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					Creating a Dyslexia
 Friendly School
                                       Introduction

The junior school in which I teach was part of an Education Action Zone, then part of an

Excellence Cluster and is now part of Coast-Ed. It is situated in an area of social

deprivation in the Tendring Peninsula. The school currently has 432 pupils on roll. In the

Department of Education and Skills ranking for social deprivation, the school is ranked

1826 out of 32482 and the pupils‟ socio-economic background is consistently below

average according to the “raise online” report each year. However, I feel that it is worth

mentioning that the Achievement and Attainment Tables (AAT) value added and the

overall and individual subject contextual value added have all increased in each year from

2003 and the standards reached by pupils with special educational needs, although lower

than other pupils, demonstrate excellent progress and they gain a higher contextual value

added score than any other pupils in the school.

The last OFSTED report (September 2009) noted that the school has a higher than

average percentage of pupils entitled to free school meals and that the school roll is

unstable with around a quarter of pupils arriving or leaving each year after the start of

term. It also commented on the caring atmosphere and the staff‟s commitment to the

pupil‟s welfare. The provision for special educational needs was deemed outstanding

“The quality of learning for pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities and

their progress” was graded outstanding “due to the skilled support, teaching and

individualised attention received by these pupils.”

I am now in my seventh year as SENCO and am continuing to enjoy the challenge this

role offers. Before taking on the role of SENCO I taught in year 6 for four years and spent

seventeen years prior to that in the secondary sector teaching music and RE. The

school‟s SEN numbers have been slowly increasing over the last eleven years and

currently stand at 41% of the school population, with the number of children with a

statement of educational needs being 27, the number of children at school action + being

 Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
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93 and at school action, 66. I have used the excellent training provided by Essex

SENCAN in conjunction with Cambridge University to both understand and develop my

role in school and have achieved the postgraduate diploma in educational studies.

The Wave 2 and 3 interventions that are used in school have had a tremendous effect in

raising the attainment of the children with special needs in the school, however, the

teaching of writing and maths is a focus on the School Improvement Plan (SIP) due to a

dip in last year‟s SAT results for year 6. The Literacy and Maths Coordinators are

delivering Continuing Professional Development (CPD) on guided learning and Assessing

Pupil Progress (APP) with their county advisors and it was felt that there was also a need

for training on Wave 1 provision for children who are dyslexic or who have

dyslexic/dyscalculia tendencies. Therefore I have attended the course for “Supporting

pupils with specific learning difficulties and dyslexia” run by the local authority and

Cambridge University and have looked at the Inclusion Development Programme (IDP)

for dyslexia.

As a result of an audit of need in school by the teaching staff, I have led two training

sessions and produced a booklet to help them understand the problems of children with a

specific learning difficulty and to give them ideas about how they can support these

children in the classroom at a Wave 1 level (good quality first teaching).

After the first training session the teaching staff wanted the school to become “dyslexia

friendly” and this study will outline the steps that have been taken to achieve this status.




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                                Ethical Considerations

Having completed assignments for the SENCO courses that I have already attended I am

aware that anonymity is important and I have ensured that I have not named individuals

or the school itself. I discussed my intentions with the head teacher and consulted my

teaching colleagues and they were fully supportive and wanted the school to become

“dyslexia friendly”. The teaching staff were asked to evaluate their practice in school and

a selection of pupils in each year group were surveyed to ascertain whether the actions

taken by the staff have resulted in the pupils being able to access more of the curriculum

and are helping them to overcome the barriers to their learning.




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                                       CPD Meeting 1

In the first staff meeting I introduced the subject by asking “what is dyslexia?”         The

teaching staff then explored the different definitions of this specific learning difficulty and

tried out some memory tests such as writing down lists of numbers both forward and

backward and then repeating it whilst saying “double, double” throughout. Despite the

hilarity this caused it made them aware of how difficult it can be for someone with dyslexia

to listen and concentrate in class whilst writing. I then used the “Inclusion Development

Programme for Dyslexia and Speech, Language and Communication” (IDP) to highlight

the problems that pupils with dyslexia faced in school. I also produced an information

booklet about dyslexia and the barriers it can cause taken from the IDP 2008 SLCN &

Dyslexia CD and gave one to each member of staff.

