements of the Maryland Higher
Education Commission’s Space Allocation Guidelines for Community Colleges. More detailed attention is devoted to
each of the College’s building structures in Chapter 4.

In determining the base inventory to be used in calculating permanent space needs, inventoried net assignable square
footage (NASF) is designated as either “permanent” or “overflow.” Although a comprehensive overview of the
College’s on-campus space inventory is provided in this section, only “permanent” space is used in Chapter 3 for
determining space needs. Space contained in temporary structures and space in facilities at locations other than
Largo Campus is considered “overflow” and is not included in the base calculations.

The 68,326 net assignable square feet of unclassified space (HEGIS 000) in the table below represents space that is
either being used by other organizations or out of service at the time of the inventory.




Chapter 2 Background Data                                         October 31, 2008                                 2-12
                                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 2-7
Summary of Existing NASF by Room Use Classification


 HEGIS         Room Use               Permanent           Overflow a         Largo Totals
   100         Classroom                  54,275            14,680                 68,955
   200         Laboratory                109,377                981              110,358
   300         Office                    131,083            11,426               142,509
   400         Study                      52,451                  0                52,451
   500         Special Use                70,894                  0                70,894
   600         General Use                72,778                125                72,903
   700         Support                    38,433                 79                38,512
   800         Health Care                 1,244                  0                 1,244
   000         Unclassified               11,638                  0                11,638
Totals                                   542,173            27,291               569,464

Data Sou rce: Prince Geo rge' s Comm unity Colleg e F acil iti es Man agemen t


a
    Largo Campus "overflow" consists of 18 temporary building structures .


As depicted in the following graphic, 31% of the College’s assignable space is classified as classroom and
laboratory/studio instruction (classroom 12%, laboratory 19%), 26% as office, 13% is general use, 2% is unclassified,
12% is special use, 7% is support, and 9% as study (library). Spaces classified as health care total less than 1%.

Figure 2-4
Distribution of Current Space by Room Use Classification



                                               Distribution of Space (Largo Campus)
                                                      (Permanent and Overflow)

                                                Health Care* Unclassified
                               Support
                                                    0%          2%
                                7%                                               Classroom
                   General Use                                                      12%
                      13%                                                                    Laboratory
                                                                                               19%


               Special Use
                  12%
                                  Study
                                                                                 Office
                                   9%
                                                                                 26%



      *Less than 1%


PGCC’s total inventory of net assignable square footage (NASF) is summarized, by building and HEGIS space
classification, in the following Table 2-8. This table provides a ready review of the distribution of existing space among
the functional classification categories.




Chapter 2 Background Data                                                October 31, 2008                             2-13
                                                                                                   Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



Table 2-8
Largo Space Inventory (NASF) By Building: Fall 2007

  HEGIS                                    A ccokeek           Bladen           Center For       Chesapeake   Childtime     Continuing        Facilities   Kent         Lanham          Largo       Marlboro          Novak      Sub-Total
  CODE                   S PACE               Hall              Hall             Adv Tech           Hall    Children's Cntr Education        Management    Hall           Hall       Student Cntr     Hall         Field House    Page 1
    100       CLASSROOM                                0           14,460             8,902            5,883            0         3,724                0            0       3,870               0       17,436               0       54,275
    200       LABORATORY                           3,009            5,841            30,207           20,569            0         5,009                0            0      24,279               0       15,590               0      104,504
    210         Class Laboratory                   3,009            5,841            24,980           20,569            0         5,009                0            0      24,279               0       12,073               0       95,760
    220         Open Laboratory                        0                0             5,227                0            0             0                0            0           0               0        3,517               0        8,744
   300        OFFICE                              7,056            34,187             7,374             6,628           0         2,474            2,632     18,354        13,392           6,959       27,318           1,569      127,943
  310/50        Office/Conference                 7,056            34,187             7,374             6,628           0         2,474            2,632     18,354        13,392           6,959       27,318           1,569      127,943
   320          Testing/Tutoring                      0                 0                 0                 0           0             0                0          0             0               0            0               0            0
   400        STUDY                              31,542             6,584             1,869             4,185           0             0                0          0         2,492             200        5,579               0       52,451
   410          Study                             8,892             6,584             1,869             4,185           0             0                0          0         2,492             200        5,579               0       29,801
  420/30        Stack                            20,455                 0                 0                 0           0             0                0          0             0               0            0               0       20,455
  440/55   Process/Service                         2,195                  0                  0             0            0             0                0            0            0              0            0               0        2,195
   500   SPECIAL USE                               6,681                  0                  0             0            0           125                0            0            0              0        3,386          24,144       34,336
 520-525   Ath./P hys. Ed.                             0                  0                  0             0            0             0                0            0            0              0            0          24,144       24,144
   530     Media Prod.                             6,681                  0                  0             0            0           125                0            0            0              0        3,386               0       10,192
    580         Greenhouse                             0                 0                0                0            0                0             0            0            0              0            0               0            0
    600       GENERAL USE                            235             1,356            1,373                0            0                0             0          205            0         40,368        7,370               0       50,907
    610         Assembly                               0                 0                0                0            0                0             0            0            0          4,038        4,620               0        8,658
    620         Exhibition                             0                 0                0                0            0                0             0            0            0              0        2,426               0        2,426
    630          Food Facility                       235                 0                0                0            0                0             0            0            0         11,769           0                0       12,004
    640          Day Care                              0                 0                0                0            0                0             0            0            0              0           0                0            0
    650          Lounge                                0               399            1,373                0            0                0             0          205            0          5,969         324                0        8,270
    660          Merchandis ing                        0               206                0                0            0                0             0            0            0          8,738           0                0        8,944
    680          Meeting Room                          0               751                0                0            0                0             0            0            0          9,854           0                0       10,605
   700        SUPPORT                              8,165             1,310              753              746            0                0         9,000          380       4,675           3,215         885              300       29,429
   710          Data P roces sing                  8,165             1,310              753                0            0                0             0          380       4,675               0         885                0       16,168
  720-45        Shop/Storage                           0                 0                0                0            0                0         9,000            0           0             470           0                0        9,470
   750          Central Svc s.                         0                 0                0                0            0                0             0            0           0           2,745           0              300        3,045
   760     Hazmat Storage                             0                 0                 0              746            0             0                0          0             0               0            0               0          746
   800   HE ALTH                                      0             1,244                 0                0            0             0                0          0             0               0            0               0        1,244
 100-800 TOTALS                                  56,688            64,982            50,478           38,011            0        11,332           11,632     18,939        48,708          50,742       77,564          26,013      455,089
    050       Inactive                                  0                 0                  0             0            0                0             0            0            0              0              0             0               0
    060       Alteration/Conversion                    0                  0                  0             0             0               0             0            0            0              0              0             0            0
    070       Unfinished                               0                  0                  0             0             0               0             0            0            0              0              0             0            0
    090       Other Organizations                  1,630                  0                  0             0        10,008               0             0            0            0              0              0             0       11,638
    000       UNCLASSIFIED                         1,630                  0                  0             0        10,008               0             0            0            0              0              0             0       11,638
Data So urce: Prince Ge org e's Com muni ty Coll ege F acilities M anagem ent




Chapter 2 Background Data                                                                        October 31, 2008                                                                                                                                2-14
                                                                                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



Table 2-8 (Continued)
Largo Space Inventory (NASF) By Building: Fall 2007

  HEGIS                                   Queen Anne        R.I. Bickford       Sculpture &        Warehouse        Sub-Total       Permanent a   Temporary        Temporary       Temporary       Temporary       Overflowb        Largo
  CODE                  S PACE             Fine Arts        Natatorium           Ceramics           Building         Page 2         Sub-Totals     Buildings         Office         Service        Classroom       Sub-Totals       Totals
    100       CLASSROOM                                 0                 0                   0            0                    0        54,275         7,655                  0               0        7,025           14,680         68,955
   200        LABORATORY                             699                 0             4,174                0             4,873         109,377             0               0               0             981              981       110,358
   210          Class Laboratory                     699                 0             4,174                0             4,873         100,633             0               0               0             981              981       101,614
   220          Open Laboratory                        0                 0                 0                0                 0           8,744             0               0               0               0                0         8,744
   300        OFFICE                               2,124               664                 0              352             3,140         131,083         2,760           4,619           2,581           1,466           11,426       142,509
  310/50        Office/Conference                  2,124               664                 0              352             3,140         131,083         2,760           4,619           2,581           1,466           11,426       142,509
   320          Testing/Tutoring                        0                 0                   0            0                    0             0                0               0               0               0                0           0
   400        STUDY                                     0                 0                   0            0                    0        52,451                0               0               0               0                0      52,451
   410          Study                                   0                 0                   0            0                    0        29,801                0               0               0               0                0      29,801
  420/30        Stack                                   0                 0                   0            0                    0        20,455                0               0               0               0                0      20,455
  440/55        Process/Service                         0                 0                   0            0                    0         2,195                0               0               0               0                0       2,195
   500   SPECIAL USE                                 152           36,406                     0            0            36,558           70,894                0               0               0               0                0      70,894
 520-525   Ath./P hys. Ed.                             0           36,406                     0            0            36,406           60,550                0               0               0               0                0      60,550
   530     Media Prod.                               152                0                     0            0               152           10,344                0               0               0               0                0      10,344
   580     Greenhouse                                  0                0                     0            0                 0                0                0               0               0               0                0           0
    600       GENERAL USE                        19,537              2,184              150                0            21,871           72,778                0          125                  0               0          125          72,903
    610         Assembly                         19,537                  0                0                0            19,537           28,195                0            0                  0               0            0          28,195
    620         Exhibition                            0                  0                0                0                 0            2,426                0            0                  0               0            0           2,426
    630         Food Facility                         0                  0                0                0                 0           12,004                0            0                  0               0            0          12,004
    640         Day Care                              0                  0                0                0                 0                0                0            0                  0               0            0               0
    650         Lounge                                 0             2,184              150                 0             2,334          10,604                0            0                  0               0            0          10,604
    660         Merchandis ing                         0                 0                0                 0                 0           8,944                0          125                  0               0          125           9,069
    680         Meeting Room                           0                 0                0                 0                 0          10,605                0            0                  0               0            0          10,605
    700       SUPPORT                                120                 0                0             8,884             9,004          38,433                0           79                  0               0           79          38,512
   710          Data P roces sing                    120                  0                   0             0               120          16,288                0           79                  0               0            79         16,367
  720-45        Shop/Storage                           0                  0                   0         8,884             8,884          18,354                0            0                  0               0             0         18,354
   750          Central Svc s.                         0                  0                   0             0                 0           3,045                0            0                  0               0             0          3,045
   760          Hazmat Storage                         0                  0                   0             0                 0             746                0            0                  0               0             0            746
   800        HE ALTH                                  0                  0                   0             0                 0           1,244                0            0                  0               0             0          1,244
 100-800 TOTALS                                  22,632            39,254              4,324            9,236           75,446          530,535        10,415           4,823           2,581           9,472           27,291       557,826
    050       Inactive                                  0                 0                   0            0                    0             0                0               0               0               0                0           0
    060       Alteration/Conversion                     0                 0                   0            0                    0             0                0               0               0               0                0           0
    070       Unfinished                                0                 0                   0            0                    0             0                0               0               0               0                0           0
    090       Other Organizations                       0                 0                   0            0                    0        11,638                0               0               0               0                0      11,638
    000       UNCLASSIFIED                              0                 0                   0            0                    0        11,638                0               0               0               0                0      11,638
                                                                                                                a
Data So urce: Prince Ge org e's Com muni ty Coll ege F acilities M anagem ent                                   Inv entory to be used in apply ing MHEC space allocation guidelines to determine the need for perm anent s pace.
                                                                                                                b
                                                                                                                Inv entory excluded when applying MHEC space allocation guidelines to determine the need for permanent space.


Chapter 2 Background Data                                                                October 31, 2008                                                                                                                                       2-15
                                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


PARKING

There are 2,962 parking spaces distributed among 19 lots at the Largo Campus site. All existing parking is on surface
lots as there are no parking structures at Largo. Table 2-10 lists the existing capacity of these lots.

Table 2-9
Existing Parking Lots (Largo)


Lot Designation                  Student        Staff/Faculty          ADA   Visitors   Designated   Other   Total Spaces
Lot A                              145                92                                                         237
Lot B                              220                56                2                                        278
Lot C                              255                34                2                                        291
Lot D                              338                35                2                                        375
Lot E                              272                                                                           272
Lot F                              462                                                                           462
Lot G                              411                                  4                                        415
Lot H                              110                70                6                                        186
Lot I (Bladen Hall)                                                     3      11          11                     25
Lot I (Kent Hall)                                     81                5       3          20                     109
Lot J                                                                   5      5           3                      13
Lot K                                                 53               21                                         74
Lot MH Circle                                                          13                                         13
Lot KH Circle                                                          2       10                                 12
Novak Rear Lot                                        41                                                          41
Childtime                                                                                             34          34
Facilities Building                                   27                1                  34                      62
Service Roadway                     27                24                                                           51
Warehouse                                             7                                     5                     12

Totals                             2,240              520              66      29          73         34        2,962

Data Source: Prince George's Community College Facilities Management


Further discussion of existing Largo Campus parking is presented in Chapters 3 and 5. Chapter 6 will include
recommendations for modifications to, and future development of campus parking.




Chapter 2 Background Data                                       October 31, 2008                                            2-16
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                            CHAPTER 3
                                                           Space Needs
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                                  CHAPTER 3
                                                 SPACE NEEDS
PLANNED ACADEMIC DIRECTION

Enhancement of Programs

Curriculum development at Prince George’s Community College is a cooperative effort among the College community
of the Board of Trustees, Office of Planning and Institutional Research, faculty, and administration; colleagues in area
high schools and four-year institutions; and the Maryland Higher Education Commission. A number of program
enhancements and additions are in the development stage at any given time. On the other hand, PGCC anticipates no
immediate deletions from its current credit program. Rather than becoming obsolete, programs are evolving to reflect
changes in instructional delivery methodology, technology, and needs of the market.

As the College’s student body continues to grow in size and diversity, there will be greater demands placed on
resources devoted to developmental education. It is expected that over the next ten years Prince George’s, as will
most community colleges, will need to enhance programs and services for a student population increasingly composed
of the under prepared.

Workforce Development and Continuing Education does not offer “programs”, as such, but “market driven” courses.
Since Continuing Education’s offerings must be extremely flexible, course changes are continuous. This flexibility is
essential in order to meet the ever changing needs of its unique market. As the general population ages, it is expected
that large numbers of Baby Boomers will demand continuing education and personal enrichment opportunities.

We believe that demand for critical skills in top growth occupations, amplified need for developmental education
programs and services, flexibility in contract and workforce training, and aging of the general population will be the
primary drivers for future program offerings and student enrollments.

Modernization of Instructional Delivery

Due to ever changing technology for both teaching and learning, much of higher education must rethink its learning
environments. Although the lecture/lab instructional delivery mode will continue to be used, colleges and universities
will increasingly supplement that delivery methodology with specialized learning environments that allow for both
scheduled and unscheduled instruction and learning in discipline related simulated environments.

Central to Prince George’s Community College’s intensified efforts to enhance and refine its learning environments are
the major thrusts of restoring and maintaining existing and currently planned facilities, as well as the aesthetic
environment. These thrusts are to be developed, guided, and modified within the parameters of systematic,
coordinated planning efforts. The short and long-term outcomes of each planning methodology will provide direct
evidence of the revitalization of levels of integrity that reflect optimal teaching and learning environments.

Contemporary learning environments are required in order for the College to enhance its success in retaining or
attracting a representative level of the county's available student population. PGCC will continue to stress the
emphases of removing some obsolete facilities from inventory, renovating and rehabilitating other existing facilities, as
well as providing new facilities. Contemporary teaching/learning environments include the provision of detailed and
unique needs for classroom, laboratory, library/study, and office space, as well as ancillary spaces required for
supporting future programmatic impetus.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                                    3-1
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Improved literacy and refinement of technology in educational institutions dictate the provision of instructional spaces
that are designed for both unique and/or shared functions. These spaces will further require adequate consistency
with a global reconfiguration that increases the utilization efficiency ratio. The lack of sufficient numbers of smart
classrooms and other contemporary, flexible instructional and learning spaces has directly and indirectly curtailed
Prince George's ability to fully develop the inherent potential of its credit and non-credit course offerings.

Future environments should be such that the distinction between a computer lab and a lecture classroom will
disappear because the technology and furnishings will be unobtrusive but available on demand. All furnishings will be
easily movable or the instructional area will automatically be able to configure the furnishings based upon immediate
need. With the exception of science labs, physical education spaces, and some visual and performing arts studios, the
idea of rooms belonging exclusively to an instructional area will disappear. Credit classrooms would be available to
Continuing Education learners and vice versa.

Electronic presentation that allows integration and manipulation of complex data into the learning environment is
becoming more and more the norm. Teleconferencing and online capabilities will make learning partnerships with
other schools and businesses, even ones in other countries, commonplace.

Modernization of instructional delivery requires that instructional spaces be configured relative to future
disciplinary/programmatic goals whose objectives and functions dictate more efficient organization and utilization of
space. And finally, consistent with any efforts to increase space utilization, office configurations should be in keeping
with global considerations as well as provide for accessibility and administrative functions.


IMPLICATIONS OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ON FACILITIES

The growth of existing programs and the establishment of new programs suggest significant growth in enrollment and a
need for specific, specialized facilities. We believe that the demand for the previously discussed skills will drive
program offerings in the coming years. Many of these programs, health sciences in particular, require specialized
classrooms, labs and other facilities that can be flexibly adjusted for a variety of teaching/learning settings.

This growth is not automatic, but it is an opportunity for PGCC. It is up to the College to provide the programs to
accommodate the anticipated demand. This demand is used in subsequent sections to develop space needs and
suggested physical development.


SPACE NEEDS ANALYSIS

Introduction

The purpose of space needs analysis is to assess the extent to which the current total amount of academic and other
space is adequate for use in support of future enrollments. The ultimate outcome of this assessment is to provide
estimates of the types and amounts of space likely to be needed to support Prince George’s Community College’s
projected academic programs and their ensuing enrollments and staffing levels.

The College provided a room-by-room facility space inventory, credit hour data from fall 2007, and current staffing data
which formed the basis for analyzing PGCC’s space needs. The consultant team applied the data to the Maryland
Higher Education Commission’s Space Allocation Guidelines for Community Colleges (COMAR Title 13B) to provide
quantitative indicators of current space needs. Definitions and room use codes are those provided by the Higher
Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) taxonomy found in the Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory



Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                                   3-2
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


and Classification Manual published in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Education in cooperation with the National
Center for Education Statistics.

Future space needs are the result of demand, in terms of anticipated programs, enrollments and staffing, on buildings
and spaces at a future date. The Maryland Higher Education Commission’s (MHEC) most recent projections anticipate
an 18% growth in headcount enrollment from fall 2006 to fall 2017, and a 19% growth in FTDES. Using these
projections, discipline-level distributions of credit hours for the fall semester of 2007 were extrapolated through fall of
2017.

It should be noted that in this space needs analysis, data relating to facilities refers to on-campus permanent buildings
at Largo Campus only. Buildings classified as temporary structures and the extension centers are excluded from these
data and analyses.

Summary of Findings

Although construction and occupancy of the new Health Sciences Building as well as renovation and re-occupancy of
Accokeek Hall will address some of the immediate need for new and upgraded facilities, anticipated student population
increases will have a significant impact on institutional space needs at Largo Campus for the foreseeable future. The
2007 campus space inventory was 542,173 net assignable square feet (NASF). The College anticipates a 2017 space
inventory of 606,403 NASF as the base or supply against which the need, generated by the demand of future
enrollments, would be quantified.

When space surpluses and deficits were computed as a result of comparing enrollment and staffing projections against
the projected space inventory, the outcome was a projected 2017 overall space surplus of 43,883 NASF. In general,
the total net assignable square feet of existing facilities exceed the minimum allowances of the Space Allocation
Guidelines for Community Colleges. There are space classifications in which Prince George’s Community College
projects will exceed allowances in 2017; most notably: class laboratory, study, data processing, and assembly.
Quantitative indicators suggest the most significant immediate and long-term need for additional facilities or re-
designation of existing space to support the following space classifications at Largo:

               Faculty/Administrative Offices              27,700 NASF
               Classroom                                   12,000 NASF
               Food Facilities                             11,400 NASF
               Open Laboratory                              9,200 NASF
               Shops/Storage/Central Services               3,100 NASF
               Athletics/Physical Education                 2,800 NASF
               Greenhouse                                   1,000 NASF
               Exhibition                                     500 NASF


A comprehensive summary of computation of space needs is presented on the following page.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                                   3-3
                                                      Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 3-1
Summary Computation of Space Needs (Largo)


 HEGIS                                                       2007        2007       Surplus         2007 - 2017                         2017        2017               Surplus
                                                                                                           a            a
 CODE                 SPACE CATEGORY                         Need      Inventory   (-) Deficit   Additions    Deletions                 Need      Inventory           (-) Deficit
  100         CLASSROOM                                        67,348      54,275      -13,073       15,266              0                81,559      69,541              -12,018
  200         LABORATORY                                       68,239     109,377       41,138       28,262         3,009                 82,638     134,630               51,992
  210             Class Laboratory                             52,855     100,633       47,778       27,585         3,009                 64,007     125,209               61,202
  220             Open Laboratory                              15,385       8,744        -6,641          677             0                18,631       9,421               -9,210
  300         OFFICE                                          159,119     131,083      -28,036       33,021         7,056                184,066     157,048              -27,018
 310/50           Office/Conference                           156,538     131,083      -25,455       33,021         7,056                181,098     157,048              -24,050
  320             Testing/Tutoring                               2,582           0       -2,582             0            0                  2,968           0              -2,968
  400         STUDY                                            33,178      52,451       19,273       32,124       31,542                  39,037      53,033               13,996
  410             Study                                        22,894      29,801         6,907        3,039        8,892                 27,724      23,948               -3,776
 420/30           Stack                                         7,346      20,455       13,109       24,145       20,455                    8,081     24,145               16,064
 440/55           Process/Service                               2,938       2,195          -743        4,940        2,195                   3,232      4,940                1,708
  500         SPECIAL USE                                      62,556      70,894         8,338        6,647        6,681                 71,831      70,860                 -971
  510             Armory                                             0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
 520/25           Athletics/Physical Education                 55,630      60,550         4,920             0            0                63,359      60,550               -2,809
  530             Media Production                              5,926      10,344         4,418        6,647        6,681                   7,472     10,310                2,838
  540             Clinic                                             0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
  580             Greenhouse                                   1,000             0       -1,000             0            0                 1,000            0              -1,000
  600         GENERAL USE                                      55,805      72,778       16,973         1,173          235                 63,372      73,716               10,344
  610            Assembly                                      16,326      28,195       11,869              0            0                17,872      28,195               10,323
  620            Exhibition                                     2,582       2,426          -156             0            0                  2,968      2,426                 -542
  630            Food Facility                                 19,317      12,004       -7,313              0         235                 23,184      11,769              -11,415
  640             Day Care                                           0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
  650             Lounge                                        6,899      10,604         3,705        1,173             0                  8,280     11,777                3,497
  660             Merchandising                                 2,682       8,944         6,263             0            0                  3,068      8,944                5,876
  670             Recreation                                         0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
  680             Meeting Room                                  8,000      10,605         2,605             0            0                  8,000     10,605                2,605
  700         SUPPORT                                          25,010      38,433       13,423         6,055        8,165                 28,922      36,323                7,401
  710            Data Processing                                2,500      16,288       13,788         5,229        8,165                   2,827     13,352               10,525
 720-45          Shop/Storage                                  18,147      18,354           207          605             0                21,234      18,959               -2,275
  750             Central Services                             4,0 00       3,045          -955          221             0                  4,436      3,266               -1,170
  760             Hazmat Storage                                   363        746           383             0            0                    425        746                  321
  800         HEALTH CARE                                          933      1,244           311             0            0                  1,087      1,244                  157
100-800           SUB-TOTALS                                  472,188     530,535       58,347     122,548        56,688                 552,512     596,395               43,883
  050         Inactive                                               0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
  060         Alteration/Conversion                                  0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
  070         Unfinished                                             0           0             0            0            0                      0           0                     0
  090         Other Organizations                              11,638      11,638              0            0       1,630                 10,008      10,008                      0
050-090          SUB-TOTALS                                    11,638      11,638              0            0       1,630                 10,008      10,008                      0

                  GRAND TOTALS                                483,826            542,173    58,347       122,548          58,318         562,520         606,403          43,883
Data Sou rce: Prince Geo rge' s Comm unity Colleg e F acil iti es Man agemen t

a
    The "Additions" column reflects redistribution of space in Accokeek Hall after its renovation plus new spac e as a result of construction of the Center for Health Sciences.
The "Deletions " c olumn represents allocations of spac e in Accokeek Hall before renovation.


