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									  Quality Planning




In Camping Programs
Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service



                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS
CAMP PROGRAMMING TIMELINE ......................................................................................................3
CAMP PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT .......................................................................................................4
   CHECKLIST OF GUIDELINES AND BEST PRACTICES ................................................................................ 4
     Facility Safety Requirements ............................................................................................................... 4
     Site Liability Requirements .................................................................................................................. 4
     Camp Program ..................................................................................................................................... 5
     Parents of Campers .............................................................................................................................. 7
     Human Resources ................................................................................................................................ 7
     Camp Health and Safety .....................................................................................................................10
     Emergency ...........................................................................................................................................12
   GUIDELINES FOR PARTICIPANT CHECK-IN AND CHECK-OUT AT 4-H CAMPING EVENTS.....................13
   CAMP RULES AND GUIDELINES ...............................................................................................................15
     Some Sample Rules for WVU Extension Service 4-H Camping Programs ......................................16
   4-H CAMP COMMUNICATIONS – A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS......................................................................18
   MINIMUM STANDARDS OF PRACTICE FOR ALL WVU EXTENSION-SPONSORED
CAMPING PROGRAMS ........................................................................................................................... 21
          OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT ........................................................................................................21
          HUMAN RESOURCES ........................................................................................................................21
          PROGRAM DESIGN & ACTIVITIES .....................................................................................................22
          SPECIALIZED ACTIVITIES .................................................................................................................22
       o     Horseback Riding .......................................................................................................................22
       o     Adventure/Challenge ..................................................................................................................23
       o     Trip and Travel ...........................................................................................................................23
            Aquatics ......................................................................................................................................23
          FACILITY & FOOD SERVICE .............................................................................................................25
          HEALTH, WELLNESS AND SAFETY ...................................................................................................27
 APPLICABLE WVU EXTENSION SERVICE POLICIES, PROCEDURES & STATEMENTS OF
BEST PRACTICE FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY .................................................................................29
   TOBACCO POLICY ....................................................................................................................................30
   ALCOHOL POLICY....................................................................................................................................31
   ILLEGAL DRUG POLICY ...........................................................................................................................33
   DEADLY WEAPONS/DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES POLICY .............................................................................35
   STATEMENT OF BEST PRACTICE—TRANSPORTATION OF CLIENTELE ..................................................36
      Waiver and Permission to Transport Child/Charge ..........................................................................38
   PROTECTIVE HEADGEAR FOR 4-H MEMBERS/YOUTH PARTICIPATING IN BICYCLE ACTIVITIES........39
   EQUINE HARD HAT POLICY ....................................................................................................................40
 APPLICABLE WVU EXTENSION SERVICE POLICIES, PROCEDURES & STATEMENTS OF
BEST PRACTICE FOR POSITIVE CAMP LIFE ..................................................................................41
   SEARCH AND SEIZURE POLICY ................................................................................................................43
   WVU SOCIAL JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT ...................................................................45
   POLICY AND PROCEDURE REGARDING SEXUAL HARASSMENT .............................................................46
   POLICY STATEMENT ON BULLYING ........................................................................................................52
 APPLICABLE WVU EXTENSION SERVICE POLICIES, PROCEDURES & STATEMENTS OF
BEST PRACTICE FOR CAMP VOLUNTEERS/STAFF .......................................................................53



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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service
  WVU EXTENSION SERVICE VOLUNTEER SELECTION AND SCREENING PROCEDURE .................................54
  CAMPER SUPERVISION RATIOS ...............................................................................................................58
  WEST VIRGINIA 4-H ―ABOVE SUSPICION‖ PROCEDURES........................................................................59
  STATEMENT OF BEST PRACTICE—OVERNIGHT SUPERVISION OF 4-H MEMBERS AND OTHER MINORS
  PARTICIPATING IN WVU EXTENSION SERVICE PROGRAMS ...................................................................60




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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service

                          Camp Programming Timeline




September-October: Conduct post-camp feedback sessions with campers, parents,
volunteers; Fall ACA Virginias Section Meeting

November-December: Establish camping dates, budget & costs; Contract with
facilities; ―Sponsor a 4-H Camper for Christmas‖ Campaign; Report results of camp
programs in Faculty File & County Indicator Reports; send Holiday cards to last year’s
campers

January: Winter ACA Virginias Section Meeting; Secure services of camp
medic/nurse & food service personnel

February: National ACA Convention; Early Camp publicity; Recruitment &
Screening of Camp Volunteers; County Camp Instructor Requests; Camp Planning early
stages

March: Camp Volunteer Training; MCI/NCI/Tri-State Camping Conference; Camp
Planning continues; Contact guest speakers and special programs

April: Camp Volunteer Training continues; Camp Planning continues; Begin camp-
related purchases, contracts and details; Advertise, mail camp letters & begin accepting
camp registrations; Plan camp store; Arrange for Inspections of your Camp Facility by
Health Department and Fire Department/Fire Marshall

May: Camp Volunteer Training continues; Final selection of camp volunteers; Final
camp planning details; Final camp arrangements & details (food, accident insurance,
supplies, crafts, guest speakers & programs); 4-H Camp Kick-off Inservice at Jackson’s
Mill

June, July, August: Conduct & evaluate Camp programs




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West Virginia University Extension Service

                           Camp Program Development
                       Checklist of Guidelines and Best Practices

Facility Safety Requirements

 Camp Director or designee inspects Camp Facility for safety

 Facility complies with ―Minimum Standards of Practice for all WVU Extension-
sponsored Camping Programs‖ (See pages 15 - 17 in Quality Planning in Camping
Programs)

 Facility provides a safe environment for participants.

 Facility is accessible for individuals with disabilities and special needs.

 Facility has telephone access.

 Emergency exits are clearly marked, unlocked and easily accessible.

 Emergency equipment exists and is accessible if needed.

 Facility (including kitchen, water and septic systems) is inspected and approved for
use by county sanitarian and fire marshal, as evidenced by a current permit to operate
issued by the appropriate health authorities.

 No other groups are scheduled to use the facility in a way that would place 4-H
campers at risk. (―Concurrent use‖ of facilities by non 4-H groups or individuals during
4-H camping programs is not recommended.)

Site Liability Requirements

 Facility use forms, agreements and/or contracts from management of the facility
chosen have been approved by WVU Legal Affairs. (See Appendix A for sample forms.)

 If payment of facility used is required, make deposit or payment per facility use form,
agreement and/or contract only after contract has been approved through appropriate
channels.

 If liability insurance is required by facility chosen, seek assistance from the Associate
Director, Operations in obtaining appropriate liability insurance.

 Secure and maintain the most current copy of the WVU’s BRIM policy in your
camping files; keep a copy with you when you are at camp (available at
http://intranet.ext.wvu.edu/  ―Policies‖  ―Certificate of Liability Insurance‖).




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 West Virginia University Extension Service



 Camp Program

 Identify camp dates and registration deadlines; promote to all audiences early and often!

       Potential audiences-
                     Parent groups
                     4-H Clubs
                     Afterschool Programs
                     Schools
                     Home School Families

 Implement a promotion plan for camp that includes a variety of approaches:
          Early release of camp dates to potential campers
          Letter of invitation with information to potential campers
          Teen awareness visits (this is your most powerful tool – send teens to speak
             to clubs and groups about the camp program
          Television and radio spots by former campers and staff
          Cards or letters from camp staff or older ―role model‖ campers
          Displays, newspaper articles and photographs
          Invite a reporter to attend the staff training activities to get pictures of these
             outstanding volunteers preparing for camp.


 Develop camp operating budget (see Camp Budget template on ―County Money
         Management‖ CD from WVU Extension Service.)



 The camp program should be planned with input from parents, campers, volunteer staff
and counselors. A written statement of objectives and strategies is needed to guide the
program and to be a focus for staff training. Program planning checklist:

                      Identify goals and objectives of your camp—what do you hope to
                       accomplish?

                      Gather ideas for
                      o Camp Themes
                      o Assemblies
                      o Camp Schedule
                      o Meditations
                      o Classes & Crafts
                      o Special Events

                      Plan your camp evaluation as you plan camp.



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West Virginia University Extension Service


                    The program is planned for the campers.

                    Examine your tribal leadership selection process; consider a pre-
                     camp application/training process to prepare excellent tribal
                     leaders

                    The program includes activities that can be conducted better at
                     camp than anywhere else.

                    The program utilizes the outdoors.

                    The program connects the campers to the environment in a
                     meaningful way.

                    Camp provides a variety of social experiences: opportunity for
                     community; opportunity for group identity; opportunity for
                     personal identity

                    The program provides for a progression in knowledge and skills.

                    The program provides age-appropriate activities that reflect the age
                     range of the camp population

                    There are a variety of exciting options, and campers have an
                     opportunity to make choices.

                    Schedule provides campers with the opportunity for adequate rest
                     and sleep.

                    Campers have an opportunity to learn and practice life skills.

                    Camp programs should be long enough for groups to form (ACA
                     suggests five days as a minimum).

                    Participant Orientation is conducted early in camp schedule;
                     includes behavior expectations, rules, policies, guidelines, safety
                     and emergency procedures.

                    Decide how you will document the camp experience (group
                     picture, slide show, video program, camp yearbook)

                    Decide camp award/recognition and selection process




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 Quality Planning in Camping Programs
 West Virginia University Extension Service
 Parents of Campers

  Parent Orientation (face-to-face or in writing) is conducted; includes purpose and
 nature of your camping program, rules and policies, consequences of violating rules and
 policies, safety and emergency procedures, parent role in preparing child for camp, what
 to pack, what not to pack, how to pack, etc.

  Drop-Off & pick-up procedures are communicated to parents
                              Organized process in place for responsible, approved
                                 adult to sign camper ―in‖ and ―out‖ of camp. (see pgs.
                                 13-14)
                              Restricted Release (Appendix B)
                              Early Release (Appendix B)

  Signed permission to participate or informed consent forms are received for each
 child.

  Signed informed consent forms for specialized activities are received for children
 participating. (Appendix B)

  Signed informed consent forms for Controversial Subjects programs are received for
 children participating. (Appendix B)

  Parents understand financial obligations and pay any required costs by posted
 deadlines.
Human Resources

 Send letters to potential staff – adults and teens.
 Utilize a formal selection and screening process, including staff application, references,
interview, and fingerprint screening (Sample application and forms in Appendix C).

 Set dates and requirements for camp staff selection and training well in advance (Include
on application).

 Recruit, screen, train and select enough volunteer staff to meet or exceed the following
ratios of:

           1 staff per 6 campers age 6-8
           1 staff per 8 campers age 9-14
           1 staff per 10 campers age 15-18

            Staff should reflect the diversity of the campers and be trained to accept,
             respect and be responsive to the diversity of your community.




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 West Virginia University Extension Service
            According to ACA standards, 80% of the staff needed to meet these ratios
             must be 18 years of age or older as of the first day of camp. Adult
             counselors should be at least 23 years of age for all-age or older camp and at
             least 18 years of age for younger camp.

            If there are going to be times during the day when these ratios are not
             needed or when lower ratios are required, document this in writing.

            Select some extra staff or have some parents ―on call‖ so that if you need to
             replace staff members immediately before or during camp, you will have the
             reserves you need.