Contents of the CD




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                                       CPD Meeting 2

At the start of the second staff meeting I gave out a survey to all of the teachers entitled

“How high is your dyslexia awareness?” (Appendix A) from the book “How to identify and

support children with dyslexia”. The results from this initial survey can be seen in the table

in Appendix B.

I then used the IDP for dyslexia resources from the CD to suggest ways that we, as a

staff, could support the pupils in school at a Wave 1 level.

Finally, I gave each year group a set of cards taken from The National Literacy and

Numeracy Strategies “The Dyslexia Friendly Classroom” (Appendix C) and asked the

staff in their year group team meetings to sort them into three piles that reflected the

strategies which were not yet evident in the classroom (areas for development), those

that were partly evident, and those that were fully in place. I also asked them to make a

list of any additional resources that they felt were needed to help them to move their

practice on so that it became more “dyslexia friendly”. The results from this survey can be

seen in Appendix C and the lists of additional resources in Appendix D. The results from

the pupil survey are contained within Appendix E. I then looked at the results and wrote

an action plan to help the school to become more dyslexia inclusive (Appendix F).




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                                         Findings

Dyslexia Awareness Survey

The results from the “Dyslexia Awareness” survey were very interesting, but overall I was

pleased that the teaching staff had such a good knowledge about dyslexia and the

problems that would manifest themselves in the classroom. 76% of the teachers knew

that 3% of the population were dyslexic and realised that meant that at least 3 children in

every class would have some type of difficulty with reading, writing, number or memory.

However, only 24% realised that the majority of dyslexics are left handed. As a direct

result of this knowledge two year groups counted their left handed children and asked for

left handed pens to be purchased to help their children to write more easily and without

smudging their work. Only 59% of the staff realised that the majority of dyslexics are

boys, but they did know that there are twice as many boys as girls with special

educational needs in our school. 82% of the staff knew that dyslexics have problems with

reading, but when I gave the staff the answers the remainder said that they had said that

this statement was incorrect because they felt that dyslexics had problems with other

aspects of English as well as reading.

94% of the staff knew that all dyslexics were not always creative and good at art and 82%

knew that the difficulty did not disappear with age. All of the staff knew that dyslexia can

affect children of any intellectual ability and that some high academics are dyslexic and

they could name them, Richard Branson being the name that everyone could put forward.

71% of the staff thought that poor handwriting could be a sign of dyslexia and this rose to

94% when talking about children having problems with spelling. All of the staff said that

dyslexic children do not need a statement of special educational needs and 76% have

realised that not all dyslexics are good at maths. Although 71% of the staff felt that the

children with dyslexia did not need specialist teaching, the 24% that did qualified this by

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                                                                                          6
saying that the role of the specialist teacher who came in termly to support them and their

teaching assistant was extremely useful and had really helped them and the child.

Most of the other statements split the staff equally with around 50% getting the correct

answer. The second CPD meeting meant that I was able to talk about how to overcome

barriers to education by giving the children strategies to use to help with their memory

and organisation as well as with specific reading and writing interventions. Emphasis was

also made about good quality first teaching for dyslexics benefiting all children in the

class.

Looking at the results overall, 41% of the staff achieved a result of 15/20 or higher and

100% scored more than 11/20. Interestingly, the highest score of all, 18/20, was achieved

by the higher level teaching assistant who represents the support staff in staff meetings.



The Dyslexia Friendly Classroom Survey

The staff feedback on this exercise was extremely positive; they felt that it was a very

worthwhile exercise and that it helped them to focus on what they needed to do to make

their classroom, and the school, more dyslexia friendly. One member of staff even said

that she was really excited by the project! The learning support team are represented at

all CPD meetings by a higher level teaching assistant. She found the training so inspiring

and useful that she has asked that I provide training for the whole team during the

summer and autumn term.

One of the main areas that was highlighted was the staff‟s need to have more

understanding about dyslexia as a specific learning difficulty and to have ways of being

able to pinpoint the problems that a child was having. As a direct result of attending the

course “Supporting pupils with specific learning difficulties and dyslexia” I now feel that I

have more knowledge about the difficulty myself and I have planned in another 2 CPD

sessions, one next term and another in the autumn term, where I hope to be able to give


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the staff assessments that they can use to determine a child‟s preferred learning style and

to more accurately show their weaknesses. Also one year group asked to have time out

of the classroom to be able to carry out these assessments. This is a matter that I will

take to the Senior Management Team meetings as I feel that this should be included in

the whole school approach to assessment.

