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Radford University Graduate Catalog_ 2008-2009

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Radford University Graduate Catalog_ 2008-2009 Powered By Docstoc
					   The College of Graduate and Professional Studies is located in Lucas Hall.



Radford University Graduate Catalog 2008-2009, Volume 95, Fall 2008. Published by
the Office of University Relations, Radford University, 6266 University Park Drive,
Radford, Virginia, 24142, once a year. Students who matriculate at Radford University at
the beginning of the 2008-2009 academic year will use the 2008-2009 Radford University
Graduate Catalog for the official description of policies they must follow and requirements
they must satisfy in order to graduate. Students may, however, elect to meet all the degree
requirements of a Radford University Graduate Catalog published subsequent to the year
of their matriculation subject to the limitations detailed in “Graduation Policy” on p. 58.
Radford University reserves for itself and its departments the right to withdraw or change
the announcements made in this catalog.


                                   Visit us on the


                                   RU
                                  World Wide Web
                                          at:
                                  www.radford.edu
Contents
Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Degrees Offered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Graduate Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Application Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . 21
Fees and Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Campus Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Academic Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Academic Colleges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Courses of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Communication Sciences and
      Disorders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Corporate and Professional
      Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Counseling and Human
   Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Counseling Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Criminal Justice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Educational Leadership. . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Occupational Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Physical Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
School Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Special Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Board and Administration . . . . . . . . . . 193
Graduate Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207




                                                                   2
                                                                                    CALENDAR
Calendar
Fall Semester               2008         2009         2010         2011
Classes begin (8 a.m.)      Sept. 1      Aug. 31      Aug. 30      Aug. 29
Thanksgiving break          Nov. 22-30   Nov. 21-29   Nov. 20-28   Nov. 19-27
  (no classes)*
Last day of classes         Dec. 12      Dec. 11      Dec. 10      Dec. 9
Final Exams                 Dec. 15-18   Dec. 14-17   Dec. 13-16   Dec. 12-15

Spring Semester             2009         2010         2011         2012
Classes begin (8 a.m.)      Jan. 20      Jan. 19      Jan. 18      Jan. 17
Spring break (no classes)   Mar. 7-15    Mar. 6-14    Mar. 5-13    Mar. 3-11
Last day of classes         May 1        April 30     April 29     April 27
Final Exams                 May 4-7      May 3-6      May 2-5      April 30-May 3
Commencement                May 9        May 8        May 7        May 5

Maymester                 2009           2010         2011         2012
Classes Begin             May 18         May 17       May 16       May 14
Memorial Day (No Classes) May 25         May 31       May 30       May 28
Last day of classes       June 5         June 4       June 3       June 1
Final Exams               June 6         June 5       June 4       June 2

Summer Session I            2009         2010         2011         2012
Classes begin               May 18       May 17       May 16       May 14
Memorial Day (No Classes)   May 25       May 31       May 30       May 28
Last day of classes         June 18      June 17      June 16      June 14
Exams                       June 19-20   June 18-19   June 17-18   June 15-16

Summer Session II           2009         2010         2011         2012
Classes begin               June 29      June 28      June 27      June 25
Independence Day            July 3       July 5       July 4       July 4
  Observed (no classes)
Last day of classes         July 29      July 29      July 28      July 26
Exams                       July 30-31   July 30-31   July 29-30   July 27-28

Summer Session may include both a Maymester and Summer Session III term.
Maymester is a three-week term beginning on the same day as Summer Ses-
sion I. Summer Session III is an 11-week long term spanning both Summer Ses-
sion I and Summer Session II. The dates are tentative and subject to change.

*Thanksgiving Break begins after classes end on the Saturday before Thanks-
giving and includes the Sunday after Thanksgiving Day. Residence halls will
close at noon on the Saturday before Thanksgiving Day. However, those stu-
dents who have Saturday classes have until 5 p.m. to vacate the residence halls.
For a more detailed version of the Academic Calendar, visit:
http://www.radford.edu/~registra/calendar.html




                                         3
Graduate Degrees
Art (M.F.A.)                                English (M.A., M.S.)

Business Administration (M.B.A.)            Music (M.A., M.S.)
                                            Music
Communication Sciences and Disorders        Music Therapy
(M.A., M.S.)
Speech and Language Pathology               Nursing (M.S.N.)
                                            Family Nurse Practitioner
Corporate and Professional                  Adult Clinical Nurse Specialist
Communication (M.S.)                        Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist
                                            Nurse Midwifery (with Shenandoah
Counseling Psychology (Psy.D.)               University)

Counseling and Human Development            Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.)
(M.S.)                                      (classes start Summer 2009)
School Counseling
Student Affairs                             Physical Therapy (D.P.T.)
    Administration                          (classes start Summer 2009)
    Counseling
Community Counseling                        Psychology (M.A., M.S.)
                                            Clinical
Criminal Justice (M.A., M.S.)               Experimental (M.A.)
                                            Industrial/Organizational
Education (M.S.)
Content Area Studies                        Reading (M.S.)
    Information Technology
    Music Education                         School Psychology (Ed.S.)
    Others
Curriculum and Instruction                  Social Work (M.S.W.)
Early Childhood Education
Educational Technology                      Special Education (M.S.)
Library Media                               Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Teaching English as a Second Language       High Incidence Disabilities
                                            Severe Disabilities
Educational Leadership (M.S.)               Early Childhood Special Education




                                        4
Graduate Study
Dr. Dennis Grady, Dean                                  Radford tries to meet the needs of all of
College of Graduate and                              these various groups.
Professional Studies                                    Radford is small enough to allow each
Lucas Hall                                           graduate student opportunities for interac-
(540) 831-7163                                       tion with fellow students and faculty mem-
e-mail: gradcollege@radford.edu                      bers, yet large enough to provide challenging
                                                     and diverse areas of study. To better serve
    As the world moves into the 21st century
                                                     graduate students, the university schedules
and the demand for highly trained profession-
                                                     classes at times designed to meet the sched-
als in every field increases, more and more
                                                     uling needs of part-time as well as full-time
students are choosing to pursue a master’s




                                                                                                     DEGREES, GRADUATE STUDY
                                                     students.
level degree. This degree, once considered
                                                        Many fields which once employed
primarily a stepping stone toward a doctorate,
                                                     graduates with bachelor’s degrees now
is becoming, for many, a terminal degree.
                                                     prefer to hire those with master’s degrees.
    From 2001 to 2003, there was a 26
                                                     Radford University is meeting the chal-
percent increase in the number of mas-
                                                     lenge of educating men and women in
ter’s degrees awarded annually at Radford
                                                     a wide variety of fields including busi-
University. In recent years, more than 72
                                                     ness administration, nursing, music, art,
percent of the master’s degree students have
                                                     English, criminal justice, communication,
been women; more than nine percent have
                                                     social work, psychology, communication
been members of ethnic minority groups;
                                                     disorders and a variety of areas within the
51 percent have been 30 years of age or
                                                     field of professional education.
older and over half of the graduate students
have been enrolled part-time.




   263 Graduate students
   were awarded degrees
   at the 2008 Spring
   Commencement. Shown
   here, a graduate of the
   College of Business and
   Economics.




                                                 5
    The College of Graduate and Professional          the dean on the administration of graduate
Studies is responsible for administer-                studies and makes recommendations to the
ing all post-baccalaureate programs at                Provost concerning graduate courses, cur-
Radford University leading to Educational             ricula, academic standards and policies.
Specialist, Master of Fine Arts, Master of
Business Administration, Master of Arts,
Master of Science in Nursing, Master of               GRADUATE COLLEGE MISSION
Social Work, Master of Science and Doctor
                                                         Within the mission of the university, the
of Psychology degrees. The College also
                                                      Graduate College mission is to provide high
offers graduate-level courses and post-bac-
                                                      quality graduate programs in selected areas
calaureate certificates for teachers seeking
                                                      of study in order to meet the needs of the
recertification and for students who have
                                                      Commonwealth and the nation for citi-
already earned a bachelor’s degree but who
                                                      zens with education beyond the level of the
are not seeking a further degree.
                                                      baccalaureate.
    Graduate studies at Radford University are
designed to give the student advanced knowl-
edge in a special field of study, higher levels        GRADUATE COLLEGE GOALS
of professional competence, an understand-
ing of and respect for scholarly research and         1. To provide high quality graduate degree
a sophisticated knowledge of the techniques              programs in fields in which there are
of continued, lifelong intellectual growth.              needs for people with such qualifications,
These goals are achieved through coherent                for which there are prospective students
orderly programs of study, investigation and             seeking such advanced qualifications and
                                                         to which the university can devote the
supervised practical experiences that are care-
                                                         requisite human and material resources;
fully planned by each individual student in           2. To provide advanced educational oppor-
consultation with a graduate faculty adviser             tunities, beyond the baccalaureate, for
and a graduate advisory committee. Each                  professionals and others who are not
student’s progress through the program is                seeking a graduate degree or who already
monitored by the graduate faculty adviser and            have a graduate degree, but who need to
by the Graduate College office through the                develop new knowledge and skills to meet
various stages of admission to the Graduate              changing conditions or to continue to keep
College, progression through a program of                current with advancing knowledge in their
study, formulation and completion of a the-              specialties;
sis, if one is to be written, administration of       3. To enhance the academic environment of
the comprehensive examination and, finally,               the university by attracting qualified stu-
application for graduation.                              dents to the campus, by giving faculty the
    The Graduate College functions as the                opportunity to teach their specialties at an
admissions office for graduate students,                  advanced level and by fostering research
consulting with each department or pro-                  and creative activity among graduate stu-
                                                         dents and faculty;
gram office on each application for admis-
                                                      4. To assure that the graduate student’s expe-
sion before making final decisions.                       rience in Radford’s programs is a coherent
    The Graduate College consists of                     experience of intellectual growth, enabling
the Dean of the College, the staff of the                each student to meet reasonable academic,
Graduate College and the graduate faculty                intellectual and professional goals.
in various departments of the university.
A Graduate Affairs Council, made up of
representatives from the graduate depart-
ments and student representatives chosen
by the Graduate Student Council, advises


                                                  6
GRADUATE COLLEGE                                       8. To work closely with the Graduate Affairs
OBJECTIVES                                                 Council, to assure that the Council is well
                                                           informed of opportunities and problems at
1. To serve as the admissions office for                    the graduate level as it establishes academic
   all graduate programs, maintain-                        policies and procedures and approves cur-
   ing admission standards and pro-                        ricular changes;
   cedures designed to admit appli-                    9. To work with the staff in the Office of
   cants who have a high likelihood of                     Academic Outreach at the Roanoke Higher
   a) profiting from the experience of gradu-               Education Center, the Southwestern Virginia
   ate study at Radford University and b)                  Higher Education Center, and other entities
   successfully completing their programs                  to make high quality graduate education
   of study and achieving their graduate                   available, particularly in western Virginia,
   educational goals;                                      for students who cannot readily study on
2. To recruit qualified graduate students to                campus;
   all graduate programs, with particular              10. To work with the Graduate Student Council,
   attention to under-represented groups;                  Student Affairs and other offices and groups
3. To seek, generate and, when appropri-                   to be aware of and, whenever possible,
   ate, administer programs of financial and                responsive to graduate students’ needs and
   other types of assistance for graduate                  concerns; and
   students;                                           11. To work with the Office of Academic
4. To provide effective advising systems both              Assessment and individual departments
   through individual faculty advisers assigned            to evaluate how graduate programs uti-
   by the departments and through a series of              lize information related to student out-
   Graduate College checkpoints: admission,                comes and student/alumni satisfaction
   establishment of regular admission status,              in order to improve graduate curricula,
   approval of program requirements, approval              facilities and services.
   of written proposals for directed studies and
   theses;
5. To maintain established standards of qual-          CHECKLIST FOR GRADUATE
   ity by the checkpoints listed above, as             STUDENT ADMISSION
   well as by monitoring of academic status,           1. Complete the online application form or
   enforcement of probation and suspension                obtain a printable version at www.rad-
   rules, final approval of theses, eligibility            ford.edu/gradcollege. You may also request
   to take comprehensive examinations and                 application materials from the Graduate
   final degree checkouts (in collaboration                Admissions Office at P.O. Box 6928,
   with the Registrar’s Office);                           Radford, VA 24142.
6. To maintain established standards through           2. Have one official transcript sent from
   monitoring membership of the Graduate                  each of the undergraduate and/or gradu-
   Faculty in order to assure that faculty                ate institutions previously attended or
   involved in graduate activities have the               currently attending. For applicants who
   appropriate qualifications, achievements                are graduates of Radford University, only
   and experience required for each level of              transcripts for course work taken at other
   membership;                                            institutions after graduation need to be
7. To work closely with the individual                    sent. Transcripts must be signed and
   departments and the other colleges to see              mailed by the institution in a sealed
   that graduate programs continue to meet                envelope directly to the Graduate
   current needs, to cancel or revise those               Admissions Office.
   that do not and to develop new programs
   as the need is perceived and the resources
   are available;

                                                   7
3. Have two or more letters of recommen-          5. Have official scores for required tests
   dation sent to the Graduate Admissions             (GRE, TOEFL, MAT, GMAT, etc.) sent
   Office.                                             directly to Graduate Admissions.
4. Submit completed application form,             6. Check for individual department require-
   $40 application fee, letters of recom-             ments beginning on p. 21.
   mendation and any other materials              7. Applications and all other supporting
   required by the program to Graduate                materials should arrive no later than pro-
   Admissions, P.O. Box 6928, Radford                 gram deadlines. Refer to pages 21 - 23.
   University, Radford, VA 24142. The             8. Apply for financial aid if needed (see p.
   applicant is responsible for making                28).
   sure that all application materials are        9. Contact the adviser to discuss under-
   submitted by the deadline. Non-degree              graduate deficiencies and/or courses to
   and transient applications may be sub-             be taken during the first semester.
   mitted at any time during the year along       10. Become familiar with all academic policies
   with an application fee of $40.                    and pertinent degree requirements presented
                                                      in the catalog.




                                              8
General Information
   Radford University offers a diverse cur-            MISSION
riculum of more than 140 undergraduate
and graduate degree programs or areas of                  Radford       University      serves      the
                                                       Commonwealth and the nation through a
concentration focused on student achieve-
                                                       wide range of academic, cultural, human
ment and career preparation. A student
                                                       service and research programs. First and
body of 9,122 studies in seven colleg-                 foremost, the university emphasizes teach-
es: Business and Economics, Education                  ing and learning and the process of learning
and Human Development, Humanities                      in its commitment to the development of
and Behavioral Sciences, Science and                   mature, responsible, well-educated citizens.
Technology, Visual and Performing Arts,                Radford University develops students’ cre-
Waldron College of Health and Human                    ative and critical thinking skills, teaches
Services, and the College of Graduate and              students to analyze problems and imple-
Professional Studies.                                  ment solutions, helps students discover their
   The Graduate College offers programs                leadership styles and fosters their growth
of study which lead to master’s educa-                 as leaders. Toward this end, the university
tional specialist and doctoral degrees. The            is student-focused and promotes a sense of
General Assembly authorized the university             caring and of meaningful interaction among
to grant the Doctor of Psychology degree in            all members of the university community.
2007. These programs provide advanced                  Research is viewed as a vital corollary to
and specialized courses of study, supervised           the teaching and learning transaction as it
practicum experiences and opportunities for            sustains and enhances the ability to teach
research. The university has an outstanding,           effectively. Radford University believes in
                                                       the dynamics of change and has a strong
nationally recruited faculty, 83 percent of
                                                       commitment to continuous review, evalua-
whom hold doctorates or other terminal
                                                       tion and improvement in the curriculum and
degrees in their teaching fields. While their           all aspects of the university, so as to meet the
primary focus is on the teaching and learn-            changing needs of society.
ing process, the faculty also are engaged
in significant scholarly, creative and public
service activities.                                    HISTORY
   Radford University is located in a small city

                                                                                                          GENERAL INFORMATION
                                                          Radford University was established by
(population 15,859) in the New River Valley,           the General Assembly as the State Normal
36 miles southwest of Roanoke, Virginia, on            and Industrial School for Women in 1910
Route 11 and I-81, close to the beautiful Blue         and has been in continuous session since
Ridge Mountains of Virginia. The university            its 1913 opening. The university became
atmosphere is residential. Most graduate stu-          Radford State Teachers College in 1924
dents live in private accommodations within            and was authorized to award the Bachelor
walking distance of the campus. The univer-            of Arts degree in 1935. In 1944, the uni-
sity grounds and facilities are conveniently           versity was consolidated with the Virginia
arranged, beautifully maintained and effec-            Polytechnic Institute as its Women’s
tively designed to meet the academic, personal         Division and renamed Radford College. The
and extracurricular needs and interests of the         General Assembly severed the formal affili-
students.                                              ation of Radford College with Virginia Tech
                                                       in 1964 and an autonomous administration
                                                       was established for Radford College. The
                                                       college also was authorized to grant the

                                                   9
Master of Science degree. In 1972, after             CAMPUS
almost 60 years as an all-women’s college,
Radford became coeducational and in 1979               Radford University’s main campus is
was granted university status by the General         located on 177-acres. Most of the uni-
Assembly.                                            versity’s 26 administrative and academic
   Today, Radford University is a coeduca-           buildings, 15 student service buildings and
tional, comprehensive institution with under-        20 residence halls are located on two large
graduate and graduate programs. In the last          quadrangles in a 76-acre area.
20 years, the enrollment has increased dra-            A new student services and activities
matically and the number of graduate degrees         building, Hurlburt Hall opened in 2006
awarded since 1996 has increased by 32               and is named in honor of former Dean of
percent. During fall 2007, student enrollment        Students Bonnie Hurlburt.
in on- and off-campus programs was 9,122, of           RU Foundation, Inc. owns Selu
whom 1,065 were graduate students.                   Conservancy, a 376-acre tract of land
                                                     bordering Little River in Montgomery
                                                     County. The conservancy, located approxi-
University Presidents                                mately five miles southeast of the campus,
John Preston McConnell        1911-1937              was received in two separate donations.
David Wilbur Peters           1938-1951              John H. Bowles donated the original 185
Charles Knox Martin, Jr.      1952-1972              acres in the fall of 1989; four additional
   Chancellor                 1972-1973              members of the Bowles family donated 191
   President Emeritus         1973-1987              acres of adjacent land in the spring of 1991.
Donald Newton Dedmon          1972-1994              Through various campus departments, stu-
Douglas Covington             1995-2005              dents are able to use this continuous tract
   President Emeritus         2005-                  in studies of ecology and botany, mapping
  Penelope Ward Kyle          2005-                  geological features, as a model in resource
                                                     management and maintenance formation
                                                     on actual building techniques as well as
                                                     cultural and oral histories. In addition to its
                                                     educational opportunities, the conservancy
                                                     offers a glimpse of Southwest Virginia’s
                                                     distinctive landscape and resources. The
                                                     Selu Conservancy Retreat Center opened
                                                     in the fall of 1997. The Farmhouse at Selu
                                                     depicts daily life on a 1930’s farm.
                                                       Natural forest growth, unusual rock for-
                                                     mations, the surrounding hills and the
                                                     New River provide a scenic setting for
                                                     the university. Radford is not completely
                                                     immune to the extremes of summer and
                                                     winter weather, but the climate is basically
                                                     temperate, with hot days and cool nights
                                                     in the summer and cool to cold weather in
                                                     the winter. Fall and spring months in the
                                                     Appalachian Highlands bring some of the
                                                     most enjoyable weather to be found any-
                                                     where on the East Coast. Points of interest
RU President Penelope Ward Kyle


                                                10
to the visitor of Radford and the surround-                   student affairs practice (counseling
ing areas include Claytor Lake and the                        emphasis)
scenic Blue Ridge Parkway, which is 45                   •	   Teacher	 and	 other	 Professional	 Edu-
minutes from the campus. Claytor Lake,                        cation	(all	programs)	–	by	the	National	
located off Interstate 81 in Pulaski County,                  Council for Accreditation of Teacher
offers picnicking, camping, boating, swim-                    Education
ming, hiking and horseback riding areas.                 •	   Nursing	–	by	the	Collegiate	Commission	
                                                              on	Nursing	Education
                                                         •	   Social	Work	–	by	the	Council	of	Social	
HigHlander THeme
                                                              Work	 Education	 at	 the	 graduate	 and	
	 The	influence	of	the	Scottish	immigrants	                   undergraduate level
who	 settled	 Southwestern	 Virginia	 more	              •	   Music	–	by	the	National	Association	of	
than 300 years ago is visible today in many                   Schools	of	Music
areas of the university. These people were               •	   School	 Psychology	 –	 by	 the	 National	
characterized	 by	 “firmness	 of	 decision,	                  Association	of	School	Psychologists
resourcefulness, ardor in friendship, love               •	   Speech-Language	 Pathology	 –	 by	 the	
of country and a generous enthusiasm.”                        Council on Academic Accreditation
Radford’s athletic teams celebrate that heri-                 of	 the	 American	 Speech-Language-
tage by proudly carrying the Highlander                       Hearing Association.
name into competition.                               Radford University holds membership in
   The Radford Highlanders Festival, held every   the	 American	 Association	 of	 State	 Colleges	
second	 Saturday	 of	 October,	 is	 a	 day-long	 cel-
                                                  and	 Universities,	 the	 Virginia	 Association	
ebration	of	the	region’s	Scots-Irish	history.	    of Colleges, the American Association of
   In the spring of 1978, the university          Colleges for Teacher Education, the American
adopted as its school colors the red, navy        Association	 of	 Colleges	 of	 Nursing,	 the	
and forest green woven into tartan plaid.         National	 Commission	 on	 Accrediting,	 Inc.,	
From the plaid comes the name of the stu-         the	 Southern	 Regional	 Education	 Board	
dent newspaper, The Tartan.                       Council	of	Collegiate	Education	for	Nursing,	
                                                  the	 National	 League	 for	 Nursing	 Council	 of	
                                                  Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs,
accrediTaTion and                                 the	Conference	of	Southern	Graduate	Schools,	
membersHips                                       the	Council	of	Graduate	Schools,	the	Council	
                                                  of Graduate Programs in Communication
  Radford University is accredited by the Sciences	 and	 Disorders,	 the	 Association	
Commission	 on	 Colleges	 of	 the	 Southern	 for Continuing Higher Education, and the
Association	 of	 Colleges	 and	 Schools	 to	
                                                  American Association of Collegiate Registrars
                                                  and	Admissions	Officers.
award baccalaureate, masters, educational
specialist and doctorate degrees. Contact the
Commission	on	Colleges	at	1866	Southern	
Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or academic ouTreacH
call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the
accreditation of Radford University.                 Based on the belief that learning is a life-
•	 Business	 Administration	 –	 by	 the	          long process, Radford University’s College
    AACSB	 (the	 Association	 to	 Advance	 of	 Graduate	 and	 Professional	 Studies
    Collegiate	Schools	of	Business)               actively promotes and enhances the uni-
•	 Counseling	 and	 Human	 Development	 versity’s mission of teaching and learning,
    –	 	 by	 the	 Council	 for	Accreditation	 of	 research	 and	 community	 service.	The	 office	
    Counseling and Related Educational staff responds to constituency needs by devel-
    Programs (CACREP) for community oping, managing and assisting with a diverse
    counseling, school counseling and array of academic programs and services.

                                                    11
   The college supports off-campus degree                 For more information about current pro-
programs, credit courses and noncredit pro-            grams and activities sponsored by Radford
fessional development programs and the                 University at the Abingdon center, contact
partnership projects with Virginia Western             the university office at (276) 469-4014. To
Community College and the Southwest                    learn more about the Southwest Virginia
Virginia Higher Education Center. Additional           Higher Education Center, refer to the web-
information may be obtained by contacting              site at www.swcenter.edu.
the Office of Academic Outreach at (540)
831-5845.
                                                       ACADEMIC YEAR
Roanoke Higher Education Center                           The university year is divided into two
   The Roanoke region has developed an                 semesters, August to December (fall semes-
imaginative and collaborative project to               ter) and January to May (spring semes-
meet present and future needs for degree               ter); and four summer sessions. Students
programs, workforce training and lifelong              may enter the university at the opening of
learning opportunities. The center, located            either semester or summer session, pending
in downtown Roanoke, is designed to be a
                                                       approval of the department to which the
unique facility to offer a continuum of train-
                                                       student is applying.
ing and education for all citizens who desire
to achieve their potential and enhance their
contribution to society.                               ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION
   The center hosts multiple member insti-
tutions and agencies, all of which excel                  The university is composed of seven col-
in their teaching and training methods.                leges: College of Graduate and Professional
Radford University currently offers several            Studies, College of Humanities and
degree programs, certificates and profes-               Behavioral Sciences, College of Business
sional development at this location.                   and Economics, College of Education and
   For more information about current pro-             Human Development, Waldron College of
grams and activities sponsored by Radford              Health and Human Services, College of
University at the Roanoke center, contact the          Visual and Performing Arts and College of
university office at (540) 767-6190. To learn           Science and Technology. The chief admin-
more about the Roanoke Higher Education                istrative officer of each college is its dean,
Center, refer to the website at: www.educa-            who reports to the Provost.
tion.edu.                                                 Each academic department within a
                                                       given college is responsible for the content
The Southwest Virginia Higher                          and prerequisites of courses offered by the
Education Center                                       department and specifies the requirements
                                                       for the department’s degree and certifica-
   Located in Abingdon, the Southwest
                                                       tion programs. The chairperson is the chief
Virginia Higher Education Center was estab-
                                                       administrative officer at the department level.
lished by the General Assembly in 1991 to
strengthen the economy of the region through
education and training of the future workforce.        UNIVERSITY
Six institutions of higher education provide           NON-DISCRIMINATION
undergraduate and graduate courses and pro-            POLICIES
grams and are recognized as partners in the
center. Currently, Radford University offers              Radford University does not discrimi-
several degree programs, certificates and               nate with regard to race, color, sex, sexual
professional development at this location.             orientation, disability, age, veteran status,
                                                       national origin, religion or political affilia-
                                                       tion in the administration of its educational

                                                  12
programs, activities, admission or employ-           may also consult a staff member at the
ment practices.                                      Center for Experiential Learning and Career
   The university has adopted policies to            Development or the Office of the Dean of
provide for prompt and equitable reso-               Students.
lution of discrimination complaints. The                Only acts of discrimination commit-
Discrimination Complaint Procedures                  ted by university employees in connection
describe the grievance procedure for stu-            with their university employment may be
dents who have experienced discrimina-               reviewed through these policies and pro-
tion. The Sexual Harassment Policy further           cedures. The term “employee” refers to
defines sex discrimination by including               any faculty, staff or student with a contrac-
examples of sexual harassment and a state-           tual employment agreement. In all cases of
ment concerning consensual relationships             alleged discrimination in which the viola-
between university employees and students.           tion is committed by a student, status as a
The Accommodation Grievance Procedure                student is adjudicated by the university’s
for Students with Disabilities confirms               student judicial system.
the university’s commitment to providing                Copies of the complete policy state-
accessibility to its programs, services and          ments, including procedures for resolving
activities for individuals with disabilities         complaints are available in the Office of the
who are otherwise qualified and entitled to a         Dean of Students, Center for Experiential
reasonable accommodation.                            Learning and Career Development and the
   Individuals who believe they may have             Department of Human Resources.
experienced discrimination, but are uncer-              Inquiries may be directed to the
tain as to whether a complaint is justified or        Executive Director of Human Resources
whether they wish to initiate a formal com-          at 704 Clement Street. Telephone: (voice)
plaint, may discuss their concerns confi-             (540) 831-5421; (hearing impaired) (540)
dentially and informally with the Executive          831-5128.
Director of Human Resources. Students




                                                13
Admission
   It is the policy of Radford University to          action taken on their application after it is
admit students whose ability, preparation             complete. A complete application includes:
and character indicate potential for success          • An official application completed and
in the programs of study offered. Radford                 returned with a non-refundable applica-
University does not discriminate with regard              tion fee.
to race, color, sex, sexual orientation, dis-         • Official transcripts from all undergradu-
ability, age, veteran status, national origin,            ate and graduate institutions. If the
religion or political affiliation in the admin-            degree has not been conferred at the
istration of its educational programs, activi-            time of application, a final transcript
ties, admission or employment practices.                  must be sent within 30 days of the first
Inquiries may be directed to the Director of              semester of enrollment. If the degree
Human Resources at 704 Clement Street.                    has not been conferred prior to the
Telephone: voice, (540) 831-5421; hear-                   beginning of the term of admission
ing impaired, (540) 831-5128.                             to graduate school, admission will be
   Admission to Radford is selective and                  rescinded.
based on a review of each applicant’s aca-            • Official test scores (GRE, MAT, GMAT,
demic qualifications. Spaces are limited and               TOEFL, etc.) if required.
applicants are encouraged to apply well in            • At least two letters of recommendation.
advance of the term in which they wish to                Students should check departmental
attend.                                               information for additional requirements.
    For full-time students and/or students               Admission to a graduate program is
seeking graduate assistantships or other              granted by the Dean of the Graduate College
forms of financial aid, the priority deadline          on recommendation from the faculty of the
is March 1 (for fall admission) or October            specific program. The decision is made, in
1 (for spring admission). All other applica-          the best professional judgment of the edu-
tions are accepted throughout the year.               cators involved, on the basis of evidence
    As the number of applicants who meet              that the applicant can benefit from graduate
the essential requirements for admission              study at Radford University and is likely
exceeds the number that can be admitted,              to complete the proposed program suc-
the university selects those students who             cessfully. As noted below, specific grade
present the strongest qualifications in scho-          point averages have been established for
lastic achievement, character, personality            admission. For those programs requiring
and performance in extracurricular activities         standardized test scores, the score will be
and evidence of aptitude for achievement in           considered in conjunction with other indi-
the professional or specific field of study for         cators of academic aptitude (grades, experi-
which the applicant seeks training.                   ence, recommendations). A high test score,
                                                      for example, may offset weaker grades and
                                                      vice versa.
ADMISSION PROCEDURES                                     Students may be enrolled in only one pro-
   A student desiring to enter Radford                gram. However, if a student wishes to apply
University should apply online at www.rad-            for admission to more than one program, a
ford.edu/gradcollege or request an applica-           complete separate application must be sub-
tion from the Graduate Admissions Office,              mitted for each program. If recommended
Box 6928, Radford University, Radford,                for admission to more than one program,
VA 24142. Students will be notified of                 students must decide which program to enter.



                                                 14
Applicants should arrange to have sent to the         be sent to the Graduate Admissions Office.




                                                                                                       ADMISSION
Graduate Admissions Office a score report              Students, excluding Radford University
for an admission test if the department of            graduates, must have official final tran-
the student’s major requires test scores as           scripts, including the award of the bachelor’s
part of its admission evaluation. Consult             degree, sent to the Graduate Admissions
the department admission policy beginning             Office.
on p. 14 to determine which of the follow-               The Graduate College must receive the
ing test scores to submit: GRE - Graduate             application, transcripts and letters of recom-
Record Examination, GMAT - Graduate                   mendation or forms supplied with the appli-
Management Admissions Test and MAT –                  cation and the $40 application fee, no later
Miller Analogies Test. English language               than the date specified on pages 21-23.
proficiency is demonstrated by (1) TOEFL of               Non-degree applications may be submit-
550 or higher on the written test, 213 on the         ted at any time during the year along with an
computer-based test, 79-80 on the internet-           application fee of $40.
based test or (2) possession of a degree from            At least two letters of recommendation
an accredited institution where English is the        are required in support of each application
language of instruction.                              except in the case of applicants seeking
   For applicants who are graduates of                admission for Initial Teaching Licensure,
Radford University, only transcripts                  for which three letters are required. Non-
for course work taken at other institu-               degree seeking and post-baccalaureate cer-
tions after graduation need to be sent.               tificate student applicants are not required
If the Radford transcripts do not include             to submit recommendations, test scores and
the student’s entire undergraduate                    post-baccalaureate certificate.
program, copies of all transcripts also must




                                                 15
   Recommendation letters should be writ-                of the student’s adviser. It also will indicate any
ten by persons familiar with the applicant’s             special conditions to be met.
academic background and/or work experi-                      For further information, contact:
ence. An applicant who has had experience                    Graduate Office Admissions
in the public schools and who plans to                       P.O. Box 6928
continue working in the area of professional                 Radford University
education is encouraged to have one of the                   Radford, VA 24142
recommendations submitted by the imme-                       e-mail: gradcollege@radford.edu
diate supervisor in the school system or, if
not currently employed by a school system,
by a supervisor in the last school system in             GRADUATE INFORMATION
which the applicant worked.                              CHECKLIST
   In some graduate programs, the number
of applicants who meet minimum admis-                    First Semester of Enrollment
sion requirements may exceed the number                  1. Meet with your adviser to finalize program
of new students who can be accommodated                     requirements. Ensure that the Graduate
in the programs. In these instances, depart-                College has an official copy of those
mental admission committees will have to                    requirements.
select the strongest applicants and, regret-             2. If you applied to the Graduate College
                                                            before your undergraduate degree was con-
tably, deny admission to others who meet
                                                            ferred, it is your responsibility to ask your
requirements.
                                                            undergraduate institution to send a final
   Acceptance into the Graduate College is                  transcript verifying degree conferred to the
effective for one semester. If an accepted                  Graduate College within 30 days of enroll-
student does not enroll for the first time                   ment.
within one academic semester after the                   3. Prepare for the preliminary examination if
initial acceptance, it will be necessary to                 required.
reapply. After initial entry to graduate study,
students who have not been enrolled for a                End of First Semester of Enrollment
period of two years must reapply for admis-              1. Select a graduate committee in consulta-
sion. Reinstatement is not guaranteed.                      tion with the adviser.
                                                         2. Request change to regular status (if appli-
                                                            cable) if nine hours of graduate work have
NOTIFICATION OF ADMISSION                                   been taken at Radford University with at
    The Graduate Admissions Office will
                                                            least a B average, all deficiency/support-
send the completed application materials to                 ing courses have been taken and applica-
the chairperson or director/program coordi-                 tion is complete including final transcript
nator of the department in which the stu-                   with undergraduate degree.
dent plans to major. If the department rec-
ommends admission, the chairperson or                    Last Semester of Enrollment
director/program coordinator will suggest an             1. Make application for the degree no later
academic adviser for the student and will note              than the second week of the semester in
any deficiencies in the student’s undergradu-                which the student expects to graduate.
ate program. After this information has been                Deadlines are given and on our web site.
returned to the Graduate Admissions Office                   Information about commencement and
and a decision made by the Dean, the applicant              graduate hooding ceremonies will be sent
will receive written notification of the College’s           after the completed application has been
admission decision. A letter of admission will              received by the Graduate College.
indicate the student’s admission status, program         2. Check that all necessary program changes
requirements and the name and phone number                  have been approved.


                                                    16
3. Submit two copies of the completed thesis          • Final transcript, showing bachelor’s degree
   or graduate recital program notes to the             conferred from regionally accredited insti-
   Graduate College office no later than the             tution
   last day of classes. See “Thesis Manual”           • Minimum 2.75 grade point average
   on the Graduate College website for com-           • All supporting course work completed
   plete instructions.                                Departments, with the approval of the
4. Request an approval form for your final             Graduate Dean, may establish and maintain
   comprehensive examination and/or thesis            additional requirements for admission and
   defense at least five days in advance of            regular status.
   the examination date and return the signed
   form to the Graduate College office no              Conditional
   later than the last day of classes.                   Students may be admitted on condi-
                                                      tional status only if they are missing a final
                                                      transcript (showing degree conferred); an
CATEGORIES OF                                         official test score; one or more letters of
GRADUATE STUDY:                                       recommendation; grade point average is
                                                      below 2.75 or the test score is below the
1. Degree Program: Any program that is                minimum required by the department.
   designed to culminate in a student obtain-            Students must remedy all admission
   ing a master’s degree, educational special-        deficiencies by the end of the first semes-
   ist degree or doctorate.                           ter or term in which they are enrolled
2. Professional Licensure: Any program that           or as required by department policy.
   is designed to culminate in the student            Students who are unable to remedy a defi-
   obtaining initial teaching licensure.              ciency in the time frame established will be
3. Non-degree Seeking: For students wish-             blocked from further registration of gradu-
   ing to take a course for reasons other than        ate courses.
   degree or initial licensure purposes.                 Students who are admitted condition-
Minimum admission requirements to all                 ally due to an exception for undergradu-
categories of graduate study are the same.            ate grade point average must maintain a
Some degree programs have higher admis-               3.0 grade point average in all support-
sion standards.                                       ing coursework completed at Radford
                                                      University. Additionally, students enrolled
CLASSIFICATIONS OF                                    conditionally must maintain a 3.0 grade
ADMISSION STATUS                                      point average, with no grade lower than a
                                                      C, during their first nine graduate hours of
DEGREE PROGRAM                                        coursework at Radford University. After
                                                      nine hours without a 3.0, students will be
Regular                                               blocked from further registration and will
   Regular status may be granted to students          no longer continue in the program or enroll
who have met all entrance requirements for            in another graduate program unless a peti-
the Graduate College, the department and              tion to continue is approved.
program in which they wish to study.                     A student’s status may be changed to
   In addition to all other Graduate College          regular after completion of nine graduate
and department requirements, minimal                  semester hours with a 3.0 grade point aver-
requirements for regular status include:              age and completion of all deficiencies.
• The graduate application process com-                  Programs, schools, and/or departments
  pleted                                              may have more stringent requirements or
• Official scores on required tests                    rules than those listed above regarding
• At least two letters of recommendation              remaining in programs.


                                                 17
PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE                                    It would be to the advantage of profes-
AND CERTIFICATION                                      sional licensure students to enroll formally
                                                       in a degree program as soon as possible
    A student who holds a bachelor’s degree            after registration in order to protect the
from a regionally accredited institution               potential future value of courses toward a
and who wishes to take graduate courses                graduate degree.
to meet initial teaching licensure require-
ments may be admitted as a professional
licensure student upon submission of an                NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
official transcript showing that the bache-                An applicant who does not plan to pur-
lor’s degree has been awarded with a grade             sue a degree or initial teaching licensure but
point average of at least 2.75 (on a scale             wishes to take one or more courses may be
of 4.0). Specific areas may have additional             admitted to this category upon application
admission requirements. For these, please              and submission of an official transcript
see the respective courses of study sections           showing that a bachelor’s degree has been
of this catalog.                                       awarded from a regionally accredited institu-
    Three letters of reference are required            tion with a minimum grade point average of
from at least three of the following:                  2.75. Exceptions to the GPA requirement
1. The director of the teacher education pro-          should be directed to the Graduate College.
   gram at the undergraduate college if the            Applicants may be required to submit tran-
   applicant was enrolled in a baccalaureate           scripts from all colleges/universities attended.
   teacher education program.                          In addition, applicants wishing to take courses
2. The chair of the department or a faculty            from certain departments will be required
   member who served as adviser for the                to submit additional application materials.
   applicant from the major department if              Applicants who have been denied admis-
   the applicant was not enrolled in an under-         sion to a graduate degree seeking program
   graduate teacher education program.                 at RU are not eligible for non-degree status
3. The clinical faculty member (cooperating            without written approval from the appropriate
   teacher) who supervised the applicant if            department(s) and the graduate dean.
   the applicant participated in any field expe-           Normally, courses taken under this
   riences or practica associated with teacher         admission category may not be count-
   preparation.                                        ed toward a degree; however, a graduate
4. The chair of the department or a faculty            student in this status who subsequently
   member who served as adviser for the                decides to pursue a degree may petition
   applicant from the major department if the          the Graduate College through the appropri-
   applicant has been enrolled in a graduate           ate department to have two courses, not to
   major following graduation.                         exceed a maximum of six graduate hours,
5. An employer to whom the applicant report-           evaluated for acceptance toward a gradu-
   ed if the applicant has been employed               ate degree. Non-degree students seeking
   since receiving the baccalaureate degree.           admission to a graduate program must
Normally, courses taken under this admis-              provide evidence that he/she has met all the
sion category may not be counted toward a              requirements of the Graduate College and
degree; however, a professional licensure              the specific program in which he/she seeks
student in this status who subsequently                enrollment.
decides to pursue a degree may petition                   Not all graduate courses may be
the Graduate College through the appropri-             taken by non-degree seeking students.
ate department to have a maximum of six                Students are advised to check with the
graduate hours evaluated for acceptance                specific program director as well as cata-
toward a graduate degree.                              log requirements prior to enrolling in


                                                  18
any graduate class. Non-degree students                INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
must adhere to all established policies of             INFORMATION
probation and suspension.
                                                          Radford University is committed to
   It would be to the advantage of non-                educating students to take their place in
degree seeking graduate students to enroll             today’s highly competitive global society.
formally in a degree program as soon as                The university is home to a growing num-
possible after registration in order to pro-           ber of students and faculty members from
tect the potential future value of courses             around the world.
toward a graduate degree.                                 International students are welcome at
                                                       Radford. The university offers a number of
                                                       services to make the transition to campus
POST-BACCALAUREATE                                     as well as to the United States smooth and
CERTIFICATE STUDENTS                                   pleasant.
    The Post-baccalaureate Certificate is gen-
erally a series of nine-18 hours of graduate
                                                       MULTICULTURAL SERVICES
level coursework related to a focused aca-
                                                       Darrell Thorpe, Director
demic topic or competency area. A post-
                                                       Pocahontas Hall 118
baccalaureate certificate may enhance the               (540) 831-5765
education of matriculated (degree seeking)                 The Office of Multicultural and
students as well as provide continuing educa-          International Student Services assists students
tion to non-matriculated (non degree seek-             with their transition to Radford University
ing) students, generally in a specialized or           and/or the United States. Located on the main
emerging field. The certificate indicates to             level of Pocahontas Hall, the office provides
a prospective employer that the university             information, services and programs to assist
validates the particular collection of courses         students with being successful at RU. Some
as a coherent substantial area of study; and           services include international student orienta-
while the award of a certificate means the              tion programs, MAP: Minority Achievement
holder has completed the required courses              Mentoring Program, Health Insurance and
and related work at an acceptable level of aca-        Social Security representation for internation-
demic accomplishment, it does not constitute           al students. Please visit the website at www.
a degree program and it neither certifies nor           radford.edu/diverse for a complete list.
licenses the student.                                      Annual programs are designed to pro-
    An applicant who is currently a matric-            vide students with the opportunity to share
ulated graduate degree seeking student                 their culture with others. They include but are
at Radford University may apply to                     not limited to: Diversity Week, International
enroll in the certificate by submitting an              Cultural Conversation Hours, the International
approved “Petition for Program Change”                 Friendship/Host Program, annual Dr. Martin
to the College of Graduate and Professional            Luther King, Jr. Celebration, Black History
Studies. Applicants who are not in a degree            Month events and International Week/
program and are seeking only the certifi-               Dinner. We also co-sponsor Hispanic Heritage,
cate, should apply as “Certificate Students”            Women’s History, GLBT and many other
and must meet the established criteria for             awareness and appreciation events throughout
admissions, as well as other requirements              the year.
indicated by the specific certificate. A cur-                The highly qualified staff understands
rent list of post-baccalaureate certificates            the needs and concerns of the university’s
being offered, along with specific entry                minority and international student popula-
requirements is available on the CGPS                  tion. The staff encourages students to utilize
website at www.radford.edu/gradcollege.                the office’s resources. Stop by Pocahontas

                                                  19
Hall 130 or call (540) 831-5765. The office           has enough money for the first year of atten-
is open 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Eastern Time),              dance at Radford is required. The estimate
Monday - Friday.                                     for 2008-2009 is $20,278.
                                                        For more information regarding univer-
                                                     sity tuition and fees, see p. 24.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION                                 Applicants must have each college or
CENTER                                               university attended send official records to
Dr. Jon W. Stauff, Director                          the Graduate College. All records must be
Teresa Dalton King, Assistant Director/              certified and translated into English.
Immigration Counselor                                   An I-20 Form, used to obtain an F1 student
302 Cook Hall                                        visa, will be prepared after the application and
(540) 831-6200                                       all necessary information have been received
   In addition to overseeing study abroad            and the Graduate College has made a decision
and international programming on-campus,             to accept the applicant as a Radford student.
the Immigration Counselor is on the staff of         The I-20 Form cannot be prepared before
the International Education Center. Located          an application is officially reviewed and the
in Cook Hall, the office works closely with           applicant has been accepted.
students, faculty and staff both before their           All international students are required
arrival and during their stay at Radford             to present proof of adequate health insur-
University with any immigration concerns.            ance coverage prior to enrollment. Students
                                                     should contact the office if they have ques-
                                                     tions or need more information concerning
ADMISSION FOR                                        various health insurance policies.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
   An international student who plans to             OTHER SERVICES FOR
enter Radford in fall semester must apply            INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
by December 1. A student entering spring                Tutors trained in teaching English as a
semester must apply by July 1.                       second language are available to help inter-
   An applicant who has not already earned           national students through the university’s
a degree at an institution at which English          Writing Center. To make an appointment or
is the language of instruction must take the         for more information, call (540) 831-6035.
TOEFL. The results must be mailed direct-               The International Student Affairs Council
ly from the Educational Testing Service,             (ISAC), a branch of the Student Government
Princeton, NJ 08541, to the Graduate                 Association, was founded to address inter-
College office.                                       national student concerns and issues. ISAC
   A TOEFL minimum score of 550 on the               plans and coordinates international-related
written test, 213 on the computer-based              activities sponsored by various on-campus
test or 79-80 on the Internet-based test is          organizations and clubs. It also seeks to help
required for admission.                              the entire campus community understand
   A notarized letter of sponsorship and an          and appreciate the rich variety of cultures
original and certified bank statement from a          represented by our international student
sponsor or parent certifying that the student        body.




                                                20
                        APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

   Each program requires official transcripts from each college and university attended.
Transcripts from your undergraduate institution showing degree conferred are required.
If you were an undergraduate student at Radford University, the Graduate Admissions
Office will request your transcript. A minimum undergraduate grade point average
of 2.75 is required; however some programs have more stringent requirements noted
below. Official test scores are required for most programs (see specific program).

Application Deadline: Unless otherwise specified applications are accepted throughout
the year.

Financial Aid Deadline: For full-time students applying for graduate assistantships or
other forms of financial aid, the deadline is March 1 (for fall admission) or October 1
(spring).




                                                                                           APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS
ART (M.F.A.)
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75 overall and in the major; 2 letters of reference;
statement of philosophy, overall goals, synopsis of work; B.F.A. or commensurate col-
legiate course work; 20 slides or CD of recent art work. Application Dates: March 15
for fall; October 1 for spring.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75; 2 letters of reference; GMAT; applications are
reviewed following guidelines recommended by the Association to Advance Collegiate
Schools of Business (AACSB).


COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS (M.A., M.S.)
   Minimum grade point average of 3.0 overall in all major core courses. If undergradu-
ate degree is not in Communication Sciences and Disorders (COSD), a minimum of 32
hours in supporting undergraduate COSD courses is required for regular status; three
letters of reference; GRE; personal essay. Application Date: February 1.


CORPORATE AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION (M.S.)
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75; short essay (see brochure or catalog); GRE;
three personal letters of reference.


COUNSELING AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (M.S.)
  Minimum grade point average of 2.75; GRE or MAT; 3 letters of reference; essay.
Application dates: Priority admission - materials due February 1 for Summer and Fall
admission. Space-available admissions - materials due by April 15 for Summer and Fall
admission.



                                          21
COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY (PSY.D.)
   Minimum graduate school grade point average of 3.25; GRE General Test; a letter
of interest describing the applicant’s professional and/or research experience and career
goals; curriculum vita; official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work; writ-
ing sample; three letters of recommendation, including at least one from a professor
who can comment on the applicant’s academic skills and one from a supervisor who can
speak to the applicant’s counseling skills. Application Date: January 15.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE (M.A., M.S.)
   Minimum grade point average of 2.90; two letters of reference, only one of which
may come from a Radford University criminal justice professor; original writing sample
(see catalog).


EDUCATION (M.S.)
  Minimum grade point average of 2.75; two letters of reference; GRE or MAT.


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (M.S.)
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75; three letters of reference (including one from
school superintendent or designee, one from most recent principal); three years of K-12
classroom teaching experience; GRE or MAT; writing sample.


ENGLISH (M.A., M.S.)
  Minimum grade point average of 2.75; two letters of reference; sample of expository
writing; GRE.


MUSIC (M.A., M.S.)
  Minimum grade point average of 2.75; GRE, Major Field Test in Music or Praxis II
(Content Knowledge); three letters of reference; written diagnostic exams in music; history
and theory before the end of the first semester and prior to admission to regular status.


NURSING (M.S.N.)
  Minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 in the nursing major; GRE or
MAT; 3 recommendation forms; graduation from a nationally accredited baccalaureate
program in nursing; meet undergraduate course prerequisites, statistics, health, assess-
ment and nursing research. Rolling admission.


PSYCHOLOGY (M.A., M.S.)
   Minimum grade point average of 3.0; GRE; three letters of reference (one from
major department; if applicant is not a psychology major then a letter of reference from
a psychology faculty member is needed); short statement approximately two pages stat-
ing why you are interested in psychology and future plans. Application Date: March 1
for fall.

                                            22
READING (M.S.)
  Minimum grade point average of 2.75; two letters of reference; essay (see catalog);
copy of teaching license.


SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (ED.S.)
   Minimum grade point average of 3.0; GRE; two letters of reference (one from major
department; if applicant is not a psychology major then a letter of reference from a
psychology faculty member is needed); short statement approximately two pages stat-
ing why you are interested in psychology and future plans. Application Date: March 1
for fall.


SOCIAL WORK (M.S.W.)
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75; three letters of reference (at least one from
a professor who can speak to academic potential and one from a supervisor in human
services who can speak to practice skills. Advanced Standing must have a reference
from their field instructor); previous experience in the field of human services as an
employee, student and/or volunteer; please check brochure or current catalog for fur-
ther requirements. Advanced standing program begins in Summer, Standard begins in
fall. Rolling admission.;

SPECIAL EDUCATION (M.S.)
   Minimum grade point of 2.75; pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy
Assessment (VCLA) during the first nine hours of enrollment; complete the Virginia
Reading Assessment as requirement for admission to the Teacher Education Program
for licensure; three letters of reference; essay.


INITIAL TEACHING LICENSURE
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75; coursework required for licensure official
transcripts showing baccalaureate degree conferred; three letters of reference for initial
certification. Rolling admission.


NON-DEGREE
   Minimum grade point average of 2.75; official transcripts showing all degrees con-
ferred. Rolling admission.


 POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE
    Minimum grade point average of 2.75; official transcripts showing all degrees
 conferred. Rolling admission.




                                           23
Fees and Financial Information
Graduate Student Expenses 2008-2009                    to the RU Web page for the most up-to-date
                            Per           Per          information: www.radford.edu
                            Sem.        Year
12-18 hrs. per sem.
                                                       IN-STATE TUITION ELIGIBILITY
In-state student
Tuition & Fees              $3,597 $7,194                 All students who wish to apply for in-
Out-of-state student                                   state tuition rates must submit the appro-
Tuition & Fees              $6,916 $13,832             priate application form prior to the first
1-11 hrs. per sem.                                     day of classes for the term they are seeking
In-state student                                       in-state status. The form is available online
Tuition & Fees              $300/credit hr.            or in the Graduate Admissions office in
Out-of-state student                                   Lucas Hall. Copies of Section 23-7.4 of
Tuition & Fees              $576/credit hr.            the Code of Virginia, the law governing
*A student taking more than 18 credit hours            eligibility for in-state tuition, are avail-
per semester will be charged for the addi-             able in the Reserved section of McConnell
tional hours at the credit-hours rate for part-        Library. Additional information is available
time students.                                         from the Graduate College office. It is the
                                                       responsibility of the student to apply for
EXPENSES (2008)                                        a change in domiciliary status.
Typical Budget for an
In-state Graduate Student                              VIRGINIA EDUCATORS
Per Year
                                                       REDUCED TUITION RATE
Tuition & Fees, Room &
 Board Allowance               $13,910                     Full-time Virginia educators (K-12) are
Books & Supplies                   800                 eligible to apply for a reduced tuition rate
Personal Expenses                1,600                 for Radford University courses offered
Transportation                     900                 on and off campus. Educators (teach-
Total Budget for Academic Year $17,210                 ers, administrators, supervisors, etc.) can
                                                       be enrolled for a graduate degree, addi-
Typical Budget for an                                  tional endorsements or for re-licensure.
Out-of-state Graduate Student Per Year                 Radford University has implemented this
Tuition & Fees, Room &                                 policy as recognition of the importance for
Board Allowance                $20,548                 Virginia educators to enhance their profes-
Books & Supplies                   800                 sional knowledge and skills. The reduced
Personal Expenses                1,600                 rate in 2008-2009 is $254 per semester hour.
Transportation                   1,100                 An application for the Virginia Educator’s
Total Budget for Academic Year $24,048                 Reduced Tuition rate needs to be completed
                                                       only once annually and is effective for both
Graduate students are also eligible to pur-            the academic year and the following summer
chase optional meal plans. For more infor-             session.
mation contact the RU Express Office at                     The following eligibility guidelines
(540) 831-5054 or 831-6449.                            apply:
   Every effort is made not to change fees             1. A baccalaureate degree is required for
after they have been published; however,                  Kindergarten through grade 12 public
if this should become necessary, public                   and private school teachers, counselors,
notice will be given prior to the semester in             administrators, supervisors, librarians
which the increase goes into effect. Refer
                                                  24
   and coaches. Admission to the Radford             OVERLOAD FEE
   University Graduate College as a matric-
   ulated or non-degree student is required.            An overload fee will be charged for
2. Eligible personnel must be full-time con-         each additional hour over the full-time aca-
   tractual employees of a public school             demic load. A full-class load at Radford,
   division or private school within the             for purposes of tuition payment, is no more
   Commonwealth of Virginia.                         than 18 hours per semester. The overload
3. Individuals on official leave from their           fee is based on the semester-hour charges
   assignments are eligible for reduced              for part-time students.
   tuition.
4. There is no restriction on the number of          APPLICATION FEE
   hours that can be taken.
5. Courses for which educators request                  A non-refundable application fee of $40
   reduced tuition must be for professional          must accompany each application to the
   development, not for planned career chang-        Graduate College. The application fee for
   es outside of education.                          non-degree students is $40. All application
                                                     fees must be paid in U.S. currency. No
   For more information or to receive                application fees are waived.
application forms, please call the Graduate




                                                                                                    FEES AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION
College at (540) 831-5431.




                          John Preston McConnell Library


                                                25
SUMMER SESSION FEES                                 COMMENCEMENT COSTS
   The cost for summer sessions will be                 All students participating in the hood-
based on the semester-hour charges for part-        ing and commencement exercises must
time students.                                      wear appropriate academic regalia, which
                                                    is available through the campus bookstore.
                                                    The charge for a cap, gown, tassle and hood
APPLIED MUSIC FEE                                   is approximately $57.

    An applied music instruction fee is
charged at the rate of $250 per credit              CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT
per semester. Applied music fees may be
waived for level system applied lessons                For more information regarding Con-
with the approval of the dean of the College        tinuous Enrollment see p. 51.
of Visual and Performing Arts for students
majoring in music and students registered
for Department of Music ensembles and               RESPONSIBILITY FOR
studying in a performance medium relevant           PAYMENT OF TUITION AND
to their ensemble participation. Fee waivers        FEES
do not apply for MUSC 107, MUSC 169,
                                                       Payment of tuition, fees and other
MUSC 170, MUSC 470 and MUSC 670.                    charges owed to Radford University is
                                                    the responsibility of the student. Billing
PARKING FEE                                         statements will be mailed to the student
                                                    at the permanent address on file with the
   Students may park motor vehicles and             university. If a student wishes to designate
motorcycles in university parking lots if           a billing address he/she may do so with the
they have obtained a parking decal from             Registrar’s Office.
the Parking Services Office located in                  Failure to pay tuition, fees and other
Walker Hall. See “Parking” on p. 37 for             charges owed to Radford University could
more details.                                       result in administrative withdrawal from
                                                    the university. The Code of Virginia allows
                                                    the university to recover all reasonable
THESIS/DISSERTATION                                 administrative costs, late fees, collection
BINDING FEE                                         fees and attorney’s fees incurred in the
                                                    collection of funds that are due Radford
   Students may request the library to bind         University. The university reports past due
personal copies of theses at a charge of $10        accounts to a credit reporting bureau.
per copy by using the "Personal Thesis/
Dissertation Binding Request" form avail-
able in the library. Each copy should be
                                                    UNPAID FEES OR FINES
presented in its own envelope or box.                  The university will hold transcripts and
   The university pays for binding the              block registration for future semesters for
two Graduate College originals which will           students who fail to pay tuition fees, fines
be maintained in McConnell Library. For             or damages. Collection agencies also may
more information call 831-6926 or 831-              be used by the university to collect unpaid
5694.                                               fees or fines.




                                               26
TUITION PAYMENT PLANS                                  BANKING FACILITIES
    Highlander Choice Monthly Payment                     Four banks are located near the Radford
Plan: in a continuing effort to assist with the        University campus: SunTrust Bank, Wachovia,
payment of educational expenses, Radford               First Bank of Virginia and BB&T. In addition,
University offers the Highlander Choice                the city is serviced by First National Bank,
Monthly Payment Plan as an alternative to              Blue Ridge Bank, Bank of America and The
standard payment arrangements.                         National Bank. Wachovia and First National
    If you would like further information              Bank operate automatic teller machines on
concerning the plans available:                        campus.
• Call the Highlander Choice customers’
   service number at (540) 831-6698;
• e-mail hc@radford.edu;                               STUDENT CHECK WRITING
• Write Highlander Choice, c/o Student                 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
   Accounts, Box 6922, Radford, VA 24142.
• Highlander Choice is also available on-                  Checks presented by Radford University
   line at: http://radford.edu/stuacct, then           students are accepted/cashed by the univer-
   follow the link to the Highlander Choice            sity subject to the following limitations and
   home page.                                          policies:
                                                       • The university accepts checks for tuition/
REFUND OF CHARGES                                         fees, room and board, the exact amount
                                                          of goods or services or to pay fines owed
Withdrawal from one or more                               to the university. The Post Office accepts
but not all courses                                       checks and RU Express for the amount of
   A student who withdraws from a class                   purchase.
by the census date will be refunded the dif-           • A student who knowingly writes a check
ference in tuition and fees for the reduced               with insufficient funds in his or her check-
number of credit hours, if any. After the                 ing account may be charged with an
census date, there will be no refund.                     honor code violation and may be pros-
                                                          ecuted under the criminal law of the
                                                          Commonwealth of Virginia.
Withdrawal from the University                         • If a student writes two “bad” checks to
(all courses)                                             the university in an academic year, the
    A graduate student who officially with-                student’s check-cashing privileges at all
draws from the university on or before the                university facilities may be suspended.
census date will be refunded all tuition and           • If a check written to Radford University
fees; all board charges (meal plan) less a                is returned from the bank due to insuf-
$200 administrative fee.                                  ficient funds, future tuition/fee or room
   After the census date through the last day             and board payments may be required to
to withdraw from a course with a grade of                 be made with cash, money order, certified
“W,” a student will be refunded the unused                check or cashier’s check and the student
portion of board (meal plan) or the board                 may be administratively withdrawn from
(meal plan) amount paid less a $200 admin-                the university.
istrative fee, whichever is less.                      • A student may be blocked from registra-
   After the last day to withdraw from a                  tion and transcripts may be held if a check
course with a grade of “W,” there will be                 is returned from the bank and remains
no refund.                                                unpaid.
                                                       • A $20 service charge will be applied to
                                                          all checks returned from the bank for
                                                          any reason. In addition to the $20 service


                                                  27
  charge, a $75 late fee will be applied to all        Foundation. Students can find more infor-
  returned tuition checks, if applicable.              mation about programs by visiting the RU
• The Bookstore will cash checks between               Financial Aid Web Site at:
  $5 and $25. There will be a service charge           http://finaid.asp.radford.edu
  of $.50 per check.                                      A number of graduate assistantships are
                                                       available to graduate students. For more
   NOTE: Checks written directly to a                  information, please see pages 32-33.
student by the Commonwealth of Virginia
or by Radford University may be cashed at
the bank indicated on the check or at a bank           APPLYING FOR FINANCIAL AID
where the student has an account.                         The priority deadline for all students (new
                                                       and returning) seeking financial aid by Free
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID                                  Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
                                                       is March 1. The FAFSA is available online at
   Helping qualified students who would                 www.fafsa.ed.gov
be unable to attend the university because                Radford awards financial aid separately
of a lack of funds is the aim of Radford’s             for the academic year and the summer
financial aid program. During the 2007-2008             terms. Students who plan to be enrolled dur-
academic year, Radford provided some form              ing the summer must submit the Summer
of aid for more than 67 percent of its stu-            Student Financial Aid Application. The
dents. Funds for education must first be the            Free Application for Federal Student Aid,
responsibility of the student. The difference          however, needs to be completed only once
between the student contribution and the cost          annually and is effective for both the aca-
of attending the university determines the             demic year and the following summer
financial need of the student.                          sessions.
   The criteria used for selecting student                Students can find out the status of their
aid recipients involve both the computed               application, documents that are missing
need and the academic grade standing of                from their application and awards that have
the individual student. Top consideration              been offered to them by using the Radford
for awarding financial aid dollars will be              University Student Information System.
given to those who demonstrate the greatest
need and who apply by the deadline. To be
eligible for federal financial aid, students            DISBURSEMENT OF
must be enrolled at least half-time (five               FINANCIAL AID
credit hours per term).                                   All types of financial aid are credited to
   After a student has been admitted to                the student’s account at the beginning of
Radford and has demonstrated financial                  each term with the exception of graduate
need, the university tries to meet that need           assistantships, work study and some loans.
by offering a financial aid package which                  These financial aid funds first must be
may consist of a grant, loan and/or on-                used to pay the required university charges
campus job.                                            outstanding at that time. Except in rare
   In addition to awards based on dem-                 cases, all awards will be disbursed equally
onstrated financial need, scholarships                  over the course of the two academic semes-
based on leadership, character and aca-                ters. Financial assistance awarded for the
demic achievements are offered at Radford.             summer terms will be divided equally
Sources of financial aid include loans and              between the terms.
grants from the federal and state govern-                 Federal Stafford loans and some
ments, as well as a number of private funds            Alternative loans received by Electronic
established through the Radford University             Funds Transfer (EFT) will be credited to the

                                                  28
student's account after enrollment require-          student’s scheduled or disbursed aid remains
ments are met. Any additional Stafford loan          unearned and must be returned to the
and Alternative loan funds remaining in the          Federal Programs. In the past, the previous
students account after all charges are satis-        Federal and Pro Rata Withdrawal Policy
fied may be deposited directly to the stu-            determined the amount of federal funds that
dents personal checking or savings account           must be returned and the university was
at any bank through the University’s RU              required to reduce the student’s charges by
Direct Deposit program.                              the same amount. The new policy governs
                                                     the earned and unearned portions of the stu-
RETURN OF TITLE IV FEDERAL                           dent’s Federal Title IV Financial Aid only.
FINANCIAL AID                                        It determines how much, if any, the student
                                                     and/or the school may need to return. This
   The Return of Title IV Federal Financial
                                                     policy does not affect the student’s charges.
Aid law requires that some students who
withdraw from all classes have to repay              The University’s Withdrawal Policy (stated
federal money that they have received.               above) will be used to determine the reduc-
   In general, this law assumes that a stu-          tion, if any, in the student’s tuition and fee
dent “earns” approved (verified) federal              or room and board charges. The student
financial aid awards in proportion to the             is responsible for paying any outstanding
number of days in the term prior to the              charges to the University.
student’s complete withdrawal. If a stu-                 The student’s official withdrawal date
dent completely withdraws from school                will be determined by the University as (1)
during a term, the school must calculate,            the date the student began the University’s
according to a specific formula, the portion          withdrawal process (the date that the gradu-
of the total scheduled financial assistance           ate student officially notified the Registrar’s
that the student has earned and is therefore         Office of his/her intent to withdraw); (2)
entitled to retain, until the time that the          the midpoint of the semester if the student
student withdrew. If a student receives (or          withdraws without notifying the university;
the University receives on the student’s             or (3) the student’s last date of attendance
behalf) more assistance than he/she earns,           at an academically-related activity as docu-
the unearned funds must be returned to the           mented by the university.
Department of Education or to the Federal                If it is determined that a portion of
Stafford or to the parent’s Federal PLUS             the financial aid received on the student’s
loan lenders. If a student’s charges are             behalf is unearned, the University shares
less than the amount earned and a refund             with the student the responsibility of return-
is due, the student may be able to receive           ing those funds.
those additional funds. Students who have                Any grant funds that the student is
not completed the verification process are            required to return to the Federal Programs
ineligible to receive any financial aid.              are considered an overpayment. The stu-
   The portion of the federal grants and             dent must either repay the amount in full or
loans that the student is entitled to receive        make satisfactory payment arrangements
is calculated on a percentage basis by               with the Department of Education to repay
comparing the total number of days in                the amount. If the student fails to repay or
the semester to the number of days that              make payment arrangements, to repay an
the student completed before he/she with-            overpayment the student will lose his/her
drew. For example, if a student completes            eligibility to receive future federal financial
30 percent of the semester, he/she earns             aid at any institution.
30 percent of the approved federal aid
that he/she was originally scheduled to
receive. This means that 70 percent of the


                                                29
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC                                RIGHTS AND
PROGRESS                                             RESPONSIBILITIES OF
                                                     STUDENT RECIPIENTS
    Federal regulations require that financial
aid recipients must be making progress                  As a recipient of state or federal aid,
toward a degree in addition to meeting the           each student has certain rights and respon-
minimum cumulative grade point aver-                 sibilities. Knowing what they are will place
age. Financial aid affected by this policy           the student in a better position to make
includes grants, loans and Federal Work              decisions about educational goals and how
Study. Graduate assistantships, Foundation           they best can be achieved. If at any time
scholarships and the Work Scholarship                there are questions about financial aid,
programs are exempt from the yearly quan-            students should come to the Financial Aid
titative progress measure, but not the mini-         Office where there is additional informa-
mum grade point average requirement.                 tion available concerning their legal rights
Some alternative loans are exempt from               and responsibilities.
this policy based on the lenders’ require-
ment of meeting academic progress.                        The student has a right to know:
    Students who enroll for a semester,              •   the cost of attending Radford University
receive financial aid covered by this policy              for an academic year, including tuition
and withdraw from all classes before the                 and fees and estimated costs of personal
end of schedule adjustment will be ineligi-              expenses, books and transportation;
ble to receive financial aid. Summer classes          •   the due dates for mandatory fees and the
will be considered in relation to all summer             payment procedures for those receiving
terms.                                                   financial assistance;
    Satisfactory Academic Progress means             •   the deadline for submitting applications;
that the student has to meet three mea-              •   how the financial need was determined;
sures:                                               •   how much of the estimated financial
    1. Maximum time frame — cumulative                   need has been met;
hours attempted may not exceed 150 per-              •   the types of financial aid offered by
cent of the program requirement.                         Radford University and the terms of
    2. Qualitative progress — meeting a 3.0              those types of aid which were received;
cumulative grade point average.                      •   how satisfactory academic progress is
    3. Quantitative progress — 75 percent                measured; and
of the yearly hours attempted must be                •   the university refund policy for students
completed. All course work is included                   who withdraw.
in cumulative hours attempted, including
transfer hours.                                         The student is responsible for:
                                                     • submitting honest and accurate informa-
   A student has a right to appeal the termi-          tion concerning enrollment and family
nation of his/her financial aid due to unsat-           financial circumstance. Full-time status
isfactory academic progress. Please check              is assumed (nine semester hours) unless
the Financial Aid Office website http://                indicated otherwise;
finaid.asp.radford.edu for more details on            • adhering to all agreements signed in the
how to appeal and to download the appeal               course of applying for and receiving
form.                                                  financial assistance;
                                                     • reporting a change to less than full-time
                                                       enrollment during the award period;




                                                30
• promptly reporting to the Financial Aid            with a maximum of $20,500 in subsidized
  Office the receipt of scholarships, grants          and unsubsidized Stafford loan. All students
  or loans awarded by organizations or               may be required to pay up to a 3 percent
  agencies other than Radford University;            origination fee and a 1% default prevention
• becoming familiar with the deadlines for           fee as required by the specific guarantee
  application, the terms of the financial aid         agency for each loan. The interest rate for
  received and refund policies for students          new borrowers is a fixed rate of 6.8 percent.
  who withdraw;                                      The interest rate for Subsidized Federal
• signing a statement of educational pur-            Stafford Loans is subsidized by the federal
  pose and registration compliance stat-             government until six months after the student
  ing that student assistance will be                graduates or leaves school, when repayment
  used solely for expenses related to                begins. For Unsubsidized Federal Stafford
  attendance at Radford University;                  Loans, the borrower makes interest pay-
• repayment of any over-awarded grant,               ments or capitalizes interest.
  scholarship or loan monies;                            Information on these loans is avail-
• knowing the loan, repayment responsi-              able from State Guarantee Agencies, local
  bilities and abiding by the terms of the           banks, savings and loan associations, credit
  promissory note;                                   unions and other lending institutions and at
• performing any student employment in               the Office of Financial Aid. Federal Stafford
  a satisfactory manner. An unsatisfactory           Loans require a family or student to estab-
  performance may result in removal from             lish financial need for Subsidized Federal
  the work program; and                              Stafford Loans. Those students not eligible
• reporting a change in dependency and/or            for Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans or
  marital status.                                    partial Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
                                                     will be eligible for Unsubsidized Federal
                                                     Stafford Loans. Therefore, all students
LOANS                                                applying for Federal Stafford Loans must
                                                     complete the Free Application for Federal
Federal Perkins Loan                                 Student Aid, to establish eligibility. Please
   The Perkins Loan is funded by the federal         note that Out-of-State Federal Stafford
government but is administered directly by           Loans, as well as loans guaranteed by
Radford University. Graduate students may            any other agency must follow procedures
borrow a total of $30,000 which includes             as outlined in this publication. Federal
any amount borrowed under NDSL or                    Stafford Loan checks are made copayable
Perkins for undergraduate study. Students            to both Radford University and the stu-
begin paying back these loans nine months            dent. Some lenders deliver Federal Stafford
after they either complete their education           funds electronically. Students will be noti-
or leave school. No interest is charged until        fied regarding fund delivery. Generally, half
repayment begins and then a five percent              of the proceeds of the loan will be available
charge is applied to the unpaid balance.             in the fall and the remaining amount avail-
                                                     able in January for the payment of Spring
                                                     semester fees.
Federal Stafford Student Loan
   The Federal Stafford Loan enables gradu-          Federal Graduate PLUS Loan
ate students to borrow as much as $65,000 in            Starting 2006-2007, PLUS loans are
subsidized Stafford not to exceed $138,500           available for graduate students. In order to
in both subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford         be eligible for this loan, graduate students
cumulative for both undergraduate and grad-          must complete the Free Application for
uate work. Graduate students may borrow              Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and apply for
up to $8,500 per year subsidized in Stafford         their entire Stafford loan eligibility before

                                                31
                                                31
borrowing from this program. In addi-                     Students awarded work may use the
tion, the Graduate PLUS loan requires that            university website to locate positions on
students must not have an adverse credit              campus http://finaid.radford.edu.work/
history which is determined by a credit               html. Students must contact supervisors
check conducted by the lender.                        listed on the Radford University Financial
   The repayment period for this begins               Aid website to secure a work position.
after the date the loan is fully disbursed.
Loan repayment deferments may be pos-                 Residence Hall Assistantships
sible when you are enrolled in at least                  The Residence Director (R.D.) position
six credit hours. Contact your lender for             is a graduate assistantship with a two-year
more information regarding deferments.                commitment. The R.D. is responsible for
Students can borrow up to their cost of               the total operation of a residence hall
education minus any other financial aid                housing 130-300 students. Qualifications
(including Federal Stafford loan eligibility).        for the position include effective interper-
The interest rate is fixed at 8.25 percent. All        sonal and communication skills, a strong
students will be required to pay a 3 percent          commitment to working with a diverse
one-time origination fee plus a default fee           student population and relevant experi-
of 1 percent for each loan. Please contact            ence. Compensation includes tuition and
the Stafford Loan Coordinator or Graduate             fees, furnished one bedroom apartment
Financial Aid Counselor about applying for            (can accommodate R.D.s who are single or
this loan.                                            married), full meal plan and a monthly sti-
                                                      pend for nine months. Additional informa-
                                                      tion and application materials are available
Radford University                                    through the Office of Residential Life or at
Graduate Grant (RUGG)                                 http://www.radford.edu/res-life.
    This program is a graduate grant program.
Students must be enrolled for at least nine
credit hours to be eligible. Awards average           GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS
$550 per academic year. Priority is given                 Graduate Assistantships provide the uni-
to those students with the highest need and           versity with a means of recruiting and
applications must be submitted by March 1.            retaining highly talented students in grad-
Students may receive other aid in addition            uate programs. Assistantships enhance
to the Radford University Graduate Grant,             graduate study by providing professional
if eligible, with the exception of other              experience and financial support through a
grant/scholarship recipients. Applicants for          stipend. Academic departments recommend
this program must submit the FAFSA by                 students in their programs for assistantship
the March 1 deadline.                                 awards. To be considered for an assistant-
                                                      ship, students must submit an assistantship
                                                      application as part of the online application
WORK PROGRAMS                                         for admission. Continuing students may
                                                      print the assistantship application from the
Federal Work-Study Program                            Graduate College website and submit cop-
                                                      ies to his/her academic department and the
   This is a federal program that provides            Graduate College.
part-time jobs for undergraduate and gradu-               To be eligible for graduate assistantships,
ate students with financial need as deter-             students must be enrolled for nine hours
mined by the Free Application for Federal             each term they hold a graduate assistantship.
Student Aid (FAFSA). A student is assigned            Students in the following categories will be
to work a specified number of hours per                eligible for a graduate assistantship with a
week in a campus location.                            minimum of six credit hours enrollment:

                                                 32
    (1) Awarded as a graduate teaching fellow             (2) Those who are the primary instructor,
        through the Graduate College.                         but not listed as the official professor of
    (2) The recipient of a federal traineeship for            record:
         nursing.                                             GTFs Not Professor of Record (GTF
    (3) Awarded as a graduate assistant in                    NPoR)
         summer.                                              The stipend for positions that are
                                                              an estimated 20 hours per week is
Graduate Teaching Fellows                                     $4,000/$8,000 per semester/academic
   A GTF is a first or second year Graduate                    year.
Assistant who has been selected to teach
one or two classes during the semester.                      GTFs NPoR have primary responsibil-
GTFs may teach no more than two fresh-                       ity for teaching a course for credit and
man or sophomore courses in any one                          must:
semester. GTFs may not teach upper divi-                     • be under the direct supervision of a fac-
sion or graduate courses. Each semester, all                   ulty member (the professor of record for
GTFs must have a student evaluation for                        that course)
each course taught as well as a post-course                  • receive regular in-service training and
evaluation by the supervisor/mentor. GTFs                    • be evaluated regularly.
teaching will be considered as full-time
students and must take six or more credit                   Typical GTF NPoR assignments may
hours of graduate course work. A detailed                   include:
monitoring plan and supervision schedule                    • teaching laboratory sessions
must be provided for each GTF position.                     • teaching discussion groups and
There are two classifications of GTFs:                       • teaching courses.