 Conduct required staff training; document topics covered and names of participants (for
a list of required topics, see ―Minimum Requirements‖ on pgs. 4 – 6 in ―Quality People in
Camping Programs‖)
                        10 hours (minimum) for Resident Camp Staff (5 days/4 nights or
                           longer duration)
                        4 hours (minimum) for Day Camp and Short-Term (3 nights or
                           shorter duration) Camp Staff
                        As needed short-term event chaperone training
                        Do not make final selections of staff until on-site training activities
                           where you have an opportunity to observe their behavior ―at
                           camp.‖

  Document training related to the following WVU Extension Service Policies,
 Procedures and Statements of Best Practice:
        Tobacco Policy
        Alcohol Policy
        Illegal Drug Policy
        Deadly Weapons/Destructive Devices Policy
        Statement of Best Practice—Transportation of Clientele (if applicable)
        Protective Headgear Policy for 4-H Members/Youth Participating in Bicycle
           Activities (if applicable)
        Equine Hard Hat Policy (if applicable)
        Policy on Technology and Communication Devices at Camp
        Search and Seizure Policy
        WVU Social Justice Nondiscrimination Statement
        Policy and Procedure Regarding Sexual Harassment
        Policy Statement on Bullying
        Camper Supervision Ratios
        West Virginia 4-H ―Above Suspicion‖ Procedures
        Statement of Best Practice—Overnight Supervision of 4-H Members and
           Other Minors
        West Virginia 4-H Chaperone Policy and Resources (if applicable)
        West Virginia 4-H Volunteer Code of Conduct
        WVU Extension Service Emergency Media Plan


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 Quality Planning in Camping Programs
 West Virginia University Extension Service


  Retain copies of camp staff training lesson plans, handouts, and evaluations (include a
 question like: ―Do you feel prepared to serve as a camp counselor? If not, what
 knowledge or skills do you need?‖). Retain lists of those who participated in each
 training event.


 Conduct training for late-recruited, replacement and other staff who have not been
present for the required hours of staff training.

 Send acceptance letters to selected camp staff with dates, times and locations. Retain
mailing list. (Sample in Appendix C)

 For each camp staff member selected, have on file:
         a signed West Virginia 4-H Volunteer Code of Conduct, and
         a signed, written agreement with the volunteer which states:
               The person is a volunteer and not a paid employee
               Room and board is provided as a convenience of WVU Extension
               The organization assigns sleeping space and duties to the volunteer
               No fringe benefits provided a regular employee are provided to the
                   volunteer
               Volunteer services can be terminated by either party at any time
               A mandatory training period, before campers arrive, will be provided
               Who will provide supervision of their service during the camp
               There will be a performance evaluation and recognition at the
                   conclusion of service


 Be sure to have written evidence (retain in file) that the leaders of ―Specialized‖
activities have appropriate certification, training and experience and follow written
procedures based on authoritative sources.

                  Document evaluation of skills to lead activities prior to leading the
                   first activity.

                  Conduct regular observations of Specialized Staff to document their
                   ability to:

                        A. Enforce established safety rules
                        B. Provide appropriate instruction to campers
                        C. Identify and manage environmental and other hazards related to
                        the activity
                        D. Apply appropriate emergency procedures related to the activity
                        and the campers.




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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service
 Make sure all staff members are familiar with the total camp program and how their
segment fits.

 Read your Camp Facility’s Emergency Plan and Policies, share them with your staff,
see that they are displayed in several key places, review them as part of the Welcome to
Camp program and document that they were communicated in a variety of ways.

 Hold daily staff meetings during camp to evaluate programs, coordinate details, share
concerns and give staff an opportunity to ask for help. Be sure to provide adequate
supervision for the campers during your staff meetings.

 Hold any recognition/celebration, etc. for staff following camp or in a time and place
that will not leave the supervision of campers too thin.

 If Teen Counselors are used, there should be a planned series of learning experiences
for them to provide instruction and processing of their learning while at camp. Oversight
of this process would be an excellent job for a skilled volunteer.


Camp Health and Safety

 Signed Health History Form with emergency contact information for each participant
(minor and adult) and only accessible by person(s) in charge of camp and Camp Health
Care personnel (Camp Nurse). Health Histories must be available for ALL persons in
camp. Use the standard WVU Extension Health Form for all camping events. Health
History forms accompany campers on off-site trips, kept in a secure location by
responsible adult. (Appendix D)

 Have a qualified person (at least ARC First Aid/CPR trained –Physician, Nurse
Practitioner, Nurse or EMT preferred) available on site 24 hours per day. Physician
available on site or on call.

 All campers meet with camp medical person (or an adult following written procedures
approved by a medical doctor) to check health history, review medical needs.
 Keep all medications (prescriptions and over-the-counter) locked in a secure place and
supervise self-medication only under the Doctor’s orders, camp standing orders or signed
instructions of the parent/guardian. (Medication Administration Record in Appendix D)

 Access to health care and health emergency procedures are known and understood by
campers and staff even when traveling away from camp.

 Current and up-to-date First Aid kits are available at camp medical center and at all
sites away from ―main camp‖ where programs are conducted. (Suggested list in
Appendix D)

 Health and/or accident insurance secured. (i.e. – American Income Life)


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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service


 Fire and emergency drill training is conducted within the first 36 hours of campers’
arrival.

 Incident or accident report forms available for use by Camp Director. (Appendix E)

 Be sure that all waterfront and swimming programs are led/supervised by qualified
individuals.
                    Lifeguards (Red Cross Lifeguards, YMCA Lifeguard, Lifeguard
                      BSA or equivalent certification). Lifeguards are needed when an
                      activity is conducted near bodies of water where a camper could be
                      in the water (intentionally or unintentionally) and rescue would
                      require the skills of someone trained in more than elementary, non-
                      swimming forms of rescue.
                    Watercraft activities
                                   -Instructor rating in the appropriate craft, or
                                   -Certification as a lifeguard from a nationally
                                       recognized certifying body, or
                                   -Other acceptable certification or license

 Have a person with current CPR for the age of the participants available for all
waterfront and swimming activities. Note that the CPR certification is only good for one
year.

 The Extension faculty member in charge of the camping event is ultimately
responsible for knowing exactly where their campers are at any time. Other Extension
faculty, staff and volunteers have the responsibility for informing the director if they
suspect or recognize that any camper is missing.
                  Each class instructor should be provided with an accurate listing of
                    participants in each class. Roll should be called at the beginning of
                    each class session, each day. Discrepancies between the list of assigned
                    campers and those actually present must be communicated to the camp
                    director immediately. Only the Camp Director will make changes in the
                    assignment of campers to classes.
                  The Camp Director is responsible for assigning camper to tribes. An
                    accurate list of each tribe should be given to tribal leaders for roll call.
                    Discrepancies between the list of assigned campers and those actually
                    present must be communicated to the camp director immediately. Only
                    the Camp Director will make changes in the assignment of campers to
                    tribes.
                  Roll-call will be taken at bedtime. Discrepancies between the list of
                    assigned campers and those actually present must be communicated to
                    the camp director immediately.
                  A list of campers and adults assigned to each sleeping cabin will be
                    posted inside the cabin by one of the entrances on the first day of camp,
                    and will be updated as necessary.



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West Virginia University Extension Service


Emergency
 Camp Director communicates with local law enforcement, fire service and emergency
medical service officials prior to camp. Written communications of dates and programs
are followed by face-to-face meeting (on site if possible) to address possible emergency
situations and response plans and procedures. (Sample letter in Appendix F)
 Plan for unexpected weather based on the season (i.e. access to shelter, means to
contact parents of changes in program, location, etc.) See Crisis Management section.
Two way radios and/or cell phones carried and used by key camp officials for
emergencies, off-site activities and on-going communication.




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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service

Guidelines for Participant Check-in and Check-out at 4-H Camping
Events
Check-in
Each child will have a registration form on file at the site of the event. The accuracy of
the information must be verified when the child is checked in. Included on the
registration form:
     contact information of parents or other responsible adult
     signature of the responsible adult acknowledging their permission for the child to
        attend the event
     a place for parents to specifically authorize who may pick up participant at the
        program site
     additional forms may be needed depending on the type and duration of event (e.g.
        media release, health history, etc.)

Check-out
A system to actually sign the child over to the person picking them up is the best
assurance that the child has been turned over to the parent or another person authorized
by the parents. The child’s ability to identify a person picking him or her up is not
adequate authorization. Many children would willingly go with a relative or neighbor
who says their mother said to pick them up, or with a divorced parent who does not have
custody.
Check out is also an opportunity to tell the parent how much the child enjoyed the
experience, how well they did, and to begin the recruiting process for the next year or
program. Include a nurse’s checkout station so parents can pick up any of their child’s
remaining medications.
Change can be difficult to accept. But when parents understand the rationale for a formal
check-out process, they are likely to cooperate and appreciate the concern and
responsibility shown for the children in their care. A positive attitude by Extension
professionals and volunteers is essential to acceptance of this process by the families
you serve. It also helps to put some thought and effort into ensuring an organized
procedure that easily expedites families.

Drop-in programs
Some day camping programs accept children on a drop-in basis. The issue of
responsibility is a liability concern. In a drop-in program children come and go –
attending the program their own without being accompanied by a responsible adult. It is
assumed that the parent or responsible adult is responsible for their health and safety.
For Day Camps and other ―drop-in‖ activities:
     Establish a procedure requiring a parent or responsible adult be present for the
        first time check-in of children.
     Fill out an information card or form the first time a child attends the program.
        Included on the registration form:
             o contact information of parents or other responsible adult(telephone
                 number where they can be reached during program hours, home address)



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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service
           o signature of the responsible adult acknowledging their permission for the
                child to attend the event
           o a place to indicate that the parents authorize the child to check themselves
                into and out of the program
           o a place for parents to specifically authorize who may pick up participant at
                the program site.
      When a child fills out an information card, a welcome note should be provided to
       the parent or responsible adult including information about the program, sign-
       in/sign-out expectations that the child must follow if a parent or responsible adult
       does not accompany them and a statement that WVU Extension 4-H Youth
       Development is not responsible for injury and, except for minor first aid, will not
       treat injury or illness.
      In the event of injury or illness, the parent or adult responsible should be called
       and should be expected to deal with the problem. Simple first aid may be
       provided on site, but staff should not transport a child to seek treatment or
       emergency care. If immediate care is needed, and the parent/responsible adult
       cannot be located, contact the local emergency medical service.
      In a child does not attend a drop-in program as expected, call the
       parent/responsible adult to check on the child’s status.




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Quality Planning in Camping Programs
West Virginia University Extension Service

Camp Rules and Guidelines

Having camp rules and guidelines is a necessary evil. Rules and guidelines can help
provide structure and order to camp—and give young people a sense of security. But like
much of life, having too many rules and guidelines can make camp life cumbersome.
Use the following principles on camp rules to help you find that happy medium:

   1. A rule must be necessary for the health, safety, welfare, rights, and interests of the
      camper and the camp. If it is merely a tradition or is unnecessary, do not make a
      rule.
   2. Camp rules are a reflection of policies, procedures and standards of practice. They
      are not the same thing! Rules are much simpler statements of expectations.
   3. Once a rule has been established it must be communicated. It is essential that the
      reason for the rule be made clear at the time the rule is stated.
   4. All staff should live by all the rules to demonstrate appropriate behavior. NO
      DOUBLE STANDARDS AT CAMP.
   5. The rule must be enforced. Once a rule has been established, and it is clearly
      explained, you must act if the rule is violated. In most instances, a three-stage
      process is appropriate for dealing with rules violations.
       First offense—provide a reminder of the rule. Confront the camper, explain
          that their actions are not acceptable, suggest alternative desirable behavior.
       Second offense—separate the camper from activity for a while. Discuss the
          problem caused by their behavior. Provide a warning of what will happen if
          their actions continue.
       Third offense—call parents and/or remove from the program
      In cases of serious matters, the reminder and/or warning stages should be skipped.
   6. Rules should be evaluated. Did the camper know the rule? Did the camper
      understand the reason for the rule? Did the camper understand you were serious
      and intended to enforce the rule?