In summary, space needs analysis is the process of estimating the needed supply of learning, support and resource
space given a projected demand of academic programs, disciplines and student enrollments. Thus, space needs
analysis begins the transitioning from the language of academic planning to the language of facilities planning.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                                                October 31, 2008                                                                          3-4
                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Need Determinants

The need for space via new or renovated facilities is typically calculated in terms of hours of instruction and the number
of students, employees and library volumes to be accommodated.

Gross projections of space need are based on an anticipated number of student enrollments, faculty and staff, and
volumes for fall semester 2017. For this master planning process, the enrollment assumption is that the base
projected mix of academic disciplines maintains the program distributions for fall semester 2007, but may be influenced
by new academic programs and program expansions.

Space deficits and surpluses are identified based on the application of Maryland Higher Education Commission’s
Space Allocation Guidelines for Community Colleges (COMAR Title 13B) to inventories of various categories of space
and projected student enrollments. However, guidelines are not to be used as the only determining factor when
making decisions about facilities needs; a variety of qualitative or non-statistical indicators of space need offer
augmentation to any statistical calculations.

As previously stated, the focus of quantitative analyses of space needs will be Largo Campus (“on-campus”).


Enrollment Projections

Headcount enrollments and full-time equivalent student (FTE or FTES) enrollments are the primary measures of
student population. Although the headcount is most commonly used when referring to enrollments, this measure is
generally not used for facility planning purposes. The most generally accepted method of counting students for the
purposes of assessing facilities needs is the FTE. However, it is useful to analyze trends in headcount enrollments
with particular attention given to the mix of full-time versus part-time students. Because full-time students have more
needs for space than do part-time students, a sizeable shift in the ratio of full-time to part-time could have a significant
impact on FTE generation, and consequently, on overall space needs.

The College anticipates an aggressive, but controlled increase in student enrollments during the next ten years. Total
headcount is expected to increase from an actual count of 11,861 in fall 2007 to a minimum total of 13,996 (18%) in fall
2017. Projections for full-time equivalent students (FTES) will increase from 6,346 to 7,685 (21%).

In consonance with the projections of overall FTES, those for FTDES are expected to increase from an actual total of
3,663 for fall 2007 to a minimum of 4,436 FTDES by fall 2017.

The following projections of enrollments for fall 2007 through fall 2017 are the outcomes of extrapolations of data
previously developed and presented. These projections represent the recommendations developed by Prince
George’s Community College in keeping with the pursuit of its mission through the year 2017. Projections are
presented in such a manner as to satisfy the requirements of the Maryland Higher Education Commission and the
State of Maryland.

These enrollment projections primarily focus upon academic activities that are expected to occur during the prime
hours before 5:00 p.m. (Day), and will be engaged by full-time and part-time students, faculty and staff. Students
enrolled during these hours are referred to as full-time day equivalent students (FTDES).

The following table presents an overall distribution of projected enrollments and contact hours for the fall semester of
2017 in comparison with fall 2007 enrollments.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                 October 31, 2008                                                    3-5
                                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 3-2
Projected Enrollments by FTDES and WSCH
Fall 2017

                                        Prince George's Community College Totals                       On Campus Day Before 5:00 p.m.

                                Full-Time        Part-Time          Total    Credit    Credit          Credit      Credit    WSCH     WSCH
     Fall Semester             Headcount        Headcount       Headcount     Hours    FTES            Hours      FTDES     Lecture      Lab
          2007                      3,007            8,854         11,861    84,971    5,665          54,951       3,663    59,279    10,461
          2017                      3,774          10,226          14,000   101,115    6,741          66,546       4,436    71,787    12,668
       % Change
      2007 - 2017                      26%               16%         18%     19.0%     19.0%          21.1%        21.1%     21.1%    21.1%

 Average Growth Rate
     2007 - 2017                      2.3%              1.5%        1.7%      1.8%     1.8%            1.9%         1.9%      1.9%      1.9%

Data Source: Maryland Higher Education Commission, June 2007




Faculty and Staff Projections

The College expects to maintain its current student/faculty ratios for the year 2017. For master planning purposes, a
conservative annual increase of 1.0% is projected for staff.

Table 3-3
Faculty and Staff Projections: 2007 (Actual) and 2017 (Projected)

                                                         2007 (Actual)                                     2017 (Projected)
         Category                       FT                PT        Total       FTEF             FT            PT         Total       FTEF
Faculty (Credit)                       244               451         695         357            295           547           842        432
Faculty (Non-Credit)                     0               354         354          89              0           428           429        107
    Sub-Total Faculty                  244               805       1,049         445            295           975         1,271        539

Administrative                          55                 1           56         na             61                1           62        na
Other Professional                      97                52          149         na            108               58          165        na
Support                                339               541          880         na            375              601          976        na
     Sub-Total Staff                   491               594        1,085         na            545              659        1,203        na

  Total Faculty and Staff              735              1,399       2,134        445            840             1,634       2,475       539

Source: Maryland Association o f Co mm unity Colleges




Space Inventory Projections

Projected (2017) space inventory is expressed as the current (2007) inventory of permanent facilities at Largo plus the
net gain as a result of renovation of Accokeek Hall in 2010 and construction of the new Center for Health Sciences in
2012.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                               October 31, 2008                                                     3-6
                                              Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Quantitative Indicators of Space Need

Guidelines Applications (Buildings)

Total need for space is based primarily on the projected program of instruction and the number of weekly student
contact hours (WSCH) that it generates. Determinations of current and projected space surpluses and/or deficits are
driven by current space inventory and anticipated changes, current enrollment and projected enrollments, and current
and anticipated staffing levels.

Title 13B of the code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) prescribes guidelines for computing maximum allowances for
space on community college campuses. These guidelines, Space Allocation Guidelines for Community Colleges,
provide an initial assessment of facilities needs for Prince George’s Community College.

By applying information about the type of space required to teach the various courses to the current and projected
enrollments previously presented, it is possible to determine the approximate amount of space that is needed using the
guidelines. Then by applying current space inventory data, it is possible to determine the current and projected space
surplus and/or deficit.

The assumptions made for the application of the formulae-driven space computations for PGCC are shown in the
following table and applied to the current Largo Campus space inventory.

Table 3-4
Space Allocation Guidelines Input Data: Largo Campus
Fall 2007 (Actual) and Fall 2017 (Projected)

                          Input Item                            Fall 2007   Fall 2017

Student Data (On-Campus Before 5 p.m.)
    Credit Hours                                                  54,951      66,546
   FTDE (Credit)                                                   3,663       4,436

Contact Hour Data (On-Campus Before 5 p.m.)
   WSCH (Lecture)                                                 60,674      73,476
   WSCH (Laboratory)                                               9,066      10,979
   WSCH (Total)                                                   69,740      84,455

Library Information Factor
    Bound Volume Equivalent (BVE)                                 73,460      80,806

Staff Requiring Office Space
    FT Faculty                                                       244         295
    PT Faculty                                                       805         975
    FTE Faculty                                                      445         539
    FT Staff                                                         491         545

Planning Headcount
    PHC = 50% (FTDE + FTEF + FT Staff)                             2,300       2,760

Data Sou rce: Com piled by Fa cil iti es Pl anning Associates




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                                October 31, 2008                              3-7
                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


These assumptions, along with the space inventory, provide a snapshot of the fall 2007 semester which is the most
recent data available at the time of this analysis. The 2007 data reflect the actual situation while the data projected to
2017 are statistically based and are, for the most part, assumptions made by the College. Summary explanations of
the data assumptions for the input items are as follows:

         Student Data (FTDE) are calculated from course credit hours. Credit Hour and Contact Hour Data are
         derived from current enrollment and CIP data provided by Prince George’s Community College Office of
         Institutional Research and Office of Facilities Management; and projections were then calculated based on
         enrollment projections developed by the College.

         Faculty and Staff Data are provided by the Maryland Association of Community Colleges. Information about
         the projected number of faculty is obtained by maintaining the current student/faculty ratio. Information about
         the projected number of staff is based on an anticipated average annual growth rate of 1.1% over the next ten
         years.

         Library Information, in terms of Bound Volume Equivalent (BVE), is based on an anticipated 1.0% average
         annual increase of basic collection over the next ten-year period.

         Planning Headcount is a data element equal to 50% of FTDE for on-campus credit and eligible non-credit
         courses plus Full-time Equivalent Faculty (FTEF) and Full-Time Staff.

Given this data, it is possible to calculate the amount of space eligible for state funding for Prince George’s Community
College. This space eligibility is derived by analyses within the parameters of the guideline algorithm contained in Title
13B of COMAR. The amounts of eligible net assignable square feet are calculated for each type of space in the U.S.
Department of Education’s Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) space classification system for both
2007 and 2017. Surpluses and deficits for each room use category are determined by subtracting the guideline
allowance from the on-campus space inventory.

These space allocation calculations are used only as an aid to analyze campus-wide amounts of space needs by room
use category. Quality of spaces is not considered when using these guidelines, and these guidelines are not used in
individual project programming.


Guidelines Analysis (Buildings)

Student enrollments, faculty and staff are expected to increase, over the next ten years at Prince George’s Community
College, and so are the spatial requirements. By the year 2017, PGCC is expected to have an on-campus enrollment
of 4,436 FTDE and an overall spatial surplus of nearly 44,000 net assignable square feet. This surplus assumes a
2017 inventory consisting of the current (2007) inventory plus the net gain as a result of renovation of Accokeek Hall
and construction of the new Center for Health Sciences. Columns in the subsequent tables representing “2007 – 2017
Additions and Deletions” reflect, when totaled, the resulting net gain.

It should be noted that for purposes of planning for future facilities, projected deficits and surpluses in individual space
categories are more reliable indicators of space need than an overall deficit or surplus.

Application of the Maryland guidelines formulae for computing space needs at Largo Campus results in current and
projected space deficits in nine HEGIS room use categories. A comprehensive summary of computed space needs
was presented in the “Summary of Findings” section of this Space Needs Analysis. With respect to current and



Chapter 3 Space Needs                                 October 31, 2008                                                    3-8
                                   Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


projected space deficits as the result of the Guidelines application, review of the individual data elements reveals the
following:

Classroom (HEGIS 100): Facilities used for classes and that are also not tied to a specific subject or discipline by
equipment in the room or the configuration of the room. This category includes general purpose classrooms, lecture
halls, seminar rooms, and support rooms that directly service classroom activity.

Guideline allowance assumes 20 hours per week target room utilization; 60% seat occupancy rate; and 18 NASF per
student station.

PGCC currently owns 81% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College will
own 85% of its needed space.

Classroom
      2007          2007        Surplus         2007-2017               2017          2017        Surplus
      Need      Inventory     (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need       Inventory    (-) Deficit
    67,348        54,275        -13,073       15,266          0       81,559        69,541       -12,018

Laboratory (HEGIS 200): Facilities characterized by special purpose equipment or specific room configuration which
ties instructional or research activities to a particular discipline or a closely related group of disciplines. Included in this
category are science labs, computer labs, art and music studios, architectural drafting rooms and distance learning
classrooms.

Guideline allowance assumes 15 hours per week target room utilization; 60% seat occupancy rate; 20 NASF per
student station for natural and social science labs; and 115 NASF per student station for technical and career labs.
The allowance assumes 80% of lab contact hours are generated in natural and social science labs, and 20% in
technical and career labs.

PGCC currently owns 160% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 163% of its needed space.

Laboratory
      2007          2007        Surplus         2007-2017               2017          2017       Surplus
      Need      Inventory     (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need       Inventory    (-) Deficit
    68,239       109,377         41,138       28,262      3,009       82,638       134,630       51,992

Office (HEGIS 300): Individual, multi-person, or workstation space specifically assigned to academic, administrative,
and service functions. This category also includes conference rooms, file rooms, break rooms, kitchenettes, copy
rooms, testing/tutoring space, and other spaces that directly service office activity.
Guideline allowance assumes 166 NASF per individual requiring office space plus a core of 1,120 NASF for student
offices.

PGCC currently owns 82% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College will
own 85% of its needed space. Although this category reflects serious space deficiencies, its magnitude is difficult to
accurately measure due to the distribution of personnel among multiple campus sites.

Office
      2007          2007        Surplus         2007-2017               2017          2017        Surplus
      Need      Inventory     (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need       Inventory    (-) Deficit
    159,119      131,083        -28,036       33,021      7,056      184,066       157,048       -27,018

Chapter 3 Space Needs                                  October 31, 2008                                                      3-9
                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Study (HEGIS 400): Spaces used to house library collections, individual and group study rooms/stations, and spaces
devoted to library processes and operations.

Guideline allowance assumes a combination of three separate space factors:
         Seating: 25 NASF per seating station for 25% of FTDE
         Stack: .1 NASF per Bound Volume Equivalent
         Processing/Service: 40% of Stack space plus a core of 1,200 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 158% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 136% of its needed space. While the combined sub-components of this classification may reflect a current
“statistical” surplus, the component most directly related to learning and student preparation (Study) is significantly
deficient. Prior to this integrated master planning process, PGCC recognized the need for contemporary library
facilities, and have rightfully included development of these resources in Maryland’s Capital Improvement Program with
a renovation of Accokeek Hall.

Study
                           2007          2007      Surplus         2007-2017                 2017          2017      Surplus
                           Need      Inventory   (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions          Need       Inventory   (-) Deficit
Study                    22,894        29,801        6,907        3,039       8,892        27,724        23,948       -3,776
Stack                     7,346        20,455       13,109       24,145      20,455         8,081        24,145       16,064
Processing/Service        2,938         2,195         -743        4,940       2,195         3,232         4,940        1,708


Athletic/Physical Education (HEGIS 520-25): Indoor spaces used by students, staff, or the public for athletic or
physical education activities. Spaces include gymnasia, basketball courts, dance studios, spectator seating, locker
rooms, ticket booths, and storage directly related to athletic and physical education activity.

Guideline allowance assumes 10 NASF/FTDE beyond 1,500 plus a core of 34,000 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 109% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 96% of its needed space.

Athletics/Physical Education
       2007         2007     Surplus          2007-2017                2017        2017        Surplus
       Need Inventory (-) Deficit         Additions Deletions         Need     Inventory     (-) Deficit
     55,630      60,550       4,920                                  63,359      60,550         -2,809

Media Production (HEGIS 530): Rooms used for the production or distribution of multimedia materials or signals.
Examples include TV studios, photo studios, video/audio cassette and software production or distribution rooms, and
media centers.

Guideline allowance assumes 0.8 NASF/FTDE beyond 1,500 plus a core of 1,600 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 175% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 138% of its needed space.

Media Production
      2007       2007         Surplus         2007-2017                2017        2017        Surplus
      Need Inventory        (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions         Need     Inventory     (-) Deficit
      5,926     10,344          4,418       6,647       6,681         7,472      10,310          2,838

Chapter 3 Space Needs                                 October 31, 2008                                                     3-10
                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Greenhouse (HEGIS 580): A building or room usually composed chiefly of glass, plastic, or other light transmitting
material, which is used for the cultivation or protection of plants or seedlings for research, instruction, or campus
physical maintenance or improvement purposes.

Guideline allowance assumes a minimum core of 1,000 NASF

PGCC currently owns no space classified as Greenhouse. The data suggests that by 2017, the College will still own
no space with this classification.

Greenhouse
      2007         2007       Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017         Surplus
     Need      Inventory    (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
     1,000             0       -1,000                                1,000            0         -1,000

Assembly (HEGIS 610): A room designed and equipped for the assembly of many persons for such events as
dramatic, musical, devotional, livestock judging, or commencement activities. Spaces in this category include theaters,
auditoria seating, orchestra pits, chapels, and stages (if not primarily used for instruction).

Guideline allowance assumes 2 NASF/FTDE beyond 1,500 plus a core of 12,000 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 173% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 158% of its needed space.

Assembly
     2007          2007       Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017         Surplus
     Need      Inventory    (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
    16,326       28,195        11,869                               17,872      28,195         10,323

Exhibition (HEGIS 620): A room or area used for exhibition of materials, works of art, artifacts, etc., and intended for
general use by faculty, students, staff, and the public. Exhibition spaces include museums, galleries, and planetariums
used primarily for exhibition.

Guideline allowance assumes 0.5 NASF/FTDE beyond 1,500 plus a core of 1,500 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 94% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College will
own 82% of its needed space.

Exhibition
       2007        2007       Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017         Surplus
      Need     Inventory    (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
      2,582       2,426          -156                                2,968       2,426            -542

Food Facility (HEGIS 630): Rooms intended for the consumption of food, and rooms that provide direct service. This
category includes dining halls, cafeterias, snack bars, restaurants, kitchens, food serving areas, food storage,
dishwashing, and cleaning areas. Also included are such facilities located in residence halls.

Guideline allowance assumes 8.4 NASF times Planning Headcount (50% FTDE, FTEF, and FT Staff).

PGCC currently owns 62% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College will
own 51% of its needed space.

Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                               3-11
                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Food Facility
      2007     2007           Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017          Surplus
      Need Inventory        (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
    19,317    12,004           -7,313             0       235       23,184      11,769         -11,415

Lounge (HEGIS 650): A room used for rest, relaxation and informal socializing that is not restricted to a specific group
of people, unit or area. Lounges include quiet lounges, study lounges, building lounges, and game lounges.

Guideline allowance assumes 3.0 NASF times Planning Headcount (50% FTDE, FTEF, and FT Staff).

PGCC currently owns 154% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 142% of its needed space.

Lounge
     2007          2007       Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017         Surplus
     Need      Inventory    (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
     6,899       10,604         3,705        1,173          0        8,280      11,777           3,497

Merchandising (HEGIS 660): A room used to sell products or services. Examples include bookstores, student supply
stores, campus food stores, barber and beauty shops, walk-away vending areas, and central ticket outlets.

Guideline allowance assumes 0.5 NASF/FTDE beyond 1,500 plus a core of 1,600 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 334% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 292% of its needed space.

Merchandising
      2007     2007           Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017         Surplus
     Need Inventory         (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
     2,682    8,944             6,262                                3,068       8,944           5,876

Meeting Room (HEGIS 680): A room that is used by the institution and is also available to the public for a variety of
non-class meetings.

Guideline allowance assumes a core of 8,000 NASF

PGCC currently owns 133% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will still own 133% of its needed space.

Meeting Room
      2007     2007           Surplus         2007-2017               2017        2017         Surplus
      Need Inventory        (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions        Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit
      8,000  10,605             2,605                                8,000      10,605           2,605

Data Processing (HEGIS 710): A room used as a computer-based data processing or telecommunications center
with applications that are broad enough to serve the primary equipment needs of a central group of users. Although
this classification is typically grouped with Support (HEGIS 700) space, it is more often analyzed separately.

Guideline allowance assumes 0.75 NASF/FTDE beyond 4,500 plus a core of 2,500 NASF.


Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                               3-12
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


PGCC currently owns 652% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 472% of its needed space.

Data Processing
      2007       2007           Surplus         2007-2017                2017       2017         Surplus
      Need Inventory          (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions         Need    Inventory      (-) Deficit
      2,500     16,288           13,788        5,229      8,165         2,827     13,352         10,525

Support (HEGIS 720-760): This category includes space classifications generally referred to as “physical plant” such
as; maintenance shops, central storage, vehicle storage, central services, and hazardous materials storage areas.
Guideline allowance assumes a combination of three room use categories:
         Central Services: 1.0 NASF/FTDE beyond 4,500 plus a core of 4,000 NASF.
         Shops/Storage/Vehicle Storage/Repair: 4% of all other campus inventory
         Hazardous Materials Storage: 2% of existing shops/storage/vehicle storage/repair NASF

PGCC currently owns 98% of the space needed in these classifications. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 87% of its needed space.

Support
                             2007          2007      Surplus         2007-2017                2017           2017      Surplus
                             Need      Inventory   (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions         Need        Inventory   (-) Deficit
Shop/Storage               18,147        18,354          207           605         0        21,234         18,959       -2,275
Central Services            4,000         3,045         -955           221         0         4,436          3,266       -1,170
Hazmat Storage                363           746          383             0         0           425            746          321

Health Care (HEGIS 800): Patient care rooms that are located in separately organized health care facilities such as;
student infirmaries, teaching hospitals and clinics, and veterinary and medical schools.

Guideline allowance assumes 0.2 NASF/FTDE beyond 1,500 plus a core of 500 NASF.

PGCC currently owns 133% of the space needed in this classification. The data suggests that by 2017, the College
will own 114% of its needed space.

Health Care
       2007        2007         Surplus         2007-2017                2017       2017         Surplus
      Need     Inventory      (-) Deficit   Additions Deletions         Need    Inventory      (-) Deficit
        933       1,244             311                                 1,087      1,244             157




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                   October 31, 2008                                                     3-13
                                                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Guidelines Analysis (Parking)

Maryland’s Space Allocation Guidelines for Community Colleges are also used to compute parking allowances. When
the guidelines input data assumptions are applied to current parking inventory data, it is possible to determine the
number of eligible parking spaces. There are 2,962 parking spaces currently at the Largo Campus site. Given this
supply, there is a computed current deficit of 428 parking spaces. The computation suggests a projected deficit of
1,116 parking spaces by fall 2017.

Current parking inventory and calculations of current and future allowance are provided in the tables that follow.

Table 3-5
Existing Parking Lots (Largo)

Lot Designation                            Student              Staff/Faculty        ADA       Visitors     Designated    Other     Total Spaces
Lot A                                        145                      92                                                                237
Lot B                                        220                      56              2                                                 278
Lot C                                        255                      34              2                                                 291
Lot D                                        338                      35              2                                                 375
Lot E                                        272                                                                                        272
Lot F                                        462                                                                                        462
Lot G                                        411                                     4                                                  415
Lot H                                        110                     70              6                                                  186
Lot I (Bladen Hall)                                                                  3             11            11                      25
Lot I (Kent Hall)                                                    81              5              3            20                     109
Lot J                                                                                5              5            3                       13
Lot K                                                                53              21                                                  74
Lot MH Circle                                                                        13                                                  13
Lot KH Circle                                                                        2             10                                    12
Novak Rear Lot                                                       41                                                                  41
Childtime                                                                                                                   34           34
Facilities Building                                                  27               1                          34                      62
Service Roadway                                27                    24                                                                  51
Warehouse                                                             7                                          5                       12

Totals                                       2,240                  520              66            29            73         34            2,962

Data Source: Prince George's Community College Facilities Management



Table 3-6
Computation of Parking Allowance (Largo)
Fall 2007 and Fall 2017

                                                      2007       2007                    2007        Surplus           2017       2017        2017       Surplus
                                         Factor Input Data Allowance                 Inventory     (-) Deficit   Input Data Allowance     Inventory    (-) Deficit
Full-Time Faculty                         0.75         244        183                                                   295        221
Full-Time Staff                           0.75         491        368                                                   545        409
FTDES-Credit                              0.75       3,663      2,747                                                 4,436      3,327
FTDES-Eligible Non-Credit                 0.75         105         79                                                   127         95
          Sub-Total                                             3,377                      2,962          -415                   4,052        2,962       -1,090

Visitor                                   0.02                                  68           29           -39                       81            29          -52
            Sub-Total

ADA                                      Allow.                                 40           66            26                       40            66           26

          Total Spaces                                                    3,485            3057           -428                    4,173       3057        -1,116

Data Sou rce: Com piled by Fa cil iti es Pl anning Associates




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                                                     October 31, 2008                                                           3-14
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


QUALITATIVE INDICATORS OF SPACE NEED

A variety of qualitative or non-statistical environmental characteristics impact the space needs of Prince George’s
Community College. These global space needs are summarized here by the following functions:

         Instructional Functions
         Instructional Support Functions
         Student Services Functions
         Institutional Support Functions
         Outdoor Functions

Unlike quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis is very subjective. Summaries of qualitative indicators of current
conditions and program characteristics and future space needs/desires are a culmination of observations by the
consultants and of views expressed by College personnel during interviews with the consultants and/or via written
statements.

This listing is by no means all-inclusive. Future architectural programming for individual new or renovated facilities at
Prince George’s Community College will require, in each instance, a thorough review and analysis of each of the
subject function's component activities to determine a specific justification and rationale for new or reconfigured
spaces.