Some of the strategies that were partially in place, or that appeared as an area for

development in one year group only, have been easier to address. The idea of using a

“study buddy” is used in some year groups but not in others, therefore, I felt it would be

useful for all of the staff to see the results of the survey so I gave a copy to each year

team. As a direct result of the discussions in team meetings, year teams are liaising

together to see how this is being done so that it can be used across the school.

For some strategies this exercise was just a reminder about what would be best practice

for the children who are struggling to read and write in the classrooms, such as writing

down homework, not asking them to copy from the board and giving strategies or

practical aids to help with the problems of short term memory. However, all year groups

had not thought about preparing children for guided reading sessions by pre-teaching the

books. Concern was expressed about a lack of time in an already packed curriculum and

each year team felt that because the guided reading groups and reading material were

chosen according to reading ability that this would not be an issue for the children and

would, therefore, not be a priority for the school.

The strategies that every year team agreed would be an area for development and a

priority for the school were;

   1. We encourage a positive view of dyslexia and dyscalculia among children –

       helping the class to understand what dyslexia means and talking about positive

       role models (talented adults, celebrities and „ordinary‟ people who are themselves

       dyslexic).


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   2. We have sought and used advice on the best hardware and software for dyslexic

       and dyscalculic children – audio-taped texts, portable word processors, speech-

       supported texts, spellcheckers, mind mappers, software to be used within a

       programme of teaching in order to practise phonics and spelling, or promote recall

       of number facts and the order of numbers, software which provides images and

       models to help the child understand the number system.

   3. We provide the child with a study pack containing, for example, highlighter pens,

       sticky notes, a line tracker for following text, blank audio tapes, index cards for

       subject vocabulary or spelling mnemonics, sticky labels to use to correct or

       conceal, a tables square, place value cards, a pocket number line, number cards,

       a hundred square, a calendar, a shapes chart.

   4. We use children who are fluent readers to tape texts and mathematical tasks and

       problems so as to boost our library of taped materials, including, where

       appropriate, bilingual materials.

   5. Handwriting models and mnemonics are on display so that the child can avoid

       reversals.

Each of these strategies had all or most of the year groups in the “area for development”

envelope and is seen as a priority for the school.



Areas for Development

   1. On the course “Supporting pupils with specific learning difficulties and dyslexia” the

       course leaders had put up posters on one of the days showing celebrities who

       have dyslexia but who have still been successful. I intend to find out where these

       posters can be purchased and put them up around the school. Also I have agreed

       to lead a whole school assembly on dyslexia so that the children understand it

       better and know who the positive role models are.


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  2. ICT is a very useful aid for dyslexic children and one day on the course was on the

      use of ICT. Because of the financial implications of providing the most appropriate

      hardware and software for the school, I am liaising with the ICT coordinator in

      school and this will be a long term area of development for us both. I have applied

      for a National Award, which if successful, would provide the school with £10000-

      15000 to spend on suitable ICT resources.

  3. At the present time 430 children attend our school; 10% of the population are

      thought to have dyslexia as a specific learning difficulty, so at least 43 children in

      school need extra support and help. As a school our percentage of children with

      special educational needs is higher than both the county and national average, so

      we are looking at a figure that could be four times higher than that. All year groups

      felt that study packs for children would be desirable but felt that it could be

      unmanageable because of the numbers that would be needed. One year group felt

      that it would be more beneficial for every teaching assistant and higher level

      teaching assistant in the school to have a study pack that could be accessed by all

      the children that they support in each class. This still has huge financial

      implications but is something that I am costing ready for the next academic year.

  4. All of the year groups felt that recording children reading would be an excellent

      idea and of great help to others but expressed their disappointment at the lack of

      suitable recording equipment in school. It is very difficult to find a tape recorder and

      even more difficult to find one with an internal microphone. Only one could be

      found in the school and this was used sometimes by one year group. Again this

      has financial implications, but one year group expressed a desire to use Voice

      Recorders as an intervention and trial it for the whole school. Voice recorders are

      being purchased for the four classes in that year group and they are going to

      evaluate their usefulness over a term and report back to me.