Youth often resent rules they see as unfair or extreme, yet they admire persons of
conviction who are willing to stand by their beliefs and words. They respect leaders who
are reasonable and fair, and who can explain reasons for having rules.




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West Virginia University Extension Service

Some Sample Rules for WVU Extension Service 4-H Camping
Programs
   1. Smoking, use or possession of tobacco products is not permitted at 4-H Camp.
   2. Absolutely no drugs or alcohol on the 4-H Camp property during 4-H camp
       programs. Medications are to be given to the nurse/EMT and dispensed by the
       nurse/EMT.
   3. No pets may be brought to 4-H Camp. Service animals must be on a leash.
   4. Shoes, shirt, pants/shorts/skirt, must be worn at all times (except in the pool area).
   5. Shoes must be worn at all times.
   6. Cell phones, walkie-talkies, pagers, laptops and other wireless electronic devices
       for sending and/or receiving communication messages or images are not
       permitted at 4-H camp.
   7. Knives, firearms or explosives (fireworks, ammunition, etc.) will not be permitted
       on the camp property, unless in conjunction with an approved program or event.
   8. No wading or swimming in the river, unless in conjunction with an approved
       program. Swimming is permitted at the pool only when a lifeguard is on duty.
   9. No rock or gravel throwing.
   10. Stay in approved areas while on the camp property.
   11. All vehicles must be parked in designated areas, and are ―off limits‖ while camp is
       in session. Teens that drive to camp must provide their car keys to the camp director
       for the duration of camp.
   12. The pay phone is off limits to campers and teen counselors, unless permission is
       granted by the camp director.
   13. No physical or emotional disciplinary measures (punishment) will be tolerated. If
       any such act of this type is observed, the Director will immediately make
       arrangements to dismiss the individual from the premises. Abusive and profane
       language will not be tolerated.
   14. Staff quarters are off-limits to non-camp employees. Only authorized staff is allowed
       in the kitchen or maintenance area.
   15. Girls' lodges are off limits to boys. Boys' lodges are off limits to girls.
   16. Archery/Rifle ranges are only used with proper qualified supervision.
   17. Campers are not allowed out of the cabins after lights out.
   18. No camper is to leave the 4-H Camp property without permission from the Camp
       Director. This requires the proper completion of a ―Participant Release Form‖.
       Written permission to leave must be given before camp by parent unless there is
       an unforeseen emergency.
   19. Campers are not permitted in cabins unless adult counselors are present.

   20. No visitors are allowed during the week at camp, unless approved in advance by the
       Camp Director.

   21. In keeping with 4-H Camp philosophy the following practices are detrimental to our
       camp programs. This behavior will not be tolerated.




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                  Telling "dirty jokes", making suggestive sexual references or using off-
                   color language.
                  Permitting put-downs of others.
                  Permitting destruction of nature in any form including picking plants and
                   carving into trees.
                  Permitting vandalism of property in any form or littering.
                  Making threats or administering physical punishments.
                  Being under the influence of or in possession of any drugs or alcohol.
                  Allowing radios, TV's to be played when they will distract from the
                   program or natural setting.
                  Permitting (or making) inconsiderate noise or disturbances in the cabins
                   after "lights out" and before wake up time.
                  Drinking soda, eating candy, or having any special privileges when
                   campers are not allowed to have them.




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4-H Camp Communications – A Recipe for Success
       Ann Berry, Associate Director – Organizational Advancement

Preparation

Complete information on every camper
Signed media release forms
Written directions to your camp
Written directions to local hospital
Identify your crisis team
Phone lists:
     911
     WVU Extension call list
     Camp phone
     Cell phone numbers
     County health department
     Local hospital phone number

Sharing a great recipe

   Goal: Build goodwill, support for program, recruit more 4-H’ers and counselors, say
   thank you, and publicly recognize supporters

   Audiences: Media, local leaders such as ESC, board member, mayor, legislators,
   friends, funders, county clerk…

   Choose a fun, educational or meaningful activity:
              Awards banquet – consider involving leaders in hands-on way
              Class: making ice cream, service day, letters to soldiers, local leader is coming
               to teach
              Considerations: your sound bites:
                 - Our mission is education. Camp is summer fun learning.
                 - Our secret ingredients:
                 - 4-H is guided by four Essential Elements. All our educational programs
                        (including camp activities) are designed around one or more of the four
                        essential elements, which research has established as necessary for
                        positive youth development. The four elements are supervised
                        independence, a sense of belonging with a positive group, a spirit of
                        generosity toward others, and a wide variety of opportunities to master
                        life challenges.
                 - Prep a camper or two: I come to 4-H camp because __________
                 - 4-H is a program of _____ County WVU Extension Service
                 - Identify yourself: WVU Extension 4-H Agent, Extension Camp Instructor




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4-H Camp Communications -- page 2


    When a good recipe turns bad
    Or … the heat is on and you can’t get out of the kitchen

    Get your call list and start calling
    911 - get help
    Notify WVU Extension - Debbie, Bill, Dave, Paul, Ann
    Gather your crisis team

    Identify the crisis
            Did it take place at camp?
            Did it take place outside of camp, but involve campers or camp staff?

    Containing the crisis
         Gather the facts
         Communicate to camp staff
         Designate one spokesperson (ensures consistency of message)
         Ensure safety of campers
         Station someone at the gate; phone duty
         Develop key messages: parents, media
         Stick to the facts
                o Don’t try to ―hide‖ bad news
                o Respond … don’t say ―no comment.‖
                o Be fair, do not lie, communicate early and often
                o Don’t ignore the situation
                o Gather your team
         Keep track of calls from media, parents
         Be calm; if you can't, grab a grownup who can

    Phrases that may be helpful:
    ―The incident is under investigation and we’ll have information for you soon.‖
    ―Our first concern is for the health and safety of our campers and staff. We are contacting the
    families and allowing the medical personnel to do their work.‖
    ―The safety of our campers is our first priority.‖




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4-H Camp Communications -- page 3


Side Dishes

Media do’s …
 Media should make an appointment, not just show up and capture photos and details that may
   not tell our story well. ―Camp is closed to the public while in session.‖
 Only the camp director should speak as the media contact, unless he or she appoints other
   people to do so or advises them to be interviewed about their classes, etc.
 Rules of three:
       o Prepare three sentences or sound bites; practice them
       o Anticipate three questions and answers
       o Anticipate three scary questions and answers
 Use statistics.
 Use quotable language, think about sound bites.
 Anticipate questions, craft potential answers.
 ―Humanize‖ your story.
 Remember: any interview begins once the reporter arrives and doesn’t end until they leave.
   Everything you say can be on the record
 Be assertive. If you think a reporter doesn’t understand your point, try again. Use targeted
   phrases: ―The most important thing is …‖ ―The best part about camp is …‖
 It’s ok to say you don’t know the answer to a question. Just let the reporter know you’ll get
   the answer and get back to him/her

Don’ts
   Don’t use jargon
   Don’t use these phrases: ―no comment,‖ ―off the record,‖ ―don’t print this,‖ ―you didn’t hear
    this from me‖

If you’re on TV ...
   Look at the interviewer, not the camera
   Don’t wear sunglasses, you’ll look shady!
   Stand still on both feet
   Be brief.
   Breathe deeply!

Dessert

Postcards from camp
CD of images to campers, funders, leaders, supporters accompanied by letter
Flyer of camp images

Questions, concerns, want more info? Ann Berry: office: 293-5691, cell: 216-3938




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Minimum Standards of Practice for all WVU Extension-
sponsored camping programs
 (adapted from American Camp Association ―Foundational Practices‖ and ―Mandatory Standards‖)


 Operations & Management
               1. Procedures are in place regarding use and release of any and all
                  personal information related to campers and staff.

               2. Budgeting, bookkeeping and audit procedures are consistent with
                  WVU Extension Service policy.

               3. Inventories of all facilities and equipment are reviewed and revised at
                  least annually

               4. Arrangements for legal counsel have been made and such counsel is
                  available as problems arise

               5. The camp has written strategic planning materials which assess current
                  conditions and identify future needs for both the program and camp
                  operations

               6. The risk management plan for the camp includes identifying,
                  analyzing and developing control techniques related to financial
                  resources

               7. Policies are in place regarding participants bringing their personal
                  items to camp

               8. All firearms and ammunition must be stored under lock. When not in
                  use, all firearms must be stored in a locked cabinet or closet, within a
                  locked room or inaccessible area for redundant safety; and all
                  ammunition is stored in either a third location or container, requiring a
                  separate key or access system

 Human Resources
               1. A camp must have written evidence of a policy in practice that
                  requires screening for all camp staff with responsibility for or access to
                  campers that includes:
                      Annually for all camp staff—paid, volunteer and contracted:
                              o A voluntary disclosure statement, and
                              o A check of the National Sex Offender Public Registry,
                                 or for residents of states not participating in the
                                 National Sex Offender database, a check of the sexual
                                 offender registry of any state in which the applicant
                                 resided


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               2. The pre-camp training for camp program staff is of sufficient length to
                  adequately prepare staff for their roles in programming and
                  supervision. The following lengths of time should be expected to
                  address the required training content:
                             o For Resident Camps (sessions at least 5 days/4 nights
                                 in length) and trip/travel camp staff – 10 hours
                             o For day camp staff and short-term (three nights or less)
                                 program staff—8 hours

 Program Design & Activities
               1. The program is designed to provide balance in the campers’ activities

               2. Campers participate in program planning in a variety of in-camp and
                  off-season ways

               3. The camp provides deliberately planned program activities designed to
                  foster understanding of individual differences and group cooperation

               4. Campers are free to practice their religious customs and to discuss
                  spiritual matters in a manner that does not offend the rights and beliefs
                  of others

               5. Contracts have been signed with all providers of program services
                  such as aquatics, adventure/challenge, horseback riding, and tripping
                  that specify responsibility for meeting the intent of appropriate ACA
                  and WVU Extension standards

               6. A camp must provide training for campers and staff, based on written
                  procedures, for overnights, trips and excursions, involving:
                          Persons using camp stoves or flammable liquids must be
                            instructed in their proper use and care and supervised until
                            competency is demonstrated

               7. A camp must require that helmets be worn by all participants (staff and
                  campers) when engaged in all boarding, in-line skating and hockey
                  activities and activities involving bicycling

 Specialized Activities
       o Horseback Riding
            1. A camp must have policies that require the use of protective headgear
               specifically designed for horseback riding

               2. Camp has a policy limiting the maximum work day for a horse
                  (Recommended maximum hours for a work day are 6 hours for ring



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                   riding and 8 hours for trail riding. Camps should take into
                   consideration the type of work and stress that a horse endures.)

       o Adventure/Challenge
            1. A camp must implement a policy that requires the use of protective
               headgear by all participants when rock climbing, rappelling,
               spelunking, and when using high-ropes course elements or a vertical
               climbing wall/tower

       o Trip and Travel
             1. All campers and staff must be required to participate in a pre-trip
                orientation that includes at least specific information on how and
                where to obtain medical and emergency assistance on the trip