Instructional Functions

         There are insufficient numbers of open access computer stations.
         There are insufficient numbers of classrooms.
         Many classrooms and laboratories lack contemporary technology. The need exists for technology-enhanced
         instructional spaces that empower faculty and students to benefit from the use of virtual learning experiences
         that enhance engagement.
         There is a need for highly flexible, multi-functional instructional spaces. Migration to teaching more disciplines
         in computer labs has created rooms that are inflexible. Permanent furniture, hardware and wiring installations
         have made it difficult, if not impossible, to rearrange classrooms to suit varied needs in different courses or
         even in the same course.
         There is a need for some instructional spaces with “quick response capability” to take advantage of emergent
         opportunities to respond rapidly to business needs, particularly in Continuing Education environments.
         There is insufficient laboratory storage in general, and in art studios and music rooms in particular.
         Facilities for performing arts are woefully inadequate, and in some cases, inappropriate. There are no
         classrooms in Queen Anne’s Hall to support the Colleges theater programs. The one room originally designed
         as instruction space is being used as a makeshift scene shop. The costume shop is located in the basement
         and subject to mold and mildew. Students must often use facilities at other locations, such as Bowie High
         School, University of Maryland College Park, Strathmore Theater and Bowie State University for modern
         black box and other performing arts facilities.
         There are a minimal number of group or collaborative learning environments on campus.

Instructional Support Functions

         The College has no facilities for adjunct faculty to work and communicate before and after classes. Not only
         is there a need for appropriate settings outside the classroom for student/faculty interaction, but also a need
         for spaces that allow for seamless integration of adjunct faculty into departmental frameworks.
         There is a need for available study rooms where small groups could meet, either as spontaneous groupings
         or as scheduled study circles.


Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                                   3-15
                                Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Student Services Functions

        There are very few gathering spaces for students to hang out, sit, eat, and store their things while on campus
        for extended periods. There is a need for informal student areas that are more inviting for enjoyment,
        relaxation, individual study and group learning.
        There is generally insufficient and inadequate student lounge space, meeting space, recreational areas, and
        student organization space.
        Much of student-centered space in Largo Student Center has been converted to offices. With only one
        student lounge in the building and insufficient space for student organizations to meet, students get minimal
        use of this facility. Scheduling space requests for Largo Student Center is problematic as its spaces are used
        for other internal and external events, for meetings and programs, and for outside organizations and the
        surrounding community.
        There is insufficient space in the Novak Field House to accommodate intercollegiate athletic teams. This
        outdated building has antiquated fitness, wellness and other activity spaces and is very inadequate in terms of
        size. Novak has only one basketball court and no classrooms.

Institutional Support Functions

        There are insufficient numbers of conference spaces and inadequately sized spaces to hold large, gala-style
        and community events at Largo. Most major fund-raisers are held off campus.
        Many office/work spaces are inadequate; and some are functionally inappropriate. Some individuals are
        cramped into areas that were designed for other purposes. Providing adequate office space for new
        personnel presents severe challenges.
        Dining and other food facilities are insufficiently sized to effectively serve the needs of students, faculty and
        staff. This problem is magnified given the absence of gathering spaces for students while on campus.
        Students often use the limited food service spaces for lounging.
        There are insufficient numbers of break rooms and social spaces for staff and faculty.
        The Warehouse is too small to take full advantage of bulk procurements in economically advantageous order
        quantities. This building has no loading dock for to conveniently accept deliveries by large trucks.
        There is insufficient space for physical plant operations such as; maintenance shops, storage, and central
        services.

Outdoor Functions

        There are very few outdoor spaces suitable for active reaction.
        Outdoor athletic facilities are poor. There has been no upgrade to these facilities in 40 years. Neither soccer
        nor track and field facilities are regulation-sized.
        Overall parking is insufficient. As new buildings come on line, parking will become more of an issue. Existing
        lots are often closed for other activities such as; motorcycle training, festivals and other large events.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                               October 31, 2008                                                  3-16
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


SUMMARY

It is often said that inferior spaces equal inferior environments equal perceived inferior service. Qualitative facilities
problems often stem from the impact of quantitative problems on the physical campuses as a whole and the absence
of certain necessary spaces.

The data leading up to and including the computed and qualitative needs establishes the necessity for renovated
and/or additional facilities at Prince George’s Community College’s Largo Campus to meet the College’s present and
future space requirements. Potential strategies for meeting these identified space requirements are addressed, in
physical terms, by the capital projects outlined later in this document.

The next chapter begins the evaluation of the College’s buildings and campus site to determine their suitability to
support existing and future programs.




Chapter 3 Space Needs                                October 31, 2008                                                   3-17
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                           CHAPTER 4
                                                             Facilities
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                    CHAPTER 4 FACILITIES


             Designation                          Facility / Infrastructure            Page No.
                                 Contents – Chapter 4                                     4-1
                       1         Kent Hall                                              4-2– 4-6
                       2         Accokeek Hall                                         4-7 – 4-10
                   3-4           Bladen Hall                                           4-11 – 4-15
                       5         Largo Student Center                                  4-16 – 4-20
                       6         Chesapeake Hall                                       4-21 – 4-25
                       7         Lanham Hall                                           4-26 – 4-31
                       8         Marlboro Hall                                         4-32 – 4-37
                       9         Queen Anne Fine Arts Building                         4-38 – 4-42
                       10        Novak Field House                                     4-43 – 4-46
                       11        Robert I. Bickford Natatorium                         4-47 – 4-50
                       12        Temporary Buildings (not shown)
                       13        Continuing Education Building                         4-51 – 4-52
                       14        Steel Building                                        4-53 – 4-54
                       15        Childtime Children’s Center                           4-55 – 4-56
                       16        Facilities Management Building                        4-57 – 4-58
                  17-20          Outdoor Facilities (not shown)
                       21        Warehouse                                             4-59 – 4-60
                  22-28          Outdoor and Temporary Facilities (not shown)
                       29        Center for Advanced Technology                        4-61 – 4-65
                                 Central Heating and Cooling Plant                     4-66 – 4-67
                                 Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems                4-68 – 4-72
                                 Special Systems                                       4-73 – 4-76
                                 Sustainable Practice and Planning                     4-77 – 4-79




Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                    4-1
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                            01 KENT HALL
Building Designation:                                  1
Number of Floors:                                      2
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     18,939
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             30,738
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               62%
Year Constructed:                                      1967
Renovations:                                           No major renovations
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                               Administrative Offices

General Condition:                                     Fair

Adequacy of Space:                                      Administrative Offices require additional space

Sprinkler Systems:                                     No


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

Housing the College’s administrative offices for over 40 years, Kent Hall has provided traditional office
space for senior administrative officials. The layout is organized around a loop corridor, generally flanked by
perimeter offices surrounding an internal core of mixed use spaces. Toilet rooms require complete
renovation, either as a systemic renovation project or total building renovation. Elevator jack shaft requires
replacement. Additional office space is needed, to be provided either by expanding or replacing the
building.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building is conditioned via three small rooftop air handlers and an air handler located in the Penthouse.
The Penthouse air handler is in poor condition and needs replacement. The rooftop air handlers were
replaced recently. The hot water heater is in poor condition and requires replacement. Additionally, the
sump pumps and condensate return pump require replacement. Piping and pumps in the mechanical room
need to be replaced. The existing plumbing fixtures are old and require replacement with new water
conserving type.

Needs:

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    Install sprinkler system.

    •    Replace hot water heater.

Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                            4-2
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




    •    Replace sump pumps.

    •    Replace condensate pump.

    •    Replace piping and pumps in mechanical room.

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.

    •    Replace steam converter.

    •    Replace two A/C units serving telephone room (KH104).

    •    Replace two split system air conditioners that serve KH263 (Installed in 1993) and KH252
         (Installed in 2001).

    •    Replace penthouse air handler, including controls.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Install motion detectors for control of fluorescent lighting.

    •    Replace all Federal Pacific Electric equipment, including switchboard, panelboards and motor
         control centers.

    •    Upgrade lighting and receptacles in restrooms.

    •    Replace the PBX System and provide security for the room and a fire suppression system.




Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                          4-3
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                       01 KENT HALL




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-4
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                          01 KENT HALL FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-5
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-6
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                      02 ACCOKEEK HALL

Building Designation:                                  2
Number of Floors:                                      3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     58,318
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             74,626
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               78%
Year Constructed:                                      1985
Renovations:                                           In Process
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Library

General Condition:                                     Pre-renovation: poor

Adequacy of Space:                                     Space needs are being accommodated by way of the
                                                       current renovation

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Yes


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

Shortcomings for this building – quantity and quality of existing spaces – are being addressed in the current
renovation.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

All systems are scheduled for replacement in the pending renovation.

Needs:

    •    None.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-7
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                  02 ACCOKEEK HALL




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-8
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       02 ACCOKEEK HALL FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-9
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-10
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                      03-04 BLADEN HALL

Building Designation:                                  3-4
Number of Floors:                                      3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     64,982
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             103,817
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               63%
Year Constructed:                                      1967
Renovations:                                           2004/2007
Additions:

Contains:                                              Offices, Instruction, Study

General Condition:                                     Renovated First Floor: Excellent
                                                       Unrenovated – Second, Third Floors: Poor

Adequacy of Space:                                     First floor renovation provided adequate space for the
                                                       student service and related office functions. Second
                                                       and third floors are in need of renovation which will
                                                       help relieve quality of space needs.

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Sprinklered


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL
Areas on the first floor which were renovated in 2006 – 2007 appear to be in excellent condition and are
serving the College well. Windows were replaced in 2007. The elevator has a capacity of 3000 lbs., which
does not meet current Code requirements for cab size. In addition, the exit stairs serving the upper floors do
not communicate directly to the exterior, creating a less than ideal egress configuration. Finishes on the
second and third floors are durable, generally VCT flooring, painted concrete block walls and suspended
acoustical ceilings; and are in a reasonable state of repair. Toilet rooms require complete renovation, either
as a systemic renovation project or total building renovation.

Good for spaces on the first floor. Suitability of classrooms on the second and third floors is mixed. Many
classrooms have no technology other than an overhead projector on a cart, tablet arm chairs and
blackboard/tackboard surface. Some classrooms have been improved with 2-person tables and separate
chairs, ceiling-mounted video projectors, and a teacher podium. Computer workstations are provided at
each seat in computer labs. Renovation of the 2nd and 3rd floors is recommended.


MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building is conditioned by three (3) rooftop air handlers and an indoor air handler (AHU-1) that is
dedicated to serving the First Floor. Additionally, several exhaust fans located on the roof serve hoods
located in the building. The indoor air handler is old and requires replacement. The rooftop air handlers
were replaced in 2001. The existing HVAC system is not functioning well and requires re-balancing.
Additionally, the control system on the First Floor is a Johnson Controls System and the remainder of the


Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-11
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


building utilizes a Siemens Control System. The need for year-round cooling requires the water-cooled
chillers in the Central Plant to operate in the Winter, resulting in operational issues and lack of efficiency.
Two small boilers dedicated to serving the Learning Center require replacement. The existing plumbing
fixtures are old and require replacement with new water conserving type.

Needs:

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    Re-balance the existing HVAC system.

    •    Add an air-cooled chiller for winter cooling requirements.

    •    Replace the two (2) small boilers serving the Learning Center.

    •    Upgrade the Controls system to be one vendor (Siemens) for the entire building.

    •    Replace AHU-1 and controls.

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.

    •    Replace three (3) low pressure fire-tube boilers.

    •    Replace cooling tower fans in motors.

    •    Replace auxiliary heating and cooling plant equipment.

ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Install motion detectors for control of fluorescent lighting.

    •    Replace all Federal Pacific Electric equipment, including switchboard, panelboards, and motor
         control centers.

    •    Upgrade lighting and receptacles in restrooms.

    •    Replace emergency generator.


Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                              4-12
                        Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                  03 - 04 BLADEN HALL




                       03 - 04 BLADEN HALL FLOOR PLANS
Chapter 4 Facilities                       October 31, 2008                        4-13
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-14
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-15
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                               05 LARGO STUDENT CENTER

Building Designation:                                  5
Number of Floors:                                      2
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     50,742
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             69,116
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               73%
Year Constructed:                                      1973
Renovations:                                           No major renovations
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Dining, Bookstore, Meeting Rooms, Campus Mail

General Condition:                                     Fair

Adequacy of Space:                                     Meeting space, dining areas, mail room, student
                                                       gathering spaces are inadequate

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Sprinklered


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

The Largo Student Center is the primary location on campus for food service and meeting space, in addition
to the only location for the bookstore. All components of the facility are taxed well beyond their ability to
adequately serve the student population and community. The kitchen and servery are cramped, slowing
service and limiting menu options. The dining areas are dark, as is much of the building, and too small for
the number of patrons during peak (lunch) times. Acoustics are problematic; sounds are transmitted
throughout the building, interfering with functions inside occupied spaces. Meeting rooms are small and
limited. Receiving, loading, and trash areas are small and do not serve the functions well. An expanded or
renovated facility is needed for reasons of lack of space and problems with the quality of the existing
spaces. Elevator jack shafts require replacement. Toilet rooms and locker room require complete
renovation, either as a systemic renovation project or total building renovation. Complete renovation is
recommended.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The Largo Student Center is conditioned via nine (9) air handling units installed in 2002. The building
contains its own chiller and cooling tower, which are old. Several exhaust fans are located on the roof,
some of which serve the Kitchen/Cafeteria. The Kitchen/Cafeteria cooking equipment is old and requires
upgrade. Air conditioning in the Cafeteria is deficient. The existing plumbing fixtures are old and require
replacement with new water conserving type.

Needs:




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-16
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:
    • Replace cooling tower and chiller.

    •    Upgrade kitchen equipment and associated mechanical systems.

    •    Provide a new air conditioning system for the Cafeteria.

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.

    •    Replace cooling tower.

    •    Replace grease hood wash-down system.

    •    Replace steam re-heat coil in food storage.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Replace electrical panelboards.

    •    Upgrade fire alarm system.

    •    Install a sound system with film projection room for Rennic Forum.

    •    Upgrade lighting in Community Rooms A, B, and C.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                           4-17
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                          05 LARGO STUDENT CENTER




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-18
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                   05 LARGO STUDENT CENTER FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-19
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-20
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                   06 CHESAPEAKE HALL

Building Designation:                                  6
Number of Floors:                                      3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     38,011
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             65,327
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               58%
Year Constructed:                                      1999
Renovations:                                           None
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Laboratories, classrooms, offices and support spaces

General Condition:                                     Good

Adequacy of Space:                                     Generally adequate given overall campus needs.
                                                       Spaces appear to serve the College well. Building
                                                       efficiency is less than might be expected for a
                                                       classroom building.

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Yes


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL
Generally, the building is in very good condition. The size and configuration of classrooms and labs appear
to be adequate to support the curriculum. Furniture and technology in the building is relatively new, and
meets the expectations for a modern higher education facility. One recommendation is to consider the
addition of glass lights in classroom doors so those in the corridor can see if a room is in use without
knocking on the door.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building contains its own heating and cooling plant consisting of two (2) 300 ton chillers and four (4)
boilers. The chillers utilize R-22 refrigerant, which has a phase-out date of 2010. The boilers are in fair
condition and will require replacement within the next 5-10 years. Several exhaust systems for hoods exist
and are in poor condition.

Needs:
   • Replace chillers in next 5 years.

    •    Replace the boilers in the next 5-10 years.

    •    Replace hood exhaust system, including fans.

    •    Replace air handlers and controls within the next 5 years.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                          4-21
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                               06 CHESAPEAKE HALL




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-22
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                       06 CHESAPEAKE HALL FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-23
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-24
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-25
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                        07 LANHAM HALL

Building Designation:                                  7
Number of Floors:                                      3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     48,708
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             77,175
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               63%
Year Constructed:                                      1969
Renovations:                                           No major renovations
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Instructional Spaces, Offices, Central Data Center

General Condition:                                     Fair

Adequacy of Space:                                     Most programs require additional space, especially
                                                       Nursing Labs

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Sprinklered


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

Lanham Hall provides instructional space for Allied Health programs. Older lab spaces with out-dated
equipment are in need of renovation and improvement. Some floor settlement is evident on the first level.
Toilet rooms are non-compliant. Control of temperature and humidity is erratic. Programs in this building
are in need of expansion which cannot be easily accommodated, requiring a new facility.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building is served by five (5) air handling units and contains its own chiller and cooling tower (replaced
in 2003). The building is heated by converting steam from the central plant to hot water which circulates
through the building to various heat coils. Both the chilled water and heating water pumps are old and
require replacements. Additionally, the chilled water and heating water pipes are in poor condition and
require replacement throughout the building. The building also contains approximately 80 unit ventilators,
which are in poor condition. The existing plumbing fixtures are old and require replacement with new water
conserving type. Elevator jacks require replacement. Toilet rooms require complete renovation, either as a
systemic renovation project or total building renovation. The roof was replaced in 2002. Complete
renovation is recommended.

Needs:

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-26
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


    •    Renovate the entire HAC system; including: replace all unit ventilators, replace chilled water and
         heating piping, replace heating and cooling pumps.

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.

    •    Replace two (2) air conditioners serving the Data Center.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Upgrade fire alarm system.

    •    Replace electrical service switchgear.

    •    Re-wir4e the electrical system to avoid nuisance tripping.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                           4-27
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                    07 LANHAM HALL




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-28
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       07 LANHAM HALL FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-29
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-30
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-31
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                     08 MARLBORO HALL

Building Designation:                                 8
Number of Floors:                                     3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                    77,564
Gross Building Area (GSF):                            129,963
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                              60%
Year Constructed:                                     1975
Renovations:                                          None
Additions:                                            None

Contains:                                              Instructional Spaces, Offices, Art Gallery,
                                                       Music Studios

General Condition:                                    Fair

Adequacy of Space:                                     Inadequate for faculty offices and instructional
                                                       spaces; mostly due to poor quality of space

Sprinkler Systems:                                    Sprinklered


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

By far the largest academic building on campus, Marlboro Hall suffers from age and lack of major
renovations for over 30 years. Structural cracking is evident in several locations, noticeably on the brick
exterior and exit stairs; the College is monitoring these cracks. Although connected to Bladen and Lanham
Halls, corridors provide through-circulation only on level 2 to both buildings and level 3 to Lanham.
Occupants report that elevators regularly malfunction. Handrails in the stairs do not comply with current
code requirements, and doors are not ADA compliant. Temperature control is erratic. Operable partitions
provide little sound resistance. Several classrooms are not equipped with basic technology infrastructure
(overhead projectors & controls), have no lighting controls beyond “on” and “off”, and classroom furnishings
are not appropriate (tablet arm chairs). Elevator cabs, equipment and controls require replacement. Toilet
rooms require complete renovation, either as a systemic renovation project or total building renovation. Any
renovation should re-configure circulation patterns to provide better campus connections. Complete
renovation is recommended.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building is conditioned via seven (7) air handling units. Chilled water is provided by two (2) chillers.
Also supplementing the cooling are ten (10) rooftop air handlers. Several exhaust fans serve toilet rooms.
All of the air handling equipment is old and requires replacement. The existing plumbing fixtures are old and
require replacement with new water conserving type.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-32
                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



Needs:

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    Replace chillers.

    •    Replace air handlers within the next 5-10 years.

    •    Replace rooftop units.

    •    Replace chilled/condenser water pumps.

    •    Replace exhaust systems, including ductwork and fans.

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.

    •    Replace sump pumps.

    •    Replace auxiliary hot water heater (100 gallons).

    •    Replace two (2) cooling towers.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Replace diesel generator with natural gas-fueled generator.




Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                         4-33
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                 08 MARLBORO HALL




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-34
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       08 MARLBORO HALL FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-35
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-36
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-37
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                 09 QUEEN ANNE FINE ARTS

Building Designation:                                   9
Number of Floors:                                       2
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                      22,632
Gross Building Area (GSF):                              33,235
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                                68%
Year Constructed:                                       1967
Renovations:                                            No major renovations
Additions:                                              None

Contains                                                805 seat auditorium, instructional space, offices and
                                                        support spaces

General Condition:                                      Non-renovated spaces (all but some offices): Poor

Adequacy of Space:                                      Administrative offices require additional space, lobby
                                                        is too small as a pre-function space for some events,
                                                        additional costume and set storage space is needed

Sprinkler Systems:                                      Partial sprinkler system

Asbestos / Hazardous Materials:                         9” x 9” floor tile present in some spaces; renovated
                                                        areas abated?


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

Limited accessibility upgrades have been made, such as the purchase of a portable lift to allow wheelchair
users to access the stage and removal of the front row of seats to provide wheelchair spaces. However,
most of the building does not comply with ADAAG, such as access to the second floor, door clearances,
toilet facilities and access to the balcony. Significant structural cracking is evident at the curved wall on the
west end of the building, which is most visible at columns in the second floor mechanical room. Finishes in
many areas of the building are in need of replacement. Toilet rooms require complete renovation, either as
a systemic renovation project or total building renovation. The roof was replaced in 1999. Any renovation
should re-configure circulation patterns to provide better campus connections. The auditorium, like the rest
of the building, is in need of major renovation. It is recommended that a complete renovation project be
accompanied by an addition to house fine art, ceramics, and music studios.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions
The building is conditioned via two (2) air handling units which utilize duct mounted steam coils for heat
zoning. Systems in the building are original. The sump pump pipe leaving the building has collapsed and
needs replacement. The existing plumbing fixtures are old and require replacement with new water
conserving type.

Needs:



Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                             4-38
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    Replace air-handling unit

    •    Replace sump and piping leaving building.

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Upgrade all electrical systems to include lighting, power distribution, emergency generator, fire
         alarm, and Information Technology facilities.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                               4-39
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                           09 QUEEN ANNE FINE ARTS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-40
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       09 QUEEN ANNE FINE ARTS FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                         October 31, 2008                        4-41
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-42
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                   10 NOVAK FIELD HOUSE

Building Designation:                                  10
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     26,013
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             35,327
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               74%
Year Constructed:                                      1967
Renovations:                                           Various minor renovations
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Athletics, Physical Education/Wellness

General Condition:                                     Renovated spaces: good
                                                       Other spaces: fair
Adequacy of Space:                                     Inadequate

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Sprinklered

Asbestos / Hazardous Materials:                        Yes


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

The major problem with the field house is its small size. With just one full basketball court and numerous
programs vying for space during all parts of the day, the court cannot accommodate the demand. Locker
rooms are only in fair condition. The Concession space is too small for the equipment necessary for a
capacity audience. Concrete bleachers prevent creative use of spaces underneath. Toilet rooms require
complete renovation, either as a systemic renovation project or total building renovation. Team rooms
require upgrading beyond the mostly cosmetic renovations completed in the 2008 summer period. In
addition to a complete renovation to Novak, a new, larger field-house type facility is needed to allow for both
practice and competition venues.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building is heated via its own boiler system. The boiler and pumps are old and require replacement.
Existing rooftop air handlers were replaced within the last 5 years. The existing plumbing fixtures are old
and require replacement with new water conserving type.

Needs:
The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing
         systems.



Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                            4-43
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


    •    Replace boilers.

    •    Replace hot water tank and two back-up water heaters.
    •    Replace four (4) 3-ton rooftop air handling units.

    •    Install HVAC for office spaces.

    •    Replace condensate tank and sump pump.

    •    Replace exhaust system.

    •    Replace water piping and valves throughout.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

Needs:

    •    Install natural gas-fueled emergency generator.

    •    Upgrade all lighting systems.

    •    Upgrade electrical distribution system and receptacles.




Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                          4-44
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                              10 NOVAK FIELD HOUSE




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-45
                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       10 NOVAK FIELD HOUSE FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                        October 31, 2008                        4-46
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       11 ROBERT I. BICKFORD NATATORIUM

Building Designation:                                  11
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     39,254
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             47,139
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               83%
Year Constructed:                                      1991
Renovations:                                           2007 – minor renovations
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Athletics, Physical Education/Wellness

General Condition:                                     Good

Adequacy of Space:                                     Adequate

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Sprinklered

Asbestos / Hazardous Materials:                        None


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

The natatorium is an important amenity for the College with its 50 meter pool. Finishes are in good
condition throughout but in need of upgrade in limited areas. Fitness rooms appear to be small for the
amount of equipment contained, and racquetball courts are little used, creating opportunities for adaptive re-
use. The building is heavily used by the community in addition to use by PGCC students. Toilet rooms
require complete renovation, either as a systemic renovation project or total building renovation.

MECHANICAL

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing systems.


ELECTRICAL

For additional electrical descriptions and needs, refer to “Campus Electrical and Lighting Systems”
and “Special Systems” at the end of this Chapter.

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                           4-47
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Needs

    •    Install motion detectors for control of fluorescent lighting.

    •    Replace all Federal Pacific Electric equipment, including switchboard, panelboards, and motor
         control centers.

    •    Upgrade lighting and receptacles in rest rooms.




Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                         4-48
                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       11 ROBERT I. BICKFORD NATATORIUM




Chapter 4 Facilities                        October 31, 2008                        4-49
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



           11 ROBERT I. BICKFORD NATATORIUM FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-50
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       12 CONTINUING EDUCATION BUILDING
Building Designation:                                  12
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     11,332
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             15,315
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               74%
Year Constructed:                                      1988?
Renovations:                                           None
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Instructional spaces

General Condition:                                     Fair

Adequacy of Space:                                     Inadequate for current programs

Sprinkler Systems:                                     not sprinklered

Asbestos / Hazardous Materials:                        None


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL
This modular brick-clad building provides instructional space for continuing education programs. Built to
meet now outdated demands of the continuing education programs, this relatively small building is showing
signs of wear. Sound attenuation between spaces is poor; the roof (now beyond its warranty) has leaked
regularly over several years, and the HVAC system is erratic with little control of temperature and humidity.
Floor finishes have degraded and require replacement. While the College has upgraded some classrooms,
several are not equipped with basic technology infrastructure (overhead projectors & controls), have no
lighting controls beyond “on” and “off”, and classroom furnishings are not appropriate (tablet arm chairs).
The building should be replaced to make way for other College projects.


MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The existing gas-fired heating and cooling units (ten total) are in poor condition and require replacement.
Each unit has 5 tons of cooling. Approximately 20 exhaust fans require replacement. The existing
plumbing fixtures are old and require replacement with new water conserving type.

Needs

As part of systemic renovations to toilet rooms, replace/upgrade lighting, HVAC, and plumbing systems.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-51
                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       12 CONTINUING EDUCATION BUILDING




Chapter 4 Facilities                        October 31, 2008                        4-52
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



              13 STEEL BUILDING (SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS)

Building Designation:                                  13
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     4,324
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             4,866
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               89%
Year Constructed:                                      1972
Renovations:                                           None
Additions:                                             None

Contains:                                              Sculpture and Ceramics Studios

General Condition:                                     Poor

Adequacy of Space:                                     Inadequate for existing programs

Sprinkler Systems:                                     Yes


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL
This pre-engineered building has out-lived its useful life without any benefit of major renovation. The
building was constructed to provide space for sculpture and ceramics programs. There are no permanent
interior finishes, windows are single-glazed, and is not air-conditioned. More permanent, durable facilities
are needed. The building should be razed; spaces for its programs should be integrated in a fine arts
facility, recommended as an addition to Queen Anne.

MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

The building is heated only via gas-fired unit heaters. The unit heaters are in poor condition. The hot water
heater also requires replacement. The ventilation system is deficient in properly exhausting contaminants
from the building; this is critical to the health of the building occupants. A MOSH inspection concluded that
toxic chemicals, welding fumes, steel & bronze dust, sawdust and silica are present and not sufficiently
contained or exhausted.

Needs

The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    Replace unit gas heaters.

    •    Replace water heater.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-53
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                  13 STEEL BUILDING




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-54
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                      14 CHILDREN’S CENTER

Building Designation:                                   14
Number of Floors:                                       1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                      10,008
Gross Building Area (GSF):                              12,826
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                                78%
Year Constructed:                                       1976
Renovations:                                            None
Additions:                                              None

Contains:                                               Childcare

General Condition:                                      Good

Adequacy of Space:                                      Adequate

Sprinkler Systems:                                      Yes


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL
This building appears to function adequately for the child care programs conducted within. Minor
renovations – mostly interior – can improve the building but are not critical. The roof is in need of
replacement.


MECHANICAL

No deficiencies exist at this time.




Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                         4-55
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       14 CHILDTIME CHILDREN`S CENTER




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-56
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       15 FACILITIES MANAGEMENT BUILDING

Building Designation:                                  15
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     11,632
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             13,945
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               83%
Year Constructed:                                      1976
Renovations:                                           None
Additions:

Contains:                                               Offices, Shops, Storage

General Condition:                                     Poor

Adequacy of Space:                                      Wholly insufficient

Sprinkler Systems:                                     No


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

The Facilities Building, now over 30 years old and without any major renovation or systemic upgrade, is long
overdue for renovations, expansion, or replacement. The building is constructed in two parts: Office space
in a brick building in front and shop areas in a pre-engineered building in the rear. Minor upgrades, several
performed by facilities staff, have provided some improvement but have not kept up with needs. Facilities
staff and campus police staff share the office part, and both suffer from significant space deficits. One
conference room is shared by both staff. Campus police must use one room for multiple functions: roll call,
staff meetings, and temporary detention, an issue of compromised functionality and safety. The roof was
replaced in 2004. The vehicle repair bay lift needs to be replaced, as well as all overhead doors.

MECHANICAL
Existing Conditions
The building contains a rooftop Mammoth unit, small 3-ton air conditioner on the roof, six (6) Sanyo split
system air conditioners, and a 3-ton air handler serving the auto-bay. The six Sanyo units require
replacement.

Needs
The entire building is aged and in need of a complete renovation. If funds are not available for a complete
renovation, or if renovation is delayed in excess of 10 years, the following items should be addressed
separately from the renovation:

    •    Replace Sanyo units.

    •    Replace boiler.

    •    Remove underground oil tank.

    •    Replace 3-ton air conditioning unit.

Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                             4-57
                         Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       15 FACILITIES MANAGEMENT BUILDING




Chapter 4 Facilities                        October 31, 2008                        4-58
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                  21 WAREHOUSE BUILDING

Building Designation:                                  21
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     9,236
Gross Building Area (GSF):                             9,290
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                               99%
Year Constructed:                                      1967
Renovations:                                           None
Additions:

Contains:                                              Storage

General Condition:                                     Fair

Adequacy of Space:                                     Inadequate for College’s storage needs

Sprinkler Systems:                                     None

Asbestos / Hazardous Materials:                        None


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

The Warehouse serves as the primary storage facility for the College. Built as a pre-engineered steel
building, and located in a remote part of the campus, the building has outlasted its useful life without a
significant expansion. The mezzanine is inaccessible except by way of a ladder, making handling of storage
items difficult. A small office next to the large service entrance allows monitoring of building operations.
The building is significantly undersized for the needs of the College.


MECHANICAL

The building is heated only via space heaters hung from the ceiling; there is no air-conditioning.

Needs:

Upgrade HVAC to include humidity control.




Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                        4-59
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                            21 WAREHOUSE BUILDING




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-60
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       29 CENTER FOR ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY

Building Designation:                                29
Number of Floors:                                    3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                   50,478
Gross Building Area (GSF):                           73,080
Net-to-Gross Efficiency:                             69%
Year Constructed:                                    2007
Renovations:                                         None
Additions:                                           None

Contains:                                             Instruction, Offices, Study

General Condition:                                   Excellent

Adequacy of Space:                                    Adequate

Sprinkler Systems:                                    Yes

Asbestos / Hazardous Materials:                      None


ARCHITECTURAL, GENERAL

The “High Tech Building” houses the most up-to-date instructional and learning technology on campus. It
provides much-needed instructional space as well as a pleasant (but apparently yet undiscovered by most
students) café on the upper floor. Supplementing the formal instructional spaces are study/lounge areas
well distributed around the building. Access to upper floors is compromised by the remote location of the
elevator relative to the front door and the rest of the campus.


MECHANICAL

Existing Conditions

All systems are new and in good condition.

Needs:

None.




Chapter 4 Facilities                         October 31, 2008                                          4-61
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                       29 CENTER FOR ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY




Chapter 4 Facilities                         October 31, 2008                        4-62
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



         29 CENTER FOR ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-63
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-64
                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 4 Facilities                      October 31, 2008                        4-65
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



             CAMPUS CENTRAL HEATING AND COOLING PLANT

EXISTING CONDITIONS

General

The central heating and cooling plant is located in the North end of Bladen Hall and serves the core of the
campus. Steam and chilled water are supplied to the various buildings via a combination of utility trenches
and tunnels. Other buildings not connected to the central plant have self-contained heating/cooling systems
or their own chillers and boilers.

Heating

Low pressure steam is supplied to the following buildings from the Central Plant: Bladen Hall, Largo
Student Center, Lanham Hall, Queen Anne Fine Arts Center, Kent Hall, Accokeek Hall, and Marlboro Hall.

The Condensate Return distribution piping was replaced in 2004. This replacement was necessitated by
the severe corrosion of the condensate system due to poor chemical treatment. Although effects of
corrosion in the steam lines have not manifested, the life expectancy of the steam lines was likely reduced
during the same time period that the condensate lines deteriorated.

A utility tunnel system on the East side of the campus is used to distribute steam to Lanham Hall. A 6”
steam and 3” condensate line serve Largo Student Center. A trench system containing a 10” steam and 2”
condensate return crosses the Plaza to provide heat to Lanham Hall.

A utility tunnel system is used on the West side of the campus core to distribute steam to Queen Anne Fine
Arts Center, Kent Hall, Accokeek Hall, and Marlboro Hall. Steam leaves Bladen Hall to the West via an 8”
main and 2-1/2” condensate return line. Expansion compensation in the tunnels is via expansion joints,
some of which were replaced in 2004.

Cooling

Chilled water is distributed from the Central Plant in Bladen Hall to Queen Anne Fine Arts Center, Kent Hall,
and Accokeek Hall via the same utility tunnel as the steam. These buildings are served by 6” chilled water
supply and return lines.

Plant Equipment

The Central Plant in Bladen Hall contains two (2) chillers, three (3) boilers, and associated appurtenances.
One of the chillers is an older screw machine and requires replacement. Additionally, the boilers are almost
20 years old and will require replacement soon. The lack of condensate return has caused use of increased
make-up water in the boiler system and subjected the boilers to increased corrosion and wear.

The pumps and piping in the boiler room are old and need upgrade.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                           4-66
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Needs

    •    Replace the boilers within the next year or two.

    •    Replace the screw chiller as soon as possible.

    •    Replace pumps in boiler/chiller rooms and repair piping.

    •    Replace the HVAC System.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                        4-67
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



        CAMPUS ELECTRICAL, LIGHTING, AND SPECIAL SYSTEMS


GENERAL CONDITIONS

The buildings on the Campus are of various ages. The electrical equipment and systems were state-of-the-
art when installed and are generally serviceable. Equipment and systems appear to be well-maintained.

Switchboard and panelboards in the older buildings are antiquated and replacement components, such as
circuit breakers, are not readily available.

There appears to be no overloading of the 15 kV distribution cable system, pad-mounted transformer,
incoming service switchboards, feeders, or panelboards.


GENERAL NEEDS

There are plans to upgrade the following:

    •    Incoming service switchboards in older buildings

    •    Medium voltage (15 kV) cabling and ductbank system

    •    Fire Alarm Systems

    •    Street and Parking Lot Lighting (poles, luminaires and distribution)

    •    IT/Telecommunication and Electrical Distribution Ductbank System

    •    There is a plan to provide a Campus-Wide Blue Light/Emergency Call Box (Phone) System. These
         plans should be completed.

    •    A Video Surveillance Security System plan exists and should be installed throughout the campus,
         including buildings and open areas, and connected to the College's information network.

    •    When buildings are upgraded or renovated and new buildings constructed, new equipment and
         systems should be state-of-the-art and energy-efficient. The following should be included:

    •    Pad-mounted transformers should be sized to accommodate building loads plus spare capacity.

    •    Incoming service switchboards, feeders and panelboards should be sized to accommodate building
         loads plus spare capacity. Energy monitoring should be provided in all switchboards.

    •    TVSS protection should be provided on all switchboards, panelboards, and telecommunication
         systems.

    •    K-rated transformers and panelboards with 200% neutrals should be provided for computer
         equipment and receptacles.


Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                        4-68
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


    •    Emergency generators should be provided and sized to accommodate building loads plus spare
         capacity. Generators should provide power for emergency lighting, exit signs, alarm systems,
         telecommunication system and associated air conditioning, an elevator, sump pumps, fire pumps,
         and other required loads with the proper automatic transfer switches.

    •    Lighting should be provided with fixtures, lamps, ballasts, and controls as defined in the
         ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.

    •    Fire Alarm System should be provided and connected to the Campus System. System shall be
         addressable type.

    •    Security Systems shall be provided and connected to the Campus System.

    •    Adequate space, facilities and raceways should be provided for IT/Telecommunications Systems.
         Equipment rooms should be provided with air conditioning and emergency power.

    •    A campus-wide Study of lightning protection should be performed.

    •    A study of the 15 kV distribution switchgear should be performed to determine the condition of the
         equipment and if the equipment should be overhauled and upgraded.


CAMPUS ELECTRICAL MEDIUM VOLTAGE DISTRIBUTION

Existing Conditions

The existing distribution system is at 15 kV and includes utility switchgear and PGCC ductbanks, medium
voltage cables and pad-mounted transformers with primary switch/fuse.

The incoming electric service from PEPCO (the electric utility) is metered at 13.2 kV and consists of a single
feeder, which serves a customer-owned 15 kV distribution switchgear.

The distribution system consists of several redial feeders with some loop switch and taps to the building
pad-mounted transformers. Switch #5 radial feeder is serving several buildings.

Outdoor Pad-Mounted (Oil-Filled) Transformers: 13.2 kV – 3 Phase Primary:

        Building                                        kVA                        Secondary
        Accokeek Hall                                   1000 kVA             480/277 V, 3 Phase, 4W.
        Bladen Hall                                       750 kVA            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4W.
        Continuing Education                              225 kVA            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Center for Advanced Technology                   Unknown             480/277V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Lanham Hall                                   (2) 750 kVA            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Largo Student Center                              750 kVA            480/277V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Marlboro Hall                                   1500 kVA             480/277V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Parking Lot “B”                                   75 kVA             480/277V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Parking Lot “G”                                    75 kVA            480/277V, 3 Phase, 4W.
        Queen Anne Fine Arts                             500 kVA*            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Novak Field House & Natatorium                    225 kVA            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        Physical Plant                                    225 kVA            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4 W.

Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                              4-69
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


        Building                                        kVA                       Secondary
        Temporary Buildings (Heavy Arts)                 500 kVA            120/208V, 3 Phase, 4 W.
        *Dry Type


There are no apparent overloading problems or equipment and cable problems.

The existing underground feeder cables are tested every two (2) years by a Certified Testing Agency and
their report is submitted to PEPCO for review. This program should continue.

There is a plan to upgrade the duct-bank and medium voltage distribution system.


Needs

    •    The plan to upgrade the duct-bank and medium voltage distribution system should be completed.

    •    The testing of underground feeder cables and reporting to PEPCO should continue.

    •    A Load Study should be performed to determine the actual loading of the radial feeders. The loads
         should continue to be monitored.



BUILDING ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

Existing Conditions

The building distribution system includes incoming electric service from the pad-mounted transformers,
incoming service switchboards, panelboards, and miscellaneous equipment.

Many of the buildings have 277/480 volt service switchboards with 277/480 volt panelboards and major
equipment connections where transformers provide service to 120/208 volt panelboards. Some buildings
have 120/208 volt services.

Older buildings, which have not been renovated, have switchboards manufactured by Federal Pacific
Electric (FPE). Replacement components, such as circuit breakers, are not readily available and may be
difficult and expensive to obtain, making these switchboards unreliable due to maintenance problems.

There are no apparent overloading problems or other equipment problems EXCEPT IN Lanham Hall, which
has numerous nuisance tripping of the electrical systems.

Generally, the equipment in the buildings is well-maintained and serviceable.

There is a plan to upgrade the existing incoming service switchboards in the older buildings.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                           4-70
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Needs

    •    The plan to upgrade the existing incoming service switchboards in the older buildings should be
         completed.

    •    The basic electrical distribution systems in the buildings are state of the art equipment and should
         be maintained.



EMERGENCY POWER

Existing Conditions

Largo Student Center, Lanham Hall, Kent Hall, Queen Anne’s Fine Arts, Bladen Hall, Chesapeake Hall,
Accokeek Hall, Marlboro Hall, R.I.B. Natatorium, Center for Advanced Technology, and Facilities
Management have generators to provide emergency power for life safety (lighting, exit signs, fire alarm
systems, etc.), and elevators. Additionally, generator power serves the IT server rooms and associated
HVAC in Kent Hall First Floor and stacked telecom rooms in the Center for Advanced Technology.

The generators at Accokeek, Chesapeake, Queen Anne’s, and Bladen are fueled by natural gas. The
generators at Largo, Lanham, Kent, Center for Advanced Technology, Marlboro, and Facilities Management
are diesel-fueled.

The generators are exercised regularly (without load) and are serviced by a Contract under a
Maintenance/Service Agreement.


Needs

    •    As buildings are renovated or new buildings are constructed, emergency generators should be
         sized for life safety loads (such as emergency lighting, exit signs, fire alarm communication and
         alarm systems), elevators, and IT equipment.

    •    Diesel generators should be converted to gas-fired types whenever possible (Refer to individual
         building descriptions).


LIGHTING
STREET AND PARKING LOT LIGHTING

Existing Conditions

The existing street and parking lot lighting includes concrete pole bases, poles, and luminaires.

The poles are deteriorating (corroding at the pole shaft/base plate) and several have been toppled in high
wind conditions and hit by parked cars. All of the older poles are suspect.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-71
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


The electrical distribution system consists of 480 volt conductors in underground rigid steel conduit. The
conduits are deteriorating and causing conductor failures and lighting outages.

There is no apparent overloading of circuits.

There is a plan to upgrade the existing poles and luminaires and the underground electrical distribution
system. The plan includes addressing upgrading lighting to provide proper levels of illumination throughout.
This plan also includes providing a blue light/emergency call box (phone) system.


Needs

    •    The plan to upgrade the existing poles, luminaires, and electrical distribution system should be
         completed.

    •    Lighting should be in accordance with the criteria of the International Dark Sky Association and the
         recommended criteria of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IESNA).



BUILDING LIGHTING (INTERIOR AND BUILDING EXTERIOR)

Existing Conditions

Generally, lighting in the building interiors is linear fluorescent with small compact fluorescent, incandescent,
and metal-halide (H.I.D.) lamps in special areas.

The lamps and ballasts in the older buildings were retrofitted to T-8 technology and electronic ballasts under
a rebate program with PEPCO (the electric utility) many years ago.

The lamps and ballasts in the newer buildings are T-8 and T-5 technology.

There are no PCB ballasts.


Needs

    •    As buildings are renovated and new buildings are constructed, energy-efficient lighting fixtures,
         lamps, and ballasts should be utilized. The energy-efficient lamps in general use T-8 and T-5
         linear fluorescent, compact fluorescent (in lieu of incandescent), metal-halide (HID) and LED.
         Ballasts should be electronic type.

    •    Lighting controls to include occupancy sensors, photocell type, etc., should be utilized.

    •    New lighting should be designed in accordance with the ASHRAE/IESNA STANDARD 90.1 –
         ENERGY STANDARD FOR BUILDINGS and the U.S. Green Building Council – LEED Criteria.

    •    Building exterior lighting should also be designed in accordance with the International Dark Sky
         Association.



Chapter 4 Facilities                            October 31, 2008                                             4-72
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                          SPECIAL SYSTEMS

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) BACKBONE

Existing Conditions

The existing Verizon telephone service is from Campus Way with an underground service to Kent Hall. The
service is a copper ‘multiple pair’ cable.

The telephone service is distributed via an underground ductbank system to the various buildings around
the campus.

Lightning strikes take-out the telephone service. It is not known if there is a problem with Verizon (the
telephone utility) or a problem with the campus equipment.

There is a plan to merge the upgrade to the College’s Communication Network with the electrical ductbank
system upgrade project.

The PBX System is located in Kent Hall.


Needs

    •    The existing Data Center is located in Lanham Hall and will be relocated to the new Center for
         Health Studies. The incoming telecommunication lines from the utilities are connected to the
         campus via Kent Hall. A new PBX system and incoming telecommunication lines from the utilities
         will be relocated to the new Data Center in the Center for Health Studies

    •    A telephone and fiber optic distribution system should be developed to cover the entire campus
         and future facilities to ensure the upgraded communications ductbank system is adequate.

    •    Transient voltage surge suppression (TVSS) protection and lightning arrestors should be provided
         on all incoming telephone service cables at each building entrance. TVSS receptacles should be
         provided for all equipment (such as rack-mounted equipment, servers, printers, fax machines, etc.
         which are not served from a plug- in protector strip. TVSS receptacles should have integral LED
         lamps.

    •    Proper grounding should be provided for all IT equipment. This would include grounding busses
         and conductors for equipment rooms. Grounding receptacles should be provided.

    •    Receptacles for equipment should have labels indicating the panelboard and circuit number
         serving the receptacle.

    •    All IT equipment (computers, monitors, etc.) at work stations should be served by plug-in protector
         strips.

    •    There is a plan to merge the upgrade to the College's communication network with the electrical
         duct-bank system upgrade project.

Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                             4-73
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




    •    As buildings are renovated or buildings are constructed, dedicated IT and equipment rooms should
         be provided. These rooms should be of adequate square footage with plywood backboards,
         receptacles, grounding, TVSS protection, and separate air conditioning systems. If available, the
         lighting receptacles, and air conditioning systems should be connected to emergency power.

    •    Adequate raceways should be provided for the installation of IT wiring.

    •    All IT work should be in accordance with PGCC’s Wiring Plan.

    •    All IT equipment should be connected to emergency generator power where possible.

    •    Air conditioning should be provided for all IT equipment rooms with equipment racks and electronic
         equipment. Air conditioning should be connected to emergency generator power where possible.

    •    The existing PBX System in Kent Hall should be replaced and the system upgraded. Room
         security and a fire suppression system should be provided.

    •    Security of the College’s Network should be provided throughout the Campus. A plan of action
         should be developed.


FIRE ALARM

Existing Conditions

The buildings have fire alarm systems.

The building fire alarm systems are connected to the Campus Central Annunciator.

Many of the systems are old technology, but are serviceable and well-maintained.

There is a plan to upgrade the fire alarm system – campus-wide.


Needs

    •    The plan to upgrade the fire alarm systems should be completed.



SECURITY

Existing Conditions

There are no building security systems.

The plan to provide a campus-wide video surveillance security system should be completed.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                          4-74
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


As buildings are renovated or new buildings constructed, they should be provided with systems compatible
with the campus-wide system.


Needs

    •    The plan to provide a campus-wide video surveillance security system should be completed.

    •    As buildings are renovated and new buildings are constructed, card-reader access hardware
         systems to rooms / suites of rooms requiring security and to building entrance doors should be
         provided.



BLUE LIGHT / EMERGENCY CALL BOX (PHONE ) SYSTEM

Existing Conditions

The Campus does not have a system.

There is a plan to provide a system throughout the Campus.


Needs

    •    The plan to provide a system should be completed. The system should cover the entire Campus
         grounds and all parking lots.

    •    As buildings are renovated and new buildings are constructed, they should be provided with
         systems compatible with the Campus-wide system.



COMPREHENSIVE WIRELESS SYSTEM

Existing Conditions

The Campus has a system, including wireless hot-spots in key areas, but it is not yet campus-wide.


Needs

    •    The existing wireless system should be expanded. A plan of action should be developed,
         accordingly.




Chapter 4 Facilities                         October 31, 2008                                             4-75
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



ELECTRONIC SIGNAGE

Existing Conditions

    •    Campus electronic signage does not yet exist.


Needs

    •    Electronic marquees should be provided at the campus entrances and at the intersection of Route
         202 and Campus Way South. Design should be coordinated with the exterior campus signage
         program.

    •    Electronic message boards should be considered in future new construction and renovation
         projects.

    •    All such devices should be remotely controlled and programmable.




Chapter 4 Facilities                         October 31, 2008                                        4-76
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




SUSTAINABLE PRACTICE AND PLANNING

The term green building is essentially synonymous with sustainable building and is an approach designed to
result in a facility that reduces its impact on the environment, costs less to operate and improves the
occupants’ quality of life.

The United States Green Building Council (USGBC) definition of green design is: design and
construction practices that significantly reduce or eliminate the negative impact of buildings on the
environment and occupants in the following five broad areas:

              1. Sustainable Sites—Example: Erosion and sediment control, bicycle storage, storm water
                 treatment.
              2. Safeguarding water and water efficiency—Example: Reduce or eliminate irrigation,
                 water efficient landscaping.
              3. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy—Example: Building systems commissioning,
                 energy analysis eliminate HCFC’s.
              4. Conservation of Materials and Resources—Example: Recycling areas, certified wood
                 and construction waste management.
              5. Indoor Environmental Air Quality—Example: Low emitting paints, adhesives, daylight,
                 energy monitoring etc;

A growing number of Colleges are making sustainable principles a fundamental part of their campus design.
In both new construction and renovation, campuses are focusing on highly efficient buildings that reduce
waste and minimize their impact while improving quality of life and educating the users. Green building
considerations start with site selection and include building placement and design, materials and techniques
used in construction and all the systems, appliances, and fixtures within the building.