(1) Those who are the primary instructor as               Graduate Assistant (GA)
    well as the official professor of record:
                                                             A GA can be awarded in an academic
    GTF Professor of Record (GTF PoR)
                                                          department as a graduate teaching, research
    The stipend for positions that are an esti-
                                                          or administrative assistant or assist the staff
    mated 20 hours per week is $4,350/$8,700
                                                          in an administrative department. Academic
    per semester/academic year (as of 2006-
                                                          programs recommend students to receive
    2007).
                                                          assistantship awards. The stipend for posi-
• GTFs PoR have primary responsibility
                                                          tions that are an estimated 20 hours per
    for teaching a course for credit and/or
                                                          week is $4,000/$8,000 per semester/aca-
    for assigning final grades for such a
                                                          demic year for master’s and Ed.S. students.
    course and must:
                                                          Stipends for doctoral programs may vary.
  • have earned at least 18 graduate semes-
                                                          GAs must take at least nine hours of gradu-
      ter hours in their teaching discipline
                                                          ate credit each term.
  • be able to teach without direct supervi-
                                                             Additional information and requirements
      sion
                                                          for GTFs and GAs are found in “Graduate
  • receive regular in-service training
                                                          Assistant Policies and Procedures” located on
  • be evaluated regularly.
                                                          the Graduate College website at www.radford.
                                                          edu/gradcollege.
  This category will be very limited with
  assignments given only in circumstances
  where there is a compelling reason for
  needing the GTF as the professor of
  record.



                                                     33
NON-SERVICE AWARDS                                    These students must meet admissions guide-
                                                      lines and take courses as they are available
      A limited number of non-service                 on university schedules. Applications are
(tuition grant) awards are available. In 2007-        available in the Graduate College.
2008, 61 awards of $4,000 ($2,000 Fall
and $2,000 spring) were made to graduate
assistants or graduate teaching fellows who           VIRGINIA WAR/PUBLIC
were nominated by their programs and who              SERVICE ORPHANS
met certain criteria. There is no application         EDUCATION PROGRAM
process for these awards and they are made               Section 23-7.1, Code of Virginia, pro-
exclusively on the recommendation of pro-             vides for tuition-free educational benefits at
grams based on each program's allocation              any state-supported college or university for
from the graduate college.                            children of permanently and totally disabled
                                                      veterans or for children orphaned by an act
SENIOR CITIZENS HIGHER                                of war. Both tuition and fees are covered by
EDUCATION ACT OF 1974                                 this program.
                                                          Eligibility is determined by the Director
   The Commonwealth of Virginia allows                of the Division of War Veterans Claims upon
senior citizens who meet certain require-             submission of an application. To be eligible
ments to take courses at state colleges or            for assistance, the applicant’s parent must
universities free of charge.                          have been a resident of Virginia upon entry
   To be eligible, persons must have reached          into the service; the applicant’s parent must
60 years of age before the beginning of the           have been a resident of Virginia for at least
semester in which they wish to enroll and             10 consecutive years prior to the date of the
must have had legal domicile in Virginia for          application; the applicant must be between
one year prior to the semester in which they          16-25 years of age; and the applicant must
plan to enroll.                                       verify admission to a state college or univer-
   A senior citizen may take courses with-            sity. Eligible applicants are entitled to a maxi-
out paying tuition or required fees, except           mum of 48 months of tuition assistance and
for course materials, under certain condi-            must be progressing toward a clearly defined
tions. If the senior citizen has taxable              educational objective.
income of not more than $15,000 in the                    In addition, an amendment to Section 23-
preceding year, the individual may take a             7.1 now allows for tuition-free educational
course for academic credit free of tuition            benefits for orphans and spouses of certain
and fees, except for fees established for the         law enforcement officers, correctional and jail
purpose of paying for course materials, such          personnel, sheriffs, deputy sheriffs, firefight-
as laboratory fees. A senior citizen, regard-         ers, members of rescue squads and alcoholic
less of income level, may audit a course              beverage control agents who have been killed
that is given for academic credit or take a           in the line of duty while serving or living in
noncredit course free of tuition and fees,            the Commonwealth.
except for fees established for the purpose
of paying for course materials such as labo-
ratory fees.
   Those eligible senior citizens enrolled in
the undergraduate or graduate-level courses
can attend the university free of tuition
(with the exception of possible mandatory
lab fees, books, materials, etc.) to complete
a bachelor's or master's degree program.


                                                 34
Campus Life
    Life outside and inside the classroom is              Outdoor facilities at the center include
considered to be equally important in the total        a jogging trail; 12 tennis courts and the
educational process at Radford University.             Patrick D. Cupp Memorial Stadium. The
The university makes an effort to provide both         stadium houses an eight-lane track and
the freedom and opportunity for students to            field surface, a soccer field, locker rooms,
engage in a variety of activities and programs.        a press box, coach’s offices, and a conces-
Students are encouraged to develop social,             sion area.
cultural and creative interests and awareness              The Dedmon Center complex also has
by actively participating in all aspects of            areas for other field sports including base-
campus life.                                           ball, lacrosse, softball and intramural foot-
    Numerous cultural and educational activi-          ball and rugby, a club sport. Other outside
ties are offered each year. Music, dance and           activities include field hockey, cross-coun-
theatre department presentations enable stu-           try, golf and basketball.
dents to attend, as well as participate in,               Peters Hall, located in the heart of the
numerous productions during the year. A                main campus provides students the oppor-
full schedule of art exhibits is arranged and          tunities to take part in aerobics classes,
presented by the Radford University Art                intramurals, a climbing wall, fitness center
Museum. A series of activities is planned each         and open gym times.
year by the Black Awareness Programming                   Hurlburt Hall, which opened in 2006,
Board to expose students to black history and          is named in honor of former Dean of
culture.                                               Students Bonnie Hurlburt. The 45,000
    Students are encouraged to form and                square-foot building includes a welcome
participate in organizations; organizations            and information center, student lounges,
are democratic and contribute to their per-            a game room with bowling and billiards,
sonal, social and professional development.            a food court, meeting rooms, a 250-seat
A variety of co-curricular clubs provides              auditorium, student organization offices
channels for speakers and discussion groups.           and more.
Activities include politics, karate, skiing,
community service and much more.                       Intercollegiate
                                                          Radford University, an NCAA Division I
                                                       member, currently participates in 19 varsity
RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES                                sports, 11 for women and eight for men. The
   The Dedmon Center, an athletic and                  sports include: men’s baseball, men’s and
convocation complex located across U.S.                women’s basketball, men’s and women’s
Route 11 (East Main Street) from the main              cross country, women’s field hockey, men’s
campus, houses an arena, an eight-lane                 and women’s golf, men’s and women’s soc-
swimming pool; basketball, volleyball,                 cer, men’s and women’s outdoor track, men’s
                                                                                                       CAMPUS LIFE


handball and racquetball courts; areas for             and women’s indoor track, women’s softball,
free exercise; weight room; steam room                 men’s and women’s tennis, and women’s
and a 1/6 mile jogging track. The Dedmon               volleyball. The university offers athletic
Center makes it possible for large numbers             scholarship aid in all 19 sports.
of students to participate in indoor sports,
the intramural program, club sports and                Campus Recreation
intercollegiate athletics, as well as indi-               Campus Recreation takes great pride in
vidualized conditioning programs.                      providing a variety of quality recreational
                                                       activities and programs for the students,

                                                  35
staff and faculty of Radford University. All           http://www.radford.edu/dos-web/.
members of the RU community are invited
to take advantage of the varied recreational           Registration of Criminal Record
opportunities offered throughout the school               It is prohibited to fail to report federal or
year. Campus Recreation strives to get                 state probation or felony criminal charges
every member of the university community               taken under advisement or conviction of a
active in at least one set of recreational             felony to the Dean of Students within 15
programs. These programs include Intra-                university business days following registra-
murals, Sports Club, RU Outdoors and the               tion or the date the action was taken. Please
Hurlburt Hall Games Room.                              contact the Dean of Students Office if clari-
                                                       fication is necessary.
CODES AND POLICIES
Student Conduct                                        STUDENT SERVICES
   All students are expected to become
familiar with the contents of the Standards of         Graduate Student Lounge
Student Conduct and are responsible for act-              There is a lounge available for gradu-
ing in accordance with the policies contained          ate students on the fifth floor of McConnell
therein. Students who do not receive a copy            Library, Room 562. This lounge provides
of the Standards of Student Conduct at ori-            computers and printers in a quiet, comfort-
entation, registration or in the residence hall        able work area to support graduate students'
may obtain a copy at the Dean of Students              research and scholarship.
Office or view the document online at:




     Radford Highlander fans display their loyalty with "Dread the Red" tees.
                                                  36
Minority Student Services                              does not have a structured program for stu-
    Various services and programs for                  dents with disabilities in terms of designated
minority students at Radford University are            courses and class sections specifically related
coordinated by the Director of Multicultural           to their individual needs.
Services, in conjunction with other depart-                For more information, students can
ments. During a reception each semester,               check out the DRO website at:
new students are introduced to other stu-                  www.radford.edu.edu/dro-web,
dents, faculty and staff and are encouraged                e-mail at dro-web@radford.edu,
to get involved in campus life.                            or phone 540-831-6350 (Voice/TTY).
    The Black Student Affairs Council,
which is affiliated with the Student                    International Student Services
Government Association, addresses black                   For information about international stu-
student concerns and interests, helps coor-            dent services, see p. 20.
dinate activities sponsored by black student
organizations and seeks to unite all students          Commuting and Off-Campus
at the university.                                     Student Services
    The African-American             Heritage              Commuting and off-campus student ser-
Association is designed to promote African-            vices are coordinated by the Office of the
American history, heritage and achieve-                Dean of Students and the Off-Campus
ments through programming and other                    Student Council, a branch of the Student
activities. The Hispanic and Asian Student             Government Association. Lounges are pro-
Association and the Native American                    vided for commuters/off-campus students
Heritage Association are also active on                in several campus buildings.
campus. Eight historically black Greek                     Announcements of interest to commut-
letter organizations complement social and             ing/off-campus students are posted on the
service opportunities on campus. The fra-              Off-Campus Student Council’s web page
ternities are Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha             at: http://www.radford.edu/ocsc.
Psi, Phi Beta Sigma and Omega Psi Phi.
                                                       Parking
The sororities are Alpha Kappa Alpha,
                                                           Students may park motor vehicles, motor-
Delta Sigma Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho
                                                       cycles and motor bikes in university parking
and Zeta Phi Beta.
                                                       lots if they have obtained a parking permit
    Social, cultural and educational activities
                                                       from the Parking Services Office located in
designed to broaden all students’ knowl-
                                                       Walker Hall. To purchase a parking permit,
edge of different people and their contribu-
                                                       students must submit proof of ownership
tions to society are presented annually by
                                                       (by the student or a member of the student’s
the Black Awareness Programming Board
                                                       immediate family), personal identification
and the Diversity Promotions Council. For
                                                       and verification of hours earned. The reg-
further information, contact the director of
                                                       istration of a vehicle does not assure the
Multicultural Services at (540) 831-5765.
                                                       registrant of a parking space. Overflow
Disability Resource Office                              parking is available for all students at
   Assistance for students who have a doc-             the Dedmon Center. Time-limited parking
umented disability is offered through the              (two or four hours) is permitted on city
Disability Resource Office (DRO). Services              streets adjacent to the campus. Detailed
may include providing reasonable academic              information regarding parking and traffic
accommodations, career counseling, study               regulations may be obtained at the Parking
skill assistance and personal counseling.              Services Office in Walker Hall or at the
   Radford University’s approach focuses               University Police Department in the Allen
on the coordination of existing resources and          Building.
services to assist students. The University

                                                  37
Off-Campus Housing                                    PHYSICAL AND MENTAL
   A substantial number of rooms and apart-           HEALTH SERVICES
ments for rent are available in the immediate         Health Center
vicinity of the campus. A list of off-cam-
pus apartments is available at the Dean of               The Student Health Center is located on
Students Office. Students living off campus            the ground floor of east Moffett Hall. The
may purchase meal tickets and eat in the uni-         center is equipped to provide diagnosis and
versity dining halls. Several meal plans are          treatment for most of the common health
available to off-camps students (see Dining           problems encountered by students. Serious
Services, p. 39).                                     medical situations are referred to a network
                                                      of local specialists. Over-the-counter medi-
Center for Experiential Learning and                  cations and a limited number of pharma-
Career Development                                    ceuticals are provided. Emergency medical
    The center is located in the lower level          care is available at the Carilion New River
of Tyler Hall and provides walk-in assis-             Valley Medical Center.
tance daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday                Students are encouraged to contact the
through Friday.                                       Health Center regarding any special health
   Services include career counseling and             concerns they bring to the university. Health
the administration of career assessments              information is confidential. Students must
including the Strong-Campbell Interest                complete the RADFORD UNIVERSITY
Inventory, the Self Directed Search, the              HEALTH RECORD FORM prior to enroll-
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Sigi Plus and            ment. Please note that two MMR injections
Virginia View. Students interested in select-         are mandatory and must be included in the
ing a major, changing their major or under-           immunization record.
standing how the academic major trans-                   The Student Health Center is accred-
lates into a career will find this invaluable.         ited by the Accreditation Association for
Typical sessions include an assessment of             Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. (AAAHC).
skills and abilities, values and the interac-            Consult the Student Health Center bro-
tion between career and personal goals.               chure for hours of operation.
   Other services include help with the loca-
tion and application process for internship           Center for Counseling and
placements, service learning or volunteer             Student Development
experiences.
   Students are encouraged to develop a                   The Center for Counseling and Student
strong portfolio of skills and accomplish-            Development, located in Tyler Hall, is a place
ments that support their academic program             where students can talk privately and confi-
of studies. Individual and group assistance is        dentially about issues which are of concern
provided with career planning, the location           to them. Among the issues for which students
of career information, job search process,            frequently seek assistance are adjustment to
resume development and interview prepara-             college, depression and anxiety and relation-
tion.                                                 ship concerns. Counseling at the CCSD is pro-
   Programs include the Success Seminars              vided by professional counselors, psycholo-
for Interns, New Student Service Month,               gists, social workers and by graduate students
Alternative Spring Break programs,                    in counseling programs. Services at the CCSD
an extensive database of internship and               are free to both undergraduate and graduate
employment opportunities, an on-campus                students at Radford University, and confiden-
recruitment program and career fairs.                 tiality is strictly maintained for all information
                                                      shared in counseling. Specific services at the
                                                      CCSD include:


                                                 38
• Individual personal counseling is offered              or for more information, call (540) 831-
  for whatever concerns students may have.               6035 or see the website at: www.radford.
  Typical topics include stress, anxiety, depres-        edu/write.
  sion, sexuality, motivation, home, relation-
  ships and adjustment. Personality testing is           DINING SERVICES
  administered as appropriate.
• Workshops and groups include commu-                         Dalton Dining Hall and Terrace Shops
  nications, study skills, sexuality, career,            feature a variety of shops including Au
  grief and support groups for minorities,               Bon Pain and Sbarro’s Pizza and Pasta and
  students with disabilities and students                Freshens. Au Bon Pain features gourmet
  with other concerns.                                   coffee, pastries and six varieties of soup
    For an appointment or information, stop              to compliment sandwich selections. The
by the lower level of Tyler Hall or call                 Terrace Shops accept cash, debit and credit
(540) 831-5226 for Center for Counseling                 cards, food dollars, flex dollars and RU
and Student Development or (540) 831-                    Express.
6350 (V/TDD) for the Disability Resource                      Menutainment! and The Fresh Grille
Office.                                                   in Dalton Dining Hall offers cooked-to-
                                                         order entrees. Terra Ve, offering vegetarian
Speech and Hearing Clinic                                selections, Market Carvery and Trattoria
   The Speech and Hearing Clinic, located                are new approaches to campus dining. This
in Waldron Hall, provides services for                   is an all-you-can-eat facility. The Hurlburt
students, faculty and staff. Graduate stu-               Student Center, nicknamed “The Bonnie,”
dents majoring in communication sciences                 has Chick-fil-A, The Max at RU, Wendy's,
and disorders provide the services under                 Salsaritas and Starbucks.
the direct supervision of faculty members.                    Stack’s Café, located in McConnell
Hearing evaluations and hearing aid evalu-               Library, has gourmet coffee, espresso, cap-
ations are available, as are rehabilitation              puccino, Au Bon Pain soups and a wide
services for the hearing-impaired person.                selection of sandwiches and salads. Stack’s
Speech and language evaluations and thera-               Café accepts cash, food dollars, flex dollars,
py are provided for persons with articulation,           debit and credit cards and RU Express.
stuttering, voice or language problems. The                   Muse Marketplace features Traditions
services are free for Radford University                 for homestyle meals, including rotisserie
students, faculty and dependents.                        chicken. Sub Central features deli sand-
Appointments may be made by calling                      wiches; Baja Flats has a rotating assortment
(540) 831-7660 (V/TDD).                                  of specialty items; Pazzelli’s offers signa-
                                                         ture pizza and pasta; and Menutainment!
                                                         has the fresh cooked entrée of the day.
WRITING CENTER                                           Muse Marketplace is also an all-you-can-
   The Writing Center, located in Muse                   eat facility.
Hall, assists students with written com-                      Residence hall students participate in
munication. Graduate and undergraduate                   a choice of meal plans. For more informa-
English majors who have experience as                    tion, call dining services at (540) 831-5351,
peer leaders work with students on personal              the RU Express office at (540) 831-5054 or
writing or on specific writing assignments.               visit www.radford.edu/~dining and www.
Tutors trained in teaching English as a                  radford.edu/ru-exprs.
second language are available to help inter-
national students. To make an appointment




                                                    39
MEAL PLANS FOR OFF-CAMPUS                                 The Walker Technology Center has over
STUDENTS                                               100 Windows and Macintosh workstations
   Meal plans available to the off-campus              offering a wide variety of hardware and
student include any 90 or 65 meals per                 software. The center offers Internet access,
semester or 5, 7, 12, 15 or 20 meals per               laserjet printers, flatbed and 35MM scanners
week. Each plan entitles you to a number of            and CD-ROM burners. All workstations are
meals per week plus Food Dollars, which                equipped with Zip, 3.5 floppy and CD-ROM
can be used in any cash operation in the               drives. Users are required to bring their own
Dalton Hall Terrace Shops. Payment plan                floppies or 100MB Zip disks to save their
options are available for all off-campus               work. Users of the center must abide by the
meal plans through the RU Express Office                Radford University Computing Policies and
in Walker Hall.                                        appropriate copyright laws.
                                                          The Walker Technology Center offers
                                                       two teaching computer labs and a multime-
TECHNOLOGY SERVICES                                    dia classroom with ceiling-mounted data
   Information Technology Resources                    projectors that can be reserved for teaching
(ITR) http://www.radford.edu/itr consists              and presentations.
of Academic Computing, Administrative
Information Systems, Systems Administration
and Operations and Technology Assistance               ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
Center. ITR provides comprehensive com-                COMPUTING RESOURCES
puter and information technology support for               Many academic departments use computers
the University.                                        in their curricula and maintain software specific
   Students, faculty and staff have access             to their needs. Hours of operation are posted
to a wide variety of computer, network and             and vary. Each department determines access
Internet resources.                                    to the labs. A complete list of academic depart-
                                                       ments with location and software can be found
WALKER TECHNOLOGY CENTER                               at http://www.radford.edu/acadcomp/.
http://www.radford.edu/walkertc
                                                       Department               Computer
    The Walker Technology Center is a gen-             Art                      Macintosh
eral purpose computer lab facility available           Biology                  Macintosh
for use by all students, faculty and staff upon        Business/Economics       Windows
presentation of a valid RU ID card. This center        Chemistry/Physics        Windows
is located on the second floor of Walker Hall           Computer Science         Windows, UNIX
and offers access to computers, hardware and           Education                Windows
software. Hours for the fall and spring terms          Interior Design          Windows
are as follows:                                        Foreign Language         Windows
                                                       Geography                Windows
Monday – Thursday 7 a.m. – 2 a.m.                      Geology                  Windows
Friday            7 a.m. – 8 p.m.                      Mathematics/Statistics Windows
Saturday         10 a.m. – 8 p.m.                      Media Studies            Macintosh
Sunday           10 a.m. – 2 a.m.                      Music                    Macintosh
                                                       Physical Education       Windows
                                                       Teaching Resource Center Macintosh,
                                                                                Windows
                                                       Theater                  Macintosh




                                                  40
   A few of the academic labs are high-              students at no charge while enrolled at the
lighted below:                                       University. The Internet account provides
   The Art computer lab in Powell 206 offers         access to e-mail, individual web pages, the
Power Macintosh G4 computers. Software               World Wide Web and RU Network and is
includes image processing and graphic design.        required for online registration.
This lab is available to students taking Art            Dial-in modems are available to RU
courses.                                             accounts through a phone connection. The
   Geography maintains a computer lab                modem pool supports 56K (v.90) PPP connec-
in Cook Hall with Windows and UNIX                   tions. RU modem pool access numbers are:
workstations to teach geographic concepts               Local 633-1894
and research techniques using geographic                Dublin 643-2550
information systems and image process-                  Roanoke 857-8923
ing. Software includes AutoCad, AtlasGIS,               Long Distance (charge) 540-633-1894
ERDAS and Arc/Info.                                     Technology Training classes are non-
   The geology, chemistry and physics                credit and free to enrolled students. Visit the
computer lab is in Curie 147 with Windows            RU Technology Training web page at http://
computers. Software includes MoluCad,                www.radford.edu/tektrain for an overall list
Sigma Plot, Visual Groundwater, Visual               of training classes offered at RU.
Mudflow, Rockworks, Red Shift and
Voyages through the Solar System.
   Music, located in Powell Hall, features           OTHER STUDENT SUPPORT
several special labs for music instruction           SERVICES
with Macintosh G4 computers. Powell 106
has synthesizers to create MIDI composi-             Hurlburt Student Information Center
tions connected to computers.                           Hurlburt Student Center Information
   Speech communications provides inter-             Office is the central information office for
active multimedia instruction on video-              the Department of Student Activities and
disc in the areas of Critical Thinking,              the campus. Staffed by a manager and stu-
Constructing and Using Speaking Outlines,            dent assistants, the office provides informa-
Mission Possible: Listening, Effective               tion on campus events and assists with plan-
Introductions and Conclusions, Developing            ning, scheduling organized activities, and
Key Ideas and Coping with Speech Fright.             placing events on the university calendar.
These programs are available in the Walker           The office serves as a ticket outlet for visual
Technology Center. See the lab proctor to            and performing arts and events sponsored
view these programs.                                 by all-campus programming groups. Also,
                                                     the office has a lost and found, key check-
   The College of Education and
                                                     out for student organizations' offices and
Human Development has two comput-
                                                     conference rooms in Hurlburt, and a laptop
er labs. Russell 211 has Windows com-                check-out system. The information office is
puters. Software includes Crossword                  responsible for the operation of the build-
Plus and Learning Plus. The Teaching                 ing’s sound system and also a broadcast
Resource Center in Walker has Macintosh              system where advertisements for approved
and Windows computers with word pro-                 events are created and broadcasted on mul-
cessing and multimedia development                   tiple televisions on campus.
software. The center is available to students
and faculty in the College of Education. The
TRC is also a Virginia Regional Teaching             I.D. Cards
Resource Center for the public schools.                 Students must present I.D. cards to use
   Campus and Internet e-mail accounts               certain campus facilities and services. I.D.
are available to all Radford University              card photographs are taken in Walker Hall.


                                                41
   If a university I.D. card is lost or stolen,         Post Office
the student must contact the ID/RU Express                A U.S. Post Office is located in Dalton
Card Office (540-831-5054) in Walker Hall                Hall.
for a replacement. The replacement fee of
$15 is payable at the time the photograph is
                                                        McConnell Library
taken. If a university I.D. card is lost or sto-        http://lib.radford.edu/
len after 5 p.m. or during the weekend, the
                                                            The John Preston McConnell Library,
student must contact Campus Police (540-
                                                        named for the first president of Radford
831-5500) to invalidate the I.D. card. Only
                                                        University, supports and enhances the uni-
the ID/RU Express Office may revalidate a
                                                        versity’s academic programs by providing col-
university I.D. card.
                                                        lections, access and instructional services for
RU Express Card
                                                        students and faculty. Serving as a link between
                                                        the library's resources and users, the library's
    Students may use their university I.D.              professional faculty and staff anticipate needs,
card as a debit card (the RU Express card)              provide state-of-the-art technologies and solic-
by making an initial deposit of at least $25            it feedback, are integrated into McConnell's
to their card’s account. Purchases made with            user-center services.
the card are limited to the card’s current bal-
ance, which can be increased by additional              Collections
deposits and which declines with each pur-                 McConnell Library contains a growing
chase made with the card. The current bal-              collection of more than 500,000 print and
ance is displayed after each transaction.               electronic resources, including books, peri-
    The RU Express card offers three types              odicals, newspapers, online databases, CD-
of accounts: the Food Dollars account, the              ROMs, DVDs, microforms, videotapes and
Food Dollars Plus account and the RU                    other media. Sixteen librarians and 19 staff
Express account. The latter enables stu-                provide a variety of services, including ref-
dents to make purchases at a wide variety               erence assistance, instruction, outreach and
of campus locations, including the book-                borrowing of materials.
store, food court and vending and laundry                  The Radford Rooms, located off the
machines and at a number of off-campus                  main Reading Room on Level 3, contain
businesses.                                             special displays, historic photographs and
    More information is available by contact-           other items of significance to the history of
ing the I.D./RU Express Office in Walker Hall            Radford University.
(Box 6992).                                                University Archives and Special Col-
                                                        lections are located on the 5th level and
Vending Services
                                                        hold historical university records, includ-
   Soft drink and snack machine refunds are             ing Board of Visitors documents and
available at the Office of Residential Life in           University-sponsored publications. Special
the basement of Tyler Hall and the Dedmon               collections include Virginia Iron Coal and
Center main entrance. To report a malfunc-              Coke Company records, the personal library
tioning machine, call (540) 831-6267 with               of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Arthur J.
the machine location and the nature of the              Goldberg and the Keystone Glass Slide
problem.                                                Collection, which is available online at
                                                        http://lib.radford.edu/keystone/index.html.
Lost and Found
                                                           The library catalog (http://rulib.radford.
   A lost and found service is provided at              edu) is the gateway to a wide variety
the information office in Hurlburt Hall. For             of books, e-books, journals, e-journals,
additional assistance, call 831-5420.                   periodical indexes and other electronic
                                                        information. The broad range of resources

                                                   42
include netLibrary, JSTOR, InfoTrac and                 and there are two multimedia classrooms
Classical Music Library.                                for group instruction. Anyone needing help
   The library’s website (http://lib.radford.           in using the library is encouraged to ask for
edu) provides access to all of the resources            assistance at the Reference Desk, send an
of the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA),              e-mail message to refdesk@radford.edu or
which includes online databases, full text              call 540-831-5696.
journals, newspapers, full text works of
poetry and verse drama, statistical reports,            Computers, Printing and
pamphlets and other full text materials.                Photocopying
                                                           There are 95 public computers avail-
Borrowing                                               able in the library; most are located in the
    The Circulation Desk is located on Level            Reference area on Level 3 and there are
3. The Radford University I.D. card serves as           additional workstations on every level.
the valid library card and must be presented            Classroom A and B serves as open com-
in order to check out library materials. The            puter lab when there are no classes sched-
online catalog allows users to manage their             uled. A public scanner is located in the
accounts, renew and request materials and               Reference area.
view electronic course reserves. For more                  Radford students, faculty and staff are
information on Circulation policies, see http://        given a set amount of money with which to
lib.radford.edu/information/Borrowing.asp or            print. Public users must pay for their print-
call the Circulation Desk at 540-831-5364.              outs. Contact the Reference Desk for more
    The Media Services department, locat-               information.
ed on Level 4, houses non-print items,                     Photocopiers are located on Level 2 and
including microform materials, filmstrips,               operate with coins or an RU Express/RU ID
recordings, videotapes, DVDs and teach-                 card. Guests may purchase a guest card.
ing aids, as well as playback equipment
for all media. Media Services also circu-               Special Services
lates camcorders and electronic equipment                  McConnell Library is wheelchair acces-
and manages satellite link-ups and CCTV                 sible and offers services to students with
broadcasts.                                             disabilities, including reading machines,
    Interlibrary Loan service is provided for           text enlargers, personal assistance in locat-
all students and faculty. Requests for mate-            ing and retrieving library materials and
rials not owned by the library are submitted            photocopy enlargements. Contact the
electronically through the ILLiad system at             Circulation Desk for assistance.
illiad.radford.edu and articles are delivered              Locking carrels are available for use
electronically via e-mail.                              by graduate and honors students engaged
                                                        in research projects and may be reserved
Reference & Research Assistance                         through the Library Administrative
   The Reference/Instruction Services de-               Office (831-5471).
partment, located on Level 3, offers a wide                A Graduate Study Lounge, equipped with
range of resources and services, includ-                three computers and a laser printer, is locat-
ing individualized research assistance,                 ed in Room 562. Two group study rooms for
library tours and course-related instruction.           student use are located on Level 5. One is
Reference works, periodical indexes and                 available for sign-up only, while the other is
abstracts and many other general and spe-               available on a first-come, first-served basis.
cialized research tools are available for use.             Stacks Café, located off the main
In addition, there are computer workstations            Reading Room on Level 3, features gour-
for accessing a continuously expanding                  met coffee and light snacks.
variety of electronic information resources


                                                   43
For more information                                 Human Services curriculum. Course-
    Students should visit the website http://        related instruction is provided in the Harvey
lib.radford.edu/information/students.asp to          Center’s multimedia classroom. A large
familiarize themselves with the information          collection of health science videos, DVDs,
resources, facilities and services available.        CD-ROMs, software can be checked out by
                                                     students and faculty. The Harvey Center
Harvey Health Information Resource                   also collaborates with RU Clinics and
Center                                               area health agencies on projects that use
   The George Harvey Health Information              technology to make health information
Resource Center, located in Waldron                  resources more available to underserved
College, provides information resources              populations.
and services to support the Health and




                                                44
Academic Policies




                                                                                                        ACADEMIC POLICIES
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE                                  to documented official university-sponsored
GRADUATE STUDENT                                       activities, health problems and other emer-
                                                       gencies. It is the student’s responsibility to
    The student must become familiar with              make arrangements, which are acceptable to
the academic policies outlined in this sec-            the instructor, to complete work missed dur-
tion of the catalog. The academic adviser              ing the student’s absence from class.
will advise the student on all matters relat-             Official university-sponsored activities
ed to the program of study and the dean of             include, but are not limited to, those events
the Graduate College will aid the student              which students attend as official delegates
in the interpretation of policies whenever             funded by the university or in which they
necessary. The ultimate responsibility for             represent a university-funded, all-campus
meeting all stated requirements for gradu-             organization, intercollegiate athletic team
ate degrees awarded by the university rests            or performing group and academic course-
with the student.                                      related field trips in which participation is
    A Graduate Information Checklist of mat-           mandatory as approved by the appropriate
ters which must be attended to during the              academic dean.
graduate program appears on p. 7 of this
catalog and is included in the student’s letter
of admission.                                          ADVISING
                                                       Faculty Advisers
Class Attendance                                           Academic advising is recognized at the
    All students are expected to attend                university as important to the educational
classes on a regular basis. No absences                development of its students and as both a
of any nature will be construed as reliev-             natural extension of teaching and an impor-
ing the student from responsibility for the            tant professional obligation on the part of
completion of all work assigned by the                 its faculty. Sound academic advice helps the
instructor.                                            student address not simply course selection
    A student registering late for a class will        and scheduling but also what a well-educated
be responsible for all work assigned and               person should be and know.
material covered during the class sessions                 After consultation with the chairperson
that were missed due to the late registra-             of the major department of each student
tion.                                                  admitted to graduate study, the dean of the
    The first class meeting of an evening               Graduate College will assign each student
class, which meets one night per week for              an adviser. Any request for a change in
15 weeks, represents about seven percent               adviser must be requested by the student
of the total class time; this first meeting is a        on a “Petition for Program Changes” form
regular class. If students wait until the sec-         and approved by the chairperson in the
ond class meeting to enroll, the class could           appropriate department and the dean of the
be cancelled due to inadequate enrollment              Graduate College before action is taken.
at the first class meeting.
    During the first week of each course,               Student’s Graduate Committee
the instructor shall inform students of the               The major adviser will serve as thesis
attendance policies for the course. Class              adviser of the student’s graduate committee,
attendance policies are determined by the              which will consist of at least two additional
instructor and should allow for a reasonable           faculty members. The adviser must be a full
number of absences which are required due              member of the graduate faculty. The other

                                                  45
two committee members must have gradu-               C indicates work below Graduate College
ate faculty status. Adjunct graduate faculty            expectations
and graduate faculty associates may serve            D is given for work of significantly below
on a thesis committee with the permission               average quality and indicates the course
of the Dean of the College of Graduate and              must be retaken
Professional Studies.                                F indicates failure and means the class
   If the student’s graduate program                    must be taken again with a passing
includes a minor, one member of the grad-               grade before credit is allowed
uate committee must be from the minor                AU indicates the student audited the
field. This member must approve the four                 course
courses (minimum of 12 semester hours)               I indicates work is incomplete. See
that constitute the minor. For further infor-           “Incomplete Grades,” on p. 48.
mation about the composition and func-               IP indicates the course is in progress
tions of the student’s graduate committee,           NG indicates non-graded
see “Thesis or Graduate Recital” on p. 55            NR indicates no grade was recorded by
and “Comprehensive Examination” on p.                   instructor
56. Doctoral programs may have a dif-                P indicates passed with satisfactory work
ferent procedure and students should refer              of “B” or better
to their doctoral program handbook. See              W indicates that a student withdrew, with-
Psy.D. website for more information on                  out penalty, from the course after sched-
dissertations.                                          ule adjustment but before the end of
                                                        the 12th week and that no credit was
Grading System                                          obtained
A is given for excellent work
                                                        To graduate in a graduate degree program,
B is given for work that meets Graduate
                                                     the student must have a minimum 3.0 grade
  College expectations




            The Master of Fine Arts program offers graduate students
            the skills necessary to thrive in highly competitive careers.


                                                46
point average overall and in the program of              PASS-FAIL COURSES
study. Grades in transfer courses are not used in
calculating grade point averages. Only courses               All courses taken at Radford while clas-
graded B or higher can be transferred. Courses           sified as a graduate student, except those in
graded B- or lower will not be accepted for              which a grade of "P" is obtained, will be used
transfer credit. In addition, every course on            in calculation of the grade point average. The
the program of study must be completed                   total number of hours attempted, excluding
with at least a grade of C.                              those in courses graded on a Pass/Fail basis,
                                                         is divided into the number of grade points
Note: Some departments have more strin-                  obtained in order to arrive at the grade point
gent requirements; please refer to your                  average. Any Pass/Fail course in which an
program or departmental handbook.                        "F" is assigned will be calculated in the stu-
   The quality of work completed is rec-                 dent’s overall grade point average.
ognized by the assignment of grade points                    A minimum of 80 percent of the required
to various letter grades. The student’s aca-             courses on a student’s program of study
demic standing depends upon the number                   must be taken for a grade and a maximum
of semester hours of work successfully                   of 20 percent can be taken as Pass/Fail.
completed and upon the number of grade                   Practica experience and internships are
points accumulated. Radford University                   exceptions to this rule. If a combination of
uses a four point system in which grade                  thesis, dissertation, practica and/or intern-
points are assigned to grades as follows:                ship exceeds 20 percent of the student’s
         A = 4 points                                    program of study, the student must take the
         B = 3 points                                    rest of his or her course work for a grade.
         C = 2 points                                    No course taken Pass/Fail for which a
         D = 1 point                                     letter grade can be assigned is acceptable
         F = 0 points                                    unless recommended by a faculty member
   A student’s grade point average is com-               and supported by the department chair and
puted by:                                                approved by the Graduate Dean.
• Multiplying the number of semester
  hours (SH) for each course taken by the                REPETITION OF COURSES
  number of grade points (GP) correspond-
  ing to the grade earned for the course                    If a student repeats for credit a course
  (see table above).                                     in which a C, D or an F was obtained, both
• Adding up the total number of grade                    the original grade and hours attempted and
  points for the appropriate period (a single            the subsequent grade and hours attempted
  semester, for example or an entire aca-                will be used in the calculation of a grade
  demic career at Radford University)                    point average. No more than six credits of
• Dividing the total number of grade points by           coursework may be repeated in this way.
  the total number of semester hours attempted
                                                         Courses taken in which a “B” or “A” was
  (TSHA) during that same period.
  For example:                                           obtained may not be taken a second time
                               GP                        for credit.
Course      Grade     SH       Per SH   GP
ABC 401     A         3x       4=       12
DEF 502     B         2x       3=        6
GHI 601     C         3x       2=        6
JKL 601     B         3x       3=        9
MNO 702     A         3x       4=       12
                      __       __       ___
                      14       45       45
GP/14
TSHA = 3.21/GPA

                                                    47
INCOMPLETE GRADES                                      FULL-TIME STATUS
    At the faculty member’s discretion, the               The normal full-time load for a graduate
letter “I” may be entered on the student’s             student is nine hours per semester including
transcript for a course whenever some por-             summer, with a maximum of 14.
tion of the required work has not been com-
pleted by the end of the semester. A written
statement of the requirements for removal              SUMMER SESSIONS
of the grade of “I” must be signed by the                  Any graduate student who enrolls in
faculty member and student and filed in the             nine or more semester hours of credit dur-
office of the chairperson of the department             ing Summer Session III or a combination
in which the course is taught, with a copy             totaling nine semester hours of enroll-
submitted to the Registrar along with the              ment in the Maymester, Summer Session
faculty member’s grade sheet.                          I, Summer Session II and Summer Session
    The grade of “I” will automatically revert         III, will be considered a full-time student.
to a grade of F if not satisfactorily removed              A graduate student may enroll for a maxi-
according to the following schedule:                   mum of 14 semester hours of credit using any
Latest date for removal                                combination of enrollments in the Summer
Fall     End of the last day of classes                Sessions.
         for the spring semester
Spring End of the last day of classes
         for the fall semester                         GPA DEFICIENCY
Summer End of the last day of classes                     A student who has not met the minimum
         for the fall semester                         3.0 grade point average in their program
    A grade of “IP” (In Progress) will be              of study or overall, may, during their last
used for thesis, graduate recital, practica,           semester, take up to six semester hours to
internship or dissertation in which case the           make up deficiencies. These courses must
supervising professor determines whether               be approved by the adviser, department
or not an exception is warranted and has               chair and graduate dean.
the option of specifying the length of time
(maximum of two years from time of reg-
                                                       GRADE CHANGES/CORRECTIONS
istration) the student has to complete the
work.                                                     Students who feel they received a grade
    Once the grade of “I” and/or “IP” is               in error should contact the appropriate
placed on the transcript, it remains on the            faculty member. If the faculty confirms
transcript until it is replaced by the appro-          that an error has indeed been made, then
priate grade when all course requirements              the faculty member must process a grade
are completed or when the deadline for                 change form and submit it to the Office of
completion has passed.                                 the Registrar no later than one year after the
    Except for a thesis, directed study, grad-         submission of the original grade (excluding
uate recital, practica, internship or disserta-        Incompletes).
tion, a student cannot re-enroll for a course
for which an “I” or “IP” is recorded on the
transcript. A degree cannot be awarded to              GRADE APPEALS
students with Incompletes on their records.               Students wishing to appeal grades
    See p. 51 for information regarding                received in courses should refer to the
Continuous Enrollment.                                 Graduate Grade Appeal Procedures and



                                                  48
associated forms posted on the Graduate                 the experience; c) circumstances under
College website: http://www.radford.edu/                which the student may be withdrawn from
gradcollege/current_students/forms_appli-               or denied entry to, the experience; and
cations.html.                                           d) processes, including appeals, which
                                                        regulate such withdrawals.
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE                                     Departments and programs governed
                                                     by the above policy include, but are not
  For concerns other than grade appeals stu-         limited to: Communication Sciences and
dents wishing to intiate the grievance pro-          Disorders, Psychology, Counseling and
cess should refer to the Graduate Grievance          Human Development, Criminal Justice,
Procedures and associated forms posted on            Educational Studies, Music, Nursing, Social
the Graduate College website: http://www.            Work and Special Education. Policies spe-
radford.edu/gradcollege/current_students/            cific to each program will be on file in the
forms_applications.html.                             Office of the Provost for Academic Affairs,
                                                     the Graduate College and in each depart-
                                                     ment office. Students planning to take such
PRACTICA/INTERNSHIP                                  courses should obtain a copy of the rel-
APPLICATIONS                                         evant departmental policies and procedures
                                                     before registration in the course.
    Students preparing to complete a field
component of their program should apply
to the department and/or program in which
they are enrolled. Departments and/or pro-           DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
grams will monitor and regulate admission
into all programmatic field experiences.
                                                     Doctoral Degree Requirements
Students must have prior written approval
                                                     See Psy.D. courses on page 97.
of the department chair or graduate coordi-
nator before they are permitted to register
                                                     Minimum Degree Requirements
for any field experience.
                                                     (Master’s and Ed.D.’s)
    Undergraduate and graduate programs,
                                                         For all graduate degrees, at least 80 per-
in which students are required to participate
                                                     cent of the credit hours in the major and 80
in a practical experience, including intern-
                                                     percent of the hours in the overall program
ships, practica, clinical courses, student
                                                     must be in 600- or 700-level courses.
teaching and fieldwork shall:
                                                         All degree programs require that the stu-
1. Provide written information to potential
                                                     dent complete a minimum of 30 or more
    majors about the qualities of character
                                                     semester hours of graduate-level work with
    and interpersonal skills that are nor-
                                                     at least a B average in the major, in the over-
    mally expected in order to complete the
                                                     all program and in all courses taken since
    program successfully.
                                                     admission.
2. Identify (when feasible) potential prob-
                                                         At least 24 credits must consist of Radford
    lems the student may have in a practi-
                                                     University courses. Some programs may
    cal experience prior to engaging in the
                                                     have additional credit hour requirements. A
    experience, make those concerns known
                                                     six-hour thesis, graduate recital or creative
    to the student and make appropriate rec-
                                                     project is required for all Master of Arts and
    ommendations to the student.
                                                     Master of Fine Arts programs.
3. Provide the following: a) written criteria
                                                         Specific requirements for each program
    for entry into a practical experience and
                                                     are listed in the departmental sections.
    procedures for implementation of those
                                                         The professional education training pro-
    criteria; b) performance standards during
                                                     grams are those with either a major or a minor

                                                49
in education. If education courses are to be          Program Requirements
used in the minor, the entire minor must be               All students enrolled in a degree
in education.                                         program will, at the time of admission,
                                                      receive a program requirements sheet
Minors                                                which lists all courses, including defi-
   A minor at the graduate level will consist         ciencies, which the student must com-
of a minimum of 12 semester hours and four            plete in order to meet degree requirements.
graduate courses taken at Radford University.         Please check with your department for any
A faculty member from the field in which               variation on this form.
the student is to minor must, in consultation             The program requirements sheet will
with other faculty in the minor department,           be the responsibility of the department in
approve the four graduate courses that will           which the student is enrolled and must ful-
constitute the minor. If the specified require-        fill all the requirements of the appropriate
ments for a minor are met, the minor will be          degree program as published in the catalog.
identified on the student’s transcript.                The year of the catalog being followed
                                                      must be indicated on this form.
Undergraduate Deficiencies                                 Once a course in the program has been
   Students enrolled in Master of Science             attempted, it cannot be deleted from the
degree programs with a major or a minor               program. Every course on the program
in education who plan to work in the public           requirements sheet must be completed with
elementary or secondary schools must hold             at least a grade of C and the average must
the Collegiate Professional Certificate or take        be at least a B.
nine semester hours of undergraduate educa-               Changes in the program must receive
tion courses (which will not count towards the        the same approvals as the original program.
master’s degree) before they will be allowed          The Petition for Program Change is avail-
to take for graduate credit any 500-level or          able online at www.radford.edu/gradcol-
600-level courses offered by the College of           lege/ or in the Graduate College Office
Education and Human Development.                      in Lucas Hall and in most departmental
   For departments outside the College of             offices.
Education and Human Development, the
number of hours of undergraduate courses
required in the major area before 600-level           CHANGE OF MAJOR
courses can be taken in the major is speci-              A graduate student may change from
fied in the departmental sections.                     one degree program to another if he or she
   Students will be advised in their let-             meets the criteria for admission to the new
ters of admission of any undergraduate                program and is accepted by the program.
deficiencies as well as the program require-           The student must file a Change of Major
ments. They should contact their academic             form with the Graduate College Office,
advisers immediately to discuss how these             which forwards all credentials to the new
deficiencies may be made up.                           department for an admission decision. The stu-
   Students who have not completed defi-               dent is notified of the decision by the Graduate
ciencies by the completion of 12 semester             College.
hours or by the end of their second semes-               A student who changes graduate degree
ter will be blocked from registering for              programs may choose a catalog no earlier
additional courses.                                   than the one in effect at the time of official
   All work taken to satisfy deficiencies will         admission into the new program or the cat-
appear on the official transcript and will be          alog under which the student next enrolls.
calculated in the overall grade point average.



                                                 50
SUPPORTING COURSES                                     CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT
    The student should list on the program                 All graduate students are required to be
requirement sheet all courses taken in sup-            registered during the semester they receive
port of the master’s program but not used              their degree from Radford University.
as part of the degree program.                         Registration and tuition payment are
    These supporting courses can be courses            required of all graduate students when
needed to make up undergraduate deficien-               using University facilities and/or faculty
cies or graduate-level courses which the               time. The minimum number of hours for
student and adviser feel may be beneficial              registration is one. Registration allows use
but are not absolutely necessary as part of            of services such as library checkout, labo-
the approved program. An average of at                 ratories and recreation facilities not open to
least a B is required in supporting courses,           the public.
as it is in all other courses taken by a gradu-            Students who are not currently regis-
ate student.                                           tered for any course work and who have
    All work taken as supporting courses               completed all course work but have other
will appear on the official transcript and              outstanding degree requirements (e.g., com-
will be calculated in the overall grade point          prehensive examination, thesis, removal of
average.                                               an I or IP grade), are required to register for
                                                       a continuous enrollment course each semes-
                                                       ter, including summer, until they have met
TRANSFER OF CREDIT; OFF-                               the outstanding requirement(s). This course
CAMPUS CREDIT                                          carries no credit hour production and does
   A maximum of one third of the total                 not count toward degree requirements. This
graduate hours in a program of study may               course option is also available to those
be transferred from another RU program or              admitted students who are not enrolled
an outside institution. Some programs may              in a given semester but who wish to use
have more stringent requirements. Only                 University facilities and services during
credit for A and B grades from a regionally            that time. This form is available online or
accredited institution or university transfer.         in the Graduate College office in Lucas
(Credit for grades of B- will not transfer).           Hall. Approval of the professor of record
Credits applied previously toward another              and the Dean of the College of Graduate
degree cannot be transferred. All transfer             and Professional Studies is required prior
credit must be approved by the student’s               to registration.
adviser after consultation with graduate
faculty in the discipline involved and by the          CORRESPONDENCE CREDIT
dean of the Graduate College.
   Any student enrolled in a degree pro-                  No correspondence credit, wherever
gram at Radford University who wishes                  earned, can be applied toward any graduate
to take transferable graduate work as a                degree awarded at Radford University.
transient student at another institution must
secure approval from his or her adviser
                                                       500-LEVEL COURSES
and from the dean of the Graduate College
before such work is taken. Courses which                  Faculty teaching graduate students in
will not be accepted for graduate credit by            500-level courses are expected to require
the institutions offering the courses will not         additional work of these students if the
be accepted by Radford University.                     course is being taken for graduate credit.
                                                       This work can be in the form of readings,
                                                       papers or a limited research project. The
                                                       student is responsible for informing the
                                                  51
instructor if the course is being taken for          ACCELERATED BACHELOR’S/
graduate credit. For a student to receive            MASTER’S PROGRAMS
graduate credit for a class, the instructor
of that class must hold graduate faculty                Students accepted for approved bache-
status.                                              lor’s/master’s accelerated programs may
                                                     take up to 12 graduate credits and these
                                                     may count toward both the bachelor’s
PREREQUISITES                                        and master’s degrees. Students in the RN/
    The prerequisites listed in the catalog          BSN/MSN accelerated program may count
for certain graduate courses are the result          up to 15 graduate credits toward both
of thorough consideration of course content          the BSN and MSN degrees. To be eligible
by the graduate faculty in the department            for participation in an accelerated degree
offering the course. A prerequisite will             program, students must have completed at
be waived only if extraordinary circum-              least 60 undergraduate credits and have a
stances exist and if the graduate faculty            cumulative GPA of at least 3.00. Individual
in the appropriate department and the fac-           departments may impose stricter admission
ulty member teaching the course submit               requirements. Admission and completion
a request for waiver to the dean of the              requirements for specific accelerated degree
Graduate College.                                    programs are described in the catalog.
                                                        The objective of accelerated Bachelor’s/
                                                     Master’s degree programs is to provide a
GRADUATE CREDIT FOR                                  means by which exceptional undergraduate
RADFORD UNIVERSITY                                   students at Radford University may complete
SENIORS                                              the requirements for both the Baccalaureate
                                                     and Master’s degrees at an accelerated pace.
    Seniors at Radford University with an               Eligibility: Students must have completed
overall grade point average at Radford of            a minimum of 60 undergraduate credit hours
3.00 or better may be permitted to take up           and have at least 24 credits remaining in their
to six credit hours of graduate-level courses        undergraduate programs. Transfer students
during their final year of undergraduate              must have completed a minimum of two
work. Students have the option of count-             semesters as a full-time student at Radford
ing the course(s) toward their undergradu-           University, a minimum of 24 hours. Students
ate degree or toward a graduate degree,              must have a minimum accumulated grade
if all admission requirements are met.               point average (GPA) of 3.00. (See the RN/
Graduate courses taken to meet baccalaure-           BSN/MSN program details for exceptions to
ate requirements may not be used toward              the eligibility criteria).
a graduate degree, except in approved                   Application to an Accelerated Bachelor’s/
accelerated bachelor’s/master’s programs             Master’s Degree Program: A prospective
(see below).                                         student should set up a meeting with the
    Undergraduate students who wish to take          Graduate Program Coordinator to review the
courses for graduate credit must receive             requirements for an accelerated Bachelor’s
specific approval from the instructor and             and Master’s degree program. Students apply-
the dean of the Graduate College. Request            ing to an accelerated program must submit the
forms are available in the Graduate College          following:
office in Lucas Hall.                                 • "Application for Accelerated Bachelor’s/
                                                         Master’s Programs" form;
                                                     • Transcripts of any courses taken at a college
                                                         or university other than Radford University;
                                                     • Application for Graduate Admission
                                                         form;

                                                52
•   $40.00 non-refundable application fee;               departments may have higher requirements
•   Appropriate test scores, if required by              and a failure to meet these requirements will
    the graduate degree program to which                 make a student ineligible to participate in the
    the prospective student is applying. If              accelerated program. A student who does
    scores are required, they must be submit-            not follow the approved Accelerated Degree
    ted no later than the second week of the             requirements may become ineligible to par-
    term in which conferral of the Bachelor’s            ticipate in the accelerated program. A student
    degree is anticipated;                               who is ineligible to participate in (or with-
•   Any other materials required for admis-              draws from) the accelerated program, cannot
    sion to the graduate program to which                double-count any courses for both Bachelor’s
    the applicant is seeking admission.                  and master’s degrees.

    Upon review of the materials submitted,
a letter of acceptance (or denial) to the                CLASS LOAD
master’s program, contingent on meeting                     The normal full-time load for a graduate
the accelerated requirements and complet-                student is nine hours per semester including
ing the bachelor’s degree, will be sent to the           summer, with a maximum of 14.
student.                                                    A graduate student who is employed
    Participation and Graduation: Students               full time or part time must realize that an
must complete the bachelor’s degree prior                excessive course load might well result in
to entering the master’s program. Students               substandard performance in academics and
in an accelerated program may not elect                  on the job.
to bypass the baccalaureate degree. Students
must receive a grade of B or better in the dou-
ble counted graduate level courses. Courses
                                                         WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURES
with a grade of C or below cannot be double-             Withdrawal from One or More
counted between the two degrees. No more                 But Not All Courses
than 12 hours of graduate work may be                       The student may complete a withdrawal
counted toward the requirements of both                  form in the Registrar’s Office or notify the
degrees (15 hours in the RN/BSN/MSN pro-                 Registrar’s Office in writing or via e-mail
gram). Students must complete the master’s               that he or she wishes to withdraw from
degree within six (6) years of the start of their        one or more (but not all) classes. The with-
first graduate course. If the master’s program            drawal is not complete until the Registrar’s
is not completed within these time limits, none          Office has been notified.
of the graduate courses taken as an under-                  Students must contact the Student Accounts
graduate will be counted toward the master’s             Office in Walker Hall to initiate a request for a
degree. Permission to pursue an accelerated              refund of tuition if they drop a class or classes
degree program does not guarantee admission              prior to the census date and if the reduced
to the Graduate College. Admission is contin-            class load qualifies them for a tuition refund.
gent on meeting eligibility requirements at the             A student who drops a class prior to
time of entering the graduate program.                   the conclusion of schedule adjustment will
    Withdrawal/Ineligibility: A student may              receive no grade. A student who withdraws
at any time withdraw from an approved accel-             from class after schedule adjustment but
erated program by informing the Graduate                 before the end of the 12th week of the
Program Coordinator in writing. A copy of                semester (or 80 percent of a summer ses-
this should be sent to the Graduate College. If          sion) will receive a grade of W. A student
a student completes the Baccalaureate degree             who withdraws from class after the 12th
requirements with an accumulated GPA of                  week of the semester (or 80 percent of sum-
less than 3.0, then he/she is no longer eligible         mer session) will receive a grade of "F."
to pursue the accelerated program. Individual

                                                    53
   A student may not withdraw from more                Students Affairs in cases of documented
than three graduate classes. Anything                  medical or other non-academic reasons.
beyond the third withdrawal results in an
automatic F.
                                                       Withdrawal from Off-campus Course
                                                          Students who register for off-campus
Withdrawal from the University                         courses must adhere to withdrawal policies
(All Courses)                                          and procedures published as outlined above.
    Students withdrawing from all courses
during a given semester must contact the
Registrar’s Office in Martin Hall in writing            RETENTION POLICIES
or via e-mail. This process must be fol-               Good Standing
lowed to ensure the student will receive any              Any student who maintains a minimum
eligible refunds and the appropriate grades            grade point average of 3.00 in graduate
for the semester.                                      courses will be in good standing. However,
    Students who withdraw from the univer-             programs may have more stringent rules for
sity before the end of the tenth day of classes        remaining in degree programs.
(Census Date) will receive no grade. A stu-
dent who withdraws from the university (all            Probation and Dismissal
classes) after the Census Date but prior to                If at any point a student earns a cumulative
the end of the twelfth week of the semester            grade point average below 2.00, the student
(80 percent of summer session) will receive            will be dismissed from the Graduate College
Ws in all classes. Withdrawals from the uni-           with no possibility of reinstatement
versity after the twelfth week will result in              If at any point a graduate student's cumula-
automatic Fs.                                          tive grade point average in graduate courses
    A graduate student may withdraw from               falls between 2.00 and 3.00, the student will
the university only once during his or her             be on probation. Some programs have more
RU academic career. (Cancelling enroll-                stringent requirements for remaining in degree
ment to the university prior to the Census             programs. A full-time student who is on pro-
Date or receiving a medical withdrawal                 bation must take a reduced course load of no
does not count as a withdrawal from the                more than nine semester hours of coursework
university.) Exceptions will be granted by             in a given term. A part-time student on proba-
the graduate college dean or by the Vice               tion may take no more than five semester hours
President for Student Affairs.                         of coursework in a given term.
                                                           To return to good standing, a student must
Withdrawal from Continuance in a                       earn a minimum cumulative grade point aver-
Degree Program                                         age of 3.00 within the first nine graduate
   Graduate students who wish to with-                 credit hours attempted after being placed on
draw from continuance in a degree program              probation. A student who does not meet the
at Radford University should submit a let-             minimum cumulative grade point average in
ter in writing to the Graduate Admissions              that time period will be dismissed from the
Coordinator, Box 6928, Radford University,             Graduate College. A student who has been on
Radford, VA 24142.                                     probation and then reinstated may again be on
                                                       probation if the student’s grade point average
EXCEPTIONS TO WITHDRAWAL                               again falls below 3.00.
PROCEDURES
   Exceptions to the withdrawal proce-
dures may be granted upon recommenda-
tion of the Office of the Vice President for

                                                  54
DIRECTED STUDY                                            it. Standards and criteria for approval of
   The directed study is a course designed                the Request are established by the student’s
by the student after thorough consultation                Thesis Advisor. Departments and/or Thesis
with the professor who will supervise the                 Advisors may require a written proposal prior
study. Before registering for a directed                  to signing the Request for Convening of
study, the student must submit a written                  Thesis Advisory Committee form. Students
proposal for approval by the supervising                  should check with their individual depart-
professor, adviser, department chairperson                ments for specific prerequisites.
and the graduate college.                                     A student cannot register for thesis
   It is recommended that students have                   hours until the Request for Convening
earned at least 12 semester hours, be on                  of Thesis Advisory Committee form has
regular status and have an approved pro-                  been reviewed and approved by 1) the
gram of study prior to enrolling in directed              thesis adviser who is in the student’s major
study courses.                                            and has full graduate faculty status, 2)
   A directed study cannot be used to                     a minimum of two additional committee
replace a required course in a graduate                   members with graduate faculty status, 3)
program of study.                                         the Department Chair or Graduate Program
   The directed study will be graded on an A/F            Director and 4) the College of Graduate
basis.                                                    and Professional Studies. A copy of this
   A single directed study can carry from                 form may be downloaded online at
one to four semester hours of credit. A                   http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege.
maximum of six semester hours of credit in                    All members of the committee must have
directed studies can be used toward gradu-                graduate faculty status. Adjunct graduate
ation in a degree program; departmental                   faculty and graduate faculty associates may
requirements may limit the student to fewer               serve on the committee with the permission
than six hours of directed study.                         of the Dean of the College of Graduate and
   Students electing to do a thesis as part of            Professional Studies. Students must be on
their degree requirements may take up to four             regular status and have an approved pro-
hours of directed study as part of the degree             gram of study on file.
program, as long as the content of the directed               It is recommended that the student estab-
study is not directly related to the thesis topic.        lish the thesis topic and begin work on the
   The proposal should be submitted to the                proposal as early as possible. The Thesis
Graduate College at least two weeks prior                 Proposal Defense form is an agreement
to registration.                                          with the student and signifies that if the
                                                          work described within an approved pro-
                                                          posal is accomplished to a quality accept-
DISSERTATION, MASTER’S                                    able to the Committee, the Committee will
THESIS OR GRADUATE                                        honor it as a satisfactory thesis.
RECITAL                                                       The particular style used in writing a the-
                                                          sis is determined by the thesis director, but
    A thesis or graduate recital is required in           general rules about style can be specified
all Master of Arts programs. It can be an elec-           by the graduate faculty in the department
tive or a requirement in a Master of Science              involved. Basic guidelines for all theses can
program, at the option of the department.                 be obtained online at: www.radford.edu/
For dissertations students should see their               gradcollege or from the Graduate College
program handbook.                                         Office in Lucas Hall.
    When a thesis topic has been established,                 Students who plan to do a thesis or
the student should submit a Request for Thesis            graduate recital are advised to begin serious
Advisory Committee form to the Graduate                   planning of this work during the first semester
College in order to register for thesis cred-

                                                     55
of enrollment as a graduate student. Past                degree program. This preliminary exami-
experiences have shown that it is very diffi-             nation would be designed to measure the
cult for a student to do a respectable job on            student’s competence in the major area. If a
the thesis or recital if all work is concentrated        particular program requires such a prelimi-
in the last semester before graduation.                  nary examination, this information is given
    It is important that the student doing               in the description of the program in the
a thesis or recital choose the committee                 departmental sections of this catalog.
before beginning work on the thesis or
recital and that the committee members be
kept informed of the student’s progress in               FINAL COMPREHENSIVE
the preparation of the thesis or recital.                EXAMINATION AND/OR THESIS
    The thesis grade will be recorded as “Pass”          DEFENSE
or “Fail.” Conventional letter grades are given
                                                             A final, comprehensive examination and/
for the graduate recital.
                                                         or thesis dissertation defense is required of
    A graduate student may take only two
                                                         all graduate degree candidates. This exami-
years to complete or withdraw from a thesis
                                                         nation can be written or oral as deemed
grade of “I” or “IP” starting from the first
                                                         appropriate by the department. It should be
semester in which the student registered
                                                         taken during the last semester of the student’s
for thesis credit. After two years this grade
                                                         graduate program and should be scheduled
will revert to an F. All requirements for the
                                                         by the student and the adviser at least two
degree must be completed within six aca-
                                                         weeks before graduation. The student must
demic years.
                                                         have at least a B average in the major area
                                                         and in the overall program at the time of
AWARDS                                                   application for the examination. The neces-
                                                         sary examination form is available in the
   Three graduate awards; one each for                   Graduate College Office in Lucas Hall. It is
the outstanding research thesis, the out-                recommended that forms be requested five
standing creative project and for exemplary              days in advance of the examination date.
performance, are given each year at the                      For a Master of Science degree candi-
spring hooding ceremony to students who                  date, the committee conducting the exami-
completed their graduate degrees during the              nation must consist of three faculty mem-
past academic year. A faculty committee                  bers, including the student’s adviser, at
designates the recipients of these awards                least one additional faculty member from
from nominees selected by each college. A                the student’s major department and at least
cash award and a plaque are given to each                one faculty member familiar with the stu-
student and a commemorative plaque to the                dent’s work in a minor area if the graduate
faculty adviser of each award-winning thesis             program has a distinct minor.
or project.                                                  For a Master of Arts or Master of
                                                         Fine Arts candidate, the committee must
PRELIMINARY MASTER’S                                     consist of the student’s adviser and at
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION                                least two additional faculty from the major
                                                         department, including the thesis or gradu-
   In addition to the final comprehensive                 ate recital director if this person is not also
examination given during the last semes-                 the adviser.
ter of enrollment, the graduate faculty in                   The student, in consultation with the advis-
each department have the option of requir-               er, can suggest the names of faculty to serve
ing a preliminary comprehensive examina-                 on the committee. All members of the com-
tion to be administered sometime before                  mittee must have graduate faculty status.
completion of three-fourths of the master’s              Adjunct graduate faculty and graduate faculty