               2. A camp must have written evidence that all aquatic activities on trips
                  are guarded and supervised by a staff member who has documented
                  skills and training in water rescue and emergency procedures specific
                  to the location and the activity, and
                       For watercraft activities, has
                              o Instructor rating in the appropriate craft, or
                              o Certification as a lifeguard from a nationally recognized
                                  certifying body, or
                              o Other acceptable certification or license
                       For swimming activities, has
                              o Certification as a lifeguard from a nationally recognized
                                  certifying body, or
                              o Acceptable certification other than lifeguard, as in the
                                  section of watercraft activities, and the participants are
                                  wearing personal flotation devices

               3. A camp must implement a policy requiring personal flotation devices
                  that are safe for use be worn by all persons in watercraft activities

               4. Water bottles carried on trips are clearly distinguishable by shape,
                  color size, style or marking from bottles containing liquids not fit for
                  human consumption

               5. The camp pays appropriate fees and secures permits to access
                  wilderness areas and parks

      Aquatics
              1. To guard each on-site swimming activity, a camp must provide (or if
                 renting an owned facility to another group, must advise each user
                 group in writing to provide) a person who has current certification as a
                 lifeguard by a nationally recognized certifying body




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               2. A camp must have written documentation that every camp lifeguard
                  has demonstrated skill in rescue and emergency procedures specific to
                  the aquatic area and activities guarded

               3. A camp should require (or if renting an owned facility to another
                  group, should advise user groups in writing to provide) a staff member
                  to be on duty and accessible at each separate swimming location (e.g.,
                  lake, pool, river) who has certification from a nationally recognized
                  provider in age-appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that
                  includes the use of breathing devices (e.g., pocket masks)

               4. Whenever SCUBA Diving occurs, a camp must provide (or if renting
                  an owned facility to another group, must advise each user group in
                  writing to provide):
                       For any SCUBA activities involving noncertified divers, and
                         adult with a current SCUBA Instructor rating from a nationally
                         recognized certifying body
                       For SCUBA activities in which ALL participants are dive-
                         certified, an adult with at least a current Divemaster
                         certification from a nationally recognized certifying body

               5. To guard each watercraft activity for day and resident camp programs
                  and for youth groups, a camp must provide (or if renting an owned
                  facility to another group, must advise each user group in writing to
                  provide) a person who holds one of the following:
                       Current instructor rating in the appropriate craft from a
                           nationally recognized certifying body, or
                       Current lifeguard training from a nationally recognized
                           certifying body, or
                       Other acceptable certification or license

               6. A camp must have written documentation that every camp watercraft
                  guard has demonstrated skill in water rescue and emergency
                  procedures specific to the type of water and activities being conducted

               7. For staff, all-adult groups and families with parent(s) present and
                  supervising use of watercraft, a camp must have written evidence that
                  participants are:
                       Supervised by certified personnel, or
                       Instructed to implement written procedures that specify
                               o Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) be worn by all
                                   persons at all times,
                               o Safety regulations be followed, and
                               o A designated checkout system is utilized




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               8. A camp must provide (or if renting an owned facility to another group,
                  must advise each user group in writing to provide) a staff member to
                  be on duty at each separate boating location (e.g., lake, river) who has
                  certification from a nationally recognized provider in age-appropriate
                  cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that includes the use of breathing
                  devices (e.g., pocket masks)

               9. A camp must implement a policy requiring personal flotation devices
                  (PFDs) that are safe for use be worn by all persons involved in
                  watercraft activities on-site, off-site or at public aquatic facilities

               10. A camp must implement a written policy to use only staffed public
                   swimming facilities or providers who have persons on duty who have:
                       Lifeguarding certification, and
                       Certification in first aid and CPR

               11. A camp must implement a written policy to use only staffed public
                   facilities for watercraft activities that have persons on duty who hold:
                        Appropriate watercraft certification, and
                        Certification in first aid and CPR

 Facility & Food Service
               1. Administrators using a nonowned site have a written agreement with
                  the site owner specifying responsibility for the use of the site,
                  facilities, equipment and services

               2. Adequate shelter for all campers and staff is provided during inclement
                  weather


               3. Permanent, enclosed dining facilities provide protection from problem
                  insects

               4. All buildings in a camp used for sleeping must be constructed or
                  equipped with the following safety features:
                       At least one emergency exit in addition to the main door or
                          entrance
                       A direct means of emergency exit to the outside from each
                          sleeping floor not on ground level

               5. The site provides separate facilities to provide privacy and freedom
                  from campers for staff during their time off

               6. Menus have been planned and/or approved by a nutritionist, dietician,
                  or other person qualified to evaluate the nutrition and balance of the
                  meals served


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               7. Food service staff wear appropriate hair covers as required by
                  state/local regulations, and wear clean, neat and practical clothing

               8. Sleeping, dining, toilet, bathing and program facilities are available to
                  persons with disabilities

               9. The camp provides toilets that meet the standards of regulatory bodies,
                  applicable building codes and provide for comfortable use of the camp
                      For resident camps, one seat for every 10 females, and one
                         seat for every 10 males
                      For day programs, one seat for every 30 females, and one seat
                         for every 50 males

               10. Hand washing facilities are located adjacent to toilets and meet the
                   standards of regulatory bodies, applicable building codes and provide
                   for comfortable use of the camp
                        Minimum ratios of basins to toilets is-
                              o For resident programs, one basin per 10 persons with a
                                  minimum of two basins for each toilet facility for more
                                  than 5 persons;
                              o For day programs, one basin per 30 persons with a
                                  minimum of two basins for each toilet facility for more
                                  than 5 persons

               11. Toilet facilities in the main area and living areas provide privacy (a
                   door or curtain) for occupants

               12. Pit and chemical toilets are screened or vented and equipped with
                   toilet lids and self-closing door

               13. The camp provides a minimum of one showerhead or bathtub for each
                   8 persons on site for all resident camps and short term resident
                   programs

               14. For any playground area and apparatus, the camp has constructed the
                   activity area according to accepted guidelines for safety, including an
                   appropriate surface to cushion falls within the safety zone under and
                   around the playground equipment

               15. Laundry facilities are available on-site or nearby for campers and staff
                   in long-term camps and for campers with special needs

               16. The site is free from observable evidence of a sewage disposal
                   problem




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               17. Erosion control methods are in practice where applicable

               18. Appropriate insect/weed control methods are in effect, and only
                   approved pesticides or herbicides are utilized on the property as
                   identified by state/local codes

               19. A camp must require that gas and liquid flammables, explosives,
                   livestock medications and other hazardous materials be:
                        Handled only by persons trained or experienced in their safe
                           use and disposal, and stored appropriately:
                               o With access limited to trained persons,
                               o In closed, safe containers that are plainly labeled as to
                                  contents, and
                               o In locations separate from food
 Health, Wellness and Safety
               1. A camp must have a system in practice that assures emergency
                  transportation is available at all times by the camp, user groups, or
                  community emergency services with whom prior arrangements have
                  been made in writing

               2. When campers are present in camp or on camp trips, a camp must
                  require that trained adults with the following minimum qualifications
                  be on duty at all times:
                       When access to the emergency medical system (EMS)is 20
                          minutes or less, certification by a nationally recognized
                          provider of training in first aid and CPR
                       When access to EMS is 20-60 minutes, certification by a
                          nationally recognized provider of training in second-level first
                          aid and CPR
                       When access to EMS is more than one hour, certification from
                          a nationally recognized provider of training in wilderness first
                          aid and CPR

               3. A camp must receive from each camper and seasonal staff person a
                  current, signed health history, requesting all of the following
                  information in relation to the activities in which the camper/staff may
                  participate in camp:
                       Description of any camp activities from which the camper/staff
                          should be exempted for health reasons,
                       Record of past medical treatment, if any,
                       Record of allergies, dietary restriction,
                       Record of immunizations, including date of last tetanus shot,
                       Record of current medications, prescribed and over the counter,
                          and




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                          Description of any current physical, mental, or psychological
                           conditions requiring medication, treatment, or special
                           restrictions or considerations while at camp

               4. A camp must provide (or if renting an owned facility to another group,
                  should advise user groups in writing to provide) adults with the
                  following qualifications to be on duty for emergency care:
                       CPR certification from a nationally recognized provider, and
                       For youth groups, first aid certification from a nationally
                         recognized provider




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    Applicable WVU Extension Service
  Policies, Procedures & Statements of Best
        Practice for Health and Safety




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                                   Tobacco Policy
Tobacco product possession and/or use by 4-H youth participants is prohibited at all
4-H sponsored activities.
Tobacco use by adults during 4-H sponsored events is discouraged and should only
be done in designated areas and not in view of youth participants.

Those attending 4-H sponsored events and parents need to be made aware of the policy
through written event rules.

                                      Justification
               1. It is illegal to use tobacco products on West Virginia University
                  property
               2. It is illegal to sell tobacco products, including smokeless tobacco, to
                  minors
               3. Tobacco use has been linked to numerous health problems
               4. We have a responsibility to foster healthy lifestyles in 4-H youth

                                     Guidelines to follow

Violation by youth participants:
       1. Confiscate tobacco from those who violate the policy.
       2. In the presence of another 4-H representative (Extension Staff or 4-H
           volunteer) discard the tobacco by tearing it up and/or dumping it in the trash.
       3. Contact custodial parent(s) or legal guardian.
       4. Participation in current (if applicable) and/or future events may be limited for
           repeated violations of this policy.

Violation by adult:
       1. Ask the adult to cease using the tobacco product.




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                                   Alcohol Policy
Alcohol is prohibited at all 4-H sponsored activities.

Those attending 4-H sponsored events need to be made aware of this policy through
written event rules. Agents need to work with local law enforcement authorities to
develop a local plan of action for dealing with violations of this policy.

In most cases, a 4-H volunteer or agent is not qualified to determine whether or not an
individual is impaired as a matter of law. Accordingly, it is important that 4-H work with
the local law enforcement authorities to establish a procedure to handle these situations.
Local 4-H professionals should meet with their respective law enforcement authorities
prior to an event taking place or a 4-H programming year begins to develop a standard
plan of action.
                                 Guidelines to follow
If alcohol emerges as an issue at any 4-H event, use your local plans of action developed
with the law enforcement authorities. The following guidelines will assist you in your
discussions and handling local situations.

Minors (under the age of 18):
      1. If possible, in the presence of another adult 4-H representative (Extension staff
           or an adult 4-H volunteer), separate the minor from others.
      2. Confiscate alcohol from those who violate the policy. If they refuse, contact the
           local law enforcement agency (this should be a apart of your discussions with
           the agency when determining local plans of action).
      3. In the presence of another 4-H representative, discard the alcohol by pouring it
           on the ground or down a drain.
      4. Contact custodial parent(s) or legal guardian to pick up child. Do not leave
           minor unattended or send him or her home without some type of escort or
           supervision. If this is not possible, make arrangements for a designated driver
           to transport the individual or have the individual contact someone to pick him
           or her up—you must not release them to drive themselves home.
      5. Participation as a 4-H member in current (if applicable) and future programs
           and events can be limited for violations of this policy.

   Non-minors, but beneath the legal drinking age (18-20 years of age):
     1. If possible, in the presence of another adult 4-H representative, separate the
       individual from others.
     2. Confiscate alcohol from those who violate the policy. If they refuse, contact the
       local law enforcement agency (this should be a part of your discussions with the
       agency when determining local plans of action).
     3. In the presence of another 4-H representative, discard the alcohol by pouring it
       on the ground or down a drain.
     4. Contact custodial parent(s) or legal guardian to pick up individual. Since the
       potential offender is not a minor, it may be more difficult to obtain parental


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         intervention. If the individual has been drinking, arrangements must be made for
         a designated driver to transport the individual or the individual should contact
         someone to pick them up—you must not release them to drive themselves
         home.
       5. Participation as a 4-H member in current (if applicable) and future programs
         and events can be limited for violations of this policy.