Prince Georges Community College has already been adopting green strategies in its capital projects and
facilities operations. The following are examples of sustainability features that have been implemented to
promote a healthy and safe learning environment:

    1. Sustainable Sites—Example: Erosion and sediment control, bicycle storage, storm water
       treatment.

         •    Bio-retention facilities were constructed in conjunction with the Chesapeake Hall, Bladen
              Student Services, Continuing Education Building and High Technology Center construction
              projects. Bio-retention areas are landscaping features adapted to treat storm water runoff on
              the development site. They are commonly located in parking lot islands or within small pockets
              in residential land uses. Surface runoff is directed into shallow, landscaped depressions and
              these depressions are designed to incorporate many of the pollutant removal mechanisms that
              operate in forested ecosystems. The filtered runoff is collected in a perforated under drain and
              returned to the storm drain system. Bio-retention facilities are located in the following areas at
              Prince George's Community College: (a) Chesapeake Hall (rear of building); (b) Parking Lot D;
              (c) Parking Lot G; and (d) High Technology Center (west exterior).
         •    Green roofing technology incorporated into the roof design for the Center for Health Studies.
         •    White reflective energy star roof (High Tech Center)


Chapter 4 Facilities                           October 31, 2008                                            4-77
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


         •    Pursuing installation of bike racks on campus to discourage the use of automobiles for local
              commuting.
         •    Maryland Department of Environment (MDE) Detection Certification for PGCC's underground
              storage tanks that are in compliance with MDE criteria and standards.

    2. Safeguarding Water and Water Efficiency—Example: Reduce or eliminate irrigation, water
       efficient landscaping.

         •    Low flow plumbing fixtures (High Tech Center)
         •    Low flow urinals are installed in the men restrooms at Marlboro Hall, Largo Student Center,
              Queen Anne and Novak Field House. We expect to reduce water consumption by dropping the
              flow from 5.1 to 1.4 gals per flush.
         •    Water efficient landscaping practices employed for the majority of the campus which require
              little to no irrigation.
         •    Installing water meters at the track and all cooling towers so these areas will not be computed
              and included as part of the water bill.
         •    Toilet room fixtures equipped with auto flow activation

    3. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy—Example: Building systems commissioning, energy
       analysis eliminate Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC’s).

         •    Building commissioning employed for the High Technology Center. When a building works
              properly, it uses less energy and provides a better environment for occupants. Building
              commissioning is a way to ensure that the sustainable systems that have been programmed
              for the building are working as designed. The goal of commissioning is to provide a more
              efficient building with fewer problems for the building owner and the best indoor environment
              for the occupants.
         •    Eliminated use of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) (ozone layer damaging) refrigerants in
              chillers.
         •    Energy efficient lighting which utilizes compact fluorescent bulbs and electronic ballast used
              throughout the campus.
         •    Daylight controls—sunscreens and motorized shade devices (High Tech Center)
         •    High performance windows that reduce solar heat gain (High Tech Center)
         •    Boilers in the High Technology Center possess 94% thermal efficiency.
         •    Large motors are controlled by variable frequency drives (VFDs) in the Center for Advanced
              Technology (CAT, saving energy and electric costs by running motors at less than 100%
              output when full power isn’t needed.
         •    High efficiency motors used for the machinery (CAT)
         •    Small air conditioning units utilize heat pumps instead of electric heat.

    4. Conservation of Materials and Resources—Example: Recycling areas, certified wood and
       construction waste management.

         •    College wide recycling program since 1997 - PGCC recycles all paper products, cardboard,
              newspaper, books, periodicals, magazines, aluminums and plastics.
         •    Use of Green Seal Certifiable paper for restroom use, tissues and towels which are 100%
              recovered paper fiber meeting EPA guidelines for post consumer materials and Green Seal
              standards for bleaching, drinking, and packaging.
         •    Recycled materials used in the concrete, carpets and wall coverings (CAT)

Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                            4-78
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


    5. Indoor Environmental Air Quality—Example: Low emitting paints, adhesives, daylight, energy
       monitoring etc;

         •    Campus wide Energy Management System that controls temperature settings for all buildings
              on campus and controls exterior lighting.
         •    Campus-wide annual carpet extraction - this a totally separate and distinct process from and in
              addition to quarterly shampooing and as-needed carpet spotting to prevent carpet "gases"
              (emissions), thus improving indoor air quality and supporting noise reduction.
         •    Use of HEPA filtration vacuum cleaners, resulting in reduction in vacuum dust emissions and
              improved indoor air quality.
         •    Integrated Pest Management, reducing and/or totally eliminating the use of pesticides, reduces
              the number of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) on the campus.
         •    Use of massalin oil cloths and treated dusting cloth technologies to reduce dust and particulate
              matter.
         •    Use of low volatile organic compound (VOC) materials and paint finishes (CAT).
         •    Implementation of "Scrub and Recoat" vinyl composition tile (VCT) programs, therein reducing
              VOC's and the costs incurred via annual stripping, sealing and refinishing processes.



Beginning with locating facilities in already-developed and/or urban areas, the master plan goes on to
encourage continued sustainability practices and, where appropriate, identifies planning strategies that
incorporate sustainable planning and design. Examples include:

    •    Compact buildings and building footprints
    •    Incorporating increased landscaping and tree cover in the site development plan
    •    Recommending strategies that encourage use of public transit and discourage use of private
         automobiles – such as providing shuttle service between, to and from the main campus and
         extension centers
    •    Reducing large expanses of parking lots and reducing the heat sink impact of those lots by
         incorporating green areas and islands
    •    Simplifying internal circulation, encouraging pedestrian linkages and making them safer, limiting
         use of vehicles
    •    Incorporating storm water management and bio-retention facilities in the proposed plans



The College has demonstrated its commitment to sustainable design and operations practices and will
continue to do so in future capital projects. The College has not yet committed to requiring LEED
(Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design as administered by the USGBC) certification for new
construction and renovation projects, but is encouraged to consider adopting a policy, accordingly.




Chapter 4 Facilities                          October 31, 2008                                             4-79
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                           CHAPTER 5
                                                                 Site
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                              CHAPTER 5
                                                SITE
INTRODUCTION
The Prince George’s Community College (PGCC) Main Campus is located on a 150-acre site in Largo near
the geographic center of Prince George’s County, and only minutes from the nation’s capital. The campus
is bounded to the north by Maryland Route 202 and Campus Way South, to the east by Largo High School,
and to the south and west by townhouse developments.

A visual review and assessment of the PGCC Main Campus site infrastructure was completed in June 2008
by Century Engineering, Gipe Associates, and Mahan Rykiel Associates. Several site visits and interviews
with the PGCC staff were conducted during this time frame. The approximate location of existing site
infrastructure was determined from an existing CAD file provided by PGCC in May 2008 as well as existing
and proposed site plans for several buildings. The information was supplemented with data obtained on the
site visits.

The Main Campus is located at 301 Largo Road in Prince George’s County and consists of tax account
number 1536960. The property is zoned R-R (Rural Residential), located in tax map grid 075A1, WSSC
grid 201SE09, assessment district 13, planning area 73, and planning analysis zone 255C.

This chapter of the master plan report provides a description of existing campus site infrastructure, features
and facilities and analyzes them in terms of assets to protect and enhance; liabilities to address; and
opportunities to consider as the master plan is implemented over time. For purposes of this report, the
chapter has been divided into Site Infrastructure, Community Context; Campus Site Organization; Access
and Vehicular Circulation; Parking; Pedestrian Circulation; Open Space; Campus Landscape; Campus
Image and Opportunity Sites.



SITE INFRASTRUCTURE
Existing Conditions

Sanitary Sewer: Sewer service is provided by the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC).
The campus is served by one ten-inch diameter sanitary sewer. The campus sanitary sewer system
experiences backups due to the lack of a grease interceptor for the Largo Student Center dining facility.
Most backups have occurred in the location of Parking Lot G. The existing sewer main is manually flushed
out approximately once every eight months to help alleviate the problem.

The original main was installed in 1968. No upgrades have been made to the existing sanitary infrastructure
since the 2001 Master Plan. No further studies have been conducted to determine if the existing system is
adequately sized to handle the existing or future sewage associated with the development of the campus.
The staff has indicated that they believe the existing sanitary infrastructure is undersized.

Water System: Water service is also provided by WSSC. Two eight-inch diameter water line connections
located along Maryland Route 202 feed the campus loop system. Many of portions of the existing eight-inch
water line main as well as many of the branches to the buildings have been replaced or upgraded since the
2001 Master Plan. The upgrades were installed along branches providing new sprinkler systems to several


Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                           5-1
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


of the existing buildings. The main was replaced in portions showing wear and tear. The newly renovated
system allows the staff to isolate portions of the waterline for future maintenance and repair, where they
could not do so before.

Storm Drains & Storm Water Management: PGCC Main Campus is located on the Flood Insurance Rate
Map #245208 0045 D; dated September 6, 1996. According to the FIRM map, the entire campus is located
in Zone C and is outside of the limits for the 500-year flood plain.

The campus drains to three main storm drain systems. The largest system drains most of the campus
buildings and some of the parking lots. The main system flows from east to west (picking up laterals from
the north and south) and discharges along the southwest property line, adjacent to the Maintenance
Building. Several portions of the 72” RCP end section have broken off and are in need of repair. The outfall
channel has become severely eroded and is also in need of remediation.

The second storm drain system drains most of the larger parking lots and discharges into a small creek just
to the south of the soccer field and track. The outfall channel appears to be in good condition with some
sediment deposits at the immediate outfall of the storm drain system.

The third system drains water flowing from the Accokeek Hall and Bladen Hall areas. The closed system
combines with drainage from Campus Way and discharges to the north of Campus Way.

Many of the inlets located within the parking lots and access roads for the campus have become blocked by
pavement overlays. These areas are currently prone to flood, most likely due to the blockage of the inlets.
During the interviews, we were informed by the staff that the inlets will soon be brought up to grade with the
contract to replace the existing pavement throughout the campus.

One particular area was brought to our attention as an area prone to flood. The inlet in question is located
within the courtyard between Marlboro Hall, Lanham Hall, and Chesapeake Hall. According to the staff, the
yard inlet repeatedly clogs due to the buildup of debris and leaves. The yard inlet should be replaced with a
larger and more adequate type of inlet.

The area once serving as a construction access road between the Largo Student Center and Maryland
Route 202, has become prone to continuous erosion. The immediate area will need to be reseeded and the
campus will need to restrict vehicular access to the former construction road to eliminate the erosion
problems.

The campus contains four relatively small existing above ground Storm Water Management Facilities. The
facilities appear to be for Water Quality Treatment and possibly Channel Protection Volume. The combined
drainage are for all four facilities appears to be less than one quarter of the developed campus area. The
first SWM facility is located to the east of Chesapeake Hall, between an access road and a parking lot for
the Modular Buildings. The facility contains a forebay and filtration area and appears to be in working
condition. Vegetation in the immediate area has become overgrown and will require trimming.

The second SWM facility is located to the east of Parking Lot F, adjacent to the access road and south of
Parking Lot D. The facility contains a forebay and a surface sand filter with cleanouts. The facility appears
to be in good working condition. The third SWM facility was recently installed with the High Technology
Center. The facility contains a forebay and bio-retention area. The facility also appears to be in good
working condition.




Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                           5-2
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


The last SWM facility is located to the northwest of Parking Lot G, adjacent to the access road. The facility
also appears to be in good working order, but will be replaced with a new SWM facility associated with the
Center for Health Studies; scheduled to begin construction later this year.

Natural Gas: Natural gas is provided by the Maryland Division of the Washington Gas Company. Other
then tying in the newly constructed buildings, no upgrades have been made to the natural gas infrastructure
since the 2001 Master plan.

Refer to the Master Utility Plan, prepared by Century Engineering. This plan is based upon the information
provided by PGCC as well as visual observations.


Analysis and Recommendations

Sanitary Sewer:

         Install grease interceptor at for the Largo Student Center dining facility.
         Conduct a study to determine the required capacity of sewer lines.
         Inspect all sanitary sewer lines and replace or repair as needed.


Storm Drains & Storm Water Management:

         Conduct study to determine adequacy of storm drains.
         Conduct study to determine adequacy of downstream channels. Consider channel restoration,
         outfall rehabilitation, and possible on-site extended detention.
         Replace inlet in courtyard between Marlboro Hall, Lanham Hall, and Chesapeake Hall.
         Bring existing inlets up to grade with new paving project.
         Sod and/or reseed and restrict vehicular access to old access road adjacent to the Largo Student
         Center.
         Maintain existing vegetation adjacent to SWM facilities; including trimming of shrubs, weeds, and
         trees possibly impacting the performance and/or integrity of existing facilities.



COMMUNITY CONTEXT
Existing Conditions

The campus is located at the intersection of two arterial roads – Campus Way South and Route 202. To the
northwest of the campus, development includes a gas station and residential community comprised
primarily of town houses and apartments. The area to the northeast, across Route 202 is mostly residential
and includes Campus Woods Park. The area to the west of the campus is also developed with a townhouse
community, separated from the campus by a wooded stream corridor. Further south along the western
boundary, there is a narrow swath of residential development that separates the campus from Harry S.
Truman Drive. Largo High School occupies the land along the eastern boundary of the campus and
residential development is located to the south. Refer to Exhibit 5.1, Community Context and Campus
Organization.




Chapter 5 Site                                   October 31, 2008                                          5-3
                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Analysis

While the PGCC is an inward-oriented campus, the proximity of the campus core to the surrounding road
network provides an opportunity to create a stronger integration between the campus and the surrounding
community across Campus Way South. Recent streetscape enhancements to Campus Way South, the
addition of highly visible pedestrian crosswalks and the construction of the new High Technology Center
have enhanced the impression that the campus is integrated into the community, both visually and
physically. As the campus continues to develop and facilities renovated, consideration should be given to
continuing to reinforce this relationship. This relationship with the surrounding community, however, is not
nearly as apparent along the northeastern boundary where undeveloped land and topography establish a
natural separation between the campus and community. It may be more appropriate to emphasize the visual
connection to the community along this edge, rather than physical connections.

A fence line is the only visual clue as to the boundary between the campus and Largo High School to the
east. While each of these facilities is large in scale with large areas of parking and open space with little
need for physical integration, there is an opportunity to better distinguish each facility visually with
architecture and landscape.

The wooded stream corridor provides a natural buffer between the residential and campus environments to
the west and should be protected and enhanced. There may be an opportunity to consider a pedestrian
linkage from the community along Harry S. Truman Drive, however, to provide better access to the heavily-
utilized recreation facilities. Any pedestrian connection would depend upon mutual agreement between the
adjacent community and the College.



CAMPUS SITE ORGANIZATION
Existing Conditions

The campus is divided into four areas or districts based on function and/or characteristics. The districts
include the Campus Core; Outer Ring District; Athletics District and South Campus. Refer to Exhibit 5.1.

Campus Core: This is the historic heart of the campus and is defined by the majority of the campus
facilities in a compact, inward-oriented arrangement of buildings. The core is defined by Campus Way
South, Route 202 and, generally, the inner loop road. With the recent construction of the High Technology
Center and the planned construction of the Center for Health Studies adjacent to the field house/natatorium
and Continuing Education Building, the core has essentially extended beyond the inner loop road to the
outer loop road along the northern perimeter of the campus. For purposes of this report, this zone will be
included as part of the Campus Core.

Outer Ring District: This is the area defined by inner and outer loop roads and is comprised entirely of
parking (at one time this district included the field house/natatorium and Continuing Education Building,
however, with recent campus development as described above, the northern portion of the outer ring is
more closely associated with the Campus Core).

Athletics District: The Athletics District is the western portion of the campus, defined by the outer loop
road, the western campus boundary and the woodlands to the south. This district is bisected north-south by
a service road and a treed valley, with the majority of the athletic facilities located to the south of this
division. The athletic facilities include a practice softball field and basketball courts to the north, adjacent to
the Childtime Children’s Center. The southern section includes eight tennis courts, a tennis practice area, a

Chapter 5 Site                                    October 31, 2008                                              5-4
                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


baseball field, softball field, two practice fields (soccer/football) and a performance soccer field with running
track. The treed valley located between the two athletic areas includes many picnic tables and informal
gathering areas.

South Campus: The South Campus is comprised primarily of woodlands with the exception of a cellular
tower and access drive.


Analysis
There are both positive and negative aspects of the existing campus organization. Because of its
compactness, the core area has a traditional campus feel and most facilities are within a shot walk from
anywhere within the campus core. The arrangement of buildings creates a variety of spaces from large
quadrangles to smaller courtyards and outdoor “corridors”, offering different pedestrian
experiences and opportunities for (or the potential for) informal social interaction. These open spaces are
discussed in more detail later in this chapter. The campus organization, with the core immediately adjacent
to the surrounding roads, also presents the opportunity for the campus to project a positive image of being
integrated with the community, rather than simply a campus surrounded on all sides by parking lots.

Conversely, the core area being located at the perimeter of the campus results in rather large seas of
parking on the other side of the core, since the parking cannot be distributed equally along the perimeter.
This also has the negative effect of isolating the athletic facilities from the campus core. Some of this
isolation is the result of physical distance between the core and the parking and athletic facilities, however,
much of this sense of isolation results from interrupted visual connections and circuitous
vehicular/pedestrian connections. Another challenge created by this organization is that the campus is
limited in the directions that it can expand.



ACCESS AND VEHICULAR CIRCULATION
Existing Conditions

Campus access occurs from several different locations, with two locations serving as primary entrances.
One primary entrance occurs at the western edge of the core along Campus Way South at the intersection
with the outer loop road where there is a traffic signal and median break. The other primary entrance occurs
at the eastern edge of the core along Route 202 at the intersection with the outer loop road. In addition to
these primary access points, there is secondary access to the inner loop road with a “right-in only” off of
eastbound Route 202. There is a “right-out only” at the other end of the inner loop road with access to
northbound Campus Way South. A third secondary access point is located in front of Bladen Hall offering
“right-in, right-out” access to and from northbound Campus Way South. The inner and outer loop roads are
connected to each other by a road located between Lots A and B and by drive aisles through the other
parking lots. Vehicular circulation throughout campus is two-way with the exception of a short leg at each
end of the inner loop road.

The current master plan shows the connection to the inner loop road at Campus Way South as the primary
entrance to the campus, with a full median break located at the intersection of the two streets. This full
intersection was denied by the Prince Georges County Department of Transportation, however. Similarly,
the current master plan shows the main access from Route 202 being relocated to the inner loop road,
where a new median break (and full intersection) would replace the existing median break at Route 202 and


Chapter 5 Site                                   October 31, 2008                                              5-5
                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


the outer loop road. The purpose of this modification would be to provide a clearer circulation pattern by
directing vehicles to the inner loop road and to create a safer distance between the access to the campus
and the access to Largo High School. Currently, the high school utilizes the outer loop for its bus traffic.

In addition to automobile circulation, the campus is served by bus with Metro and local bus stops along
Campus Way South and local bus stops located at the eastern and western ends of the outer loop road.
Refer to Exhibit 5.2, Existing Circulation and Parking.

Analysis

Campus vehicular circulation continues to be a problem for the College and remains a primary concern of
faculty, staff, students and visitors. Part of this is the lack of way-finding signage; however, a good way-
finding system has been developed for the campus, as illustrated in the appendix of the current master plan.
The primary reason for the challenging vehicular circulation, however, is a result of the road and parking
layout itself. Both of the primary entrances place visitors on the outer loop road which, essentially, dumps
them at the intersection of the two segments of the outer loop road, at the furthest point from the campus
core. The only clear connection to the inner loop from the outer loop is at the eastern end of the campus
between Lots A and B. All other access points are through the parking lots. There is an exception in that
there is a separate roadway that extends off of the outer loop, just south of the Continuing Education
Building; however, it dumps vehicular traffic into the middle of Lot G and somewhat of a “middle ring” road
that links Lot G with Lot B, but with no direct connections to the inner loop. This roadway connection from
the outer loop will be eliminated, however, with the construction of the new Center for Health Studies.

In addition to the problems associated with the outer loop, visitors approaching the campus southbound on
Campus Way South are presented with some confusing situations. The first is a median break at the
intersection of Campus Way South and the street between Prince Place and Route 202 which gives the
impression that there should be an entrance into the campus at this location. In addition, the new High
Technology Center was designed as a “gateway” structure at the inner loop, yet visitors cannot access the
campus from this location, either. Finally, the gateway signage at the corner of the outer loop and Campus
Way South is oriented toward northbound Campus Way South traffic and is not visible to southbound traffic.

Unfortunately, the College was denied a full intersection at Campus Way South and the inner loop which is
an appropriate location for a main entrance. However, this master plan as well as future master plans
should maintain the flexibility for this to be a full intersection in the future, should transportation policies
change. Until that time, if it is ever allowed, the challenge will be to create a clear circulation pattern that is
intuitive as well as well-marked with signage.

A lack of parking near Bladen Hall and student registration continues to be a problem for the campus,
however, the current master plan proposal shows a drop-off area and additional parking. The College still
intends to develop this; however, the layout may need to be modified to accommodate the recent Bladen
Hall entrance addition. In addition to limited parking for registration, there are limited drop-off zones
provided along the inner loop. People tend to stop for drop-off and pick-up activities in front of Chesapeake
Hall and in front of the High Technology Center, resulting in traffic congestion in these areas.

Many of the issues dealing with circulation are currently being addressed with the Circulation and Roadway
Plan.




Chapter 5 Site                                    October 31, 2008                                               5-6
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


PARKING
Existing Conditions

As described in Chapter 2 of this report, the campus currently has 2956 parking spaces, a deficit of 434
spaces for current enrollment. This deficit will increase to 1,144 when taking into consideration growth
through 2017. Most of the parking spaces are located within the Outer Ring District with the exception of
Lot H, Lot I, Lot K, and other minor facilities located within the core. The 462 spaces in Parking Lot F are
currently not used, as this area is utilized for motorcycle training. Parking spaces are re-striped every two
years. Refer to Exhibit 5.2.

Analysis

While the campus is “technically” short parking spaces, in accordance to state standards, most concerns
from stakeholders relate to the distribution of parking spaces rather than the number of parking spaces. In
addition, parking lots are not well marked, particularly for visitors, adding to the circulation confusion.
However, the proposed way-finding system does include new parking lot identity signs and directional
information so that should address some of those concerns. As new buildings and facilities are developed
on the campus, particularly within the core, there will be added pressure to develop within existing surface
parking lots or within open spaces in order to preserve parking.

The furthest parking spaces are 600-800’ from the inner loop. These distances are the result of the campus
organization with the core located against one perimeter, limiting the direction in which parking can expand.
The distances are increased, psychologically, by the lack of shade and limited tree cover within the parking
areas.

Although structured parking may not be feasible at this time, the master plan should consider the most
appropriate locations for structured parking to preserve this option in the future.



PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION
Existing Conditions

The campus is well-served by pedestrian sidewalks located throughout the core area and with linkages to
the parking areas, athletic fields and surrounding road system. In addition, both Route 202 and Campus
Way South include sidewalks. Well-delineated crosswalks were also included as part of the Campus Way
South streetscape improvements. Internal to the campus, crosswalks are located at all intersections with
the inner loop and adjacent parking areas and at the intersections along Route 202 and Campus Way South
and are re-striped on an annual basis. In addition, “stop for pedestrian” markers have been located within
many of the crosswalks, particularly along the inner loop. Because some buildings, such as the Largo
Student Center do not accommodate adequate vehicular access, there are incidents where campus service
vehicles must drive on the walkways. New campus maps have been added adjacent to sidewalks at various
locations along the inner loop. Sidewalks do not extend along most of the length of the outer loop.

Analysis

While the campus is well-served by sidewalks, there lacks a clear hierarchy of walkways – particularly
leading from the inner loop road into the core - adding to the confusion experienced by visitors. The


Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                            5-7
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


alignment of some walkways also changes along the way, sometimes with sharp jogs, thereby obscuring
destinations. The most successful walks are those where a pedestrian has a clear sense of the destination,
such as the walkways that connect the inner loop with the core, between Marlboro Hall and Queen Anne
Fine Arts and between Kent Hall and Queen Anne. The walkway connection between Bladen Hall and
Accokeek Hall, however, is awkward as it jogs around the loading/service area. Similarly, the connection
from the inner loop to the core, between Chesapeake and Marlboro, is a significant pedestrian connection;
however, this isn’t always apparent particularly from the inner loop. The athletic fields also appear to be
further away from the core because there lacks a direct and clearly defined pedestrian linkage between the
two.