                                                    56
associates may serve on the committee with             AUDITING COURSES
the permission of the Dean of the College
of Graduate and Professional Studies and                  Students may audit classes on a space
must sign the Report of Final Comprehensive            available basis with written permission
Examination. A majority of the committee               of the class instructor and the department
must recommend “satisfactory” in order for             chairperson. Students who audit a course
the student to pass.                                   may not transfer to regular status in the
   A candidate who fails the examination may           course after the census date. Auditing stu-
request re-examination no earlier than the fol-        dents are expected to attend class on the
lowing semester. A student who fails to pass           same basis as a regular student. The instruc-
the examination or thesis defense on the sec-          tor may delete from the roster any auditing
ond attempt will be dropped from the degree            student who does not meet course require-
program.                                               ments.
   Students should note specific depart-
mental requirements for the final com-                  RECORDS AND REPORTS OF
prehensive examination or thesis defense
                                                       STUDENTS
in the course descriptions section of this
catalog. Doctoral examinations may vary                    Grades as filed with the office of the
so students should see their program hand-             Registrar are final, except where an error
book.                                                  of judgment has occurred or an error has
                                                       been made in computation or transcription.
                                                       Students may electronically access grades at
TIME LIMIT                                             the end of the semester.
    All requirements for the master’s degree               A transcript is the official record, compiled
or Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) degree must          by the Registrar, of a student’s academic
be completed within six academic years.                career. For each semester or summer term,
Neither Radford University courses nor trans-          the transcript shows the courses, credits
fer courses more than six academic years old           and grades; semester or summer term grade
at the time of graduation will be allowed as           point average; and notice of academic pro-
part of the hours for graduation. All require-         bation, suspension or withdrawal. Transfer
ments for a doctoral degree must be com-               credit also is recorded, but without grades.
pleted within eight years. Neither Radford                 The completed transcript records the
University courses nor transfer courses more           degree and major, minor and/or concentra-
than eight academic years old at the time of           tion as appropriate, final graduation grade
graduation will be allowed as part of the hours        point average and the date the degree was
of graduation.                                         conferred.
                                                           Transcripts are issued upon the receipt of a
                                                       signed, written request. There is no charge for
SECOND MASTER’S DEGREE                                 this service. There is a limit of 10 transcripts
                                                       issued per request, unless otherwise approved
   Students will not be allowed to enroll in
                                                       by the Registrar.
a graduate program leading to a master’s
degree in a field in which they already
hold a graduate degree. A student pursuing             FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS
a second master’s degree in a new field                 AND PRIVACY ACT
may not count toward the new degree any
credits already applied toward an earlier                 Radford University student record poli-
degree, but must meet all requirements for             cies and practices are in full compliance
the appropriate degree.                                with state and federal laws.
                                                          Upon request, the university will grant
                                                       students who are or have been in attendance
                                                  57
access to their educational records, except           sion to Radford University, each student
those excluded by law and will provide an             makes a commitment to support and uphold
opportunity for a hearing to challenge such           the Honor System without compromise
records.                                              or exception. The students of Radford
                                                      University believe that individuals have
    The university will not release informa-          the right to compete fairly, to keep what
tion about a student from records, except             they have earned and to have others accept
directory information, to other than a                their word without question. Individuals
specified list of exceptions without obtain-           have the responsibility to be honorable in
ing the written consent of the student.               their own conduct and to insist that other
    A full statement of the Family Educational        students act honorably.
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and infor-                Lying, cheating and stealing are con-
mation as to how students may exercise                sidered to be acts of dishonor and will,
the rights accorded them by this policy are           therefore, cause a student to be subject to
available from the office of the University            temporary or permanent suspension from
Registrar or from the Dean of Students                the university community. Students who
                                                      commit an honor violation or any mem-
Office.                                                bers of the Radford University community
    University and federal laws permit the            who have knowledge that a student has
university to routinely release information           committed an honor violation are expected
in the following categories:                          to comply with the reporting procedures.
• Student’s name, local and home address,
   phone listing                                      GRADUATION POLICY
• E-mail address
• Major field of study                                     A currently enrolled full-time student
• Participation in officially recognized               may meet the graduation requirements
   activities and sports                              listed in the Radford University Graduate
• Weight and height of members of athletic            Catalog in effect at the time of the stu-
   teams                                              dent’s initial enrollment at Radford. Or, the
• Photograph                                          individual may elect to meet the require-
• Dates of attendance                                 ments in any subsequent catalog published
• Degrees and awards received                         between enrollment and graduation as long
    This information is released with respect         as the catalog is no more than six years old.
to each student unless the student informs            A student may not follow requirements for
the university that any and all information           graduation listed in a catalog in effect prior
designated should not be released without             to the student’s enrollment at Radford.
the student’s prior consent. Requests for the             A regularly enrolled, part-time student
restricted release of directory information           may complete the graduation requirements in
should be filed at the Registrar’s Office.              effect when the student enrolled at Radford.
    Students should report any change of name,        Or, this student may complete requirements
address or marital status to the Registrar’s          listed in any subsequent catalog, as long as
Office so their university records can be cor-         the catalog is no more than six years old when
rected.                                               the student graduates. Doctoral students must
                                                      have completed all degree requirements prior
                                                      to participation in graduation ceremonies.
HONOR SYSTEM
                                                      APPLICATION FOR DEGREE
   Radford University’s Honor System
provides the foundation for a university                 Each candidate for the advanced degrees
community in which freedom, trust and                 must apply for the degree through the
respect can prevail. In accepting admis-              Graduate College by the census date of the
                                                      expected term of graduation according to

                                                 58
deadlines specified online. Unless the nec-             forever link you with Radford University
essary forms are filled out by the student              and link the faculty of Radford University
before the stated deadline, graduation may             with you. The colors you are awarded are
be delayed.                                            both Radford’s colors and yours.
                                                          The hooding is done by a Radford
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES                                 University graduate faculty member, tra-
                                                       ditionally a professor under whom the
   Commencement exercises and hooding
                                                       candidate has studied.
ceremonies are conducted at the end of the
spring semester and are open to degree-
seeking students only. Students completing             PARTICIPATION IN
degree requirements are urged to attend                COMMENCEMENT
these ceremonies unless extenuating circum-
stances justify their absence. Diplomas will              Radford University restricts participation in
be mailed to students completing degree                graduation exercises to those degree-seeking
requirements after confirmation that their              students who will complete their degree
degree requirements have been completed.               requirements by the time of commencement
                                                       or (for Spring ceremonies) those who can
HOODING CEREMONY                                       complete all coursework in no more than two
    Earning an advanced degree is a distinctive        courses or six semester hours, which will be
achievement that deserves special recognition          available during the immediately following
in addition to the customary commencement              summer session(s).
ceremony. The practice of hooding degree                  Graduation applications and petitions
recipients grows out of the traditions of aca-         to participate in commencement must be
demic regalia. The academic cap, hood and              approved by the department following the
gown originated in medieval universities in            guidelines established by departments and
Europe around the 12th century.                        submitted to the Graduate College by the
    Hoods are traditionally black on the out-          census date of the expected term of gradua-
side, trimmed with the color representing              tion. All applications must be approved by
the degree and lined on the inside with the            the Graduate Dean.
official colors of the university. Thus, you               Participation in commencement does
should be able to identify the institution from        not guarantee that the diploma will be
which the wearer received the degree and               awarded.
the level of the degree, by looking at the
hood. The presentation of the hood is a                EXCEPTION TO ACADEMIC
symbolic recognition of admission to a higher
                                                       POLICY
scholarly status within the academic com-
munity.                                                   The Radford University Graduate
    Awarding a graduate degree is not some-            Catalog is the basic authority for academic
thing to be taken lightly. The act of attaching        requirements at Radford University. All
your hood as part of your academic regalia             students are expected to follow the catalog
carries with it some significant recognitions,          in the pursuit of their degrees. On rare
including:                                             occasions, extraordinary circumstances
• acknowledgement of your achievements                 may, however, justify minor departures
• recognition of the University’s expecta-             from the catalog requirements. A graduate
   tions of your future leadership roles and           student who needs to petition for an excep-
• acknowledgement of the University’s                  tion to academic policy must complete the
   bond with you.                                      Graduate Student Academic Petition form
    Those who receive a Graduate Degree, as            in consultation with his/her adviser, avail-
well as the graduate faculty supporting the            able in the Graduate College office and
awarding of this degree, have formed a life-           submit to the Graduate College.
long partnership. The hood you receive will
                                                  59
Academic Colleges
   Radford University is organized into             COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND
seven colleges – the College of Graduate            ECONOMICS
and Professional Studies and six academic
colleges. Students enrolled in graduate pro-        Faye Gilbert, Dean
grams apply to the Graduate College and             J. Duncan Herrington, Associate Dean
are advised by graduate faculty members.            Whitt 135, (540) 831-5187
However, they still maintain close ties with           The College of Business and Economics
the other academic colleges in which their          offers the Master of Business Administration
majors are located. A student majoring              (MBA) degree, an interdisciplinary pro-
in music is considered a member of the              gram that involves course work in the
College of Visual and Performing Arts as            College’s three academic departments:
well as the Graduate College.                       Accounting, Finance and Information
                                                    Systems; Economics; and Management and
                                                    Marketing.
COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES
                                                    Accreditation
AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
                                                       The graduate and undergraduate pro-
                                                    grams in business administration offered
Dr. Brian Conniff, Dean
                                                    by the College of Business and Economics
William Kennan, Interim Associate Dean
Russell 133, (540) 831-5149                         at Radford University are accredit-
                                                    ed by the International Association for
   The College of Humanities and                    Management Education. (AACSB). The
Behavioral Sciences offers a Doctor of              AACSB is recognized by the Council on
Psychology in Counseling Psychology,                Postsecondary Accreditation and by the
the master’s degree in four areas and the           Office of Postsecondary Accreditation,
Educational Specialist degree in School             U.S. Department of Education, as the
Psychology. Degrees are listed on p. 4.             sole accrediting agency for baccalaureate
   Graduate degrees are offered through the         and master’s degree programs in business
departments of Communication, Criminal              administration and accounting.
Justice, English and Psychology.
   Other areas or departments do not offer
                                                    Enrollment Restrictions
a graduate degree but offer selected courses
for graduate credit.                                   Students in graduate programs outside
   The College of Humanities and                    of business may not take more than 50
Behavioral Sciences consists of English,            percent of their coursework in business or
foreign languages and literatures, history,         economics courses.
philosophy and religious studies, anthro-
pology, criminal justice, geography, politi-        Center for Economic Education
cal science, psychology, the School of              145 Davis Hall, (540) 831-5100
Communication and sociology.                           The Center for Economic Education
   Both graduate and undergraduate pro-             provides in-service programs for local teach-
grams within the College provide close              ers of economics or economics-related sub-
student-faculty relationships designed to           jects. The center also prepares educational
meet the needs of individual students.              materials, conducts research, assembles
                                                    economic education libraries and engag-
                                                    es in a variety of community programs.
                                                    The Center for Economic Education is a

                                               60
member of the Virginia Council on                    Core Battery as well as applicable Specialty
Economic Education and the U.S. Joint                Area tests is required as a prerequisite for
Council on Economic Education.                       initial teacher licensure.
                                                     Licensure/Advising
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND                             Donna Dunn
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT                                    Peters Hall A104, (540) 831-5424
                                                        The office provides information con-
Patricia Shoemaker, Dean
                                                     cerning licensure, certification, transfer and
Bill Zuti, Associate Dean
                                                     advising within the College of Education
Peters Hall A121, (540) 831-5439
                                                     and Human Development.
   The College of Education and Human
Development provides programs designed
to prepare students for areas of specializa-
                                                     Field Experiences
tion that include teaching and administra-
                                                     Peters Hall A104, (540) 831-5277
                                                        The office administers a variety of
tion in elementary, middle and second-
                                                     services that support academic programs
ary schools; school, community and stu-
                                                     within the College and the University.
dent affairs counseling and student affairs
                                                     Specifically, the office coordinates the
administration; child development; and
                                                     graduate and undergraduate field pro-
special education. Students may select from
                                                     grams including Early Field Experiences,
a wide range of program options at both the
                                                     Pre-Student Teaching, Student Teaching
undergraduate and graduate levels. Many
                                                     and Graduate Practica. The office also
of these options lead to teacher licensure.
                                                     coordinates special programs, seminars,
Through programs emphasizing academic
                                                     workshops and institutes developed by the
excellence, the College is committed to the
                                                     faculty.
development of knowledgeable, thought-
ful, skillful and caring professionals who           Center for Professional Development
think critically and synthesize experience           Robert McCracken
as effective practitioners, leaders and inno-        Peters Hall, A044
vators.                                              (540) 831-5682
   Students in the College of Education                 The Center for Professional Develop-
and Human Development work closely                   ment was established in the College of
with a highly competent faculty who are



                                                                                                     ACADEMIC COLLEGES
                                                     Education and Human Development and
dedicated to teaching, to providing service          reports directly to the dean of the col-
and to promoting academic excellence at              lege. Working with regional directors
Radford University.                                  of professional development, the center
   The College of Education and Human                serves school divisions by providing cur-
Development includes the departments of              rent, relevant staff development programs
Counselor Education, Educational Studies,            that enhance the professional growth of
Exercise, Sport and Health Education and             classroom teachers, school administra-
Special Education.                                   tors and other school personnel. More
                                                     information can be obtained as follows:
Praxis Examination                                   e-mail:pdcenter@radford.edu
   By action of the Virginia General                 web: www.radford.edu/pdcenter
Assembly and the Board of Education, all
prospective teachers seeking initial certi-
fication after July 1, 1980, are required to
take the Praxis Examination and submit
scores to the Division of Teacher Education
and Certification. A passing score on the

                                                61
WALDRON COLLEGE OF                                     ment of the university, western Virginia, the
HEALTH AND HUMAN                                       Commonwealth and beyond; and to make
SERVICES                                               significant artistic contributions in the disci-
                                                       plines of dance, fashion, interior design, music,
Raymond Linville, Dean                                 theatre and the visual arts.
Kenneth Cox, Associate Dean                                The faculty of the college maintain active
345 Waldron Hall, (540) 831-5102                       professional lives as performers, artists, design-
    The Waldron College of Health and Human            ers and research scholars. Frequent visits by
Services provides students with programs of            guest artists provide a special dimension to the
study for entry into and advancement within            educational experience of the arts. Students
health-related and human services profes-              have many opportunities to learn from the
sions. The programs combine a strong liberal           arts professionals who appear on the campus
arts and sciences base with discipline-specific         annually.
study to develop graduates who contribute to               Internship programs are an integral part
the health and well-being of society. Programs         of many College of Visual and Performing
are characterized by an emphasis on integrat-          Arts degree requirements. The College’s
ing theory with practice in the classroom and          Community Arts School employs qualified
in on- and off-campus practicum experiences.           students as teachers in dance, music, the-
The faculty is committed to teaching and               atre and the visual arts.
promoting student development, to advanc-
ing scholarship within the disciplines and to
providing professional service.                        COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND
    The Waldron College of Health and                  TECHNOLOGY
Human Services is composed of six academic             Orion Rogers, Dean
departments. Graduate students may pursue a            127 Davis Hall, (540) 831-5958
Master of Arts or Master of Science degree in              The College of Science and Technology
Communication Sciences and Disorders with              includes the disciplines of information tech-
a concentration in speech-language pathol-             nology, mathematics, statistics, geology,
ogy; a Master of Science in Nursing with a             biology, chemistry and physics. The college
specialty in Adult Clinical Nurse Specialist,          collaborates with the College of Education
Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Family          and Human Development in preparing
Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Midwifery and a              future math, science and technology K-12
post baccalaureate gerontology certificate; or a        teachers and Community College and higher
Master of Social Work degree.                          education instructors.
                                                           The college prepares students with skills
COLLEGE OF VISUAL AND                                  and expertise essential to the Commonwealth
PERFORMING ARTS                                        and the nation as each moves from an
                                                       industrial-based economy to an information-
Joseph P. Scartelli, Dean                              based economy.
242 Porterfield Hall, (540) 831-5265                        Most important, the learning experiences,
    The College of Visual and Performing               programs of study and faculty mentoring are
Arts seeks to provide comprehensive pre-               all designed to teach students to be comfort-
professional and liberal arts education for            able with the dynamics of change. Faculty
students in the disciplines of dance, fashion,         work as partners with students in research
interior design, music, theatre and the visual         and build strong alliances with government
arts; to serve the educational needs of all            and industry leaders to develop cooperative
Radford students by providing comprehen-               research programs and educational oppor-
sive opportunities and experiences in the arts;        tunities for their majors.
to enrich the artistic and cultural environ-

                                                  62
Academic Programs




                                                                                                  ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
ACADEMIC TERMINOLOGY                                 Middle and other options complement the
                                                     Education major by preparing the student
    Degree: A degree represents the aca-             for a specific career path. As noted above,
demic level of a program and the general             option semester hours are in addition to
category into which it falls. For example:           those for the major.
Master of Arts, Master of Science, etc.
At Radford University, the term “Arts”
in a graduate degree generally implies
a language and thesis requirement. The
                                                          The Radford University
minimum number of semester hours for a                            Honor Code
Radford University graduate degree is 30.            I do hereby resolve to uphold the
    Major: A major represents a student’s            Honor Code of Radford University by
principal field of study; that is, the aca-
demic discipline he or she wishes to study
                                                     refraining from lying, from the stealing
intensively, for example, Psychology,                or unauthorized possession of prop-
Music, etc.                                          erty and from violating the Standards
    Program: The term “program” defies                of Student Academic Integrity.
unique definition. One use of the term
involves a combination of a major and a
degree, e.g., Master of Science in Criminal
Justice. Occasionally, a program may con-
sist only of a degree and not have a spe-
cific major, as in the Master of Business
Administration. “Program” may also be
used in a more generic sense to modify
degree/major combinations, as in “School
Psychology Program.”
    Minor: A minor represents a student’s
secondary field of study and, by implica-
tion, is different from the major. This dis-
tinguishes the minor from concentrations
and options. The minimum number of
semester hours in a graduate minor is 12.
    Concentration: A concentration is a
field of study within a major. An exam-
ple is Curriculum and Instruction within
Education. The number of semester hours
for a concentration varies, but are always
included within the semester hours for the
major. This distinguishes concentrations
from options, which represent semester
hours beyond the major.
    Option: An option is a set of related
courses and/or experiences that comple-
ments the major (as distinguished from
being a field within the major). The principal
example is in education where Elementary,

                                                63
Courses of Study
◆ART                                                Art Electives                            12
Andrew S. Arbury, Chairperson                       Art 702. Studio Management                3
Halide Salam, Program Coordinator
Graduate Faculty                                    Art 699. Research and Thesis              6
See Graduate Faculty list at:
http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/         Final Comprehensive Examination
index.html                                              A final, comprehensive oral examina-
                                                    tion is required of all Master of Fine Arts
    Graduate students in Art work with              students. The examination should be taken
faculty to design their course of study.            during the last semester of the student’s
Because of the comfortable size and flex-            graduate program and should be scheduled
ibility of the M.F.A. program, students ben-        by the student and adviser at least two weeks
efit from close association with profession-         before graduation. The student should pres-
al faculty and fellow students. The graduate        ent the “Report of Final Comprehensive
program draws students from many parts              Examination” form to the committee at the
of the United States as well as other coun-         time of the examination. Forms are available
tries, promoting a global perspective. The          in the Graduate College Office. Please refer
M.F.A. (Master of Fine Arts) requires 60            to “Final Comprehensive Examination” on
graduate hours and allows students to seek          p. 56.
a terminal degree in studio art. Students
elect an area of concentration.
                                                    ◆BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                              (MBA) DEGREE
M.F.A.                                              Clarence C. Rose, Program Director
• Minimum grade point average of 2.75               MBA Program
  overall and in the major                          102 Whitt Hall, (540) 831-5258
• Two letters of reference                          Accounting, Finance and Business Law
• Statement of philosophy, overall goals            Dan Davidson, Chairperson
  and synopsis of work                              Economics
• B.F.A. or commensurate collegiate course          Nozar Hashemzadeh, Chairperson
  work                                              Management
• Evidence of artistic competence is                Hooshang Beheshti, Chairperson
  required, as demonstrated by submission           Marketing
  of 20 slides or CD of recent work                 James Lollar, Chairperson
                                                    Graduate Faculty
Acceptance in the program is competitive.           See Graduate Faculty list at:
                                                    http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
MASTER OF FINE ARTS DEGREE                          index.html
Art Major                            60 hrs.
  The degree consists of 60 semester hours          ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
within five areas, a M.F.A. thesis, a final
comprehensive examination and an M.F.A.                Applications for admission may be made
exhibition.                                         for the fall, spring or summer semesters.
                                                    Please see p. 21 for specific deadlines.
Required Courses                 60 hrs.            Applications are reviewed following the
Areas of Concentration (2-D or 3-D) 30              guidelines recommended by the Association
                                                    to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
Art History                              9          (AACSB).

                                               64
   Applicants must:                                  in written and oral communication and
                                                     computer usage.
• meet all requirements of the Graduate
  College;                                           PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
• provide official university and college
  transcripts to the Graduate College;                  All students in the MBA program are
• provide official scores from the Graduate           subject to academic regulations for graduate
  Management Admission Test (GMAT);                  students, which are described in detail begin-
• provide two letters of reference from pro-         ning on p. 45.
  fessors in the major area of study and/or             After admission, MBA students are
  employers;                                         required to complete 30 semester hours of
• meet major undergraduate foundation                graduate course work consisting of the fol-
  knowledge.                                         lowing:

Applicants should also provide additional            Program Requirements                  30 hrs.




                                                                                                      BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
information such as a resume of prior experi-
                                                     Required Courses                    24 hrs.
ence/work history, evidence of creativity and
leadership and a written statement on why he/        ACTG 611. Accounting for Decision
she is interested in obtaining an MBA.               Making and Control.                      3
                                                     MGMT 621. Organizational Behavior
Admission is competitive and is granted only         and Management Skills.                   3
to those who show high ability and likely            ITEC 623. Management Information
success in graduate business study. Criteria         Systems.                                 3
used for admission include the candidate’s           MGMT 624. Operations Management. 3
score on the GMAT, undergraduate grade
averages and the trend of the grades during          FINC 631. Financial Management.          3
undergraduate work, letters of reference, a          MKTG 641. Marketing Management. 3
goals statement and work experience.                 ECON 651. Managerial Economics. 3
                                                     MGMT 685. Strategic Management           3
Prerequisites: Applicants must have taken
                                                     Electives                           6 hrs.
accredited collegiate preparation in the
following foundation areas (or equiva-               At least one elective must be a course with
lents):                                              an International focus. Electives outside
Financial Accounting and Managerial                  the College of Business and Economics
Accounting. 1                                        must be approved by the director of the
Macroeconomics and Microeconomics. 2                 MBA program.
Organizational Behavior. 3
Principles of Marketing. 3                           MBA Comprehensive Examination
Introduction to Business Finance. 3                  Policy
Statistics                                               The Radford University MBA
Calculus                                             Comprehensive Exam is integrated with
1 ACTG 511 may be taken to satisfy both              MGMT 685, Strategic Management.
financial and managerial accounting.                  MGMT 685 is the capstone course of the
2 ECON 505 may be taken to satisfy both              MBA core curriculum.
macro- and microeconomics.                               Each MBA student must have a 3.0
3 Must be completed at a four-year
                                                                                                      ART




                                                     or higher grade point average (GPA)
institution.                                         and be near completion of the MBA
   Prior to enrolling in MBA classes, all            Program of Study (last semester of enroll-
applicants are expected to have achieved,            ment or permission of the instructor) in
by experience and/or education, basic skills         order to enroll in MGMT 685, Strategic
                                                     Management. MGMT 685 utilizes an
                                                65
integrated business analysis project which            communication. The program’s curricula also
must be presented by students and a final              provide students the opportunity to 1) meet
exam which includes the business man-                 the requirements of the Virginia Board of
agement core competencies.                            Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology
   Each MBA student must make a grade                 for licensure in speech-language pathology
of "B" or better in this capstone course              and 2) meet requirements for teacher licen-
in order to satisfy the comprehensive                 sure offered through the Virginia Department
exam requirement. A student who makes                 of Education for those graduates who seek
less than the grade of "B" must repeat                employment through the Virginia Department
the course and make a grade of "B" or                 of Education.
higher to satisfy the comprehensive exam                  The program offers either a Master
requirement. The course may be repeat-                of Science or Master of Arts degree in
ed only once and must be successfully                 Communication Sciences and Disorders, with
completed within a 12-month period. A                 a concentration in speech-language pathology.
student who fails to earn a grade of "B"              A thesis is required for the Master of Arts
or higher on the second attempt will be               degree. A final, comprehensive examination
dropped from the program.                             is required of all Master of Arts and Master of
                                                      Science candidates. For Master of Arts can-
                                                      didates, the final comprehensive examination
                                                      will be an oral defense of the master’s thesis.
◆COMMUNICATION SCIENCES                               Master of Science candidates are required to
AND DISORDERS                                         pass a final written comprehensive examina-
Claire Waldron, Chairperson and                       tion. COSD graduate students are responsible
Graduate Program Coordinator                          for becoming familiar with and for meeting
Graduate Faculty                                      all stated Academic Policies outlined in this
See Graduate Faculty list at:                         catalog.
http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
index.html                                            ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
                                                         Prospective students should complete pro-
GRADUATE PROGRAM                                      cedures for graduate student admission as
                                                      indicated in this catalog, noting the following
    The mission of the Department of                  department specific requirements:
Communication Sciences and Disorders                  • Submit a one to two page essay which
(COSD) is to develop speech-language pathol-            outlines the student’s personal and profes-
ogists who are ethical, thoughtful, knowledge-          sional goals for pursuing a master’s degree
able, skillful and capable of working inde-             at Radford University
pendently and in collaboration with clients,          • A minimum grade point average of 3.0
families and other professionals.                       overall and 3.0 in all major core courses
    The department’s graduate program in              • Three letters of reference from faculty
Speech-Language Pathology is accredited by              members, an adviser or clinical supervi-
the Council on Academic Accreditation of the            sors who are familiar with the student’s
American Speech-Language-Hearing Associa-               performance in major coursework
tion (ASHA). The program offers academic              • Graduate Record Examination score
and clinical curricula that provide students
with the knowledge and skills required for the        Students who have not earned an undergrad-
Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-          uate degree in Communication Sciences
Language Pathology (CCC-SLP). This nation-            and Disorders must complete the following
ally recognized professional credential is            32 credit hours of supporting coursework
issued to individuals who present evidence            in addition to the Required Graduate Core
of their ability to provide independent clini-        Courses. Students have two options for
cal services to persons who have disorders of
                                                 66
completing supporting courses. The first               ACADEMIC AND CLINICAL
option is to complete supporting courses              REQUIREMENTS
as a non-degree seeking student before
applying to the Graduate Program. The                    COSD students are required to complete
second option is to complete supporting               graduate coursework and graduate clinical prac-
courses after admission to the Graduate               tica that meet ASHA’s 2005 Standards for the
Program; in this case, all supporting courses         Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-
will appear on the official transcript and will        Language Pathology. Students are responsible
be calculated in the overall graduate grade           for reading and understanding these standards,
point average.                                        which are published in the Clinic Handbook for
                                                      Speech-Language Pathology.
COSD 301. Anatomy and Physiology                         In addition to the standards printed in this
of the Speech, Language and Hearing                   catalog, COSD graduate students are required
Mechanism.                                 4          to meet the following academic standards:
                                                      • Earn at least a “C” or better in
COSD 315. Language Science and




                                                                                                        COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS
                                                          all COSD courses.
Technology.                                3
                                                      • Earn a minimum grade point aver-
COSD 316. Hearing Science.                 3              age of 3.0 in COSD 640 courses in
COSD 330. Introduction to Audiology. 3                    order to graduate with a master’s
                                                          degree in Communication Sciences and
COSD 401. Neuroanatomy in
                                                          Disorders.
Communication Disorders.                   3
                                                      • If a student earns a grade of “F” in
COSD 416. Current Topics in                               any section of COSD 640 for behavior
Audiology.                                 3              that is not consistent with professional
COSD 421. Language Development:                           service delivery and/or any violation
Birth to Five Years.                       3              of the code of ethics of the American
COSD 425. Later Language                                  Speech-Language-Hearing Association,
Development.                               3              the result will be automatic termination
                                                          from the COSD graduate program.
COSD 438. Phoenetics.                      3
COSD 453. Speech-Language
Disorders: Prevention, Assessment and
                                                      SPEECH-LANGUAGE
Intervention.                         4               PATHOLOGY
                                                      CONCENTRATION
The deadline for applications is February
1. Admission to the program is competitive.           MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE
Final admission decisions will be made by             Program Requirements             51 hrs.
April 1 for Fall enrollment. The sequence of          Required Core Courses            51 hrs.
graduate studies begins in the Fall semester,
although students may elect to complete               COSD 512. Audiologic Rehabilitation. 3
academic coursework required for teacher              COSD 601. Research in
certification the summer before beginning              Communication Sciences and Disorders.3
the graduate sequence of courses.                     COSD 602. Language Disorders:
                                                      Birth to Five Years.                   3
                                                      COSD 604. Advanced Studies in
                                                      Articulatory and Phonologic Disorders. 3
                                                      COSD 606. Fluency Disorders.           2



                                                 67
COSD 607. Language Disorders in                      COSD 614. Childhood Apraxia of
School-Age Children and Adolescents. 3               Speech.                                     2
COSD 608. Motor Speech Disorders. 3                  COSD 615. Voice Science and
COSD 609. Aphasia.                   3               Disorders.                                  4
COSD 610. Pediatric and Adult                        COSD 616. Augmentative and
Dysphagia.                           3               Alternative Communication.                  3
COSD 611. Autism Spectrum                            COSD 630. Professional
Disorders.                           2               Development I.                              1
COSD 614. Childhood Apraxia of                       COSD 640. Advanced Practicum in
Speech.                              2               Speech-Language-Hearing.                    9
COSD 615. Voice Science and                          COSD 650. Professional
Disorders.                           4               Development II.                             1
COSD 616. Augmentative and
Alternative Communication.           3               COSD 699. Research and Thesis.              6
COSD 630. Professional                               COSD 511. Public School Methods in a
Development I.                       1               Diverse Society. While not required for a
COSD 640. Advanced Practicum                         graduate degree, the course must be taken
                                                     for Virginia teacher licensure in Speech-
in Speech-Language-Hearing.         12
                                                     Language Pathology. Students should also
COSD 650. Professional                               consult with their advisers regarding other
Development II.                      1               licensure requirements.

MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE
A thesis is a requirement for the Master of          ◆CORPORATE AND
Arts degree. An oral defense of the thesis is        PROFESSIONAL
required during the last semester of enroll-         COMMUNICATION
ment.                                                Lynn Zoch, Director
                                                     School of Communication
Program Requirements            54 hrs.              Kristin Froemling, Program Coordinator
Required Core Courses           54 hrs.              Graduate Faculty
COSD 512. Audiologic Rehabilitation. 3               See Graduate Faculty list at:
COSD 601. Research in                                http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
Communication Sciences and Disorders. 3              index.html
COSD 602. Language Disorders:
Birth to Five Years.                       3         GRADUATE PROGRAM
COSD 604. Advanced Studies in                           The Master of Science degree in Corporate
Articulatory and Phonologic Disorders. 3             and Professional Communication is an
COSD 606. Fluency Disorders.               2         applied degree designed to prepare students
                                                     for a variety of careers in the public and
COSD 607. Language Disorders in                      private sector. Students will be prepared
School-Age Children and Adolescents. 3               to seek careers as communication profes-
COSD 608. Motor Speech Disorders.          3         sionals in human services and in manage-
COSD 609. Aphasia.                         3         ment positions, as public relations specialists
                                                     and as training/development coordinators.
COSD 610. Pediatric and Adult                        Graduates of the program demonstrate a broad
Dysphagia.                                 3         range of career possibilities. For example,
COSD 611. Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2               our graduates currently hold positions in

                                                68
fields as diverse as health care, public rela-           enables the committee to select a class
tions, computer software, media, higher                 of entering graduate students who indi-
education, non-profit services and govern-               vidually and collectively have the potential
ment. Additionally, students are prepared to            to make substantial contributions to the
pursue doctoral degrees. The degree provides            professional and intellectual environ-
a foundation of course work in both internal            ment of the program, university and field.
and external organizational communication               Admission is competitive.
and also allows students to focus their stud-              In addition to meeting the minimum
ies in their specific areas of interest.                 requirements for the Graduate College,
                                                        the following application procedures are




                                                                                                           CORPORATE AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
                                                        required:
ADMISSION INFORMATION                                   • Complete and submit the Application
                                                          for Graduate Admission form, including
    The basic requirements for graduate                   official copies of all undergraduate and
study at Radford University are given in                  graduate transcripts. This requirement
this catalog. General requirements and proce-             applies even if an applicant has not yet
dures for the Master of Science in Corporate              completed an undergraduate degree.
and Professional Communication follow.                  • Take the Graduate Record Examination
Detailed requirements and procedures for                  (GRE) Aptitude Test and include exam
the degree may be found in the Corporate                  scores with the application. Test scores
and Professional Communication Graduate                   more than five years old will not be
Student Handbook.                                         accepted. Subject tests offered by the
(www.radford.edu/gradcomm)                                Educational Testing Service are not
    In those cases where program require-                 required. No other exams or tests may be
ments and procedures are more stringent                   substituted for the GRE Aptitude Test.
than those of the College of Graduate and               • Provide at least three recent letters of ref-
Professional Studies, the requirements and                erence.
procedures of the program take precedence. It           • Write a short essay (typed, double-spaced
will be assumed that students are thoroughly              and limited to three pages in length)
familiar with the requirements and procedures             addressing the following issues:
stated in the above documents. The ultimate               a. Upon what past experiences and inter-
responsibility for meeting all stated degree                 ests do you base your present decision
requirements rests with the student. The dean                to apply to this graduate program?
and staff of the College of Graduate and                  b. How does study for the M.S. in this
Professional Studies, the Graduate Program                   program fit in with your short- and
Coordinator and the graduate faculty are all                 long-term goals and career aspira-
available to guide, advise, help interpret poli-             tions?
cies and otherwise assist the student in meet-            c. Is there any other information, not
ing degree requirements.                                     covered elsewhere in your application,
    Application materials provide a vari-                    that you would like to share with the
ety of information about an applicant’s                      program’s graduate admissions com-
skills, talents, background, experiences,                    mittee?
career goals, motivation, commitment and                • Applicants whose native language is not
potential for successful completion of the                English must also take the Test of English
program. The Corporate and Professional                   as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit
Communication admissions committee will                   scores as part of their application materials.
view each applicant’s admission file as
an integrated package. No single item
of information will be used to reject any
applicant. The application information

                                                   69
All of the above application materials                   Graduate Program Coordinator
should be sent to:                                       Corporate and Professional Communication
  College of Graduate and Professional                   Radford University
    Studies                                              Box 6932
  Radford University                                     Radford, VA 24142
  Box 6928                                                Letters requesting consideration for a
  Radford, VA 24142                                    Graduate Assistantship for the fall semes-
                                                       ter must be received by March 1. Letters
   Applicants to the graduate program are              requesting consideration for a Graduate
normally admitted for the fall semester; how-          Assistantship for the spring semester must
ever, admission may be granted for the spring          be received by October 1. All Graduate
semester. An applicant who is applying for             Assistantships are competitive.
admission for the fall semester should have
his or her application file completed by
March 1. An applicant who is applying for              OPTIONS
admission for the spring semester should
have his or her application file completed by              There are two options in the degree pro-
October 1.                                             gram: a non-thesis option and a thesis option.
                                                       Students graduating under the non-thesis
                                                       option must successfully complete 30 hours
GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP
                                                       of course work and a comprehensive exami-
INFORMATION                                            nation. Students graduating under the thesis
    Graduate assistantships are available for          option must successfully complete 24 hours of
the program in Corporate and Professional              course work, apply for and complete a thesis
Communication. Because the degree focuses              for six hours of credit and successfully com-
on the education and training of communica-            plete an oral defense of the thesis. (See “Final
tion professionals and because those commu-            Comprehensive Examination” on p. 56).
nication professionals may well be called upon
to educate and train others in the workplace or
the classroom, the primary duties of graduate          Program Requirements                   30 hrs.
assistants involve teaching.                           Required Courses                       15 hrs.
    The Corporate and Professional Com-
munication faculty believe that all graduate           All students must successfully complete
assistants who teach should be provided with           the following core courses:
the best preparation possible for educating            COMM 600. Communication Theory. 3
others. Thus, all teaching assistants are pro-
                                                       COMM 605. Applied Communication
vided with a semester of training and practice
                                                       Research.                       3
under a designated mentor before those assis-
tants are assigned teaching responsibilities.          COMM 610. Seminar in Organizational
Typically, graduate assistants who complete            Communication.                     3
their semester of training are assigned to work        COMM 615. Seminar in Public
with the mentor in teaching communica-                 Relations.                                   3
tion courses. Before assuming any teaching
                                                       COMM 620. Training and
duties, however, students must be approved             Development.                                 3
for teaching assignments by the graduate fac-
ulty and the teaching mentor.                          Non-Thesis Option                      15 hrs.
    Applicants for admission who also wish
                                                       Electives, approved by Graduate
to be considered for a Graduate Assistantship
                                                       Coordinator.                               15
should write a letter to that effect addressed
to:
                                                  70
                                                  70
Thesis Option                       15 hrs.           See Graduate Faculty list at:
COMM 699. Research and Thesis.             6          http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
                                                      index.html
Electives, approved by Graduate
                                                         The Counseling and Human Development
Coordinator.                              9
                                                      program offers graduate education leading
    Because some students may not have                to the Master of Science (M.S.) degree for
completed an undergraduate degree in                  students interested in becoming professional
communication, other factors may be taken             counselors and working in elementary, mid-
into consideration when assessing poten-              dle and secondary schools, colleges or uni-
tial. For example, sufficient experience in            versities and community counseling centers,
a communication-related profession will be            hospitals, agencies or clinics. The program
taken into consideration when assessing a             also trains students in student affairs and col-
student’s potential. Students lacking a suf-
                                                      lege counseling who are employed in college
ficient background in communication (as
                                                      or university administration.
judged by the admissions committee) may
                                                         Three programs in the department were
be required, prior to enrollment in graduate
                                                      nationally accredited in 1996 and reaccredit-
courses, to take one or more undergraduate
courses to provide the necessary foundation           ed in 2004 by the Council for Accreditation of
for graduate study in communication. These            Counseling and Related Educational Programs




                                                                                                         COUNSELING AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
courses may not be counted as a portion of            (CACREP). Accredited programs include
the 30 hours required to complete the degree.         Community Counseling, School Counseling
                                                      and College Counseling. The program is also
                                                      accredited by the National Council for the
ACCELERATED BACHELOR’S/                               Accreditation of Teacher Education (2004)
MASTER’S DEGREE                                       and the Virginia Department of Education
CORPORATE AND                                         (2004). These certification and accreditation
PROFESSIONAL                                          achievements certify that the department offers
COMMUNICATION                                         the highest quality professional education
   The objective of the accelerated                   available in the counseling and student affairs
Bachelor’s/Master’s degree program in                 professions.
Corporate and Professional Communication
is is to provide a means by which excep-              PROFESSIONAL ENDORSEMENTS
tional undergraduate students at Radford
                                                      AND LICENSURE
University may complete the requirements
for both the Baccalaureate and Master’s                  Courses in the department are often used
degrees at an accelerated pace.                       for educational endorsements and for state
   For information on accelerated programs,           licensure by professional regulatory boards
see p. 52. For more information contact the           such as the Commonwealth of Virginia
Department of Communication, the graduate             Department of Health Professions Board of
admissions office or consult the web at http://        Counseling and other licensing agencies.
www.radford.edu/gradcollege.
                                                      Students with master’s degrees seeking
                                                      endorsements in School Counseling, need-
                                                      ing specialized courses or seeking to enroll
◆COUNSELING AND HUMAN                                 in supervised clinical practica or internships
DEVELOPMENT                                           in community counseling leading to licen-
Alan Forrest, Chairperson and                         sure as a Licensed Professional Counselor,
Graduate Program Coordinator                          must complete the following advanced
Graduate Faculty                                      level course sequence prior to enrolling
                                                      in any of the department’s clinical intern-
                                                      ships. The sequence of required courses are:
                                                 71
                                                 71
COED 641: Practicum: Individual                         • Counseling and psychotherapy tech-
Counseling Techniques and COED 642:                       niques;
Practicum: Group Counseling Techniques.                 • Human growth and development;
COED 641 and COED 642 must be com-                      • Group counseling and psychotherapy,
pleted in the Department prior to enrolling               theories and techniques;
in any counseling internship offered in the             • Career counseling and development the-
department. Other courses offered by the                  ories and techniques;
department can be taken for the purpose                 • Appraisal, evaluation and diagnostic pro-
of professional endorsement certification or               cedures;
licensure with approval of the Chair.                   • Abnormal behavior and psychopathol-
                                                          ogy;
SPECIALIZED ENDORSEMENTS                                • Multicultural counseling, theories and
AND LICENSURE FEATURES                                    techniques;
                                                        • Research;
                                                        • Diagnosis and treatment of addictive
School Counseling (K-12):                                 disorders;
   Graduates of the school counseling program           • Marriage and family systems theory;
are eligible to obtain licensure by the state at          and
the kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12)                • Supervised internship of 600 hours to
level. Licensure as a Virginia school counselor           include 240 hours of face-to-face client
requires the candidate have a master’s degree             contact.
from a state approved program in counseling.                The Department of Counselor Education
                                                        has identified courses which may be taken to
Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC):                 satisfy the core areas listed above. Students
   Radford University’s Counselor Education             wishing to pursue licensure in Virginia should
Department provides academic course work                consult with their adviser in planning their
that meets degree requirements established by           program of study.
the Virginia Board of Counseling for licen-
sure as a Licensed Professional Counselor.              Courses identified in the Department of
                                                        Counselor Education:
Licensure for Professional Counselor
in Virginia                                             EDEF 606. Educational Research.
   The Commonwealth of Virginia,                        COED 610. Human Growth and
Department of Health Professions, Board                 Development.
of Counseling is the state agency that deter-           COED 611. Introduction to Counseling
mines licensure for professional counselors             Theories and Techniques.
in Virginia. The state of Virginia requires
that the applicant for licensure shall have             COED 612. Professional, Ethical, and Legal
completed 60 semester hours or 90 quarter               Issues in Counseling.
hours of graduate study in the following                COED 613. Career Counseling.
core areas, with a minimum of 3 semester                COED 614. Group Counseling Theories
hours or 4.5 quarter hours in each of the               and Techniques.
areas identified as follows:
                                                        COED 615. Assessment and Appraisal
• Professional identity, function and eth-              Techniques in Counseling.
  ics;                                                  COED 616. Cultural and Diversity
• Theories of counseling and psychothera-               Counseling.
  py;


                                                   72
COED 620. Psychopathology, Diagnosis,             successfully passing the National Counselors
and Treatment Planning.                           Examination (NCE) offered upon comple-
COED 633. Gender Issues in Counseling.            tion of the program.

COED 635. Human Sexuality Issues in
Counseling.                                       ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
COED 637. Death, Loss and Grief                       Admission to the program is competitive
Counseling.                                       and the department values diversity in its
                                                  student population. Prospective students
COED 641. Practicum: Individual                   are selected for the program based on their
Counseling Techniques.                            ability to complete academic requirements
COED 642. Practicum: Group                        of the program, personal qualifications nec-
Counseling Techniques.                            essary for success in the counseling and
                                                  student affairs profession and appropriate-
COED 650. Introduction to Community               ness of professional goals.
Mental Health Counseling.                             The Admissions Committee of the
COED 670. Counseling Children and                 department will evaluate academic quali-
Adolescents.                                      fications and potential for success in the
                                                  program based on an admissions applica-
COED 680. Couples and Family                      tion portfolio. Applicant admissions port-
Counseling: Theory and Methods.                   folios are evaluated throughout the year,
COED 681. Couples and Family                      but matriculation as a student into the
Counseling: Strategies and Techniques.            Counselor Education program is restricted
                                                  to summer and fall terms only. Priority
COED 685. Foundations of Play                     admission deadline is February 1 for sum-
Therapy.                                          mer and fall admissions. The space-avail-
COED 686. Overview of Substance                   able admission deadline is April 15 for
Abuse and Addictive Disorders.                    summer and fall admissions.
                                                      Admissions decisions are made based
COED 688. Crisis Intervention and                 on an overall evaluation of all stated crite-
Trauma Counseling.                                ria. Failure to meet a minimum criterion in
COED 690. Internship in Community                 one area will not necessarily be cause for
Mental Health Counseling.                         rejection of admission.
COED 699. Research and Thesis                     The admissions portfolio shall include:
                                                  • Minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or
  Only those students who already have              higher
a master's degree or are seeking licensure        • Official transcripts of all prior under-
will be permitted to enroll in Counselor            graduate and graduate work;
Education (COED) courses. Special per-            • A maximum of 9 credit hours may be
mission for students seeking a master's             transferred into the Counselor Education
degree in another department can request            program with the exclusion of the fol-
permission to enroll in classes from the            lowing clinical courses: COED 611,
department chair.                                   COED 641, COED 642 and COED 690-
                                                    694;
NATIONAL CERTIFICATION:                           • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or
                                                    Miller Analogies Test (MAT) scores are
   Counselors in all three concentra-
                                                    required;
tions – Student Affairs, Community
                                                  • Three personal reference letters submit-
and School Counseling – can earn the                ted to the Graduate College; and
national certification from the National           • Admissions Essay, limited to three
Board of Certified Counselor (NBCC) by               pages, including experiences, interests
                                             73
   and other factors central to your deci-             examination. The master’s thesis is directed
   sion to apply to the program and short-             by graduate faculty in the department.
   and long-term goals and career aspira-              Students who plan to write a master’s thesis
   tions related to the program.                       should begin designing their research and
   Admission is competitive. Approxi-                  planning the thesis during their first year
mately 40 new students are admitted for                in the program. A thesis grade is recorded
fall matriculation each year.                          “Pass” or “Fail.”

                                                       PROGRAMS OF STUDY
ACADEMIC QUALITY STANDARDS
                                                       School Counseling (K-12)
   The following courses must be com-                      The school counseling program con-
pleted with a "B" or better: COED 610.                 sists of 48 credit hours of courses in the
Human Growth and Development, COED                     Counselor Education Department, includ-
611. Introduction to Theories and Techniques,          ing three hours of elective approved by
COED 612. Professional, Ethical, and Legal             the faculty adviser. The school counsel-
Issues in Counseling, COED 614. Group                  ing program educates and trains students
Counseling Theories and Techniques, COED               to become knowledgeable, thoughtful and
641. Practicum: Individual Counseling                  skillful counselors at K-12 levels.
Techniques and COED 642. Practicum:                        The curriculum includes core cours-
Group Counseling Techniques. Furthermore,              es which introduce the student to human
any student receiving more than two C’s                growth and development, counseling theory,
or lower in graduate courses attempted at              professional issues in counseling and con-
Radford University will be dismissed from the          sulting skills. A blend of other courses are
Counselor Education program.                           more specifically directed toward continued
                                                       development of school counseling knowl-
COMPREHENSIVE                                          edge and thoughtful application of this
EXAMINATIONS                                           knowledge in self development and clinical
                                                       practice. Finally, the curriculum focuses
   A written comprehensive examination,
                                                       on the integration of knowledge, skills and
scheduled in the fall and spring semester, is
                                                       abilities into a skillful counselor.
required of all students who do not elect to
                                                           Licensure as a Virginia school counselor
write a thesis. Students are eligible to take
                                                       requires that the candidate have a master’s
the examination as of the semester in which
                                                       degree from a state approved program in
they complete all required core coursework.
Additionally, all students who register to take        counseling. The school counseling concen-
the comprehensive examination must have                tration requires 48 semester hours of course
an approved letter of candidacy and have a             work and is CACREP accredited. It prepares
signed copy of their program of study on file           students for state license as school counsel-
with the Graduate College. A student must              ors in Virginia and similar states. Graduates
complete the examination no later than two             of the program are prepared to be licensed
weeks prior to graduation. The comprehen-              by the state at the K-12 grade levels.
sive examination is a written examination and
typically includes essay and objective exami-          Student Affairs
nation questions. (See “Final Comprehensive
Examination” on p. 56.)                                   The Student Affairs program educates
                                                       future student affairs administrators, student
Thesis Option:                                         development educators and counselors who
   Students may elect to write a master’s              are skilled in assessing and promoting stu-
thesis instead of taking the comprehensive             dent growth and development in the context

                                                  74
of higher education. The program leads to a         MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
Master of Science Degree through integrat-          COUNSELING AND HUMAN
ing academic course work with practicum             DEVELOPMENT
and internship experience.
   The program has student development,             The following core courses are required of
counseling and administrative emphases.             students in all concentrations. Additional
Student development theory permeates the            course requirements for each of the concen-
program and provides an essential knowl-            trations are listed below:
edge base upon which counseling, student
development education and student affairs           Program Requirements               48 hrs.
administration are built. Students decide           Required Courses                30 hrs.
between two options of study: Student
Affairs or College Counseling. Both pro-            EDEF 606. Educational Research.      3
grams require 48 semester credit hours.             COED 610. Human Growth and
   The administrative track addresses               Development.                            3
knowledge and skill development in the
                                                    COED 611. Introduction to Counseling
administration and management within an
                                                    Theories and Techniques.             3
academic community.
   The counseling track includes knowledge          COED 612. Professional, Ethical, and
and skill development in areas of assessing,        Legal Issues in Counseling.          3
diagnosing, developing and implementing             COED 613. Career Counseling and
counseling interventions, services and pro-         Development.                            3
grams in an academic community. This
specialization in College Counseling is             COED 614. Group Counseling Theories
CACREP accredited.                                  and Techniques.                   3
                                                    COED 615. Assessment and Appraisal
Community Counseling                                Techniques in Counseling.          3
    The community counseling program is
a CACREP accredited program designed                COED 616. Cultural and Diversity
to provide knowledge, skills and abili-             Counseling.                             3
ties necessary for counselors to work in a          COED 641. Practicum: Individual
variety of community settings, including            Counseling Techniques.                  3
mental health centers, substance abuse pro-
grams, marriage and family clinics, career          COED 642. Practicum: Group
counseling agencies, social service agen-           Counseling Techniques.                  3
cies and employee assistance programs in
business and industry. Students enrolled
in the community counseling option are              SCHOOL COUNSELING (K-12)
required to take 48 hours within the College        CONCENTRATION
of Education and Human Development.
Through course work, practica and clinical
                                                    Required Courses                 18 hrs.
internship placements, students may pre-
pare to practice as a Licensed Professional         COED 620. Psychopathology,
Counselor, Private Practice Counselor,              Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning.    3
Community Mental Health Counselor,                  COED 670. Counseling Children and
Clinic or Hospital Psychotherapist, Career          Adolescents.                      3
Counselor, Employee Assistance Counselor,
                                                    COED 671. Secondary School
Gerontology Counselor, Marriage and
                                                    Counseling.                             3
Family Counselor and Substance Abuse
Counselor.

                                               75
COED 691. Internship in Elementary                  STUDENT AFFAIRS CONCENTRATION-
School Counseling.                 3*               ADMINISTRATION
COED 692. Internship in Middle School
                                                    Required Courses                           18
Counseling OR                       3
                                                    COED 660. Introduction to Student
COED 693. Internship in High School                 Affairs in Higher Education.                3
Counseling.                         3
                                                    COED 661. The College Student
Elective approved by faculty adviser     3          Developmental Theories.                     3
*Internships: Students must enroll in an            COED 662. Student Affairs
internship in elementary school counseling          Administration.                             3
for three credit hours with the distribution        COED 663. Leadership and
of an additional three credit hours selected        Organizational Behavior.                    3
between middle or high school internships.
                                                    COED 694. Internship Student
                                                    Affairs.                                 3, 3
COMMUNITY COUNSELING
CONCENTRATION
                                                    ◆CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Required Courses                         18         Mary Atwell, Chairperson
COED 620. Psychopathology,                          Graduate Faculty
Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning.       3          See Graduate Faculty list at:
                                                    http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
COED 650. Introduction to Community                 index.html
Mental Health Counseling.          3
COED 680. Couples and Family
Counseling: Theory and Methods.          3          GRADUATE PROGRAM
COED 686. Overview of Substance
Abuse and Addictive Disorders.           3             The graduate program in criminal jus-
                                                    tice allows students to prepare for lead-
COED 690: Internship in Community                   ership, advanced careers, and/or doctoral
Agency Counseling.              3, 3
                                                    education in criminal justice and related
                                                    fields. The program is designed both to
STUDENT AFFAIRS CONCENTRATION –                     enhance students’ existing capabilities and to
COUNSELING                                          develop unique competencies and skills for
                                                    future academic/career goals. Students are
Required Courses                         18         required to complete a minimum of 36 semes-
COED 620. Psychopathology,                          ter hours for either the Master of Arts or the
Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning.       3          Master of Science degree in criminal justice.
                                                    Further program information, including mis-
COED 660. Introduction to Student
                                                    sion, learning outcomes, and student hand-
Affairs in Higher Education.             3
                                                    book, is available online (http://crju-web.asp.
COED 661. The College Student and                   radford.edu/crjugrad.htm).
Developmental Theories.           3
COED 662. Student Affairs
Administration.                          3          ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
COED 694. Internship in Student                     • Submission of an Application for Graduate
Affairs.                               3, 3           Admission, including official transcripts for



                                               76
  all prior undergraduate and graduate course-         CRJU 610. Historical Perspectives in
  work                                                 Criminal Justice.                    3
• A maximum of six credit hours may be trans-          CRJU 620. Judicial Behavior.         3
  ferred into the program
                                                       CRJU 630. Organizational Theory.            3
• Two letters of reference from persons
  able to evaluate the student’s academic              CRJU 635. Foundations of Law
  ability/potential (at least one letter must          Enforcement.                                3
  come from a person outside the Radford               CRJU 638. Foundations of Corrections.3
  University Criminal Justice faculty)
                                                       CRJU 643. Social Awareness.                 3
• An original writing sample by the appli-
  cant consisting of five typed pages with              CRJU 645. Organizing and Planning
  appropriate references on "the most impor-           Community-based Corrections.                3
  tant current problem in criminal justice."           CRJU 650. Criminal Justice Ethics.          3
                                                       CRJU 660. Issues in Criminal Justice. 3
Applications will not be reviewed until all
materials (including references, writing sam-          CRJU 684. Criminal Justice Graduate
                                                       Internship.                         3
ple and transcripts) are complete. Please refer
to p. 21 for application deadlines.                    CRJU 690. Topical Seminar.                  3
                                                       CRJU 698. Directed Study.                   3
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
                                                       Free Electives                          6 hrs.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
                                                           Any approved graduate class may be used
   Students pursuing the Master of Science             for completion of the Master of Science degree,
degree in criminal justice must complete               including those electives listed above.
a minimum of 36 semester hours from
among the following areas: Required core               Criminal Justice Minor                  12 hrs.
courses (18 credits), CRJU electives (12                  A minor in criminal justice at the graduate
credits), free electives (6 credits).                  level will consist of a minimum of 12 semester
                                                       hours (four courses). A criminal justice gradu-
Program Requirements                  36 hrs.          ate faculty member must, in consultation with
                                                       other graduate faculty members, approve the
Required Core Courses           18 hrs.                four courses that will constitute the minor.
CRJU 600. Survey of Criminal Justice. 3
                                                       Comprehensive Written and Oral
CRJU 655. Constitutional Law and the
                                                       Examination
Criminal Justice System.              3
                                                          Students completing the Master of Science
CRJU 670. Criminal Justice Research                    degree must complete comprehensive writ-
Methods.                              3
                                                                                                         CRIMINAL JUSTICE
                                                       ten and oral examinations as a requirement
CRJU 671. Quantitative Methods in                      for graduation. Students should present the
Criminal Justice Research.            3                “Report of Comprehensive Examination”
CRJU 675. Studies in Criminological                    to the committee at the time of the oral
Theory.                               3                examination.
CRJU 691. Public Policy and Criminal
Justice.                              3
                                                       MASTER OF ARTS IN
Criminal Justice Electives    12 hrs.
                                                       CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJU 580. Mediation and Criminal                          Students pursuing the Master of Arts
Justice.                           3                   degree in Criminal Justice must complete
CRJU 590. Seminar.                 3                   a minimum of 36 semester hours from

                                                  77
among the following areas: Required core             Comprehensive Written and Oral
courses (18 credits), CRJU electives (12             Examination
credits) and research and thesis (6 credits).           Students completing the Master of Arts
                                                     degree are exempt from the comprehensive
Program Requirements                 36 hrs.         written examination. The student is required
                                                     to successfully complete the oral defense/
Required Courses                18 hrs.              oral examination as a requirement for
CRJU 600. Survey of Criminal Justice. 3              graduation.
CRJU 655. Seminar in Civil Liberties
and Criminal Law.                    3               ACCELERATED BACHELOR’S/
CRJU 670. Criminal Justice Research                  MASTER’S DEGREE IN CRIMINAL
Methods.                            3                JUSTICE
CRJU 671. Quantitative Methods in                       Exceptional undergraduate students at
Criminal Justice Research.                3          Radford University may complete require-
                                                     ments for baccalaureate and master’s
CRJU 675. Studies in Criminological
                                                     degrees in five rather than six years.
Theory.                             3
                                                        For information on accelerated programs
CRJU 691. Public Policy and Criminal                 see p. 52. For more information contact
Justice.                             3               the Department of Criminal Justice, the
                                                     Graduate Admissions office or consult the
                                                     web at: http:www.radford.edu/gradcollege.
Criminal Justice Electives          12 hrs.
CRJU 580. Mediation and Criminal
Justice.                                  3
CRJU 590. Seminar.                        3
                                                     ◆EDUCATION
                                                     Sandra Moore, Director, School of
CRJU 610. Historical Perspectives in                 Teacher Education and Leadership
Criminal Justice.                    3               Betty Dore, Assistant Director and
CRJU 620. Judicial Behavior.              3          Program Coordinator
CRJU 630 Organizational Theory.           3
                                                     Graduate Faculty
CRJU 635. Foundations of Law                         See Graduate Faculty list at
Enforcement.                              3          http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
CRJU 638. Foundations of Corrections.3               index.html
CRJU 643 Social Awareness.                3
                                                     GRADUATE PROGRAM
CRJU 645. Organizing and Planning
Community-based Corrections.                         The School of Teacher Education and
CRJU 650. Criminal Justice Ethics.        3          Leadership offers programs leading to the
                                                     Master of Science Degree.
CRJU 660. Issues in Criminal Justice. 3
                                                     M.S. in Education                    p. 80
CRJU 684. Criminal Justice Graduate                  M.S. in Educational Leadership       p. 83
Internship.                         3                M.S. in Reading                     p. 103
CRJU 690. Topical Seminar.                3          M.S. in Special Education           p. 111
CRJU 698. Directed Study.                 3
                                                        Graduate studies in the School of
Research and Thesis                  6 hrs.          Teacher Education and Leadership are
CRJU 699. Research and Thesis.            6          designed to prepare graduate students for
                                                     administrative, supervisory and related
                                                78
instructional and non-instructional posi-             • Most practica/internships are taken in the
tions in Virginia’s educational system.                 latter half of the graduate program and
    Each major or program of study requires             have specific prerequisites or corequi-
a series of courses unique to that discipline.          sites.
Careful selection of electives and support-           • Any practicum/internship must be taken
ing courses permits a graduate student to               during a semester in which the student has
develop an individualized program of study              sufficient time to devote to the experience.
with an emphasis on one or more of the fol-           • Scheduling a practicum or internship
lowing areas: results-oriented teaching skills          should be done in consultation with the
(pre-school through adult education); prepa-            student’s adviser or practica supervisor.
ration for various professional areas within          • Travel time, expenses and the availability
education; additional endorsement for teach-            of a qualified supervisor in cooperating
ers already licensed; preparation for doctoral          school or other host agency supervisors
studies.                                                are all considered in determining place-
    Potential graduate students who wish to be          ment sites.
licensed in any field in education are encour-         • When possible, students are encouraged
aged to contact Dr. Betty Dore, Assistant               to enroll in a practicum or internship dur-
Director in the School of Teacher Education             ing the regular academic year.
and Leadership, at (540) 831-5843;                    • Some experiences require the presence
edore@radford.edu to discuss options for                of children and can be taken only when
obtaining either initial licensure to teach or          school is in session.
add-on endorsements.                                  • Students must submit an application
                                                        one month in advance of the practicum
                                                        or internship to ensure the availability
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
                                                        of the site and appropriate supervision.




                                                                                                      EDUCATION
   Admission to the graduate studies pro-               Application forms are available from the
grams administered by the School of Teacher             departmental office in Peters Hall A002.
Education and Leadership is determined
using the following sources:                          Comprehensive Examinations
• Minimum grade point average of 2.75                    A comprehensive examination is
   overall and in the major                           required of all students during the semester
• Scores from the Graduate Record Exami-              in which degree requirements are complet-
   nation (verbal and quantitative) or the            ed. The examination should be scheduled
   Miller Analogies Test                              in consultation with the student’s adviser.
• Two letters of reference                            (See “Final Comprehensive Examination
    Please refer to pages 21 - 23 for applica-        on p. 56.) A written examination should
tion deadlines.                                       be scheduled well in advance of the close
                                                      of the semester (three to fours weeks is
Practica and Internships                              recommended) in order to allow sufficient
   Practica and/or internships are required           time for evaluation.
in most programs in the department. These
experiences allow graduate students to apply          Initial Teacher Licensure
the knowledge gained in coursework to edu-               Persons seeking initial licensure to teach
cational settings. Several important points to        in the elementary, middle or secondary
remember with regard to registering for and           schools should contact Dr. Betty Dore for
completing a practicum or internship include          assistance and guidance before applying
the following:                                        for admission to graduate studies. Dr. Dore
                                                      can be contacted at (540) 831-5843 or
                                                      edore@radford.edu.


                                                 79
MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE                           • A minimum of 18 semester hours of
IN EDUCATION                                         approved graduate course work in a con-
                                                     tent area (18 credits).
Common Core
    All students enrolled in the Master of            At the present time, two areas of study
Science in Education degree are required to        are available for students under this con-
complete 12 semester hours of course work          centration:
that comprise a common core or common
knowledge base. To the extent possible,            • Information Technology
students are encouraged to complete the            • Music Education
common core courses early in their pro-               Since the development of content areas
gram of study, particularly the research           of study under this concentration may
course. Courses required in the common             not coincide with current catalog informa-
core are:                                          tion, students should contact the Graduate
                                                   Program Coordinator for information on
EDET 620. Educational Technology:                  areas of study that are available.
Applications, Applied Research and
Integration.                            3
                                                   CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
EDEF 606. Educational Research.         3
                                                   CONCENTRATION
EDUC 681. International Education.      3
EDEF 607. Educational Foundations.      3          Program Requirements                30 hrs.
                                                       A minimum of 30 semester hours of
Programs of Study                                  graduate course work (including the com-
In developing a program of study, students         mon core) are required for the degree and a
select one of six concentrations within the        concentration curriculum and instruction.
M.S. degree in Education:                          This concentration allows professional edu-
• Content Area Studies                             cators opportunity to expand their profes-
• Curriculum and Instruction                       sional development and enhance skills in
• Early Childhood Education                        teaching and content knowledge. The con-
• Educational Technology                           centration requires a minimum of 18 semes-
• Library Media                                    ter hours of graduate work outside the com-
• Teaching English as a Second Language            mon core, with at least one course selected
                                                   from each of the following areas:
CONTENT AREA STUDIES                               • Curriculum Development
CONCENTRATION                                      • Reading
                                                   • Teaching, Assessment and Evaluation
Program Requirements                36 hrs.        • Special Education
   The degree with a concentration in              • Students may also select courses in the
Content Area Studies requires a minimum               teaching discipline as approved by the
of 36 semester hours of graduate course               adviser.
work, including:
• Common core courses (12 credits).                See adviser for required courses.
• Elective courses in education in addition
  to the common core. These electives
                                                   EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
  will be selected in consultation with the
                                                   CONCENTRATION
  adviser and will be designed to comple-
  ment the student’s academic and career           Program Requirements              30 hrs.
  goals (6 credits).                                 The degree with a concentration Early
                                                   Childhood Education requires a total of 30
                                                   semester hours of graduate work consisting

                                              80
of 12 required hours in the common core              3. Classroom teachers who hold a valid
and 18 hours of additional study. The 18                teaching license and have previously
hours must be course work related to early              earned the master’s degree may work
childhood education and the program of                  toward an add-on endorsement by com-
studies will be designed in close consulta-             pleting only the courses required for the
tion with the adviser.                                  endorsement.
                                                         Close contact with the academic adviser
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY                               is very important to ensure that the appro-
CONCENTRATION                                        priate program is followed that is compat-
                                                     ible with prior academic work and current
Program Requirements                 33 hrs.
                                                     licensure status.
   The degree with a concentration in
Educa-tional Technology requires a total of
                                                       Courses required in addition to the com-
33 semester hours of graduate work consist-
                                                     mon core include the following:
ing of 12 required hours in the common core
and 21 hours in the major area of emphasis.
                                                     EDLS 608. Child and Adolescent
   In consultation with the adviser, each
                                                     Literature for Library Media Specialists. 3
student will develop a major area of study
                                                     EDLS 610. Developing Library
with 21 hours of course work:
                                                     Collections.                              3
                                                     EDLS 612. Reference Materials and
EDET 619. Instructional Design.           3
                                                     Services.                                 3
EDET 630. Instructional Graphics and
                                                     EDLS 614. Organization of Library
Visualization.                            3
                                                     Media Center Materials.                   3
EDET 640. Multimedia Technologies for
                                                     EDLS 616. Developing Partnerships for
Instruction.                              3
                                                     Learning.                                 3
EDET 650. Instructional Integration of the
                                                     EDLS 618. Production and Evaluation
Internet.                                 3
                                                     of Educational Media.                     3
EDET 689. Practicum in Educational
                                                     EDET 629. Administration of Media/
Media/Technology.                         3
                                                     Technology.                               3
Electives                                 6
                                                     EDET 689. Practicum in Educational
                                                     Media/Technology                          3
LIBRARY MEDIA                                        or
CONCENTRATION                                        EDUC 640. Internship. (if seeking initial
                                                     licensure)                                6
Program Requirements                 36 hrs.
    The concentration in library media under
the Master of Science in Education degree
allows three opportunities for persons to            TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND
obtain licensure as a library media special-         LANGUAGE CONCENTRATION
ist in grades PK-12:
1. Students with an undergraduate degree             Program Requirements                30 hrs.
   in another subject area to secure licen-
                                                        The Master of Science degree in Educa-
   sure as a library media specialist while
                                                     tion, with a concentration in Teaching
   completing a Master of Science degree
                                                     English as a Second Language (TESL),
   in Education.
                                                     allows students to develop knowledge of
2. Classroom teachers who hold a valid
                                                     second language acquisition theory based
   teaching license may either complete the
                                                     on sound educational practices. Emphasis
   degree and the concentration or complete
                                                     is given to the interconnectedness of plan-
   only those courses required for an add-on
                                                     ning, delivery and assessment of second
   endorsement as a library media specialist.

                                                81
language instruction. The concentration in           ENGL 663. Linguistics.                3
TESL provides graduates with the back-               EDLI 602. ESL: Applied Linguistics    3
ground necessary to work in either admin-            EDLI 603. ESL: Analysis and Application
istrative or teaching positions. Students            of Instructional Techniques.          3
who are licensed may also seek an add-on             EDRD 688. Advanced Study in Reading.3
endorsement. The program is an excel-                EDLI 604. Second Language Assessment
lent preparation to pursue doctoral studies,         Principles.                           3
teaching, program administration, teacher
supervision and curriculum development.              Electives (selected in consultation
The TESL specialization may be completed             with the adviser)                     3 hrs.
in 1.5 to 2 years.
                                                        Students seeking an endorsement in
                                                     TESL should consult the School of Teacher
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
                                                     Education and Leadership at (540) 831-
   Requirements and considerations related           5302. Each candidate for endorsement
to admission to the program include the              must also complete six hours of college-
following:                                           level instruction in a modern foreign lan-
• Students who have not met the prere-               guage.
  quisites for admission to the Master of
  Science in Education must complete up to
  nine hours of prerequisites in Education
  with at least one course or experience in          ◆EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
  Special Education.                                 Sandra Moore, Director, School for
• Students choosing this concentration               Teacher Education and Leadership
  must meet the requirements for admis-              Betty Dore, Assistant Director
  sion to the College of Graduate and                William Flora, Program Coordinator
  Professional Studies.
• Students wishing to specialize in Teach-           Graduate Faculty
  ing English as a Second Language who               See Graduate Faculty list at
  have not completed undergraduate work              http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
  in English beyond the general education            index.html
  requirements, which are a minimum of                   The Master of Science Degree in
  nine to 12 credits, will also be required          Educational Leadership is designed to pre-
  to complete up to nine hours of work in            pare professional personnel to fill positions
  English.                                           as preK-12 school principals or instruc-
• Students must demonstrate that they have           tional supervisors in Virginia. Endorsement
  completed six semester hours of university-        in administration in Virginia requires a
  level course work in a foreign language            minimum of three years of successful K-12
  with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0.           teaching experience prior to beginning a
  Non-native English speaking students must          graduate program in this area. Successful
  have passed the TOEFL exam with a mini-            completion of this program of study would
  mum score of 550 for admission to the              lead to a license in preK-12 school admin-
  Graduate College and the M.S. in education         istration and supervision.
  degree.
                                                     ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
   In addition to the courses required in
the common core, students are required to            • Undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or better.
complete an additional 18 semester hours             • Official test scores from either the
of graduate course work as follows:                    Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
                                                       or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
                                                82
                                                82
  factored in with undergraduate or gradu-           EDEL 626. The School and Community
  ate grade point average (GPA) to derive            Relations.                        3
  acceptable cutoffs.                                EDEL 630. Legal and Ethical Dimensions
• Minimum of three years K-12 classroom              of School Administration.           3
  teaching experience.
• Three references, one of which is from             EDEL 690. Internship.                    6
  most recent principal, one from current            Elective                                 3
  superintendent or designee.
• Writing sample to be completed which




                                                                                                    EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
                                                     OPTION 2 - MASTER OF
  details applicant’s philosophy of teaching,        SCIENCE EDUCATIONAL
  learning and administration garnered over
                                                     LEADERSHIP W/ LICENSURE
  the years of classroom teaching experi-
                                                         Option 2 (30 hours) is designed to
  ence (two pages typed, double-spaced, 12
                                                     culminate in a Master's degree with a
  pt. font, with one-inch margins).
                                                     recommendation of endorsement in pre-
   Please refer to pages 21 - 23 for applica-        K-12 administration and supervision. This
tion deadlines.                                      option is for students who hold a prior mas-
   The Educational Leadership Program                ter's degree from an accredited program.
offers two MS degree options; a 36-hour
MS in Education degree (Option 1), and a             Required Courses                 30 hrs.
30-hour MS in Education degree (Option               EDEL 612. Introduction to School
2)                                                   Administration.                       3
                                                     EDEL 614. Supervision and Evaluation
OPTION 1 -MASTER OF                                  of Instruction.                      3
SCIENCE EDUCATIONAL
                                                     EDUC 615. Principles of Curriculum
LEADERSHIP W/ LICENSURE
                                                     Development.                       3
   Option 1 (36 hours) is designed to cul-
minate in a master’s degree with a recom-            EDUC 617. Models of Teaching.            3
mendation of endorsement for full preK-              EDEL 621. Organization and
12 administration and supervision. This              Management of Public Schools.            3
option is for students who DO NOT hold
a prior master's degree from an accredited           EDEL 624. Technology for School
program.                                             Administrators.                          3
                                                     EDEL 626. The School and Community
Required Courses                 36 hrs.             Relations.                       3
EDEL 612. Introduction to School                     EDEL 630. Legal and Ethical
Administration.                       3              Dimensions of School Administration. 3
EDEL 614. Supervision and Evaluation
                                                     EDEL 690. Internship.                    6
of Instruction.                      3
EDUC 615. Principles of Curriculum
Development.                       3                 FIELD EXPERIENCE & LICENSURE
EDEF 606. Educational Research.           3              In order to be fully licensed, a student
EDUC 617. Models of Teaching.             3          must complete an internship. An internship
                                                     consists of a total of 360 hours of adminis-
EDEL 621. Organization and
                                                     tration experience in local schools and/or
Management of Public Schools.             3
                                                     in a division office setting. Students may
EDEL 624. Technology for School                      begin the field placement after six hours
Administrators.                           3

                                                83
                                                83
in the program at a time (in 2 hour incre-           British and American literature. Students
ments). Each 2.0 hour unit of the internship         who choose English Education as
consists of 120 clock hours working with a           an area of study may receive the M.S.
mentor principal/central office supervisor.           degree with initial teacher licensure or
The administrative internship is required            add a master’s degree endorsement to an
for licensure as a preK-12 supervisor.               existing license. Initial teacher licensure
                                                     is not available with the M.A. degree. The
                                                     program emphasizes independent research
LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS                               – using both print and electronic sourc-
                                                     es – and the writing of scholarly papers
   The School Licensure Leadership Assess-           based on a critical understanding of lit-
ment (SLLA) by ETS is required by the                erature’s aesthetic and humanistic values
Commonwealth of Virginia, prior to                   and of its social, historical and cultural
receiving the pre K-12 Administration and
                                                     significance. The program also offers stu-
Supervision license.
                                                     dents the opportunity to take courses and
   Radford University’s Master of Science
                                                     to pursue interests in contemporary critical
in Educational Leadership provides stu-
                                                     theory, creative writing, technical writing,
dents the opportunity to prepare for the role
                                                     linguistics and the teaching of English.
of school principal and/or central office
supervisor licensure at the preK-12 level.              Completion of the Master of Arts or Master
   All program requirements are to be com-           of Science degree normally requires three or
pleted before registering for the SLLA.              four semesters for full-time students.