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   5. One year group felt that it was very important that alphabet strips, handwriting

       models and lists such as days of the week and months of the year were displayed

       in every classroom in the same way. The other year groups agreed so posters of

       days of the week, months of the year and the alphabet in upper and lower case

       letters have been purchased for every classroom.



Pupil Survey

Two or three pupils from every class, who are supported at school action plus level for

problems with literacy, were surveyed after the cpd meetings had been held and the

resources distributed to the year groups. Here are the questions asked:

       1. What are you good at in school?

       2. What do you find difficult in school?

       3. Is there anything in the classroom that really helps you?

       4. Is there anything outside the classroom that helps you?

       5. Is there anyone in school that helps you?

       6. Is there anything or anyone else that helps you?

The results of this survey can be found in Appendix F. (tables and pie diagrams)



Analysis of results

When asking the selected children what they felt that they were good at in school

(question 1), I was expecting the answers to be those subjects that had very little, if any,

reading or writing, such as art and PE. I was, therefore, not surprised when 25 out of the

36 answers where PE, art drama and design technology (DT). What was more surprising

was that children in every year group felt that they were good at literacy. This could be

because of very good differentiation or because the teaching assistant support is very

prominent in literacy lessons.


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When asked what difficulties they faced (question 2), there was a range of subjects

mentioned, but again literacy featured prominently as did maths. It seems an anomaly

that children who think that they are good at literacy also say that they find it difficult, but if

children enjoy a subject they will say that they are good at it even if they find some

aspects of it challenging. Having attended the six day course on supporting the children

with learning difficulties, and knowing that problems with memory can make maths a

difficulty for some children, I was not surprised that 12 children found maths difficult.

However, in year 6, only 1 child thought that it was difficult. This could be because extra

support has been put into maths in year 6 and the lowest 20% have been given booster

lessons by Higher Level Teaching Assistants (HLTAs).

Of all of the children surveyed about what helps them in the classroom (question 3), only

one mentioned that buff paper really helped them with their reading but the teaching

assistants have said that there are lots of children in the classes who are saying that they

like the different paper. The two left handed children who had been given left handed

pens felt that they really help them to write more neatly and the teachers in year 4 and 6

who purchased left handed pens have reported that the children‟s presentation is much

improved and that the right handed children are asking for special pens to help their

handwriting! Two children mentioned that the new clocks that had been placed in their

classrooms were of great help. In these two year 5 classrooms the clock has been placed

at eye level and the teachers report that many of the children are using them during

lessons.

Displays and word banks were mentioned by children across the school as being of

particular help to them both in and out of the classrooms (question 4). Photographs of the

displays and the resources can be found in Appendix H. The literacy coordinator has

introduced “working walls” and these are obviously being used by the children in class.




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Four children mentioned the Learning Mentors as being very helpful and it was obvious

from the results that friends are also very important as sources of help to many of the

children questioned.

Teaching assistants and teachers were described as being the most help to the children

both in and out of the classroom, with all of the children surveyed mentioning one or both

in their answers to questions 5 and 6. This would concur with the evidence cited on the

IDP for dyslexia that is taken from the Primary National Strategy – Learning and teaching

dyslexic children:

“Overall, it is clear that pupils have no difficulty recognising the learning environment in

which they succeed. They want calmness and security, the feeling that teachers might

actually like them and are enthusiastic about their subject, quiet recognition of their

difference and the provision of low-key differentiation and support.” (IDP resources for

overcoming the barriers to dyslexia, Primary National Strategy – Learning and teaching

dyslexic children page 6)

                                        Conclusions

From my research I have found that the impact that this project has had so far is the

following:-

   1. Impact on the pupils

                 New resources are starting to have some impact in class as pupils are

                  noticing them and starting to use them

                 Pupils are more knowledgeable about dyslexia and what can be done to

                  help

                 Peer support is valued by pupils

                 Pupils recognise the support that they receive from the teaching and non

                  teaching staff



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             Pupils self esteem is starting to increase as they see that their area of

              difficulty can also be their strength

  2. Impact on the teachers

             More knowledgeable about dyslexia

             Reflection on current practice

             Highlighted areas for development

             Desire to have further training so that they can be more helpful and can

              better identify pupils‟ needs

             New resources purchased from their self evaluation

             Increased confidence when supporting pupils

  3. Impact on the school

             Training for teaching and non teaching staff

             Further training needs identified

             Increased knowledge of dyslexia

             Better resourced

             Consistent approach across the year groups

             Becoming more dyslexia friendly

  4. Impact on my own learning

             Increased subject knowledge

             Opportunities to lead CPD

             Better informed to support parents/carers

             Desire to know more and continue with further studies

             Better understanding of the school‟s position and areas for development

  5. Impact beyond the school

             Presentation on dyslexia to the SENCO Cluster in May 2010

             Presentation of the IDP at the SENCO Conference in July 2010
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             Collaboration between two schools on the project