   Adult, legal drinking age:
     1. Alcohol should be kept out of the view of 4-H participants. Adults should be
       asked to remove the alcohol from view.
     2. Confiscate alcohol from those who violate the policy. If they refuse, contact the
       local law enforcement agency (this should be a part of your discussions with the
       agency when determining local plans of action).
     3. In the presence of another 4-H representative, discard the alcohol by pouring it
       on the ground or down a drain.
     4. If the individual has been drinking, arrangements must be made for a
       designated driver to transport the individual or the individual should contact
       someone to pick him/her up—you must not release them to drive themselves
       home.

   Consideration should always be given to the safety and welfare of all other
   participants involved in the event or activity. For those instances when an
   intoxicated individual becomes belligerent and/or refuses to follow requests, 4-H
   should immediately contact the local law enforcement agency. Again, the situation
   should be discussed with the appropriate agency prior to an event taking place or a 4-
   H programming year begins.




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                                  Illegal Drug Policy
Possession or use of illegal drugs and controlled substances at 4-H sponsored
activities is prohibited.

Those attending 4-H sponsored events and parents need to be made aware of the policy
through written event rules. Agents need to work with local law enforcement authorities
to develop a local plan of action for dealing with violations of this policy.

It is important that 4-H work with the local law enforcement authorities to establish a
procedure to handle local situations that involve illegal drugs. Local 4-H professionals
should meet with their respective law enforcement authorities prior to an event taking
place or a 4-H programming year begins to develop a standard plan of action.

                                 Guidelines to follow
If illegal drugs emerge as an issue at any 4-H event, use your local plans of action
developed with the law enforcement authorities. The following guidelines will assist you
in your discussion and handling local situations.

Minors (under the age of 18 years) and 4-H participants up to age 21:
      1. If possible, in the presence of another adult 4-H representative (Extension staff
           or an adult 4-H volunteer), separate the minor from others. Two responsible
           adults should remain with the individual until law enforcement
           authorities arrive.
      2. Confiscate the suspected drug or drug paraphernalia from those who violate the
           policy. If they refuse, send a representative to call the local law enforcement
           agency immediately and wait for them to arrive (this should be a part of your
           discussions with the agency when determining local plans of action).
      3. Contact the local law enforcement agency.
      4. Contact custodial parent(s) or legal guardian to inform them their child is
           involved in a situation that may involve illegal drugs, and that you have called
           law enforcement to begin an investigation.
      5. Keep the suspected drug or drug paraphernalia in a secure location.
      6. Participation, as a 4-H member, in current (if applicable) and future events may
           be limited for violating this policy.

Adults:
       1. If possible, in the presence of another adult 4-H representative, separate the
            individual from others. Two responsible adults should remain with the
            individual until law enforcement authorities arrive.
       2. Confiscate the suspected drug or drug paraphernalia from those who violate the
            policy. If they refuse, send a representative to call the local law enforcement
            authorities and wait for them to arrive.
       3. Contact the local law enforcement agency.
       4. Keep the suspected drug or drug paraphernalia in a secure location.


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Consideration should always be given to the safety and welfare of all other participants
involved in the event or activity.
For those instances when an individual becomes belligerent and/or refuses to comply
with requests, 4-H should immediately contact the local law enforcement agency.
Again, the situation should be discussed with appropriate agency prior to an event taking
place or a 4-H programming year begins.




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West Virginia University Policy
Division of Administration and Finance




                       Deadly Weapons/Destructive Devices Policy

PURPOSE

The purpose of this policy is to impose the prohibition of and penalty for the possession
or storage of deadly weapons, destructive devices, or fireworks in any form on the West
Virginia University campus or any University-leased facilities.

SCOPE

This policy applies to all University faculty, staff, students, and visitors, including those
on the regional campuses. It shall also apply to private vehicles parked or operated on
University owned or leased property which openly displays firearms. West Virginia
University’s Director of Public Safety may grant exceptions to this policy in writing for
the convenience of the University in achieving its mission.

The provisions of this policy shall not apply to the following persons, while acting in
their official capacity:

       Law enforcement officers or law enforcement officials;
       West Virginia Department of Corrections employees;
       Members of the armed forces of the United States or the militia of West Virginia;
       Any circuit judge, prosecuting attorney, assistant prosecuting attorney, or
        investigator duly appointed by a prosecuting attorney; and
       Individuals required to possess the items prohibited by this policy in order to
        participate in undertakings sanctioned by West Virginia University which include
        academic/research programs, historical items, the farm management programs
        which are approved by the Department of Natural Resources.

POLICY

Possession or storage of a deadly weapon, destructive device, or fireworks in any
form (as defined by West Virginia State Code) is prohibited on the West Virginia
University campus, in University-leased facilities and in University vehicles.

Any University faculty member, staff member, or student who has been found in
violation of this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action for misconduct which may
include termination or expulsion as well as criminal prosecution. Individuals not
affiliated with the University shall be subject to criminal prosecution.



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WVU Extension Service
Statement of Best Practice—Transportation of clientele
West Virginia University Extension does not require its employees (―Extension
professionals‖) to coordinate transportation for non-employee third parties (―clientele‖)
or to transport clientele in personal vehicles. It is appropriate for Extension professionals
to inform clientele that they are responsible for making their own travel/transportation
arrangements.

From time to time, an Extension professional may determine that for legitimate
educational or business purposes it would be appropriate to transport clientele in a
personal vehicle or to coordinate transportation for clientele. When such situations arise,
the Extension professional must follow the procedures outlined below.


Transporting Clientele in Personal Vehicles

   Before transporting clientele in a personal vehicle, the Extension professional must do
   each of the following:

   •   Ensure that a current, valid copy of his/her driver’s license and proof of insurance
       are filed with the appropriate Extension office in a locked and secure location.

   •   Notify his/her personal insurance carrier that a personal vehicle will be used for
       business purposes to transport non-employee third parties. An Extension
       professional’s personal insurance may be the only source to cover expenses in the
       event of an accident or other mishap.

   •   Ensure that there is documentation of transporting clientele for legitimate
       educational/business purposes (i.e., note on personal work calendar). In the event
       of an emergency, it is recommended that employees note this on their calendar
       after the fact, as well as include in other documentation that may be required as
       part of the emergency situation.


Coordinating Transportation

   Before coordinating transportation for clientele (not including charter bus or public
   transportation), the Extension professional (or volunteer acting within the scope of
   their responsibilities on behalf of WVU Extension) must do each of the following:

   •   Ensure that a current, valid copy of each driver’s license and proof of insurance
       are filed with the appropriate Extension office in the volunteers’ personnel file
       that is locked and secure. When emergency conditions make it impossible to file
       these documents, the Extension professional should verify that each driver has a




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       valid driver’s license and proof of insurance, and document the emergency
       conditions as soon as possible after the fact.

   •   Encourage each driver to notify his/her personal insurance carrier of the intended
       use of their personal vehicle and inform each driver that their personal insurance
       may be the only source to cover expenses in the event of an accident or other
       mishap.

   Transporting Minors

   In addition, before transporting any minor, the Extension professional or volunteer
   must do each of the following:

       •   Obtain the signature of the minor’s parents/guardians on the attached form
           entitled ―Waiver and Permission to Transport Child/Charge.‖
   For the protection of all involved (adults and youth), it is strongly recommended that
   more than one adult be in a vehicle when transporting youth. Consistent with West
   Virginia University Extension policy, an adult shall never intentionally place
   themselves in a one-on-one situation with a minor.




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             Waiver and Permission to Transport Child/Charge
                    West Virginia University Extension

Child/Charge: ___________________________________________________________

Event: _____________________________________________ Date: _______________

Location: _______________________________________________________________

Driver: _________________________________________________________________

I give permission for my child/charge (―child‖) to be transported in a motor vehicle
driven by the individual identified to an event at the specified location on the date
indicated. I understand that my child is expected to follow all applicable laws regarding
riding in a motor vehicle and is expected to follow the directions provided by the driver
and/or other adult volunteers.

I have read, understand, and discussed with my child that:
            (1) They will be traveling in a motor vehicle driven by an adult and they are
            to wear their safety-belt while traveling;
            (2) They are expected to respect each other, the vehicles they ride in, and the
            people they travel with during the trip;
            (3) Riding in a motor vehicle may result in personal injuries or death from
            wrecks, collisions or acts by riders, other drivers, or objects; and
            (4) They are to remain in their seats and not be disruptive to the driver of the
            vehicle.

I understand that my child is not required to participate in this activity, but grant
permission for him/her to do so, despite the possible risks. I recognize that by
participating in this activity, as with any activity involving motor vehicle transportation,
my child may risk personal injury or permanent loss. I hereby attest and verify that I have
been advised of the potential risks, that I have full knowledge of the risks involved in this
activity, and that I assume any expenses that may be incurred in the event of an accident,
illness, or other incapacity, regardless of whether I have authorized such expenses.

Parent/Guardian Name (please print): _________________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature: ____________________________________ Date: ________

Child/Charge Signature:                                                 Date:




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WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE POLICY
Protective Headgear for 4-H Members/Youth Participating in Bicycle Activities
MARCH 1, 1994

POLICY
Effective immediately all participants* (who have not reached their 21st birthday as of January 1
or who are current 4-H members) in any 4-H bicycle activity in West Virginia must wear
approved ANSI or SNELL bicycle helmets. An ANSI or SNELL sticker inside the helmet
guarantees the helmet is the quality you need for protection. Participants must have the chin strap
fastened. Check with local authorities for policies which may supersede this policy.

POLICY APPLICATION
     1. The brand, selection, approval, use, fit, and standards of the bicycle helmet shall be
     determined for 4-H members/youths by the parent or guardian.
     2. All 4-H members/youths in any bicycle events at local, county, district, and/or state
     levels shall wear the protective headgear.
     3. Persons who are over 21 years of age taking part in 4-H sponsored bicycle events are
     strongly encouraged but not required to wear protective headgear.
     4. Failure to comply will result in being disqualified from further participation in the
     event.
     5. County Extension faculty are responsible for communicating the policy to the
     appropriate clientele, and enforcing the policy.

*All persons (youths) who have not reached their 21st birthday as of January 1, or who are current
4-H members.




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West Virginia University Extension Service
Equine Hard Hat Policy

On January 1, 1988, a hard hat policy was instituted. It requires that all youth participants in any
mounted 4-H horse activity or show in West Virginia must wear American Society of Testing
Materials (ASTM) and Safety engineering Institute (SEI) approved headgear, with harness
secured whenever mounted. This rule applies for all 4-H-youth-sponsored trail rides, gymkhana,
and organized shows. This policy applies to all 4-H youths and other youth participants in related
mounted horse events al local, county, area, district, and state levels. All youth participants must
wear and use safety headgear and other safety items in any 4-H event at any level without judge
discrimination. It is recognized that in some instances, availability or appropriate safety headgear
for saddle seat and other style riding may be a problem. Judges will be instructed that suitability
of safety headgear for a specific class is not to be a factor in placing that class. The show
manager, the show steward, and the county Extension agents, or their designated representative
are authorized to inspect each hard hat. If a member/youth turns up at the ring-gate without
protective headgear, he/she will be refused entry to the class. Anyone caught riding outside the
ring without a helmet may be disqualified from further participation in that particular show or
event. The show superintendent, steward, or county Extension agent or designee will rule on any
disputes regarding the use of hard hats.