                                                     ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
◆ENGLISH                                             • Graduate Record Examinations scores
Rosemary Guruswamy, Chairperson                        typically of 500 or above verbal, of 4.5
Paul Witkowsky, Program Coordinator                    or above analytical.
                                                     • Students pursuing the Master of Science
Graduate Faculty                                       or Master of Arts degree in English must
See Graduate Faculty list at:                          have earned a minimum of 21 semester
http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/            hours of credit in English at the under-
index.html                                             graduate level with a 2.75 GPA.

GRADUATE PROGRAM                                       NOTE: Although not required for admis-
                                                       sion, graduate students pursuing initial
    The graduate program in English, which             teacher licensure must have the following
leads to a Master of Arts or Master of                 in order to meet Virginia licensure require-
Science degree, prepares students for teach-           ments: (1) a minimum of 27 semester hours
ing at the secondary and college levels; for           of credit in English at the undergraduate
further graduate study in pursuit of the               level with a 2.75 GPA; 2) completion of
doctoral degree; and for entry into various            EDUC 309 or equivalent; 3) completion of
professions where critical thinking, com-              EDSP 362 or equivalent; 4) completion of
munication skills and writing are valued               EDRD 416 or equivalent.
and employed.                                        • Two letters of recommendation.
   Graduate study in English provides                • At the time of application to the Graduate
students with an opportunity to devel-                 College, all applicants must submit a sam-
op skills in literary scholarship and                  ple of expository writing, which may be a
criticism through an intensive study of                previously graded undergraduate paper,
                                                       to:

                                                84
    Graduate Program Coordinator                     Other Required Courses (Students choose an
    Department of English                            area of study in one of the following: British
    Box 6935                                         Literature, American Literature, English
    Radford University                               Education)
    Radford, VA 24142
                                                     British Literature
• Applicants for Graduate Teaching
  Fellowships must submit an addition-               at least 9 hours chosen from the following
  al recommendation (in addition to the              courses:
  two required for graduate admission)               ENGL 631. Studies in Middle English
  and a statement of teaching philosophy             Literature.
  to the Graduate Program Coordinator.
                                                     ENGL 633. Studies in English
  Guidelines for this statement are avail-
                                                     Renaissance.
  able from the Coordinator.
Please refer to pages 21 - 23 for application        ENGL 635. Studies in Restoration and
deadlines.                                           18th Century British Literature.
                                                     ENGL 637. Studies in 19th Century
General Requirements
                                                     British Literature.
The student must maintain a "B" average.             ENGL 639. Studies in 20th Century
                                                     Literature.




                                                                                                      ENGLISH
No more than 20 percent of the total credit          ENGL 653. Studies in Women’s
hours taken for graduate credit may be in            Literature.
500-level courses.
                                                     Appropriate ENGL 680. Special Topics in
Graduate students pursuing initial teacher           English.
licensure must also (1) submit passing
scores for Virginia on the appropriate Praxis        American Literature
I and Praxis II tests before completion of 12        at least 9 hours chosen from the following
semester hours; (2) meet qualifications for           courses:
acceptance and retention in the Secondary            ENGL 546. Appalachian Folklore.
Education Licensure Program in English.
                                                     ENGL 639. Studies in 20th Century
                                                     Literature.
MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH                            ENGL 644. Studies in American
Program Requirements               30 hrs.           Literature I (to 1861).

Required Core Courses                9 hrs.          ENGL 645. Studies in American
                                                     Literature II (since 1861).
ENGL 600. Introduction to Literary
Scholarship.                              3          ENGL 648. Studies in Oral and Written
                                                     Literature of Appalachia.
ENGL 621. Principles of Literary
Criticism.*                               3          ENGL 653. Studies in Women’s
                                                     Literature.
ENGL 663. Linguistics.*                   3
                                                     Appropriate ENGL 680. Special Topics
Required M.A. Course                                 in English.
ENGL 699. Research and Thesis.            6
                                                     English Education, Non-licensure
                                                     (12 hours listed below)
                                                     ENGL 502. Teaching Writing.*               3

                                                85
ENGL 629. Critical Approaches to                   Appropriate ENGL 680. Special Topics
Teaching Literature.                    3          in English.
ENGL 563. Grammar and Language for
Teachers.*                       3                 American Literature
                                                   at least 9 hours chosen from the following
EDEF 606. Educational Research.         3          courses:
                                                   ENGL 546. Appalachian Folklore.
Electives
     *ENGL 621, ENGL 663, ENGL 502,                ENGL 639. Studies in 20th Century
ENGL 563 may be replaced by an elective if         Literature.
an undergraduate equivalent was completed.         ENGL 644. Studies in American
                                                   Literature I (to 1861).
                                                   ENGL 645. Studies in American
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH                       Literature II (since 1861).
                                                   ENGL 648. Studies in Oral and Written
Program Requirements             33 hrs.*          Literature of Appalachia.
Required Core Courses              9 hrs.          ENGL 653. Studies in Women’s Literature.
                                                   Appropriate ENGL 680. Special Topics
ENGL 600. Introduction to Literary                 in English.
Scholarship.                            3
ENGL 621. Principles of Literary                   English Education, Non-licensure
Criticism.*                             3          ENGL 502. Teaching Writing.*           3
ENGL 663. Linguistics.*                  3         ENGL 563. Grammar and Language
Other Required Courses                             for Teachers.*                 3
(Students choose an area of study in one of        ENGL 629. Critical Approaches to
the following: British Literature, American
                                                   Teaching Literature.                   3
Literature, English Education—non-licen-
sure or English Education with initial             EDEF 606. Educational Research.        3
teacher licensure)
                                                   English Education with initial secondary
British Literature                                 teacher licensure (grades 6-12):
at least 9 hours chosen from the following
courses:                                           Required courses that count toward the 33
ENGL 631. Studies in Middle English                hours required for the Master of Science
Literature.                                        Degree:

ENGL 633. Studies in English                       ENGL 502. Teaching Writing.*           3
Renaissance.                                       ENGL 525. Adolescent Literature.       3
ENGL 635. Studies in Restoration and               or
18th Century British Literature.
                                                   ENGL 629. Critical Approaches to
ENGL 637. Studies in 19th Century                  Teaching Literature.                   3
British Literature.
                                                   EDEF 606. Educational Research.        3
ENGL 639. Studies in 20th Century
                                                   EDUC 640. Internship in Teaching.      6
Literature.
                                                   A 600-level Educational Technology
ENGL 653. Studies in Women’s
                                                   course satisfying licensure requirements.3
Literature

                                              86
Supporting courses:                                 Written Examination Required of
The following courses do not count toward           Both Degrees
the 33 hours required for the Master of                 The written examination will be admin-
Science Degree, but are required for initial        istered by the director of the candidate’s
teacher licensure:                                  thesis/examination committee. For Master
                                                    of Arts candidates, the members of the
Students may prefer to complete the
                                                    examination committee may be different
following before entering the Graduate
                                                    from the members of the thesis committee,
Program
                                                    with the exception of the thesis director.
EDUC 309. Foundations of Education                  The examination areas will be determined
(3) or an equivalent course                         in consultation between the candidate and
EDSP 362. Current Trends in Education               the examination committee members, draw-
of Exceptional Individuals (3) or an                ing upon the candidate’s program of study.
equivalent course                                   The examination will consist of three essay
                                                    questions, one submitted by each member
EDRD 416. Content Reading and                       of the candidate’s committee. The candidate
Literacy.                                           will choose the format of the examina-
Students take the following courses dur-            tion (closed-book, with two hours for each
ing the early field experience or student            question or open-book, with 48 hours for
teaching:                                           the entire examination). The examination
                                                    must be completed at least two weeks
EDUC 441. Field Experience,
                                                    prior to graduation. It is recommended that
Grades 6-12.                              3
                                                    approval forms be requested at least five
ENGL 426. Teaching English in the                   days in advance of the examination date.
High School.                              2
ENGL 428. Planning and Teaching
Seminar.                                  1         ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR
Also required for licensure:                        THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE

Passing scores for Virginia on the appro-           Language Proficiency
priate Praxis I and Praxis II tests upon or            The candidate must meet a foreign lan-
before completion of 12 semester hours              guage reading proficiency requirement.
(SAT scores of 1100 or higher may be                This may be accomplished in one of three
submitted in lieu of passing Praxis I               ways: (1) completion, with a grade of B
scores); students must also meet quali-             or above, of 12 semester hours in a for-
fications for acceptance and retention               eign language no earlier than five years
in the Secondary Education Licensure                before admission to graduate studies; (2)
Program in English.                                 completion, with a grade of B or above, of
                                                    French 210, German 210, Spanish 202 or
Electives                                           Latin 201 or the equivalent transfer hours
                                                    no earlier than five years before admis-
*ENGL 621, ENGL 663, ENGL 502,                      sion to graduate studies; or (3) passing
ENGL 563 may be replaced by an                      a reading proficiency exam administered
elective if an undergraduate equivalent             by the Department of Foreign Languages
was completed.                                      and Literatures, on material chosen by the
                                                    foreign language examiner in consultation
                                                    with the candidate’s thesis adviser. The
                                                    requirement must be completed at least


                                               87
two weeks prior to graduation. Forms are               the final semester of study and at least two
located in the Graduate College office.                 weeks prior to graduation. The questions
                                                       for this examination can both complement
THESIS PROPOSAL                                        and vary from those posed for the written
                                                       examination. The oral examination will fol-
EXAMINATION                                            low the written examination and cannot be
    The candidate will submit a Thesis                 taken prior to the candidate’s satisfactory
Proposal Defense form, including a nar-                completion of the written examination. The
rative statement, to his or her committee              two examinations can be scheduled either in
before registering for thesis hours. The               consecutive semesters or in the same semes-
committee will meet with the candidate to              ter. If the oral examination is not completed
review the proposal and to suggest changes;            satisfactorily, the candidate must retake the
the proposal, including any revisions, must            examination during a subsequent semester.
be approved by the committee before sub-
mission of the Request for Thesis Advisory
Committee form to the Graduate College.                ◆MUSIC
The thesis proposal must be approved, and the          Eugene C. Fellin, Chairperson
Request for Thesis Advisory Committee form             Bruce Mahin, Program Coordinator
signed by the committee, no later than the end
                                                       Graduate Faculty
of the first week of the semester in which the
                                                       See Graduate Faculty list at:
candidate intends to register for thesis hours.
                                                       http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
                                                       index.html
THESIS
                                                       GRADUATE PROGRAM
   The thesis will be written under the
supervision of the candidate’s committee.                 The graduate program in music offers
The committee must approve the thesis.                 courses leading to a Master of Arts or
                                                       Master of Science degree. The Master of
                                                       Arts program provides advanced study for
ORAL THESIS EXAMINATION
                                                       musicians, music scholars in preparation
   After the thesis has been completed but             for professional careers or doctoral study.
prior to its submission to the office of the            The Master of Science program provides
dean of the Graduate College, the commit-              advanced study and opportunities for music
tee will meet with the candidate for an oral           therapists to refine existing competencies
examination of one hour on the topic of the            and to attain new ones.
thesis. The examination must occur at least               Graduate standing is a prerequisite to all
two weeks prior to graduation.                         500- and 600-level courses.
                                                          At least 80 percent of hours in the program
                                                       must be in 600-level courses. An exception to
                                                       the 80 percent minimum in 600-level courses
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS
                                                       is applicable to graduate degree programs in
FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE                              music for specific purpose of providing for
DEGREE                                                 an additional one to six credit hours of 500-
                                                       level performing ensembles in the program
ORAL EXAMINATION
                                                       of study. The 500-level courses listed in this
   An oral examination of not more than two            section may be taken for graduate credit pro-
hours, based primarily on the candidate’s              vided the student has the necessary prerequi-
program of study, will be administered in              sites and if the same course or a comparable
                                                       course was not taken as part of the student's

                                                  88
undergraduate program (MUSC 531, 535,                2. Students will be informed of specific
536, 537, 553, 555, 557 and 558 excepted).              deficiencies identified through the diag-
                                                        nostic exams and they will have the
                                                        choice of two options:
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                                  a. Students may take (a) prescribed
                                                        course(s) to remedy the deficiencies. A
   Minimum overall grade point average                  grade of at least "B" must be earned
required is 2.75. Minimum major grade point             in the course(s) in order to remove the




                                                                                                     MUSIC
average required is 2.75. All applicants must           deficiency from the student’s record. If
submit an official undergraduate transcript              a grade of at least "B" is achieved, the
prior to admission.                                     student will have satisfied the entrance
   All students applying for admission to               requirements in music history and music
a graduate music program are required to                theory for master’s degree programs in
take one of the following ETS standard-                 music.
ized tests: the Graduate Record Examination             b. Students may choose to study on their
(GRE), the Major Field Test in Music or                 own in areas of deficiency. Following
the Praxis II Subject Assessment (Music:                individual study the student must retake
Content Knowledge) Examination.                         the diagnostic examination(s) prior to
   Three letters of reference are to be                 completing 18 hours of study. Failure to
submitted from professional sourc-                      retake the exam prior to the completion
es. All students pursuing a master’s                    of 18 hours in the degree program will
degree in music must have, at the                       require the student to utilize option "a."
undergraduate level, music courses                      If upon retaking the exam(s) a satisfac-
equivalent to those required in an appro-               tory score on the exam(s) is achieved,
priate undergraduate degree program at                  the student will have satisfied the
Radford University. All students entering               entrance requirements in music history
the M.A. (Music) program (which requires                and music theory for master’s degree
at least two semester hours of graduate                 programs in music. The student will
level applied study) must also present an               be permitted to retake the diagnostic
entrance audition in their applied perform-             exam(s) only one time, after which the
ing area for placement purpose. Students                option "a" must be utilized.
entering the M.S. (Music Therapy) pro-
gram (which does not require graduate
level applied study) without a bachelor's
degree in music from an NASM member                  THE PRELIMINARY
institution must also present an entrance            COMPREHENSIVE
audition in their undergraduate applied              EXAMINATION IN MUSIC
major and minor performing areas for diag-
nostic purposes.                                         The Preliminary Comprehensive Exami-
   Please refer to pages 21 - 23 for applica-        nation is a discussion among the student and
tion deadlines.                                      a faculty committee regarding the progress
                                                     of the student in the degree program. It is
Entrance Requirements in Music History               not an assessment of the student’s knowl-
and Music Theory                                     edge in any specific content area. The
1. Students admitted to the graduate                 Preliminary Comprehensive Examination
   music program are required to take the            occurs prior to the completion of the first
   Radford University diagnostic exams in            semester (or 9 hours) of graduate study.
   music history and music theory on the             1. The committee will consist of the stu-
   first day of classes in the first semester             dent’s adviser and two other graduate
   of graduate study.                                   music faculty appropriate to the student’s



                                                89
   degree program selected by the student            defense. Master of Science candidates in the
   in conjunction with the adviser. This             “cognate” option within the music educa-
   committee may or may not be the same              tion concentration are required to take only
   as the committee for the student’s even-          the final comprehensive oral exam. Master
   tual final project, thesis, recital and/or         of Science candidates in the music therapy
   Final Comprehensive Examination.                  concentration are required to take the final
2. At least one week prior to the exam,              comprehensive oral exam concurrently with
   the student will submit a report contain-         their project defense.
   ing the following information to each
   committee member: (1) A summary of the
                                                     MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE
   student’s progress in the degree program,
   including progress toward the remedia-            MUSIC CONCENTRATION
   tion of any deficiencies. (2) A state-
   ment of professional objectives and a
                                                     Program Requirements                 30 hrs.
   plan for realizing these objectives which
   includes a proposed program of study.             Music Core Courses             9 hrs.
   (3) If appropriate to the student’s degree
                                                     MUSC 601. Bibliography and Research.3
   program, an outline of possible areas/
   topics of interest for the final project,          Music History Period Course.               3
   thesis or recital.                                MUSC 633. Analytical Techniques.           3
3. During the exam, the committee and
   student will discuss the three areas out-         Required Music Courses         11 hrs.
   lined in the student’s report. As part of
                                                     Music History Period Course.        3
   this discussion, the committee will offer
   suggestions to the student on courses             MUSC 571. Fourth Year Applied Music
   and procedures that may be beneficial in           or
   working towards the attainment of the             MUSC 572. Fourth Year Applied Music
   student’s goals.                                  or
4. The student will be provided with a writ-         MUSC 671. Advanced Applied Music
   ten assessment by the committee follow-           or
   ing the examination.                              MUSC 672. Advanced Applied Music. 2
                                                     MUSC 697. Graduate Recital
                                                     or
THE FINAL COMPREHENSIVE                              MUSC 699. Research and Thesis.      6
ORAL EXAMINATION IN MUSIC                            Supporting Courses                     10 hrs.
   The final comprehensive oral examina-                 An additional 10 semester hours in sup-
tion is designed to measure the ability of           porting elective studies are to be determined
students to synthesize course work taken             in consultation between student and adviser.
in their degree program and apply the con-           Students electing the graduate recital must
tent of these courses to their major area of         complete a minimum of four semester hours
concentration. The student’s ability to ver-         of credit beyond level eight in applied music.
bally express ideas and facts coherently and         Students who elect to present a graduate
concisely is an important focus of the oral          recital in voice are expected to be proficient
examination. All Master of Arts candidates           in French, German and Italian diction. A
and those Master of Science candidates in the        language examination in at least one modern
“recital” or “thesis” option within the music        foreign language is required for those who
education concentration are required to take         elect to write a thesis.
the final comprehensive oral exam concur-
rently with their recital hearing or thesis
                                                90
                                                90
MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE                             Research Option                        24 hrs.
MUSIC THERAPY CONCENTRATION                          Required Courses                20 hrs.
Program Requirements             33-42 hrs.          EDEF 606. Educational Research.      3
                                                     MUSC 620. Advanced Methods and
Music Core Courses                    9 hrs.




                                                                                                        NURSING
                                                     Materials in Music Therapy.                  3
MUSC 601. Bibliography and
                                                     MUSC 641. Practicum in Music
Research.                                 3
                                                     Therapy.                                  2
Music History Period Course.              3          MUSC 650. Seminar in Music Therapy. 6
MUSC 517. Form and Analysis.                         MUSC 699. Research and Thesis.            6
                                                     Supporting Music Courses*              1 hr.
or
                                                     Includes courses such as performance, the-
MUSC 633. Analytical Techniques.          3          ory, analysis, history and literature.
                                                     Behavioral Science Electives* 3 hrs.
Clinical Option                      33 hrs.
                                                     *Courses are to be determined in consulta-
Required Music Therapy                               tion between student and adviser.
Courses                      17 hrs.
MUSC 620. Advanced Methods and
Materials in Music Therapy.       3
MUSC 641:642. Practicum in Music                     ◆NURSING
Therapy.                                  4          Kathy LaSala, Director
MUSC 651. Special Applications in                    Janet McDaniel, Program Coordinator
Music Therapy I.                          3          Graduate Faculty
MUSC 652. Special Applications in                    See Graduate Faculty list at:
Music Therapy II.                         3          http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
                                                     index.html
MUSC 696. Music Therapy Project.          4

Supporting Music Course                 1 hr.        GRADUATE PROGRAM
Includes courses such as performance,                    The graduate program in Nursing offers
theory, analysis, history and literature.            courses leading to the Master of Science in
                                                     Nursing (MSN) and/or preparation to sit for
Supporting Counselor Education
                                                     professional certification in selected areas. The
Courses                        15 hrs.
                                                     program is designed to provide advanced
COED 610. Human Growth and                           knowledge in nursing theory, research and
Development.                        3                practice. Four clinical concentrations are
COED 611. Introduction to the                        available: Adult Clinical Nurse Specialist,
Counseling Theories and Techniques. 3                Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Family
                                                     Nurse Practitioner and, in collaboration with
COED 612. Professional, Ethical, and
                                                     Shenandoah University, Nurse Midwifery.
Legal Issues in Counseling.          3
                                                     Two certificates are available: post-master’s
COED 614. Group Counseling Theories                  Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate and
and Techniques.                   3                  Certificate in Gerontological Nursing. In addi-
Behavioral Science Elective*           3             tion, an accelerated RN/BSN/MSN option is
*To be determined in consultation between            available for academically and profession-
student and adviser.                                 ally qualified registered nurses who have
                                                91
                                                91
identified the MSN degree as an educational              Financial aid for tuition and/or fees may
goal. A Program of Study for this option com-        be available to qualified students in the form
bines undergraduate and graduate courses             of scholarships, traineeships, stipends and
that prepare RNs for advanced nursing prac-          graduate assistantships.
tice in either the Family Nurse Practitioner
(FNP) or one of the Clinical Nurse Specialist        ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
(CNS) concentrations.
    Both the ADULT CNS and Gerontology                  Application for admission into the
CNS concentrations emphasize develop-                Graduate Program may be made at any time
ment of advanced nursing practice compe-             and admission is continuous. Applicants
tencies in the holistic management of clients        must have:
and families with complex health promotion,          • graduated from a nationally accredited
protection and restoration needs. Students             baccalaureate program in nursing
will participate in practica in a variety            • a cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)
of acute and chronic health care settings              of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 in the nursing
designed to meet program outcomes and                  major
the individual learning needs of the stu-            • met undergraduate course prerequisites
dents.                                                 (undergraduate statistics, health assess-
    The FNP concentration educates nurses              ment, nursing research)
who, upon completion, are qualified to
provide primary health care in a variety             Send to the Graduate College:
of settings. Graduates are prepared to seek          • an official Graduate College application
national nurse practitioner certification and           with application fee
                                                     • three recommendation forms (part of the
to practice collaboratively or independently
                                                       Graduate Application) completed by for-
in rural and urban underserved areas.
                                                       mer employers or nursing faculty
    Students may be accepted into graduate
                                                     • official scores for the Graduate Record
study as full-time or part-time students. The
                                                       Exam (GRE) or the Miller Analogy Test
MSN in either CNS concentration or the
                                                       (MAT)
FNP can be completed in four semesters               • official transcripts from all undergradu-
plus one summer of full-time study. The                ate or graduate institutions attended
Nurse Midwifery can be completed within
two calendar years, including two semes-                In addition, all applicants must supply
ters plus one summer of full-time Radford            the School of Nursing with:
University coursework and two semesters              • a current license to practice as a
plus one summer of midwifery courses                   Registered Nurse in Virginia
through Shenandoah University.                       • current certification in BLS or ACLS
    Students seeking the MSN in all concen-          • a letter from the applicant describing
trations must complete a comprehensive                 career goals and how the graduate cre-
examination. For students completing a                 dential will assist in meeting those goals;
thesis, the oral defense serves as the com-            potential for practice in a rural area
prehensive exam and for students complet-            • a resume that includes education and
ing a master’s capstone intervention proj-             description of professional practice posi-
ect, the accompanying paper serves as the              tions; must be able to document a mini-
comprehensive exam (for additional infor-              mum of one year of full-time or the
mation, please refer to the section Final              equivalent of 12 months nursing practice
Comprehensive Examination, on p. 56 of                 within the past three years
this catalog).                                       • three letters of reference (in addition
                                                       to the recommendation forms to the


                                                92
  Graduate College) from professional                NURS 696. Master’s Capstone Project. 1,1
  contacts that address the applicant’s
  potential for advanced practice nursing            OR
• evidence of either an undergraduate
  course or a continuing education course            NURS 699. Thesis.                        (3,3)
  in gerontology                                     Gerontology Clinical Nurse
• an interview with the Graduate Nursing             Specialist.                 22-26 hrs.
  Admissions Committee
                                                     NURS 622. Gerontological Nursing. 3
   Prior to enrollment in the program, appli-        NURS 630. Advanced Adult Nursing I. 5
cants are expected to have achieved, by              NURS 632. Advanced Adult Nursing II.6
experience and education, basic skills in
written and oral communication and com-              NURS 640. Nursing Administration.           3
puter usage.                                         NURS 642. Practicum in Gerontological
   Admission is competitive and is granted           Nursing.                            3
to those applicants who demonstrate aca-
demic ability and the likelihood of success          NURS 696. Master’s Capstone Project. 1,1
in graduate study.
                                                     OR

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE                             NURS 699. Thesis.                        (3,3)

                                                     Family Nurse Practitioner  29-33 hrs.
Program Requirements             41-54 hrs.
                                                     NURS 634. Advanced Family Nursing
Required Courses for all                             I: Women’s Health.                 5
Concentrations                 21 hrs.               NURS 635. Advanced Family Nursing
NURS 620. Theoretical Foundations in                 II: Children’s Health.            5
Nursing.                             3               NURS 636. Advanced Family Nursing
NURS 628. Advanced                                   III: Acute Illness Across the Lifespan. 5
Pathophysiology.                          3          NURS 637. Advanced Family Nursing
NURS 629. Advanced Health                            IV: Chronic Illness Across the Lifespan.5
Assessment Across the Lifespan.           3          NURS 638. FNP Preceptorship.                7
NURS 631. Pharmacotherapeutics.           3          NURS 696. Master’s Capstone Project.
NURS 633. Advanced Nursing                           1,1
Practice in Rural Communities.            3          OR
NURS 650. Advanced Nursing                           NURS 699. Thesis.                         3,3
Research.                                 3
NURS 651. Role Preparation in                        Nurse Midwifery
Nursing.                                  3             The 43-credit Nurse Midwifery option
                                                     provided in collaboration with Shenandoah
Adult Clinical Nurse Specialist 20-24 hrs.           University prepares nurses for advanced
                                                     practice in the care of women across the lifes-
NURS 630. Advanced Adult Nursing I.        7         pan with an emphasis on the child-bearing
                                                     phase of the life cycle. The Nurse Midwifery
NURS 632. Advanced Adult Nursing II. 8               component is taught by the Division of
NURS 640. Nursing Administration.          3         Nursing at Shenandoah University, the only
                                                     Graduate Program in the Commonwealth

                                                93
of Virginia with a Nurse Midwifery spe-                CERTIFICATE IN
cialty that is accredited by the American              GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING
College of Nurse Midwives. The Nurse                      The School of Nursing also offers a cer-
Midwifery courses offered by Shenandoah                tificate in Gerontological Nursing designed
University will qualify students to sit for the        to prepare nurses who have graduated from
nurse-midwifery certification examina-                  a baccalaureate or master's nursing program
tion of the American College of Nurse-                 for leadership roles in gerontological nursing
Midwives Certification Council.                         practice. Students completing Level I course
                                                       work with a 3.0 GPA or above may be eli-
POST-MASTER’S FAMILY NURSE                             gible for admission to the master's program
PRACTITIONER                                           in Nursing. All certification course work may
   This three-semester, 33-credit certifi-              be applied to the master's program of
cate track is designed for nurses who have             study.
previously earned a master’s in nursing
from an accredited program. An applicant               ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
for this certificate must have completed a
three credit graduate level pathophysiology            Admissions requirements for Level I
course and a minimum of a three cred-                  include:
it hour graduate level health assessment               a. B.S. in nursing and active R.N. licensure
course within five years previous to appli-                in Virginia.
cation. In addition, the applicant must have           b. History of work experience for minimum
completed courses comparable to N620:                     of two years in agencies that provide health
Theoretical Foundations in Nursing, N651:                 care for a majority of persons (51 percent or
Role Preparation in Nursing and N650:                     greater) who are 65 years of age or older.
Advanced Nursing Research. A minimum                   c. Undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or above.
total of 24 credit hours must be completed
at Radford University in order to earn the             Admissions requirements for Level II
certificate from this institution. Application          include:
follows the same procedures as application             a. Master's in Nursing or currently enrolled
into the FNP concentration.                               in master's in nursing program.
NURS 631. Pharmacotherapeutics for                     b. Active R.N. licensure in Virginia.
Primary Care Providers.                    3           c. History of work experience for minimum
                                                          of two years in agencies that provide
NURS 633. Advanced Nursing Practice                       healthcare for a majority of persons (51
in Rural Families and Communities. 3                      percent or greater) who are 65 years of
NURS 634. Advanced Family Nursing                         age or older.
I: Women’s Health.                5                    d. Undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or above.
NURS 635. Advanced Family Nursing
II: Children’s Health.            5                    Required Courses                  15 hrs.
NURS 636. Advanced Family Nursing                      Students pursuing the certificate program
III: Acute Illness.               5                    in Gerontological Nursing must complete a
                                                       minimum of 15 semester hours.
NURS 637. Advanced Family Nursing
IV; Chronic Illness.              5                    NURS 622. Gerontological Nursing. 3
NURS 638. Preceptorship.                    7          NURS 628. Advanced Pathophysiology.3
                                                       NURS 629. Advanced Health Assessment
                                                       Across the Lifespan.              3



                                                  94
NURS 640. Nursing Administration.          3            positions (must document a minimum of
NURS 642. Practicum in Gerontological                   one year of full-time or the equivalent of
Nursing.                            3                   12 months of nursing practice within the
                                                        last three years)
                                                      • current licensure to practice as a
Note: Currently enrolled masters students take
                                                        Registered Nurse in the State of Virginia
the courses as outlined above in addition to
                                                      • availability for interview, preferably in
the other required courses for the Masters in
                                                        person but by phone if at a distance
Nursing. Post-masters students take courses
based upon evaluation of previous graduate
course work related to the required courses           Required Courses
outlined above. All students must take NURS              Courses taken towards the BSN (see
642: Practicum in Gerontological Nursing,             Undergraduate Catalog for course descrip-
regardless of previous course work.                   tions for 300 and 400 level course):

                                                      NURS 343. Nursing Therapies (complet-
RN/BSN/MSN OPTION                                     ed by challenge exam)
                                                      NURS 444. Gerontologic Nursing.
   Application for admission into the RN/
BSN/MSN option may be made when the                   NURS 362. Nursing Research.
applicant is within 15 credits of completing          NURS 435. RN Transition II.
general education and nursing prerequisites.          NURS 449. Leadership in Nursing.
Admission requires that the student has
                                                      NURS 451. Community Health Nursing.
completed all nursing prerequisite courses
and have no more than nine credits of                 NURS 620. Theoretical Foundations in
General Education courses to complete.                Nursing.
Applicants must have graduated from a                 NURS 631. Pharmacotherapeutics for
nationally accredited Associate Degree or             Primary Health Care Providers.
Diploma program and must have a mini-                 NURS 628. Advanced Pathophysiology.
mum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on a
                                                      NURS 629. Advanced Health
scale of 4.0 on lower division course work.
                                                      Assessment.
Applicants submit:                                    NURS 651. Role Preparation in Nursing.
• an application to Undergraduate Admissions             Upon completion of all BSN require-
• official scores on the Graduate Record               ments (the end of three academic semesters
  Exam (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test                 of full time study) students will be awarded
  (MAT) to the Graduate College                       a BSN and upon admission into the gradu-
• a graduate application to the Graduate              ate program, will go on to complete the
  College in the last semester of the BSN             MSN requirements. The MSN will require a
                                                      minimum additional 30-35 credits, depend-
  Applicants must supply the School of                ing on the MSN concentration.
  Nursing with:                                          The total RN-MSN students in all con-
• an application for Registered Nurses to             centrations can be completed in six (6)
  Upper Division                                      semesters plus two summer sessions of
• a letter describing career goals and how            full-time study. Individualized Programs
  the advanced practice credential will               of Study will be developed for the student
  assist in meeting those goals and poten-            who wishes to complete the RN/BSN/MSN
  tial for practice in a rural community              on a part-time basis.
• a resume which documents education
  and description of professional practice

                                                 95
WITHDRAWAL                                           in the provision of clinical services that
                                                     restore function, regain movement, allevi-
   A graduate nursing student may not                ate pain, and prevent injury. The program
withdraw from more than three differ-                is expected to begin the summer of 2009.
ent graduate courses. Any withdrawal
                                                     Application procedures, admission criteria,
beyond the third withdrawal will result in
                                                     course descriptions, faculty information,
an automatic "F." In addition, a student
                                                     and degree requirements, will be pub-
may not withdraw from the same course
                                                     lished in the 2009-2010 Graduate Catalog.
more than once. A second withdrawal from
a course will result in an automatic "F."            Current information about the DPT program
                                                     will be available on the Radford University
                                                     website as it becomes available (http://
                                                     wchs-web.asp.radford.edu). Contact Dr.
◆OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY                                Raymond Linville, Dean, Waldron College
(M.O.T.)                                             of Health and Human Services for further
                                                     information.
GRADUATE PROGRAM

    Radford University plans to offer a              ◆PSYCHOLOGY (PSY.D.)
Master of Occupational Therapy program,              Hilary M. Lips, Chairperson
which will prepare students for profes-              James L. Werth, Jr., Program Director
sional careers as occupational therapists.
The program is expected to begin in the              Graduate Faculty
fall of 2009. Occupational therapy enables           See Graduate Faculty list at:
people with special needs to participate             http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
in the occupations of daily life; that is to         index.html
care for themselves and their families and
homes, to work or study, and to enjoy rest
and play activities. Occupational thera-             DOCTORAL PROGRAM
pists work with people of all ages whose
                                                         Radford University offers a Doctor of
physical, cognitive, or psychosocial condi-
                                                     Psychology (Psy.D.) in counseling psy-
tions affect their performance, in hospi-            chology with a focus on rural mental health
tals, schools, workplaces and community              beginning fall 2008. The Psy.D. degree in
settings. Because there is a shortage of             counseling psychology is designed for per-
occupational therapists in Southwestern              sons interested in careers as psychologists
Virginia, the program will emphasize                 in mental health settings and institutions
rural health care. For current information,          where clinical supervision and the direct
please contact Dr. Douglas M. Mitchell at            application of counseling, therapy, and
dmmitchell@radford.edu.                              psychological assessment are required. The
                                                     program follows the practitioner-scholar
                                                     model with an emphasis on clinical train-
◆PHYSICAL THERAPY (D.P.T.)                           ing and the application of research to prac-
                                                     tice. The recommended course sequence
DOCTORAL PROGRAM                                     includes three years of post-Master's
                                                     coursework, practica, and dissertation, in
    Radford University plans to offer a
                                                     addition to a capstone 1800-2000 hour
Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) with an
                                                     internship approved by the program fac-
emphasis in rural and geriatric applications.
                                                     ulty. The program is not yet accredited by
The DPT is designed for those interested
                                                     the American Psychological Association;
                                                96
                                                                                               Occupational Therapy
however, the plan is to apply as soon as             PSYC 840. Counseling Psychology
possible, which will be during the 2011-             Practicum I. (a)
2012 academic year (when the first students
go on internship).                                   Spring 1 - 11 credits
                                                     PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory,
Applicants must have completed a master’s            Assessment, Appraisal and Application.
degree in a human services area awarded by           PSYC 628. Biological Foundations of
a regionally accredited institution of higher        Behavior.
education. Interested applicants should              PSYC 803. Vocational Psychology.
submit the following by January 15, and              PSYC 840. Counseling Psychology
ensure that all of the following are received        Practicum I. (b)
by that date. Please see the Psy.D. website
for more details on what is expected:                Summer 1 - 11 credits
• Radford University Graduate Application            PSYC 660. Human Growth and Lifespan
• A letter of interest describing the appli-         Development.
    cant's professional and/or research              PSYC 804. Integrative Approaches to
    experience and career goals                      Psychotherapy.
• Curriculum vita                                    PSYC 805. Advanced Cognitive and
• Official transcripts of all undergradu-             Intellectual Assessment Techniques.
    ate (including community college) and            PSYC 840. Counseling Psychology




                                                                                               Physical Therapy
    graduate work                                    Practicum I. (c)
• Three letters of recommendation, includ-
    ing at least one from a professor who            Fall 2 - 10 credits
    can comment on the applicant’s aca-              PSYC 774. Introduction to
    demic skills and one from a supervisor           Psychopharmacological Medications.
    who can speak to the applicant’s coun-           PSYC 777. Multivariate Analyses of
    seling skills                                    Behavioral Data.
• A writing sample                                   PSYC 806. Advanced Personality
• Official scores from the GRE General                Assessment.
                                                     PSYC 841. Counseling Psychology
    Test
                                                     Practicum II. (a)
Final candidates will be invited to inter-
                                                     Spring 2 - 10 credits
view with program faculty.
                                                     PSYC 772. Couples and Family Systems
                                                     Therapy.
    Updated information about the Psy.D.
                                                     PSYC 785. Neuropsychological
program will be available on the Radford
                                                     Assessment.
University Psychology department website
                                                     PSYC 808. Qualitative Research Methods.
as it becomes available (http://www.rad-
                                                     PSYC 841. Counseling Psychology
ford.edu/psyc-web).
                                                     Practicum II. (b)
                                                                                               Psy.D.

Counseling Psychology Psy.D. Courses
                                                     Summer 2 - 10 credits
                                                     PSYC 809. Supervision.
Recommended Plan of Study
                                                     PSYC 810. Rural Consultation and
Fall 1 - 11 credits
                                                     Program Evaluation.
PSYC 800. Introduction to Counseling
                                                     PSYC 811. Health Psychology in Rural
Psychology.
                                                     Areas.
PSYC 801. Multicultural Counseling.
                                                     PSYC 841. Counseling Psychology
PSYC 802. Ethical, Legal, and
                                                     Practicum II. (c)
Professional Issues in Psychology.

                                                97
Fall 3 - 11 credits
PSYC 623. Advanced Social Psychology.               ◆PSYCHOLOGY (M.A./M.S.)
PSYC 630. Cognitive and Affective Bases             Hilary M. Lips, Chairperson
of Behavior.                                        Jeff Chase, Program Coordinator
PSYC 812. Rural Cultural Issues.                    (Clinical)
PSYC 842. Counseling Psychology                     Mike Aamodt, Program Coordinator
Practicum III. (a)                                  (I.O.)
PSYC 899. Dissertation.                             Jenessa Steele, Program Coordinator
                                                    (Experimental)
Spring 3 - 8 credits
PSYC 622. Historical Foundations of a
                                                    Graduate Faculty
Scientific Psychology.
                                                    See Graduate Faculty list at:
PSYC 773. Assessment and Treatment of
                                                    http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
Addictive Disorders in Rural Settings.
PSYC 842. Counseling Psychology                     index.html
Practicum III. (b)
PSYC 899. Dissertation.
                                                    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Summer 3 - 1 credit                                    In accepting applicants for admission, the
PSYC 842. Counseling Psychology                     department considers an applicant’s grade
Practicum III. (c)                                  point average, scores on the Graduate Record
                                                    Examination (GRE), letters of recommen-
Fall 4 - 1 credit                                   dation and the applicant’s work, life and
PSYC 870. Doctoral Internship. (a)                  academic accomplishments. Although there
                                                    is not a required minimum GRE score, the
Spring 4 - 1 credit                                 majority of students admitted to the psy-
PSYC 870. Doctoral Internship. (b)                  chology graduate program has a GRE score
                                                    of at least 1,000 (Verbal + Quantitative)
Summer 4 - 1 credit                                 and a GPA above 3.0. To be admitted
PSYC 870. Doctoral Internship. (c)                  on Regular Status, applicants must have
                                                    completed a minimum of 18 semester hours
Interested students need to be aware that           of undergraduate psychology coursework.
one of the courses in the Spring of Year
1 (Psychometrics) has a prerequisite of                Applicants are required to submit:
Radford's PSYC 611 or its equivalent (the           • GRE scores (the subject portion is not
final determination of whether a student's             required).
research course was sufficient will be in            • Official transcripts from all colleges
the hands of the Psychometrics instructor).           attended.
Further, the Multivariate statistics course         • Three letters of reference, with at least
that is taken in the Fall of Year 2 requires          one from a faculty member in a psychol-
substantive background in basic statistics            ogy department (two preferred).
(the equivalent of Radford's PSYC 610)              • Short statement (approximately two
or students will have difficulty with the              pages) regarding why she/he is interested
course.                                               in psychology and future plans.

                                                        Deadline for completed application is
                                                    March 1. Late applications will be consid-
                                                    ered on a space available basis. Admission
                                                    is competitive.

                                               98
CENTER FOR GENDER STUDIES                            36 hours is required for completion of this
Hilary M. Lips, Director                             option. All core requirements must be met.
   The objective of the Center is to create          Selection of courses to meet the 36 hour
a resource for and a model of excellence             minimum requirement must be made in
                                                     consultation with the Department Chair.




                                                                                                    PSYCHOLOGY
in gender-related teaching and research.
The research activities of the Center pro-
vide an important resource for teach-
ing students about gender and training               ADDITIONAL ADMISSIONS
them to do research on gender-related                REQUIREMENT
issues. Through the activities of the Center,           In addition to general requirements
graduate students become involved in
                                                     for admission to the Graduate College,
seminars and opportunities for research
                                                     the department requires that all graduate
experience are provided to undergraduate
                                                     students have a basic understanding and
and graduate students.
                                                     knowledge of psychology.
   The Center also provides a resource for
                                                        Applications must be accompanied by at
information about gender research to other
                                                     least one letter of recommendation from a
departments in the university and to the
                                                     faculty member from the applicant’s major
extra university community.
                                                     department. If the applicant’s major is not
                                                     psychology, then at least one letter should
GRADUATE PROGRAM                                     be from a psychology faculty member.
    The Psychology Department offers gradu-             Applicants without GRE scores on file
ate courses designed primarily for those stu-        (Verbal+Quantitative) will be subject to
dents who wish to concentrate their studies          deferral pending receipt of such.
in experimental, clinical, counseling, indus-           The Psychology GRE is not required for
trial-organizational or school psychology.           admission. However, it is recommended
Graduate standing is a prerequisite to all           that students take this examination and sub-
600-level courses.                                   mit the score along with their application.
    Because of the sequencing and/or                 For students who may wish to enhance
infrequent offering of certain psychology            their chances of acceptance into a competi-
courses, students making up undergraduate            tive program, the Psychology GRE score
deficiencies or students beginning gradu-             may be helpful for the committee’s consid-
ate work during a semester other than                eration of their credentials.
fall semester might experience scheduling               For graduate students in psychology,
problems which can delay completion of               a minimum grade point average of 3.0
the required program of studies.                     is required in graduate-level psychology
    Upon admission to the Graduate College,          courses. Failure to maintain this require-
each student is assigned a temporary advis-          ment after completion of 15 semester hours
er. The student must select a permanent              in graduate course work will result in
adviser prior to submitting the Program of           termination from any/all programs lead-
Study. This should be done on a “Petition            ing to any graduate degree in psychology.
for Program Changes” form available in the           Students receiving more than two grades of
Graduate College office.                              "C" or lower in any graduate work attempt-
    Students who, for personal or program-           ed at Radford University will be dismissed
matic reasons, decide not to continue in             from the psychology graduate program.
a concentration in which they were origi-
nally admitted, may request admission to
the General option. Students will not be             CORE REQUIREMENTS
admitted to this option upon admittance                 All Master of Arts and Master of Science
to the Graduate College. A minimum of                students in psychology, regardless of

                                                99
concentration, are required to take a com-         CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
mon core consisting of the following cours-        CONCENTRATION
es:
                                                       The applied clinical master's program
                                                   offers students core courses providing basic
PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral Data.             foundations in research methodology and
PSYC 611. Methodology and Program                  statistical analysis; normal and abnormal
Evaluation in Psychology.                          development; and diagnostic and therapeu-
                                                   tic interventions with mental health popu-
PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory,                     lations. Job opportunities for graduates
Assessment, Appraisal and Application.             include community mental health centers,
or                                                 correctional facilities and hospitals.
                                                       Students are encouraged to take electives
PSYC 631. Cognitive Intellectual
                                                   both in and outside of the clinical area and
Assessment Techniques.
                                                   to engage in independent research culminat-
PSYC 798. Professional Internship.                 ing in completion of a master’s thesis. The
or                                                 thesis is particularly recommended for those
                                                   students who plan to pursue further graduate
PSYC 781. School Psychology                        training.
Practicum I.                                          Students in the Clinical Concentration
and                                                will be expected to maintain professional
PSYC 782. School Psychology                        behavior and judgment and to follow the
Practicum II.                                      ethical principles established by the American
                                                   Psychological Association while in the
                                                   program. Failure to do so will result in
                                                   immediate dismissal. After completion of
MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE                           the core course requirements, students will
    Students pursuing the Master of Science        be evaluated through their performance on
degree must have earned a minimum of               the pre-practicum interview to determine
18 semester hours of credit in psychology          their suitability for practicum. Successful
at the undergraduate level. The concentra-         completion of the practicum is required for
tions consist of a minimum of 36 hours in          the degree.
Clinical, 36 hours in Industrial/Organizational,      Students in the clinical concentration are
33 hours in Experimental.                  With    required to pass a comprehensive oral exam
permission of the student’s adviser, a maximum     which tests the student’s grasp and ability
of six semester hours of credit can be earned in   to communicate knowledge in major areas
an academic area outside of the Psychology         within the field, including the ability to syn-
                                                   thesize and apply this knowledge. The com-
Department related to psychology.
                                                   prehensive oral exam committee must include
                                                   a minimum of two faculty from the clinical
MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE                              area. The oral thesis defense does not fulfill
                                                   the comprehensive oral exam requirement.
   Students pursuing the Master of Arts degree        Coursework in the clinical concentra-
must have earned a minimum of 18 semester          tion may or may not meet individual state
hours of credit in psychology at the undergrad-    requirements for the coursework required
uate level. The degree requires a six-semester-    for licensure at the master’s level. In
hour thesis, with the remaining hours usually      Virginia, coursework in the clinical track
taken in psychology courses appropriate to the     may not meet current licensure requirements
student’s area of concentration.                   for the primary master’s degree license,
                                                   the Licensed Professional Counselor. It is

                                               100
recommended that students check with the      or
state in which they will reside for specific   PSYC 774. Introduction to
licensure requirements.                       Psychopharmacological Medications
                                              or
MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE                         PSYC 785. Neuropsychological
                                              Assessment.                          3
Clinical Concentration
Program Requirements
                                              MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE
PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral
                                              Clinical Concentration
Data.                                   3
                                              Program Requirements
PSYC 611. Methodology and Program
Evaluation in Psychology.         3           PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral
                                              Data.                                3
PSYC 631. Cognitive Intellectual
Assessment Techniques.                  3     PSYC 611. Methodology and Program
                                              Evaluation in Psychology.         3
PSYC 637. Personality Assessment.
                                              PSYC 631. Cognitive Intellectual
or                                            Assessment Techniques.               3
PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory,                PSYC 637. Personality Assessment.
Assessment and Appraisal.
                                              or
or
                                              PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory,
PSYC 636. Child Personality                   Assessment and Appraisal.
Assessment.                             3
                                              or
PSYC 640. Professional Orientation
and Function in Mental Health                 PSYC 636. Child Personality
Counseling.                             3     Assessment.                          3

PSYC 641. Theories of Counseling and          PSYC 640. Professional Orientation
Psychotherapy.                     3          and Function in Mental Health
                                              Counseling.                          3
PSYC 642.Techniques in Counseling 3
and Psychotherapy.                            PSYC 641. Theories of Counseling
                                              and Psychotherapy.                   3
PSYC 685. Clinical Psychopathology. 3         PSYC 642. Techniques in Counseling
PSYC 699. Research and Thesis.          6     and Psychotherapy.                 3
PSYC 798. Professional Internship.      3     PSYC 685. Clinical Psychopathology. 3
PSYC 660. Human Growth and                    PSYC 643. Mental Health Practicum. 3
Development.                                  PSYC 798. Professional Internship.   3
or                                            PSYC 660. Human Growth and
PSYC 663. Child Psychopathology.              Development.
or                                            or
PSYC 686. Child and Adult Sexual              PSYC 663. Child Psychopathology.
Assault.                                      or
or                                            PSYC 686. Child and Adult Sexual
PSYC 628. Biological Foundations of           Assault.                             3
Behavior
                                            101
PSYC 628. Biological Foundations of               experience within at least two content areas.
Behavior.                                         Students take area core courses, as well
or                                                as additional coursework designed to meet
                                                  individual needs. Each student is expected to
PSYC 774. Introduction to                         be actively involved in research or some other
Psychopharmacological Medications.                scholarly endeavor under the supervision of
or                                                a faculty member after completion of the first
                                                  semester and until the degree is awarded.
PSYC 785. Neuropsychological
                                                  Each student must also undertake a thesis
Assessment.                                3
                                                  project based on empirical research and suc-
                                                  cessfully defend the thesis project in an oral
FINAL COMPREHENSIVE                               defense. The Experimental Psychology fac-
EXAMINATION – CLINICAL                            ulty promote interdisciplinary and collabora-
                                                  tive approaches to the study of psychology.
   The final comprehensive examination
committee of three faculty members must
include two faculty members from the clin-        Program Requirements                  33 hrs.
ical option. This examination is intended to
examine the student’s comprehensive grasp         Required Courses               27 hrs.
of the field and is not limited to a defense       PSYC 628. Biological Foundations of
of a thesis if one is submitted.                  Behavior.                           3
   If a thesis is submitted it must be suc-       PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral
cessfully defended prior to attempting the
                                                  Data.                                      3
final comprehensive examination. These
may or may not be concomitant. The thesis         PSYC 611. Methodology and Program
is taken for credit and the defense repre-        Evaluation in Psychology.         3
sents one part of the grading process and         PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory,
does not represent a grade for the student’s      Assessment, Appraisal and
comprehensive grasp of the field. (See             Application.                               3
“Final Comprehensive Examination” on
p. 56.)                                           PSYC 622. Historical Foundations of a
                                                  Scientific Psychology.                 3
EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY                           PSYC 623. Social Psychology.               3
CONCENTRATION                                     PSYC 699. Research and Thesis.             6
   The goal of the Experimental Psychology        PSYC 798. Professional Internship.         3
concentration is to provide students with a
solid foundation in the core principles of        Recommended Electives             6 hrs.
psychology, as well as with supervised expe-      PSYC 630. Cognitive and Affective
rience in laboratory research. The program        Bases of Behavior.                    3
allows students to apply their degree as a ter-
                                                  PSYC 660. Human Growth and
minal master’s qualifying them to (a) serve
                                                  Lifespan Development.                      3
as an instructor at the community or junior
college level or to (b) conduct research in       PSYC 690. Seminar in Psychology.           3
applied settings. The program also provides       PSYC 698. Directed Study.                1-4
students with an opportunity to strengthen
applications to doctoral programs in any          PSYC 774. Introduction to
subfield of psychology.                            Psychopharmacological Medications. 3
   Experimental Psychology students are
expected to develop a breadth of knowledge
in psychology, as well as to acquire research

                                               102
INDUSTRIAL-ORGANIZATIONAL                         PSYC 653. Job Analysis and
PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION                          Evaluation.                                3
    The program is designed for those stu-        PSYC 654. Performance Appraisal.           3
dents who want to apply psychological prin-       PSYC 655. Organizational
ciples directly to the study of work behavior.    Psychology II.                             3
The student will learn how to conduct a job
                                                  PSYC 656. Employee Selection and
analysis, construct and validate selection
                                                  Placement II.                              3
tests and evaluate job performance. In
addition, he/she will examine what moti-          PSYC 798. Professional Internship.         3
vates people to work, what techniques are
available for training skills and changing        Electives                        0-3 hrs.
attitudes and the reciprocal social influence      Additional requirements for M.A.




                                                                                                   READING
between the individual and the organiza-          Degree:
tion. The program is designed to provide          PSYC 699. Research and Thesis.             6
a major for master’s degree students in
psychology or a minor in an area such as
business. There is considerable emphasis             The remaining course in the Industrial/
on applied projects, group work and com-          Organizational program will be selected by the
puter skills.                                     student in consultation with his/her adviser.
    Students in this specialty may elect either      The internship carries up to six hours
the Master of Arts (thesis option) or Master      credit, only three of which may be applied
of Science (non-thesis option) degree. All        toward degree requirements and involves
students must pass a comprehensive oral           on-site experience in business, industrial or
exam in the I/O specialty area. The student       institutional settings.
working toward the M.A. degree will also be
required to complete a thesis, which offers
six semester hours of credit (PSYC 699)
and complete an additional oral examination
on that thesis. (See “Final Comprehensive         ◆READING
Examination” on p. 56.) Therefore, the M.A.       Sandra Moore, Director, School of
graduate would need to complete a total of        Teacher Education and Leadership
39 semester hours.                                Betty Dore, Assistant Director
                                                  Donald Langrehr, Program Coordinator

Program Requirements               36-39 hrs.     Graduate Faculty
                                                  See Graduate Faculty list at:
Required Courses                33 hrs.
                                                  http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral                  index.html
Data.                                3
PSYC 611. Methodology and Program                    The Reading Specialist (K-12) Program
Evaluation in Psychology.         3               leads to a Master of Science in Reading
                                                  and requires 33 semester hours of graduate
PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory.              3
                                                  work. Endorsement requires at least three
PSYC 650. Organizational                          years of successful classroom teaching
Psychology I.                               3     experience in which the teaching of reading
PSYC 651. Employee Selection and                  was an important responsibility.
Placement I.                                3
PSYC 652. Training and Development. 3


                                                103
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                            EDSP 669. Diagnostic Educational
                                                  Procedures for Exceptional Individuals. 3
• Minimum undergraduate grade point aver-
  age of 2.75 overall.                            Elective                               3 hrs.
• Send official transcripts for all undergradu-
  ate and graduate coursework including             In consultation with their adviser, students
  degrees conferred.                              may choose one elective in areas such as
• Submit an essay (typed, double spaced,          Educational Technology, English, Special
  three pages in length), that includes the       Education and Communication Sciences and
  following:                                      Disorders. In addition, special topics courses
  a. What past work experiences and inter-        (EDRD 660) will be offered periodically on
      ests influenced your decision to apply       topics pertinent to reading education such
      for the reading education program?          as Children’s Literature and Strategies for
  b. Describe your short- and long-term           Classroom Writing.
      goals and career aspirations as they
      relate to the reading program.
                                                    For successful completion of the Graduate
      Essays will be evaluated by the
                                                  Reading program all candidates are required
      admissions committee as part of the
                                                  to attain a benchmark score of 245 or
      application.
                                                  higher on the Virginia Reading Assessment
• References should be from two individuals
                                                  (VRA). Candidates will be allowed two
  who can address your history of success-
                                                  opportunities to successfully pass the VRA.
  ful teaching experiences with students and
                                                  A Master’s Degree will not be awarded if a
  your potential for academic and profession-
                                                  candidate fails to achieve the score of 245
  al success in the field of literacy education.
                                                  or higher after taking the VRA a second
• Submit a copy of your teaching license.
                                                  time. http://www.va.nesinc.com/
 Please refer to pages 21 - 23 for application
deadlines.
                                                  ◆SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
Program Requirements                  33 hrs.     Hilary M. Lips, Chair
Required Courses                30 hrs.           Jayne Bucy, Program Coordinator
EDEF 606. Educational Research.      3
                                                  Graduate Faculty
EDRD 624. Administration and                      See Graduate Faculty list at:
Supervision of Reading Programs.            3     http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/
EDRD 630. Teaching Reading in the                 index.html
Content Areas.                              3        The Department of Psychology offers
EDRD/EDSP 641. Classroom Development              a NASP-accredited Educational Specialist
and Remediation of Language Skills. 3             Degree Program in School Psychology.
                                                  The academic and training requirements for
EDRD 688. Advanced Study in
                                                  the School Psychology Training Program
Reading Skills.                             3
                                                  are founded on both a philosophical and
EDRD 692. Reading Diagnosis: Testing,             practical understanding of the role and
Prescription and Remediation.         3           function which the psychologist expects
EDRD/EDSP 695. Alternative Approaches             (and is expected) to occupy within the edu-
to Reading.                         3             cational setting.
EDRD 697. Practicum: Diagnostic and
Remedial Techniques in Reading.             6


                                                104
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                            on the results of the assessment process.
                                                  Within this role, school psychologists may
• Minimum grade point average of 3.0              intervene either directly or indirectly. Direct
• At least two letters of reference (one          interventions would often involve individual
  from major department)                          and group counseling. Indirect interventions
• GRE                                             would generally involve consultation with
• Final transcript showing degree conferred       the teacher and other professionals concern-
• Essay                                           ing behavioral and academic programs that
The deadline for applications is February         can be managed most effectively in the
15.                                               classroom.




                                                                                                      SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
ROLE AND FUNCTION OF THE                          RESEARCH/PROGRAM
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST                               EVALUATION ROLE
   The school psychologist is a profes-              To the greatest extent possible, the prac-
sional, operating as a specialist, within         tice of school psychology should be gov-
the framework of the school system. An            erned by empirical evidence derived from
interpreter of the behavioral sciences in         scientific research. School psychologists
educational settings, the school psycholo-        must understand research methodology, be
gist functions cooperatively with profes-         able to critically review research reports
sional educators, as well as other concerned      and translate research results into practice.
persons in the community, in an effort to         Also, school psychologists often are called
improve the psychological climate of the          upon by the systems for which they work to
school environment. Toward this end, there        collect data needed to make educational and
are three major roles or responsibilities         administrative decisions. In undertaking
(shown below) that the school psychologist        such assignments, knowledge of research
must assume.                                      methodology is crucial. To a lesser extent,
                                                  school psychologists also might desire to
ASSESSMENT ROLE                                   undertake their own research projects to
                                                  contribute to the knowledge base of the
   The school psychologist’s function within
                                                  field. Functioning within this scientist-
this role is to determine the nature and extent
                                                  practitioner framework requires that school
of the problems for which students have
                                                  psychologists possess competencies in
been identified and any contributing factors
                                                  research methodology, statistical inference
that might be apparent. In fulfilling this
                                                  and measurement theory and practice.
role, school psychologists rely on a variety
of psychological instruments designed to
evaluate a broad spectrum of human char-          SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY TRAINING
acteristics and behaviors, both psychologi-       PROGRAM
cal and academic, as well as the educational         The requirements of the School Psychol-
environment itself. The primary purpose of        ogy Training Program at Radford University
assessment is to determine intervention           are designed to enable students to fulfill the
strategies that can be used to remediate          three basic roles (as well as others) with a rea-
identified problems.                               sonable level of competence and confidence.
                                                  The program operates under the philosophy
INTERVENTION ROLE                                 that practicing school psychologists should be
                                                  knowledgeable in the theoretical and applied
   In this role, school psychologists attempt
                                                  skills of both education and psychology.
to determine and implement the best inter-
                                                     Entering students are expected to com-
ventions for students with problems, based
                                                  mit three years to the program. The first

                                              105
year is devoted to developing a more              PSYC 631. Cognitive and Intellectual
advanced background in psychological              Assessment Techniques.                   3
foundations and theory and also includes          PSYC 632. Child Behavioral Assessment
several basic skill courses in psychological      and Intevention.                      3
assessment, observational and interviewing
techniques. The second year is a combina-         PSYC 636. Child Personality
tion of theory and skill practice, with an        Assessment.                              3
increasing emphasis on the application of         PSYC 660. Human Growth and
skills as the year progresses. By the end of      Lifespan Development.                    3
the second year, the student should have
                                                  PSYC 663. Child Psychopathology.         3
the entry level skills of a school psychol-
ogy intern and the third year is devoted to a     PSYC 665. School Psychological
full-time, 1,200 clock hour internship, with      Services.                                3
at least half of that internship being in the     PSYC 633. Academic Assessment and
public school setting.                            Intervention.                     3
    The Ed.S. degree will be awarded fol-
lowing the successful completion of the           EDSP 651. Current Trends in Programs and
year-long internship, successful comple-          Services for Exceptional Individuals. 3
tion of a final comprehensive oral and
portfolio examination and upon com-               Second Year Courses                 29 hrs.
pletion of a minimum of 71 semester               PSYC 638. Early Childhood
hours of graduate coursework with a               Assessment and Intervention.             3
GPA of 3.0 or better and no more than
two grades of C or lower in any graduate          PSYC 678. Child Neuropsychological
work attempted at Radford University.             Assessment and Intervention.             3
    The School Psychology Training                PSYC 698. Directed Study.                2
Program is fully accredited by the National
                                                  PSYC 687. Pre-internship Seminar.        1
Association of School Psychologists and
by the National Council for Accreditation         PSYC 688. Consultation and Collaboration
of Teacher Education. Upon completion of          in Schools, Home and Community.        3
the program, graduates are fully certifiable       PSYC 692. Mental Health Intervention and
as school psychologists in Virginia and,          Prevention in Schools I.               3
upon successfully completing the exami-
nation requirements, also are nationally          PSYC 693. Mental Health Intervention and
certifiable, making them eligible for certifi-      Prevention in Schools II.              3
cation in most other states.                      PSYC 781. School Psychology
                                                  Practicum I.                             4
                                                  PSYC 782. School Psychology
Program Requirements                  71 hrs.     Practicum II.                            4
Required First Year Courses             30 hrs.   EDSP 672. Introduction to High Incidence
Students are required to take the following       Disabilities.                          3
courses during their first year in the program.
PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral
                                                  Third Year Courses                  12 hrs.
Data.                                        3
                                                  PSYC 795, 796. School Psychology
PSYC 611. Methodology and Program
                                                  Internship.                            6, 6
Evaluation in Psychology.                   3




                                                106
    Courses may occasionally be taken             simultaneously. Students are required to
in a different sequence if circumstances          complete two consecutive semesters of
permit or if course offerings are modified.        full time (9 hours/semesters) graduate
    In addition to the courses listed, students   study prior to their internship year.
may be expected or required to take addi-             Students with a master’s degree from
tional courses in Pupil-Personnel Services,       Radford University who have not regis-
Foundations of Education or School                tered for graduate courses at Radford dur-
Organization/Administration.                      ing the three years preceding application
    Students with a master’s degree from an       for admission to the Ed.S. Degree program
institution other than Radford University         in School Psychology must reapply to the
who apply for the Ed.S. degree must submit        Graduate College for admission. The appli-
an application to the Graduate College for        cation will not be complete until it contains
admission to graduate study.                      all of the items specified above.
    The application will not be considered            If an applicant completed the last course
complete until it contains the following:         in his or her master’s degree program
• Completed application form                      within seven years of completion of the
• Graduate Record Examination                     Ed.S. degree, hours earned toward the
• At least two letters of reference. If an        master’s degree (to a maximum of 30
   applicant has been employed by a school        hours approved by the School Psychology
   system since completing his or her             Committee) will apply toward the Ed.S.
   master’s degree, at least one letter must be   degree. If the last course in an applicant’s
   from a supervisor in the school system         master’s degree program was completed
• A letter stating the applicant’s reasons for    more than seven years before completion of
   applying for admission to graduate study       the Ed.S. degree, none of these hours will
   in school psychology                           apply toward the Ed.S. degree, unless the
• Current resume´                                 applicant has been substantially employed
• Graduate transcript                             as a school psychologist or the equivalent
    The Educational Specialist degree             during the interval between completion of
in School Psychology requires a mini-             the master’s degree and admission to the
mum of 71 hours or a minimum of 41                Ed.S. degree program.
hours past the master’s degree. A stu-                Students who have been admitted to
dent, who enters the program with a mas-          the Educational Specialist program will
ter’s degree in psychology or a closely           receive a list of program requirements
related field will have a program of study         with their admission letter which specifies
that designates the 41 required hours and         all requirements, including deficiencies,
any other courses needed for the Ed.S.            necessary for completion of the degree.
degree subject to transcript review and           Of the 71 semester hours (or 41 hours past
approval by the School Psychology                 the master’s) required for the Ed.S. degree,
Committee. Students entering the program          no more than 12 hours may be outside
without a master’s degree in psycholo-            psychology. Student’s entering the Ed.S.
gy or closely related field may earn a             program without a master’s and desiring to
Master’s of Science degree in psychol-            simultaneously be awarded the M.S. degree
ogy from Radford University by complet-           in Psychology and the Ed.S. in School
ing all requirements for the Ed.S. degree,        Psychology should consult their advisers
completing a total of 77 hours (36 hours          for assistance in choosing the six additional
applied to the master’s degree and 41 hours       hours required to earn both degrees.
applied to the Ed.S. degree) and passing the          The practicum sequence is integrated
comprehensive examinations for the Ed.S.          with other coursework during the sec-
degree. For these students, the master’s          ond year of the student’s program. Each
degree and Ed.S. degree will be awarded           practicum course involves weekly on-site

                                              107
experience in local public school settings         The internship is a full-time experience,
under the direct supervision of a qualified     closely approximating the on-the-job char-
school psychologist. An application for        acteristics of the certified school psycholo-
practicum must be made in the spring of        gist. A written plan of internship goals and
the first year.                                 objectives is prepared prior to the internship
   One academic year of full-time intern-      and agreed to by representatives of the local
ship (or similar supervised work experi-       educational agency, the intern supervisors,
ence) is required by the Virginia State        Radford University faculty supervisor and the
Department of Education for permanent          intern. Such plans present internship objec-
certification in school psychology. (In some    tives and approximate experiences for the
states, a provisional certificate may be        achievement of and evaluation of each objec-
issued when all requirements other than the    tive. Sample plans may be obtained from the
internship have been completed.                School Psychology Coordinator.
   The School Psychology Training                  The Virginia State Department of Education
Program at Radford University requires         requires that all public school personnel have
two successive semesters of full-time          certain courses at the undergraduate or gradu-
internship under the direct and continuous     ate level before certification can be obtained.
supervision of a fully certified, experienced   Two specific required courses which students
school psychologist, who is approved by        often have not had at the undergraduate level
the School Psychology Committee to be          are American History and Personal Health.
qualified to render supervision. The School     School psychology students should examine
Psychology Program requires a minimum          their undergraduate and graduate course work
of 1,200 clock hours internship experience     carefully with certification requirements in
                                               mind and should work closely with their
(600 hours per semester for two semesters)
                                               advisers in the development of a program that
before the intern will be recommended for      will meet all of the certification requirements.
certification.                                      At the completion of the year’s intern-
   Prerequisites for the school psychol-       ship, when all required courses (graduate
ogy internship include: Approved applica-      and undergraduate) have been successfully
tion for the internship (forms available       completed and at least 71 semester hours
in the department office) proposed site,        of graduate credit (or 41 hours past the
supervisor’s name and when the internship      master’s) have been passed, provided that
will begin; completion of all coursework,      the student has a B average or better and
including practicum courses with at least      no more than two grades of C or lower in
B average overall with no more than two        any graduate work attempted at Radford
grades of “C” or lower in attempted gradu-     University, the student will be awarded the
ate work and Pass in the practicum courses;    Educational Specialist degree in School
and permission of the School Psychology        Psychology (Ed.S.). The student will also
Coordinator at least four weeks prior to       be endorsed by the State Department of
registration. The cooperating school system    Education in Virginia with full certification
generally pays the intern for services dur-    as a school psychologist.
ing this period.                                   Each candidate for the Educational
                                               Specialist degree must apply for the degree
   The Radford University School
                                               within the first two weeks of his/her final
Psychology Program adheres to the
                                               semester. Unless the necessary forms are filled
standards for internship recommended           out by the student before the stated deadline,
by the National Association of School          graduation will be delayed. Graduate standing
Psychologists.                                 is a prerequisite to all 600-level courses.




                                           108
                                                     and
◆SOCIAL WORK                                         b.) Indicate that such bachelor’s degree
Diane Hodge, Interim Director                        provided an adequate liberal arts back-
Jo Brocato, Graduate Program                         ground. Liberal arts coursework must
Coordinator                                          include the following:
Graduate Faculty                                        1) the humanities (9 hours);
                                                        2) human biology content (3 hours)
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK                                   3) the social sciences (15 hours).
                                                     It is expected that an applicant’s aca-
DEGREE
                                                     demic background will indicate broad-
    This degree is structured to meet the needs      based exposure to liberal studies.
of full-time students and those who wish to          Coursework in introductory statistics is
study on a part-time basis. The goal of the          recommended.