The parking lots are also connected to the core by sidewalks; however, most pedestrians appear to walk
down the drive aisles of the parking bays which are the most direct links. As a result, many pedestrians
cross the inner loop at the drive aisle intersections rather than at the designated crosswalks. The lack of
significant shade along the parking lot walkways provides little incentive for pedestrians to go out of their
way to use them.

As the campus expands with this master plan and future master plans, consideration should be given to
visually reinforcing and identifying the primary pedestrian connections; providing a clear sense of pedestrian
destinations; and providing adequate shade along the walkways to make the, sometimes lengthy, walks
more comfortable.



OPEN SPACE
Existing Conditions

The open space system contributes significantly to the “campus experience” of the students, faculty, staff
and visitors at PGCC. There is a hierarchy of open spaces that currently exist on campus and this hierarchy
can be divided into the primary categories outlined below. Currently, none of the open spaces are named.
Refer to Exhibit 5.3, Existing Campus Open Space.

Traditional Quads: There are two “traditional quads” within the campus that are internally oriented and
provide areas for gathering, passive play and informal socialization; a west quad defined by Queen Anne,
Kent, Accoceek and Bladen Halls; and an east quad defined by Bladen, Marlboro, and Lanham Halls and
Largo Student Center. The west quad is characterized by well-manicured canopy shade trees, lawn and
shrub/flower masses near buildings. The east quad is divided into two areas and includes the sunken
courtyard adjacent to Largo Student Center and the new fountain courtyard at the southern end of the
courtyard. The sunken courtyard is characterized by large expanses of concrete paving and tall masonry
planters. The southern area is characterized by open lawns planted with ornamental cherry trees and a
special paved area and fountain as a focal point.

Perimeter Open Spaces: These open spaces are those which are located along the edges of the campus
and campus roadways. While they may provide some areas for gathering, their function is primarily visual.
They include the setback area along Campus Way South and Route 202 and the setback area along the
outer loop between Campus Way South and the running track.

Transitional Open Spaces: In addition to the traditional quads and perimeter open spaces, there are some
areas on campus that share some characteristics of both and provide some function as gathering areas but
are not as well-defined as the traditional quads. Similarly, they are highly visible spaces from the inner loop
road. These transitional spaces include the open space on the west side of Kent and Queen Anne Halls,

Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                                5-8
                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


the open space on the parking lot side of the High Technology Center and the field house/natatorium (and
future Health Sciences Building) and the open spaces to the south and west of Marlboro Hall.

Athletic Fields: The athletic fields comprise a significant portion of the open space system and include
land to the north and south of the existing service road. The site athletic facilities include the following:

         Baseball Field
         Softball Field
         Practice Softball Field (north side of service road)
         Two Basketball Courts (north side of service road)
         Eight Tennis Courts
         Eight Tennis Practice Walls
         Two Practice Fields (Soccer/Football)
         Running Track
         Performance Soccer Field (undersized)
         Driving Range

The athletic facilities, particularly the track, are heavily used by the community.

Valley Corridor: There is a unique open space adjacent to service road which includes a linear valley
connecting the inner loop with the stream along the western property perimeter. The area is mostly
comprised of lawn and meadow grasses with groves of trees. There are numerous picnic tables located
within this corridor, adjacent to the athletic facilities.

Natural Areas: A large portion of the campus is comprised of mature woodlands which define the
northwestern and southern boundaries of the campus.

Remnant Open Spaces: The remaining open space areas include those associated with the parking lots
and are generally comprised of lawn and ornamental trees.


Analysis

The west quad is one of the most attractive spaces on campus and is characterized by the classic campus
elements of open lawn and high-canopied shade trees. The space is well maintained and is activated by
students moving among buildings. While the lawn is dotted with trees, the high canopies provide for good
visibility throughout the space and allow for informal gatherings on the lawn. Unfortunately, there are few, if
any, benches or places to sit within this quad. The new fountain courtyard at the southern end of the east
quad is also very attractive and utilizes a good combination of lawn and hardscape areas. Many benches
have been provided in this area and it appears to be a popular gathering place for students. On the day that
we observed this space, it was a pleasant temperature so there were many students utilizing the benches in
this area. However, most of the benches are located in full sun and only a few will benefit in the future from
shade provided by the new cherry trees. Contrasting this space, the northern end of the east quad is quite
desolate, characterized by a large expanse of concrete, a sunken plaza, tall planters (that obscure important
sight lines) and a lack of shade. Numerous stakeholders have made remarks that this space is uninviting
and, therefore, underutilized. There is also general agreement that more outdoor gathering needs to be
encouraged.

The perimeter open spaces vary in quality and contribute much to the image of the campus and will be
discussed later in this chapter. The transitional open spaces, with the exception of the Marlboro Hall Circle
area are also quite nice and could be functional as well as visual. In particular, the area to the west of Kent

Chapter 5 Site                                   October 31, 2008                                               5-9
                             Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


and Queen Anne Halls is quite nice as it is characterized by lawns and high-canopied trees. Some of the
nicest trees on campus are located in this area, particularly along a short stretch of the inner loop road, just
to the southwest of Queen Anne Hall. Like the traditional quads, this space contributes significantly to a
classic campus image. Contrasting this is the transitional open space associated with the south side of
Marlboro Hall. It contains large expanses of concrete against blank building walls. Fortunately, this area is
softened by a grove of existing trees that provides an overhead canopy for some benches; however, the
space is generally not welcoming. This is particularly unfortunate because it is located at the beginning of
one of the primary pedestrian links into the campus core.

The athletic fields are very functional by nature and do not fully utilize the land area available in this part of
campus. This provides the opportunity to make more efficient use of the land, particularly if a new soccer
field and track need to be developed to make room for a new field house as is currently being considered by
the College. As the athletic field area is modified to accommodate a new field house, consideration should
be given to providing more trees in some areas between fields to provide shade for players during breaks
and to subdivide the athletic area into smaller outdoor “rooms”. The tennis courts are in poor condition and
need to be renovated.

The valley corridor that separates the two athletic field areas is very attractive and also provides a
landscape setting that is unique when compared to other open spaces on campus. While this area does
flood during heavy rains, there is an opportunity to incorporate pedestrian paths to create an attractive
linkage between the athletic fields and the campus core.

The remnant open spaces have the potential to become a visual amenity to help reduce the scale of the
parking lots, however, most of these spaces are currently underutilized as they are planted with small
ornamental trees rather than large shade trees. The one island between Lots E and G does include picnic
tables and provides an amenity for those using the motorcycle training course.

The open spaces within a campus are the primary factor in providing a positive or negative campus
experience, regardless of whether they have a function or just provide visual relief. Unfortunately, they are
often threatened by new development and parking resources. While some of this new development cannot
be avoided and may enhance the campus environment, care should be given in locating new buildings and
facilities so that they reinforce existing open spaces and help to create new ones. The College might also
consider naming the most significant open spaces to heighten their importance within the campus
environment and to help reinforce way-finding throughout.



CAMPUS LANDSCAPE AND IMAGE
Existing Conditions

The landscape character of the campus provides a variety of different environments and qualities of
environments that influence the experience of students, faculty, staff, visitors and even people whose only
interaction with the College is by driving by it on Route 202 or Campus Way South.

As described in earlier sections of this chapter, the core area of the campus is characterized by a classic
campus landscape consisting predominantly of tall canopy trees and lawn. This is particularly evident in the
west quad, the transitional open spaces around Kent, Queen Anne, the field house/natatorium, and
Temporary Buildings #6-17. In some areas of the core, the landscape also includes smaller ornamental
trees and planting beds consisting of shrubs and/or seasonal color used to accent buildings, building
entrances and some gathering areas, as evident in the west quad. In other areas, such as along the Route

Chapter 5 Site                                   October 31, 2008                                            5-10
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


202 perimeter and portions of the Campus Way South perimeter, there is a noticeable absence of taller
shade trees and the landscape is characterized by lawn and or lawn planted with small ornamental trees,
with little screening of service areas.

The landscape along the loop roads is also varied. The landscape along most of the inner loop includes
taller shade trees on both sides of the road and smaller ornamental trees along one side near the
intersection with Route 202. The landscape along the outer loop includes woodlands and shade tree
plantings between Campus Way South and the running track, but then includes very little tree or shade tree
planting along other parts, with the exception of the woodlands to the south along one section of roadway.
The large parking area in the outer ring is divided into smaller lots by planting islands. These islands are
predominantly planted with small ornamental trees and lawn. With the exception of the valley corridor
which includes groves of shade trees and the woodland areas of the south campus and the northeastern
perimeter, the landscape is characterized by open lawns.

Site furniture includes a variety of styles with the most common being metal benches and picnic tables,
painted blue to reflect the school color. Trash receptacles throughout most of the campus are constructed
of a tan aggregate. Pedestrian lighting includes “shoebox” fixtures that are bronze in color. These will be
replaced as part of the Circulation and Signage plan, currently being developed.

The new fountain courtyard area of the east quad, however, utilizes a coordinated set of benches, trash
receptacles and pedestrian lighting, painted a dark green and traditional in design. It is unclear whether or
not this design represents the new campus standard or just the standard for this courtyard. A different,
contemporary, bench style is utilized at the new north entrance to Bladen Hall.

Refer to Exhibit 5.4, Campus Landscape and Image


Analysis

The landscapes that are the most successful and of the highest quality include those that are comprised of
the “classic” campus landscape – lawn and tall canopy trees. These landscapes, such as can be found in
the west quad and the adjacent transitional open space, are successful because the tall trees provide scale,
integrate the buildings into the landscape and provide cooling shade. In addition, the tall shade trees
provide structure and allow for views beneath their canopies rather than blocking views. This is particularly
important on a college campus where unobstructed sight lines provide a sense of security. The areas that
are comprised primarily of smaller ornamental shade trees, such as the parking lot islands and along the
inner loop near Route 202, aren’t as successful as the trees are not large enough to define spaces or
provide shade. In addition, their mature canopy heights are fairly low, tending to block important views
which can negatively impact way-finding as well as a sense of safety and security.

The landscape maintenance of the campus core is quite good with well-maintained lawns, flower beds and
shrub masses. In particular, the shrub masses are simple in design and work well with the architecture of
the buildings. Because of significant amounts of rain this spring, the lawn areas are lush, however, they are
subject to “browning out” because they are not irrigated like the lawn in the new fountain courtyard in the
east quad and resources are limited to keep watered on a regular basis. While the lawns just go dormant
during droughts, the image of the campus is negatively affected which is a concern to some stakeholders.
As the master plan is implemented, consideration of an irrigation system should be balanced with a desire to
“be more green” and consideration of more sustainable methods of watering, such as with rainwater
collection systems.




Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                          5-11
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


For the remaining areas of the campus, such as adjacent to the athletic fields and along the outer loop and
parking areas, the emphasis should be on providing more tall canopy shade trees to reinforce spaces and
circulation routes, provide shade and to visually reduce the scale of large expanses of paving.

In terms of campus image, the interior of the campus projects a very positive one, while much of the
perimeter projects a negative one. This is mostly due to buildings being inwardly oriented with service areas
and blank walls oriented to the street. Recent renovations to Bladen Hall and the construction of the High
Technology Center have begun to change the perimeter image for the better and are to be applauded. For
many of the facilities with large expanses of blank walls, the planting of tall canopy shade trees as described
above will help to create a more positive campus image and soften blank walls.

In addition to the new construction and renovations, there is currently a “Three-Year Beautification Plan,”
dated May 7, 2008 and prepared by the College-Wide Forum Facilities & Physical Environment Committee
(“Beautification Committee”). This plan outlines a number of appropriate building and site enhancements to
be considered over a three year period. This plan is outlined in Chapter 7 with additional recommendations
added as part of this master plan.



OPPORTUNITY SITES
The current master plan identifies a number of expansion opportunities for buildings and new building sites.
In addition to these opportunities, there are additional sites that could be opportunities for the addition of
new facilities that include, in addition to buildings, parking areas, open spaces and athletic facilities. These
opportunity sites are identified in Exhibit 5.5, Opportunity Sites, and described below.

Site A: This site is shown in the current master plan as an expansion site for Queen Anne Hall. It continues
to be a logical building site as it presents an opportunity to create a stronger image along the inner loop
while not impacting important open space. Development of a building in this location would displace a
significant amount of parking which would have to be relocated elsewhere.

Site B: This site is also a logical expansion site for Queen Anne Hall and would help to lessen the distance
between this part of the core campus and the area on the west side of the inner loop. A development in this
location would displace one of the most attractive open spaces on campus, however.

Site C: This site is also identified on the current master plan and would be a logical expansion to Kent Hall.
Like Site B, development here would help to improve the connection with the area west of the inner loop
road. Similarly, development here would displace an attractive open space.

Site D: This area is a logical area for parking and a drop-off loop as shown in the current master plan.
There is an opportunity to take advantage of the existing grade change to screen parking from the
intersection of Route 202 and Campus Way South.

Site E: Site E could provide additional space into which the student center can expand. The topographic
change could allow for access at the lower, campus level and an upper level closer to grade with Route 202,
should that be desirable.

Site F: The current plans are for the temporary buildings to revert back to a surface parking lot; however,
this site could work well for structured parking at some point in the future, given the grade change and the
close proximity to the campus core.


Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                            5-12
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Site G: The current master plan showed the redevelopment of this parking area into a new open space
quad. This is an appealing idea in that it would enhance the setting for the High Technology Center, the
existing field house/natatorium building and the proposed Health Studies Building. It would displace a
significant amount of parking, however, so this parking resource would need to be relocated elsewhere.

Site H: Some areas within the entire field of surface parking can be considered an opportunity site for new
building development, open space development or the development of some structured parking, particularly
in the distant future. As the campus expands and grows, careful attention should be given to identifying
where development within this area would be most logical so that long-term flexibility can be maintained.

Site I: The College has identified an interest in developing a new field house in this location, where the track
and soccer field are currently located. Development within this site would require that a new track and
soccer field be developed in another location. This is desirable from the College’s perspective since the
existing soccer field is undersized.

Site J: The existing basketball court and practice softball field might be consolidated or reorganized to open
up long-term development of parking and/or other facilities in this area of the campus.

Site K: The space between the softball and baseball fields provides an opportunity for additional parking to
service the athletic fields.

Site L: The space to the north of the Facilities Management Building is a logical expansion area as shown
in the current master plan.

Site M: The practice field area provides an opportunity to reorganize the athletic fields, especially if a new
field house is to be developed where the track is currently located.




Chapter 5 Site                                  October 31, 2008                                           5-13
                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




Chapter 5 Site                       October 31, 2008                       5-14
                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                                            October 31, 2008




Chapter 5 Site                       October 31, 2008                                          5-15
                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                                            October 31, 2008




Chapter 5 Site                       October 31, 2008                                          5-16
                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                                            October 31, 2008




Chapter 5 Site                       October 31, 2008                                          5-17
                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                                            October 31, 2008




Chapter 5 Site                       October 31, 2008                                          5-18
                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                                            October 31, 2008




Chapter 5 Site                       October 31, 2008                                          5-19
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                      CHAPTER 6
                                                    Capital Projects
                                  Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                           CHAPTER 6
                                    PROPOSED CAPITAL PROJECTS

The need for renovations and new facilities is significant. After the proposed and now designed new Allied Health
buildings, then, renovations, additions, new facilities, and certain site improvement and infrastructure projects need to
be undertaken. The following represents the capital projects as currently scheduled by the College, supplemented by
projects recommended by the Consultant Team.




                                    Proposed Capital Projects: Largo Campus

   Group / No.      Project                                                   Comments

        A           BUILDINGS - MAJOR PROJECTS

                    New Facilities
        1           Applied Technology / Automotive Center                    30,000 sf
        2           Center for Health Studies                                 112,071 sf (design complete)
        3           Conference Center                                         15,000 sf
        4           Health & Wellness Center                                  65,000 sf

                    Renovations, Additions
        5           Bladen Hall - upper floors renovation                     Bladen Hall - upper floors renovation
        6           Child Care Building - renovation
        7           Facilities Maintenance Building - renovation & addition   addition: 1 story @ 5,000 sf
        8           Kent Hall renovation & addition                           addition: 2 stories @ 10,000 sf
                                                                              for continuing education / workforce
        9           Lanham Hall - renovation
                                                                              development and other instructional space
        10          Largo Student Center - renovation & addition              addition: 2 stories @ 15,000 sf = 30,000 sf
        11          Marlboro Hall - renovation
        12          Novak Field House - renovation
                                                                              addition - music department and fine arts
        13          Queen Anne renovation and addition                        space: 2 stories @ 15,000 sf = 30,000 sf
                                                                              includes ceramics
        14          Warehouse renovation & addition                           addition: 1 story @ 10,000 sf
        15          Remove temporary buildings




Chapter 6 Capital Projects                              October 31, 2008                                                    6-1
                                 Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                             Proposed Capital Projects: Largo Campus, continued

    Group / No.       Project                            Comments
        B             UPGRADES, SYSTEMIC RENOVATION PROJECTS

         1            Fire alarm upgrade - campus-wide
         2            Roof replacements - various buildings
         3            Toilet room re-construction - campus-wide
         5            Interior signage - new
                      Largo Student Center improvements: grease
         6            interceptor, kitchen renovation & fire       Complete renovation of building still needed.
                      suppression system, upgrade elevator
         7            Central plant renovation
         8            Structural renovations                       Marlboro, Queen Anne, replace pedestrian footbridge
         9            Cooling tower replacement - campus-wide
                      Exterior masonry improvements - campus-
         10
                      wide




Chapter 6 Capital Projects                           October 31, 2008                                                    6-2
                                   Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                             Proposed Capital Projects: Largo Campus, continued

   Group / No.       Project                                          Comments
       C             SITE PROJECTS

         1           Sanitary sewer system upgrade
         2           Storm sewer system upgrade
                     Campus electrical & communications
         3
                     ductbanks - upgrade
         4           Tennis, handball courts upgrade, incl lighting   In-situ or relocated
                     New Multi-Purpose Field / Renovation of          Track & field - NJCAA regulations - renovate / construct.
         5
                     Track                                            Also, see new Wellness Center
                                                                      Visitor parking, drop-off, gateway element, Accokeek-
         6           Bladen Hall Drop-Off / Visitor Parking           Bladen pedestrian link. Bid-alternate in Health Studies
                                                                      project
                     Inner loop road modifications (Pedestrian
         7                                                            Primarily pedestrian - allow for emergency and service
                     Walk)
         8           Marlboro Plaza                                   May also include relocation of cooling tower
         9           South Core Visitor Drop-Off                      Coordinate with Queen Anne Addition
        10           East Quad/Largo Amphitheater                     Incorporate amphitheater
        11           Enhance overall planting                         From beautification plan *
        12           Site furniture standards                         From beautification plan *
        13           Circulation and roadway project                  Includes several site projects as listed below
                        Exterior signage                              Continue to implement throughout campus
                                                                      Portion may be separate project; other portions
                        Exterior lighting
                                                                      include/coordinate with other site and building projects
                        Exterior security cameras - campus wide
                                                                      Coordinate with roadway/parking lot reorganization and
                        Parking lot / roadway resurfacing
                                                                      with storm sewer system upgrade (C-2)
                         Outer loop road improvements                 Boulevard design. Coordinate with C-2
                         Parking lot reorganization and expansion     Coordinate with resurfacing project and with C-2
                         Campus entrances
                         Route 202/CWS gateway/marquee                Coordinate with C-6
        14           Valley corridor enhancements                     Include with new wellness center
        15           Future South Quad                                Preserve flexibility for open space in distant future
        16           Novak Quad                                       From previous master plan
        17           North/south pedestrian walk
                     Additional Campus Core / Athletic District
        18                                                            Include with adjacent development projects
                     linkages
        19           Future parking structures                        Preserve flexibility for distant future
        20           Landscape master plan                            From beautification plan *
        21           Improvement of lawn and grassy areas             From beautification plan *
                     Restroom facilities - upgrade existing; build
        22                                                            Serving athletic & recreation fields
                     new
        23           Irrigation system - campus wide
                                                                      * May, 2008 plan - see page 5-13


Chapter 6 Capital Projects                              October 31, 2008                                                          6-3
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                               CHAPTER 7
                                     Site Development Plan
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan



                                          CHAPTER 7
                                   SITE DEVELOPMENT PLAN


INTRODUCTION

This section of the report describes specific recommendations for the site development plan in terms of
campus organization, location of building facilities, open space, access and vehicular circulation, pedestrian
circulation, campus landscape and image. Each category includes a vision for the future campus, followed
by specific recommendations. Many of the recommendations are included as part of the “Circulation and
Roadway Project” (C-13 as listed in Chapter 6) and are noted as such. Throughout this section, refer to
Exhibit 7.1, Illustrative Site Development Plan, which is included at the end of this chapter.

The site development plan described in this chapter and illustrated in the Illustrative Site Development Plan
is actually the compilation of several alternative plans that the planning team explored and reviewed with the
College.



CAMPUS ORGANIZATION
Vision

The Prince George’s Community College campus will be known for a well-defined, pedestrian-friendly
Campus Core with clear linkages to the Athletic District and parking resources located within the Outer Ring
District.

Specific Recommendations

Strengthening the Core: As described in Chapter 5, the campus is already comprised of a fairly strong
core; however, this core is bisected by the inner loop road, creating some pedestrian and vehicular conflicts
and a separation of several facilities from the rest of the campus. As the campus continues to grow with the
recommendations of this master plan, new facilities and expansions to existing facilities should, for the most
part, be concentrated within the core area. In addition, new facilities should be located in a manner that
allows flexibility in the distant future to expand the campus core, should it be warranted.

Stronger Definition of Districts: While it is not practical, nor appropriate, to include all facilities within the
core, new or expanded facilities located outside of the core should be located in such a way as to
strengthen the organization of “district” in which they are located, particularly the Athletic District.

Connect the Districts: The campus is comprised of a series of districts and, currently, these districts are
not well connected visually or physically. As existing facilities are renovated, expanded or added, they
should be located on the site in a way that strengthens the linkages among districts.




Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                   October 31, 2008                                              7-1
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


LOCATION OF BUILDING FACILITIES
Vision

The Prince George’s Community College Campus is known for its broad range of facilities set within a
compact campus environment that includes academic, administrative, athletic and open space uses. These
uses are all within easy and comfortable walking distance of each other. Following is a description of
specific recommendations for the location of new building projects described in Chapter 6. Each is labeled
with a letter/number designation (such as “A-1”) which corresponds to the designation shown on the
Illustrative Site Development Plan and in Chapter 6. For the most part, only those facilities that require an
addition or new building are described in this chapter.

Specific Recommendations

New Center for Health Studies (A-2): The new Center for Health Studies is currently being designed and
will be located west of the inner loop road, opposite the Center for Advanced Technology. This location
works well in that it will reinforce a new space defined by both of these buildings and the Novak Field
House. Recommendations for this space are described later in this chapter under “Open Space”.

New Health and Wellness Center (A-4): Because this is a large “footprint” building associated with the
athletic program, the appropriate location for this facility is within the Athletic District. The planning team
recommends that it be located to the north of the existing track, adjacent to the “valley corridor” described in
Chapter 5. This location is visually prominent from the roadway and easily accessible. Further, this
location, in conjunction with the removal of the existing Steel Building and Continuing Education Building,
will help to reinforce the connection between the Campus Core and the Athletic District and take advantage
of the attractive valley corridor setting. The design of this building should take into consideration the
following:

    Offices, meeting space and other uses with windows should be located on the northeast side of the
    building, facing the roadway and valley corridor.
    A vehicular drop-off should be provided at the entrance to the building.
    The building design should be sensitive to and respond to its proximity of the adjacent track.

Kent Hall Renovation and Addition (A-8): As identified in the previous master plan, a westward
expansion of Kent hall is logical and appropriate. Because there are a significant number of mature trees
within this area, the building/site design should consider this and strive to preserve as many as possible, as
well as take advantage of their proximity.

Facilities Maintenance Building Renovation and Addition (A-7): The addition to the Facilities
Management Building should extend from the east end of the building to maintain sufficient space around
the existing baseball field. Consideration should be given to taking advantage of views from within this
building out onto the athletic fields and the adjacent valley corridor.

Warehouse Renovation and Addition (A-14): The logical location for an addition to the Warehouse is to
the east as there is sufficient space between the existing building and adjacent softball field. In addition,
expansion in this direction will not interfere with the existing parking and vehicular circulation.