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   Applicable WVU Extension Service
Policies, Procedures & Statements of Best
     Practice for Positive Camp Life




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Policy on Technology & Communication Devices at Camp

Wireless electronic devices for sending and/or receiving communication messages or
images (e.g., cellular telephones, pagers, handhelds, laptops, walkie-talkies, etc.) are
not permitted at 4-H camping programs or events, unless needed as part of the
planned educational program or otherwise authorized by the Extension Professional
or other adult in charge of the program or event.

Possession or unauthorized use of these items will result in confiscation by the event
director. Items will be returned to the participant (or their parents/guardians) at the end
of the program/event.

Possession or use of electronic devices for playing music, radio, television or other
forms of entertainment (e.g., radios, televisions, digital devices, CD players, etc.) is
discouraged at 4-H camping programs or events. WVU Extension cannot be held
responsible for personal items which are lost, stolen or damaged. Their use can be
distracting to other participants, and detracts from the natural esthetic of the camp
environment.

If event directors choose to allow campers to possess or use these devices, they need to
develop and communicate clear parameters and limitations on their use.

Those attending 4-H sponsored events and parents need to be made aware of the policy
through written event rules.




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                           Search and Seizure Policy
West Virginia University Extension Faculty and Staff responsible for camping
programs and events have the right to conduct a search of participants’ outer
clothing, luggage, personal belongings, lodging rooms, and furniture being used by a
participant if there is ―reasonable suspicion‖ that the participant has something in
his/her possession that is not allowed on site. Any contraband that is found will be
handled according to state and local laws, or in compliance with WVU Extension
Service or West Virginia University policy.

                                         Guidelines
A 4-H employee or representative may conduct a search and/or seizure of illegal items or
those in violation of 4-H policy.
Should a situation arise where search and/or seizure are necessary, an assessment should be
made to ascertain the seriousness of the problem. If imminent danger exists to the parties
involved, then local law enforcement authorities should be present to conduct the search.
However, if the situation does not pose an immediate danger to the parties involved, then a
search and/or seizure is permissible if the following procedures are followed.
Any search conducted upon a participant must be based upon ―reasonable cause.‖ The
reasonableness of a search is determined through a two part test.
    1. The search must be justified at its inception. That is, a search may be conducted by a 4-
    H employee if there is a ―reasonable suspicion‖ that a search will turn up evidence that
    the 4-H participant has violated, or is violating, the law or event rules. Accordingly, it is
    critical that 4-H include in its rules the specific types of conduct which are prohibited at
    4-H activities.
    2. Any search must be reasonably related in scope to the circumstances at hand. This
    means that search measures adopted must be reasonably related to the objectives of the
    search, and that the search itself cannot be excessively intrusive in light of the age and
    sex of the 4-H participant and the nature of the infraction.

                                    Procedure to follow:
   1. All searches and/or seizures must be conducted by a minimum of two 4-H employees
   or 4-H representatives (4-H volunteers acting in the presence of, and at the direction of a
   4-H employee.) The 4-H participant should be present at the time of the search and/or
   seizure.
   2. 4-H employees or 4-H representatives must follow relevant procedures requiring 4-H
   employees or representatives who are the same gender as the 4-H participant.
   3. All searches must be documented. Extension personnel should make notes describing
   the situation, action taken and record names of those involved including witnesses.
   4. Depending upon the circumstances, participants may be required to empty pockets,
   wallets, purses, duffel bags, suitcases, sleeping bags, remove shoes and loosen clothing.
   However, participants should never be strip searched, nor should they be physically
   touched or handled during the search.




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   5. 4-H employees or representatives should not search automobiles unless the evidence or
   item, violating either the law or 4-H policy, is in plain view.
   6. If the participant refuses to cooperate, the parents may be called to assist, the
   participant may be asked to leave the premises, or law enforcement officials may be
   called (depending upon the seriousness of the situation).
   7. If during a search an item is found which is illegal or violates 4-H policy then the item
   should be confiscated.
   8. In general, if the confiscated materials are illegal per se, (e.g. controlled substances –
   drugs, or illegal weapons/guns) the material should be turned over to the local law
   enforcement authorities.
   9. If the confiscated material is not illegal per se. But nonetheless violates 4-H policy
   (e.g. alcohol), those substances may be destroyed by the 4-H employees or 4-H
   representatives.
   10. If the confiscated item is something like a knife which is not per se illegal, but could
   be in violating of 4-H policies and quite dangerous, the employee may hold the item in a
   secure location until the end of the 4-H activity and then return it to the participant.
   11. If the authorities are contacted pre-search, 4-H employees then become agents of the
   police, and the standard for searches changes from reasonable cause to the higher
   standard of probable cause. Seek assistance from law enforcement authorities if they are
   contacted prior to a search.




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                  WVU Social Justice Nondiscrimination Statement

West Virginia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution. The
University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, age, disability, veteran status,
religion, sexual orientation, color, or national origin in the administration of any of its
educational programs, activities, or with respect to admission or employment. Faculty,
staff, students, and applicants are protected from retaliation for filing complaints or
assisting in an investigation under the University's Equal Opportunity Policy/Affirmative
Action Plan. Inquiries regarding the University's non-discrimination policy may be
directed to the Director, Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity, at West
Virginia University.




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 (Note: The following University policy applies to WVU Extension volunteers and
  program participants in addition to faculty and staff. Adult volunteers in WVU
  Extension programs who work with youth participants should be considered as
      serving in a ―supervisory‖ or ―teaching‖ role with youth participants. )

                          West Virginia University
             Policy and Procedure Regarding Sexual Harassment
                                 July - 1998
I. POLICY STATEMENT
West Virginia University is committed to providing faculty, staff, and students with a work and
educational environment free from all forms of sexual harassment. Therefore, sexual harassment,
in any manner or form, toward West Virginia University students, faculty and staff is a violation
of University policy and expressly prohibited.
All University faculty, students, and staff are expected to:

        • engage in conduct that meets professional standards,

        • remain sensitive to the effect of their actions and words on others,

        • take appropriate action to prevent sexual harassment,

        • avoid behavior that might be construed as sexual harassment, and

        • acquaint themselves with this policy.

Those in supervisory positions have a special responsibility to discourage sexual harassment as
well as to implement and to enforce this policy. Violators of this policy are subject to disciplinary
action that may include sanctions as severe as discharge of an employee or expulsion of a student.
In addition, sexual harassment that constitutes sexual assault or other criminal law violations will
be referred to the appropriate authorities for prosecution.

II. LEGAL BASIS
Sexual harassment is prohibited by:

        • 1980 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission interpretive guideline of Title VII of
            the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
        • The Office of Civil Rights policy statement interpreting Title IX of the Educational
        Amendments of 1972.
        • The West Virginia Human Rights Act, and
        • The Board of Trustees' Policy Bulletin No. 9: Policy Regarding Sexual Harassment.

III. ACCOUNTABILITY
Under the President, the Director of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (AA/EO)
Programs, through the Executive Officer for Social Justice, shall ensure compliance with this
policy. The Director of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity, in conjunction with the Deans
and Vice Presidents, shall implement this policy.

IV. DEFINITIONS
A. Sexual Harassment:



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Consistent with Policy Bulletin No. 9 and guidelines promulgated by the United States
Department of Education, West Virginia University uses the EEOC definition of sexual
harassment:
Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a
sexual nature when:
        1. submission to such conduct is an explicit or implicit condition of employment;
        2. submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment
        decisions; or
        3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of:
                        a. unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or educational
                             performance; or
                        b. creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational
                             environment.

B. Consensual Relationships:
These may include amorous or romantic relationships and conduct that is beyond a platonic
relationship.

V. POLICY

        A. Requirements:

1. WVU prohibits sexual harassment by any faculty, staff, or student.
    For all University personnel and students the University is committed to creating and
    maintaining a work environment free of inappropriate, disrespectful conduct and
    communication of a sexual nature. The University will not tolerate sexual behavior that
    interferes with an individual's work performance or that creates an intimidating, hostile or
    offensive work or learning environment.
2. In determining whether alleged conduct constitutes sexual harassment, consideration shall be
given to the record as a whole and to the totality of the circumstances, including the nature of
sexual advances and the context in which the alleged incident(s) occurred.
3. Listed below are examples of verbal and physical conduct that may constitute sexual
harassment. Such conduct may occur not only between faculty/students and supervisor/employee
of a different sex, but also between student/students, faculty/faculty, staff/staff and people of the
same sex. Examples of conduct that may be considered sexual harassment include the following:
         • subtle or overt pressure for sexual favors, accompanied by implied or overt threats
         concerning one's job, grades, letters of recommendation, or physical well-being;
         • insults, humor, jokes and/or anecdotes that belittle or demean an individual's or a
         group's sexuality or sex;
         • unwelcome sexual comments or inquiries about an individual's or a group's sexuality or
         sex;
         • inappropriate displays of sexually suggestive objects or pictures, which may include but
         not be limited to posters, pin-ups, and calendars, computer screen savers;
         • unauthorized entering of restrooms and other locations reserved for the exclusive use of
         the opposite sex;
         • unnecessary and unwelcome touching, such as patting, pinching, hugging, or repeated
         brushing against an individual's body; and
         • sexual assault.
B. Consensual Relationships



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1. Although the University acknowledges that consensual relationships are within the realm of
individual privacy, it is necessary to advise that these relationships, particularly those occurring
between supervisors and staff members or between faculty and students, can lead to
circumstances that can be interpreted as sexual harassment.

2. Consensual relationships can also be interpreted as causing a hostile or offensive work
       environment when other staff members or students believe that the person(s) is/are
       receiving favorable treatment in employment/educational decisions and actions.

C. Student-Teacher Relationships

It is a violation of University policy for a faculty member to engage in an amorous, dating, or
sexual relationship with a student whom the faculty member instructs, evaluates, supervises, or
advises.
          Where there is a pre-existing amorous, dating, or sexual relationship, the individual with
          the power of status advantage shall notify his or her immediate supervisor. The
          supervisor shall have the responsibility for making arrangements to eliminate or to
          mitigate a conflict whose consequences might prove detrimental to the University or to
          either party in the relationship.
D. Supervisor-Employee Relationships
The University views as inappropriate any amorous relationship involving an executive, manager,
or supervisor and a staff employee. Typically, the superior has authority, influence, or
responsibility with regard to that employee. Persons engaging in such conduct may be subject to
disciplinary action.
E. Confidentiality
The confidentiality of all parties involved in a sexual harassment charge shall be strictly respected
insofar as it does not interfere with the University's obligation to investigate misconduct
allegations and to take corrective action.
F. Dishonest or Frivolous Complaints
If sexual harassment allegations of are not substantiated, all reasonable steps shall be taken to
protect the reputation of the accused. Moreover, if the complainant is found to have intentionally
or maliciously been dishonest or frivolous in making the allegations, the complainant shall be
subject to appropriate disciplinary action.

VI. COMPLAINT PROCEDURES

A. Requirement for Filing Complaints
       1. Any applicant for employment or to be a student, current or former employee, or
       student, (herein referred to as complainant) at WVU may file a discrimination complaint
       with the AA/EO Office.
       2. A complaint may be filed with the AA/EO office without first discussing the issues
       with any other University official. However, it is encouraged that individuals first attempt
       to resolve the complaint by bringing the issue to their supervisor or next level supervisor.
       3. A complaint should be filed within 30 days following the alleged discriminatory act, or
       the date on which the complainant knew or reasonably should have known of said act.
       4. The complaint must be filed with the AA/EO - Social Justice Office.