                                                                                                     SOCIAL WORK
degree program is to prepare advanced,            2. Have at least a 2.75 grade point average (on
autonomous social work practitioners                 a 4.0 scale) for all undergraduate course-
with expertise in community-based social             work and a 3.0 for the last 60 hours of upper
work practice with families. The Radford             division coursework. Advanced Standing
campus offers full and part-time programs            applicants must have an overall 2.75 GPA
and the Abingdon campus offers a part-               and 3.0 for all undergraduate social work
time program. Some courses are also taught           course work.
in Roanoke. An advanced standing option           3. Demonstrate motivation and potential for
is available for full-time and part-time stu-        a career in social work, including suit-
dents who are qualified graduates of CSWE             ability for the profession.
accredited BSW Programs. The MSW pro-             4. Demonstrate interest and ability to par-
gram is accredited by the Council on Social          ticipate in the field of human services
Work Education.                                      preferably through previous professional,
    This is a year-round program, includ-            volunteer or field placement experience.
ing summers. Full-time standard students              Applicants lacking coursework in these
can complete the program in two years.            areas must fulfill this requirement before
Part-time standard students can complete          being considered for Regular Admission;
the program in four years. For Advanced           Conditional Admission may be granted with
Standing, full-time students can complete         the condition that the student make up the
the program in one year and part-time             deficiency within the first semester of enroll-
students can complete the program in two          ment with a grade of 3.0 or better.
years.                                                Application review is open for advanced
                                                  standing and standard program and contin-
                                                  ues until the program is full. After review
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                            of the completed application to the pro-
    Applicants must meet the following            gram, those applicants with an overall
criteria for admission to the master’s            GPA not lower than 2.5 may be considered
degree in Social Work Program at Radford          for admission to the standard program.
University:                                       Remediation requirements will be deter-
1. a.) Hold a bachelor’s degree from an           mined on an individual basis by the School
   institution accredited by a recognized         of Social Work.
   regional accrediting agency in the United          The School of Social Work follows
   States (degrees from institutions outside      the Council on Social Work Education’s
   the United States will be evaluated on an      guideline that no academic credit be given
   equivalency basis);                            for life experience or previous work experi-
                                                  ence.
                                              109
Standard Program Requirements 61 hrs.         Elective Emphasis Areas
                                                 In order to provide enriched field of
Foundation Curriculum          27 hrs.        practice options after graduation and to
SOWK 601. Human Behavior in the Social        help students acquire a competitive edge
Environment I.                      3         in these areas, three-course (9 credits) of
                                              elective emphases may be intentionally
SOWK 602. Human Behavior in the Social
                                              pursued, in the standard program.
Environment II.                     3
SOWK 611. Social Welfare Policy I:            The emphasis areas are in:
Policy is Practice.                    3      • Child Welfare (public social services
SOWK 621. Research I: Basic Research             emphasis, attractive to students receiv-
Methodology.                         3           ing Title IV-E stipends and others):
                                                 SOWK 615, SOWK 625, SOWK 626,
SOWK 631. Social Work Practice I:                open elective;
Foundations.                           3      • Mental Health (emphasis in men-
SOWK 632. Social Work Practice II:               tal health, preparation for licensure):
                                                 SOWK 615, SOWK 710, open elec-
Families, Groups and Community-
                                                 tive.
Based Practice.                        3      • School Social Work Certification; SOWK
SOWK 641:642. Foundation Practicum               720, EDSP 651 and complete (1) School
and Seminar I and II.              3:3           of Social Work elective: SOWK 680,
Elective                               3         SOWK 615, SOWK 613, SOWK 625.
                                                  Field placement in a primary or second-
ADVANCED STANDING                                 ary school. IF A PLACEMENT IS NOT
SOWK 679. Advanced Standing                       COMPLETED IN THE SCHOOLS,
Bridge Course.                         3          take also EDSP 622.

                                              Advanced Standing Curriculum 37 hrs.
CONCENTRATION                                     Students in the Advanced Standing
                                              Program enter the program in the summer,
Curriculum                        34 hrs.     in which SOWK 679, Advanced Standing
                                              Bridge Course is required. The course
SOWK 682. Biopsychosocial
Assessment.                            3      acts as the bridge between the student’s
                                              previous undergraduate social work cur-
SOWK 761. Social Welfare Policy II:           riculum and Radford University’s special
Family Policies and Advocacy.          3      conceptual emphasis, preparatory to enter-
SOWK 772. Research II: Advanced               ing the Concentration year. Thereafter, the
Research Methodology.                  3      Advanced Standing students follow the
SOWK 783. Social Work Practice III:           same curriculum as offered to all concen-
Community Practice to Strengthen              tration-level students in the full-time or
Families.                              3      part-time program.
SOWK 784. Social Work Practice IV:
Family Practica in a Community
Context.                               3
SOWK 785. Integrative Seminar.         3
SOWK 791:792. Concentration
Practicum and Seminar I and II.       5:5
Electives                              6

                                            110
                                                                                                           SPECIAL EDUCATION
                                                        ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
◆SPECIAL EDUCATION                                      See application requirements for Special
Sandra Moore, Director, School of
Teacher Education and Leadership                        Education on p. 23.
Betty Dore, Assistant Director                          • Have a minimum undergraduate grade
Debora Bays, Program Coordinator                          point average of 2.75 overall. Work
                                                          experience and other graduate-level work
Graduate Faculty                                          may be considered for those students
See Graduate Faculty list at:                             whose grade point averages does not
http://www.radford.edu/gradcollege/faculty/               meet this minimum.
index.html                                              • Send official transcripts for all under-
                                                          graduate and graduate coursework.
MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE                                • Submit an essay (typed, double-spaced,
IN SPECIAL EDUCATION                                      three pages in length), that includes the fol-
                                                          lowing:
    The Master of Science Degree Program                      a. The special education concentration
in Special Education is a single degree                       you are considering and what past expe-
program with licensure and non-licensure                      riences and interests influenced your
options in four concentrations. The concen-                   decision to apply for this program.
trations are: 1. High Incidence Disabilities                  b. Your short- and long-term goals and
– Emotional Behavioral Disorders (EBD),                       career aspirations as they relate to this
Learning Disabilities (LD) and Mental                         program.
Retardation (MR); 2. Deaf and Hard of                   • References should be from individuals
Hearing (D/HH); 3. Early Childhood                         who can address your history of successful
Special Education (ECSE); and 4. Severe                    teaching experiences with students with or
Disabilities (SD).                                         without special needs and your potential
    The licensure option in each specialty area            for academic and professional success in
is designed to prepare teachers to work with               the field of special education.
students with these disabilities in the fol-            • Applicants should be available for inter-
lowing grades: EBD, LD, MR grades K-12;                    view, preferably in person or by phone if at
D/HH grades PreK-12; and ECSE ages birth                   a distance.
to five.                                                 • Submit a copy of your teaching license.
    The non-licensure option in each spe-               • All applicants must pass the Virginia
cialty area is intended for students who                  Communication & Literacy Assessment
already have teacher licensure in special                 (VCLA) during the first 9 hours of enroll-
education or who are teaching and have                    ment.
a conditional teaching license in the spe-              • Applicants must complete the Virginia
cialty area that they are pursuing. Students               Reading Assessment and Praxis I along
who choose to complete their M.S. without                  with the VCLA as mentioned above, as a
completing an internship will be respon-                   requirement for admission to the Teacher
sible for securing their permanent licen-                  Education Program if they pursue licensure
sure directly through their school division                through RU.
and the Virginia Department of Education
rather than through completion of Radford
University’s approved programs in special               NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
education.                                                 Non-degree students may not enroll in
                                                        any graduate (600) level courses offered by
                                                        the Special Education Department without
                                                        permission of the Director of the school or
                                                  111
Graduate Coordinator. These students must         Supporting Course for Severe Disabilities
also meet the prerequisites for the Special       Concentration
Education graduate program.                       EDRD 688. Advanced Study in
                                                  Reading Skills                              3
SUPPORTING COURSES                                or an approved course in reading.
   Before completion of the Master’s
Degree Program in Special Education, the          COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
candidate may need to complete course-
work in instructional technology, develop-           Students must complete a written com-
mental reading and adaptive strategies in         prehensive examination at least two months
mathematics. There will be specific require-       prior to completion of their program of
ments within each program concentration.          studies. The examination may include an
The need for supporting courses will be           oral follow-up examination. It is the stu-
determined by the adviser.                        dent’s responsibility to schedule the exam
                                                  with his/her adviser and obtain the neces-
Supporting Courses for High Incidence             sary form from the Graduate College office
Concentration                                     prior to the examination date. (See “Final
EDSP 545. Adaptive Strategies in                  Comprehensive Examination” on p. 56.)
Arithmetic.                         3
EDSP 641. Language Development and
Remediation.                       3              RETENTION IN THE PROGRAM
EDRD 688. Advanced Study in Reading                  In accordance with the University policy
Skills.                             3             governing programs with field experiences,
EDET 620. Instructional Computing.      3         particular qualities of character and interper-
                                                  sonal skills, which reflect general expectations
                                                  for professional educators, are required for a
Supporting Courses for Deaf and Hard              student to be admitted to and retained in field
of Hearing Concentration                          experience programs. Students will be expect-
                                                  ed to demonstrate the following academic,
EDSP 545. Adaptive Strategies in                  personal and professional characteristics:
Arithmetic.                             3
EDSP 641. Language Development and                1. Academic performance that is congruent
Remediation.                       3                 with excellence in professional teaching
                                                     practice;
COSD 223. American Sign Language
                                                  2. Effective oral and written communication
(ASL) III.                              3
                                                     skills. Formal assessment will occur the
Or demonstrated proficiency in ASL.                   first nine hours;
EDRD 688. Advanced Study in                       3. D/HH applicants must demonstrate ASL
Reading Skills.                         3            proficiency;
                                                  4. Any grade lower than C results in dismissal.
EDET 620. Instructional Computing.      3            More than one C will also result in dis-
                                                     missal.
Supporting Courses For Early Childhood
                                                  5. Behavior that is congruent with the Code
Special Education Concentration
                                                     of Ethics of the National Education
EDRD 688. Advanced Study in                          Association, the Council for Exceptional
Reading Skills.                         3            Children and the Radford University Honor
                                                     Code (see the Student Handbook);
EDET 620. Instructional Computing.      3

                                            112
6. Appropriate interpersonal skills (respect       Program Requirements              30 hrs.
    of others, acceptance of constructive          With Licensure                36-42 hrs.
    criticism, acceptance of diversity, ability
    to maintain productive working relation-       Required 600-Level Core Courses for
    ships);                                        All Concentrations             12 hrs.
7. Professional characteristics evidenced by       EDEF 606. Educational Research.         3
    such things as cooperation with other
                                                   EDSP 622. Collaboration in Schools
    professionals, responsiveness to the com-
                                                   and Community for Special
    munity and the execution of professional
                                                   Populations.                            3
    duties;
8. Demonstrated psychological well-being           EDSP 651. Current Trends in Programs and
    sufficient to interact positively and pro-      Services for Exceptional
    fessionally with students and colleagues       Individuals.                          3
    (e.g., self confidence, enthusiasm, initia-     EDSP 670. Behavior Management and Social
    tive, persistence, sound decision-making       Skills Development.                 3
    skills and the ability to handle stress
    inherent in the teaching experience);
                                                   SPECIALTY AREA
9. Demonstrated physical well-being suf-
                                                   CONCENTRATIONS              (choose one)
    ficient to assume responsibilities of the
    field experience in a constant and stable       Concentration 1. High Incidence
    manner;                                        (Emotional Behavioral Disorders, Learning
10. Appropriate self awareness and self con-       Disabilities and Mental Retardation EBD,
    fidence (e.g., the ability to self-evaluate;    LD, MR)
    accepting constructive criticism);
11. Appropriate professional conduct (e.g.,        Required Concentration Area
    reliability, dependability, social maturity,   Courses                           18 hrs.
    ability to handle stress, responsiveness to
                                                   EDSP 672. Introduction to High Incidence
    school policies, ability to work collabora-
                                                   Disabilities (ED, LD, MR).             3
    tively with others, respecting worth and
    dignity of others, grooming and dressing       EDSP 566. Teaching Students with
    appropriately);                                Individualized Adapted Curriculum.      3
12. The ability to function in direct practice     EDSP 669. Diagnostic Educational
    from a professional educational knowl-         Procedures for Exceptional Individuals. 3
    edge base (e.g., applying knowledge of
    subject matter, of pedagogy, of human          EDSP 676. Teaching Exceptional Learners in
    development).                                  the General Curriculum.
                                                   EDSP/EDRD 695. Alternative Approaches to
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS                                Reading.                            3
                                                   EDSP/EDRD or EDET 600 level Elective
   The program consists of 12 semester hours
of courses covering a common knowledge             To obtain licensure in special education, an
base for all of the M.S. degree programs           additional 6-12 semester hours of internship
in special education and 18 semester hours         experiences are required.
involving specific option area requirements.        EDSP 791. Teaching Internship in High
To obtain licensure in special education, an       Incidence Disabilities (ED, MR, LD) -
additional 6-12 semester hours of practicum        Elementary.                             6
experience are required.                           EDSP 792. Teaching Internship in High
                                                   Incidence Disabilities (ED, MR, LD) -
                                                   Secondary.                            6


                                               113
Concentration 2. Deaf and Hard of              To obtain licensure in Special Education,
Hearing                                        an additional 6-12 semester hours of intern-
Required Concentration Area                    ship experiences are required.
Courses:                           18 hrs.
                                               EDSP 740. Teaching Internship in Early
EDSP 526. Introduction to Deaf and Hard        Childhood Special Education: Home- and
of Hearing.                            3       Community- based Services
EDSP 527. Curriculum and Methods for           (3-6 hours; repeatable up to 6 hours).
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.   3         EDSP 741. Teaching Internship in Early
EDSP 528. Development and Remediation          Childhood Special Education: School-
of Reading, Writing and Discourse for the      based Services (3-6 hours; repeatable up
Deaf and Hard of Hearing.                3     to 6 hours).
EDSP 669. Diagnostic Educational               *Six semester hour minimum in at least
                                               two settings, one of which may be a current
Procedures for Exceptional Individuals. 3
                                               place of employment.
EDSP/EDRD 695. Alternative Approaches
to Reading.                         3
COSD 512. Communication Approaches             Concentration 4: Severe Disabilities
and Sensory Devices for Children with
Hearing Impairment.                   3        Required Concentration Area
                                               Courses:                           18 hrs.
To obtain licensure in special education, an   EDSP 663. Characteristics of Students with
additional 6-12 semester hours of intern-      Severe Disabilities.                    3
ship experiences are required.                 EDSP 664. Curriculum and Assessment in
                                               Severe Disabilities.                 3
EDSP 755. D/HH Teaching Internship-            EDSP 566. Teaching Students with
Preschool/Elementary.                    6     Individualized Adapted Curriculum.       3
EDSP 756. D/HH Teaching Internship             EDSP 665. Positioning and Handling.      3
-Secondary.                              6
                                               EDSP 667. Communication and Severe
                                               Disabilities.                      3
                                               EDSP 668. Transition and Community-
Concentration 3. Early Childhood               based Instruction.                  3
Special Education

Required Option Area Courses: 18 hrs.          To obtain licensure in Special Education, an
                                               additional 6-12 semester hours of internship
EDSP 536. Teaching Infants, Toddlers and
                                               experiences are required.
Preschoolers with Special Needs.       3
EDSP 538. Program Management in Early
                                               EDSP 781. Teaching Internship in Severe
Childhood Special Education.       3
                                               Disabilities (Elementary K-8).       1-6
EDSP/PSYC 638. Early Childhood
                                               EDSP 782. Teaching Internship in Severe
Assessment and Intervention.             3
                                               Disabilities (Secondary 6-12).       1-6
COSD 602. Language Disorders: Birth to
Five Years.                          3
EDSP 677. Medical Aspects of Teaching
Young Children with Disabilities.    3
EDSP, EDRD or EDET 600-level Elective.

                                             114
FIFTH YEAR MASTER’S DEGREE                       Required Courses and Field
IN SPECIAL EDUCATION AND                         Experiences                           30
LICENSURE PROGRAM IN HIGH                        EDEF 606. Educational Research.        3
INCIDENCE DISABILITIES
                                                 EDSP 622. Collaboration in School and
   This program option is designed solely for    Community for Special Populations.    3
students who have completed the non-licensure    EDSP 641. Language Development and
B.S. program in High Incidence Disabilities      Remediation.                       3
(the IDHI option within the Interdisciplinary
Studies major). Undergraduate students in the    EDSP 676. Teaching Exceptional
pre-professional portion of the program must     Learners in the General Curriculum.    3
meet all requirements for admission to the       EDRD 695. Alternative Approaches to
College of Graduate and Professional Studies     Reading.                            3
before being enrolled in the master’s degree
                                                 EDSP 669. Diagnostic Educational
portion of the program. Students are expected
                                                 Procedures for Exceptional Individuals. 3
to complete the graduate admissions process
during the fall of their senior year. Graduate   EDSP 791-792. Internship in High-
admissions requirements for students in the      Incidence Disabilities (EBD, LD, MR;
5-year program are the same as for other         Elementary and Secondary).           12
concentrations within the Special Education         In addition, the Comprehensive
program (see pg. 23).                            Examination is required during the final
   The following courses are required for        semester enrolled.
the master’s degree in special education and
K-12 licensure in High Incidence Disabilities
(EBD, LD and MR, K-12).




                                             115
COURSE IDENTIFICATION
   The following section contains course descriptions for each department. A course num-
ber indicates in a general way the difficulty and level of the student group for which the
course is offered. Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen; 200 to 299 for
sophomores; and 300 to 499 for juniors and seniors. Some 500 to 599 courses have been
approved for graduate credit (see departmental sections) and may be taken by qualified
seniors and graduate students. Courses numbered 600 and above are restricted to graduate
students.
   The number in parentheses after a course indicates the credit in semester hours.
   A hyphen (-) between the numbers of a course indicates no credit will be given until all
of the course sequence is successfully completed.
   A colon (:) between the numbers of a course and semester hours credit indicates
credit will be given as each semester of the course is completed; courses must be taken
in sequence.
   A comma (,) between the numbers of a course and semester hours credit indicates credit
will be given as each semester of the course is completed and they need not be taken in
order.
   The line following the course title and credit tells the number of lecture and laboratory
hours a week. The third line gives the prerequisite, if any.
   Following some course descriptions, the semester in which the course is offered (fall,
spring) will be listed. When no semester (or semesters) is listed at the end of the course
description, then in most cases that course is offered each semester during the academic
year. However, students should consult with their academic advisers to verify exact sched-
ules for course offerings.
   To obtain detailed information regarding a specific course, students may view the com-
plete course syllabus for a specific course by accessing the course through the Radford
University computer network.
COURSE PREFIX INDEX                               EDRD   Reading
Prefix  Subject                                    EDSE   Secondary Education
ACTG   Accounting                                 EDSP   Special Education
ANTH   Anthropology                               EDUC   Education
APST   Appalachian Studies                        ENGL   English
ART    Art                                        FINC   Finance
BIOL   Biology                                    GEOG   Geography
BLAW   Business Law                               GEOL   Geology
CHEM   Chemistry                                  ITEC   Information Science and
CHHS   College of Health and                             Technology
       Human Services                             MGNT   Management
COED   Counselor Education                        MKTG   Marketing
COMM Communication                                MATH   Mathematics
COSD   Communication Sciences                     MUSC   Music
       and Disorders                              NURS   Nursing
CRJU   Criminal Justice                           PHSC   Physical Science
ECON   Economics                                  POSC   Political Science
EDEC   Early Childhood Education                  PSYC   Psychology
EDEF   Education Foundation                       RCPT   Recreation, Parks and
EDEL   Educational Leadership                            Tourism
EDET   Educational Technology                     SOCY   Sociology
EDLI   English as a Second Language               SOWK   Social Work
EDLS   Library Science                            THEA   Theatre
EDME   Middle Education

                                            116
COURSES
ACCOUNTING                                     Uniform CPA Examination. Audit teams
                                               will be utilized to conduct an audit simula-
ACTG 511. Fundamentals of                      tion based on a cycle approach.
Accounting.                          (3)
Three hours online course.                     ACTG 615. Seminar in Financial




                                                                                               COURSES
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.              Accounting.                              (3)
This course provides an integrated study       Three hours seminar.
of introductory financial and managerial        Prerequisites: ACTG 313 and ACTG 314.
accounting. This course may be taken for       Study of the practice of accounting, finan-
an elective in the MBA program.                cial reporting and analysis of financial per-
                                               formance for corporate entities. Emphasis
ACTG 606. Governmental and                     on research and analysis of advanced finan-
Nonprofit Accounting.                     (3)   cial topics of current interest.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: MBA status or permission of     ACTG 671. Special Topics in
the instructor.                                Accounting.                           (3)
Study of the practice of accounting, finan-     Prerequisites: MBA status or permission of
cial reporting and analysis of financial per-   instructor.
formance for governmental and nonprofit         Examines topics of special interest in
organizations. Emphasis will also be placed    accounting areas not covered in current
on budgeting and managerial control of         graduate course offerings.
these organizations.
                                               ACTG 698. Directed Study.               (1-4)
ACTG 611. Accounting for Decision              Hours and credits to be arranged.
Making and Control.                     (3)    Prerequisites: MBA status and permission
Three hours lecture.                           of the instructor, adviser and Directed Study
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of      form submitted to the Graduate College.
the instructor.                                See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
Emphasis on accounting data used by man-
agers in decision making. The course uses a    ACTG 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
textbook and cases. Among topics covered       Hours and credits to be arranged with the
are relevant cost identification in decision    approval of the student’s thesis supervisor,
making, contribution margin approach and       adviser, department chairperson and the
capital budgeting.                             dean of the Graduate College. See “Thesis”
                                               on p. 55.
ACTG 614. Advanced Auditing and
Attestation.                          (3)
Three hours seminar.                           ANTHROPOLOGY
Prerequisite: ACTG 414.
An expanded study of auditing and attes-
                                               ANTH 511. Appalachian Cultures. (3)
tation services and technology topics. It
                                               Three hours lecture.
is designed to further expose students to
                                               Prerequisite: ANTH 121 or SOCY 110.
the prerequisite knowledge tested on the
Auditing and Attestation section of the        Contemporary Appalachian culture; anthro-
                                               pological explanations of regional culture



                                           117
explored; causes and repercussions of            under the direction of a faculty adviser. A
culture change in Appalachia examined.           Directed Study course must be approved
                                                 by the appropriate department chairperson
                                                 prior to the deadline for adding cours-
APPALACHIAN STUDIES                              es in the term in which the study is to
                                                 be undertaken. No student may apply
APST 560. Seminar in Appalachian                 more than six hours of credit for Directed
Studies.                                 (3)     Study toward graduation requirements.
Three hours lecture.
The seminar focuses on a designated topic
of current interest in Appalachian Studies       ART
and is designated to give students in-depth
exposure both in the classroom and in the        The following 500-level courses may be
field. Topic examples include mountaintop         taken for graduate credit if the student has
removal, coal field labor practices, cultural     the necessary prerequisites and the same or
attachment to place, Appalachian-Scottish-       a comparable course was not taken as part
Irish connections, Appalachia in the media.      of the undergraduate program. At least 80
The course fulfills part of the requirement       percent of the hours in the overall program
for the Certificate in Appalachian Studies.       must be in 600-level courses.
May be repeated for credit when content
differs.                                         Enrollment in 500-level courses for gradu-
                                                 ate credit requires upper division or gradu-
APST 595. Research in Appalachia. (3)            ate standing.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and/
or chair.                                        ART 512. Late 18th and 19th Century
Will vary as topics vary. Currently the          Art.                                      (3)
course focuses on research in communities        Three hours lecture.
served by the Appalachian Arts and Studies       A study of European trends in art of the late
in the Schools program (AASIS). May be           18th and 19th centuries.
repeated for credit when content differs.
                                                 ART 522. Ancient Art.                 (3)
APST 680. Appalachian Studies                    Three hours lecture.
Internship.                             (3)      A study of the art and architecture of
Each hour of credit will require 40 hours        the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean,
on the job.                                      Greece and Rome.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Course counts up to three hours toward           ART 524. Medieval Art.                 (3)
fulfillment of course requirements for an         Three hours lecture.
Appalachian Studies minor. Requires an           Exploration of the origins, evolution,
internship in a public or private agen-          themes and visual characteristics of the
cy in Appalachia. Student will receive           arts of the early Christian through Gothic
academic and agency supervision. The             periods.
course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
                                                 ART 527. Special Topics in Art
                                                 History.                                  (3)
APST 698. Directed Study. (1-6)                  Three hours lecture.
Directed Study courses are offered by            An historical study of an art topic that may
several departments and are designed to          not be a significant part of the content in
permit students to investigate indepen-          regularly taught art history courses. May be
dently specific problems or areas of interest     taken again for credit.


                                           118
ART 528. Twentieth Century Art.         (3)   ART 601. Seminar in Art History.           (3)
Three hours lecture.                          Three hours discussion, research, field
Study of the development of the visual arts   assignments.
of the 20th century emphasizing chronolog-    Prerequisites: Graduate status and 12 hours
ical evolution, themes and visual forms.      of art history at the undergraduate level or
                                              approval of the instructor.
ART 540. Elementary Art Education             Study and critical interpretation of a period/
Theory and Practice.                   (3)    movement in art history with particular
Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.      emphasis on contemporary social, political
Teaching of art in public schools – prin-     and technological influences. May be taken
ciples, practices and materials.              again for credit.
ART 541. Secondary Art Education              ART 605. Research in Art.                (3)
Theory and Practice.                   (3)    One hour lecture, four hours studio.
Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.      Problem analysis of technical processes in
Teaching of art in secondary schools –        selected studio areas of concentration. May
principles, practices and materials.          be taken again for credit.
ART 544. History of American                  ART 609. Art Education Supervision.(3)
Architecture.                           (3)   Three hours lecture, discussion or reports.
Three hours lecture.                          The study of current supervisory prob-
The study of American architecture empha-     lems in the administration of art programs.
sizing the international and multicultural    Offered alternate spring semesters.
influences on the design of various styles,
as well as the social, technological and      ART 642. Art Education Theory and
environmental forces affecting that design.   Practice.                                 (3)
                                              Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
ART 562. Renaissance Art.               (3)   A study of historical and prevailing ideas
Three hours lecture.                          in art education and their practical applica-
An examination of the rebirth of the visual   tion.
arts in Europe in the 14th, 15th and 16th
centuries.                                    ART 666. Graduate Art History
                                              Travel.                                  (6)
ART 582. Baroque and Rococo Art. (3)          On-site art history course designed around
Three hours lecture.                          actual works of art and architecture found
A study of the styles and themes of 17th-     in museums and historical sites in the coun-
and early 18th-century Western European       tries visited.
art.
                                              ART 694. Internship.                  (3-6)
ART 594. Art Museum Education. (3)            Prerequisite: Graduate level standing and
Three hours seminar.                          permission of instructor.
A hands-on approach to the study, theo-       In close collaboration with a supervising
retical foundations and implementation of     professor the student will arrange outside
education programs in the Art Museum          employment working in their field concen-
setting.                                      tration, such as Graphic Design or Jewelry.
                                              By working in an actual job situation, the
ART 600. Graduate Studio/Research. (3)        student will gain valuable real world expe-
One hour lecture and four hours studio.       rience, portfolio work and possible future
May be taken again for credit.                job contacts.



                                          119
ART 698. Directed Study.           (1-4)         continuous enrollment course each semes-
Prerequisite: Approval of the adviser,           ter, including summer, until they have met
department chair and Directed Study form         the outstanding requirement(s).
submitted to the Graduate College.
Hours and credit to be arranged. See             This course carries no credit hour produc-
Directed Study on p. 55.                         tion and does not count toward graduation
                                                 requirements. This course option is also
ART 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)              available to those admitted students who
Prerequisite: The proposal for the visual        are not enrolled in a given semester but
exhibition and its complementary writ-           who wish to use University facilities and
ten exposition must have prior approval          services during that time.
of all members of the student’s Graduate
Committee and the dean of the Graduate
College.                                         BIOLOGY
Development and realization of an exhi-
bition of original art work and a writ-
                                                 BIOL 581. Special Topics in Biology.(1-6)
ten exposition of means and mean-
                                                 One to six hours of lecture and/or labora-
ings of the exhibition. Visual docu-
                                                 tory.
mentation and an oral comprehensive
                                                 Prerequisites: Minimum of eight (8) hours
examination complete the visual
                                                 of undergraduate biology or permission of
exhibition written exposition proj-              instructor.
ect. Hours and credits to be arranged
                                                 An outline of topics will be made available
with the approval of the chair of the
                                                 each time the course is offered. May be
student’s supervisory committee and the
                                                 taken for credit more than once, providing
dean of the Graduate College. See “Thesis”
                                                 the topics are different each time.
on p. 55.
                                                 BIOL 681. Advanced Topics in
ART 702. Studio Management.           (3)
                                                 Biology.                                (3-4)
Three hours lecture or seminar.
                                                 A minimum of 45 (for 3 credits) or 60 (for 4
Problems in the management of the profes-
                                                 credits) contact hours per course.
sional art studio.
                                                 Prerequisites: Minimum of eight (8) credits
GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)             of undergraduate or graduate biology or
                                                 permission of instructor.
All graduate students are required to be
registered during the semester they receive      Selected topics in advanced biol-
their degree from Radford University.            ogy. An outline of topics will be
Registration is required of all graduate stu-    made available each time the course
dents when using University facilities and/      is offered. May be taken for credit more
or faculty time. The minimum number of           than once, providing the topics are different
hours for registration is one. Registration      each time.
allows use of services such as library           BIOL 698. Directed Study.              (1-4)
checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-    Prerequisite: Approval for directed study.
ties not open to the public.
                                                 An opportunity to pursue research or other
Students who are not currently registered        advanced scholarly study in biology. Hours
for any course work and who have com-            and credit to be arranged in consultation
pleted all course work but have other out-       with the faculty member with whom the
standing degree requirements (e.g., compre-      student will work on the directed study.
hensive examination, thesis, removal of an       May be repeated for a maximum of six
I or IP grade), are required to register for a   hours of credit to count toward the degree.


                                             120
BUSINESS LAW                                     COSD 511. Public School Methods in a
                                                 Diverse Society.                         (3)
BLAW 603. Legal Aspects of                       Three hours lecture.
Enterprise.                           (3)        Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
Three hours lecture.                             sion.
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of        A study of clinical delivery and administra-
the instructor.                                  tion of services to the communicatively
A study of the legal framework within            disordered children and adolescents in the
which business enterprises function with         culturally diverse school setting, including
special attention to business-government         current regulations and issues. Must be
relationships.                                   taken for Virginia Teacher Certification.

BLAW 671. Special Topics in                      COSD 512. Audiologic
Business Law.                           (3)      Rehabilitation.                        (3)
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of        Three hours lecture.
the instructor.                                  Prerequisite: Admission to COSD graduate
Examines topics of special interest in busi-     program or enrollment in the Teacher of
ness law areas not covered in current            Hearing Impaired certification program.
graduate course offerings.                       This course will include an in-depth
                                                 study of sensory devices and intervention
                                                 approaches for children with hearing loss.
COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND
HUMAN SERVICES                                   COSD 601. Research in Communication
                                                 Sciences and Disorders.                 (3)
CHHS 686. Special Topics in                      Three hours lecture.
Health and Human Services.              (3)      Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.          sion.
A comprehensive study of special interest        A course designed to introduce methods of
topics in health and human services requir-      research, theories of measurement, research
ing a minimum of 45 contact hours per            design and statistics.
offering. Each topic will be described in
detail when offered. The course may be           COSD 602. Language Disorders: Birth
taken for credit multiple times, provided        to Five Years.                         (3)
that the topics are substantially different      Three hours lecture.
and the department or school approves.           Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
                                                 sion.
                                                 The nature, prevention, assessment and
                                                 treatment of language/communication dis-
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES                           orders in infants, toddlers and other pre-
AND DISORDERS                                    school children.

COSD 510. Neuroanatomy in                        COSD 604. Advanced Studies in
Communication Disorders.               (3)       Articulatory and Phonologic
Three hours lecture.                             Disorders.                             (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-       Three hours lecture.
sion.                                            Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
Study of the neurological structures and         sion.
functions related to normal speech, lan-         A study of articulatory and phonologi-
guage and hearing processes.                     cal disorders with special emphasis on



                                           121
research, advanced assessment measures          instrumental assessment methods and treat-
and intervention.                               ment strategies emphasizing a multidisci-
                                                plinary approach to the whole patient.
COSD 606. Fluency Disorders.         (2)
Two hours lecture/seminar.                      COSD 611. Autism Spectrum
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or per-        Disorders.                             (2)
mission.                                        Two hours lecture.
Study of fluency disorders with special          Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
emphasis on research, assessment mea-           sion.
sures, intervention and prevention.             Study of autism spectrum disorders with
                                                emphasis on research, assessment issues
COSD 607. Language Disorders in                 and efficacious intervention.
School-Age Children and
Adolescents.                           (3)      COSD 614. Childhood Apraxia of
Three hours lecture.                            Speech.                                (2)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or per-        Two hours lecture.
mission.                                        Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
The nature of language disorders in school      sion.
age children and adolescents and the appli-     An in-depth study of assessment and man-
cation of current research and theory to        agement principles concerning Childhood
prevention, assessment and intervention in      Apraxia of Speech, a childhood motor
this population.                                speech disorder.

COSD 608. Motor Speech Disorders. (3)           COSD 615. Voice Science and
Three hours lecture.                            Disorders.                              (4)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-      Four hours lecture.
sion.                                           Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
Study of neuropathology in relation to          COSD 316: Hearing Science or permis-
                                                sion.
apraxia and dysarthria, including symptom-
atology, differential diagnosis and appro-      Advanced study of voice science includ-
priate management techniques.                   ing motor control, phonation, respiration,
                                                resonance, perception, laryngeal anatomy-
COSD 609. Aphasia.                   (3)        physiology and current methods for pre-
Three hours lecture.                            vention, assessment and intervention of
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or per-        voice disorders in children and adults.
mission.
                                                COSD 616. Augmentative and
Study of the neurologic basis for speech
                                                Alternative Communication.             (3)
and language behavior, etiology, symp-
                                                Three hours lecture.
tomatology, assessment and management
                                                Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
of aphasia.                                     sion.
COSD 610. Pediatric and Adult                   An in-depth study of evidence-based
Dysphagia.                             (3)      approaches to assessment and intervention
Three hours lecture.                            with individuals who require the use of
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-      augmentative and alternative communica-
sion.                                           tion (AAC). The course will also provide
                                                hands-on training of current AAC technol-
Study of normal adult and infant swallow
                                                ogy.
physiology related to various mechani-
cal, structural and neurological disorders
of swallowing, including clinical and


                                          122
COSD 630. Professional                          counseling and collaborating with clients,
Development I.                           (1)    family members and other professionals.
One hour lecture.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-      COSD 698. Directed Study.          (1-4)
sion.                                           Variable credit, 1-4 hours.
Discussion of contemporary professional         Prerequisite: Graduate standing and per-
and legal issues, the Code of Ethics of         mission.
the American-Speech-Language-Hearing            Subject to approval of Communication
Association (ASHA) and organization of          Sciences and Disorders Department and
ASHA. Focus on requirements for certifi-         Directed Study form submitted to the
cation, specialty recognition, licensure and    Graduate College. Students may take a
other relevant professional credentials.        maximum of six hours of directed studies
                                                and no more than four hours credit per
COSD 631. Special Clinical Topical              study.
Seminar.                                (1-3)   See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
Variable Credit, 1-3 hours.
Lecture, discussion, field trips and presenta-   COSD 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
tions.                                          Variable credit, 1-6 hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-      Follows guidelines established by the College
sion.                                           of Graduate and Professional Studies.
Specific areas of specialized clinical knowl-    See “Thesis” on p. 55.
edge in communication disorders will be
                                                GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment (1)
offered. Topics will change each semester.
                                                One credit hour.
COSD 640. Advanced Practicum in                 All graduate students are required to be
Speech-Language-Hearing.               (1-6)    registered during the semester they receive
Variable credit, 1-6 hours.                     their degree.
Prerequisite: Admission to COSD Graduate        See “Continuous Enrollment” on p. 51.
program.
A clinical practicum course involving prin-
ciples and methods of prevention, assess-
ment and intervention for people with           CORPORATE AND
communication and swallowing disorders;         PROFESSIONAL
including consideration of anatomical/          COMMUNICATION
physiological, psychological, developmen-
tal, linguistic and cultural correlates of      No more than 20 percent of a gradu-
disorders      of    articulation,    fluen-    ate student’s program (6 credits) may be
cy, voice and resonance, recep-                 in the 500-level courses described below.
tive     and      expressive      language,     Enrollment in 500-level courses for gradu-
hearing, swallowing and cognitive and           ate credit requires upper division or gradu-
social aspects of communication.                ate standing. Courses numbered 600 and
                                                above are for graduate students only.
COSD 650. Professional
Development II.                       (1)       COMM 506. Communication
One hour lecture.                               Skills Tutoring.                   (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and             Three hours lecture/participation.
COSD 630.                                       Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
This course addresses summative assess-         instructor’s permission.
ment of curricular and clinical knowl-          Principles and methods of training cli-
edge and skills and development of pro-         ents in the improvement of commu-
fessional skills, including interviewing,       nication skills in such areas as public

                                            123
speaking, group discussion and listening.        Emphasis on theoretical and practical
Applied component of the course pro-             considerations of human awareness and atten-
vides supervised consultation and tutoring       tion, perception and reception of auditory,
experience.                                      visual and nonverbal codifications; pro-
                                                 cessing, reception and representation
COMM 508. Public Relations Case                  of the spoken word (psycholinguistics),
Studies.                                 (3)     image formation and visualization, as
Three hours lecture/discussion.                  well as other semiotic processes such
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and             as kinesics, proxemics, paralinguistics,
instructor’s permission.                         haptics and chronemics. Explores audi-
Case studies and typical public relations        ence reception in personal as well as
problems in industry, labor, education, gov-     mediated contexts in terms of recent devel-
ernment, social welfare and trade asso-          opments in brain/main research and theory.
ciations. Planning and preparation of com-
munication materials for various media;          COMM 559. Communication in
applications of public relations techniques.     Conflict Management.                        (3)
                                                 Three hours lecture/discussion/field expe-
COMM 513. Political                              rience.
Communication.                           (3)     Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
Three hours lecture/discussion.                  instructor’s permission.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and             This course addresses the nature of conflict
instructor’s permission.                         between people as it is manifested in com-
Contemporary theories and practices of           municative interaction in varied contexts,
political communication. Examines the            within individuals, between individuals,
structure and function of political messag-      between groups and between organiza-
es, the strategic dissemination of political     tional and social entities. It deals with both
messages and the effects of those messages       competitive and, especially, cooperative
on corporate, social, professional and cul-      communication genres as well as strategies
tural institutions.                              of conflict intervention and mediation.
COMM 539. Communication and                      COMM 565. Communication and
Leadership.                            (3)       Health Care.                             (3)
Three hours lecture/discussion.                  Three hours lecture/discussion.
An introduction to the study and practice        Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
of leadership from a communication per-          instructor’s permission.
spective. Analysis of major theories and         A survey of research findings and theoretic
research in leadership with primary empha-       models relevant to communication prac-
sis on application in real-world settings.       tices and health care at the interpersonal,
Through discussions and participation in         group, organizational and social levels.
group activities, students explore leader-
ship concepts and theories, analyze their        COMM 600. Communication Theory.(3)
personal leadership styles, and develop          Three hours seminar.
leadership communication skills.                 Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
                                                 An overview of the history and theory of
COMM 540. Listening and Nonverbal                the discipline of communication, including
Communication.                   (3)             epistemological, ontological and axiologi-
Three hours lecture/discussion.                  cal positions driving theoretic models. This
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and             course provides background and founda-
instructor’s permission.                         tion for the study of corporate and profes-
                                                 sional communication.


                                           124
COMM 605. Applied Communication                    relations strategies and contemporary theo-
Research.                                 (3)      ries of public relations.
Three hours seminar/research.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                   COMM 620. Training and
Research methods and reporting procedures          Development.                             (3)
in communication research. Understanding           Three hours seminar.
reporting procedures and a variety of quan-        Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
titative and qualitative methods of data col-      COMM 605 or instructor’s permission.
lection, analysis and interpretation.              This course provides an overview of the
                                                   communication skills important in con-
COMM 610. Seminar in Organizational                temporary organizations and of the theo-
Communication.                           (3)       retic and practical concerns inherent in the
Three hours seminar.                               assessment of communication needs within
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                   organizations, the provision of communi-
Detailed study of theoretical and applied          cation training and development and the
literature in organizational communica-            assessment of outcomes. These processes
tion focusing on modern organizations.             are viewed from the perspective of internal
Topics for discussion include: the nature of       organizational function, as well as from
communication in conceptualizing modern            that of external consultants.
organizations, micro perspectives (interper-
sonal, group, public and technological con-        COMM 625. Issues Management.           (3)
texts), macro perspectives (classical theory,      Three hours seminar.
human relations theory, feminist theory,           Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
cultural theory, systems theory, TQM mod-          The study of distinctive advocacy roles,
els, quality circles, etc.), communication         relationships and strategies to maintain
networks, communication auditing, organi-          mutual lines of communication between
zational change and the role of the profes-        various types of organizations and their
sional communicator.                               publics including research and analysis of
                                                   problems and issues, preparation and plan-
COMM 611. Communication Law and                    ning of appropriate action, development
Ethics.                                    (3)     and implementation of effective communi-
Three hours seminar.                               cation and systematic evaluation.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Survey of the legal and ethical constraints        COMM 630. Communication, Change
placed upon the content, form and trans-           and Innovation.                       (3)
mission of messages in a variety of con-           Three hours seminar.
texts related to personal, political, business     Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
and corporate life.                                The study of organizational change and
                                                   innovation as a fundamental and recurrent
COMM 615. Seminar in Public                        series of events rooted in and dependent
Relations.                               (3)       upon complex communication processes.
Three hours seminar.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                   COMM 633. Seminar in Persuasion. (3)
Examination of the public relations pro-           Prerequisites: None
fession and application of theoretical and         Seminar format in which students will
research literature in public relations.           discuss and explore concepts and theories
Topics for discussion include: the public          relating to persuasion. Includes application
relations industry, role of public relations       to the corporate environment.
in organizations and society, public rela-
tions ethics, public relations roles, public


                                             125
COMM 635. Contemporary Issues in                Provides the opportunity for individual work
Corporate and Professional                      with a faculty member in areas of mutual
Communication.                       (3)        interest. May be repeated for a maximum
Three hours seminar.                            of six hours of credit to count toward the
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                degree (non-thesis option). See “Directed
Study of current issues in corporate and        Study” on p. 55.
professional communication. Topics to be
announced. May be repeated under differ-        COMM 699. Research and Thesis.              (6)
ent topics.                                     Prerequisites: Approval of student’s thesis
                                                proposal by the student’s thesis committee
COMM 640. Internship in Corporate               and by the dean of the College of Graduate
and Professional Communication.       (3)       and Professional Studies.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and per-       Research project completed and reported by
mission of the supervising instructor and       a thesis student in his or her area of interest.
permission of the Graduate Coordinator.         See “Thesis” on p. 55.
An opportunity for practical application
of communication theory to practical con-
texts. Requires a written proposal.             GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment (1)
                                                All graduate students are required to be
COMM 650. Seminar in Interpersonal              registered during the semester they receive
Communication.                         (3)      their degree from Radford University.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                Registration is required of all graduate stu-
Seminar format in which students will           dents when using University facilities and/
discuss and explore concepts and theories       or faculty time. The minimum number of
relating to interpersonal communication in      hours for registration is one. Registration
work relationships and personal relation-       allows use of services such as library
ships.                                          checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
                                                ties not open to the public.
COMM 658. Diversity in the
Workplace.                             (3)      Students who are not currently registered
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                for any course work and who have com-
For managers and members of the work-           pleted all course work but have other out-
force, diversity poses both challenges and      standing degree requirements (e.g., compre-
benefits. Greater emphasis on understanding      hensive examination, thesis, removal of an
cultural differences and managing diversity     I or IP grade), are required to register for a
as a competetive advantage has become both      continuous enrollment course each semes-
a reality and an opportunity in American        ter, including summer, until they have met
organizations. This is a seminar format         the outstanding requirement(s). This course
course in which students will discuss and       carries no credit hour production and does
explore concepts and theories relating to       not count toward graduation requirements.
diversity communication in work relation-       This course option is also available to those
ships and personal relationships.               admitted students who are not enrolled
COMM 698. Directed Study.              (3)      in a given semester but who wish to use
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and per-       University facilities and services during
mission of the instructor, graduate coordi-     that time.
nator and Directed Study form submitted to
the Graduate College.




                                          126
COUNSELOR EDUCATION                              including an examination of legal and
                                                 ethical issues. Material discussed in class
COED 600. Current Issues in                      is applicable to counselors in training in
Counselor Education (Topic).        (1-4)        all settings.
Prerequisite: Faculty approval
One to four hours per week.                      COED 613. Career Counseling and
Examines a major problem, in the coun-           Development.                          (3)
seling field, its implications and possible       Prerequisite: COED 610, 611 or faculty
alternative solutions.                           approval
                                                 Three hours lecture.
COED 610. Human Growth and                       Emphasizes the understanding of theoreti-
Development.                             (3)     cal approaches to career development and
Prerequisites: None                              development and coordination of services
Three hours lecture.                             to help individuals achieve career matu-
Covers the nature and range of human             rity. Includes activities to promote self-
characteristics and individual differences.      understanding, educational and vocational
Centers on three areas: human behavior,          information services, decision making and
interpersonal life styles and human interac-     placement skills.
tion systems and social support systems.
The course adopts a case study approach          COED 614. Group Counseling
to learning.                                     Theories and Techniques.                  (3)
                                                 Prerequisite: COED 610 and 611 or faculty
COED 611. Introduction to                        approval.
Counseling Theories and Techniques. (3)          Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisites: None                              Introduction to small group counseling.
Three hours lecture.                             Didactic and experiential learning in group
This course is designed to introduce stu-        theory and practice. Involves group par-
dents to the variety of theoretical models       ticipation to develop self awareness, accep-
that underlie the practice of counseling and     tance and effective interpersonal skills.
techniques associated with them. Theories
and techniques that provide a framework for      COED 615. Assessment and Appraisal
the process of counseling will be explored.      Techniques in Counseling.                 (3)
The course will provide a systematic, com-       Prerequisite: COED 610, 611 or faculty
prehensive and balanced overview of the          approval
leading theories and techniques of counsel-      Three hours lecture.
ing and psychotherapy. Students will be          This course is designed to provide counsel-
provided the opportunity to put theory into      ors and other behavioral science helping pro-
practice through small supervised experi-        fessionals knowledge, skills and abilities in
ences using counseling techniques to help        educational, occupational and mental health
focus on three domains: thinking, feeling        assessment. The course objective is to aid
and behaving.                                    students in becoming knowledgeable, skill-
                                                 ful and thoughtful in the exercise of profes-
COED 612. Professional, Ethical and              sional judgement based assessment derived
Legal Issues in Counseling.            (3)       from clinical observations, consultation and
Prerequisite: None                               objective assessments. The course also
Three hours lecture.                             instructs counselors in assessment proce-
This course is designed for mental health        dure to evaluate current functioning of a
practitioners involved in the helping pro-       client in varying settings including schools,
fessions. An introduction and overview           colleges or universities and mental health
of the counseling profession is presented        treatment facilities. The course addresses

                                           127
professional issues related to the ethical       COED 635. Human Sexuality Issues in
use of assessment tools and strategies in a      Counseling.                             (3)
culture of diversity.                            Prerequisites: COED 610, equivalent
                                                 course, (or concurrently) or permission of
COED 616. Cultural and Diversity                 instructor.
Counseling.                           (3)        Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: COED 610, 611                      This course explores the importance of
Three hours lecture.                             human sexuality issues in the counseling
Designed to provide an overview of human         of children, adolescents and adults. Areas
behavior including human diversity and           explored include basic human sexual func-
cultural pluralism. Multicultural theories       tioning and sexual expression, gender iden-
and models of counseling and consulting          tity development, gender issues in coun-
are presented and examined. Students also        seling men and women and the effects of
experience multicultural relationship dif-       sexual abuse on personality development
ferences.                                        and functioning. Other issues considered
                                                 will include current topics such as sexual
COED 620. Psychopathology, Diagnosis,            harassment and date rape.
and Treatment Planning.                  (3)
Prerequisites: COED 610, 611 and 615 (or         COED 637. Death, Loss and Grief
faculty approval)                                Counseling.                              (3)
Three hours lecture.                             Prerequisites: COED 610 and 611 or fac-
This course integrates theory and prac-          ulty approval.
tice of assessment, evaluation, diagnosis,       Three hours lecture.
treatment planning and case management           This course provides students with a per-
to achieve developmental and remedial            sonal and professional understanding of
counseling and psychotherapy goals and           death, grief and loss responses. Theories
objectives. The course examines current          and models of death and loss will be
classifications of psychopathology signs,         presented. Both didactic and experiential
symptoms and syndromes and integrates            methods of instruction will be utilized.
developmental and remedial assessment of
patients, clients or students with case con-     COED 639. Counseling and
ceptualization, treatment planning and case      Spirituality.                          (3)
management.                                      Prerequisites: COED 610 and 611 or with
                                                 permission of instructor
COED 633. Gender Issues in                       Three hours lecture.
Counseling.                             (3)      This course will examine the interface of
Prerequisite: None                               counseling and spirituality. Spirituality
Three hours lecture.                             will be explored from multiple perspec-
This course provides an exploration              tives and orientations. Topics will include
of gender within the context of coun-            dynamics that interact with health, pathol-
seling and psychotherapy. Specifically,           ogy, and development, intervention meth-
this course examines how gender,                 ods, counselor belief systems, mindfulness,
as both a social construct and a core            spiritual competencies, and exploring and
identity, shapes psychosocial development.       exercising each student’s unique approach
A primary emphasis consists of students          to spirituality counseling.
becoming more knowledgeable about the
impact of gender on their personal lives
and the impact of gender in their role as a
counselor and their work with clients.


                                           128
COED 640. Counseling Techniques. (3)              COED 650. Introduction to Community
Prerequisites: COED 610 and 611                   Mental Health Counseling.              (3)
Three hours lecture.                              Prerequisite: None
Development and mastery of basic counsel-         Three hours lecture.
ing skills through a combination of didactic      A course that examines the basic assump-
and experiential approaches. Video and            tions which underlie the community
audio tapes, role playing, simulation and         counseling model, conceptions of social
practice in procedures utilized.                  intervention, implications for the counsel-
                                                  ing process, the role of the community
COED 641. Practicum: Individual                   counselor, prevention in the community
Counseling Techniques.                   (3)      and current controversies and issues.
Prerequisite: COED 611 with a
grade of “B” or higher and fac-                   COED 660. Introduction to Student
ulty approval; pre- or corequisites               Affairs in Higher Education.             (3)
COED 610 and COED 612 can be taken                Prerequisite: None
concurrently with COED 641, but if taken          Three hours lecture.
prior to COED 641 must have a grade of            Introduces role and philosophy of student
“B” or higher                                     affairs in higher education. Students exam-
One hour lecture; four hours laboratory.          ine professional journals and organizations
This course integrates varying the-               associated with higher education, philo-
oretical     approaches       to    counsel-      sophical issues in the field and research in
ing through clinical practice. It also
                                                  a problem area in higher education.
requires progressive clinical proficiency
in the assessment, diagnosis, planning and        COED 661. The College Student and
execution of counseling, while demonstrat-        Developmental Theories.                  (3)
ing effectiveness in the use of the behavior-     Prerequisite: COED 660 or concurrently.
al sciences and theory, tools and techniques      Three hours lecture.
of counseling and psychotherapy.
                                                  This course is comprised of two components.
COED 642. Practicum: Group                        One examines the developmental needs of
Counseling Techniques.                   (3)      today’s college students. This in-depth
Prerequisite: COED 610, 611, 612, 614 and         examination covers characteristics, demo-
641 with grades of “B” or higher                  graphics, culture, challenges and needs of
One hour lecture; four hours laboratory.          the college students in today’s institutions
Four integral components of the course            of higher education. The second com-
include first, the development of group            ponent is studying the process of human
counseling skills; second, organizing,            growth and development during the college
implementing and evaluating counseling            years. Students’ intellectual, moral, ethi-
groups; third, the acquisition and dem-           cal, ego, psychosocial, identity and career
onstration of advanced group counseling           development is examined. Linking theory
skills through clinical practice; and fourth      to the challenges facing college students is
the enhanced use of self as a helping agent       the foundation of this course.
as a result of personal and professional
growth and development associated with
group participation.




                                            129
COED 662. Student Affairs                         COED 680. Couples and Family
Administration.                        (3)        Counseling: Theory and Methods. (3)
Prerequisite: COED 660 or concurrently.           Prerequisites: COED 610 and 611
Three hours lecture.                              Three hours lecture.
This course provides the student with an          COED 680 is a survey course that exam-
overview of the areas of importance in the        ines the historical antecedents, philosophical
administration of a college Student Affairs       assumptions and theoretical rationale of
Division. Areas included are budgeting,           the major approaches to marital and family
finance, management, legal and ethical             therapy.
concerns, assessment and supervision.
                                                  COED 681. Couples and Family
COED 663. Leadership and                          Counseling: Strategies and
Organizational Behavior.                  (3)     Techniques.                              (3)
Prerequisite: COED 660 or permission of           Prerequisites: COED 680
instructor.                                       Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Three hours lecture.                              COED 681 is designed to provide an over-
COED 663 is intended to provide in depth          view of the techniques and skills associated
knowledge regarding organizational behav-         with the practice of couples, marriage and
ior and the psychological and managerial          family therapy.
aspects of leadership behaviors. This course
will look at institutions of higher education     COED 685. Foundations of Play
as the primary context for examining these        Therapy.                                     (3)
two critical areas.                               Prerequisites: COED 610 and 611, or per-
                                                  mission of instructor.
COED 670. Counseling Children and                 This course includes an overview of essential
Adolescents.                            (3)       elements and principles of play therapy, includ-
Prerequisite: COED 610, 611 or faculty            ing history, theories, techniques, modalities,
approval.                                         and applications of play therapy. The course
Three hours lecture.                              features an experiential element during which
This course examines developmental pat-           students conduct play therapy session(s), under
terns and counseling needs of children and        supervision of the instructor.
adolescents. Covers planning, implementa-
tion and evaluation of school-related help-       COED 686. Overview of Substance
ing services. Includes recognition of the         Abuse and Addictive Disorders.           (3)
rights of special student populations and         Prerequisites: COED 610 and COED 611
counseling needs.                                 Three hours lecture.
                                                  COED 686 is intended to provide an over-
COED 671. Secondary School                        view of the strategies, goals, methodolo-
Counseling.                              (3)      gies, programs and types of knowledge and
Prerequisite: COED 610 or faculty                 skills necessary for effective identification
approval.                                         and treatment of substance abuse.
Three hours lecture.
The course focuses on the functions, roles        COED 688. Crisis Intervention and
and current issues of secondary school            Trauma Counseling.                       (3)
counselors. Content areas include foun-           Prerequisites: COED 610, 611, 612, or per-
dations of secondary school counseling,           mission of instructor.
knowledge and practice of school counsel-         Three hours lecture.
ing, assessment and consultation. Major           This course will provide graduate students
concerns of adolescents and counseling            the opportunity to learn, understand, imple-
approaches to assist these concerns are also      ment, and experience the theories and
included.                                         helping skills that guide the practices of
                                            130
crisis intervention and trauma counseling.         semester hours available for each intern-
Students will begin to learn how to put            ship.
theory into practice in this critical area of
counseling.                                        COED 693. Internship in High School
                                                   Counseling.                            (3)
COED 690. Internship in Community                  Prerequisites: Completion of 33 semester
Mental Health Counseling.              (3-6)       hours in good academic standing including
Prerequisites: Thirty semester hours com-          COED 641, 642, 671 (or concurrently) and
pleted in good academic standing including         permission of the chairperson at least one
COED 620, 641, 642, 650 (or concurrent)            semester prior to registration.
and approval of chairperson one semester           This course requires that each semester
prior to registration.                             hour of credit is the equivalent of 100
This course requires that each semester            contact hours. Counselor Education faculty
hour of credit is the equivalent of 100 con-       will determine credit hours available to
tact hours. The Counselor Education fac-           each student. Students must register for
ulty will determine credit hours available         three semester hour increments up to the
to each student. Students may register for         total number of semester hours available
an internship in three semester hour incre-        for each internship.
ments up to the total number of semester
hours available for each internship. This          COED 694. Internship in Student
course provides clinical experience provid-        Affairs Services.                      (3-6)
ing counseling services in a human service         Prerequisites: Completion of 30 hours in
agency.                                            good academic standing including COED
                                                   641, 642, 660 and 661 and approval of
COED 691. Internship in Elementary                 chairperson one semester prior to registra-
School Counseling.                        (3)      tion.
Prerequisites: Completion of 33 semes-             This course requires that each semester
ter hours in good academic stand-                  hour credit is the equivalent of 100 contact
ing including COED 641, 642, 670 (or               hours. The Counselor Education faculty
concurrently) and permission of the                will determine credit hours available to
chairperson at least one semester prior to         each student. Students may register for an
registration.                                      internship in three semester hour incre-
This course requires that each semester hour       ments up to the total number of semester
credit is the equivalent of 100 contact hours.     hours available for each internship. The
Counselor Education faculty will deter-            course provides practical experience in
mine credit hours available to each student.       student personnel service areas.
Students must register for three semester
hours available for each internship.               COED 698. Directed Study.            (1-4)
                                                   Hours and credit to be arranged.
COED 692. Internship in Middle                     Prerequisite: Approval of adviser, depart-
School Counseling.                       (3)       ment chair and Directed Study form sub-
Prerequisites: Completion of 33 semester           mitted to the Graduate College.
hours in good academic standing including          See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
COED 641, 642, 670 (or concurrently) and
permission of the chairperson at least one         COED 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
semester prior to registration.                    The student will complete a research proj-
This course requires that each semester            ect in the area of counselor education.
hour credit is the equivalent of 100 contact       Hours and credit arranged with the approv-
hours. Counselor Education faculty will            al of the student’s thesis supervisor and the
determine credit hours available to each           dean of the Graduate College. See “Thesis”
student. Students must register for three          on p. 55.

                                             131
GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment (1)               including attention to issues of diversity in
All graduate students are required to be          criminal justice. It will introduce questions
registered during the semester they receive       of the factors influencing public policy as
their degree from Radford University.             well as ethical considerations relating to the
Registration is required of all graduate stu-     application of criminal justice.
dents when using University facilities and/
or faculty time. The minimum number of            CRJU 610. Historical Perspectives in
hours for registration is one. Registration       Criminal Justice.                        (3)
allows use of services such as library            Three hours lecture.
checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-     Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
ties not open to the public.                      Traces the development of ideas about
                                                  and institutions within the criminal justice
Students who are not currently registered for     system, focusing especially on the United
any course work and who have completed            States and its roots in the western tradi-
all course work but have other outstanding        tion. Students will study some of the major
degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive          works in the criminal justice field.
examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP
grade), are required to register for a con-       CRJU 620. Judicial Behavior.              (3)
tinuous enrollment course each semester,          Three hours lecture.
including summer, until they have met the         Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
outstanding requirement(s).                       Survey of the American judiciary. Studies
This course carries no credit hour produc-        judicial self-perception, public perception
tion and does not count toward graduation         of the judiciary and specific judicial actions
requirements. This course option is also          in sentencing and court management.
available to those admitted students who
                                                  CRJU 630. Organizational Theory. (3)
are not enrolled in a given semester but
                                                  Three hours lecture.
who wish to use University facilities and
                                                  Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
services during that time.
                                                  A survey of current organizational theory
                                                  as it relates to the public sector. Emphasis
                                                  on development of explanations of organi-
                                                  zational behavior and development of an
CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                  understanding of individual behavior in
                                                  complex public organizations.
CRJU 590. Seminar.                       (3)
Three hours lecture.                              CRJU 635. Foundations of Law
Prerequisites: Graduate standing for stu-         Enforcement.                             (3)
dents taking the course for graduate credit.      Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Concentrated study of specific topics related      This graduate course is designed
to the American criminal justice system.          to examine critical issues in polic-
                                                  ing. Topics for discussion will include
CRJU 600. Survey of Criminal                      (but are not limited to): the function
Justice.                                 (3)      of policing, historical perspectives, strate-
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                  gies and programs, the nature of policing,
This course will provide an overview of           performing the job, ethics and deviance and
Criminal Justice theory by providing criti-       contemporary issues.
cal evaluation and discussion of research in
the criminal justice field. It will emphasize
seminal works and review current research,


                                            132
CRJU 638. Foundations of                          practice    with    a    required     research
Corrections.                             (3)      project.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
This is a graduate course intended to exam-       CRJU 671. Quantitative Methods in
ine critical issues in corrections. Topics        Criminal Justice Research.                 (3)
for discussion will include (but are not          Three hours lecture.
limited to): the evolution of contempo-           Prerequisite: CRJU 670.
rary correctional strategies, institutional       This course is intended to equip the student
and community-based correctional alterna-         with the ability to calculate and conduct
tives, correctional ethics and contemporary       statistical analyses for original research to
policy issues.                                    ensure the ability to interpret the results of
                                                  statistical analysis and to apply those results
CRJU 643. Social Awareness.               (3)     appropriately to real world situations.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                  CRJU 672. Applications in Crime
Examines the interrelationship of race, class     Analysis.                                    (3)
and gender with the criminal justice sys-         Three hours lecture.
tem, considering the experiences of racial        Prerequisite: CRJU 670 (required), CRJU
and ethnic minority groups and women.             671 (recommended).
                                                  This course is an introduction to the quan-
CRJU 650. Criminal Justice Ethics. (3)            titative skills used in tactical, strategic, and
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                  administrative crime analysis.
Theories and practices in the areas of legal-
ity, morality, values and ethics within the       CRJU 673. Crime Mapping.                 (3)
criminal justice system.                          Three hours lecture.
                                                  Prerequisite: CRJU 670 (required), CRJU
CRJU 655. Constitutional Law and the              671 (recommended).
Criminal Justice System.               (3)        This course expands on the quantitative
Three hours lecture.                              principles and applications used in tactical,
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                  strategic, and administrative crime analysis
Examination of constitutional civil liber-        introduced on CRJU 672. The primary
ties and impact upon criminal law and field        focus of this course is geographic mapping
behavior.                                         of crime patterns.

CRJU 660. Issues in Criminal                      CRJU 675. Studies in Criminological
Justice.                                 (3)      Theory.                                (3)
Three hours lecture.                              Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                  Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Examination of current issues which impact        Examines the theories of criminality rang-
criminal justice through an analysis of for-      ing from classical explanations to recent
mation, procedural influence and policy            paradigms.
determination.
                                                  CRJU 676. Environmental
CRJU 670. Criminal Justice                        Criminology.                           (3)
Research Methods.                     (3)         Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Three hours lecture.                              This course examines the spatial distribu-
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                  tion of crime, focusing primarily on theo-
Designed      to     provide     advanced         retical explanations and their associated
social science research skills and to             policy implications.
allow students to put those skills into

                                            133
CRJU 684. Criminal Justice Graduate              GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)
Internship.                             (3)      All graduate students are required to be
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                 registered during the semester they receive
An experimental learning program for             their degree from Radford University.
criminal justice students to observe, learn      Registration is required of all graduate stu-
and participate in the daily functions and       dents when using University facilities and/
procedure of a specific criminal justice          or faculty time. The minimum number of
agency. The course consists of not less          hours for registration is one. Registration
than 16 hours per week for 15 weeks and is       allows use of services such as library
graded on a Pass/Fail basis.                     checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
                                                 ties not open to the public.
CRJU 690. Seminar.                   (3)
Three hours lecture.                             Students who are not currently registered for
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                 any course work and who have completed
Concentrated study of a specific issue or         all course work but have other outstanding
topic in criminal justice.                       degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive
                                                 examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP
CRJU 691. Public Policy and Criminal             grade), are required to register for a con-
Justice.                                  (3)    tinuous enrollment course each semester,
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                 including summer, until they have met the
Three hours lecture.                             outstanding requirement(s).
Prerequisite: At least one graduate or upper-    This course carries no credit hour produc-
division undergraduate class in police           tion and does not count toward graduation
administration, public policy or American        requirements. This course option is also
political economy.
                                                 available to those admitted students who
Intensive study of policy formulation pro-       are not enrolled in a given semester but
cess for American criminal justice agencies.     who wish to use University facilities and
Attention to each of the major components        services during that time.
of the American criminal justice system:
police, courts and corrections.
                                                 ECONOMICS
CRJU 698. Directed Study.               (1-4)
Prerequisites: Approval of the adviser,          ECON 505. Methodology of
department chair and Directed Study form         Economics.                             (3)
submitted to the Graduate College.               An introduction to the study of economics
Semi-autonomous, independent research            as a social science and business philoso-
on a topic of interest to the student and the    phy, which exposes students to concepts of
criminal justice system. Provides an oppor-      supply and demand, product and resource
tunity to develop a high degree of concep-       markets, producer and consumer decision-
tual sophistication on a specific topic. See      making, industrial organization and general
“Directed Study” on p. 55.                       equilibrium theory. Principles of national
                                                 economic performance, monetary and fis-
CRJU 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
                                                 cal policy and international economics will
Hours and credit arranged with the approv-
                                                 be presented. This course may not be taken
al of the student’s thesis supervisor, adviser
                                                 for an elective in the MBA program.
and the dean of the Graduate College. See
“Thesis” on p. 55.




                                             134
ECON 651. Managerial Economics. (3)              ECON 695. Current Topics in
Three hours lecture.                             Economics.                             (3:3)
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of        Three hours lecture.
the instructor.                                  Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Study of selected topics in economic theory      Investigates topics of current and continu-
and their application to management prob-        ing interest not covered in regularly sched-
lems. Topics include demand and sup-             uled graduate courses. Topics announced
ply, revenues, elasticity, production and        with each offering of course. May be taken
cost, incremental decision making, market        twice for a total of six semester hours
structure and pricing and investment             credit.
analysis. Elementary quantitative methods
developed and utilized.                          ECON 698. Directed Study.               (1-4)
                                                 Hours and credits to be arranged.
ECON 672. Collective Bargaining. (3)             Prerequisites: Approval of the directed study
Three hours lecture.                             supervisor, adviser and Directed Study form
Explores nature of collective bargaining in      submitted to the Graduate College.
the United States and deals with the pro-        Semi-autonomous independent research on
cess of negotiating agreements. Emphasis         an economic topic of interest to the student.
on practical decision making in solving          Provides the student with an opportunity to
problems under the collective bargaining         develop conceptual sophistication on a spe-
contract; employs considerable case mate-        cific topic. See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
rial in labor law and arbitration.
                                                 ECON 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
ECON 673. Financial Institutions and             Hours and credit to be arranged with the
Monetary Policy.                        (3)      approval of the student’s thesis supervisor,
Three hours lecture.                             adviser, department chairperson and the
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.                dean of the Graduate College. See “Thesis”
Deals with general and specialized roles         on p. 55.
of financial institutions as well as their
structure, regulation, markets and sources
of funds. Monetary theory explained with         EDUCATION
particular emphasis on its effects on finan-
cial markets.                                    EDEC 500. Foundations, Programs
                                                 and Trends in Early Childhood
ECON 694. Business Forecasting.          (3)     Education.                             (3)
Three hours lecture.                             The historical, philosophical and social
Prerequisites: Admission to the MBA              foundations of early childhood education
Program or graduate status, STAT 205 (or         and how these foundations influence cur-
equivalent) and MATH 151 (or equivalent).
                                                 rent thought and practice will be exam-
Forecasting involves making the best pos-        ined. Students will explore philosophical
sible judgment about some future event.
                                                 schools influencing the development of
Topics covered include introduction to fore-
                                                 the profession and perspectives on current
casting, a review of basic statistical con-
                                                 trends in America that impact young
cepts, exploring data patterns and choosing
                                                 children and their families will be
a forecasting technique, moving averages
                                                 addressed. Students will research and
and smoothing models, regression analy-
sis, time series analysis, the Box-Jenkins       critically examine various education-
(ARIMA) methodology and judgmental               al programs and curricula for young
elements in forecasting. Students will be        children.
trained in using computer-based models,
databases and programs.

                                           135
EDEC 516. Home-School Collaborative              EDEC 698. Directed Study in Early
Relationships.                          (3)      Childhood.                            (1-4)
Three hours lecture.                             Hours and credits to be arranged.
This course is designed to provide knowl-        Prerequisites: Approval of adviser, depart-
edge and skills for teachers to build part-      ment chair and Directed Study form submit-
nerships with parents, caregivers and fami-      ted to the Graduate College.
lies. The interrelationships among families,     See “Directed Study” section in the
school and community will be studied.            Graduate Catalog.
Parent involvement and parent education
programs will be examined. This course           EDEC 750. Internship in Early
emphasizes the professional’s responsibil-       Childhood Education.
ity to initiate, implement and foster con-       Six hours practicum.
tinuous family/teacher teamwork for young        Prerequisites: EDEC 425 or pre- or coreq-
children with diverse needs.                     uisite; EDEC 525 or permission of instruc-
                                                 tor.
EDEC 525. Assessment-Based                       This is a full-time clinical practicum expe-
Instruction and Adaptation for Young             rience in one or more grade levels with
Children.                               (4)      prekindergarten/kindergarten/primary
Four hours lecture/discussion.                   grade children. This experience begins
Prerequisites: HUMD 300 or equivalent; or        with limited participation and culminates in
permission of instructor.                        assumption of full teaching responsibility
This course is designed to provide peda-         for a minimum of three weeks.
gogical concepts and skills for pre- or in-
service teachers working with pre-school         EDEF 600. Child and Adolescent
through primary grade children in inclusive      Development.                            (3)
classrooms. Informal assessment strate-          Prerequisite: Graduate level.
gies are applied to individualize and adapt      Covers critical components of human
instruction. The central concepts and tools      development from the prenatal stage
of inquiry in the social studies/sciences,       through adolescence, including theories,
are used to develop integrated curricu-          ethics, research and applications. Personal,
lum and learning experiences that enhance        social, professional and cultural perspec-
children’s development. Applied use of           tives related to working with children and
technology and media will be integrated          adolescents are explored. This course does
throughout the course.                           not meet requirements for psychology
                                                 majors.
EDEC 602. The Young Child PreK-3. (3)
Three hours lecture.                             EDEF 606. Educational Research. (3)
Theories of cognitive, social, emotional and     Three hours lecture.
physical development of the young chil-          An analysis of various approaches to the
dren are related to early childhood practi-      planning of research. Discusses techniques
cum. Current curriculum theory applied to        and procedures used in making and evaluat-
classroom practice.                              ing studies. Elementary statistics included.