New Conference Center (A-3): This building should be located near an edge of the core so that it is easily
visible and accessible. The master plan recommendation is to locate it at the southeastern corner of the
core, adjacent to Route 202 and the secondary campus entrance from Route 202, and in place of the
Temporary Services Buildings. Design of the building and site should take into consideration this prominent

Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                            7-2
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


location and the opportunity to create a positive image for the campus and should also allow for the center
to take advantage of the site topography and be developed with access to the outdoors from two levels. In
addition, this location will allow for a strong relationship between the new conference center and the Largo
Student Center, particularly if it expands as described later in this section.

Queen Anne Renovation and Addition (A-13): As described in Chapter 6, a renovation and addition to
Queen Anne Hall will accommodate a new cultural arts facility and ceramics. There are two areas that are
appropriate for this addition to be located, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The Illustrative
Site Development Plan shows the building expanding to the west of the existing Queen Anne Hall. The
advantage of expanding in this direction is that it will allow for the creation of a significant drop-off/visitor
parking area (in addition to that being proposed at the northeast corner of the core) to the south of Queen
Anne, where surface parking is currently located inside the current inner loop road. This new drop-off is
described later in this chapter. The disadvantage of expanding in this direction is that it will impact several
mature trees and “fill” an attractive open space, currently part of the West Quad.

An alternative is to construct the addition to the south of Queen Anne Hall and locate a drop-off function
outside of the current inner loop road. The advantage of this is that the addition will only impact a surface
parking lot and more of the West Quad will be preserved. The disadvantage is that it may not allow for a
“close in” drop-off for visitors with a direct connection to the Visitors Center in Bladen Hall, as described later
in this chapter. Both sites are appropriate, however, for expansion.

Regardless of where this expansion occurs, the design should strive to minimize the impact to existing open
spaces and mature trees while providing additional convenient access to the Visitors Center in Bladen Hall.
In addition, consideration should be given to providing a police sub-station as part of this building addition to
provide a location that is more central to the Campus Core.


Largo Student Center Renovation and Addition (A-10): The planning team explored two locations for
the expansion of the Largo Student Center and, working with the College, determined that the preferred
location is to the east, along Route 202. This location for the expansion will allow for the preservation (and
redesign) of the open space just south of Largo. This location will also complement the new Conference
Center described earlier.

Marlboro Hall Renovation (A-11): While the Marlboro Hall renovation will not include an addition, the
renovation does provide an opportunity to enhance the south and west facades to better activate the open
space to the west and the improved open space to the south (Marlboro Plaza) described later in this
chapter. Renovations should take into consideration these opportunities.

Center for Applied Technology (A-1): This new facility will accommodate service bays and classroom
space for automotive and other trades. Because of the nature of this facility, it is appropriate that it be
located in the Outer Ring District where it will be proximate to large surface parking areas and vehicular
access ways. There is an opportunity to locate this building in such a way as to further reinforce
connections between the Campus Core and Athletic District. As shown on the Illustrative Site Development
Plan, this new building should be located within existing Parking Lot F so that it can reinforce a new
pedestrian connection as described later in this Chapter.




Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                   October 31, 2008                                             7-3
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


OPEN SPACE
Vision

The Prince George’s Community College Campus is defined by an extensive open space system which is
comprised of large open lawns, plazas and courtyards, natural areas, gardens and streetscapes. This open
space systems provides a framework for a variety of active and passive recreation as well as an attractive
and comfortable environment for pedestrians to move among various campus districts.

Specific Recommendations

Naming Program: Just as building facilities are named, open space facilities should also be named to
bring prominence to them and to help students and visitors with orientation when navigating the campus.
Work with campus stakeholders to develop names for significant open spaces that currently lack names and
start labeling open spaces on campus maps. For purposes of this master plan, the planning team has
assigned names to the open spaces. These names should be updated with appropriate names developed
by the College.

East Quad/Largo Amphitheater (C-10): As described earlier, the northern portion of the East Quad is not
a welcoming place. It is characterized by a significant amount of hard surfaces and planter walls that
obscure visibility and is also lacking in shade. The master plan envisions a renovation of this area to create
a significant and attractive new open space that complements other open spaces on the campus. The space
should continue to utilize a change in elevation to foster events and performances but should be softened to
be more comfortable to students and faculty. Specifically, new designs for the space should consider:

    Lawn terraces separated by low seat walls to accommodate audiences during performances as well as
    places to gather between classes.
    High-canopied trees to provide shade and spatial enclosure, while allowing for views beneath their
    canopies (as is so successfully demonstrated in the West Quad).
    Ornamental lighting and benches utilizing the campus standard and portable tables and chairs,
    particularly adjacent to Largo Student Center.
    Areas for the display of public art.

Marlboro Plaza (C-8): With the conversion of the inner loop road to a predominantly pedestrian corridor,
the existing drop-off in front of Marlboro Hall will be eliminated. The master plan recommends that this area
be enhanced as a new plaza, designed to be more inviting to students. The design should recognize the
important pedestrian corridors along both the east and west sides of this space and should emphasize more
landscape areas in place of the significant amount of pavement that currently exists. In addition, the design
should strive to preserve some of the existing tree canopy and provide additional canopy.

Novak Quad (C-16): As envisioned in the previous master plan, there is an opportunity to replace Parking
Lot H with green space to create a new quad, Novak Quad, serving Novak Field House, the proposed
Center for Health Studies and the Center for Advanced Technology. This current master plan agrees with
this vision but recommends that a portion of Parking Lot H remain as convenience parking serving these
buildings. As described under Access and Vehicular Circulation, because the inner loop road will be
converted to a pedestrian way, the remaining parking would be served from the north, allowing for
uninterrupted pedestrian connections between the new Novak Quad and the East Quad. While the ultimate
design of this space could take follow a number of approaches, ideally, the space should appear as a
natural extension of the East Quad, with emphasis on high canopied shade trees reinforcing the edges of
the space and providing shade for the buildings and walkways. This parking lot is currently used for


Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                          7-4
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


festivals and events so much of the space should be comprised of an open lawn area, providing maximum
flexibility for tents and activities during events and spontaneous play/gatherings on a daily basis.

New Multi-Purpose Field / Track Renovation (C-5): The existing multi-purpose field is located within the
running track so it cannot be sized for the preferred soccer field dimension of 220’ x 360’ (there is no set
regulation field size for soccer, however, this is the typical preferred dimension which offers the most
flexibility). The master plan recommendation is to develop a full size field of this dimension to the southwest
of the existing running track and renovate the existing track.

Tennis and Handball Courts Upgrade (C-4): The existing tennis courts will be partially displaced with the
development of the new Wellness Center. The tennis courts should be upgraded with new paving, fencing
and lighting and should be shifted to the south to accommodate the new Wellness Center while maintaining
the existing number of courts. The handball courts should be relocated to the west of the new Wellness
Center.

Renovation of and New Restroom Facilities (C-22): In addition to renovation of existing restroom
facilities, provide new restroom facilities in the vicinity of the athletic fields. These could be a stand-alone
structure (as shown) or developed as part of the new Health and Wellness Center (with direct access to the
outside). New facilities should be located where they can be easily reached from the majority of the athletic
and recreation fields.

Valley Corridor Enhancement (C-14): The treed valley extending between the Campus Core and the
Facilities Management building is an incredible amenity for the campus. With the new Wellness Center and
the addition to the Facilities Management Building, there is an opportunity to enhance this space with
additional tree planting, picnic tables and pathways. Ideally, this should be enhanced as a significant
pedestrian corridor linking the Campus Core and Athletic District. The new Wellness Center will also help to
activate this corridor.

Future South Quad (C-15): The development of a new Center for Advanced Technology, as described
above, in Parking Lot F starts to set the stage for a possible future extension of the open space system from
the Campus Core southward into the parking lot area as shown in Exhibit 7-2, Illustrative Site
Development Plan – Distant Future. This space extension would then establish a framework around
which additional facilities could be constructed, provided that parking structures are developed to
accommodate the displaced surface parking. While the College may never experience the growth requiring
this number of new buildings, it is important to maintain the opportunity to accommodate additional growth in
an orderly fashion and in a way that will enhance the overall campus environment.



ACCESS AND VEHICULAR CIRCULATION
Vision

Vehicular access to and throughout the Prince George’s Community College campus is clearly defined and
convenient. It allows for safe, attractive and comfortable pedestrian circulation, with minimal conflicts
between pedestrians and automobiles.


Specific Recommendations



Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                            7-5
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


Access/Entrances (C-13): As part of the circulation and roadway project, the College should continue to
reinforce the entrances to the outer loop road from Campus Way South and from Route 202 as the primary
campus access points/entrances. The other entrances from Campus Way South and Route 202 should be
reinforced as secondary access points/entrances.

Bladen Hall Drop-Off/Visitor Parking (C-6): As identified in the previous master plan, a visitor drop-off
and parking area will be provided in front of the Bladen Hall and is currently under design as part of the site
development plan for the new Center for Health Studies. This master plan recommends that the existing
right-in/right-out access point be converted to an exit only, with a full right-in/right-out access provided in
front of the Center for Advanced Technology (subject to County approval). Motorists going westbound on
Campus Way South will still be required to make a “U-turn” in order to access Parking Lot H and the new
parking / drop-off area at Bladen Hall. The College should continue to have conversations with the County
regarding a potential access point opposite the townhouse development to take advantage of the existing
median break. This option may require a signal and would need to be studied carefully; however, it would
provide more direct access to Bladen Hall.

Inner Loop Road Modifications (C-7): As shown in the Illustrative Site Development Plan, the master plan
recommends a clearer circulation system that eliminates most of the inner loop road, replacing it with a
broad pedestrian way that also accommodates emergency and service vehicles (this portion of the inner
loop road will be described in more detail later in this chapter). Two sections of the inner loop road will
remain, however. The northern section will remain to provide access to Parking Lot H and Bladen Hall
visitors parking as described above. The eastern section of the inner loop road will also remain, continuing
to provide direct access from Route 202 into the campus. It will extend around the perimeter of Parking Lot
A, with a drop-off area provided between Chesapeake Hall and the new Conference Center. At this point,
the inner loop road will be modified to allow for pedestrian, emergency and service traffic only.

Outer Loop Road Improvements (C-13): As part of the circulation and roadway project, eliminating the
inner loop road will allow for the creation of a clearer circulation system utilizing the outer loop road that
provides direct access to two different “drop-off areas” to the Campus Core and the parking resources. At
the entrances to the campus, the alignment of the roadway will follow the existing alignment. Closer into the
center of the campus, the alignment will roughly follow the middle loop road that partially exists today and
the road section will be expanded to include a median. Access to the surface parking areas will feed off of
the outer loop road at a limited number of locations as shown in the Illustrative Site Development Plan.
Traffic calming measures should be considered for the realigned outer loop road to discourage cut-through
traffic seeking to avoid the intersection of Route 202 and Campus Way South.

South Core Visitor Drop-Off (C-9): A second visitor drop-off parking area is proposed in front of Queen
Anne Hall, extending off of the outer loop road and providing close-in access to the southern portion of the
Campus Core. This will allow for a second point of access for visitors to get to Bladen Hall, approaching
from the south. The walkway leading to Bladen Hall from this drop-off could be distinguished with special
paving and signage to clearly identify it.



PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE CIRCULATION
Vision

The pedestrian and bicycle circulation system at Prince George’s Community College is comprised of an
extensive series of walkways and bike paths through open spaces and along roadways. The pedestrian


Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                            7-6
                                       Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


system offers an environment that is safe, attractive and comfortable, allowing for easy navigation
throughout the Campus Core and among campus districts.

Specific Recommendations

Inner Loop Pedestrian Walk (C-7): As discussed earlier, most of the inner loop road will be modified to
accommodate primarily pedestrian traffic along with emergency and service vehicular traffic. Daily
automobile traffic will be eliminated from the inner loop road to minimize conflicts between pedestrians and
motorists as pedestrians travel from the parking areas to the Campus Core. This pedestrian walk will also
establish an attractive and vibrant framework along which future and distant future building development
could occur to further reinforce this corridor. As the design of this walkway is developed, consideration
should be given to the following:

      Narrow the width to approximately 20’ to reduce the scale of the walkway while still providing sufficient
      space for emergency vehicles.
      Utilize special paving materials and patterns to distinguish this walkway from other walkways
      throughout the campus.
      Provide clear connections from the pedestrian walk to other districts of the campus.
      Activate the walk by providing benches, information kiosks and campus directories and tables and
      chairs along its route.
      Preserve existing tree cover and provide additional trees to further define the corridor.
      Utilize the campus light standards and possibly banners along its route.




Figure 7.1– New pedestrian paths that provide important linkages should be scaled appropriately so that there is a clear
hierarchy in the pedestrian network.



North / South Pedestrian Way (C-17): The north/south pedestrian way is a proposed walkway that links
the Campus Core with the proposed Center for Applied Technology and the Athletic District. It intersects
the inner loop pedestrian path in the vicinity of Queen Anne Hall and the proposed drop-off and will tie in
with the walkway that leads to Bladen Hall visitor drop-off area. This walkway should be visually prominent
and clearly identified. The design of this walk should consider the following:
     Provide a width of 10-12’.
     Consider use of special paving material or special paving pattern.
     Utilize campus standard lights.
     Define with high canopied trees to provide shade and to reinforce this linkage.


Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                           October 31, 2008                                                 7-7
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


    Align the walk so that future and distant future buildings can be developed along its edge and further
    reinforce it as an important pedestrian link.

Additional Campus Core / Athletic District Linkages (C-18): In addition to the north/south walk
described above, the master plan illustrates several areas where clear pedestrian connections should be
provided between the Campus Core and the Athletic District. The development of the new Wellness Center
along the valley corridor, combined with the development of the new Center for Health Studies and the
elimination of the Steel Building and Continuing Education Building, sets forth a logical location for another
major pedestrian linkage between the Campus Core and the Athletic District, via the valley corridor and the
new Novak Quad. Another linkage between the Campus Core and the Athletic District is shown midway
between the new Center for Health Studies and the north/south pedestrian way described above. Because
the surface parking areas are so large, it is important to provide very clear pedestrian connections through
them. In areas where these pedestrian walks cross parking drives and roadways, well-marked crosswalks
should be used.



PARKING
Vision

Parking resources are convenient to all parts of Prince George’s Community College but are primarily
located along the perimeter of the campus to emphasize the pedestrian environment of the Campus Core.
Some convenience parking is provided within the Campus Core to accommodate visitors and people with
special needs. Parking is visually unobtrusive and is in the form of well-landscaped surface lots that provide
future opportunities for architecturally pleasing structured lots.

Specific Recommendations

Surface Parking Reorganization and Expansion (C-13): In addition to resurfacing the existing surface
parking lots as part of the circulation and roadway project, the existing surface parking areas will need to be
modified to accommodate the realignment of the outer loop road and to control the number of access points
onto the outer loop road. In addition, development of the Novak Quad, the proposed Queen Anne Hall
expansion, the new Center for Health Studies, the proposed Center for Applied Technology and the
realignment of the outer loop road will require use of land that is currently used for surface parking.
Therefore, the parking areas will need to expand to make up for this loss of spaces. The Illustrative Site
Development Plan shows areas where surface parking can be expanded and where portions of the existing
outer loop road can be captured for parking once it is realigned. Some parking areas will continue to be a
distance from the Campus Core, which further reinforces the need for the clear, attractive and comfortable
pedestrian linkages described above.

Future Parking Structures (C-19): At some point in time it will no longer be feasible to continue to
develop land-intensive surface parking and consideration will need to be given to developing some
structured parking. The advantage of structured parking is that it will allow for providing a significant number
of parking spaces close in to the Campus Core while freeing-up land for future building/open space
development. While it may not be until the distant future before parking structures are developed, it is
important that the development of near future capital projects maintains the flexibility for constructing
parking decks at a later point in time. The most logical locations for parking structures are between the
outer loop road and the Campus Core, located in a way where they can be “wrapped” or surrounded by
building development. This is illustrated in Exhibit 7-2, Site Development Plan-Distant Future.


Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                            7-8
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


CAMPUS LANDSCAPE
Vision

The Prince Georges Community College Campus is known for its attractive landscaped campus not only
within the Campus Core, but also throughout the Athletic District and along its perimeter.


Specific Recommendations

Exterior Signage Program (C-13): As part of the circulation and roadway project, continue to implement
the exterior signage program already developed for the campus.

Exterior Lighting (C-13): As part of the circulation and roadway project, continue to implement the exterior
lighting program already developed for the campus. In some cases, the exterior lighting can be a project in
itself and in other cases it should be included with other site and building projects.

Exterior Security Cameras (C-13): As part of the circulation and roadway project, continue to implement
exterior security cameras throughout the campus. In many cases, this work can be included as part of a site
or building project.

Irrigation System (C-23): Provide appropriate irrigation campus-wide to improve quality of high visibility
grassy and planted areas. Consideration should be given, however, to using rainwater collection methods
and emphasizing native, drought tolerant plants to minimize need for irrigation.

Beautification Plan (C-12,C-20, C-13 – Route 202/CWS Gateway Marquee,C-21, C-22): In addition to
the new construction and renovations, there is currently a “Three-Year Beautification Plan,” dated May 7,
2008 and prepared by the College-Wide Forum Facilities & Physical Environment Committee ( CWFFPEC
or “Beautification Committee”). This plan outlined a number of building and site enhancements to be
considered over a three year period. Following is an outline of the recommendations along with additional
recommendations provided as part of this master plan. Many of these recommendations are already
underway, however, it is likely that they will require more than 3 years for implementation. Therefore, they
have been divided into “Phase I, II and III” increments rather than the original “Year One, Two and Three”
increments.

Beautification Plan – Phase I:

1. Contract with landscape architect to create a cohesive and professional architectural and landscaping
   plan for the entire campus. The CWFFPEC Exterior Recommendations PowerPoint presentation
   should be a starting point for the development of the architect’s design plan.

    Additional Master Plan Recommendations: The landscape plan should be a landscape master plan
    that can be implemented over time. The framework and priorities for this landscape master plan should
    reinforce the site development recommendations described in this current master plan.

2. Replace the current information sign on the corner of Rt. 202 and Campus Way with an electronic sign.
   In addition, the sigh should be accented by three flags (USA, State of Maryland and Prince George’s
   County).

    Additional Master Plan Recommendation for Route 202/CWS Gateway Marquee: It is also
    important to consider that the landscape also plays an important role in the identity of a campus. In

Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                           7-9
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


    addition to the sign and flags, emphasis should be placed on establishing groupings of canopy shade
    trees to extend the character of the core area out to this intersection. The use of seasonal color could
    also highlight this corner; however, the emphasis should be placed on using large masses of color that
    are in scale with the intersection.

3. Develop a comprehensive plan for points of entry to the college that will clearly identify the name of the
   school and create a boundary that you are on PGCC property.

    Additional Master Plan Recommendations: The primary points of entry should be at the intersections
    of the outer loop road with Campus Way South and Route 202. The landscape treatment at these entry
    points should clearly identify these as the primary entrances. Secondary points of entry are the other
    “right-in” entrances along Campus Way South and Route 202. The landscape design for these
    entrances should continue the theme established at the primary entrances, but to a lesser extent.

4. Camouflage trash receptacle area located to the left of Bladen Hall at Route 202 and Campus Way.

    Additional Master Plan Recommendations: This screening should be incorporated at the time the
    new visitors drop-off and parking are provided. There is an opportunity to take advantage of the
    topographic change and use evergreen planting on the hillside, behind the new entrance sign, to screen
    views to the service area.

Beautification Plan – Phase II:

1. Implement first year recommendations of landscape architect design plan. First year recommendations
   should include:

         Improvement of lawn and grassy areas.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations: There is a desire to keep the lawns green; however,
         this can be a challenge during a dry summer. In addition to providing an irrigation system,
         consideration should be given to collecting rain water runoff and other sustainable methods of
         irrigation. Consideration might also be given to reducing the amount of lawn and grass areas and
         incorporate meadow grasses, wildflowers and/or groundcovers, particularly in some of the areas
         surrounding the athletic fields and valley corridor. This could reduce the level of maintenance and
         create a richer landscape environment.

         Improvement of overall planting and bed design including addition of shade trees in areas where
         people gather.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations: Flower and shrub beds should be limited to the
         areas where they make the most impact, including highly visible areas and gathering areas. The
         existing trend of using bold, simple masses of a few plant types should continue. Adding shade
         trees is a good recommendation and the emphasis should be placed on shade trees rather than
         ornamental trees. A good place to start would be in the fountain courtyard where most of the
         benches are in open sunny areas. The trees planted in this area appear to be cherry trees which
         will never achieve the appropriate scale for this space. Additional plantings of oaks and maples
         should be considered in this area.




Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                        7-10
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan


         Generally, throughout the campus, the emphasis should be on high canopy shade trees which
         provide the maximum amount of shade and reinforce spaces while allowing for clear sight lines
         underneath their canopies.

         Replacement of metal benches and tables with eco-friendly materials to soften the landscaping.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations – Site Furniture Standards: Consideration might
         be given to using a campus standard in most areas (such as those made from eco-friendly
         materials or metal) but allowing unique designs in certain areas where coordination with
         architecture is important or where there is a strong reason to distinguish a space. The bench
         standard used in the new fountain courtyard is attractive but is traditional in design whereas the
         architecture of the campus is very contemporary. Consideration should be given to selecting a
         contemporary standard that utilizes the same dark green color used in the fountain courtyard.

         Adding colorful umbrellas to provide shade in seating areas.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations – Site Furniture Standards: Umbrella tables
         should particularly be provided adjacent to Largo Student Center and in the renovated East
         Quad/Largo Amphitheater described earlier.

2. Implement beautification plan for campus points of entry.

3. Add college name to top of buildings that face major intersections or points of entry to the college.


Beautification Plan – Phase III:

1. Implement second year recommendations of landscape architect design plan, including:

         Improvement or replacement of walkway bridge linking Lanham and Largo Student Center.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations: Consideration should be given to how this bridge
         could become an iconic image for the east quad, much like the new glassy entrance to Bladen
         adjacent to the fountain. The enhancement of this bridge should be included in the design of the
         addition for Largo Student Center.

         Redesign of Largo Student Center courtyard.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations: Recommendations for this space are included in
         the “Open Space” section of this chapter and described as part of the “East Quad/Largo
         Amphitheater” project.

         Redesign of Largo Student Center terrace.

         Additional Master Plan Recommendations: This should be done in conjunction with the
         redesign of the courtyard and should consider redesign of the exterior staircase to make the
         transition from one space to the other more inviting.




Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                                          7-11
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan




Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                 7-12
                                  Prince George’s Community College Master Plan




Chapter 7 Site Development Plan                  October 31, 2008                 7-13
Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                                   CHAPTER 8
                                              Extension Centers
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                       CHAPTER 8
                                   EXTENSION CENTERS




                                             Laurel




                               UTC



                                                              Largo


                                                        Andrews
                                 Skilled
                                 Trades




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-1
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                           EXTENSION CENTERS: OVERVIEW

The Andrews, Laurel, Skilled Trades, and UTC extension centers provide a much needed service to the
residents of Prince Georges County, extending programs and services that otherwise would not be available
to many students unable to get to the main Largo campus. The centers are for the most part located near or
convenient to population and employment concentrations in the County. Of the four centers, only UTC has
good access by public transit. This likely contributes to its healthy enrollment and need to expand.

Enrollment is static at Laurel and Andrews and is limited but ready to expand if enlarged facilities resources
were available at Skilled Trades and UTC. Andrews is subject always to the space being made available by
the Air Force – in other words, is controlled by the Air Force and not PGCC. The spaces in the Skilled
Trades Center are more appropriate to office and classroom uses than to the construction maintenance
programs now being conducted there.

There have been discussions within the College about a PGCC presence in the southern part of the County.
This is the least populated area of the County, and, while not fully rural, there may not be a sufficient
population base to warrant opening a center in this area. In addition, the roads system in the south County
are not well developed and do not connect conveniently to the more populous areas of the County and
Washington, DC. More study is needed before testing a facility in this area.


PGCC AS A SYSTEM: METHODOLOGY

In addition to the facilities at Largo, the College also has a presence at four additional county locations. It
occupies over 45,000 net square feet of space at Andrews Air Force Base, Laurel College Center, Skilled
Trades Center and University Town Center. The College offers both credit and non-credit continuing
education courses at these locations. Classes at the extension centers are identical in title, number, course
content, credit and transferability to those offered at the main campus at Largo.

The College provided room-by-room space inventories and credit hour data for each of the major extension
centers. These data were used as the basis for analyzing PGCC’s needs for “instructional” space at the
centers by applying the data to the Maryland Higher Education Commission’s Space Allocation Guidelines
for Community Colleges. Space categories other than instruction (classroom and laboratory) are not
quantitatively analyzed with the guidelines which are intended for use for campus-wide analyses only.