B. Further Provisions on Time Limits
All of the time limits contained within this complaint procedure may be extended with the
approval of the Affirmative Action Officer, or his/her designee.
C. Discrimination Complaints Filed with Other WVU departments or units


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Any complaint relating to discrimination on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin,
race, religion, sex (including sexual harassment), sexual orientation, or veteran status that is filed
with another WVU department or unit shall be referred to the AA/EO Office within twenty-four
hours, or the next working day.
D. Responsibilities:
         1. The employee, job applicant or student is responsible for:
                  a. Whenever possible, attempting to resolve complaints through an immediate
                  supervisor or next level supervisor. If such discussions fail to resolve the
                  complaint, the complainant may seek a review of his/her complaint in accordance
                  with the steps outlined below.
                  b. Contacting the AA/EO Office for advice and/or counseling if there is a
                  concern about being discriminated against or harassed, and
                  c. Filing a discrimination complaint with the AA/EO Office if the situation
                  remains unresolved.
         2. The AA/EO Office is responsible for:
                  a. Receiving a complaint and assisting the complainant in defining the charge and
                  completing the complaint form.
                  b. Apprising the person(s) named in the complaint (herein referred to as the
                  respondent) and his/her administrative office of the allegation and notifying them
                  that no retaliation may occur.
                  c. Assisting the individuals named in the complaint in interpreting the charge.
                  d. Obtaining a response to the complaint within ten (10) working days after
                  receipt of the allegations.
                  e. Upon receipt of the response from the respondent named in the complaint,
                  investigating the complaint further if necessary and appropriate. The AA/EO
                  Office shall have access to all necessary documents, the right to interview
                  witnesses, and the ability to bring together the complainant and respondent, if
                  desirable.
                  f. Upon completion of the investigation, issuing a finding on the case to all
                  individuals named in the complaint within twenty (20) working days. If the
                  evidence supports a finding that there is no basis for a charge of illegal
                  discrimination, the AA/EO Office shall indicate this conclusion to the
                  complainant and advise him/her that the case is closed.
                  g. Making recommendations for the resolution of the complaint if unlawful
                  discrimination is found, and
                  h. Monitoring the recommendations for implementation, and that appropriate
                  action is taken without retaliation against the complainant or respondent.
         3. The respondent is responsible for:
                  a. Providing a response to the charge within ten (10) working days after receipt
                  of the charge.
                  b. Taking no retaliation or reprisal against the complainant, others related to the
                  complainant, or persons involved in the complaint investigation.
         4. The respondent's supervisor is responsible for:
                  a. Providing a response to the AA/EO Office within seven (7) business days of
                  the action taken with reference to the AA/EO recommendations.
                  b. Taking no retaliation or reprisal against the complainant, others related to the
                  complainant, or persons involved in the complaint investigation.
This policy does not prohibit the employer from taking disciplinary action in appropriate
circumstances.




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VII. RESPONSIBILITIES
A. The director, manager or supervisor is responsible for:
        1. Consulting with the AA/EO staff as quickly as possible and before taking any action,
        but preferably within five (5) working days after knowledge of the situation when he/she
        is aware of a problem where sexual harassment is suspected or alleged.
        Even if the nature or gravity of the alleged sexual harassment is not entirely clear to the
        supervising authority, it nevertheless must be reported. The report may be verbal but
        must include:
                 - the names of the complainant and alleged harasser,
                 - date of incident(s)
                 - the nature of harassing actions and,
                 - the department(s) in which the parties are located.
        2. taking no action on an alleged sexual harassment problem without prior consultation
        with the AA/EO Office except in situation which may require immediate actions.
        3. reporting a sexual harassment problem requiring immediate intervention by the
        University to the AA/EO Office that same day. In the case of evenings, holidays or
        weekends, the AA/EO Office is to be advised on the next working day.
B. The employee, job applicant, or student is responsible for:
        1. bringing questions about procedures, seeking informal advice, or presenting a
        complaint if alleged sexual harassment has occurred or is suspected to his/her immediate
        supervisor and/or the AA/EO Office.
C. The AA/EO Office is responsible for:
        1. acting as a sounding board for the supervisor's plan of action or advising the supervisor
        on appropriate resolutions within the reporting department or unit.
        2. providing advice and guidance in response to oral inquiries regarding possible sexual
        harassment.
        3. investigating formal complaints involving sexual harassment and reporting findings
        and recommending solutions and/or disciplinary action to the person responsible for the
        department in which the harassment occurred.




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Performed by                                  Action Taken

Employee, Student or Job Applicant            1. Seeks information or advice or presents
                                              complaint to supervisor or his/her superior
                                              and/or AA/EO Office

Supervisor, Dean, Vice President or           2. Consults with the AA/EO Office before
Designee                                      taking any action, but within five (5)
                                              working days after knowledge of the
                                              situation

                                              3. Discusses situation with the alleged
                                              harasser and takes appropriate action.


AA/EO Office                                  4. Provides advice and/or guidance and/or
                                              discusses situation with alleged harasser
                                              and/or Dean, Vice President or Designee.
Employee, Student or Job Applicant            5. Files a formal complaint with the
                                              AA/EO Office within thirty (30) days of
                                              the objectionable behavior if informal
                                              procedures were not utilized or the
                                              situation remains unresolved.


AA/EO Office                                  6. Informs alleged harasser of the
                                              allegations and investigates complaint.

Alleged harasser                              7. Responds to sexual harassment
                                              allegations
AA/EO Office                                  8. Identifies appropriate solutions and/or
                                              disciplinary action and reports
                                              recommendations to person responsible for
                                              department in which harassment occurred,
                                              should cause to support the complaint be
                                              found.
                                              9. Notifies the complainant of findings and
                                              of action taken to remedy the situation.

                                              10. If the complaint cannot be sustained,
                                                   informs all parties in writing and
                                                   closes the case.




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         WVU Extension Service, 4-H Youth Development
                Policy Statement on Bullying

Educational programs and activities conducted by WVU Extension Service, 4-H
Youth Development are characterized by an environment of physical and emotional
safety. Bullying and similar harassing behaviors do not contribute to a positive
environment for learning, and will not be tolerated.

Bullying happens when a person or a group of people want to have power over another,
and use their power to get their way, at the expense of someone else. Bullying includes
such behaviors as exclusion, teasing, taunting, gossiping, hitting, kicking, pranking, or
―putting down‖ with the intent of hurting, embarrassing or making fun of another.
Bullying can also happen through cyberspace; use of e-mails, text messaging, instant
messaging, web sites, and other less direct methods.

Individuals in charge of 4-H programs and activities will address all incidents of bullying
seriously, and will educate staff, volunteers and program participants on the importance
of communication (i.e., tell someone in charge) when bullying occurs or is observed, and
in dealing with specific bullying incidents. Serious or recurring problems or incidents can
result in individuals being dismissed from activities and/or barred from future
participation.




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Applicable WVU Extension Service
Policies, Procedures & Statements of Best
Practice for Camp Volunteers/Staff




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WVU Extension Service Volunteer Selection and Screening Procedure
Overview
The purposes of the WVU Extension Service 4-H Youth Development Program’s
volunteer selection process are:
     to provide a safe atmosphere for youths involved in Extension activities, and
     to select and place qualified volunteers for 4-H youth activities.

This volunteer selection process was developed and implemented for the following
reasons:
       1. The WVU Extension Service should provide a safe environment for 4-H youths
       participating in its programs.
       2. Recruitment, retention, and motivation of skilled volunteers often depend on
       the careful match of a volunteer to an appropriate educational role.
       3. Adults who are building resumes for work or recognition need evidence that
       they were selected as a person appropriate to work directly with youths.
       4. Courts are finding employers liable for negligent hiring of employees and
       volunteers.
       5. Extensive media coverage has enhanced society’s awareness of child abuse.
       Because of the concerns surrounding this issue, most major youth-serving
       agencies have instituted selection processes.

The WVU Extension Service 4-H Youth Development Program’s process for selecting
adult volunteers consists of the following:
    an application form for 4-H youth development program volunteers
    reference forms (sent by mail or used during phone or face-to-face interviews)
    interview questions and report for agent or volunteer recruiter to use with
        volunteer applicant

Information gathered during the process will be kept on file in the WVU Extension
county office and used to:
     establish a system of recruitment and selection of qualified volunteers for 4-H
       youth development programs
     match volunteers to jobs needed
     provide basic accurate information, including correct name and address, for each
       volunteer
     identify areas for volunteer orientation and training
     provide information that might be used to assist the volunteer; e.g., letters of
       reference, recommendations for awards, and recognition

Who should be screened?
Effective October 1, 1993, any new adult volunteer, 18 years or older*, who will work
directly with youths will be screened before being officially appointed to assist with any
4-H youth development program. Extension staff works with cooperating agencies,
organizations, and schools to ensure that volunteers are appropriately screened.


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*Please note: In West Virginia, currently enrolled 4-H youth members in good standing
who are 18 years of age or over do not need to complete the application process in order
to volunteer in the program. If WVU Extension collaborates with another group(s) or
organization(s) to recruit volunteers, then WVU-ES representatives must discuss and
document selection procedures with the cooperators. If WVU-ES is the leader of record
for a program, then this selection process shall be used.

If a volunteer drops out of the 4-H youth development program for one year or more and
then wishes to reenter as a volunteer, he or she must complete the application process.
Exempted from this policy are volunteers who work under the direct supervision of or in
the presence of a screened volunteer or Extension employee for a brief period. Examples
might include judges, workshop presenters, guest speakers, and members of such service
groups as Rotary and Kiwanis.

Who should do the screening?
In each county, one person shall handle the screening of all 4-H youth development
volunteers. In counties, this will be the Extension agent who has youth development
responsibilities. In some counties, a key leader may be selected to be the volunteer
recruitment coordinator. The volunteer recruitment coordinator and Extension agent will
receive training in the following areas:
     selection process
     orientation
     purpose of volunteer selection
     rationale for volunteer selection
     confidentiality procedures
     official record-keeping
     procedures for volunteer screening
     applicant interviewing procedures
     training documentation methods
     special-needs youths
     other areas deemed appropriate

Official records
Completed records will be maintained in a secured, individual, confidential file in the
county Extension office. For each volunteer who works directly with 4-H youth
development programs, the following will be on file:
       1. Application form;
       2. Reference forms completed by mail and/or written responses to questions asked
       in a telephone interview; dated and signed by the agent or key leader;
       3. Notes from the personal interview, if held; dated and signed by the agent or key
       leader; and
       4. Letter of appointment.

For applicants not selected, items 1 through 3 will be on file with the letter of rejection.
    Access to the files should be limited to trained Extension staff.



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      The Freedom of Information Act allows the individual to see his or her file within
       24 hours, after you receive a written request. Please note, however, that by
       signing the application form, the applicant waives any right to review reference
       materials. Therefore, you may wish to keep reference letters and comments in a
       separate envelope marked ―For agent’s eyes only.‖
      Files on active volunteers will be kept indefinitely.
      For inactive volunteers—with less than three years of service—files will be kept
       for three years.
      For inactive volunteers—with more than three years of service—files will be kept
       for five years.
      For volunteer applicants not selected for service—files will be kept for five years.