EDEC 658. Problems in Early                      EDEF 607. Foundations of
Childhood Education.                   (3)       Education.                                  (3)
Three hours lecture.                             Three hours lecture.
Focuses on early childhood and issues            Study of the historical, philosophical and
and concerns in practices. Addresses relat-      sociological bases undergirding educational
ed educational concerns of teachers and          practice in all its aspects, particularly those
administrators on an individual basis.           of curriculum, methodology, evaluation,
                                                 administration, guidance and research.

                                           136
EDET 619. Instructional Design.           (3)   instructional applications of video, audio
Three hours lecture.                            and animation.
This course provides students with ini-
tial skills and competencies in apply-          EDET 650. Instructional Integration of
ing instructional design principles to          the Internet.                             (3)
teaching and learning problems. The             Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
student applies Instructional Design meth-      Prerequisite: EDET 620 or equivalent or
odologies to critical components in instruc-    instructor permission.
tion including content, learner characteris-    This course will cover the use of the
tics and diversity in technology integration.   Internet as an instructional tool for use
                                                in education and training. A comprehen-
EDET 620. Educational Technology:               sive range of synchronous and asynchro-
Applications, Applied Research and              nous Internet technologies are covered.
Integration.                           (3)      Among key topics included are manage-
Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.        ment and logistical issues for using the Web
Prerequisite: Basic computer skills.            in education and training, policy issues,
Addresses the instructional integration of      copyright and fair use for educators.
technology and is closely aligned both
with Virginia and national standards for        EDET 660. Current Issues in
technology. In addition, the course empha-      Educational Media/Technology
sizes research, practice, policy and tech-      (Topic).                            (1-4)
nology deployment issues involving cur-         One to four hours per week.
rent computer and related technologies in       Examines a major problem or special issue
education.                                      concerning educational technology, its
                                                implications and possible solutions. The
EDET 629. Administration of                     course may be repeated for a maximum of
Educational Media.                   (3)        six (6) semester hours.
Three hours lecture.
The course examines the role of media           EDET 689. Practicum in Educational
managers, specialists and technicians in        Media/Technology.                          (3)
the administration of educational media         A minimum of 150 hours of practicum
programs and services.                          experience each semester enrolled.
                                                Prerequisite: Minimum of 18 semester hours
EDET 630. Instructional Graphics                of credit courses outlined in the Educational
and Visualization.                      (3)     Technology and Library Media concentra-
Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.        tions and permission of School of Teacher
Prerequisite: Basic computer competen-          Education and Leadership School Director
cies.                                           at least four weeks prior to registration.
This class focuses on the application of        This course offers practical field or clinical
computer graphics in education and train-       experience in an appropriate setting under
ing, including design and development of        the joint supervision of cooperating profes-
instructional graphics. Through projects,       sionals and university personnel. Grade
students explore a variety of graphic pro-      recorded as “Pass” or “Fail.” Forms are
duction software, input and output devices.     available in the Department of Educational
                                                Studies. The course may be repeated for a
EDET 640. Multimedia Technologies               maximum of six (6) semester hours.
for Instruction.                        (3)
Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
This course is for students who are skilled
in computer hardware and software
applications. The emphasis is on current


                                            137
EDET 698. Directed Study in                   literature for children and adolescents.
Educational Media/Technology.         (1-4)   Emphasis will be on selecting and apply-
Hours and credit to be arranged.              ing literature within the K-12 library media
Prerequisites: Approval of the adviser,       center to strengthen and support the cur-
School Director of the School of Teacher      riculum; meeting information literacy goals
Education and Leadership and Directed         for all students; developing within K-12
Study form submitted to the Graduate          students a love of reading and desire to
College.                                      become lifelong learners; and meeting
The course may be repeated for a maxi-        pleasure reading needs of K-12 students.
mum of six (6) semester hours credit.
                                              EDLS 610. Developing Library
EDLI 602. English as a Second                 Collections.                            (3)
Language (ESL): Applied                       Three hours lecture.
Linguistics.                            (3)   Analysis of the impact of qualitative stan-
Three hours lecture.                          dards, formulas and other measures of
Provides for a comprehensive examination      collection adequacy on library planning.
of the relationship between linguistics and   Emphasis on curriculum-support responsi-
second language teaching.                     bilities of the library.
EDLI 603. English as a Second                 EDLS 612. Reference Materials and
Language (ESL): Analysis and                  Services.                                (3)
Application of Instructional                  Three hours lecture.
Techniques.                             (3)   Prerequisites: Graduate standing
Two hours lecture, two hours lab.             Course introduces ways of locating, evalu-
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.       ating and selecting general and subject-
Provides opportunities for practical appli-   oriented reference sources with empha-
cations of second language acquisition the-   sis on works suitable for children and
ories and methodologies through a series      young adults; fosters a concept of reference
of guided observations, evaluations and       librarianship which integrates information-
limited supervised teaching.                  al and instructional roles of library media
                                              specialists.
EDLI 604. Second Language
Assessment Principles.                  (3)   EDLS 614. Organization of Library
Prerequisite: EDLI 603 or permission of       Media Center Materials.                  (3)
instructor.                                   Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.                          Prerequisites: Graduate status.
Analysis of current testing methods for the   Course introduces basic principles of orga-
second language classroom.                    nizing print and nonprint materials for effi-
EDLI 605. Second Language                     cient accessibility in library media center.
Curriculum Design.                      (3)   Descriptive cataloging, classification and
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.       assignment of subject headings introduced.
                                              Emphasis placed on integration of computer
Three hours lecture.
                                              automation into the organization process.
Compare/contrast and analyze current sec-
ond language curriculum models.               EDLS 616. Developing Partnerships for
                                              Learning.                                  (3)
EDLS 608. Child and Adolescent
                                              Three hours lecture.
Literature for Library Media
                                              Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-
Specialists.                       (3)
                                              tor permission.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
                                              The role of libraries in the teaching-learning
Provides exposure to a wide variety of

                                          138
process and the role of the school library      specific. Focuses on problems that
media specialist within the curriculum as       arise in junior and senior high schools.
a teacher, team member, instructional con-      Topics include, but are not limited
sultant and leader is examined. Students        to: curriculum, classroom procedure, mate-
will apply learning theory to planning and      rials, textbooks, study and assignments.
implementing cooperative projects which
lead to the promotion of information lit-       EDUC 506. Teaching and Learning
eracy. Methods of developing learning           Science.                                  (3)
partnerships will be examined.                  Three hours lecture.
                                                Students will engage in critical analysis and
EDLS 618. Production and Evaluation             research related to developmentally appro-
of Educational Media.                    (3)    priate, research based teaching content
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to stu-       area methods for the science classroom.
dents enrolled in the library media con-        Building upon the previous academic and
centration, the library media certificate,       experiential backgrounds of the students,
and licensed library media specialists, or      the course is designed to provide concrete
permission of the instructor.                   experiences for appropriate implementa-
This course is designed for preservice          tion and incorporation of national and
and inservice library media specialists and     state standards in planning, instruction and
focuses on principles and practices related     assessment within the educational setting.
to the design, production and evaluation
                                                EDUC 603. Evaluation of Student
of instructional materials. Enrollment in
                                                Learning.                                (3)
this course is limited to library media spe-    Three hours lecture.
cialists and students pursing endorsement/      Emphasis on a variety of evaluation tech-
licensure in library media.                     niques, including classroom tests, student
                                                projects, student reports, standardized tests
EDME 659. The Middle Education
                                                and other evaluative instruments which are
Student.                                  (3)
                                                suitable for use in schools. Consideration
Three hours lecture.
                                                given to informal methods of evaluation.
Provides those who teach or aspire to
                                                Class evaluates techniques and methods.
teach in middle education (grades 6-8, ages
                                                Focus on improvement of pupil evaluation
10-14) with insights into growth character-
                                                process in school.
istics of the preadolescent student and their
implications for teaching, learning and         EDUC 610. Problems in Language Arts
classroom management. Considers related         and Literature. (K-8).                   (3)
current research.                               Three hours lecture.
                                                Study of problems in communication skills
EDSE 621. Recent Developments in                of listening, speaking and writing and
Teaching in the Secondary School. (3)           literature for children appropriate to early
Three hours lecture.                            and middle education.
Focus on recent research and developments
that have potential for improved teaching in    EDUC 612. Problems in Social
secondary school classrooms. Emphasis on        Studies.                                 (3)
research and developments which have the        Three hours lecture.
most general application.                       Selected topics in the social studies area to
                                                be determined by the interests of students
EDSE 631. Problems in Secondary                 in the course. For the elementary classroom
School Teaching.                (3)             teacher, supervisor, principal or specialist
Three hours lecture.                            in the social studies area.
Examines instructional and organi-
zational problems, both general and

                                            139
EDUC 615. Principles of Curriculum              EDUC 681. International Education
Development.                              (3)   Topic.                                     (3)
Three hours lecture.                            Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-    The course is designed to contrast and
tor permission.                                 compare educational programs in other
Philosophical, sociological, historical, eco-   countries with education in the United
nomic and psychological foundations are         States. Special attention given to curric-
related to K-12 curriculum design. Emerging     ulum, faculty and student composition,
trends and democratic values and goals are      legal structure, facilities and administrative
examined. Models of curriculum develop-         arrangements. Course may be repeated
ment are explored. Curriculum alignment,        with different topic.
scope and sequence and state regulations
pertaining to learning are examined.            EDUC/EDSP 690. Cognitive
                                                Instruction: An Introduction.            (3)
EDUC 617. Models of Teaching.            (3)    Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.                            A study of learning and instructional strate-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-    gies based upon current cognitive theories;
tor permission.                                 course competency based; students dem-
Examines student learning styles, teacher       onstrate the technical skills necessary to
instructional styles (models of teaching)       develop the learning capabilities of their
and methods of differentiating instruction      clients.
and assessing student learning. Focuses
on different ways to improve and enhance        EDUC 698. Directed Study.          (1-4)
student learning.                               Hours and credit to be arranged.
                                                Prerequisites: Approval of the adviser,
EDUC 640. Internship in Teaching. (3-9)         School Director and Directed Study form
Practicum for graduate students seeking         submitted to the Graduate College.
teaching credentials.                           See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
EDUC 660. Current Issues in                     EDUC 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
Education (Topic).                (1-5)         Hours and credit to be arranged with
Examines a major problem or trend, its          the approval of the dean of the Graduate
implications and possible solutions or          College.
impact on education.                            See “Thesis” on p. 55.
EDUC 670. Basic Principles and                  GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)
Practices of Multicultural Education. (3)       All graduate students are required to be
Three hours lecture/discussion.                 registered during the semester they receive
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or per-        their degree from Radford University.
mission of instructor.                          Registration is required of all graduate stu-
Focuses on the development of respon-           dents when using University facilities and/
sive and responsible educators who will         or faculty time. The minimum number of
work effectively with all students and          hours for registration is one. Registration
families in a pluralistic society. Students
                                                allows use of services such as library
learn how to implement antibias curri-
                                                checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
cula in order to teach students strategies
                                                ties not open to the public.
for living and learning in a multicultural
society. Students consider how diversity        Students who are not currently registered for
issues impact curriculum, instruction, and      any course work and who have completed
reciprocal home-school relationships with       all course work but have other outstanding
families. Students are introduced to critical   degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive
pedagogy for multicultural teaching.

                                            140
examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP     supervisors in the improvement and evalu-
grade), are required to register for a con-    ation of instruction.
tinuous enrollment course each semester,
including summer, until they have met the      EDEL 621. Organization and
outstanding requirement(s).                    Management of Public Schools.              (3)
                                               Three hours lecture.
This course carries no credit hour produc-     Prerequisites: Graduate standing, 3 years
tion and does not count toward graduation      K-12 teaching, or permission of instructor.
requirements. This course option is also       A comprehensive study of the varied mana-
available to those admitted students who       gerial duties and responsibilities of school
are not enrolled in a given semester but       principals at the elementary, middle and
who wish to use University facilities and      secondary levels. Examines the principal’s
services during that time.                     managerial leadership role in school plan-
                                               ning; organizing time, space and records;
                                               master-scheduling; staffing; budgeting and
                                               purchasing; attending to staff and stu-
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP                         dent safety; overseeing school plant and
                                               grounds; and coordinating school programs
EDEL 612. Introduction to School               for student activities, transportation, custo-
Administration.                          (3)   dians, clerks and food services employees.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-   EDEL 624. Technology for School
tor permission.                                Administrators.                          (3)
Trends and implications of major historical,   Three hours lecture.
philosophical and ethical influences affect-    Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-
ing school organization and leadership are     tor permission.
studied with particular reference to demo-     Explore technological applications for the
cratic values. Processes are examined for      purpose of effectively enriching teaching
use in the collaborative shaping of a school   and learning in K-12 schools. Current tech-
vision with all stakeholders in the school     nologies for school management and for
community. A study of the research on          business procedures will be presented and
school improvement and effective schools       assessed. Short and long range technology
is included. State laws and regulations gov-   planning for the school, including explor-
erning school quality in Virginia (Standards   ing resource options, will be investigated.
of Quality and Standards of Accreditation)
are covered.                                   EDEL 626. The School and Community
                                               Relations.                               (3)
EDEL 614. Supervision and Evaluation           Three hours lecture.
of Instruction.                        (3)     Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-
Three hours lecture.                           tor permission.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, 3 years      Principles and practices of human relations
of classroom teaching, application to edu-     within schools and effective school public
cational leadership program or permission      relations programs, development of mutual
of instructor.                                 school and community understandings,
Study of the processes, techniques and         public participation in planning school pro-
problems associated with supervision,          grams and services, cooperative activities
evaluation and improvement of classroom        with appropriate community groups and
instruction and instructional programs in      the relationship of school administrators
K-12 schools. Examination of the roles         and staffs. Self-awareness of leadership
of school administrators and instructional     skills and self-analysis of beliefs, values,

                                           141
actions and their potential impact upon        an internship in 2.0 hour increments up to
others is required. Examines the process of    6.0 hours. Each 2.0 hour unit represents a
change and its impact upon the school and      minimum of 120 hours of administrative
community.                                     experience in the local school/district.
                                               Students enrolled in an internship are also
EDEL 630. Legal and Ethical                    expected to complete two (2) seminar
Dimensions of School                           classes for each 2.0 hour unit of the intern-
Administrators.                          (3)   ship. The internship meets state licens-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instruc-   ing requirements for administrative field
tor permission.                                experience. Grade is recorded as “Pass”
Explores the legal status of public schools    or “Fail.”
in the United States with special reference
to ethics. Emphasis on constitutional law      EDEL 698. Directed Study.            (1-4)
and the judicial rulings of the Supreme        Hours and credit to be arranged.
Court, federal district courts and state       Prerequisites: Approval of adviser, School
appellate courts. Laws and regulations in      Director of School of Teacher Education
Virginia are examined.                         and Leadership and Directed Study form
                                               submitted to the Graduate College.
EDEL 635. Seminar in Problems of               See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
Educational Leadership.                 (3)
Three hours lecture.                           GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)
The course will be conducted in semi-          All graduate students are required to be
nar format with professors and students        registered during the semester they receive
identifying the major problems currently       their degree from Radford University.
facing educational leaders. Once the prob-     Registration is required of all graduate stu-
lems have been identified students will be      dents when using University facilities and/
expected to conduct research concerning        or faculty time. The minimum number of
the problems, report their findings and offer   hours for registration is one. Registration
potential solutions to the problems.           allows use of services such as library
                                               checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
EDEL 660. Current Issues in                    ties not open to the public.
Education (Topic).                    (2-4)    Students who are not currently registered
Examines a major problem or trend, its         for any course work and who have com-
implications and possible alternative solu-    pleted all course work but have other
tions or impact on education.                  outstanding degree requirements (e.g.,
                                               comprehensive examination, thesis,
EDEL 690. Internship in School                 removal of an I or IP grade), are required to
Administration.                         (6)    register for a continuous enrollment course
Six hours laboratory.                          each semester, including summer, until they
Prerequisites: Acceptance as a degree-         have met the outstanding requirement(s).
seeking student by the Graduate
College; completion of 6 semes-                This course carries no credit hour pro-
ter hours of Educational Leadership            duction and does not count toward grad-
program coursework; and permission of the      uation requirements. This course option
adviser and School Director at least four      is also available to those admitted stu-
weeks prior to registration.                   dents who are not enrolled in a given
Requires that the student enter into an        semester but who wish to use University
Administrative field experience in local        facilities and services during that time.
schools under the cooperative supervision
of both local school/district and university
personnel. The student may register for

                                           142
SPECIAL EDUCATION                                 hard of hearing students and techniques
                                                  for enhancing language and teaching read-
EDSP 504. Introduction to                         ing in this population. Examines current
Special Education for Secondary                   theories and practices in reading and lan-
Educators.                               (3)      guage arts instruction for hearing as well
Prerequisite: EDUC 309 or EDEF 320                as deaf/hard of hearing children. Presents
or approved equivalent and admission to           methods for assessing reading and language
Teacher Education Program.                        problems in deaf/hard of hearing children,
Corequisite: Enrollment in Secondary Early        making adaptations and modifications in cur-
Field Experience Program                          riculum, integrating technology and includ-
Introduction to special education with            ing parents in the instructional process.
emphasis on its history and purposes, the
laws governing special education and the          EDSP 536. Teaching Infants, Toddlers
students served. Course will also stress          and Preschoolers with Special Needs (3)
teaching strategies for secondary educators.      Three hours lecture.
                                                  Prerequisites: EDSP 360 or 651 or permis-
EDSP 526. Introduction to Deaf and                sion of the instructor.
Hard of Hearing.                            (3)   Addresses methods for providing devel-
Three hours lecture.                              opmentally and exceptionally appro-
Prerequisites: EDSP 651 or 361.                   priate instructional programming for
Introduction to the education of deaf and         young children with special needs in
hard of hearing students (PreK-12) for            all areas of development. Includes
prospective teachers and other profession-        development of individualized education
als serving deaf/hard of hearing students.        programs and individualized family service
Includes legislation, trends, issues, etiology,   plans.
identification, characteristics, Deaf culture,
school related needs and communication            EDSP 538. Program Management in
modes used in educational practices.              Early Childhood Special Education. (3)
                                                  Three hours lecture.
EDSP 527. Curriculum and Methods                  Prerequisites: EDSP 360 or 651 or permis-
for Deaf and Hard of Hearing                      sion of the instructor.
Students.                               (3)       Addresses administrative aspects of ser-
Three hours lecture.                              vice delivery systems for young children
Prerequisites: EDSP 526.                          with disabilities or at-risk conditions and
Study of curriculum, methods, techniques          their families. Examines legal require-
and materials used in the education of deaf/      ments, funding mechanisms, service
hard of hearing students. Includes infor-         coordination, resource acquisition, inter-
mation on classroom organization, class-          agency coordination, integration with
room management, instructional planning,          peers without disabilities, child find, transi-
curriculum adaptations and modifications,          tion facilitation, professional development
community agencies, assessment and eval-          and program evaluation. Includes tech-
uation and standards of professionalism.          niques for working with children, families,
                                                  educators, related services providers and
EDSP 528. Development and                         other human service professionals.
Remediation of Reading, Writing and
Discourse for the Deaf and Hard of                EDSP 545. Adaptive Strategies in
Hearing.                             (3)          Arithmetic.                            (3)
Three hours lecture.                              Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: EDSP 526.                          Prerequisites: EDSP 360 or 361 or 651.
Study of the complex nature of language           For students working with children and
acquisition, reading and writing in deaf/         youth in the areas of arithmetic and
                                              143
mathematics. Emphasis on techniques and          Prepares teachers with culturally
strategies for the teaching and remediation      responsive collaboration and consultation
of arithmetic and mathematical skills and        skills to work with school personnel, includ-
competencies.                                    ing paraprofessionals, families, community
                                                 agencies, employers and others. Addresses
EDSP 560. Current Problems in                    transitions throughout the educational expe-
Special Education (Topic).              (1-4)    rience; consultation, case management and
Examines a major problem or current topic        coordination of service delivery. Includes
in the field of special education, its implica-   long-term planning, access to community
                                                 experiences and resources, career develop-
tions and possible solutions.
                                                 ment, life skills, self-advocacy and self-
EDSP 564. Introduction to Mental                 determination, guardianship and legal con-
Retardation and Severe Disabilities. (3)         siderations. Field-based experiences are
Three hours lecture.                             integral to the course.
Prerequisite: EDSP 360 or 361 or 651             EDSP/PSYC 638. Early Childhood
The course considers persons with mental         Assessment and Intervention.              (3)
retardation and severe disabilities in
                                                 Three hours lecture.
terms of incidence, etiology and abili-
ties and needs in academic, social and           Prerequisite: PSYC 631 or permission of
biophysical realms. Formats and meth-
                                                 instructor.
ods for educational and vocational               This course will teach selection, admin-
programming, as well as services and sup-        istration and interpretation of formal
ports provided through other human service       and informal assessment techniques
agencies, are examined. Current issues and       for young children with disabling and
future trends in the field are considered.        at-risk conditions and their families. Within
Students engage in field experiences in           a developmental-ecological context the
local community services and programs for        course will teach assessment strategies and
persons with developmental disabilities.         link assessment results with effective inter-
                                                 vention strategies.
EDSP 566. Teaching Students with
Individualized Adapted Curriculum. (3)           EDSP/EDRD 641. Classroom
Three hours lecture.                             Development and Remediation of
Prerequisite: EDSP 464 or 564 or 672.            Language Skills.                         (3)
Study of curriculum, methods, techniques         Three hours lecture.
and materials used in the education of           Prerequisite: Three semester hours of read-
students who have disabilities that require      ing instruction.
individualized planning to design curricu-       For graduate students working with chil-
lum goals appropriate to their needs. Most       dren and youth in oral and written language
typically, these students have intermit-         development. Emphasizes development of
tent, limited, or extensive support needs.       language, relationship between thought and
Educational planning and program content         language, disability and language and cul-
for primary, intermediate and secondary
                                                 tural and experiential differences affecting
levels is addressed.
                                                 language. Classroom strategies for devel-
EDSP 622. Collaboration in Schools               opment and remediation of oral and written
and Community for Special                        language skills discussed.
Populations.                             (3)
Two hours lecture; one hour field experience.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and EDSP
361, 651 or instructor approval.



                                             144
EDSP 651. Current Trends in                      EDSP 665. Positioning and
Programs and Services for                        Handling.                                  (3)
Exceptional Individuals.                (3)      Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.                             Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-       Focuses on the educational, social,
sion of School Director.                         physical and health care needs
This course presents an overview of excep-       of students with both cognitive
tionalities of children and youth and cur-       and physical/sensory disabilities. Emphasis
ricular and instructional modifications with      is given to specific strategies for positioning
emphasis on administrative provisions to         and handling, facilitating movement and
meet their needs. Current trends and issues      developing self-care skills. Students are
in service delivery, federal and state law,      required to hold or obtain CPR and Airway
court cases and Virginia regulations for         Obstruction certification. Field-based activi-
special education programs are addressed.        ties are required to allow students to directly
                                                 apply and demonstrate their learning.
EDSP 660. Current Issues in Special
Education (Topic).                    (1-4)      EDSP 667. Communication and
One to four hours per week.                      Severe Disabilities.                      (3)
Examines a major problem in special edu-         Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
cation, its implications and possible solu-      This course introduces special education pro-
tions.                                           fessionals to augmentative and alternative
                                                 communication (AAC) for individuals with
EDSP 663. Characteristics of Students            severe speech and language impairments.
with Severe Disabilities.               (3)      This course will address the knowledge
Three hours lecture.                             and skills needed to assess the potential
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.          AAC user, make team decisions, develop
Provides knowledge and understanding of          and implement instruction and evaluate the
the characteristics and needs of individu-       effects of instruction with focus on motivat-
als with severe disabilities. Serves as the      ing, building and expanding communica-
foundations course for the licensure pro-        tion, choice-making and social interaction.
gram in severe disabilities. Course format       Field-based activities are required to allow
is a combination of distance-learning and        students to directly apply and demonstrate
web-based learning modules and interac-          their learning.
tive sessions.
                                                 EDSP 668. Transition and Community-
EDSP 664. Curriculum and                         based Instruction.                       (3)
Assessment in Severe Disabilities.        (3)    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.     This course provides an overview of the
This course is designed to develop knowl-        special educator’s role in preparing stu-
edge and skills related to best practices        dents with disabilities for post-secondary
in curriculum and assessment for those           educational and vocational environments.
preparing to teach individuals with severe       Emphasis is placed on designing and modi-
disabilities. Students will plan, develop        fying high school curricula, involving
and implement a variety of assessment and        students and their families in transition
curriculum activities that target students       planning and helping students acquire the
with disabilities. Applied use of assistive      services needed to be successful in adult
technology will be integrated within the         life. Field-based activities are required to
course. Field-based activities are required to   allow students to directly apply and dem-
allow students to directly apply and demon-      onstrate their learning.
strate their learning.

                                             145
EDSP 669. Diagnostic Educational                EDSP 676. Teaching Exceptional
Procedures for Exceptional                      Learners in the General Curriculum. (3)
Individuals.                             (3)    Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.                            Prerequisites: EDSP 672, or EDSP 464 and
Prerequisites: EDSP 361, 651 or PSYC            EDSP 472.
401.                                            Addresses current issues and needs in
Covers rationale, content, technical adequa-    instructional programming for students
cy, administration and scoring of diagnostic    with high incidence disabilities (learning
educational instruments used with excep-        disabilities, emotional/behavioral disor-
tional students. Emphasis is on identifying     ders, mental retardation) at the elementary
areas of educational need in students with      through high school levels. Emphasizes
specific learning and/or behavioral difficul-     methods for the development and reme-
ties. Diagnostic and informal information is    diation of basic academic skills, study
used to formulate a written and oral report     skills, learning strategies and modification
including IEP goals and objectives.             of course content to meet individual needs
                                                of students who are engaged in the general
EDSP 670. Behavior Management                   education curriculum.
and Social Skills Development.            (3)
Three hours lecture.                            EDSP 677. Medical Aspects of Teaching
Prerequisite: Graduate standing; EDSP           Young Children With Disabilities.       (3)
361 or 651.                                     Three hours lecture.
This course considers practical applica-        Prerequisites: EDSP 651 or permission of
tions of theoretical constructs regarding the   the instructor.
management of behavior and development          Examines the educational, physical, medi-
of social skills in students with learn-        cal and health care needs of infants, tod-
ing and behavioral problems. Related top-       dlers, and young children with cognitive,
ics include functional behavioral analysis,     physical, or sensory disabilities. Includes
positive behavioral supports, student moti-     intervention, medical aspects, and manage-
vation, age appropriateness, problem-solv-      ment of neurodevelopmental and motor
ing, awareness of commercially prepared         disabilities.
resources, professional collaboration and
avoiding teacher burnout and collaboration      EDSP/EDRD 695. Alternative
with families and professionals in design-      Approaches to Reading.                (3)
ing behavior intervention plans.                Prerequisites: Three semester hours of
                                                reading instruction.
EDSP 672. Introduction to High                  Covers alternative instructional reading
Incidence Disabilities.                   (3)   programs and how to replace, supplement
Three hour lecture.                             or interface them with ongoing classroom
Prerequisite: EDSP 361 or 651.                  programs in order to accommodate varying
This course provides an overview of specific     learning styles and needs.
learning disabilities, mental retardation and
emotional/behavioral disorders. It examines     EDSP 698. Directed Study.          (1-4)
history, philosophy, definitions, prevalence,    Hours and credit to be arranged.
needs and characteristics, assessment, etiol-   Prerequisites: Approval of the adviser,
ogy, legal issues, current issues and trends    School Director and Directed Study form
and service options across the lifespan.        submitted to the Graduate College.
                                                See “Directed Study” on p. 55.




                                            146
EDSP 740:741. Teaching Internships             *Internship/Practicum
in Early Childhood Special                     EDSP 755: Practicum in Deaf and Hard
Education.                            (3-6)    of Hearing Preschool – Elementary.(0-6)
Prerequisites: Completion of 15 semester       EDSP 756. Practicum in Deaf and Hard
hours of coursework in the ECSE program        of Hearing – Secondary.         (0-6)
with a grade of “B” or above to include
EDSP 651, 536, 670, 665; departmental          *Four semester hour minimum in at
approval that student meets professional       least one practicum. Based on students’
performance criteria; admission to teacher     prior experiences, both practica may be
education; and permission of the School        required.
of Teacher Education and Leadership
School Director at least four weeks prior to
                                               EDSP 791:792. Teaching Internship
registration.
                                               in High Incidence Disabilities (EBD/
Each of these courses provides pedagogi-
                                               LD/MR).
cal experience with infants, toddlers or
preschoolers with disabilities, developmen-    EDSP 791: 6 hrs. Elementary.             (6)
tal delays, risking conditions, or typical     EDSP 792: 6 hrs. Secondary.              (6)
development. EDSP 740 placements focus         Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher
on services delivered in home and commu-       Education Program and at least 18 semes-
nity settings including early intervention,    ter hours of coursework in the program
Head Start and preschool programs. EDSP        completed to include: EDSP 361 or 651;
741 placements include self-contained and      464 or 564, 472 or 672; 426 or 670; 466
inclusive public schools services. These       or 566; 676; departmental approval that
are structured and supervised clinical field    student meets professional performance
experiences.                                   criteria; and permission of the Special
                                               Education Program Coordinator at least
Field Experience grades are recorded as        one semester prior to registration.
“Pass” or “Fail.”                              Each of these courses represents a one-half
                                               semester, full-time placement, in which the
EDSP 750. Internship in Early                  student works with children with learn-
Childhood Special Education                    ing disabilities, emotional disturbance and
Practicum.                               (6)
                                               mental retardation at one age level under the
Prerequisites: Completion of EDSP 360,
                                               direction of a qualified teacher. Internship
361, or 651; and EDSP 436, 437, 438, 439
and 451 or their equivalents.                  grades are recorded as “Pass” or “Fail.”
EDSP 750 is a one-half semester, full-         GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)
time placement in which the intern works       All graduate students are required to be
in an early childhood special education        registered during the semester they receive
setting under the direction of a quali-        their degree from Radford University.
fied teacher. Full teaching responsibility is   Registration is required of all graduate stu-
assumed for at least three weeks. Internship   dents when using University facilities and/
grades are recorded as “Pass” or “Fail.”       or faculty time. The minimum number of
                                               hours for registration is one. Registration
                                               allows use of services such as library
                                               checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
                                               ties not open to the public.
                                               Students who are not currently registered for
                                               any course work and who have completed
                                               all course work but have other outstanding
                                               degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive

                                           147
examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP      clarity, organization and rhetorical effec-
grade), are required to register for a con-     tiveness of language and layout. Realistic
tinuous enrollment course each semester,        weekly assignments include excerpts from
including summer, until they have met the       technical manuals, insurance and govern-
outstanding requirement(s).                     ment documents, instructions and reports.

This course carries no credit hour produc-      ENGL 509. Advanced Fiction
tion and does not count toward graduation       Writing.                              (3)
requirements. This course option is also        Three hours lecture.
available to those admitted students who        For students wishing to develop potential
are not enrolled in a given semester but        in fiction writing. May be taken twice for
who wish to use University facilities and       credit.
services during that time.                      ENGL 510. Advanced Poetry
                                                Writing.                              (3)
                                                Three hours lecture.
ENGLISH                                         For students wishing to develop potential
                                                in poetry writing. May be taken twice for
ENGL 502. Teaching Writing: Theories            credit.
and Practices.                            (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                ENGL 525. The Study of Adolescent
The course provides prospective teachers        Literature.                              (3)
of the English language arts with theories      Three hours lecture.
and practices governing effective teaching      Course familiarizes students with classical
of writing in elementary, middle-school         and contemporary literature whose audience
and high school classrooms. A field expe-        is primarily adolescents. Students are led to
rience in an area public school classroom       understand why teenage readers make the
allows teachers and teacher candidates to       literature choices they do. The course helps
design and teach lessons and to conduct         students develop a positive attitude
writing workshops. Students will complete       toward this kind of literature and under-
a field research project that investigates and   stand it should have a place in the read-
applies composition theory to some area of      ing program of adolescents. Course
their teaching.                                 required to satisfy certification require-
                                                ments for English majors intending to teach
ENGL 506. Advanced Technical                    at the secondary level.
Writing.                              (3)
Three hours lecture.                            ENGL 546. Appalachian Folklore. (3)
Teaches students to master the advanced         Three hours lecture.
technical writing skills required to write      Study of mountain verbal lore of tales, bal-
professional reports, proposals, manuals        lads and sayings; non-verbal or partially
and other communications studied in the         verbal lore of customs, games and ritu-
course. Individual and team-written proj-       als; material lore of structure, designs and
ects assigned.                                  landscapes. Field collections and written
                                                analyses required.
ENGL 507. Technical Editing.            (3)
Three hours lecture.                            ENGL 547. Appalachian Literature. (3)
Prepares students to analyze the readabil-      Three hours lecture.
ity of technical documents written in the       Establishment of standards for identifying
workplace (e.g., instructions, user manu-       Appalachian literature; study of selected
als, abstracts, proposals) and to deal with     works representative of the mountain cul-
problems of correctness, consistency,           ture.

                                            148
ENGL 549. African-American                     ENGL 606. Technical and Business
Literature.                             (3)    Writing.                                 (3)
Three hours lecture.                           Three hours lecture.
Familiarizes students with literature writ-    Prerequisites: Graduate standing required
ten by African-Americans. Scope includes       (or permission of the instructor) and fluency
all genres and periods. Enables students       in written English.
to understand African-American literature      Study of documents common in profes-
both in itself and within larger context of    sional settings, including correspondence,
American literature and culture.               proposals, reports, instructions and presen-
                                               tation materials; writing of various docu-
ENGL 550. Tribal and Pan-Indian                ments, including an article on communica-
Literature.                              (3)   tion in the student’s field; and development
Three hours lecture.                           of an effective professional writing style.
Course is a comparative study of various
tribal and pan-Indian literatures, including   ENGL 611. Creative Writing.             (3)
traditional oral texts and transitional and    Three hours lecture and workshop.
contemporary works in English by tribal        Writing of fiction or poetry for a criti-
and pan-Indian authors.                        cal audience composed of the student’s
                                               instructor and classmates; studies in writ-
ENGL 563. Grammar and Language for             ing strategies and techniques. May be taken
Teachers.                                (3)   twice for credit.
Primarily intended for graduate-level, pre-
service teaching intern candidates, this       ENGL 621. Principles of Literary
course addresses the topics of English         Criticism.                             (3)
grammar and usage, language acquisition        Three hours lecture.
and language-related learning, all informed    Examination of literary theories stated in
by contemporary research from the fields of     major critical texts; emphasis on prin-
anthropological linguistics, psycholinguis-    ciples underlying contemporary schools of
tics and sociolinguistics.                     criticism.

ENGL 564. The History of the English           ENGL 629. Critical Approaches to
Language.                           (3)        Teaching Literature.                      (3)
Three hours lecture.                           The course provides prospective teachers
History and development of English lan-        of literature with an examination and appli-
guage from its origins to present.             cation of current theory research and prac-
                                               tice in the teaching of literature. In a field
ENGL 590. Summer Workshop.          (3)        experience portion of the course, students
Designed to give students concentrated         will design lesson plans and apply particu-
study in a specialized area of English.        lar approaches to teaching literature with
Graded as Pass/Fail. May be taken twice        students in local, middle, high schools, or
for credit.                                    college classrooms. They will design a Unit
                                               of Literature Study for classroom use.
ENGL 600. Introduction to Literary
Scholarship.                            (3)    ENGL 631. Studies in Middle English
Three hours lecture.                           Literature.                              (3)
Examination of tools and techniques essen-     Three hours lecture.
tial to advanced literary study and scholar-   Close reading, largely in Middle English,
ship. Strongly recommended during the          of works best typifying developments in
first semester of graduate study.               English literature during the centuries after
                                               the Norman Conquest. With a different
                                               subheading, may be taken twice for credit.
                                           149
ENGL 633. Studies in English                     ENGL 648. Studies in Oral and
Renaissance.                          (3)        Written Literature of Appalachia. (3)
Three hours lecture.                             Three hours lecture.
Study of selected major authors or impor-        Study of specified genre of oral or written
tant topics of the English Renaissance.          Appalachian literature, or a combination of
With a different subheading, may be taken        genres from both types to show cross influ-
twice for credit.                                ences. Genre selections, which vary from
                                                 term to term, include folktale or ballad
ENGL 635. Studies in Restoration and             in oral literature, or perhaps a combina-
18th Century British Literature.    (3)          tion of ballad and poetry. With a different
Three hours lecture.                             subheading, may be taken twice for credit.
Study of selected major British writers
1660-1789. With a different subheading,          ENGL 651. Teaching Expository
may be taken twice for credit.                   Writing.                                 (3)
                                                 Prerequisite: Appointment as a Graduate
ENGL 637. Studies in 19th Century                Teaching Fellow in the English Department.
British Literature.                       (3)    Introduction to ideas about learning, com-
Three hours lecture.                             position and the process of writing; read-
Study of selected major figures and impor-        ing of selected texts on the theory and
tant topics of 19th century, with attention to
                                                 practice of teaching writing; survey of
American and European cross-influences.
With a different subheading, may be taken        selected teaching strategies; preparation
twice for credit.                                of course descriptions and syllabi; writing;
                                                 and model teaching.
ENGL 639. Studies in 20th Century
Literature.                              (3)     ENGL 653. Studies in Women’s
Three hours lecture.                             Literature.                            (3)
Study of selected major figures and               Three hours lecture.
important topics of 20th century British and     A study of the distinctive literary heri-
American literature, with attention to other     tage shared by women writers in England
influences. With a different subheading,          and North America; course designed to
may be taken twice for credit.                   ground students in feminist literary criti-
                                                 cal theories and practices (including
ENGL 644. Studies in American                    feminist applications of psychoanalytic,
Literature I (to 1861).                  (3)     Marxist, deconstructive and new historicist
Three hours lecture.
                                                 theories).
Study of selected authors and important
topics of American literature prior to 1861.     ENGL 655. Practicum in the
With a different subheading, may be taken        Teaching of Expository Writing.           (3)
twice for credit.
                                                 Prerequisite: Appointment as a second-year
ENGL 645. Studies in American                    Graduate Teaching Fellow and completion
Literature II (since 1861).           (3)        of 18 hours of graduate work.
Three hours lecture.                             Application of current theory, research and
Study of selected authors and important          practice of composition to actual classroom
topics of American literature since 1861.        setting; participants work closely with fac-
With a different subheading, may be taken        ulty mentors who assist them in designing
twice for credit.                                and implementing their writing courses and
                                                 in assessing classroom practice. Can be
                                                 repeated once for credit; cannot be included
                                                 as part of a student’s program of study lead-
                                                 ing to a master’s degree.


                                             150
ENGL 663. Linguistics.                  (3)      This course carries no credit hour produc-
Three hours lecture.                             tion and does not count toward graduation
Introduction to development of the sci-          requirements.
entific description of modern English
                                                 This course option is also available to those
through a study of structural linguistics
                                                 admitted students who are not enrolled
and generative transformational gram-
                                                 in a given semester but who wish to use
mar. Designed to facilitate the application
                                                 University facilities and services during
of linguistics to the teaching of English
                                                 that time.
grammar.

ENGL 680. Special Topics in English. (3)
Three hours lecture.
                                                 FINANCE
Study of a topic in composition, creative
writing, literary criticism, rhetoric, litera-   FINC 631. Financial Management. (3)
ture, language, linguistics or folklore. With    Three hours lecture.
a different subheading, may be taken twice       Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of
for credit.                                      the instructor.
                                                 Examines techniques and concepts used
ENGL 698. Directed Study.          (1-4)
                                                 in modern business and the theoretical
Prerequisite: Approval of the adviser,
department chair and Directed Study form         advances in the areas of asset manage-
submitted to the Graduate College.               ment and capital structure planning. Topics
See “Directed Study” on p. 55.                   include capital budgeting, working capital
                                                 management, valuation, cost of capital,
ENGL 699. Research and Thesis.       (6)         capital structure planning, dividend policy,
Hours and credits to be arranged with            option pricing, mergers and acquisitions.
the approval of the dean of the Graduate         Problems and short cases used to enhance
College.                                         student skills in financial planning and
See “Thesis” on p. 55.                           decision making.

GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)             FINC 632. Risk Management.             (3)
All graduate students are required to be         Three hours lecture.
registered during the semester they receive      Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of
their degree from Radford University.            the instructor.
Registration is required of all graduate stu-    Provides a study of the management of
dents when using University facilities and/      nonspeculative risks in business and the
or faculty time. The minimum number of           several management tools available to deal
hours for registration is one. Registration      with them. Examines cases and situations
allows use of services such as library           which require risk management decisions.
checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-    Students conduct a risk management analy-
ties not open to the public.                     sis of a business organization.
Students who are not currently registered        FINC 635. International Finance.       (3)
for any course work and who have com-            Three hours lecture.
pleted all course work but have other out-       Prerequisites: MBA status or permission of
standing degree requirements (e.g., com-         the instructor.
prehensive examination, thesis, removal of       Examines the international financial envi-
an I or IP grade), are required to register      ronment and focuses on the basics of inter-
for a continuous enrollment course each          national financial decision making required
semester, including summer, until they           in international business operations.
have met the outstanding requirement(s).

                                             151
FINC 671. Special Topics in Finance. (3)        GEOG 680. Advanced Topics in
Prerequisites: MBA status or permission of      Geospatial Analysis.                   (3-4)
instructor.                                     Prerequisite: Minimum of 9 credits of under-
Examines topics of special interest in finance   graduate or graduate geography (GEOG
areas not covered in current graduate course    225 and GEOG 250 plus another geogra-
offerings.                                      phy course) or permission of instructor.
                                                Advanced Topics in Geospatial Analysis.
FINC 681. Investment Analysis and               An outline of topics will be made available
Portfolio Management.                     (3)   each time the course is offered. May be
Three hours lecture.                            taken for credit more than once, provid-
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of       ing the topics are different each time. A
the instructor.                                 minimum of 45 (for 3 credits) or 60 (for 4
An in-depth study identifying various           credits) contact hours per course.
investment instruments offered in the finan-
cial markets and how technical and funda-
mental analysis is used to predict the future   GEOLOGY
performance of a portfolio and the market.
                                                Selected 500-level courses can be taken for
FINC 698. Directed Study.           (1-4)       graduate credit provided the student has
Hours and credits to be arranged.               the necessary prerequisites and if the same
Prerequisites: MBA status and approval          course or a comparable course was not
of the directed study supervisor, adviser       taken as part of the student’s undergraduate
and Directed Study form submitted to the        program. Enrollment in 500-level courses
Graduate College.                               for graduate credit requires upper division
See “Directed Study” on p. 55.                  or graduate standing and must be taught
                                                by a member of the graduate faculty. The
FINC 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
                                                master’s in Environmental Engineering
Hours and credits to be arranged with the
                                                Geosciences has been discontinued. For
approval of the student’s thesis supervi-
                                                information, contact the Department of
sor, adviser and the dean of the Graduate
                                                Geology.
College.
See “Thesis” on p. 55.                          GEOL 555. Principles of Engineering
                                                Geology.                                 (4)
                                                Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.
GEOGRAPHY                                       Prerequisites: Graduate standing, eight
                                                hours of geology and mathematics through
GEOG 580. Seminar.                   (1-4)      trigonometry. Minimum of one semester of
Prerequisites: Minimum of 9 hours of            physics is strongly recommended.
undergraduate geography (GEOG 225 and
                                                Taught concurrently with GEOL 455 with
GEOG 250 or equivalent, plus another
                                                additional project requirements for gradu-
geography course of choice) or permission
of instructor.                                  ate credit.
Intensive study of a special field of geog-
                                                A study of the application of geologic
raphy. An outline of topics will be made
                                                principles and data collection techniques to
available each time the course is offered.
                                                the evaluation of design and construction
May be taken for credit more than once,
                                                problems relating to engineering projects
providing the topics are different each
                                                including dams, highways, landfills, tunnels
time.
                                                and reservoirs, including an overview of
                                                availability and suitability of soil and rock
                                                as construction materials.

                                            152
GEOL 561. Regional Geology of the              cartographic techniques, theoretical and
United States.                           (4)   practical use of computer-based remote
Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.   sensing and applications of remote sens-
Prerequisite: GEOL 320.                        ing to geology including environmental
Regional survey of structural and strati-      and resource management and exploration.
graphic framework of geologic provinces        Makes use of IMAGINE software pack-
of the United States; emphasis on geologic     age.
features and evolution of Appalachian and
Western Interior regions.                      GEOL 606. Applied Geophysics.           (3)
                                               Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
GEOL 574. Hydrogeology.                  (4)   Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the
Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.   Environmental and Engineering Geo-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, eight        sciences program, or permission of instruc-
hours of geology and three hours of cal-       tor.
culus.                                         Application of geophysical methods to shal-
Minimum of one semester of physics is          low sub-surface investigations. Acquisition
strongly recommended. Taught concurrent-       and processing of data from the students’
ly with GEOL 474 with additional project       own multiple field surveys form a major
requirements for graduate credit.              component of this course. Some Saturday
                                               labs may be required.
A qualitative and quantitative study of
groundwater availability and movement          GEOL 615. X-Ray Diffraction in
and the development of groundwater as a        Geology.                                 (4)
resource. Included will be pertinent geo-      Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory.
logic and engineering aspects of ground-       Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
water flow and the effect of man on the         GEOL 212 (Mineralogy).
groundwater regime. Laboratory includes a      This course includes a presentation of the
field investigation.                            basic theory of X-ray diffraction, the use
                                               of X-ray diffraction equipment to identify
GEOL 601. Geographic Information               minerals, determine lattice types, param-
Systems for the Geosciences             (3)    eters and the indexing of diffraction lines.
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.     The application of the techniques and
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.               equipment to various geologic problems
Introduction to Geographic Information         will be investigated. Laboratory hours will
Systems and their geologic applications.       be scheduled on an individual basis with
Includes basic digital cartographic tech-      the instructor.
niques, theoretical and practical use of
computer-based geographic information          GEOL 645. Applied Geology Summer
systems, applications of GIS to geology,       Field School.                             (6)
computer modeling using GIS and an intro-      Approximately two months correspondence
duction to programming in GIS languages.       and 40 hours of field work and classroom
Makes use of ARC/INFO and ArcView              instruction per week.
GIS packages.                                  Prerequisite: GEOL 102 or GEOL 103.
                                               Intensive training in geological field methods
GEOL 602. Remote Sensing for the               with emphasis on mapping, data collection and
Geosciences.                            (4)    the geology of Virginia with applications to
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.     environmental and engineering concerns
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.               and on land use planning. The Radford
Introduction to remote sensing and its geo-    University campus serves as the base
logic applications. Includes basic digital     from which field studies are conducted.

                                           153
The course requires overnight excursions        GEOL 658. Soil Mechanics in
permitting the examination of a wide vari-      Engineering Geology.                    (3)
ety of geological field conditions including     Three hours lecture.
field trip stops in all the geologic provinces   Prerequisites: GEOL 455/555 (Principles
of Virginia. The student will design a proj-    of Engineering Geology) or equivalent or
ect that incorporates field school material      consent of instructor.
that can be used in their profession. Course    Examination of basic principles and labora-
may require transportation, food and camp-      tory tests in soil mechanics as applied to
ing fees.                                       engineering geology.

GEOL 651. Regulatory Issues in                  GEOL 659. Principles of Rock
Environmental Geology.                   (3)    Mechanics.                                (3)
Three hours lecture.                            Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: At least four upper-level        Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
(200-level) or above courses in geolo-          GEOL 455 or GEOL 555 (Principles of
gy including GEOL 474 or GEOL 574               Engineering Geology).
(Hydrogeology) or equivalent or the con-        Investigations into the principles describing
sent of the instructor. General computer        the mechanical response of rock media to
literacy will be expected and required for      stress, particularly human-induced stresses.
success in the course.                          Included are the application of rock char-
This course investigates the societal and       acterization; scale effect; in-situ stresses;
regulatory framework within which much          mechanisms of rock deformation and frac-
of the professional practice of environ-        ture; and rock engineering.
mental geology occurs. The relevant cur-
rent and developing legislation will be         GEOL 675. Advanced Physical
addressed, along with the roles of federal,     Hydrogeology.                             (3)
state and municipal authorities in prom-        Three hours lecture.
ulgation of the law. Class discussions and      Prerequisites: Graduate standing and
assignments will emphasize the functions        GEOL 474/574 (Hydrogeology).
of the professional geologist in the various    Advanced study of physical and resource
research, regulatory and consulting roles       aspects of hydrogeology. Theoretical and
related to environmental regulation.            practical treatment of topics associated with
                                                groundwater flow in natural porous media
GEOL 657. Erosion and Sediment                  (unconsolidated materials, porous bedrock,
Control/Stormwater Management. (3)              fractured bedrock and karst terrane). The
Three hours lecture.                            vadose zone – in particular groundwater
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and eight      recharge – will be covered as well. Project
hours of geology.                               and seminar opportunities will enhance
A study of the principles of erosion and        student ownership of course-related con-
sediment control and stormwater manage-         cepts in practical situations. Laboratory
ment as these apply to construction sites.      experiences involve experimentation and
Topics emphasized include regulatory and        fieldwork to calculate flow parameters as
legal aspects, techniques of estimating rain-   well as on-site water well drilling, develop-
fall runoff, use of soil loss estimators,       ment and testing (yield and aquifer param-
examination of structural and non-structur-     eter). Exercises will be designed to practice
al methods of erosion and sediment control      aquifer parameter analysis methodologies.
and preparation of erosion and sediment         Modeling principles and currently available
control plans.                                  computer programs will also be explored, as




                                            154
will legal aspects of groundwater resource     and Engineering Geosciences. Grade for
exploitation.                                  course(s) recorded as letter grade.

GEOL 676. Groundwater Modeling. (3)            GEOL 698. Directed Study.             (3-6)
Three hours lecture.                           Hours and credits to be arranged.
Prerequisites: graduate standing and GEOL      Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor,
474 or GEOL 574 (Hydrogeology).                adviser, department chair and Directed
Advanced study of the mathematics of           Study form submitted to the Graduate
groundwater flow and the formulation            College.
of analytical and numerical models that        Provides graduate students oppor-
describe steady-state and transient ground-    tunity to work individually with facul-
water flow systems. Modeling will involve       ty members on topics of mutual inter-
the use of physical models, flownets,           est. Grade for course recorded as
spreadsheets, analytical solutions and         letter grade.
finite-difference and finite-element models.     See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
Class will also focus on proper modeling
protocol, model calibration techniques and     GEOL 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
sensitivity analyses.                          Hours and credit to be arranged with
                                               approval of the Geology Graduate Studies
GEOL 691. Seminar in                           Committee and the dean of the Graduate
Geosciences.                          (1-6)    College.
Three hours lecture.                           Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Environ-
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.               mental and Engineering Geosciences.
Presentation and discussion of current         See “Thesis” on p. 55.
topics in various areas of Engineering
Geosciences which are not considered in        GEOL 755. Advanced Engineering
other courses. Content varies from semes-      Geology.                                  (3)
ter to semester. A single topic area will be   Three hours lecture.
selected by the instructor for discussion      Prerequisites: Graduate standing, GEOL
                                               455/555 (Principles of Engineering Geol-
during the semester based on current stu-
                                               ogy) or equivalent or consent of instructor.
dent interest and current developments in
                                               Investigations into the applications of basic
Engineering Geosciences. May be taken
                                               principles and techniques of engineering
more than once.
                                               geology to real world situations through the
GEOL 697. Environmental and                    detailed study of actual engineering geol-
Engineering Geosciences Graduate               ogy case histories.
Internship.                           (3-6)
                                               GEOL 776. Contaminant Transport. (3)
Each semester hour credit is the equivalent
                                               Three hours lecture.
of 80 hours of internship experience.
                                               Prerequisites: graduate standing and GEOL
Prerequisites: Two semesters of gradu-
                                               675 (Advanced Physical Hydrogeology) and
ate course work completed; courses taken
                                               GEOL 676 (Introduction to Groundwater
must include GEOL 555 and GEOL 574.
                                               Modeling) or the consent of the instructor.
Approval of Geology Graduate Studies
Committee in the semester prior to regis-      As the capstone course in the hydrogeology
tration.                                       sequence, this course combines elements
A professional experience in the area of       of the core hydrogeology classes to cover
environmental and engineering geoscienc-       the hydrogeologic factors associated with
es. Student supervised by a professional       protection of groundwater. Topics covered
staff member at the work site and a member     include advection, diffusion, dispersion,
of the Graduate faculty in Environmental       retardation, decay and their use in the


                                           155
advection-dispersion equation. Fate and         the College of Science and Technology
transport models and aquifer remediation        may not take this course for credit toward
techniques will also be studied.                their degree.

GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment. (1)            ITEC 501. Software Development and
All graduate students are required to be        Algorithms.                              (3)
registered during the semester they receive     Three hours lecture.
their degree from Radford University.           Prerequisite: ITEC 400 or ITEC 500 or
Registration is required of all graduate stu-   ITEC 220 or permission of ITEC depart-
dents when using University facilities and/     ment.
or faculty time. The minimum number of          This course covers object-oriented algo-
hours for registration is one. Registration     rithm design from the software engineering
allows use of services such as library          perspective, data structures and algorithms
checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-   used in the solutions of nonnumeric prob-
ties not open to the public.                    lems.
Students who are not currently registered for   ITEC 502. Computer Organization
any course work and who have completed          and Operating Systems.                     (3)
all course work but have other outstanding      Three hours lecture.
degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive        Prerequisite: ITEC 400 or ITEC 500 or
examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP      ITEC 220 or permission of ITEC depart-
grade), are required to register for a con-     ment.
tinuous enrollment course each semester,        This course covers relationships among
including summer, until they have met the       computer components, structures and sys-
outstanding requirement(s).                     tems, hardware features, costs, capabilities
This course carries no credit hour pro-         and selection. It also includes the principles
duction and does not count toward               of operating systems and the interrelation-
graduation requirements. This course            ships between the operating system and the
option is also available to those admit-        architecture of computer systems.
ted students who are not enrolled in            ITEC 593. Selected Topics in
a given semester but who wish to use            Information Technology.                (1-3)
University facilities and services during       Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
that time.
                                                ITEC 593 covers selected topics in infor-
                                                mation technology, as student and faculty
                                                interest demands. A new course description
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
                                                is available each time the class is offered.
ITEC 500. Foundations of Computer               Interested students should contact the
Science.                                (3)     course instructor before registering. This
Three hours lecture.                            course may be taken more than once for
A rigorous, systematic approach to object-      credit with a different topic.
oriented problem solving and programming.
This is a leveling course for students who      ITEC 625. Web Development.              (3)
do not have either the educational experi-      Three hours lecture.
ence or background to start the Information     Prerequisite: ITEC 501 and ITEC 502, or
Technology (IT) courses for the IT concen-      permission of ITEC department.
tration for a master’s in Education (MSED)      An introduction to a broad variety of web
program. ITEC 500 will not count as grad-       development topics, including client-side,
uate credit towards the ITEC Concentration      server-side, servers and design issues.
for the MSED. Undergraduate students in

                                            156
ITEC 623. Management Information                This course may be taken more than once
Systems.                                (3)     for credit with a different topic.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of       ITEC 698. Directed Study in
the instructor.                                 Information Technology.              (1-4)
Development and application of manage-
                                                Prerequisite: ITEC 501 and ITEC 502, or
                                                Permission of ITEC Department.
ment information systems to organizations.
                                                Directed Study courses are designed to
Analysis of critical information flow in the
                                                provide graduate students an opportuni-
context of an organizational system.            ty to investigate independently specific
                                                problems or areas of interest under the
ITEC 640. Database Concepts.        (3)
                                                direction of a graduate faculty member.
Three hours lecture.                            The content of the course will vary with
Prerequisite: ITEC 501 and ITEC 502, or         each offering and requires the approval of
permission of ITEC department.                  the supervising professor, adviser, depart-
An in-depth study of the theory, design         ment chairperson, and the Graduate Dean.
and implementation of database concepts
with emphasis on relational and object-
relational systems.
                                                MANAGEMENT
ITEC 650. Networking Concepts.         (3)
Three hours lecture.                            MGNT 601. Business Research and
Prerequisites: ITEC 501 and ITEC 502, or        Reporting.                             (3)
permission of ITEC department.                  Three hours lecture.
Physical and logical design of networks,        Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of
topologies, protocols, local and wide-area      the instructor.
networks. Advanced topics include statis-       Reviews specific method and reasoning
tical measures of quality of service and        process as philosophical foundations for
traffic characterization, as well as design      research; explores the basic methodology
methodologies for networks. Concepts of         for business research design, measurement,
teaching the field of networking through         data collection, analysis and reporting.
homework and lab experiences.                   Group project used to demonstrate the con-
                                                cepts learned in the course.
ITEC 680. Programming Languages. (3
Three hours lecture.                            MGNT 621. Organizational Behavior
Prerequisite: ITEC 501 and ITEC 502, or         and Management Skills.                  (3)
permission of ITEC Department.                  Three hours lecture.
Programming language constructs, run-time       Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of
behavior of programs, desirable features of     the instructor.
languages, design and implementation con-       Studies the behavior of individuals and
siderations to obtain those features.           groups in organizations from a managerial
                                                point of view; applies the concepts, meth-
ITEC 693. Selected Topics in                    ods and research findings of the behavioral
Information Technology                (1-3)     sciences to the understanding of the causes
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.         and consequences of human performance,
ITEC 693 covers selected topics in infor-       satisfaction and development in organiza-
mation technology, as student and faculty       tions. Also includes management skills
interest demands. A new course descrip-         development.
tion is available each time the class is
offered. Interested students should contact
the course instructor before registering.


                                          157
MGNT 622. Quantitative Methods. (3)             the project level, cover the life cycle of a
Three hours lecture.                            project and provide a thorough understand-
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of       ing of all its phases. Extensive field work
the instructor.                                 is required. Finally, it will wrap up with
Provides study of quantitative tools used in    the individual level and the career implica-
business production and service organiza-       tions of landing/creating a consulting job,
tions. Topics include linear programming,       including ethical challenges and lifestyle
integer programming, network analysis and       implications.
stochastic programming.
                                                MGNT 671. Special Topics
MGNT 624. Operations                            in Management.                         (3)
Management.                            (3)      Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.                            Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of       the instructor.
the instructor.                                 Examines topics of special interest in man-
A problem-solving course designed to help       agement area not covered in current gradu-
reduce uncertainty in the decision-making       ate course offerings.
environment of operations and produc-
tion in manufacturing and service firms of       MGNT 685. Strategic Management. (3)
private and public sectors of the economy.      Three hours lecture.
Emphasis on employment of mathematical          Prerequisites: MBA status or permission
models for use and application in decision      of the instructor, ACTG 611, FINC 631,
making in business.                             MGMT 624, MKTG 641.
                                                Integrates graduate business courses in
MGNT 651. Entrepreneurship.              (3)    a top level strategy development course.
Three hours lecture.                            Emphasis on environmental analysis and
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of       decision making. A capstone course; must
the instructor.                                 be taken during or after the term in which
This course focuses on starting and manag-      the last required MBA course is taken.
ing high growth businesses. Major topics
include: identifying potential high growth      MGNT 698. Directed Study.           (1-4)
business opportunities, characteristics of      Hours and credits to be arranged.
entrepreneurs, developing creativity, evalu-    Prerequisites: MBA status and approval
ating market potential, choosing a legal        of the directed study supervisor, adviser
structure, tax planning, financial strategies,   and Directed Study form submitted to the
preparing a business plan, operating con-       Graduate College.
siderations, choosing an exit or succession     See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
strategy.
                                                MGNT 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
MGNT 652. Business Consulting.           (3)    Hours and credits to be arranged with the
Three hours lecture/field work.                  approval of the student’s thesis supervisor,
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of       adviser, department chairperson and the
the instructor.                                 dean of the Graduate College.
This course will be organized on four levels.   See “Thesis” on p. 55.
First, it will examine the consulting indus-
try to understand the context and some key
factors affecting business consulting, firm
strategies and key events. Second, it will
move to the firm level examine the man-
agement issues associated with running a
consulting firm. Third, it will proceed to

                                                158
MARKETING                                       and Directed Study form submitted to the
                                                Graduate College.
MKTG 602. International Business. (3)           See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
Prerequisite: MBA status or permission of
the instructor.                                 MKTG 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
Provides an analysis of international busi-     Hours and credits to be arranged with the
                                                approval of the student’s thesis supervisor,
ness challenges, strategies and operations;
                                                adviser, department chairperson and the
includes readings in contemporary interna-
                                                dean of the Graduate College.
tional business perspectives and cases.
                                                See “Thesis” on p. 55.
MKTG 612. Global Market
Research.                                 (3)
Three hours lecture.                            MATHEMATICS
Prerequisites: MBA status and permission
                                                MATH 681. Topics in Mathematics
of instructor.
                                                Education.                              (3)
Provides MBA students an opportunity to
                                                Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
participate in international market research.
                                                A minimum of 45 contact hours per course.
Students conduct an in-depth analysis of
                                                Selected topics in mathematics education.
foreign markets to determine market poten-
                                                An outline of topics will be made avail-
tial and to develop strategies for Virginia
                                                able each time the course is offered. May
firms to enter or expand specific markets.
                                                be taken for credit more than once, pro-
MKTG 641. Marketing                             viding the topics are different each time.
Management.                              (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: MBA status or permission of      MEDIA STUDIES
the instructor.
                                                MSTD 560. Special Topics in Media
This course teaches students the art and sci-
                                                Studies.                                (3)
ence of selecting target markets and acquir-
                                                Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ing and maintaining profitable customers in
a socially responsible and ethical manner.      A comprehensive study of special interest
Case studies, experiential projects, simula-    topics in Media Studies. Each topic will
tions and marketing planning assignments        be described in detail when offered. The
may be used.                                    course may be taken for credit multiple
                                                times, provided that the topics are sub-
MKTG 671. Special Topics in                     stantially different, and the Department or
Marketing.                             (1-6)    School approves.
Hours and credits to be arranged.
Prerequisites: MBA status or permission of
instructor.                                     MUSIC
Provides students an opportunity to exam-
ine topics of special interest in the market-   MUSC 517. Form and Analysis. (3)
ing area beyond the subjects covered in the     Three hours lecture.
current grade course offerings.                 Prerequisite: MUSC 212 or equivalent
MKTG 698. Directed Study.           (1-4)       music theory course.
Hours and credits to be arranged.               Standard forms from small units through
Prerequisites: MBA status and approval          concerto and fugal techniques. Synthesis of
of the directed study supervisor, adviser       larger, more general concepts. Comparative
                                                study of various periods and cultures.


                                       159
MUSC 518. Arranging and                         MUSC 533. Advanced Jazz
Orchestration.                        (3)       Combo.                                 (1)
Three hours lecture.                            Two hours rehearsal.
Prerequisite: MUSC 212 or equivalent            Prerequisite: Audition.
music theory course.                            Performance of advanced jazz literature for
Scoring for various band and orchestral         a jazz combo. Emphasis on composition/
ensembles; vocal and instrumental arrang-       arranging, improvisation, development of
ing. Includes the study, preparation and        repertory of jazz tunes for performance.
performance of scores.                          Present concerts and programs throughout
                                                the year on and off campus.
MUSC 519. Counterpoint.                (3)
Three hours lecture.                            MUSC 534. Jazz Ensemble                (1)
Prerequisite: MUSC 212 or equivalent            Three hours rehearsal.
music theory course.                            Prerequisite: Audition.
The detailed study and composition of the       Exposure, learning and performance of tra-
various countrapuntal devices and forms         ditional and contemporary styles of music
found in the history of western music.          for the jazz ensemble. Presents formal and/
                                                or informal programs throughout the year,
MUSC 521, 522. Guitar History and               on and off campus. Open to all students by
Literature.                             (2,2)   audition. May be taken again for credit.
Two hours lecture.
Prerequisites: MUSC 321 and 322 or              MUSC 535. Percussion Ensemble.          (1)
equivalent music history courses.               Three hours rehearsal.
A study of guitar history and literature from   Prerequisite: Audition.
the Renaissance to the present will include     Performance of contemporary percussion/
such topics as notation, performance prac-      marimba ensemble literature. Presents pro-
tices, instrumental development and social      grams throughout the year, on and off cam-
contexts.                                       pus. Open to all students by audition each
                                                semester. May be taken again for credit.
MUSC 528. Computer Music Forum.(1)
Two hours presentations and discussion.         MUSC 536. Guitar Ensemble.             (1)
Prerequisite: MUSC 128 or equivalent            Three hours rehearsal.
computer music skills.                          Prerequisite: Audition.
Intensive work on individual projects in        The Guitar Ensemble offers training in
computer music and related research, with       sight-reading and chamber music perfor-
class discussion of these and of current        mance skills for guitarists; performs both
developments in the field. Graduate credit       on and off campus and is open to all stu-
requires work at advanced levels. May be        dents by audition each semester. May be
taken again for credit.                         taken again for credit.

MUSC 531. Wind Ensemble.             (1)        MUSC 537. Digital Ensemble.             (1)
Three hours rehearsal.                          Two hours rehearsal
Prerequisite: Audition.                         Prerequisites: MUSC 128 or equivalent
Emphasis on study and performance of            computer music skills.
serious wind ensemble literature. Concerts      Existing and original music is prepared for
presented each year on campus and on tour       public performance using electronic sound
only. May be taken again for credit.            sources in a chamber ensemble setting.
                                                May be taken again for credit.



                                                160
MUSC 545. Guitar Pedagogy.          (3)           activities both on and off campus. May be
Three hours lecture.                              taken again for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSC 270 or equivalent
fretboard skills.                                 MUSC 557. Opera Workshop.               (1)
Guitar instructional principals, pro-             Three hours rehearsal.
cedures, materials and their applica-             Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
tions will be studied. This course will           Study and preparation of vocal roles and
investigate both historical and current           chorus parts to produce major opera or
theories and practice.                            opera excerpts. Membership open to stu-
                                                  dents by audition. May be taken again for
MUSC 549. Piano Pedagogy.               (3)       credit.
Three hours lecture, demonstration, labora-
tory.                                             MUSC 558. Accompanying.                 (1)
Prerequisite: Level 4 proficiency in piano.        Two hours lab/coaching.
Survey of piano teaching materials, meth-         Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ods and approaches, with emphasis on              Piano/guitar accompanying in class, applied
elementary through intermediate level stu-        lessons, rehearsals and public performanc-
dents; practical demonstration and applica-       es. May be repeated for credit.
tion of material; observation of teaching;
supervised student teaching.                      MUSC 571/572. Fourth Year Applied
                                                  Music.                                (1-2)
MUSC 553. Chamber Music                           Prerequisites: (Music 571): Satisfactory
Ensemble.                             (1)         entrance audition or completion of
Two hours rehearsal.                              MUSC 372 with a grade of “C” or better.
Rehearsal and performance of chamber              Prerequisite (Music 572): Completion of
music literature from duos to nonets for          MUSC 471 or MUSC 571 with a grade of
strings, winds, pianos, mixed strings and         “C” or better.
winds with or without piano. Open to              Private instruction in the Applied Music
qualified students. Chamber groups must            Level System at levels VII and VIII, or
be formed in advance of registration with         higher as appropriate to the student’s level
consent of instructor. May be taken again         of advancement. Covers technique, reper-
for credit.                                       toire, musicianship, sight-reading. Specific
                                                  requirements for each level of compe-
MUSC 555. Madrigal Singers.               (1)     tency in each applied area are on file in the
Three hours rehearsal.                            Department of Music office.
Prerequisite: Audition.
Performs primarily a capella literature from      MUSC 585. Psychology of Music.           (3)
the Renaissance through the 20th century.         Three hours lecture.
A high degree of personal musicianship,           Prerequisite: Senior Standing, BIOL 331 or
discipline and vocal ability is required.         equivalent anatomy and physiology course
May be taken again for credit.                    and upper level standing as a music thera-
                                                  py major.
MUSC 556. Radford Singers.            (1)         Science of sound and music including
Four hours rehearsal.                             acoustics, hearing anatomy, aesthetics, per-
Prerequisite: Audition.                           ception, evaluation and measurement of
Performs a wide variety of cho-                   musical ability, achievement, research and
ral music from all historical periods. A          statistical methods. Required of all Music
high degree of personal musicianship,             Therapy Majors; open to students in other
discipline and vocal ability is required.         curricula.
Participates in concerts, tours and other

                                                161
MUSC 595. Seminar in Music History              MUSC 608. Music Teaching and
and Literature.                         (3)     Learning.                                (3)
Three hours lecture.                            Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: MUSC 321 and 322 or              Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in
equivalent music history courses.               music or permission of the instructor.
Variable topic course. Study of advanced        Perceptual processes, learning theories and
music history or literature. May be taken       curricula in music education will be studied
again for credit with different topics.         in this course.

MUSC 601. Bibliography and                      MUSC 610. Medieval Music.               (3)
Research.                               (3)     Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.                            Pre- or corequisite: MUSC 601.
Prerequisite: Bachelor’s degree in music or     Survey of monophonic and polyphonic tra-
permission of the instructor.                   ditions of both sacred and secular Medieval
Survey of bibliography and methods of           music. Offered every third year.
research in music (music education, music
therapy and musicology); study of process-      MUSC 611. Renaissance Music.            (3)
es of research and writing in music. Fall.      Three hours lecture.
                                                Pre- or corequisite: MUSC 601.
MUSC 603. Dalcroze, Kodaly and Orff             Historical survey of Renaissance music
Methods.                                 (3)    with emphasis on musical literature, styles,
Three hours lecture.                            forms and techniques. Offered every third
Prerequisite: Level 2 proficiency in key-        year.
board.
Dalcroze, Kodaly and Orff instructional meth-   MUSC 612. Baroque Music.              (3)
ods and adaptations in American music edu-      Three hours lecture.
cation. Offered alternate years.                Pre- or corequisite: MUSC 601.
                                                Developments in form and style of the
MUSC 605. Measurement and                       Baroque period from Monteverdi through
Evaluation of Music Experiences.       (3)      J. S. Bach. Offered every third year.
Three hours lecture.
Measurement and evaluation techniques           MUSC 613. Classical Music.          (3)
for music aptitude, achievement and prefer-     Three hours lecture.
ence will be explored. An emphasis of the       Pre- or corequisite: MUSC 601.
course is on developing teacher-made tests      Study of 18th century music with special
and on available standardized music tests.      emphasis on pre-classical and classical
                                                composers. Detailed survey of the music
MUSC 607. History and Philosophy of             of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Offered
Music Education.                        (3)     every third year.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in          MUSC 614. Romantic Music.             (3)
music or permission of instructor.              Three hours lecture.
This course surveys the history of American     Pre- or corequisite: MUSC 601.
music education and explores the philo-         Music literature, styles, forms and tech-
sophical foundations of music education.        niques of the 19th century, as well as
                                                intellectual foundations of the Romantic
                                                movement. Offered every third year.