Unlike the other extension centers, the College reports that only non-credit continuing education instruction
was offered at Skilled Trades Center for the fall semester of 2007. Since Maryland space planning models
do not provide for consideration of continuing education enrollment data when quantifying space needs,
analysis of Skilled Trades Center’s needs for space are best expressed in terms of the facility’s qualitative or
non-statistical environmental characteristics.

Summaries for each center follow.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                    October 31, 2008                                             8-2
                                      Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE

Andrews Air Force Base is located near Suitland Parkway and Maryland Route 4 in Morningside. A total of
6,913 net square feet of space, in two adjacent buildings, is used for the following purposes: Classroom
(3,845), Laboratory (1982) and Office (1,086). The College’s instructional and office space is provided by
the base, free of charge.

Enrollment

A comprehensive summary of actual face-to-face credit hours generated at Andrews is provided in the table
below. The data are further organized by Day before 5:00 p.m., Evening after 5:00 p.m., and Weekend
(Saturday and Sunday). The majority (77%) of Andrews’s enrollment is concentrated in the evening, while
20% is weekend enrollment.

Table 8-1
Comparative Summary: Day, Evening, Weekend
Andrews Credit Hour Generation (Fall 2007)


                      Andrews Air Force Base
         Generations           Credit Hrs                            FTES Percentage
Credit Hours/FTES: Day                 36                                2        2%
Credit Hours/FTES: Evening         1,205                                80       77%
Credit Hours/FTES: Weekend            318                               21       20%
Credit Hours: Total                 1,559                              104      100%

Source: PGCC O ffice of Plannin g and Institutional Research


Facilities Inventory and Space Needs (Quantitative)

The data suggests that there is no projected deficit of classroom space for the College’s use at Andrews Air
Force Base. The host location been historically cooperative in providing the spaces needed to offer PGCC
programs and services.

Table 8-2
Andrews AFB Space Inventory (NASF): Fall 2007

  HEGIS                                Andrews             HE GIS                             Andrews
  CODE               S PACE              AFB               CODE               SPACE             AFB
   100      CLASSROOM                      3,845               600    GENE RAL USE                      0
   200      LABORATORY                     1,982               630      Food Facility                   0
   210        Class Laboratory             1,982            650         Lounge                          0
   220        Open Laboratory                  0            700       SUPPORT                           0
   300      OFFICE                         1,086            710         Data Processing                 0
  310/50      Office/Conference            1,086           720-45       Shop/Storage                    0
   400      STUDY                              0            800       HEALTH
   410         Study                             0        100-800 TOTALS                          6,913
  420/30       Stack                             0             060    Alteration/Conversion             0
  440/55       Process/Service                   0             090    Other Organiz ations              0
   500      SPECIAL USE                          0             000    UNCLASSIFIED                      0


Data So urce: PGCC Facilities Management




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                                    October 31, 2008                             8-3
                               Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 8-3
Summary Computation of Instructional Space Needs (Andrews AFB)


 HEGIS                                    2007       2007       Surplus       2007 - 2017              2017       2017         Surplus
                                                                                     a            a
 CODE       SPACE CATEGORY                Need     Inventory   (-) Deficit Additions    Deletions      Need     Inventory     (-) Deficit
  100 CLASSROOM                              1,995      3,845       1,850             0            0      2,417      3,845          1,428
  200 LABORATORY                             1,728      1,982          254            0            0      2,092      1,982           -110
  210   Class Laboratory                     1,392      1,982          590            0            0      1,685      1,982            297
  220   Open Laboratory                        336           0        -336            0            0        407           0          -407


Space Needs (Qualitative)

Instructional Functions

          Existing classrooms are small. However, the Air Force is constructing new larger classrooms in a
          nearby building that will be ready for use in spring 2009.
          Limited technology. Again, new classrooms will be contemporary in terms of technology.

Instructional Support Functions

          There are no offices available to PGCC faculty.
          Library facilities are currently limited. Air Force is constructing new Library/Education Center and
          will be accessible to PGCC students.

Student Services Functions

          There are no study spaces or social spaces available to PGCC students.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                          October 31, 2008                                                  8-4
                                       Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


LAUREL COLLEGE CENTER

Laurel College Center is located at 312 Marshall Avenue in Laurel. This site is unique in that it is occupied
in partnership between Prince George’s Community College and Howard Community College. Of the
23,256 net square feet of space assigned to the two colleges, Prince George’s uses 11,630 net square feet
for the following purposes: Classroom (6,623), Laboratory (2,983), Office (1,743) and Food Facility (281).

Enrollment

A comprehensive summary of actual face-to-face credit hours generated at Laurel College Center is
provided in the table below. The data are further organized by Day before 5:00 p.m., Evening after 5:00
p.m., and Weekend (Saturday and Sunday). The majority (51%) of Laurel’s enrollment is concentrated in
the evening, and 33% is during the day.

Table 8-4
Comparative Summary: Day, Evening, Weekend
Laurel Credit Hour Generation (Fall 2007)


                       Laurel College Center
         Generations           Credit Hrs                             FTES Percentage
Credit Hours/FTES: Day                596                                40       33%
Credit Hours/FTES: Evening            924                                62       51%
Credit Hours/FTES: Weekend            275                                18       15%
Credit Hours: Total                 1,795                               120      100%

Source: PGCC O ffice of Plannin g and Institutional Research


Facilities Inventory and Space Needs (Quantitative)

The data suggests that there is no projected deficit of overall instructional space for the College’s use at
Laurel College Center.

Table 8-5
Laurel College Center Space Inventory (NASF): Fall 2007

  HEGIS                                  Laurel                HE GIS                             Laurel
  CODE                S PACE           College Cntr            CODE             SPACE           College Cntr
   100       CLASSROOM                        6,623             600     GENE RAL USE                     281
   200       LABORATORY                       2,983             630       Food Facility                  281
   210         Class Laboratory               2,983             650       Lounge                           0
   220         Open Laboratory                    0             700     SUPPORT                            0
   300       OFFICE                           1,743             710       Data Processing                  0
  310/50       Office/Conference              1,743            720-45     Shop/Storage                     0
   400       STUDY                                0             800     HEALTH
   410          Study                             0            100-800 TOTALS                        11,630
  420/30        Stack                             0             060     Alteration/Conversion              0
  440/55        Process/Service                   0             090     Other Organiz ations               0
   500       SPECIAL USE                          0             000     UNCLASSIFIED                       0

Data So urce: PGCC Facilities M anagem ent




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                                     October 31, 2008                               8-5
                                Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 8-6
Summary Computation of Instructional Space Needs (Laurel College Center)


 HEGIS                                     2007       2007       Surplus       2007 - 2017              2017       2017         Surplus
                                                                                      a            a
 CODE       SPACE CATEGORY                 Need     Inventory   (-) Deficit Additions    Deletions      Need     Inventory     (-) Deficit
  100 CLASSROOM                               1,530      6,623       5,093             0            0      1,853      6,623          4,770
  200 LABORATORY                              1,328      2,983        1,655            0            0      1,608      2,983          1,375
  210   Class Laboratory                      1,067      2,983       1,916             0            0      1,292      2,983          1,691
  220   Open Laboratory                         260           0        -260            0            0        315           0          -315


Space Needs (Qualitative)

Instructional Functions

          Design of some classrooms result in inefficient use of square footage and also limit class sizes to
          less than 25 students. An example is protruding columns in these spaces that interfere with room
          layouts, obstruct views, and force awkward proportions.
          Built-in instructional technology is limited. Only 2 of 17 classrooms are smart.
          There are inadequate fume hoods in biology prep area. Proper ventilation is needed to remove
          fumes from the room and the adjacent hallways.
          The College anticipates increasing demand for chemistry offerings. There is no chemistry lab
          currently available to potential students.

Instructional Support Functions

          Arrangement and distribution of office spaces are very inefficient. There is only 80% of the needed
          office space for staff at Laurel; this does not take into account the need for faculty office space.
          There are no learning resources (library) facilities or collections other than online.
          The collection of spaces allocated for tutoring are not ideal for that purpose. Circulation among the
          various rooms is jumbled at best.

Student Services Functions

          There are insufficient student break/rest areas.
          There are no lounge or game/activity spaces, or just a place for students to relax between classes
          or while on breaks.
          There are no quiet places for student study.

Institutional Support Functions

          Some internal spaces not ADA accessible.
          There is insufficient lighting in parking lots.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                            October 31, 2008                                                 8-6
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


SKILLED TRADES CENTER

Skilled Trades Center, PGCC’s newest extension center, is located at 6400 Old Branch Avenue in Temple
Hills. Unlike the other extension centers, this 8,244 GSF building is owned by the College. Dedicated to
meeting the training needs of the skilled construction trades industry, these facilities are used in a
cooperative joint venture arrangement with Southern Management Corporation.

Facilities Inventory

Skilled Trades contains a total of 5,397 net square feet of space of which 82% is dedicated to primary
instruction. The remainder is used for instructional support activities. Because of its joint venture
arrangement, the College only reports 50% of its inventory or 2,698 net square feet for inventory purposes.

Table 8-7
Skilled Trades Center Space Inventory (NASF): Fall 2007


  HEGIS                                Skilled            HE GIS                             Skilled
  CODE               S PACE          Trades Cntr          CODE             SPACE           Trades Cntr
    100     CLASSROOM                        411           600     GENE RAL USE                    184
    200     LABORATORY                     1,800           630       Food Facility                   0
   210        Class Laboratory             1,800           650       Lounge                        184
   220        Open Laboratory                  0           700     SUPPORT                           0
   300      OFFICE                           303           710       Data Processing                 0
  310/50      Office/Conference              303          720-45     Shop/Storage                    0
   400      STUDY                              0           800     HEALTH
    410        Study                           0          100-800 TOTALS                         2,698
  420/30       Stack                           0           060     Alteration/Conversion             0
  440/55       Process/Service                 0           090     Other Organiz ations              0
    500     SPECIAL USE                        0           000     UNCLASSIFIED                      0

Data So urce: PGCC Facilities Management



Space Needs (Qualitative)

Also unlike the other extension centers, the College reports that only non-credit continuing education
instruction was offered at Skilled Trades Center for the fall semester of 2007. Since Maryland space
planning models do not provide for consideration of continuing education enrollment data when quantifying
space needs, analysis of Skilled Trades Center’s needs for space are best expressed in terms of the
facility’s qualitative or non-statistical environmental characteristics.

This converted office building is ill-suited for construction trades instruction and training. Design of the
existing building provides neither the capacity to appropriately house current programs, nor the flexibility for
easy adaptation of interior spaces to changing needs in the future. Many qualitative problems with Skilled
Trades Center stem from the fact that the current building was never designed or built to accommodate the
unique learning environments necessary for contemporary construction trades programs. As a result, there
are both insufficient and inappropriate spaces for instruction, instructional support,
office/conference/meeting/food service, building support and outdoor spaces.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                               October 31, 2008                                   8-7
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Instructional Functions

         Instructional spaces are adequate for Southern Management Corporation’s “maintenance trades”
         programs, but are too small for PGCC “construction trades” programs.
         There are insufficient numbers of instructional spaces (2 classrooms and 4 skills labs). This, along
         with inappropriately sized spaces, has resulted in a waiting list averaging 15-20 applicants for
         some programs.
         Building Maintenance Engineer classes must meet at Suitland High School because Room 103 is
         configured to train for existing building systems and not initial installation wiring. This space meets
         Southern Management’s needs, but not PGCC’s.
         Room 105, HVAC Applications Lab, has a capacity to effectively accommodate only 8 students
         while class sizes are as large as 20 students.
         There are no facilities for Journeyman or Master Plumber; only Basic.
         Instructors are available and on a waiting list to form classes and teach various courses, but the
         facilities are not available.
         Most carpentry classes are conducted at Suitland High School because of lack of appropriate
         facilities at Skilled Trades. Only first-level carpentry can be taught in the building’s Carpentry Lab
         due to insufficient lab area and volume.

Instructional Support Functions

         There are insufficient individual computer stations and no computer laboratory.
         There are no learning resources (library) facilities or collections other than online.
         Work space for both faculty and staff are shared by the College and Southern Management. Open
         office arrangements are inappropriate for confidential discussions.

Student Services Functions

         With the exception of one common building break area, there is no area for students to relax before
         class or during breaks.

Institutional Support Functions

         The main building entrance and some interior spaces are not ADA accessible.
         There are no appropriate places to warehouse or store large items or pieces of equipment. Such
         items are often stored in instructional and administrative spaces.
         Office space shared by two coordinators also houses the building’s electrical panels.

Outdoor Functions

         Parking is very limited. Available spaces can only support the current student population and
         cannot accommodate any large events such as graduations.

Although there is acreage for some limited expansion, the design of the building does not allow for its
expansion in advantageous directions without difficulty. Expansion would encroach on land needed for
parking.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                    October 31, 2008                                              8-8
                                    Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


UNIVERSITY TOWN CENTER

University Town Center is located at 6505 Belcrest Road in Hyattsville. A total of 21,439 net square feet of
space is used for the following purposes: Classroom (8,977), Laboratory (6,859), Office (3,003), Study
(756), Lounge (1,367), Data Processing (280) and Storage (197).

Enrollment

A comprehensive summary of actual face-to-face credit hours generated at University Town Center is
provided in the table below. The data are further organized by Day before 5:00 p.m., Evening after 5:00
p.m., and Weekend (Saturday and Sunday). The majority (49%) of enrollment is concentrated during the
day, and 40% of student enrollment occurs after 5:00 p.m.

Table 8-8
Comparative Summary: Day, Evening, Weekend
University Town Center Credit Hour Generation (Fall 2007)


                       University Town Center
         Generations             Credit Hrs                       FTES Percentage
Credit Hours/FTES: Day               3,593                          240       49%
Credit Hours/FTES: Evening           2,972                          198       40%
Credit Hours/FTES: Weekend              790                          53       11%
Credit Hours: Total                  7,355                          490      100%

Source: PGCC O ffice of Plannin g and Institutional Research


Facilities Inventory and Space Needs (Quantitative)

The data suggests that there is no projected deficit of overall instructional space for the College’s use at
University Town Center.

Table 8-9
University Town Center Space Inventory (NASF): Fall 2007


  HEGIS                              University                HE GIS                            Univ ersity
  CODE                 S PACE       Town Center                CODE             SPACE           Town Center
    100     CLASSROOM                       8,977               600     GENE RAL USE                   1,367
    200     LABORATORY                      6,859               630       Food Facility                    0
   210        Class Laboratory              5,682               650       Lounge                       1,367
   220        Open Laboratory               1,177               700     SUPPORT                          477
   300      OFFICE                          3,003               710       Data Processing                280
  310/50      Office/Conference             3,003              720-45     Shop/Storage                   197
   400      STUDY                             756               800     HEALTH
    410        Study                          756              100-800 TOTALS                         21,439
  420/30       Stack                            0               060     Alteration/Conversion              0
  440/55       Process/Service                  0               090     Other Organiz ations               0
    500     SPECIAL USE                         0               000     UNCLASSIFIED                       0

Data So urce: PGCC Facilities Management




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                                    October 31, 2008                                8-9
                                Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan


Table 8-10
Summary Computation of Instructional Space Needs (University Town Center)


 HEGIS                                     2007       2007      Surplus       2007 - 2017              2017       2017        Surplus
                                                                                     a            a
 CODE       SPACE CATEGORY                 Need     Inventory  (-) Deficit Additions    Deletions      Need     Inventory    (-) Deficit
  100 CLASSROOM                               5,950      8,977      3,027             0            0      7,205      8,977         1,772
  200 LABORATORY                              5,158      6,859       1,701            0            0      6,246      6,859           613
  210   Class Laboratory                      4,150      5,682      1,532             0            0      5,026      5,682           656
  220   Open Laboratory                       1,008      1,177         169            0            0      1,221      1,177            -44


Space Needs (Qualitative)

Instructional Functions

          There are insufficient numbers of instructional spaces.
          Small classrooms limit class sizes to approximately 24 students.
          Computer and biology labs are small at approximately 20 stations each.
          There is limited instructional technology available. Only 2 of 15 classrooms are smart.
          There are limited facilities for developmental or ESL students. The College reports over 50% of
          University Town Center’s enrollment are within these categories. Developmental and other special
          needs programs require more square footage per student.

Instructional Support Functions

          A number of employees do not have adequate office work space.
          There are no learning resources (library) facilities or collections other than online.
          Testing facilities are make-shift. Often computer laboratories are used for purposes of testing. The
          College cannot offer proctored exams at University Town Center.

Student Services Functions

          Appropriate student break areas are limited in this facility.
          There are no adequate areas for visiting Student Services staff to set up temporary stations to
          service UTC’s students.

Institutional Support Functions

          Storage space is both insufficient and inadequate. Audio-Visual and other sensitive equipment is
          stored in administrative offices. Other equipment and supplies, in need of storage, are found in
          hallway alcoves or in general circulation passageways.
          There are no spaces for community gatherings and large events. This is significant given
          University Town Center’s location in a major population center.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                           October 31, 2008                                               8-10
                           Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                 CENTERS: DESCRIPTIONS

                               ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE

Building Designation:                                  Andrews AFB
Number of Floors:                                      1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                     6,913
Leased Area:                                           N/A

Contains:                                              Classrooms, Offices

General Condition:                                     Good

Adequacy of Space:                                     Classrooms and administrative offices are provided in
                                                       adequate number, but classrooms are small. No
                                                       faculty office space is provided.



Space for Prince George’s Community College and 4 other colleges and universities is provided rent-free by
the Air Force base education office (AFBEO). The mission of the College for this location is to serve the
military, their dependents and families, and the civilian community surrounding the base. Course offerings
are varied, including on-line, accelerated and 16-week, suited mostly to the needs of the AFBEO. Programs
offered include Business Administration AA, Business Management AAS, Criminal Justice AAS, General
Studies AAS, and Accounting AAS.

The space is subject to availability but normally is sufficient to accommodate PGCC’s programs. Enrollment
is not growing, but is likely related to increased deployments overseas; this has been the historic pattern at
AAFB. According to the Center manager for PGCC, enrollment may also be limited due to cumbersome
screening of civilians desiring to take courses on base. Normal distribution of students is 60% military / 40%
civilian.

Current classrooms are smaller than desirable, but the Air Force is currently renovating another building
with larger classrooms for use by the 5 higher education institutions. Technology in the classrooms is
limited, but will be more state-of-the-art in the renovated facility. The biology lab is fitted out with
appropriate technology and equipment. A total of 22 classrooms, one computer classroom, one open
computer lab, and one biology lab are provided for use by all 5 institutions.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                   October 31, 2008                                              8-11
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                              ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-12
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                                 LAUREL COLLEGE CENTER

Building Designation:                                    Laurel College Center
Number of Floors:                                        3
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                       23,256 (shared with Howard CC)
Leased Area – SF                                         approx. 33,000

Contains:                                                Classrooms, Science Lab, Offices

General Condition:                                       Good

Adequacy of Space:                                       Generally adequate

Sprinkler Systems:                                       Yes


Prince Georges Community College occupies three floors in a 10-story office building known as the
“Executive Office Building” in Laurel, located at the northern end of the County. Shared with Howard
Community College, enrollment has historically been about 50% PGCC students and 50% HCC students.
The current fall 2008 semester is about 2/3 PGCC students.

Twenty eight learning spaces are provided, including 17 instructional / lecture classrooms (including two
“smart” classrooms), 9 computer labs, one biology lab, and one room used for art. All 28 learning spaces
are used some evenings throughout the semester. Capacity is limited (approximately 25 students/room)
due to the configuration to the building: the irregular building perimeter limits use of all the space in order to
preserve sight lines to the teaching station and teaching wall. The library resource offered by the College is
strictly on-line: no print media is available. No wireless service is provided. There is no designated testing
space. A student break room is available but is not a pleasant space to occupy; it is often used by students
collaborating on course work. Staff commented that employees of another building tenant are disrespectful
of PGCC faculty, staff, and students and are generally disruptive.

Much of the office space is a maze of corridors and inaccessible rooms; if the College intends to extend the
lease for a significant period, a renovation should be considered.

Parking is plentiful and free. However, public transportation is practically non-existent. Should enrollment
increase, there is currently space available in the building for expansion.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                     October 31, 2008                                              8-13
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                               LAUREL COLLEGE CENTER




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-14
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                   LAUREL COLLEGE CENTER FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-15
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                   LAUREL COLLEGE CENTER FLOOR PLANS




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-16
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                   LAUREL COLLEGE CENTER FLOOR PLANS




                                        4th Floor Plan




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-17
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                  SKILLED TRADES CENTER

Building Designation:                                    Skilled Trades Center
Number of Floors:                                        1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                       5,397
Gross Building Area (GSF):                               8,244

Contains:                                                Trades labs, classrooms, offices

General Condition:                                       Good

Adequacy of Space:                                       Instructional and training spaces are too small and
                                                         insufficient in number.

Sprinkler Systems:                                       No


Located in Temple Hills near Camp Springs, the Skilled Trades Center is the only extension center owned
by the College. Formerly a Social Security Administration branch, the space is more appropriate to office
space than for its current use. Programs offered at the center are for building maintenance and construction
trades, and are administered jointly by PGCC and Southern Management. Enrollment is limited by available
space; the center manager reports that additional students could be enrolled if more space were to be
available.

The trades labs are limited both in plan – spaces are too small – and in height. Ceilings are too short for
much of the equipment that is used for demonstration and for mock-ups. While the spaces may be
adequate for instruction and training in building maintenance, they are wholly inadequate for construction
trades instruction and training.

Even if expansion of the building were possible, the facility is limited by parking, which is often fully
occupied. No other parking is available, and there is no public transportation serving this location.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                     October 31, 2008                                            8-18
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                               SKILLED TRADES CENTER




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-19
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                    SKILLED TRADES CENTER FLOOR PLAN




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-20
                            Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                                 UNIVERSITY TOWN CENTER

Building Designation:                                    UTC
Number of Floors:                                        1
Net Assignable Square Feet (NASF):                       21,439
Leased Area – SF                                         approx. 32,000

Contains:                                                Classrooms, Science Lab, Offices

General Condition:                                       Good

Adequacy of Space:                                       Classrooms are adequately sized but are insufficient
                                                         in number to meet demand

Sprinkler Systems:                                       Yes


Occupying the entire second floor of an 8-story office building in the Hyattsville town center, UTC is in a
prime location convenient to public transit, shopping and amenities, and a population center. Parking is
convenient, but is reported to be a financial strain on students using the facility for more than two hours (first
two hours are free). Enrollment flattened about 3 semesters ago, but fall 2008 registration increased
significantly, and students were turned away from some courses due to lack of space to conduct those
courses. Enrollment is constrained by both the size and number of learning spaces; room sizes typically
cap the capacity at 24 students. The biology lab was over-enrolled for the first time in the fall 2008
semester, surpassing the 20-station capacity. The facility operates at or above capacity during peak times
in weekday mornings and evenings and Saturdays.

There is no testing facility (which would allow for more efficient use of class “seat” time). The library
resource offers on-line access but no print media. One student break area is provided. Rotating Largo-
based staff for the Career Center and Financial Aid do not have appropriate office space. Storage space is
insufficient.

The center manager has pointed out that the UTC operates more as an “access point” than a degree center:
Half of the enrollments are either remedial or in the area of English as a Second Language, and that if more
space were available, the center could also provide more adult basic education.

Expansion space is available in the building.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                     October 31, 2008                                             8-21
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                              UNIVERSITY TOWN CENTER




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-22
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan



                   UNIVERSITY TOWN CENTER FLOOR PLAN




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                        8-23
                          Prince George’s Community College Facilities Master Plan




                 EXTENSION CENTERS: RECOMMENDATIONS



SUMMARY RECOMMENDATIONS

    1. Expand the UTC, leasing more space in the same building.

    2. Move the building maintenance and construction programs now in Skilled Trades to another, larger
       facility. This would require investigation into availability, cost, and feasibility. Use the Skilled
       Trades Center for academic / instructional programs.

    3. Conduct a demographic and market analysis to help determine if an additional PGCC extension
       center is warranted in the South County area and to define the type and size of such a facility.

    4. Continue operations at Andrews and Laurel, but monitor the enrollment and occupancy of the
       spaces.

    5. In all cases, except for Skilled Trades, which is owned by the College, the College should consider
       a leasehold arrangement for a new facility location rather than ownership, unless: 1) the price is
       right, as was the case for Skilled Trades, and 2) a continued strong market is suggested for several
       years in the future for any particular location. Leases for new facilities would allow the College to
       test the location before committing to the costs of capital development, remaining more nimble in
       the process.




Chapter 8 Extension Centers                  October 31, 2008                                          8-24

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:53
posted:7/26/2011
language:English
pages:191