Volunteer service descriptions will assist WVU-ES staff in matching the volunteers to
particular jobs. The descriptions will also be a useful addition to the volunteer’s file.

Volunteer service descriptions: Volunteers require a clear and current description of the
duties and responsibilities that they are expected to perform for the WVU Extension
Service. Volunteer descriptions are used as a guide in determining whether a position is
needed and whether the volunteer requires additional screening and training. The
volunteer duties are representative of typical roles and jobs done in similar capacities
across the state.

Volunteer Screening Procedures
The selection process includes using the volunteer application form, receiving two
personal references, and conducting a personal interview. A completed application and
the two reference checks regarding ability and suitability to work with youths are
mandatory. An interview will be held at the discretion of the Extension agent or volunteer
recruitment coordinator.
        1. Prospective volunteers will be given an application to complete and return to
        the WVU Extension office. Applications are available on the Web
        (www.wvu.edu/~exten/infores/pubs/fyres/volunteer_application.pdf), at the
        Extension office, or from the volunteer recruitment coordinator in each county.
        2. No one will be excluded from applying for volunteer positions. The screening
        process will help match volunteers to particular jobs. Some people might not be
        selected.
        3. The volunteer recruiter needs to be sensitive to all types of people who may
        have skills the WVU Extension Service can use. The recruiter may need to
        establish different ways of gaining the needed information.
        Example: If a prospective volunteer has low literacy skills, the volunteer recruiter
        may need to become familiar with the application questions so that during an
        interview with the potential volunteer, the recruiter can complete the application
        form on his or her behalf.
        4. Applications are returned to the Extension office.
        5. The 4-H youth development volunteer recruiter will contact—by mail or
        phone—the people named as references. (See reference section for copies of
        forms.)


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       6. The 4-H youth development volunteer recruiter may conduct an interview with
       the applicant. (See section for copy of form.)
       7. If the application information, reference checks, and interview are all
       acceptable, the youth development agent sends a letter of appointment to the
       applicant.
       8. If any part of the screening procedure produces something that may be
       questionable or unacceptable, additional information will need to be solicited.
       a. In some cases, the agent may wish to check with the local sheriff or prosecuting
       attorney regarding a potential volunteer.
       b. The agent may discuss a questionable volunteer with the WVU-ES 4-H youth
       development director or the volunteer leadership specialist.
       c. If an agent chooses to accept a volunteer for whom there is a negative reference
       or other questionable matter, note will be put in the volunteer’s file outlining why
       the decision was made.
       9. If an applicant is not to be appointed, a concise (not detailed) explanation must
       be on file. A letter must be sent to the individual explaining why he or she was not
       selected to be a 4-H youth development program volunteer. The letter must
       contain a concise explanation why the individual was not selected.
       10. Keep the volunteer’s file up-to-date with the application form, reference
       letters, interview schedule (if one), and copies of letters and notes. Place job
       descriptions and other information in the file, as applicable.
       11. Guidelines for determining whether to interview applicants:
                a. The volunteer will serve or work with vulnerable clientele without
                direct supervision (youths under 18), frail older persons, or persons with
                mental or physical disability.
                b. The volunteer will have access to confidential materials.
                c. The volunteer will handle funds.
                d. The volunteer is completely unknown to faculty.
                e. The volunteer is completely unknown to other volunteers.

Due Process: It is the right of participants to know in advance any rules, expectations,
and standards to be followed in 4-H programs, events, and camps. They will be informed
in advance of possible consequences if they fail to follow such rules, expectations, and
standards. A plan or outline must be made before each event and communicated in
writing.
A volunteer may be relieved of specific duties by the WVU-ES volunteer leadership
specialist or 4-H youth development director working with that volunteer when it is
shown that the volunteer:
1. Does not follow WVU Extension Service program policies, guiding principles, and/or
code of conduct;
2. Emotionally or physically harms a young person or adult;
3. Fails to meet the volunteer service description; or
4. Is convicted of a crime.




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Camper Supervision Ratios
Use camper to counselor ratios in cottages overnight to determine compliance with this
standard for residential camping. Adult counselors must be at least 23 years of age for all-
age or older camp; adult counselors must be at least 18 years of age for younger camp.
These guidelines are established as a minimum. Counties are encouraged to establish
their own guidelines, taking their camp community into consideration.
                                             Minimum                      Minimum
            Camper Age                  Adult:Camper Ratio         Adult:Camper Ratio
                                       for Overnight Camps             for Day Camps

               4-5 years                           1:5                       1:6
               6-8 years                           1: 6                      1: 8
              9-14 years                           1: 8                     1: 10
             15-18 years                          1: 10                     1: 12

 For campers with special physical, medical, or behavioral
                             needs:
  Needing constant and individual
                                              1:1                            1:1
      assistance or supervision
  Needing close, but not constant,
                                              1:2                            1:2
      assistance or supervision
   Needing occasional assistance              1:4                            1:4
    Needing minimal assistance




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West Virginia 4-H ―Above Suspicion‖ Procedures

It’s important for WVU Extension Service employees and volunteers to not intentionally or purposefully
place themselves in a position alone with a child in a one-on-one situation. This is often difficult to achieve
in camping situations where adults fill roles supervising youth and sharing sleeping quarters with campers
not related to them.

To help protect West Virginia Cooperative Extension employees, as well as 4-H Teen Leaders and Adult
Volunteers, those involved in camping and programs all reasonable effort to adhere to the guidelines suggested
in these procedures. (Recognize that occasional temporary deviation from these procedures may be needed,
especially in times of threats to camper safety or health.)

One-on-One Situations: Teens, Summer Staff, Volunteers, and Agents are to be trained and instructed to
travel and address situations (discipline, injuries) in groups of three when tending to the needs of a camper or
Teen Leader.
 If an Adult is present or required, a second Adult is called-in to be present, regardless of the presence of a
Teen Leader, with one of the Adults being the same sex as the camper or Teen Leader.
 If a Teen Leader is addressing the situation, a second Teen Leader or camper is called-in to be present with
that second person being the same sex as the person requiring attention.

Room Checks: Lodging and sleeping arrangements are unique to each camping location. Each Extension
camp director needs to develop an effective plan for camper accountability and management based on their
unique local situations. The following are suggested practices which may be applied or adapted for county and
state camping and overnight programs:

 At least two adults will be housed in each cabin and will check each sleeping area at night to ensure all and
only those children assigned to the cabin are present. Discrepancies between the list of assigned campers
and those actually present must be communicated to the camp director immediately.
 Only males will be stationed in male housing, females in female housing.
 For routine night-time visits to the infirmary (med-checks, stomach ache), 1 teen and 1 adult Volunteer,
two Teen Leaders or one Teen Leader and one camper may escort the individual requiring attention. At least
one of the escorts will be the same sex as that individual. It is suggested each cluster of cabins select an adult
volunteer or Teen Leader to serve as in this role.
 If an Adult must take a camper to the hospital during the night, the Camp Director may assign one trained
4-H Teen Leader to replace that Adult in the cabin or lodge until he or she returns, and one Teen Leader to
accompany the Adult and camper to the hospital.
 If an Adult must take a camper to the hospital during the day, a second Adult will accompany them.
 If an ambulance is used for transporting a camper to the hospital, one Adult, the same sex as the camper,
will accompany in the ambulance. One Adult will pick both up at the hospital if the camper may return to
camp.




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WVU Extension Service
Statement of Best Practice—Overnight supervision of 4-H members and
other minors participating in WVU Extension Service programs
Many 4-H trips and activities require adult chaperones. The duties of adult chaperones
are often minimal, yet important. Some examples of these duties include:
        Transportation of youth involved with events and activities
        Supervision and Guidance of 4-H members while on trips away from home
        Overnight supervision of youth

It is important to note the difference between a 4-H Chaperone and a 4-H Camp Staff
member. In general, a chaperone has duties limited to those listed above, operates under
the supervision of a more-extensively trained volunteer or Extension staff member, and is
assigned to a shorter-duration role (although this alone is not the determining factor). In
contrast, a 4-H Camp Staff member has a broader range of duties (often involving
program teaching), has greater independence of action, and is ―on-duty‖ for a complete
week-long residential camp activity.

Any chaperone (of any age) should be selected carefully according to the particular
requirements of the event or activity. Not all adults will be suitable for all chaperone
positions. Chaperones should be selected according to how well they fit the position
description for the event/activity.

To help ensure the safety of the young people participating in programs and activities
sponsored by WVU Extension Service, the following guidelines should be followed when
planning activities and programs which require the use of volunteer chaperones:
MCHAPERONE GUIDELINES
4-H Youth Development Program Chaperones are expected to abide by these guidelines
while serving as a 4-H Chaperone. 4-H Chaperones act on behalf of West Virginia
University and must abide by all WVU policies and 4-H Youth Development core values.

           1. Chaperones supervising ―all age‖ (ages 8 to 21) or ―age of majority‖ (age
              18 and older) groups of 4-H participants must be at least 23 years of age.
              Chaperones age 18 or older may be used if they are supervising 4-H
              participants no less than 4 years younger than themselves. In any case,
              chaperones must be accepted though the West Virginia 4-H volunteer
              selection and screening procedure.
           2. Chaperones shall respect the individual rights, safety, and property of
              others.
           3. Chaperones shall not act in any way detrimental to the 4-H Youth
              Development Program, or in conflict with its policies or procedures and
              core values.
           4. Chaperones shall not possess or use alcohol and/or illegal drugs (or be
              under the influence thereof) while serving as a 4-H chaperone.
           5. Fraternization and/or relationships with individual 4-H members, event
              staff, or other volunteers which are inappropriate or reduce the


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               effectiveness of the staff, or behavior which discriminates against and/or
               offends others is grounds for dismissal. Individuals may not serve as a
               chaperone for an event if they have a pre-existing amorous or romantic
               relationship with any 4-H member in their delegation or under their
               charge.
           6. When chaperoning 4-H members, chaperones shall not leave the youths
               under their supervision or the grounds of the 4-H event unless they have
               received approval of the adult in charge of the event or delegation.
           7. Chaperones are responsible for ensuring that all members of their
               delegation attend scheduled sessions and events.
           8. Chaperones shall not use obscene and discriminatory language at the 4-H
               event.
           9. At overnight events, participants will not be allowed in the sleeping areas
               of participants of the opposite gender. All participants (except those with
               special planning or program responsibilities) must be in their assigned area
               at curfew and shall comply with quiet hour and lights-out regulations.
           10. Chaperones shall not participate in gambling or other games where money
               is used to wager.
           11. Chaperones must have the correct number of seat belts for number of 4-H
               members in their vehicle.
           12. Chaperones must have medical treatment forms for each 4-H member in
               their vehicle, including one for the driver.
           13. Drivers must have automobile liability insurance and a valid driver’s
               license.
           14. Chaperones shall recognize and support the responsibilities of WVU
               Faculty and staff in setting program standards, priorities, and direction.
           15. Chaperones shall show a ―positive image‖ to the 4-H members while on
               duty.
           16. Chaperones are considered ―on duty‖ from the time they begin their trip
               until they return their charges to their parents/guardians.


Penalties for Infractions:
Infractions of these 4-H Chaperone Guidelines may result in one or more of the following
penalties:
• Possible disciplinary action by the WVU Faculty member supervising their service,
State 4-H Program Leader, or Director of the WVU Extension Service.
• Released of chaperone duties immediately.
• Prohibited from being a chaperone for future 4-H events/activities.
• Released to the nearest law enforcement agency and/or the proper authorities.




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