                                            162
MUSC 615. Twentieth-Century                   MUSC 641:642. Practicum in
Music.                           (3)          Music Therapy.                     (2:2)
Three hours lecture.                          One and a half hours of lecture, 3-5 hours
Pre- or corequisite: MUSC 601.                of field work per week.
Significant developments in form and           Prerequisite: MUSC 620.
style of the music of the 20th century.       Advanced music therapy practice under
Offered every third year.                     approved clinical supervision. MUSC
                                              641 requires clinical work only. MUSC
MUSC 620. Advanced Methods in                 642 emphasizes administrative and
Music Therapy.                     (3)        supervision practices. Approval forms
Three hours lecture.                          are available in the Graduate College
Prerequisites: MUSC 477, 485 and 486.         office.
Investigation into advanced methods and
materials in music therapy. Emphasizes        MUSC 650. Seminar in Music
the development of Introductory Level         Therapy.                             (3)
(Level I) skills in the Bonny Method          Three hours lecture.
of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM)             Prerequisites: MUSC 485 and 486;
as sanctioned by the Association for          corequisite: MUSC 641 or 642.
Music and Imagery (AMI). This course          Survey of contemporary trends in music
involves group participation to develop       therapy; emphasis on administration,
self awareness, acceptance and effective      supervision and teaching. May be taken
interpersonal skills. Personal develop-       again for a maximum of six semester
ment is an integral component of this         hours credit. Offered in the Spring.
course. Additionally, emphasis will be
placed on music and relaxation and pro-       MUSC 651. Special Applications in
cedures with sensory, physical, emo-          Music Therapy I.                    (3)
tional, cognitive and social disabilities.    Three hours lecture.
Offered in the Fall.                          Pre- or Corequisite: MUSC 641 or 642;
                                              MUSC 620.
MUSC 627. Technology in Music and             This course focuses primarily on two
Music Education.                      (3)     advanced applications of music in thera-
Three hours lecture.                          py. “Mind/Body and Music” will focus
Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in        on the use of music in the various models
music or permission of instructor.            of healing for mind and body. “Musical
Direct application of current digital tech-   Elements and Inner Process” will focus
nologies used in music composition,           on the building blocks of music and their
performance and instruction. Emphasis         effect on the inner life of the human
on the use of MIDI applications for the       being.
production of musical materials in vari-
ous media, including distribution via the     MUSC 652. Special Applications in
World Wide Web.                               Music Therapy II.                     (3)
                                              Three hours lecture.
MUSC 633. Analytical Techniques.(3)           Pre- or Corequisite: MUSC 641 or 642;
Three hours lecture.                          MUSC 620.
Prerequisite: MUSC 417 or 517                 This course focuses primarily on the
Various analytical techniques with par-       creative arts and their interrelationships.
ticular attention to analysis of tonal,       Emphasis will be placed on Mandala
textural and temporal features at vari-       Assessment and this will be integrated
ous levels of structure. Offered in the       into advanced models of Music Therapy
Spring.

                                              163
practice that include the Bonny Method of           May be taken again for credit with differ-
Guided Imagery and Music (GIM).                     ent topics for a maximum of six semester
                                                    hours.
MUSC 654. Advanced Conducting
Techniques.                            (2)          MUSC 691. Seminar in Music
One hour private lesson, one hour labora-           Education.                         (1-3)
tory.                                               One to three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instruc-           Prerequisites: MUSC 319 and 320.
tor.                                                In-depth study and research in a specialized
Emphasizes advanced analytical, aural and           topic concerning music education. May be
gestural techniques in the development of           taken again for credit with different topics
skills and abilities as a choral and/or instru-     for a maximum of six semester hours.
mental conductor.
                                                    MUSC 694. Graduate Chamber Music
MUSC 666. Travel Study.             (1-6)           Recital.                          (6)
Academic study involving domestic and/or            Prerequisites: Level 10 proficiency in
international travel. May be taken again for        applied music.
credit with different topics or areas of study      The performance of chamber music must
for a maximum of six semester hours.                cover at least three periods of music his-
                                                    tory in which music has been written for
MUSC 670. Advanced Applied                          the performing medium. Includes prepara-
Music.                           (1-2)              tion of program notes.
One-half or one-hour private lesson.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory entrance audi-           MUSC 695. Graduate Lecture-
tion or completion of MUSC 372 with a               Recital.                            (6)
grade of “C” or better.                             Prerequisites: Level 10 proficiency in
Graduate level applied music instruction            applied music.
for students who have met their major               The lecture-recital shall include an appro-
requirements in applied music. May be               priate balance between musical perfor-
taken again for credit.                             mance and lecture based on scholarly
                                                    research.
MUSC 671:672. Advanced Applied
Music.                               (1-2)          MUSC 696. Music Therapy
One-half or one-hour private lesson.                Project.                         (1-4)
Prerequisite (MUSC 671): Satisfactory               Hours and credit to be arranged.
entrance audition or completion of MUSC             Prerequisites: MUSC 620 and 642.
472 with a grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite     Clinical and/or research project. To be
(MUSC 672): Completion of MUSC 671                  determined in consultation with the music
with a grade of “C” or better.                      therapy faculty.
MUSC 690. Seminar in                                MUSC 697. Graduate Recital. (6)
Musicology.                        (3)              A minimum of a one-hour recital.
Three hours lecture.                                Prerequisite: Level 10 proficiency in
Pre- or Corequisite: MUSC 601.                      applied music.
In-depth study and research in a special-           The performance must cover at least three
ized topic chosen from areas such as:               periods of music history in which music has
acoustics, aesthetics of music, computer            been written for the performing medium.
music, ethnomusicology, history of theory,          Includes preparation of program notes.
jazz, problems of performance practice,
works of a major composer, a major com-             MUSC 698. Directed Study.        (1-4)
position, group of compositions or genre.           Hours and credit to be arranged.

                                                  164
Prerequisites: MUSC 601 or MUSC 604,           NURSING
eligibility for admission to candidacy
and Directed Study form submitted to the       NURS 573. Emerging Therapies for
Graduate College.                              Health.                            (3)
A maximum of four credits may be count-        Three hours seminar.
ed toward a master’s degree in music.          Prerequisites: Graduate standing or per-
See “Directed Study” on p. 55.                 mission of faculty.
MUSC 699. Research and Thesis.(6)              Examines therapies becoming accepted
Prerequisite: MUSC 601.                        by Americans as complements or alter-
Hours and credit to be arranged with           natives to traditional Western medical
the approval of dean of the Graduate           practices. Focuses on non-toxic and non-
College.                                       invasive approaches to achieving and
See “Thesis” on p. 55.                         maintaining wellness and healing for the
                                               body, mind and spirit.
GRAD 799. Continuous
Enrollment.                          (1)       NURS 590. Special Topics in
All graduate students are required to          Advanced Nursing.                    (3)
be registered during the semester they         Topics will vary. Provides students an
receive their degree from Radford              opportunity to examine topics of spe-
University. Registration is required of all    cial interest in advanced practice nursing
graduate students when using University        beyond the subjects covered in the cur-
facilities and/or faculty time. The mini-      rent course offerings.
mum number of hours for registration is        NURS 620. Theoretical
one. Registration allows use of services       Foundations in Nurisng.             (3)
such as library checkout, laboratories         Three hours seminar.
and recreation facilities not open to the      Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
public.                                        Examines development of nursing the-
                                               ory and its uses in nursing practice and
Students who are not currently registered      research. Includes the study and critique
for any course work and who have com-          of nursing theories and theories from
pleted all course work but have other          related disciplines. Explores philosophi-
outstanding degree requirements (e.g.,         cal issues related to contemporary nurs-
comprehensive examination, thesis,             ing theory.
removal of an I or IP grade), are required
to register for a continuous enrollment        NURS 622. Advanced Practice
course each semester, including sum-           Nursing of Older Adults.             (3)
mer, until they have met the outstanding       Two hours lecture and three hours
requirement(s).                                practicum/week.
                                               Prerequisite: Graduate standing and
This course carries no credit hour pro-        undergraduate gerontological nursing
duction and does not count toward gradu-       course or continuing education in ger-
ation requirements. This course option is      ontology.
also available to those admitted students      The emphasis is on holistic assessment
who are not enrolled in a given semester       of older adults and their families; health
but who wish to use University facilities      promotion, protection and restoration;
and services during that time.                 multidisciplinary health care planning
                                               along the continuum of care; and health
                                               care services and systems for older adults.
                                               The practicum provides opportunities to

                                              165
translate theory into advanced practice nurs-    selected holistic needs; policy issues related
ing for older adults.                            to health promotion, protection and resto-
                                                 ration; and ethical-legal issues related to
NURS 628. Advanced                               health care delivery. Practicum is individu-
Pathophysiology.                    (3)          alized and may involve acute care specialty
Three hours seminar.                             units, medical-surgical units or outpatient
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                 settings. Advanced nursing practice roles are
This course is designed for the study of         emphasized. Current research findings and
physiological alterations underlying disease     advancement in nursing theory and practice
entities and relating knowledge to interpret     also determine course content.
changes in normal function that result in
symptoms indicative of illness. Students         NURS 631. Pharmacotherapeutics for
will examine current research in pathophysi-     Primary Care Providers/ Advanced
ology. The course provides the student with      Practice Nurses.                   (3)
an essential theoretical basis for advanced      Three hours lecture.
nursing practice.                                Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
                                                 This course focuses on the primary health
NURS 629. Advanced Health                        care provider/advanced practice nurse’s role
Assessment.                           (3)        in managing health and illness by pharma-
Two hours seminar; two hours laboratory          ceutical therapeutics. Emphasis will be on
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Program      the understanding of pharmacology in health
in Nursing, or with permission of Graduate       promotion, protection and restoration for
Nursing Program Coordinator.                     which drugs are prescribed. Emphasis will
Provides the advanced practice nurse with        also be placed on motivations of clients in
advanced knowledge and skills related to         seeking prescriptions and adhering to medi-
health assessment and clinical decision-mak-     cation regimens.
ing. The focus is on acquiring, evaluating
and refining health assessment data as the        NURS 632. Advanced Adult
basis for the development of a diagnostic        Nursing II.                            (3)
problem list. Common normal variations as        Variable credit; 6-8 credit hours; three hours
well as abnormalities and acute and chronic      seminar; six to 12 hours practicum.
disease characteristic of diverse ethnic back-   Prerequisite: NURS 630, 650.
grounds and age groups in health and illness     Focus on the implementation of advanced
are emphasized. The laboratory component         nursing practice roles in adult nursing. Content
of the course provides the opportunity to        addresses total quality management/quality
become proficient in eliciting health histo-      improvement; issues related to health promo-
ries, performing physical examinations and       tion, protection and restoration; advanced
critically examining and documenting health      nursing management of clients/families with
data.                                            selected complex holistic needs; political
                                                 issues; and economics of acute and chronic
NURS 630. Advanced Adult                         care facilities. Practicum is individualized
Nursing I.                          (5-7)        and emphasizes the roles of clinician, consul-
Variable credit; 5-7 credit hours; three hours   tant, manager and researcher.
seminar; six to 12 hours practicum.
Prerequisites: N620, 628, 629, 651, under-
graduate course in gerontological nursing.
Introduction to advanced practice in adult
nursing. Emphasis is on advanced nurs-
ing management of clients/families with


                                         166
NURS 633. Advanced Nursing                        prevent illness and provide an avenue for
Practices in Rural Communities.           (3)     intervention in situational health crises.
Three hours seminar.
                                                  NURS 636. Advanced Family
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.                 Nursing III: Acute Illness Across the
This course will focus on the advanced            Lifespan.                                (5)
practice nurse’s role in applying the nurs-       Three hours seminar; six hours practicum.
ing process within the rural community            Prerequisites: Admission into the FNP con-
using community assessment skills, epi-           centration, N620, N628, N629, N631 (or
demiological and preventive intervention          concurrent), N651.
principles, partnership development and           This course is designed to prepare the
program evaluation.                               student to practice advanced nursing skills
NURS 634. Advanced Family Nursing I:              with rural community based families expe-
Women’s Health.                            (3)    riencing acute conditions. Emphasis is
Three hours seminar; six hours                    on analyzing, synthesizing and applying
practicum.                                        current family and health care theories,
Prerequisites: Admission into the FNP con-        research and practice related to individuals
centration; N620, N628, N629, N631 (or            and families across the lifespan. The focus
concurrent) N651.                                 includes risk assessment, wellness promo-
                                                  tion, health protection, health restoration,
This course is designed to prepare the
                                                  management of acute conditions, coordina-
student with the knowledge and skills to
                                                  tion of services, collaboration with other
practice in a rural setting to deliver primary
                                                  providers and appropriate referral.
health care to women. The student will
develop clinical judgement in history and         NURS 637. Advanced Family Nursing
physical assessment as well as decision           IV: Chronic Illness Across the
making in the management of common                Lifespan.                              (5)
health problems. The focus includes health        Three hours seminar; six hours practicum.
promotion, health protection, problem             Prerequisites: Admission into the FNP con-
identification and management and client/          centration; N620, N628, N629, N631 (or
family counseling.                                concurrent), N651.
NURS 635. Advanced Family Nursing                 This course is designed to prepare the
II: Children’s Health.                    (3)     student to practice advanced nursing
Three hours seminar; six hours practicum.         skills in rural and urban community-
Prerequisites: Admission into the FNP             based clients and families experiencing
concentration, N620, N628, N629, N631             chronic conditions. Emphasis is on ana-
(or concurrent) N551.                             lyzing, synthesizing and applying current
                                                  family and health care theories, research
This course provides the nurse practitioner
                                                  and practice related to individuals and
opportunities to develop knowledge and
                                                  families across the lifespan. The focus
skills needed to deliver primary health
                                                  includes wellness promotion, health pro-
care to children in rural and urban settings.
                                                  tection, management and maintenance of
Classroom and clinical activities emphasize
                                                  chronic conditions, restoration and reha-
the application of problem identification
                                                  bilitation, coordination of services, col-
and management, health promotion and cli-
                                                  laborative care with other providers and
ent/family counseling. Growth and devel-
                                                  appropriate referral.
opment, health status and environmental
interactions are explored. Nursing strate-
gies are designed which promote health,



                                                167
NURS 638. Family Nurse Practitioner             evaluation of effective units of instruction/
Preceptorship.                        (7)       learning.
One hour seminar; 18 hours practicum.
Prerequisites: N634, N635, N636 and             NURS 645. Practicum in Nursing
N637.                                           Education.                               (3)
This clinically intensive course provides       Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
the family nurse practitioner student the       This course is designed to provide practi-
opportunity to apply relevant theories,         cal experience in the facets of the role of
concepts and research findings to clinical       nurse educator including teaching in the
care. Emphasis is on developing clinical        classroom, laboratory and clinical setting.
competence required in delivering primary       Other responsibilities of the nurse educator
health care.                                    will be explored including membership on
                                                committees that contribute to the effective-
NURS 640. Nursing Administration. (3)           ness of a nursing program and the larger
Three hours seminar.                            unit of which the school is a part (college/
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                university).
This course is designed to help students
examine theories, principles and applica-       NURS 650. Advanced Nursing
tions of roles, characteristics and functions   Research.                               (3)
related to nursing administration. The focus    Three hours seminar.
is on delivery of high-quality and cost-        Prerequisite: N620, undergraduate nursing
effective care in a fiscally constrained         research.
health care delivery system.                    In-depth examination of the components of
                                                the research process and interrelationships
NURS 642. Advanced Nursing for                  among these components in the study of
Older Adults.                         (3)       nursing problems. Emphasis is placed on
One hour seminar and six clinical hours/        the use of theories, conceptual models and
week.                                           the state of the discipline as a basis for
Prerequisites: N622, N628, N629.                research.
This clinically intensive course provides
the student enrolled in the gerontologi-        NURS 651. Role Preparation in
cal clinical nurse specialist program           Nursing.                               (3)
the opportunity to apply theories, con-         Three hours seminar.
cepts and research findings in the clini-        Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
cal care of older adults. Emphasis is on        Examines specific advanced practice roles
developing clinical competence required         and requisite skills for role assumption
for the advanced practice gerontological        within the health care delivery system.
nurse.                                          Engages students in activities designed to
                                                develop competencies of the Advanced
NURS 644. Theories and Strategies for           Practice Nurse.
Nursing Education.                    (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.                NURS 696. Master’s Capstone
Examines issues related to nursing edu-         Project.                           (1)
cation in a variety of settings including       Prerequisites: Completion of NURS 620,
schools of nursing, continuing education        628, 629, 650, 651
and staff development in the work place.        The Master’s Capstone Project pro-
Focuses on the teaching-learning process        vides an opportunity for the student
and the development, implementation and         to synthesize knowledge and skills



                                            168
acquired from the core courses as               students when using University facilities
well as from the specialized clinical con-      and/or faculty time. The minimum number
centration resulting in the completion of an    of hours for registration is one. Registration
evidence based project. If a student has not    allows use of services such as library
elected to complete a Thesis, the student       checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
will register for one credit of this course     ties not open to the public.
in each of the last two semesters of her/his
program of study.                               Students who are not currently registered for
                                                any course work and who have completed
NURS 697. Independent                           all course work but have other outstanding
Practicum.                              (1-3)   degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive
Variable credit; one to three credit hours.     examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP
One credit will require 45 hours clinical       grade), are required to register for a con-
practice, two will require 90 and three will    tinuous enrollment course each semester,
require 135 hours of practice.                  including summer, until they have met the
Prerequisite: Completion of minimum of          outstanding requirement(s).
one clinical course in the student’s Program
of Study and approval of supervising fac-       This course carries no credit hour produc-
ulty and adviser.                               tion and does not count toward graduation
Offered each semester with faculty avail-       requirements. This course option is also
ability.                                        available to those admitted students who
This course is designed to provide clini-       are not enrolled in a given semester but
cal experience for the graduate student         who wish to use University facilities and
who elects to pursue additional prac-           services during that time.
tice in a selected area. The content
of the practicum will be defined by the
student in consultation with the faculty        POLITICAL SCIENCE
member supervising the practicum.
                                                POSC 530. Organizational Theory in
NURS 698. Directed Study.               (3)     the Public Sector (AG).                    (3)
Prerequisite: N650; approval of the stu-        Three hours lecture.
dent’s adviser, directed study adviser.         Prerequisites: POSC 300 or permission of
Provides the opportunity to pursue a            the instructor.
research topic relevant to advanced nursing     This course is concerned with understand-
practice. See “Directed Study” on p. 55.        ing, explaining, and predicting the best
                                                manner to structure/design public organiza-
NURS 699. Research and Thesis.         (3)      tions to (1) enhance their operating efficien-
Hours and credits to be arranged with           cy and (2) fulfill their legislative, judicial,
the approval of the student’s thesis advis-     and /or political mandate. Specifically, the
er, adviser and the dean of the Graduate        course is behaviorally oriented and seeks to
College.                                        explore how individuals and groups behave
See “Thesis” on p. 55.                          in varying organizational structures and
                                                environments. The unique dynamics of
GRAD 799. Continuous                            managing public organizations, as opposed
Enrollment.                             (3)     to private enterprises, is also a major theme
All graduate students are required to be        of the course.
registered during the semester they receive
their degree from Radford University.
Registration is required of all graduate


                                            169
POSC 531. Leadership in Public                 PSYC 591. Selected Topics in
Administration (AG).                     (3)   Psychology.                                (3)
Three hours lecture.                           Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: POSC 300 or permission of       Prerequisites: Graduate students, senior
the instructor.                                psychology majors or permission of the
The issue of leadership as a determinant of    instructor.
organizational effectiveness is an important   Presentation and discussion of current
one for public organizations. This course      issues in psychology which are not consid-
will review a number of leadership theories    ered in other areas. The content varies from
and the potential impact of leadership on      semester to semester. The instructor will
organizational behavior, culture, and revi-    select a topic or area of interest for discus-
talization in the public sector. A dominant    sion based on student interest and current
theme of this course will be to clarify the    developments in psychology. May be taken
distinction between leaders and managers       as often as course content changes.
in organization life.
                                               Graduate standing is a prerequisite to all
                                               600-level courses.
PSYCHOLOGY                                     PSYC 600. Advanced General
PSYC 505. Forensic Psychology.          (3)    Psychology.                               (3)
Three hours lecture.                           Three hours lecture.
Conveys information relating to forensic       Designed as a survey course for graduate
psychology, including the insanity defense,    students and covers the most significant
aggression, courtroom psychology, men-         concepts, principles, theories, methodolo-
tal health aspects of criminology and the      gies, issues and insights in the field of psy-
psychological forces toward crime and          chology. Content varies somewhat based
delinquency.                                   on the needs of the students.

PSYC 580: Human Neuropsychology.(3)            PSYC 610. Analysis of Behavioral
Three hours lecture.                           Data.                                   (3)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or per-       Three hours lecture.
mission of instructor.                         Prerequisites: Two courses in statistics or
Disorders and diseases of the human brain      equivalent.
will be examined to familiarize students       Inferential procedures in the treatment of
with the causes, consequences and treat-       psychological research data. Emphasis on
ment of brain disorders and to illuminate      practical and behavioral applications of
the role of the brain in normal psycho-        techniques of data analysis. Implications
logical functioning. Students will learn       for the collection and organization of data
about the structure and function of the        discussed.
nervous system, causes of brain damage,        PSYC 611. Methodology and Program
common neuropsychological disorders and        Evaluation in Psychology.              (3)
syndromes, disorders of brain function in      Three hours lecture.
children and adults and assessment and         Discussion of and practice in the design
rehabilitation of brain function.              and evaluation of psychological research,
                                               including measurement and experimental
                                               design, their limitations and sources of
                                               confounding and the interpretation of data.




                                           170
Techniques for performing cost-effective-       of two of three specialty areas in psychol-
ness analysis and cost-benefit analysis in       ogy: Cognitive, Developmental, or Social
mental health and other human services          Psychology. The two specialty areas cho-
will also be covered.                           sen will alternate from year to year and
                                                will be based on the needs and interests of
PSYC 612. Psychometric Theory,                  graduate students. Students will develop a
Assessment, Appraisal and                       firm grounding in these areas of psychol-
Application.                              (3)   ogy through discussion of original writings
Three hours lecture, demonstration and          in the psychological literature as well as
discussion.                                     through in-class demonstrations of classic
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-         empirical findings in psychology.
chology, and PSYC 611 or an equivalent
course.                                         PSYC 622. Historical Foundations of a
A comprehensive survey of measurement           Scientific Psychology.                     (3)
theory and practice in psychology. Topics       Three hours lecture.
covered may include scaling models, valid-      Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
ity, reliability, measurement error and cor-    chology or permission of the instructor.
relation analyses, multivariate correlational   Discussion of the role of psychologists as
analysis, areas of assessment (vocational,      scientists, from the inception of the field to
personality, intellectual), the evaluation      the present. Issues to be discussed include
process and the report-writing process.         the advantages and disadvantages of the
                                                scientific method as a mode of inquiry, the
PSYC 620. Core Proseminar in                    concept of scientific progress, and the sta-
Psychology I.                             (3)   tus of psychology as a science. The course
Three hours lecture.                            will trace the historical development of the
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-         various schools of psychology and describe
chology or permission of the instructor.        the factors that have led to psychology’s
This course, intended for first-year gradu-      current position as both a basic and an
ate students in psychology, will present        applied science.
the core theory and principles of two of
three specialty areas in psychological sci-     PSYC 623. Advanced Social
ence: Physiological Psychology, Learning,       Psychology.                              (3)
or Sensation and Perception. The two spe-       Three hours lecture.
cialty areas chosen will alternate from year    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
to year and will be based on the needs and      chology or permission of the instructor.
interests of the graduate students. Students    Focused coverage of the scientific literature
will develop a firm grounding in these areas     relating to psychological aspects of human
of psychology through discussion of origi-      social behavior. Topics covered will vary
nal writings in the psychological literature    as a function of the needs and interests
as well as through in-class demonstrations      of the students, but will usually include
of classic empirical findings in psychology.     one or more of the following: attribution
                                                and social perception, attitude formation
PSYC 621. Core Proseminar in                    and change, prosocial behavior, aggression,
Psychology II.                           (3)    social influence and applications of social
Three hours lecture.                            psychology.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
chology or permission of the instructor.
Each offering of this course, intended for
first-year graduate students in psychology,
will present the core theory and principles

                                            171
PSYC 626. Advanced Comparative                 psychological processes in humans and
Learning and Motivation.                 (3)   other animals. Students will learn about
Three hours lecture.                           biological approaches to the study of behav-
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-        ior, structure and function of the nervous
chology or permission of the instructor.       system, neural bases of perception, action,
Focused coverage of the scientific litera-      cognition, and motivation, and biological
ture relating to associative learning, com-    contributions to disorders of behavioral and
parative cognition and motivation. Original    psychological functioning.
research involving both nonhuman and
human subjects will be covered and criti-      PSYC 630. Cognitive and Affective
cally evaluated. Topics covered will vary      Bases of Behavior.                       (3)
as a function of the needs and interests of    Three hours lecture.
the students, but will usually include one     Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
or more of the following: classical condi-     chology or permission of the instructor.
tioning, instrumental conditioning, obser-     This course will examine how and why
vational learning, evolution of behavior,      people think and behave as they do.
motivational processes, aversive motiva-       Current theoretical and empirical evidence
tion, comparative cognition, memory and        from mainstream cognitive and affective
concept formation.                             perspectives, evolutionary psychology,
                                               and neuroscience will be examined and
PSYC 627. Advanced Sensation and               integrated. Applications to a variety of
Perception.                             (3)    contexts will be explored.
Three hours lecture.
                                               PSYC 631. Cognitive Intellectual
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
                                               Assessment Techniques.                    (3)
chology or permission of the instructor.
                                               Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Focused coverage of the scientific litera-
                                               Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
ture relating to acquisition and processing
                                               chology or permission of instructor.
of sensory information. Original research
involving both human and nonhuman sub-         A study of the theory and development of
jects will be covered and critically evalu-    the Stanford-Binet and the Wechsler Scales,
ated. Topics covered will vary as a function   as well as additional intelligence tests,
of the needs and interests of the students,    including a history of and current research
but will usually include one or more of the    and practices in the field of individual
following: acquisition and processing of       intelligence testing. Laboratory experience
sensory information, use of sensory infor-     includes supervised administration, scoring
mation to guide action, perception of space    and interpretation of individual intelligence
and form, color perception, different sen-     scales. Students administer and score a num-
sory systems and the conscious experience      ber of scales each semester and are expected
of objects and object relations.               to achieve proficiency in report writing as
                                               part of their laboratory experience.
PSYC 628. Biological Foundations of
Behavior.                                (3)   PSYC 632. Child Behavioral
Three hours lecture.                           Assessment and Intervention.             (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-        Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psy-
chology or permission of the instructor.       chology or permission of the instructor.
Examines the biological underpinnings          Two hours lecture.
of behavior and the role of the nervous        This course will emphasize the applica-
system in mediating behavior and               tion of behavioral theories and the prin-
                                               ciples to administration and interpretation


                                           172
of child behavioral assessment instruments        PSYC 637. Personality Assessment. (3)
and techniques, with the goal of linking          Three hours lecture.
assessment to intervention. Associated            Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 631
multicultural, legal, and ethical issues will     with a “B” or better, PSYC 663 or 685
be examined.                                      (these may be taken concurrently), or per-
                                                  mission of instructor.
PSYC 633. Instructional Assessment                Students will gain experience in assess-
and Intervention.                         (3)     ment interviews and administration and
Three hours lecture.                              interpretation of several of the widely used
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psy-          methods of personality assessment, includ-
chology or permission of the instructor.          ing the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality
This course is intended to provide students       Inventory and Rorschach.
with the skills necessary to assess academic
skills and instructional environments with-       PSYC/EDSP 638. Early Childhood
in a consultative framework and to develop        Assessment and Intervention.             (3)
instructional interventions. The course will      Three hours lecture.
teach skills intended to integrate assess-        Prerequisite: PSYC 631 or permission of
ment, consultation, and intervention func-        instructor.
tions. Students will learn and practice skills    This course will teach selection, admin-
necessary to address academic referrals           istration and interpretation of formal and
within the context of the educational sys-        informal assessment techniques for young
tem. This course has a specific focus on           children with disabling and at-risk condi-
understanding the relationship between the        tions and their families. Within a develop-
instructional environment and academic            mental-ecological context the course will
difficulties that students experience. This        teach assessment strategies and link assess-
class will emphasize the use of curriculum        ment results with effective intervention
based assessment within a decision mak-           strategies.
ing model and linking assessment prac-
tices to intervention. Focus will be placed       PSYC 640. Professional Orientation
on behavioral and ecological interventions        and Function in Mental Health
that have an empirical basis.                     Counseling.                               (3)
                                                  Three hours lecture.
PSYC 636. Child Personality                       Prerequisites: Graduate standing in coun-
Assessment.                                 (3)   seling psychology.
Three hours lecture.                              An orientation to professional counsel-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychol-      ing with an emphasis on mental health
ogy; a “B” or better in a course of individual    counseling. The course traces the histori-
intelligence testing, a graduate course in psy-   cal development and trends in counseling
chopathology (may be taken concurrently), or      as a discipline and assesses current iden-
permission of the instructor.                     tity and functions. The roles of profes-
Intended for school and clinical psychol-         sional organizations and associations are
ogy graduate students. The course includes        analyzed. The laws and ethics regarding the
supervised administration, scoring and            practice of professional counseling are stud-
interpretation of individual projective and       ied. Issues related to mental health practice
objective personality tests and supervised        are included. Collaborative consultation and
interviewing experience with children and         issues of outreach and treatment/prevention
parents. Students administer, score and           strategies will also be discussed.
interpret several personality tests and are
expected to achieve proficiency in writing
comprehensive psychological reports.

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PSYC 641. Theories of Counseling and            human behavior. Death-related variables
Psychotherapy.                          (3)     such as sociocultural forces, life-threatening
Three hours lecture.                            illness, medical ethics, grief and bereave-
Prerequisite: Graduate status in clinical or    ment, funerals, etc. will be evaluated as to
counseling psychology or permission of the      their contributions to the development of
instructor.                                     individual differences across the lifespan.
Course provides students with an over-
view of current theories of counseling and      PSYC 650. Organizational
psychotherapy. The course will include a        Psychology I.                            (3)
critical evaluation and comparative study       Three hours lecture.
of major theories with emphasis on philo-       Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
sophical assumptions and implications for       chology or permission of instructor.
application.                                    An introduction to the study of behavior
                                                in organizations. Focuses on the individ-
PSYC 642. Techniques of Counseling              ual, the organization and their interaction.
and Psychotherapy.                       (3)    Provides students with ways of looking at
Three hours lecture.                            and thinking about behavior in organiza-
Prerequisite: Graduate status in clinical       tions. Presents a framework for analyzing
or counseling psychology or permission of       organizational behavior and considers both
instructor.                                     empirical and case study research on orga-
Course provides students with an introduc-      nizational issues. Focuses on organizational
tion to applied techniques. Simulated coun-     socialization, attitudes, motivation, deci-
seling experiences provide opportunities to     sion-making, absenteeism, turnover, stress,
use basic counseling, communication and         work groups and teams.
helping relationship skills while increasing
student’s comfort with the therapeutic role.    PSYC 651. Employee Selection and
                                                Placement I.                           (3)
PSYC 643. Mental Health Counseling              Three hours lecture.
Practicum I.                             (3)    Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
Prerequisite: Graduate status in clinical       chology or permission of instructor.
or counseling psychology or permission of       Provides knowledge in the use of employ-
instructor.                                     ee recruitment techniques, interviewing
A supervised practicum in the field of men-      methods, reference checking and training
tal health counseling involving a minimum       and experience ratings. Provides an under-
of 50 hours of which 20 must be direct          standing of employment laws related to
client contact. Work experience includes        employee selection.
intake procedures, assessments, social his-
tories, crisis intervention. The student will   PSYC 652. Training and
meet with the program faculty member one        Development.                             (3)
and one half hours per week.                    Three hours lecture.
                                                Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-
PSYC 646. Psychology of Death and               chology or permission of instructor.
Dying.                                  (3)     Presents and evaluates the techniques used
Three hours lecture and discussion.             in industry for the training and motiva-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.               tion of personnel; examines psychological
Course provides students with a broad           theories behind the techniques and issues
introduction to the field of thanatology,        involved in application of these techniques.
while considering the influence of death         Focuses on effects of training and motiva-
and its associated psychological effects on     tion techniques on both job morale and job
                                                performance.

                                            174
PSYC 653. Job Analysis and                     methods (e.g., reliability, validity general-
Evaluation.                             (3)    ization, utility, etc.).
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-        PSYC 660. Human Growth and
chology or permission of instructor.           Lifespan Development.                   (3)
Covers major methods of job analysis and       Three hours lecture.
evaluation and the completion of extensive     Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psy-
job analysis and job evaluation projects.      chology or related field.
                                               Course provides a comprehensive overview
PSYC 654. Performance Appraisal. (3)           of human growth. Areas covered include
Three hours lecture.                           the developmental areas of physical, cogni-
Prerequisite: Psychology 653 or permission     tive, intellectual, perceptual, information
of instructor.                                 processing, language, personality, social
Covers major methods of appraising             and moral development across the life
employee performance and utilizing these       span.
appraisals to improve employee produc-
tivity.                                        PSYC 663. Child Psychopathology. (3)
                                               Three hours lecture.
PSYC 655. Organizational                       Utilizes an eclectic approach to the study
Psychology II.                         (3)     of causes and diagnoses of childhood psy-
Three hours lecture and discussion.            chopathology. Definitions, concepts and
Prerequisites: PSYC 650 or permission of       theories of childhood psychopathology are
instructor; graduate enrollment at Radford     covered. Emphasis will be on the current
University.                                    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM).
A continuation in the study of behav-
                                               PSYC 665. School Psychology
ior in organizations. Focuses on current
                                               Services.                                (3)
organizational psychology issues in such
                                               Three hours lecture.
areas as leadership, power, organizational
                                               Provides an understanding of the role of
effectiveness and organizational theory.
                                               the school psychologist in education set-
Provides the student with additional ways
                                               tings. Covers historical antecedents of con-
of looking at and thinking about behavior
                                               temporary school psychology, the types
in organizations. Presents a framework
                                               of methods, skills and knowledge that the
for integrating research in organizational
                                               school psychologist applies in his or her
psychology with popular organizational
                                               job and legal and ethical issues involved
effectiveness trends.
                                               in providing school psychological services.
PSYC 656. Employee Selection and               Students are encouraged to do volunteer
Placement II.                            (3)   work in a school setting in order to gain
Three hours lecture and discussion.            familiarity with problems school psycholo-
Prerequisites: PSYC 651 or permission of       gists encounter.
instructor; Graduate enrollment at Radford
                                               PSYC 670. Child and Adolescent
University.
                                               Drug Abuse: Assessment, Diagnosis,
A continuation in the study of employee        Treatment and Prevention.               (3)
selection and placement. Familiarizes stu-     Three hours lecture.
dents with additional selection methods
                                               Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
such as cognitive ability, biodata, assess-
                                               The course introduces students to the areas
ment centers, work samples, personality
                                               of assessment, diagnosis, treatment and
inventories and integrity tests. Also covers
                                               prevention of drug abuse in children and
various approaches of evaluating these
                                               adolescents. The DSM and other diagnostic

                                           175
systems are presented. Approaches to therapy    Emphasizes knowledge of and ability to
that have proven effective with children and    use the current Diagnostic and Statistical
adolescents are covered. Ethical/legal and      Manual (DSM). Theoretical and empirical
prevention strategies are considered. The       research into the major clinical syndromes
student is required to do an assessment, a      will be reviewed.
diagnosis, develop a treatment plan, design
a treatment center and develop a preven-        PSYC 686. Child and Adult Sexual
tion plan.                                      Assault.                               (3)
                                                Three hours lecture.
PSYC 671. Theories of Personality. (3)          Prerequisites: Graduate standing and per-
Three hours lecture.                            mission of instructor.
A thorough, critical evaluation of major        This course will provide students with an
personality theories with emphasis on phil-     overview of issues regarding child sex-
osophical assumptions and applied impli-        ual abuse and adult rape. Students will
cations of each theory for therapeutic inter-   be exposed to current theoretical and
ventions.                                       empirical literature concerning the defini-
                                                tion, prevalence, assessment, effects and
PSYC 673. Legal and Ethical Issues. (1)         treatment of child and adult victims of
One hour lecture.                               sexual assault.
Exposes students to the legal and ethical
issues in professional practice and research.   PSYC 687. Pre-internship Seminar. (1)
Ethical guidelines of professional orga-        Prerequisites: Concurrent registration with
nizations; legal rulings which influence         PSYC 781.
practice; and the course of professional        This course will cover standards of poten-
development will be discussed.                  tial internship sites, portfolio development,
                                                requirements of NASP for the year long
PSYC 678. Child Neuropsychological              school psychology internship, and other
Assessment and Intervention.            (3)     relevant information necessary to complete
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psy-        a successful internship search and secure an
chology AND grade of “B” or better in
                                                acceptable internship to meet the third year
PSYC 631 and 632; OR permission of
instructor.                                     requirement of the School of Psychology
                                                Program. It will be graded on a pass-fail
Three hours lecture-discussion.
                                                basis.
This course will emphasize the application
of neuropsychological theory and principles     PSYC 688. Consultation and
to selection, administration, and intrepre-     Collaboration in Schools, Home and
tation of neuropsychological assessment         Community.                                (3)
batteries and techniques, with the goal of      Three hours lecture.
linking assessment to intervention.             Prerequisite: Enrollment in the School
Associated multicultural, legal, and ethical    Psychology Graduate Program; Concurrent
issues will be examined, with an emphasis       registration. in School Psychology Prac-
on practicing within the scope of one’s         ticum (PSYC 781).
competency and the interface between            Provides the School Psychology graduate
school psychology and pediatric neuro-          student with a practical and theoretical
psychology.                                     exposure to consultation, to provide them
                                                with supervised practice in techniques for
PSYC 685. Clinical Psychopathology. (3)
                                                establishing and maintaining consultative
Three hours lecture.
                                                relationships and to help students become
Prerequisites: Abnormal psychology or per-
                                                familiar with problem-solving techniques
mission of the instructor.
                                                appropriate for consultative activities. Role

                                            176
playing, case simulations and discussion          PSYC 698. Directed Study.            (1-4)
and analysis of cases in practicum will be        Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor,
used to facilitate learning.                      adviser, department chair and Directed
                                                  Study form submitted to the Graduate
PSYC 690. Seminar in Psychology. (1-3)            College.
One to three hours lecture.                       Provides graduate students opportunity to
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.          work individually with faculty members on
Presentation and discussion of current issues     topics of mutual interest.
in various areas of psychology which are not      See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
considered in other courses. Content varies
from semester to semester. A single topic         PSYC 699. Research and Thesis. (1-6)
or area selected by the instructor for dis-       Hours and credit to be arranged with
cussion during the semester based on cur-         the approval of the dean of the Graduate
rent student interest and developments in         College.
psychology. Previous topics have included:        See “Thesis” on p. 55.
Cortical Bases of Behavior, Human Sexuality,
Divorce Counseling, Rorschach, Computers          PSYC 771. Group Dynamics in
in Personnel and Appraisal in Industry.           Processing and Counseling.               (3)
                                                  Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
PSYC 692:693. Mental Health                       Prerequisite: PSYC 641 and permission of
Intervention and Prevention in                    instructor.
Schools I and II.                         (3,3)   Course will consider theories and techniques
Prerequisites: For 692: Graduate stand-           of group counseling, including focus on
ing or advanced degree in psychology,             content, process and leadership issues.
education or social work; a field or work          Groups with special populations will also be
placement which will enable the student           considered. The course will also include an
to have clinical experience simultaneously        experiential component in which the stu-
with course enrollment. PSYC 693 requires         dent will be required to participate in a
a grade of “B” or better in PSYC 692 for
                                                  group.
enrollment. NOTE: Students who have
received credit for 694 may not take the          PSYC 772. Couples and Family
692:693 sequence for credit without special
                                                  Systems Therapy.                         (3)
permission of the instructor.
                                                  Three hours lecture.
This course will expose the student to vari-      Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychol-
ous models of therapeutic interventions for       ogy and PSYC 641 or equivalent, or admis-
children and adolescents within the school        sion into the Psy.D. program, or persmis-
setting. Emphasis will be on case conceptu-       sion of instructor.
alization using knowledge of developmental        An analysis of couples and families as
psychopathology, and in learning effective        social systems and the identification of
therapeutic techniques of working individu-       issues affecting these systems are included.
ally and in groups with children and adoles-      A number of theoretical approaches and
cents. Prevention programs addressing high        counseling techniques for therapy with
risk behaviors and populations will also be       couples and families are presented and
addressed in this sequence. Other topics cov-     evaluated.
ered in this course will include developing and
leading family/parenting skills groups,
cultural diversity issues related to therapeu-
tic interventions, professional and ethical
issues related to counseling, and assessing
effectiveness of the counseling intervention.

                                              177
PSYC 773. Assessment and Treatment               Individuals will conduct a review of the lit-
of Addictive Disorders in Rural                  erature in a selected area of research. This
Settings.                                  (3)   is a Pass/Fail course.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psy-          PSYC 776. Human Sexuality
chology and PSYC 641 or equivalent, or           Counseling.                           (3)
admission into the Psy.D. program, or per-       Three hours lecture.
mission of instructor.                           Prerequisite: PSYC 641.
This course focuses on recognizing, iden-        Provides foundation of knowledge con-
tifying, assessing, and diagnosing abused        cerning basic human sexual functioning,
substances as well as compulsive/impul-          knowledge of sexual diseases, awareness
sive behaviors in the rural community.           and acceptance of sexual variance, knowl-
Students will be introduced to the prevail-      edge of sexual dysfunctions and an under-
ing theories around addiction as well as         standing of basic treatment and sex therapy
frequent treatment modalities. Experiential      techniques. Legal and ethical issues and
activities, hosted in the community, will be     concerns pertaining to sex counseling/ther-
integrated throughout the course. Students       apy will be considered. A seminar format
will be encouraged to consult and integrate      utilized.
the current scientific literature on abuse
and misuse of substance and validated            PSYC 777. Multivariate Analysis of
treatment for substance abuse in treatment       Behavioral Data.                          (3)
planning. The curriculum for the course          Three hours lecture.
is infused with a strengths-based, diver-        Prerequisites: Graduate standing and PSYC
sity oriented, social justice perspective that   610 or equivalent, or admission into Psy.D.
encourages students to identify barriers to      program, or permission of instructor.
treatment for individuals of marginalized or     This course will provide a treatment of the
disenfranchised populations.                     most commonly used multivariate tech-
                                                 niques for quantitative analysis of behavior-
PSYC 774. Introduction to                        al data. Students will learn the conceptual
Psychopharmacological Medications. (3)           basis for these techniques, as well as receive
Three hours lecture.                             instruction for conducting their own analy-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.                ses using the SPSS software package.
Course provides students with rudimen-
tary information regarding commonly              PSYC 781, 782. School Psychology
prescribed psychopharmacological medi-           Practicum I and II.                 (4,4)
cations including basic classifications,          Two hour seminar, 8-hour practicum in the
indications and contraindications. Issues        schools.
of making appropriate referrals and the          Prerequisites: PSYC 631, 636, 665 and
identification of effects and side effects will   acceptance by the School Psychology
also be addressed.                               Committee into the Educational Specialist
                                                 degree program.
PSYC 775. Special Topics in                      A pre-internship experience for second-
Counseling Psychology.                    (3)    year school psychology students offer-
One hour lecture.                                ing supervised field work. Includes intel-
Prerequisite: Either PSYC 610 or 611, the lat-   lectual, behavioral and curriculum-based
ter of which may be taken simultaneously.        assessment techniques with emphasis
Course is designed to engage the stu-            on educational interpretation and reme-
dent in current research areas in coun-          dial implications of assessment data.
seling psychology. Counseling research           Supervised field interventions include
will be reviewed, analyzed and critiqued.        pre-referral interventions, consultation,

                                             178
individual and group counseling, behavior         settings to gain experience in the use and
management, in-service education, par-            application of psychological techniques
ent training and counseling and program           and procedures used in performing the ser-
evaluation. Students work under the dual          vices of a professional school psychologist.
supervision of practicum instructor and           Internship grades recorded as “Pass” or
on-site field supervisor (certified, experi-        “Fail.” Courses must be taken in sequence
enced school psychologist). Students spend        and may not be taken concurrently. Interns
a minimum of eight hours per week in the          are required to attend our on-campus semi-
schools plus a two-hour weekly seminar.           nars each semester.

PSYC 785. Neuropsychological                      PSYC 798. Professional Internship. (3-6)
Assessment.                                (3)    Hours may vary from 10 to 25 per week.
Three hours lecture.                              Prerequisites: Permission of instruc-
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psy-          tor; enrollment in a graduate program in
chology and a “B” or better in PSYC 631           Psychology at Radford University.
or its equivalent and PSYC 628 or its equiv-      Note: This course may be repeated for a
alent; or admission to the Psy.D. program;        total of 12 credits; students should consult
or permission of instructor.                      with their faculty advisers for specific
This course will emphasize the application        requirements within their area of concen-
of neuropsychological theory and principles       tration.
to selection, administration, and interpreta-
tion of neuropsychological assessment bat-        A part-time professional experience under
teries and techniques with pediatric, adult,      the supervision of the Psychology Graduate
and geriatric clients. Neuropsychological         Faculty. The student will function as a
assessment will cover the following               staff member in professional settings to
domains: language/communication, visu-            gain experience in the use and applica-
al-spatial/perceptual/motor, sensorimotor,        tion of psychological techniques and
attention, learning and memory, and execu-        procedures. Common emphases of all sec-
tive function. Associated multicultural           tions will be on developing professional
(including rural), legal, forensic, and ethical   identity through an experiential component.
issues will be examined, including practic-       Ethical practice and responsibilities will
ing within the scope of one’s competency          also be an emphasis for all sections of the
and the interface between counseling/clini-       course. Internship grades will be recorded
cal psychology and neuropsychology.               as Pass or Fail. Each internship section
                                                  will have a specific and detailed course
PSYC 795:796. School Psychology                   description of the content of the course as
Internship.                            (6:6)      related to the specific graduate concentra-
Forty hours per week.                             tion of the student.
Prerequisites: Completion of all course
work, other than directed study, includ-          GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment (1)
ing practica, in the School Psychology            All graduate students are required to be
Program, a Pass in both practica and              registered during the semester they receive
permission of the School Psychology               their degree from Radford University.
Committee at least four weeks prior to reg-       Registration is required of all graduate
istration. Applications are available in the      students when using University facilities
department office.                                 and/or faculty time. The minimum number
A full-time paid professional experience          of hours for registration is one. Registration
under the dual supervision of a member of         allows use of services such as library
the School Psychology Committee and an            checkout, laboratories and recreation
approved on-site field supervisor. Intern          facilities not open to the public.
functions as a staff member in professional

                                              179
Students who are not currently registered for    affected psychology and counseling psy-
any course work and who have completed           chology; (b) training and practice guide-
all course work but have other outstanding       lines; (c) professional ethics, including the
degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive         American Psychological Association ethics
examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP       code, foundational meta-principles, morals,
grade), are required to register for a con-      values, virtues, and decision-making; (d)
tinuous enrollment course each semester,         mental health law and related legal issues;
including summer, until they have met the        and (e) current issues that affect the prac-
outstanding requirement(s).                      tice and training of professional psycholo-
This course carries no credit hour produc-       gists in a multicultural society.
tion and does not count toward graduation
requirements. This course option is also         PSYC 803. Vocational Psychology. (3)
available to those admitted students who         Three hours lecture.
are not enrolled in a given semester but         Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
who wish to use University facilities and        gram or permission of instructor.
services during that time.                       This course presents vocational theo-
                                                 ries, counseling strategies, and practice
PSYC 800. Introduction to                        in vocational assessment and counseling.
Counseling Psychology.                     (3)   Current research in vocational counseling
Three hours lecture.                             is reviewed and there is a focus on working
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        with diverse populations.
gram or permission of instructor.
This course will include examination of (a)      PSYC 804. Integrative Approaches to
the development of counseling psychology         Psychotherapy.                          (3)
as a distinct field; (b) the present state of     Three hours lecture.
counseling psychology; (c) projections of        Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
the future of the field; and (d) topics of spe-   gram or permission of instructor.
cial importance to counseling psychologists      This course will include examination of (a)
(e.g., diversity, social justice, prevention).   cognitive-behavioral approaches to psy-
                                                 chotherapy; (b) interpersonal approaches
PSYC 801. Multicultural                          to psychotherapy; (c) principles for psy-
Counseling.                            (3)       chotherapy integration; (d) the therapeutic
Three hours lecture.                             relationship; (e) principles of change; (f)
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        integrative treatment planning; (g) the cul-
gram or permission of instructor.                tural context of psychotherapy; and (h)
This course will include background in the       evidence-based practice issues.
historical context of multicultural counsel-
ing, personal examination of areas pertain-      PSYC 805. Advanced Cognitive and
ing to multicultural counseling, a strong        Intellectual Assessment Techniques. (3)
foundation in common domains of cultural         Three hours lecture.
competency, as well as implications for          Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
clinical practice.                               gram or permission of instructor.
                                                 The purpose of this course is to provide the
PSYC 802. Ethical, Legal, and                    student with the historical frame, theory,
Professional Issues in Psychology. (3)           and research in cognitive and intellectual
Three hours lecture.                             assessment. The student will build mas-
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        tery in testing theory, assessment selection,
gram or permission of instructor.                administration, scoring, hypothesis testing,
This course will include examination of          and integrated feedback in the clinical set-
(a) the past and present forces that have        ting.

                                             180
PSYC 806. Advanced Personality                   as well as how to conduct program evalua-
Assessment.                            (3)       tions, especially in rural areas. Developing
Three hours lecture.                             a consultation/evaluation project is a
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        required part of the course.
gram or permission of instructor.
The purpose of this course is to provide the     PSYC 811. Health Psychology in Rural
student with the historical frame, theory,       Areas.                                   (3)
and research in personality assessment.          Three hours lecture.
The student will build mastery in testing        Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
theory, assessment selection, administra-        gram or permission of instructor.
tion, scoring, hypothesis testing, and inte-     This course includes the study of selected
grated assessment and feedback.                  physical health problems of people who
                                                 live in rural areas (e.g., Appalachia). Rates
PSYC 808. Qualitative Research                   of physical health disorders that are higher
Methods.                                  (3)    than the average U.S. rate will be studied.
Three hours lecture.                             The causes of higher rates of disorders will
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        be examined and interventions to alleviate
gram or permission of instructor.                them will be studied. Special attention
This course will include examinations of         will be focused on children, older adults,
qualitative (including pure qualitative and      women, and members of various miniority
mixed methods) approaches to research            groups in rural areas.
and analysis. The course will provide an
introduction to the conceptual and method-       PSYC 812. Rural Cultural Issues. (3)
ological features that distinguish qualitative   Three hours lecture.
research from other empirical approaches.        Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
Ways to use qualitative methods to supple-       gram or permission of instructor.
ment quantitative approaches, and vice           This course will include an exploration
versa, will be discussed.                        of (a) the unique features of rural cul-
                                                 ture; (b) the past and current issues that
PSYC 809. Supervision.                (3)        have influenced rural cultural development;
Three hours lecture.                             (c) individual and group characteristics of
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        rural populations, including various minor-
gram or permission of instructor.                ity groups; (d) challenges and assets of the
This course will include a didactic and an       rural cultural setting; and (e) the differ-
experiential aspect. Students will learn         ential impact of current societal issues on
about various approaches to supervision          those residing or practicing in rural areas.
and will also conduct supervision of less
experienced graduate students under the          PSYC 840. Counseling Psychology
oversight of a licensed psychologist.            Practicum I.                            (2)
                                                 Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
PSYC 810. Rural Consultation and                 gram.
Program Evaluation.                   (3)        This course will provide doctoral students
Three hours lecture.                             with the opportunity to gain actual practical
Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-        experience providing counseling, assess-
gram or permission of instructor.                ment, education, and other applied work in
This course will include a didactic and an       a variety of settings. Students will provide
experiential aspect. Students will learn         services for approximately 16 hours per
about various approaches to consultation         week under the on-site supervision of a
with community agencies and individuals          licensed professional and will participate


                                             181
in individual and/or group supervision in       diversity, social justice, and evidence-based
the department. Training related to cultural    practice will be infused throughout the
diversity, social justice, and evidence-based   course. Students must register for 842 for
practice will be infused throughout the         three consecutive terms in their third year
course. Students must register for 840 for      (i.e., Fall, Spring, Summer) and must suc-
three consecutive terms in their first year      cessfully complete all three before they can
(i.e., Fall, Spring, Summer) and must suc-      receive credit for any of them. This a Pass/
cessfully complete all three before they can    Fail course.
receive credit for any of them. This a Pass/
Fail course.                                    PSYC 870. Doctoral Internship.         (1)
                                                Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
PSYC 841. Counseling Psychology                 gram.
Practicum II.                            (1)    This course is a 1,500-2,000 hour training
Prerequisites: Enrollment in Counseling         opportunity (either one-year full-time or
Psy.D. program and successful completion        two consecutive half-time years) at a site
of three consecutive terms of PSYC 840.         that is focused on training advanced doc-
This course will provide doctoral students      toral students to become psychologists. It
with the opportunity to gain actual practical   is the capstone applied experience of the
experience providing counseling, assess-        Psy.D. program. Students must register
ment, education, and other applied work in      for PSYC 870 for three consecutive terms
a variety of settings. Students will provide    and must successfully complete all three of
services for approximately 16 hours per         them. This is a Pass/Fail course.
week under the on-site supervision of a
licensed professional and will participate      PSYC 899. Dissertation.                 (1)
in individual and/or group supervision in       Prerequisites: Admission into Psy.D. pro-
the department. Training related to cultural    gram.
diversity, social justice, and evidence-based   This course is designed to be the capstone
practice will be infused throughout the         research component of the Psy.D. program.
course. Students must register for 841 for      As such, students are expected to complete
three consecutive terms in their second year    an original research project that is of suf-
(i.e., Fall, Spring, Summer) and must suc-      ficient size and quality to justify being
cessfully complete all three before they can    considered competent to conduct research
receive credit for any of them. This a Pass/    independently. Students must re-enroll
Fail course.                                    in the course every term until the final
                                                product is complete and approved by the
PSYC 842. Counseling Psychology                 Psy.D. program faculty and the College of
Practicum III.                          (1)     Graduate and Professional Studies. This is
Prerequisites: Enrollment in Psy.D. pro-        a Pass/Fail course.
gram and successful completion of three
consecutive terms of PSYC 841.
This course will provide doctoral students
with the opportunity to gain actual practical   RECREATION, PARKS AND
experience providing counseling, assess-        TOURISM
ment, education, and other applied work in
a variety of settings. Students will provide    RCPT 601. Environmental and
services for approximately 16 hours per         Experiential Philosophy.              (3)
week under the on-site supervision of a         Three hours lecture.
licensed professional and will participate      Provides an advanced understanding of
in individual and/or group supervision in       philosophical perspectives and theories
the department. Training related to cultural    relating to the experiential learning and

                                            182
environmental education. Offered in the         RCPT 625. Issues in Recreation
Fall.                                           Management.                             (3)
                                                Three hours lecture.
RCPT 611. History and Philosophy of             The course covers issues which influence
Recreation, Parks and Tourism.           (3)    recreation management such as financial
Three hours lecture.                            analysis and future forecasting, financial
Discussion of issue, problems, trends and       accountability, politics, conflict manage-
principles as foundations of recreation phi-    ment, strategic planning and technological
losophy and education for leisure based         applications in managing and marketing
living.                                         recreation services. Organizational simula-
                                                tions and role playing are incorporated in
RCPT 617. Seminar in Recreation                 the course.
(Topical).                             (1-4)
Hours and credit to be arranged.                RCPT 635. Research Applications in
Covers factors affecting leisure-centered       Recreation, Parks and Tourism.       (3)
living, specific topical inquiry and concep-     Three hours lecture.
tual analysis of modern recreation, urban or    Provides basic understanding of research
rural recreation, sociology of sport, surveys   and its planning and application within
in recreation. Students may take course         recreation services.
again for maximum of six hours credit.
Offered in the Fall and Spring, alternate       RCPT 655. Leisure Education.            (3)
years.                                          Three hours lecture.
                                                Develops an understanding of the need for
RCPT 619. Recreation                            recreation education in today’s society and
Administration.                         (3)     how to plan, implement and provide educa-
Three hours lecture.                            tion within the recreation systems.
In-depth study and analysis of the admin-
istration of recreation agencies. Emphasis      RCPT 660. Legal Aspects of
on legal foundations, political processes,      Environmental and Experiential
personnel practices, departmental organiza-     Activities.                             (3)
tion, relationships with other agencies and     Three hours lecture.
evaluation techniques.                          In-depth studies of legal issues related to
                                                the provision of outdoor adventure and
RCPT 623. Recreation                            experiential programming; liability, leg-
Administration.                          (3)    islation, tours, contracts. Offered in the
Three hours lecture.                            Spring.
Introduction to the administration of recre-
ation services. Emphasis on fiscal manage-       RCPT 676. Wilderness Institute.           (6)
ment, personnel management, organiza-           Lectures, labs and field trips integrated into
tional structure, marketing techniques and      an intensive, experiential, primarily off-
legal foundations in recreation and leisure     campus course.
services departments.                           Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
                                                This class provides graduate students with
RCPT 624. Environmental Issues.         (3)     an in-depth experience in the design, devel-
Three hours lecture.                            opment, implementation and evaluation
In-depth study of environmental issues fac-     of wilderness-based educational programs,
ing outdoor recreation agencies. Focuses        including extending wilderness expedi-
on care of resources and programming for        tions. Topical issues include environmen-
large numbers of people. Discusses teach-       tal education, resource management, risk
ing and interpretation methodologies for        management, program design and group
educating a general audience.                   facilitation. Offered Summer I.
                                            183
RCPT 686. Practicum in                          READING
Environmental and Experiential
Education.                             (2-6)    Please see pg. 135 for additional graduate
Six to 27 hours per week.                       education courses.
Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy
with-in the department and permission of        EDRD 624. Administration and
the department chair or adviser.                Supervision of Reading Programs. (3)
Offers additional practical experience in       Three hours lecture.
the management of experiential programs         Course for educators who will be involved
under the joint supervision of a quali-         in planning, implementing, supervising and
fied program administrator and Radford           evaluating reading programs. Helps stu-
University faculty. Practicum grades will       dents better understand the issues, choices,
be recorded as Pass/Fail. May be taken          procedures and requirements for good read-
                                                ing programs and includes a review of some
for up to six hours credit. Applications are
                                                exemplary programs currently in use.
available in the department office.
                                                EDRD 630. Teaching Reading in the
RCPT 690. Seminar in Experiential
                                                Content Areas.                           (3)
Education.                            (3)
                                                Three hours lecture.
Three hours lecture.
                                                Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
Emphasis on current issues in the man-
                                                Covers skills necessary to teach reading
agement and development of experiential
                                                in K-12 content areas and community col-
programs. Examines one specific topic dur-
                                                lege and adult basic literacy programs.
ing any one semester of the school year.
                                                Differential assignments will be made for
Students may take this course for a maxi-       students from the various content areas.
mum of six hours credit.
                                                EDRD/EDSP 641. Classroom
RCPT 698. Directed Study.              (1-4)    Development and Remediation of
Hours and credit to be arranged.                Language Skills.                         (3)
Prerequisites: Eligibility for admission        Three hours lecture.
to candidacy within the department and
                                                For graduate students working with chil-
approval of the adviser, department chair
                                                dren and youth in oral and written language
and Directed Study form submitted to the
Graduate College.                               development. Emphasis on development of
                                                language, relationship between thought and
To pursue in depth a topic of interest in the   language, disability and language and cul-
area of experiential or environmental edu-      tural and experiential differences affecting
cation. See “Directed Study” on p. 55.          language. Classroom strategies for devel-
                                                opment and remediation of oral and written
RCPT 699. Research and Thesis.          (6)
                                                language skills discussed.
Prerequisite: Approval of adviser in depart-
ment.                                           EDRD 660. Current Issues in
Hours and credit to be arranged with the        Education (Topic).                   (1-4)
approval of the student’s thesis adviser,       One to four hours credit.
thesis committee and the dean of the            Examines a major issue in reading and its
Graduate College. Provides opportu-             implications for teachers and reading spe-
nity to show in-dependent judgment in           cialists.
the study of a specific issue. See “Thesis”
on p. 55.




                                            184
EDRD 688. Advanced Study in                    EDRD 698. Directed Study.         (1-4)
Reading Skills.                        (3)     Hours and credits to be arranged.
Three hours lecture.                           Prerequisites: Approval of the adviser,
An in-depth exploration and comparison         Director of School of Teacher Education
of the various reading skills, methods and     and Leadership and Directed Study form
approaches leading to an understanding         submitted to the Graduate College.
of the fundamental processes of reading.       See “Directed Study” p. 55.
Materials will be prepared for teaching
specific reading skills.                        GRAD 799. Continuous
                                               Enrollment.                              (1)
EDRD 692. Reading Diagnosis:                   All graduate students are required to be
Testing, Prescription and                      registered during the semester they receive
Remediation.                            (3)    their degree from Radford University.
Three hours lecture.                           Registration is required of all graduate stu-
Prerequisite: EDRD 688                         dents when using University facilities and/
Designed to provide instruction in the         or faculty time. The minimum number of
administration and interpretation of a         hours for registration is one. Registration
selected battery of tests and in designing     allows use of services such as library
a program of remediation for a disabled        checkout, laboratories and recreation facili-
reader. Students will prepare a case study     ties not open to the public.
for teachers and parents which will include
                                               Students who are not currently registered for
interpretation of test results and plans for
                                               any course work and who have completed
remediation using appropriate methods and
                                               all course work but have other outstanding
materials.
                                               degree requirements (e.g., comprehensive
EDRD 695. Alternative Approaches               examination, thesis, removal of an I or IP
to Reading.                           (3)      grade), are required to register for a con-
Three hours lecture.                           tinuous enrollment course each semester,
Prerequisite: EDRD 688 or permission           including summer, until they have met the
of the Director of School of Teacher           outstanding requirement(s).
Education and Leadership.                      This course carries no credit hour produc-
Covers alternative instructional reading       tion and does not count toward graduation
programs and how to replace, supplement        requirements. This course option is also
or interface them with ongoing classroom       available to those admitted students who
programs in order to accommodate varying       are not enrolled in a given semester but
learning styles and needs.                     who wish to use University facilities and
                                               services during that time.
EDRD 697. Practicum: Diagnostic
and Remedial Techniques in
Reading.                                 (6)
Twelve hours laboratory experience.            SCIENCE EDUCATION
Prerequisites: EDRD 692.
Students will be placed with a selected        PHYS 510. Modern Physics.               (4)
group of children in a public school or        Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
clinical setting and will plan and implement   Prerequisites: One year of calculus and one
                                               year of physics.
an overall program of remediation based
on diagnosis with emphasis on individual       Introduction to modern physics, including
needs within the group.                        special relativity, quantum theory, atomic
                                               and nuclear physics, elementary particles.



                                           185
PHYS 511 (CHEM 511). Nuclear                      A study of energy, its many forms and uses,
Chemistry.                                (3)     how it is converted from one form to anoth-
Three hours lecture.                              er and the environmental consequences of
Prerequisite: One year of chemistry, one          that conversion.
year of physics and one year of calculus.
Historical development of modern atomic           PHSC 601. Seminar.                           (1)
theory; properties of atomic nuclei; gener-       Meets minimum of 15 hours per semester.
alizations related to atomic nuclei; types of     Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate
nuclear reactions; mathematics of radioac-        College.
tive decay processes; nuclear counters;           Recent developments in science education.
biological effects of radiation; applications     May be taken up to four times for credit pro-
of nuclear reactions, radioisotopes and par-      vided the topic studied is different each time.
ticle accelerators.
                                                  PHSC 602. Scientific Literature.         (3)
PHYS 550. Selected Topics in Physics. (4)         Two hours lecture; three hours laboratory.
Minimum of 60 contact hours for the               Provides opportunity to locate, retrieve
semester.                                         and assimilate information from scientific
Prerequisites: One year of physics and two        literature. May be taken twice provided the
years of calculus.                                topics studied are different each time.
Selected topics in advanced undergraduate
physics. A specific course syllabus will be        PHSC 611:612. Selected Topics in
available when the course is offered. A student   Physical Science.                 (3-4 each)
may take this course for credit more than once    A minimum of 45 contact hours per
provided the topic is different each time.        course.
                                                  Prerequisite: Graduate student majoring or
PHSC 510. Science for the Elementary              minoring in science education.
School Teacher.                         (3)       A study in depth of one or more science
Two hours lecture; three hours laboratory.        topics.
Nature of science, curricula and structure        Provides students with initial skills and
of elementary science programs. Activities        competencies in applying instructional sys-
include utilization of curriculum materials,      tems principles to teaching learning prob-
observation and teaching.                         lems. Examines development of specifica-
                                                  tions for facilities, equipment and materials
PHSC 521. Comparative Planetology. (3)            for learning under a variety of conditions
Three hours lecture.                              and instructional media in relation to con-
Prerequisites: GEOL 111:112 and AST               tent and learner characteristics. Includes
111:112.                                          large and small group activities.
Application of geological concepts and
techniques to solid astronomical bodies;          PHSC 621:622. Earth Science for
composition and classification of mete-            Teachers.                              (3:2)
orites; terrestrial impact craters; surface       A minimum of 100 contact hours for both
features of the moon, Mars, Mercury and           courses.
asteroids.                                        In-depth study of earth science topics, con-
                                                  cepts and instructional strategies essential
PHSC 531. Energy and the                          to teaching modern secondary school earth
Environment.                    (4)               science.
Four hours lecture.
Prerequisite: PHYS 111:112 or PHYS
221:222 or PHSC 121:122 or CHEM
101:102.


                                              186
PHSC 631:632. Physics for                       This is the first course in the Human
Teachers.                            (3:2)      Behavior sequence. In this course the dy-
A minimum of 100 contact hours for both         namics of human behavior and the contexts
courses.                                        within which humans grow and develop
Prerequisites: One year of college physics      through the life cycle are explored. It provides
and one year of college mathematics.            a foundation knowledge base from which
Examines physics concepts and approaches        social work students ground the assessment
essential to teaching modern secondary          and intervention processes with individuals
physics.                                        and families utilizing a biopsychosocial
                                                spiritual framework. Traditional and post-
PHSC 641:642. Chemistry for                     modern theories are analyzed and chal-
Teachers.                            (3:2)      lenged. The ecological and strengths per-
A minimum of 100 contact hours for both         spectives are presented in relation to human
courses.                                        risk and resilience. HBSE I attempts to
Prerequisites: One year of college chemis-      honor different ways of knowing and being,
try and one year of college mathematics.        developing pathways to understanding and
Examines chemistry topics and instruction-      appreciating uniqueness. Students are chal-
al strategies essential to teaching modern      lenged to explore their own values and
secondary school chemistry.                     culture in an effort to create an inclusive
                                                viewpoint of human diversity.
PHSC 651:652. Biological Science for
Teachers.                               (3:2)   SOWK 602: Human Behavior in the
A minimum of 100 contact hours for both         Social Environment II.                      (3)
courses.                                        Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in biol-      Prerequisite: SOWK 601 or permission of
ogy.                                            instructor.
Examines biological concepts and instruc-       Human Behavior in the Social Environ-
tional strategies essential to teaching mod-    ment II is the second of two Foundation
ern secondary school biology.                   courses. Students will continue to apply
                                                basic frameworks for creating and orga-
PHSC 698. Directed Study.            (1-4)      nizing knowledge of human behav-
Hours and credit to be arranged in con-         ior. The course examines problems of
sultation with the faculty member with          living; impacts of racial, ethical, class, cul-
whom the student will work on the directed      tural, religious/spiritual and gender diver-
study.                                          sity on behavior; and the reciprocal nature
Prerequisites: Approval of the supervis-        of interactions of persons, families, social
ing professor, adviser, department chair
                                                groups, communities, organizations and
and Directed Study form submitted to the
Graduate College.                               institutions.
See “Directed Study” on p. 55.                  SOWK 611. Social Welfare I.
                                                Policy is Practice.                  (3)
                                                Three hours lecture.
SOCIAL WORK                                     Prerequisite: Admission to graduate pro-
                                                gram in Social Work or permission of
SOWK 601. Human Behavior in the
                                                the instructor.
Social Environment I.              (3)
                                                The course covers frameworks to under-
Three hours lecture.
                                                stand the formulation/analysis of Social
Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate
program in Social Work or permission of         Work policies and programs. The signifi-
the instructor.                                 cance of contextual factors, values and


                                            187
history are examined from a “policy is            analysis and critical evaluation of research
practice” perspective with emphasis on            conclusions. Students are introduced to
social/economic justice, diversity and pop-       a systematic approach to the classifica-
ulations-at-risk.                                 tion, organization and analysis of data.
                                                  The course emphasizes the identification
SOWK 613. Crisis Intervention.          (3)       and formulation of researchable problems
Prerequisite: Accepted into School of Social      in social work, the utility of the scien-
Work or permission of instructor.                 tific method, the selection of appropriate
This course focuses on developing basic           methodologies, an understanding of the
crisis intervention skills (interviewing,         standards for evaluation of research and
assessment, intervention and follow-up).          sensitivity to bias and ethical behavior in
Special topics of concern in populations          the conduct of research.
at risk will be highlighted: lethality/sui-
cide/homicide; partner abuse; child abuse;        SOWK 625. Child Sexual Abuse
school violence, workplace violence, sub-         and CPS (Child Protective Services)
stance abuse and the chronically mentally         Investigation.                            (3)
ill. Students become aware of the role of         Three hours lecture, demonstration and
various agencies within the realm of crisis       discussion.
intervention and the importance of col-           Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-
laboration.                                       sion of instructor.
                                                  This course explores the issues involved
SOWK 615. Substance Abuse and                     in child abuse and neglect cases, with an
Dependency.                                (3)    emphasis on child sexual abuse. If offers
Three hours lecture and discussion.               an integrative framework of principles,
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis-        theories, process and skills specifically
sion of instructor.                               designed for performing culturally sensi-
This course examines current theories and         tive investigations and assessments with
models pertaining to substance abuse and          alleged abusive and neglectful families.
chemical dependency. It explores interven-        This academic course is offered to graduate
tion and treatment techniques for working         students interested in public social services
with chemically dependent individuals and         and to those awarded Title IV-E stipends
their families, with an emphasis on diverse       (supplanting the VISSTA [Virginia Institute
populations. The course integrates theory         for Social Services Training Activities]
and practice skills to teach students to criti-   training sequence) and to qualified com-
cally examine the clinical issues involved        munity people. Child Welfare emphasis
in substance abuse and chemical depen-            area elective.
dency treatment. Mental Health emphasis
area elective.                                    SOWK 631. Social Work Practice I:
                                                  Foundations.                            (3)
SOWK 621. Research I: Basic                       Two hours lecture, two hours skill lab.
Research Methodology.                  (3)        Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate
Three hours lecture.                              program in social work.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate           This course is the first of two founda-
Program in Social Work or permission of           tion courses designed to provide students
the instructor.                                   with an overview of the basic knowledge
The fundamental elements of scientific             and skills essential to generalist social
inquiry and research techniques, includ-          work practice. Key themes and concepts
ing a variety of research methodolo-              include interviewing, relationship build-
gies, are introduced in this course. Focus        ing and assessment as they relate to com-
is on the technical aspects of research           munity-based family practice. The course

                                              188
introduces practice models in relation to         SOWK 680. Special Topic Seminar. (3)
populations at risk. Personal and profes-         Three hours lecture.
sional values will be discussed, along with       May be taken a maximum of three times.
the use of self, the importance of evalua-        Prerequisites: Graduate standing and per-
tion, research and ethics.                        mission of instructor.
                                                  An intensive study of a specialized area in
SOWK 632. Social Work Practice II:                human services. Topics will be determined
Families, Groups and Community-                   by the instructors based upon demonstrated
based Practice.                            (3)    student interest. Special topics courses
Three hours lecture.                              may be elected for no more than nine
Prerequisites: SOWK 631                           semester hours of credit.
This second foundation practice course
is designed to provide students with an           SOWK 682. Biopsychosocial
                                                  Assessment.                            (3)
overview of the basic knowledge and skills
                                                  Three hours lecture.
essential to generalist social work practice
                                                  Prerequisites: SOWK 602, Advanced
as it relates to both group practice and com-     Standing status in Social Work or permis-
munity-based practice. Key themes and             sion of instructor.
concepts include introductory group practice      This course focuses on identifying indi-
knowledge for developing various types of         vidual and family strengths and on view-
groups, groups for populations at risk, gen-      ing behavior in context. Particular empha-
eral stages of group practice and assessing       sis is placed on understanding the indi-
group work. Community-based practice              vidual/family and environment interaction
themes and concepts include documenting a         by means of a systems perspective. This
community, assessing and understanding            course addresses the legal, ethical, social
community problems and concerns, generic          justice, diversity and cultural competence
community practice skills and the need for        ramifications as they relate to managed
social planning and activism.                     care and community treatment models of
                                                  practice.
SOWK 641:642. Foundation
Practicum and Seminar I and II. (3: 3)            SOWK 688. Administration,
Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate           Management, and Supervision.            (3)
program in social work and SOWK 631/632           Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
as pre- or corequisites. SOWK 641 must be         This course elective is designed to focus
completed before SOWK 642 can be taken.           on the role and function of the social work
Two semester sequence. A practicum expe-          leader as supervisor, manager, and admin-
rience (16 hours each week) accompanied           istrator.
by a minimum of six seminars each semes-
                                                  SOWK 698. Directed Study.          (1-4)
ter designed to integrate theory and field.
                                                  Hours and credit to be arranged.
SOWK 679. Advanced Standing                       Prerequisite: Approval by the School of
Bridge Course.                              (3)   Social Work and Directed Study form sub-
Three hours lecture.                              mitted to the Graduate College.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Advanced           See “Directed Study” on p. 55.
Standing program.
This course is required for all advanced stand-   SOWK 699. Research and
ing students and is aimed at providing the        Thesis.                            (1-6)
conceptual orientation necessary for the con-     Hours and credit to be arranged with
centration year in the graduate program.          the approval of the dean of the Graduate
                                                  College. See “Thesis” on p. 55.



                                              189
SOWK 710. Women and Mental                         with conceptual frameworks, helping principles
Health.                             (3)            and processes to maximize the academic perfor-
Three hours lecture and discussion.                mance and personal development of children and
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of   their families, 3) explore issues of diversity and
instructor.                                        multicultural competence in casework practice
This course is designed to provide students        with children, families and their communities,
with specific knowledge about clinical social       and 4) develop competence in critical thinking.
work practice with adult women and mental          School Social Work emphasis area elective.
health issues that affect women. Key themes
and concepts include: historical social work       SOWK 722. Community Organization. (3)
practice with women, theories for mental           Three hours lecture and discussion.
health practice and a feminist critique of those   Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission
theories, feminist practice issues, aspects of     of instructor.
feminist/mental health practice, feminist social   This course focuses on community practice and
work practice methods and current issues/situa-    the development of community strategies that
tions that affect women’s lives and their mental   address the needs of identified groups.
health. Mental Health emphasis area elective.
                                                   SOWK 761. Social Welfare Policy II:
SOWK 715. Ethical Issues in Social Work            Family Policies and Advocacy.                (3)
Practice.                                   (3)    Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the School of        Prerequisite: SOWK 611 or SOWK 679.
Social Work or by permission of the instructor.    The course provides a broad understanding of
This course focuses on the ethical issues and      the development/analysis of family policies
dilemmas that confront professional social         with an advocacy perspective on the local, state
workers in practice with individuals, groups,      and federal levels. The role of socio-cultural
families, agencies and communities. Theoretical    values, contextual factors and policy/service
models for social work ethical decision-making     assumptions are examined with the emphasis
and the National Association of Social Workers     on social work advocacy to promote social/
Code of Ethics are presented. The ways in          economic justice with populations at risk.
which personal and professional values differ
are addressed. The elements involved in ethical    SOWK 772. Research II: Advanced
decision-making are applied to case illustra-      Research Methodology.                         (3)
tions. Examples from the student’s own prac-       Three hours lecture.
tice experience will be used.                      Prerequisite: SOWK 621 or SOWK 679.
                                                   This second course in the MSW research
SOWK 720. School Social Work.                (3)   sequence is designed to explore the dynamics
Three hours lecture.                               of research theory and practice. It is intended
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the MSW         to provide students with the knowledge base
Program or permission of instructor.               to stimulate critical use of research studies in
This course is designed as an entry for            their practice, to prepare them for participation
social workers into the School as a complex        in agency or interdisciplinary research and to
host organization for social work practice.        prepare them to undertake selected research in
Philosophical, societal, population and cultural   social work practice.
sensitivity issues are addressed. School Social
Work emphasis area elective.                       SOWK 783. Social Work Practice
                                                   III: Community Practice to
SOWK 721. School Casework Practice. (3)            Strengthen Families.                    (3)
Three hours lecture, demonstration and discus-     Three hours lecture.
sion.                                              Prerequisite: SOWK 631 and 632.
Prerequisite: SOWK 720 or permission of in-        The course is the first of two concentration
structor.                                          practice courses and emphasizes communi-
This course provides students with learning        ty and organizational practice. Community-
experiences that 1) inform them about the nature   based family practice is the application of
of social casework practice, 2) provide them       social work practice skills to enhance

                                               190
collaborative relationships among families and     This course carries no credit hour production
their community networks.                          and does not count toward graduation require-
                                                   ments. This course option is also available to
SOWK 784. Social Work Practice                     those admitted students who are not enrolled in
IV: Family Practice in a Community                 a given semester but who wish to use University
Context.                                   (3)     facilities and services during that time.
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: SOWK 783.
This course is the second of two concentration
practice courses. This course focuses on the       SOCIOLOGY
knowledge, methods and skills for family prac-
tice within a community-based family practice      SOCY 580. Survey Research Methods. (3)
model.                                             Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
                                                   This course covers the construction of an instru-
SOWK 785. Integrative Seminar.            (3)
                                                   ment, sampling design and methods of analysis
Prerequisite: Last semester of the MSW             and interpretation of data. It acquaints students
Program.                                           with the use of computers for social science
Social Work 785 is the synthesis of Social         research. Students gain a hands-on experience
Work 783 and 784. This capstone course             with design and completion of survey research
is designed to facilitate the integration of       that is valuable for any student entering a career
theory, practice, policy and research through      requiring familiarity with the basis of social sur-
the lens of community-based family practice.       vey research. Students receiving undergraduate
SOWK 791:792. Concentration Practicum              credit for SOCY 480 cannot also receive gradu-
and Seminar I and II.                  (5:5)       ate credit for SOCY 580.
Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate pro-
gram in social work and SOWK 783/784 as
pre- or corequisites. SOWK 791 must be com-        THEATRE
pleted before SOWK 792 can be taken.               THEA 511. Theatrical Scene Design.          (3)
Two semester sequence. A practicum experi-         Three hours lecture, demonstration and cri-
ence (24 hours each week) accompanied by           tique.
a minimum of six seminars each semester            Prerequisite: THEA 101 and THEA 102 or con-
designed to integrate theory and field.             sent of the instructor.
GRAD 799. Continuous Enrollment.             (1)   The course is a study in the fundamentals of
All graduate students are required to be reg-      scene design for theatrical venues, incorporat-
istered during the semester they receive their     ing computer Aided Design, including concep-
degree from Radford University. Registration       tualization for stage floor plans and perspec-
is required of all graduate students when using    tives resulting in realized color renderings or
University facilities and/or faculty time. The     model design.
minimum number of hours for registration is
                                                   THEA 525. Porterfield Ensemble.               (3)
one. Registration allows use of services such
                                                   Three hours lecture, demonstration and cri-
as library checkout, laboratories and recreation
                                                   tiques.
facilities not open to the public.
                                                   The ensemble emphasizes advanced training in
Students who are not currently registered for      acting, stylized movement and vocal expres-
any course work and who have completed all         sion. Acting theories based on Jerry Grotowski
course work but have other outstanding degree      and Augusto Boal are combined with pedagogy
requirements (e.g., comprehensive examina-         in physical expression, and Cicely Berry vocal
tion, thesis, removal of an I or IP grade), are    technique. The ensemble performs as part of
required to register for a continuous enrollment   the Studio Theatre season. Touring is required
course each semester, including summer, until      and participation is based solely on auditions.
they have met the outstanding requirement(s).



                                               191
THEA 550. Directing II: Advanced.             (3)     This course will contain a concentrated study
Three hours lecture, demonstration and critique.      of particularly significant people, events, move-
Prerequisite: THEA 125 and THEA 225 and               ments or aspects of theatrical venues not cov-
THEA 350 or consent of the instructor.                ered in depth in other course offerings. May
The course is the study of various significant         be repeated (on different topic) for maximum
figures and theories of stage, video and film           of 12 semester hours credit.
production. Students are required to com-
plete a final advanced project for public presen-      THEA 576. Theatre Production
tation in one of the mediums listed above. A          Practicum.                                  (3)
final portfolio is also required.                      One hour lecture; four hours laboratory.
                                                      Introduction to the theatrical production pro-
THEA 575. Theatrical Problems.               (3)      cess through directing, designing or state man-
Three hours lecture.                                  aging. May be taken again for maximum of 12
                                                      semester hours credit.




                                                192
BOARD AND ADMINISTRATION
BOARD MEMBERS                                          TERM EXPIRES
Mr. Randal J. Kirk, Rector                             June 30, 2011
Radford, VA
Ms. Nancy H. Agee, Vice Rector                         June 30, 2011
Roanoke, VA
Ms. Nancy E. Artis                                     June 30, 2009
Pagosa Springs, CO
Mr. Robert L. Blake                                    June 30, 2009
Radford, VA
Mr. Thomas E. Fraim, Jr.                               June 30, 2008
Norfolk, VA
Mr. C. Nelson Harris                                   June 30, 2010
Roanoke, VA
Mrs. Mary Ann Hovis                                    June 30, 2010




                                                                                             BOARD, ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY
Oakton, VA
Mr. Stephen A. Musselwhite                             June 30, 2008
Vinton, VA
Mr. Mark R. Pace                                       June 30, 2008
Roanoke, VA
Dr. Cora S. Salzberg                                   June 30, 2011
Richmond, VA
Ms. Karen H. Waldron                                   June 30, 2009
Shawsville, VA
Two non-voting members are selected each year: one representing the faculty and one repre-
senting the student body.
Secretary to the Board of Visitors:
Mrs. W. Carlene Alvis

ADMINISTRATION
Penelope W. Kyle
President
Catherine Greenberg
Interim Vice President for University Advancement and Chief Development Officer
John Hachtel
Vice President for University Relations and Chief Communications Officer
Danny M. Kemp
Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer
Jo Ann Kiernan
Special Assistant to the President
Margaret McManus
Director, Internal Audit
Norleen K. Pomerantz
Vice President for Student Affairs
Wilbur W. Stanton
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Donna M. VanCleave
Vice President for Finance and Administration and Chief Financial Officer


                                           193
Aamodt, Michael G., Professor of Psychology;             Austin, Susan, Professor of Counselor Education;
B.A., Pepperdine University; M.A., Ph.D., Univer-        B.S., M.S., Radford University
sity of Arkansas                                         Baker, Moira P., Professor of English; B.A., College
Abdul-Ra’uf, Bakhitah B., Assistant Professor of         of St. Rose; M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
Criminal Justice; B.S., Cheyney State University;        Barker, Harvey, Professor of Counselor Education;
M.A., Antioch University; Ph.D., University of South     B.S., Ph.D., University of Richmond
Florida                                                  Basham, Pepper D., Professor of Communication
Albig, David, Assistant Professor Mathematics and        Sciences and Disorders; B.S., M.S., Radford Uni-
Statistics; B.S., Michigan State University; M.A.,       versity
University of Illinois; Ph.D., Florida State Univer-     Barris, Roann, Professor of Art, B.A., University of
sity                                                     Michigan; M.A., University of Illinois, Ed.D., M.S.,
Alexander, Jenny Burroughs, Instructor of Social         Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Illinois
Work; B.A., University of Mexico; M.S.W., New            Bassett, Margaret, Instructor of Nursing, B.S., Uni-
Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., Virginia Poly-       versity of Michigan; M.S., Boston University
technic Institute and State University                   Bay, Richard J., Associate Professor of Art; B.S.,
Altieri, Elizabeth, Associate Professor of Special       Kansas State University; M.A., Pittsburg State Uni-
Education; B.S., Florida Atlantic University; M.S.,      versity; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University
George Peabody College at Vanderbilt University;         Bays, Debora, Associate Professor of Special Educa-
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-     tion; B.S., M.S., Radford University; Ph.D., Virginia
versity                                                  Polytechnic Institute and State University
Amenkhienan, Felix E., Chairperson and Professor         Beach, Alan, Instructor of Social Work; B.S., Hard-
of Accounting; Finance and Information Systems;          ing University; M.S.W., University of Arkansas-Lit-
B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Mississippi;        tle Rock; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
CMA                                                      State University
Anderson, Donald, Professor of Counselor Educa-          Beach, Steven L., Associate Professor of Finance;
tion; Ed.D.,M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and     B.S., B.A., M.B.A., Tennessee Technological Uni-
State University; B.S., University of New Orleans        versity; Ph.D., Washington State University
Anderson, Tiffany C., Professor School of Teacher        Beard, James S., Professor of Geology; B.S., Uni-
Education and Leadership; B.A., Saint Louis Univer-      versity of Massachussets; Ph.D., University of Cali-
sity; M.A., University Missouri Saint Louis; Ph.D.,      fornia
Saint Louis University                                   Beheshti, Hooshang M., Chairperson and Professor
Arbogast, Terry, Professor, Education Leadership;        of Management; B.S., Iranian Institute of Advanced
B.S., Bridgewater College; M.Ed., University of Vir-     Accounting; M.S., State University of New York at
ginia                                                    Binghamton; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University
Arbury, Stephen, Director of Radford University          Benson, Ann, Counselor of Education; B.S., M.A.,
Art Museum, Chairperson and Professor of Art; B.A.,      Ed.S., Radford University
Albion College; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University          Bienstock, Carol C., Associate Professor of Man-
Arthur, Elizabeth, Instructor of Social Work; B.S.,      agement and Marketing; B.A., Medical College of
Cornell University; M.S.W., Syracuse University          Georgia; M.B.A.., Mississippi State University;
Askins, Justin, Professor of English; B.A., The          Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-
College of Staten Island; M.A., Boston University;       versity
Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center                              Birx, Ellen C., Professor of Nursing; B.S., Texas
Aspelmeier, Jeffery E., Associate Professor of Psy-      Women’s University; M.S., University of Rochester;
chology; B.S.E.D., Southwest Missouri State Univer-      Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
sity; M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University                 Bixler, Larry L., Professor of Counselor Education;
Atwell, Mary W., Chairperson and Professor of            Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-
Criminal Justice; B.A., Webster College; M.A.,           versity; M.S., Radford University; M.M., B.M., West
Ph.D., Saint Louis University                            Virginia University, Morgantown
Austin, Ellen, Professor of Special Education; B.S.,     Bizzell, Brad, Professor School of Teacher Educa-
Atlantic Christian College; M.S., Radford Univer-        tion and Leadership; B.S., Appalachian State Uni-
sity                                                     versity; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
                                                         University
                                                       194
Black, Karen, Professor of Communication Sciences         Carter, Arther E., Chairperson and Assistant Pro-
and Disorders; B.S., Radford University; M.S., Bay-       fessor of Information Technology; B.S. Old Domin-
lor University                                            ion University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic
Blaylock, Bruce K., Professor of Management;              Institute and State University
B.B.A., Ohio University; M.B.A., Auburn Univer-           Carter, Fletcher F., Professor of Education; B.A.,
sity; Ph.D., Georgia State University                     University of Florida; M.A., Appalachian State Uni-
Borling, James E., Professor of Music; B.M., DeP-         versity; Ph.D., Florida State University
auw University; M.M., University of Miami                 Carter, Kimberly F., Professor of Nursing; B.S.,
Bradbury, Carlee A., Assistant Professor of Art;          Radford University; M.S.N., Ph.D., University of
B.A., Wheaton College; M.S., University of Edin-          Virginia
burgh; Ph.D., University of Illinois                      Carter, Tania, Professor of Communication Sciences
Brinckman, Douglas, E., Associate Professor of            and Disorders; B.S., Radford University; M.S., Old
Accounting, Finance and Business Law; B.A., Vir-          Dominion University
ginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Juris   Chase, Bruce W., Professor of Accounting; B.S.,
Doctor, Gonzaga University                                M.B.A., Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University;
Brocato, Jo, Assistant Professor of Social Work,          CPA
B.A., M.S.W., Florida International                       Chase, Jeffrey L., Professor of Psychology; B.A., St.
University; Ph.D., Florida International University       Louis University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Brosowsky, Eve, Professor of Communication Sci-           Chase, Joseph D., Associate Professor of Informa-
ences and Disorders; B.A., Auburn University; M.A.,       tion Technology; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Poly-
Appalachian State University                              technic Institute and State University
Brouwer, Charles, Professor of Art; B.A., Grand           Chatham, Michael D., Assistant Professor of
Valle State University; M.A., M.F.A., Western Michi-      Accounting, Finance and Business Law; B.S.B.,
gan University                                            M.B.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma
Brown, Gwendolyn O., Associate Professor of               State University
Communication; B.A., York College of Pennsylva-           Childers, John Stephen, Assistant Professor of
nia; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland                  Management and Marketing; B.S., M.B.A., East Car-
Brown, Jo Ann, Assistant Professor of Management;         olina University Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
B.S., Christian Brothers University; M.B.A., Univer-      and State University
sity of Florida; Ph.D., University of Mississippi         Christensen, P. Niels, Associate Professor of Psy-
Bucy, Jayne E., Associate Professor of Psychol-           chology; Ph.D., M.S., Texas A&M University; B.A.,
ogy; A.P.A., University of Texas Medical Branch           University of Notre Dame
– Galveston; Ph.D., University of North Carolina,         Clelland, Iain J., Associate Professor of Manage-
Chapel Hill                                               ment and Marketing; B.A., M.S., San Diego State
Burggraf, Virginia, Professor of Nursing; B.S.N.,         University; Ph.D., University of Southern Califor-
Cornell University; M.S.N., Seton Hall University;        nia
D.N.S., Louisiana State University                        Clemente, Corey, Assistant Professor of Commu-
Burke, Tod W., Professor of Criminal Justice; B.A.,       nication Sciences and Disorders; B.A., James Madi-
University of Maryland; M.F.S., George Washington         son University; M.A., Appalachian State University;
University; M. Phil. Ph.D., City University of New        Ph.D., Touro University International
York                                                      Clements, Nicole, Professor of Communication Sci-
Burriss, Theresa, Administrative/Professional Faculty     ences and Disorders; B.S., Towson University; M.S.,
of English and Director of Learning Assistance and        Towson University
Resource Center; B.A.; Emory University; M.S., Rad-       Cline, Mark A., Assistant Professor of Biology;
ford University; Ph.D., Union Institute and University    B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
Byers, Wendy., Professor, School of Teacher Education     State University
and Leadership; B.S., James Madison University; M.S.,     Cohen, Jeradi A., Professor of School of Teacher
University of Tennessee                                   Education and Leadership, B.A., University of Mich-
Call, Jack E., Professor of Criminal Justice; B.S.,       igan; M.A., University of Virginia; Ed.D., University
Ball State University; J.D., College of William and       of Virginia
Mary, Ph.D., University of Georgia                        Cohn, Tracy J., Assistant Professor of Psychology;
                                            195           B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Kansas
Colley, Kenna M., Assistant Professor of Special           Deskins, Elizabeth, Instructor of Social Work, B.A.;
Education; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and       Emory and Henry College; M.S.W., Radford Uni-
State University; M.S., The Johns Hopkins Univer-          versity
sity; B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo        Dickerson, Jennifer, Professor of Communication
Collins, Jennifer, Assistant Professor of Art; B.F.A.,     Sciences and Disorders; B.S., M.S., Radford Uni-
Calvin College; M.F.A., Radford University                 versity
Conlin, Peter, Instructor of Social Work, B.A., Iona       Dickinson, Renee, Assistant Professor of English;
College; M.S.W., Fordham University                        B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A., University of
Conrad, Kristin, Instructor of Nursing; B.S., Beth-El      Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom; Ph.D., Univer-
College of Nursing at University of Colorado; M.S.,        sity of Colorado
Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory           Dillon, Joanne F., Instructor of Communication Sci-
University                                                 ences and Disorders; B.A., Hollins College; B.S.,
Cooper, Sharla C., Associate Professor of Nursing,         M.S., Radford University
B.S.N., Radford University; M.S.N., Old Dominion           Dobkins, David H., Associate Professor of Commu-
University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University         nication; B.A., Emporia State University; M.A., Uni-
Cosmato, Charles, Instructor of Educational Tech-          versity of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma
nology; B.S., M.S., Radford University                     Dodson, Drew, Associate Professor of Art; B.F.A.,
Cox, Kenneth, Associate Dean of Waldron College            University of Florida; M.F.A., Edinboro University
of Health and Human Services and Associate Profes-         of Pennsylvania
sor of Communication Sciences and Disorders; B.A.,         Dooley, Alton C., Jr., Professor of Geology; B.A.,
University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill; M.A.,          Carleton College; Ph.D., Louisiana State University
University of North Carolina – Greensboro; Au.D.,          Dore, Elizabeth D., Associate Professor of School
University of Florida, CCC-A                               of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.S., M.Ed.+
Creighton, Linda, Assistant Professor of School            CAS, University of Maine; Ed.D., University of
of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.S., Indiana         Northern Colorado
University of Pennsylvania; M.S., California State         Dulaney, Dru, Professor of Communication Sci-
University Los Angeles; Ed.D., Sam Houston State           ences and Disorders; B.S., University of Kentucky;
University                                                 M.S., Radford University
Cubbison, Laurie, Associate Professor of English;          Duncan-Daston, Rana, Assistant Professor of Social
B.A., Muskingum College; M.A., Eastern Kentucky            Work; B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.S.W.,
University; Ph.D., Purdue University                       Florida International University; Ed.D., University
Cummings-Lilly, Karen T., Professor of Social              of Virginia
Work; B.A., California State University; M.S.W.,           Dunleavy, Matt, Assistant Professor of School of
San Diego State University                                 Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.S., Old
Cunningham, Don, Assistant Professor of Eng-               Dominion University; Ph.D., University of Virginia
lish; B.S., M.S.,Texas A&M University-Commerce;            Durrill, Preston L., Professor of Chemistry; B.S.,
Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago            M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D.,
Daniel, Leslie, Assistant Professor of Special Educa-      Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
tion, M.S., Radford University; B.S., State University     Easterling, Tricia, Assistant Professor of School of
of New York at Geneseo                                     Teacher Education and Leadership; Ed.D., University
Davidson, Daniel V., Chairperson and Professor of          of Memphis; M.E.d., Freed-Hardeman University;
Business Law; B.S., J.D., Indiana University               B.S., The University of South Florida
Davis, Trent, A. Professor of Counseling and Human         Edwards, Grace Toney, Director and Professor, Appa-
Development; B.S., Virginia State University; M.A./        lachian Regional Studies Center and Distinguished Pro-
Ed.S., James Madison University; Ph.D., Virginia           fessor of Appalachian Studies; Professor of English;
Polytechnic Institute and State University                 B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., Uni-
Dembele, Gaston, Assistant Professor of School of          versity of Virginia
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., University         Eleweke, C. Jonah, Assistant Professor of School
of Ouagadougou; Ph.D., Michigan State University           of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.A.,
Derrick, Emory, Assistant Professor of Information         University of Nigeria; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Technology; B.S., Naval Academy; M.S., Ph.D., Vir-         Manchester; Ph.D., University of Alberta
ginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univeristy           Elis, Lori A., Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice;
                                                           B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland


                                                         196
Ellerman, Gary D., Professor of Education; B.A.,        Froemling-Orlov, Kristin, Assistant Professor of
M.A., Louisiana Tech University; Ph.D., Louisiana       Communication; B.A., M.A., Bowling Green State
State University                                        University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma
Elliott, Ann N., Professor of Psychology; B.A.,         Gallops, Ronald Wayne, Assistant Professor of
Lynchburg College, M.A., Boston College; Ph.D.,         Music, B.M., University of Tampa; M.A., Florida
Northern Illinois University                            State University; Ph.D., University of South Florida
Elliott, Johnna, R., Professor of School of Teacher     Gainer, Kim, Associate Professor of English; B.A.,
Education and Leadership; B.S., University of North     Rhode Island College; M.A., Ohio State University;
Carolina; M.Ed., University of Virginia                 Ph.D., Ohio State University
Epperly, Rebecca, Instructor of Communication           Gallo, Louis, Professor of English; B.A., Tulane
Sciences and Disorders; B.S., Radford University;       University; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D.,
M.S., East Tennessee Sate University                    University of Missouri
Evans, Deneen, Instructor of Social Work; B.A.,         Geller, Carol H., Professor of School of Teacher
Roanoke College; M.S.W., Radford University             Education and Leadership B.S., M.S., Southern Illi-
Fellin, Eugene C., Chairperson and Professor of         nois University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Music; B.F.A., University of Wisconsin; M.M., Uni-      and State University
versity of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin     Geller, Krista, Professor of Psychology; B.S., Rad-
Fender, Keith, Instructor of Social Work; B.S.W.,       ford University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Ferrum College; M.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth           and State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic
University; Ph.D., La Salle University                  Institute and State University
Feng, Zheng-Liang, Professor of Art; B.F.A.,            George, Donald, Assistant Professor of Music; B.M.,
Shanghai Teachers’ University; M.F.A., Radford          Southeastern Louisiana University; M.M. Louisiana
University                                              State University
Flora, Rudolph, Jr., Instructor of Social Work; B.S.,   Gibson, Mary H., Professor Nursing; B.S.N., Uni-
East Tennessee State University; M.S.W., Virginia       versity of Virginia; M.S.N., Vanderbilt University;
Commonwealth University                                 Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
Flora, William, Assistant Professor of School of        Gilbert, Sharon L., Assistant Professor of School
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., Ferrum          of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.S., M.S.,
College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Virginia           University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Auburn
Fooks, Nan, Professor of School of Teacher Educa-       University
tion and Leadership; M. S., University of Virginia,     Gilley, Christina T., Professor of Special Education;
M.S., Vanderbilt University; B.A., Mary Washington      M.Ed., B.S., Radford University
College                                                 Givens, Karolyn W., Associate Professor of Nurs-
Forrest, Alan, Chairperson and Professor of Coun-       ing; B.S.N., Wayne State University; M.S., Boston
selor Education; Ed.D., College of William and Mary;    University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
M.A., University of New Haven; B.A., Eisenhower         State University
College                                                 Goldwasser, Joni, Assistant Professor of School of
Foulks Boyd, Barbara, Professor of School of            Nursing; B.S., St. John College; M.S., University of
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.S.Ed.,        Cincinnati;
State University of New York; Ed.D., University of      Gorzycki, Laura, Instructor of Communication Sci-
the Pacific                                             ences and Disorders; B.S., Rhodes College; M.A.,
Frahm, Whitney, Professor of Communication Sci-         Memphis State University
ences and Disorders; B.A., Emory                        Graham, Suzanne, Professor of Special Education;
and Henry College; M.S., Radford University             B.A., University of Virginia; M.S., Radford Univer-
Fraser, Nicholas C., Professor of Geology; B.S.,        sity
Aberdeen University; Honorary M.A., Cambridge           Grady, Dennis, Dean of College of Graduate and
University; Ph.D., Aberdeen University                  Professional Studies and Professor of Political Sci-
Friedman, Dianne E., Professor of Psychology;           ence; B.A., University of North Carolinia; M.C.P.,
B.A., Northwestern University; M.A., University of      Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Emory Uni-
Michigan; Ph.D., University of South Carolina           versity
French, Sandra, Assistant Professor of Communica-       Graves, Lynn, Professor of School of Teacher Edu-
tion; B.S., Radford University; M.A., Wake Forest       cation and Leadership; B.A., M.S., University of
University; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State Univer-       Tennessee
sity

                                                    197
Green, Egan, Assistant Professor of Criminal Jus-         Helm, John, Professor of Information Technology;
tice; B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., East      B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.S., Purdue Uni-
Tennessee State University; Ph.D., Indiana Univer-        versity; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
sity of Pennsylvania                                      University; Ph.D., Purdue University
Grossmann, Axel, Assistant Professor of Account-          Helton, Susan, Professor of Social Work; B.S., M.S.,
ing, Finance and Business Law; B.S., Technical Col-       University of Tennessee
lege of Giessen; M.B.A., Ph.D., The University of         Henderson, Dale A., Associate Professor of Man-
Texas Pan-American                                        agement; B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
Gumaer, D. James, Professor of Counselor Educa-           State University; M.B.A., Radford University; Ph.D.,
tion; B.S., State University of New York at Cortland,     University of Nebraska at Lincoln
M.S., Syracuse University; Ed.S., Ed.D., University       Hendrix, Nicole, Assistant Professor of Criminal
of Florida                                                Justice; B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina at
Guruswamy, Rosemary, Chairperson and Profes-              Charlotte; Ph.D., University of Albany
sor of English; B.A., Kent State University; M.A.,        Henslee, Mary, Instructor of Social Work; B.A.,
University of Maryland, College Park; Ph.D., Kent         Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University;
State University                                          M.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth University
Hall, Donald, Professor of Psychology; B.A., Wake         Hernandez, Rodrigo, Assistant Professor of Finance;
Forest University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North       M.A., Ph.D., University of Arkansas
Carolina                                                  Hever, David R., Instructor of Counselor Education;
Hamilton, Evelyn, Instructor of Counselor Educa-          B.A., University College Dublin; B.D., Maynooth
tion; B.A., Bluefield College; M.S., Radford Uni-         University; M.S., Appalachian State University
versity                                                   Hill, Jennifer, Professor of Communication Sciences
Hammond, Georgia A., Associate Professor of Biol-         and Disorders; B.S., Stephen F. Austin State Univer-
ogy; B.S., M.A., College of William and Mary; Ph.D.,      sity; M.A., Our Lady of the Lake University
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University       Hiltonsmith, Robert W., Professor of Psychology;
Harding, Victoria, Instructor of Communication            B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., Ohio State Uni-
Sciences and Disorders; B.S., Trent University; M.S.,     versity; Ph.D., Peabody College of Vanderbilt Uni-
Dalhousie University; M.B.A., Plymouth State Uni-         versity
versity                                                   Hochstein, Lucy, Associate Professor of Criminal
Harrington, K. Vernard, Assistant Profes-                 Justice; B.A., Seattle University; M.A., Ph.D., Wash-
sor of Management and Marketing; B.B.A.,                  ington State University
University of Iowa; M.S., Iowa State Uni-                 Hodge, Diane, Interim Director of School of Social
versity; Ph.D., Texas A&M University                      Work and Associate Professor of Social Work; B.A.,
Hart, Katherine, Instructor of Social Work; B.S.,         Alma College; M.S.W., University of Michigan;
Concord College; M.S.W., West Virginia University         Ph.D., Ohio State University
Hartig, Nadine, Assistant Professor of Counselor          Holland, Lisa Dare, Instructor, School of Teacher
Education; B.A., M.S., University of Wisconsin;           Education and Leadership; B.S., M.S., Radford. Uni-
Ph.D., University of Northern Colorado                    versity
Hashemzadeh, Nozar, Chairperson and Professor of          Hoge, Melinda, Professor of School of Teacher Edu-
Economics; B.A., Isfahan University; M.A., Ph.D.,         cation and Leadership; B.S., Concord College; M.S.,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University       Radford University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic
Haskins, Vanessa, Instructor, School of Teacher           Institute and State University
Education and Leadership; B.A., Mary Baldwin Col-         Hollandsworth, Randall Jackson, Professor for
lege; M.S., Radford University                            College of Education; B.S., University of North
Hastings, Sarah, Assistant Professor of Psychology;       Carolina-Charlotte; M.S., Georgia State University;
B.S., M.Ed., James Madison University; Ed.S., Uni-        Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-
versity of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Kansas          versity
Hazleton, Vincent Jr., Professor of Communica-            Holt, Karen, Professor of Communication Sciences
tion; B.A., Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts; M.A.,       and Disorders; M.A., B.A., Wichita State Univer-
Ph.D., University of Oklahoma                             sity
Helbert, Fredia, Professor of Communication Sci-          Honaker, Barbara, Instructor of Social Work;
ences and Disorders; B.S., King College; M.S., Flor-      B.S.W., Concord College; M.S., West Virginia Uni-
ida State University; Ph.D., AT Still University of       versity
Health Sciences

                                                        198
Hoover, Kathryn A., Assistant Professor of Special       Kasturi, Prahlad, Professor of Economics; B.S.,
Education; B.A., Brigham Young University; M.A.,         Andhra Pradesh Agricultural University, Hyderabad
West Virginia University; M.Ed., University of Hous-     – India; M.S., Ph.D., University of Hawaii
ton; Ph.D., University of Virginia                       Kats, Nitza, Associate Professor of Music; M.F.A.,
Htay, Maung, Professor of Information Technology;        Teaching Certificate, Artist Diploma, Rubin Acad-
B.S., Rangoon University; M.S., University of Lon-       emy of Music, Jerusalem; M.F.A., University of Min-
don; M.S., Rangoon University; Ph.D., Louisiana          nesota
State University                                         Kelly, Kathryn H., Associate Professor of English;
Hundley, Jane Carter, Instructor of Social Work;         B.A., M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
B.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A., University of       University; Ph.D., Florida State University
Oklahoma                                                 Kelso, Andrea, Instructor of Nursing;         B.S.N.,
Ichikawa, Yumiko, Professor of Art; B.A., Kyoritsu       George Mason University; M.S.N., Catholic Univer-
Women's University; M.F.A., Radford University           sity of America
Ingham, Alice King, Assistant Professor of Social        Kennan, William R., Interim Associate Dean of
Work, University of Albany New York; M.S.W.,             College of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences and
Syracuse University; B.S., State University of New       Professor of Communication; B.A., M.A., University
York; B.S., Syracuse University                          of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma
Ireland-D’, Ardenne Rochelle, Professor School of        King, Joseph S., Professor of Honors Academy and
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.S., Pittsburgh       Professor of Psychology; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia
State University; M.S., Southwestern Oklahoma            Polytechnic Institute and State University
State University                                         Kipling, Kim, Professor of Philosophy and Reli-
Jackson, Pamela A., Professor of Psychology; B.A.,       gious Studies; B.A., M.A., Kent State University;
Berea College; Ph.D., University of Kentucky             Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
James, Clarity, Professor of Music and Director of       Kizner, Scott, Instructor of Educational Leadership;
Opera Workshop; B.M., University of Wyoming;             B.A., Baruch College - City University of New York;
M.M., Indiana University                                 Ed.S., James Madison University; Ph.D., Virginia
James, Jane, Professor of School of Teacher Educa-       Polytechnic Institute and State University
tion and Leadership; B.S., M.S., Radford University;     Knipe, James, Professor of Art; B.A., Western Wash-
Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-     ington State University; M.F.A., University of Minne-
versity                                                  sota
Jaronski, Walter S., Chairperson and Professor of        Kolenbrander, Ronald W., Professor of Education;
Physical Science; B.S., St. Peter’s College; M.S.,       B.A., Southwest State University; M.A., Emporia State
University of Maryland; Ph.D., Florida State Uni-        University; M.A., Ph.D., Kansas State University
versity                                                  Kopf, Jerry, Professor of Management; B.S.B.A.,
Johnston, Matthew W., Professor of Art; Ph.D.,           M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Arkansas
M.A., University of Chicago; B.A., Yale University       Kuennecke, Bernd H., Chairperson and Professor
Jones, Franklin, Professor of Chemistry and Phys-        of Geography; B.A., Universitaet Regensburg; M.A.,
ics; Ed.D., University of Georgia; M.Ed., University     University of Oregon; Ph.D., Universitaet Regens-
of North Carolina; B.A., Appalachian State Univer-       burg
sity                                                     LaRue, Laura, Instructor of School of Nursing;
Jones, Jennifer, Assistant Professor of School of        B.S., M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., Bluefield        LaSala, Kathleen, Director of School of Nursing
College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Virginia            and Professor of the School of Nursing; B.S., Rad-
Jordan, Kathryn, Professor of Counselor Educa-           ford University; M.S., University of Virginia; Ph.D.,
tion; Ph.D., Philosphy, Virginia Polytechnic Institute   George Mason University
and State University; M.S., Counseling, Radford          Langrehr, Donald B., Associate Professor of School
University; B.A., Sociology, College of William and      of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.S.,
Mary                                                     New Jersey City University; Ph.D., Florida State
Jordan, Zach, Instructor of Nursing; Pharm.D., Uni-      University
versity of Wyoming                                       Lanier, R. Parks, Jr., Professor of English; A.B.,
Just, Gloria, Professor of Nursing; Ph.D., New York      Pfeiffer College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennes-
University; Ed.M., M.A., Teachers College Colum-         see, Knoxville
bia University; B.S., Upsala College/ Mountainside
Hospital New Jersey

                                                     199
Leake, Valerie S., Assistant Professor of Psychol-        Margheim, Dale E., Professor of School of Teacher
ogy; B.S.Ed., University of Georgia; M.S., Ph.D.,         Education and Leadership; B.A., English; M.A.,
University of Kentucky                                    Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-
Lee, Hwajung, Assistant Professor of Information          versity
Technology; B.S., Duksung Women’s University;             Martin, C. Novel, Professor of Accounting, Finance
M.S., Yonsei University; Ph.D., George Washington         and Business Law; B.S., Radford University; M.B.A.,
University                                                Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Lee, Rebecca, Assistant Professor of Psychology;          Mathai, Christina, Professor of Counselor Educa-
B.S., East Tennessee State University; M.S., Radford      tion; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
University                                                and State University
LeShock, Edward, Assistant Professor of Art; B.A.,        Mathews, Carolyn, Associate Professor of English;
B.S., Penn State University; M.Ed., Temple Univer-        B.A., Radford University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic
sity, Tyler School of Art                                 Institute and State University; M.A., Ph.D., The Uni-
Lewis, John, Professor of Information Technology;         versity of North Carolina at Greensboro
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and     Mauro, Lucy, Assistant Professor of Music; B.M.,
State University                                          M.M., D.M.A., Peabody Conservatory of the Johns
Linkous, Kathleen, Professor of Art; M.F.A., B.S.,        Hopkins University
Radford University                                        McCracken, Robert C., Assistant Professor of
Linkous, Vicki, Professor of School of Teacher Edu-       School of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.S.,
cation and Leadership; B.A., Radford College; M.A.,       California State College; M.A., C.A.G.S., Ed.D., Vir-
C.A.G.S., Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and       ginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
State University                                          McDaniel, Janet L., Professor of Nursing; B.S.N.,
Linville, Raymond N., Dean of the Waldron Col-            Berea College; M.P.H., University of North Carolina,
lege of Health and Human Services; B.A., M.S., East       Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Iowa            State University
Lips, Hilary M., Chairperson and Professor of Psy-        McFeature, Bill, Professor of Counselor Education;
chology, Director of Center for Gender Studies; B.A.,     B.S., M.S., East Tennessee State University; Ph.D.,
University of Windsor; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern          Capella University
University                                                McNamee, Carole, Professor of Counselor Educa-
Lollar, James, Chairperson and Associate Professor        tion; S.B., Simmons College; M.S., Stanford Univer-
of Management and Marketing; B.S., M.A., Univer-          sity; Ph.D., University of California; Ph.D., Virginia
sity of Alabama; Ph.D., University of Alabama             Polytechnic Institute and State University
Lowrance, April, Professor of Communication Sci-          Meador, Marilyn, Professor of Music; B.S., Middle
ences and Disorders; B.S., Georgia State University;      Tennessee State University; M.M., Southern Illinois
M.S. East Tennessee State University                      University; Ph.D., North Texas State University
Lythgoe, Michael A., Professor of Counselor Educa-        Mekolichick, Jeanne, Associate Professor of Sociol-
tion; B.A. Virginia Military Institute; M.A., Naropa      ogy; B.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Wayne
University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and     State University
State University                                          Mesmer, Eric M., B.S., James Madison University;
Mabry, Jennifer, Assistant Professor of Psychology;       M.A./C.A.S., Appalachian State University; Ed.S.,
B.S., James Madison University; M.Ed., University         Ph.D., University of South Florida
of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Ed.D., University of       Millar, Diane, C., Associate Professor of Communi-
Virginia                                                  cation Sciences and Disorders; B.S., McMaster Uni-
Machado-Escudero, Yolanda, Instructor of Social           versity; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Work; B.S.W., M.S.W., University of Puerto Rico           Minarik, Darren William, Professor of Special
Mahin, Bruce P., Director of Center for Music Tech-       Education; B.A., M.Ed., Auburn University
nology and Professor of Music; B.M., West Virginia        Mooney, Janice, Assistant Professor of Nursing;
University; M.M., Northwestern University; D.M.A.,        B.S.N., University of Virginia; M.S., Ohio State Uni-
The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins Uni-           versity
versity                                                   Moore, George Wayne, Professor of Communication
Manns, Gloria, Instructor of Social Work; B.S., Ten-      Sciences and Disorders; M.S., B.S., Radford Univer-
nessee State University; M.S.W., Smith College for        sity
Social Work


                                                        200
Morrison, Kristan, A., Assistant Professor, School of     Pettit, John, Professor of Communication Sciences
Education and Teacher Leadership; B.A., Westminster       and Disorders; B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., The
College; M.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., Univer-     Ohio State University; Ph.D., Purdue University
sity of North Carolina                                    Phillips, David, Professor of Music; B.M., George
Mullenbach, Kereen, Assistant Professor of Nursing;       Peabody College; M.M., D.M.A., University of
B.S., M.S., Loyola University; M.B.A., Averett College;   Michigan
Ph.D., Loyola University                                  Phillips, Robert H., Jr., Associate Professor of
Mullis, H. Thomas, Professor of Psychology; B.A.,         Information Technology; B.S.E., M. Acctcy., Ph.D.,
Davis and Elkins College; M.S., Springfield College;      Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Ph.D., University of Utah                                 Philpot, Eloise, Assistant Professor of Art; B.F.A.,
Murray, Lynda, Assistant Professor of Counselor           Memphis Academy of Arts; M.A., New School for
Education; B.A., University of Richmond; M.S.,            Social Research; Ph.D., Mississippi State Univer-
Lynchburg College; M.A., University of Kentucky;          sity
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-      Pierce, Thomas W., Professor of Psychology; B.A.,
versity                                                   McGill University; Ph.D., University of Maine
Nicely, James, Professor of Communication Sci-            Pillow, Gary L., Instructor of Communication Sci-
ences and Disorders; A.M., B.S., Indiana University;      ences and Disorders; B.S., M.A., East Tennessee State
Ph.D., University of Illinois                             University; Au.D., Pennsylvania College of Optometry;
Nordgren, Cheryl, Professor of Communication              Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
Sciences and Disorders; M.S., Radford University;         Pitonyak, Cynthia, Professor of Special Education;
B.S., Purdue University                                   B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Radford Uni-
O’Conner, Joseph John, Assistant Professor of Art;        versity
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univer-    Poland, Michelle, Professor of Music; B.M., James
sity; M.F.A., Radford University                          Madison University; M.M., University of North Caro-
Okie, Edward, Professor of Information Technol-           lina at Greensboro; D.M.A., University of North Caro-
ogy; B.S., Carnegie Mellon University; M.S., Ph.D.,       lina
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University       Poland, Timothy C., Professor of English; B.A., Ohio
Onega, Lisa, Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., Radford        University; M.A., Ph.D., Georgia State University
University; M.S.N., F.N.P., Ph.D., University of Vir-     Pomerantz, Norleen, Vice President of Student
ginia                                                     Affairs; B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A.,
Orlov, Alexei G., Associate Professor of Economics;       The University of Arizona; Ph.D., The Union Insti-
B.S., Moscow State Civil Engineering University;          tute
M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of        Porter, Angela Wood, Instructor of Social Work;
Virginia                                                  M.S.W., Radford University; B.A., Mary Baldwin
Owen, Stephen, Associate Professor of Criminal            College
Justice; B.S., Southeast Missouri State University;       Porter, Daniel, Professor of Psychology; B.S., Old
M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri at St. Louis          Dominion University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Poly-
Pack, Alison, Assistant Professor of Art; B.S., Appa-     technic Institute and State University
lachian State University; M.F.A., East Tennessee          Pritchett, James, Instructor of Social Work, M.S.W.,
State University                                          Radford University; B.S., Wingate College
Pallante, Thomas, Professor of Art, M.F.A., Radford       Quinn, Avis, Professor of Counselor Education;
University                                                M.S., Radford University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytech-
Park, Boyoung, Assistant Professor of School of           nic Institute and State University
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., Ewha              Reilly, Nora P., Professor of Psychology; B.A.,
Women’s University; M.A., Ph.D., University of            Stonehill College; Ph.D., Dartmouth College
Georgia                                                   Ren, Michele, Assistant Professor of English; B.A.,
Paynter, Clara, Instructor of Social Work; B.S., Vir-     M.S., Radford University; Ph.D., Washington State
ginia State University; M.S., Radford University          University
Pennix, James, Instructor of Social Work; B.S., Roa-      Ricci, Ronald, Professor of Counselor Educa-
noke College; M.S.W., Radford University                  tion; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
Perumpral, Shalini, Professor of Accounting,              University; M.A., Antioch New England Graduate
Finance and Business Law; B.A., Delhi University;         School; M.S. Saint Michael’s College Vermont; B.S.,
M.S., Purdue University; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia Poly-      Green Mountain College Vermont
technic Institute and State University

                                                      201
Riffe, Kara, Instructor of Communication Sciences         Saperstein, Jeffrey S., Professor of English; B.A.,
and Disorders; M.S., Radford University; B.S., West       State University of New York at Albany; M.A.,
Virginia University                                       Northeastern University; Ph.D., University of New
Rigney, Susan, Instructor of Social Work; M.S.W.,         Hampshire
Radford University; B.S.W., James Madison Uni-            Sargent-Martin, Sheila, Instructor of School of
versity                                                   Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., Clinch
Ring, Deborah, Instructor of School of Nursing,           Valley College of the University of Virginia; M.S.,
B.S., University of Virginia; M.A., University of         Radford University
Northern Colorado                                         Saubert, Lynn, Professor of Accounting, Finance
Robbins, Holly, Assistant Professor of School             and Business Law; B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Univer-
of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A.,                sity of Wisconsin
M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte;          Scartelli, Joseph P., Dean of the College of Visual
Ph.D.,University of North Carolina Greensboro             and Performing Arts and Professor of Music; B.S.,
Roberts, Polly, Professor of Counselor Education;         Mansfield University; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Ph.D., M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State     Miami
University; M.A., Duke University; B.A., Randolph-        Scarfe, Michelle, Professor of Communication Sci-
Macon Women’s College                                     ences and Disorders; B.S., M.S., Radford Univer-
Robson, Sean, Associate Professor of Psychology;          sity
B.A., James Madison University; M.A., Ph.D., Uni-         Schneller, Debora, Assistant Professor of Social
versity of Tulsa                                          Work; B.A., University of California; M.A., State
Rogers, Orion J., Interim Associate Dean of the Col-      University of New York; M.S.W., Smith College
lege of Science and Technology and Professor of           School of Social Work; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic
Biology; B.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D. North        Institute and State University
Carolina State University                                 Schoenherr-Crump, Carolyn, Instructor of Coun-
Rose, Clarence C., Professor of Finance; B.S., Ferris     selor Education; A.S., St. Clair Community College;
State University; M.B.A., Central Michigan Univer-        B.S., St. Mary-of-the-Woods College; M.A., Western
sity; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State     Michigan University
University                                                Schoppelrey, Susan, Assistant Professor of Social
Rose, Dana, Assistant Professor of School of Teacher      Work; B.A., Angelo State University; M.S.W., Our
Education and Leadership; B.A., Oklahoma Baptist          Lady of the Lake University; Ph.D., The University
University; M.S., George Peabody College of Teach-        of Texas at Austin
ers; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State      Scott, William R., Assistant Professor of Counselor
University                                                Education, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
Rossi, Patricia, Instructor of Communication Sci-         State University; M.A., Vermont College of Nor-
ences and Disorders; B.A., M.S., University of Ari-       wich University; B.A., Mary Washington College
zona; CCC-SLP, University of Virginia                     and Lehigh University
Roybark, Helen M., Assistant Professor of Account-        Secreast, Donald F., Professor of English; B.A.,
ing, Finance and Business Law; B.A., Saint Leo Col-       M.A., Appalachian State University; M.A., Johns
lege; M.S., Old Dominion University; Ph.D., Virginia      Hopkins University; M.F.A., Ph.D., University of
Commonwealth University                                   Iowa
Roufagalas, John, Professor of Economics; B.A.,           Sellers, James, Associate Professor of School of
Piraeus Graduate School of Industrial Studies; M.A.,      Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.A.,
Athens School of Economics and Business Studies;          Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-
Ph.D., University of Florida                              versity
Salam, Halide, Professor of Art; B.A., Government         Seyfrit, Carole L., Professor of Sociology; B.A.,
Girls’ College, Chittagong, Bangladesh; M.A., New         Indiana Institute of Technology; M.S., Utah State
Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., Texas Tech            University; Ph.D., University of Maryland
University                                                Shareef, Reginald A.T., Professor of Political Sci-
Samson, Donald C., Jr., Professor of English; B.A.,       ence; B.S., M.Ed., Virginia State University; M.Ad.,
Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North      Lynchburg College; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic
Carolina                                                  Institute and State University
                                                          Sheehy, Robert R., Associate Professor of Biology;
                                                          B.S., Eastern Oregon State College; Ph.D., Univer-
                                                          sity of Arizona

                                                        202
Shelor-Rogers, Malinda, Instructor of Social Work;      Steigerwald, Fran J., Associate Professor of Coun-
M.S.W., B.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth Univer-           selor Education; B.S.E., St. John’s College; M.Ed.,
sity                                                    Cleveland State University; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni-
Shepherd, Kristyn B., Instructor of School of           versity
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.S., M.S., Rad-      Stewart, Elizabeth, Professor of Communication
ford University                                         Sciences and Disorders; B.S.Ed., M.Ed., University
Sherman, Greg, Assistant Professor of School of         of Georgia
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A.Ed., M.Ed.,       Stewart, Jill S., Chairperson and Professor of Math-
Ph.D., Arizona State University                         ematics and Statistics; B.S., Georgia Southern Col-
Shing, Chen-Chi, Associate Professor of Informa-        lege; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
tion Technology; B.S., National Cheng Kung Uni-         State University
versity; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute    Strauss, Sarah, Professor of Nursing; B.S., Univer-
and State University                                    sity of Texas; M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D.,
Shoemaker, Patricia B., Dean, College of Education      University of Washington
and Human Development; Associate Professor of Edu-      Steele, Jenessa, Assistant Professor of Psychology;
cation; B.M.E., St. Mary College; B.A., M.A., Ph.D.,    B.A., Winona State University; M.A., West Virginia
University of South Florida                             University; Ph.D., West Virginia University
Sinclair, Michael, Instructor of Social Work; B.S.,     Strosnider, John, Assistant Professor of Counselor
State University of New York College at Old Westbury;   Education; A.S., Lee McRae College; B.S., Virginia
M.S.W., Columbia University                             Commonwealth; M.A., Appalachian State Univer-
Singleton, Susan, Instructor of Communication Sci-      sity
ences and Disorders; M.S., B.S., Radford Univer-        Stump, Christie, Instructor of Communication Sci-
sity                                                    ences and Disorders; B.S., M.S., Radford Univer-
Slusher, Jennifer J., Professor of Counselor Educa-     sity
tion; B.S., Longwood College; M.S., Radford Uni-        Talbot, Patricia, Assistant Professor of School of
versity; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and      Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.A.,
State University                                        Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-
Smith, Kevin, Assistant Professor of Art; B.F.A.,       versity
Auburn University; M.F.A., Louisiana Tech Univer-       Taylor, Catherine, Professor of Counselor Educa-
sity                                                    tion; B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.,
Smith, Wendy, Professor of Math and Statistics;         Chestnut Hill College; Psy.D., Chestnut Hill Col-
M.S., B.A., Central Washington University; Ph.D.,       lege
University of Colorado                                  Templeton, Dennie, Professor of Distance Edu-
Spielman, Laura J., Assistant Professor of Math         cation; B.S., Southern Illinois University; M.S.,
and Statistics; B.S., Roanoke College, M.S.,            Ph.D.,University of Georgia
Ph.D.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-     Terry, Krista, Professor, School of Teacher Educa-
versity                                                 tion and Leadership; B.A., Lyndon State College;
Squires, Gail, Assistant Professor of Communica-        M.A., Radford University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytech-
tion Sciences and Disorders; B.S., M.A., Trenton        nic Institute and State University
State College                                           Thayer, Preston, Professor of Art; B.S., Univer-
Stackpole-Hodges, Christene, Instructor of Com-         sity of Michigan; M.A., University of Delaware;
munication Sciences and Disorders; B.S., M.S., West     Ph.D.,University of Pennsylvania
Virginia University; M.S., West Virginia Graduate       Toliver-Hardy, Sharon; Instructor of Social Work;
College; B.A., Marshall University                      M.S.W., Radford University
Stanley, Paula H., Director, Faculty Development        Tolley, PaTricia, Instructor of Communication Sci-
Center; Professor of Counselor Education; Ph.D.,        ences and Disorders; M.S., East Tennessee State Uni-
University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A.,       versity; B.S., Appalachian State University
B.A., Appalachian State University                      Tong, Hsin-Min, Professor of Marketing; B.S., Tung-
Stanton, Angela, Associate Professor of Manage-         hai University; M.S., Fort Hays Kansas State Univer-
ment and Marketing; B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Old            sity; Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln
Dominion University                                     Trent, Robert S., Associate Professor of Music;
Stanton, Wilbur W., Provost and Professor of Infor-     B.M., Philadelphia College of Performing Arts;
mation Science and Technology; B.B.A., M.B.A.,          M.A., Trenton State College; D.M.A., The Peabody
M.D.S., Ph.D., Georgia State University                 Institute of the Johns Hopkins University

                                                    203
Triplett, Cheri, Associate Professor of School of            Weber, Linda H., Professor of Educational Leader-
Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., Meredith             ship; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Cali-
College; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D.,          fornia State University; B.S., Central Michigan
University of Georgia                                        University
Tso, Jonathan L., Associate Professor of Geology;            Webster, H. Francis, Professor of Chemistry; B.S.,
B.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook;           M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State        University
University                                                   Webster-Garrett, Erin, Associate Professor of Eng-
Turner, Matthew, Assistant Professor of Media Stud-          lish; B.A., University of Richmond, M.A., Virginia
ies; B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-     Commonwealth University; Ph.D., University of
versity; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio University                        Denver
Tyler, Brenda-Jean, Assistant Professor of Special           Webster, Lisa, Professor of Communication; B.A.,
Education-High Incidence; B.A., Dickinson College;           University of Virginia’s College; M.A., University of
M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin              Alabama; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University
Uppuluri, Premchand, Assistant Professor of Infor-           Weirr, Timothy, Professor of Music; B.M., Canberra
mation Technology; B.E., Osmania University; M.S.,           School of Music; M.M., Florida International Univer-
Iowa State University; Ph.D., State University of            sity; Ph.D., University of Miami
New York                                                     Weiss, Frieda, Associate Professor of Counselor
Van Dyke, Ray, Professor of Education; A.S., South-          Education; B.A., Towson State College; M.S., Rad-
west Virginia Community College; B.A., M.A.,                 ford College; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-         and State University
versity                                                      Weisz, Virginia, Assistant Professor of Nursing;
Van Noy, Richard G., Associate Professor of Eng-             B.S.N., Capital University; M.S., Medical College of
lish; B.A., The Colorado College; M.A., Western              Virginia; Virginia Commonwealth University
Washington University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve           Wellons, Jaye, Professor of Special Education; B.S.,
University                                                   Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University;
Van Patten, Isaac T., Professor of Criminal Justice;         M.Ed., James Madison University; Ed.D., Memphis
B.A., Hampden-Sydney College; M.Ed., Boston Uni-             State University
versity; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and           Werth, James L., Jr., Professor of Psychology; B.S.,
State University                                             Texas Christian University; M.L.S., University of
Vandsburger, Etty, Assistant Professor of Social Work;       Nebraska; Ph.D., Auburn University
B.S.W., Haifa University; M.S.W., Rutgers University;        Whisonant, Brenda, Instructor of Communication
Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University                      Sciences and Disorders; B.A., Furman University;
Vaught, Holley, Instructor of Communication Sciences         M.S., Radford University
and Disorders; B.S., James Madison University; M.S.,         Whisonant, Robert, Professor of Geology; B.S.,
Radford University                                           Clemson University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State Uni-
Vehorn, Charles, Assistant Professor of Economics;           versity
B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., University of          Wiggs, Garland, Instructor; B.B.A., University of
Arkansas; Ph.D., The Ohio State University                   Cincinnati; M.A., University of Northern Colorado;
Waldron, Claire M., Chairperson and Professor of             Ed.D., George Washington University
Communication Sciences and Disorders; B.A., M.A.,            Williams, Eric G., Professor of Counselor Educa-
University of Missouri-Columbia; Ph.D., Virginia             tion; B.I.S., Virginia Commonwealth University;
Polytechnic Institute and State University; CCC-             M.A., Kent State University;
SLP                                                          Williams, Robert, Associate Professor of English;
Washenberger, Michelle, Professor of Communication           B.A., William and Mary University; M.A., Ph.D.,
Sciences and Disorders; B.S., M.S. Radford Univer-           Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
sity                                                         Willner, Jeffrey, Associate Professor of Psychology;
Wallace, Tamara, Assistant Professor of the School           B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Ph.D., Dal-
of Teacher Education and Leadership; B.A., M.A.,             housie University
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Uni-         Willoughby, J. Ronald, Professor of Chemistry and
versity                                                      Physics; B.S., Emory and Henry College; M.Ed., Ed.D,
Wawrzycka, Jolanta W., Professor of English; B.A.,           University of Virginia
M.A., University of Wroclaw, Poland; Ph.D., South-
ern Illinois University

                                                           204
Wilson, Brent T., Assistant Professor of Communi-      Wojtera, Allen F., Professor of Music; B.S., Central
cation Sciences and Disorders; B.S., Radford Univer-   Connecticut State University; M.M., Northwestern
sity; Ph.D., Univeristy of Louisiana at Lafayette      University
Witkowsky, Paul W., Professor of English; B.A.,        Woolley, Douglas C., Professor of Economics; B.A.,
Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of         M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut
North Carolina                                         Zuschin, David, Assistant Professor of Music; B.S.,
                                                       Kent State University; M.S., Yale University




                                                   205
INDEX
Academic Calendar ...............3               Certificate, Post-                            Criminal Record ..................36
Academic Colleges ..............60                 Baccalaureate ...................19         Curriculum and
Academic Organization .......12                  Change of Major..................50            Instruction Concentration..80
Academic Outreach .............11                Check Writing Policies ........27
Academic Policies ...............45              Checklist ................................7   Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Academic Programs ............63                 Class Attendance .................45           Concentration .................114
Academic Terminology .......63                   Class Load ...........................53      Deficiency............................48
Academic Year.....................12             Classifications o                             Degree Requirements ..........49
Accelerated Bachelor’s/                           Admission Status ..............17            Degrees Offered.....................4
 Master’s Degree................52               Clinical Nurse Specialist .....93             Dining Services ...................39
Accreditation and                                Clinical Psychology...........100             Directed Study .....................55
 Memberships ....................11              Codes and Policies...............36           Dissertation ..........................55
Admission ............................14         College of Business and                       Disbursement of Financial
Admission Procedures .........14                  Economics ........................60          Aid.....................................28
Admission Status .................17             College of Education and
Advanced Adult Nursing                            Human Development .......61                  Early Childhood Education
 Concentration ...................94             College of Health and                          Concentration ...................80
Advisers ...............................45        Human Services................62             Early Childhood Special
Advising...............................45        College of Humanities                          Education Concentration ..114
Application Fee ...................25             and Behavioral Sciences...60                 Ed.S. Degree ...................... 111
Application for Degree ........58                College of Science                            Education .............................78
Application                                       and Technology.................62            Education and Human
 Requirements ....................21             College of Visual and                          Development.....................61
Applied Music Fee ..............26                Performing Arts ................62           Educational Leadership .......82
Applying for Financial Aid 28                    Colleges ...............................60    Educational Technology
Art ........................................64   Commencement ...................59             Concentration ...................81
Auditing Courses .................57             Commencement Costs.........26                 Educational Specialist
Awards .................................56       Communication Sciences                         Degree ............................. 111
                                                  and Disorders ....................66         English .................................84
Banking Facilities ................27            Community Counseling ......75                 English as a Second
Biology Courses ................120              Commuting Student                               Language .........................81
Board and                                          Services ............................37     Exception to Academic
  Administration ...............193              Comprehensive                                  Policy ...................................59
Business Administration                            Examination.....................56          Exceptions to Withdrawals..54
 (MBA) ..............................64          Computer Labs ....................40          Experimental Psychology..102
Business and                                     Conditional Admission ........17              Expenses ..............................24
 Economics ........................60            Conduct Code ......................36
                                                 Content Area Studies                          Faculty ...............................194
Calendar .................................3       Concentration ...................80          Faculty Advisers ..................45
Campus Life ........................35           Continuous Enrollment .......51               Family Educational Rights
Cap and Gown Charges .......26                   Corporate and Professional                      and Privacy Act.................57
Categories of Graduate                             Communication ...............68             Family Nurse Practitioner ...93
 Study .................................17       Correspondence Credit ....... 51              Fees ......................................24
Center for Experiential                          Counseling Psychology .......96               Field Experiences ................61
  Learningand Career                             Counseling and Human                          Final Comprehensive
   Development..................38                Development.....................71             Examination......................56
Center for Economic                              Course Descriptions ..........117             Financial Aid........................28
 Education ..........................60          Course Identification .........116            Financial Aid Eligibility ......28
Center for Gender Studies ..99                   Course Prefix Index ...........116            Five Hundred Level
Center for Professional                          Courses of Study..................64            Courses .............................51
 Development.....................38              Criminal Justice ...................76        Full-Time Status ..................48

                                                                       206
Gender Studies.....................99         Licensure, Initial                            Prerequisites.........................52
General Information ..............9            Teacher ..............................79     Presidents .............................10
Geography Courses ...........152              Loans....................................31   Privacy Act ..........................57
Geology Courses ...............152            Location and Campus ..........10              Probation or Parole ..............36
Gerontological Nursing .......93              Lost and Found ....................42         Probation and Dismissal ......54
Good Standing .....................54                                                       Professional Licensure ........18
GPA Deficiency ...................48          Master of Business                            Psy.D. Program ....................96
Grade Changes/Corrections 48                   Administration ..................64          Psychology...........................96
Grade Appeals .....................48         Master of Fine Arts ..............64
Grade Point System .............46            Mathematics Courses ........159               Reading ..............................103
Graduate Assistantships.......32              Meal Plans ...........................40      Records and Reports of
Graduate Committee ...........45              Memberships .......................11          Students.............................57
Graduate Degrees ..................4          Minority Student Services ...37               Recreation, Parks and
Graduate Faculty ...............193           Minors ..................................50    Tourism Courses .............182
Graduate Recital ..................55         Mission ..................................9   Recreational Activities ........35
Graduate College Goals ........6              Music ...................................88   Reduced Tuition ..................24
Graduate College Mission .....6               Music Therapy .....................91         Refund of Charges ...............27
Graduate College Objectives 7                 Multicultural Services .........19            Regular Admission ..............17
Graduate Credit for Seniors ..52                                                            Repetition of Courses ..........47
Graduate Study ......................5        Non-Degree Students ..........18              Residence Hall
Graduation Policy ................58          Non-Discrimination                              Assistantships...................32
Grant Program .....................32          Policies..............................12     Responsibility for Payment .26
Grievance Procedures..........49              Non-Service Awards ............34             Retention Policies ................54
                                              Notification of Admission ...16               Rights of Financial Aid
Health and Human Services 62                  Nurse Midwifery .................93            Recipients .........................30
Health Center .......................38       Nursing ................................91    RN/BSN/MSN .....................95
High Incidence                                                                              Roanoke Higher Education
 Concentration .................113           Occupational Therapy .........96               Center................................12
Highlander Theme ...............11            Off-Campus Housing ..........38               RU Express Card .................42
History of Radford.................9          Off-Campus Student
Honor Code .........................63         Services .............................37     School Counseling...............75
Honor System ......................58         Out-of-State Tuition ............24           School Psychology ............105
Humanities and                                Overload Fee .......................25        Science Courses .................185
 Behavioral Sciences .........60                                                            Science and Technology ......62
Hurlburt Hall........................10       Parking Fee ..........................26      Second Master’s Degree......57
Hurlburt Information ...........41            Participation in                              Senior Citizens.....................34
                                                Commencement ................59             Senior Enrollment................52
Identification Cards .............41          Pass-Fail Courses.................47          Severe Disabilities .............114
In-State Tuition ....................24       Payment of Fees ..................26          Social Work .......................109
Incomplete Grades...............48            Policies, Academic ..............45           Sociology Courses .............191
Industrial-Organizational                     Post-Master’s Family                          Southwest Virginia Higher
  Psychology......................103           Nurse Practitioner .............94            Education Center ..............12
Information Technology                        Physical and Mental                           Special Education .............. 111
  Courses ...........................156        Health Services .................38         Speech and Hearing Clinic ..39
International Student                         Physical Therapy                              Speech and Language
  Admission .........................20         Program (D.P.T.) ..............96             Pathology ..........................67
International Education .......20             Post-Baccalaureate                            Student Affairs
Internships ...........................49       Certificate .........................23       Concentration ...................76
                                              Post Office ...........................42     Student Conduct Code.........36
Library .................................42   Practica/Internships .............49          Student Responsibility.........45
                                                                                                                                         INDEX




Library Media ......................81        Praxis Examination..............61            Student Services ..................36
Licensed Professional                         Preliminary Comprehensive                     Summer Session Fees ..........26
 Counselors ........................72          Examination......................56         Summer Sessions.................48
Licensure/Advising .............61                                                          Supporting Courses .............51

                                                                   207
Teacher Licensure, Initial ....79              Undergraduate Deficiencies 50                  Waldron College of Health
Teaching English as a                          Unpaid Fees or Fines ...........26              and Human Services .........62
  Second Language .............81                                                             War/Public Service Orphans .34
Technology Services............40              Vending Services .................42           Withdrawal Procedures .......53
Thesis ...................................55   Virginia Educators Tuition                     Work Programs ....................32
Thesis Defense.....................56            Rate ..................................24    Work Study ..........................32
Thesis Binding Fee ..............26            Visual and Performing                          Writing Center .....................39
Time Limit ...........................57         Arts ...................................62
Transfer of Credit ................51
Tuition Payment Plans.........27




                                                                     208

				
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