             Support of colleagues from other schools

             Cross phase collaboration with local secondary school and involvement in

              an SEN review for Key stages 4 and 5

  6. Action required

             Monitor the impact of the input

             Ensure further training is delivered

             Monitor the use of resources

             Track pupils‟ attainment




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                   15
Appendices                                                            Page



A             How high is your dyslexia awareness?                    17
B             Table of results from App A                             18
C             The Dyslexia Friendly Classroom – activity cards &
                                                analysis of results   19
D             Resources                                               31
E             Pupil Survey results                                    33
F             Action Plan                                             35




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                                                                           16
                                      Appendix A




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                                              17
                                                                Appendix B
Knowledge of Dyslexia - Staff Quiz - results

Question number          Correct answer   Incorrect   Didn’t know

                                          answer

         1                       13          2            2

         2                        4          12           1

         3                        8          6            3

         4                       10          6            1

         5                       14          3            0

         6                       16          0            1

         7                       14          1            2

         8                       17          0            0

         9                       17          0            0

         10                      14          3            0

         11                       9          7            1

         12                      12          4            1

         13                       6          6            5

         14                      12          5            0

         15                       9          7            1

         16                      16          1            0

         17                      17          0            0

         18                      11          1            5

         19                       5          8            4

         20                      13          3            1




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                                                                        18
                                                                                 Appendix C
The Dyslexia Friendly Classroom – National Literacy & Numeracy
Strategies - results from each of the year groups

Statements:

   6. We recognise all children‟s strengths and make sure that they have opportunities

       to demonstrate them: for example, the child who struggles with numbers and the

       number system may be very good at problem-solving, or a child who has difficulty

       with word-level work may shine in oral work and shared reading or writing

       sessions.

       Strategy fully in place                    Year 4 & 5

       Strategy partially in place                Year 3& 6

       Area for development



   7. Children have study buddies whose skills complement their own:

              A child who has good ideas for writing (composition) but difficulty with

               spelling and handwriting (transcription) is paired with a child who is good at

               transcription but weaker at composition;

              A child who is good with numbers and the number system is paired with a

               child who finds this difficult, but is good at shape and space.

       Strategy fully in place

       Strategy partially in place                Year 4 & 5

       Area for development                       Year 3& 6



   8. We encourage a positive view of dyslexia and dyscalculia among children –

       helping the class to understand what dyslexia means and talking about positive



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      role models (talented adults, celebrities and „ordinary‟ people who are themselves

      dyslexic).

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development                     All Year groups



  9. We make arrangements for any text that a child will struggles to read (written

      instructions, word problems in mathematics, texts in literacy) to be read to them by

      a study buddy, teaching assistant or teacher.

      Strategy fully in place                  All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  10. We avoid asking dyslexic children to copy from a blackboard, whiteboard or OHP,

      as they may struggle to find their place as they go from board to paper and back.

      Instead, we have then work with a study buddy, or we quickly jot things down for

      them, or use a photocopied manuscript.

      Strategy fully in place                  Year 4 & 5

      Strategy partially in place              Year 3

      Area for development                     Year 6



  11. We recognise that dyslexic children may know something one day and forget it the

      next, may lose or forget equipment they need, or may forget what they are

      supposed to be doing in the course of a lesson. We avoid getting cross with them

      when this happens; instead we talk with them about strategies, linked to their

      personal learning styles, which they can use to help them remember things.

Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
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      Strategy fully in place                   Year 4

      Strategy partially in place               Year 3 & 6

      Area for development                      Year 5



  12. We listen to parents‟ or carers‟ concerns and make sure that they are clear about

      what is being done to help their child and how they can contribute. We actively

      involve the child as well as their parents or carers in deciding on the targets to be

      set and the strategies which the child, their parent or carer, teacher and teaching

      assistants will use to ensure progress.

      Strategy fully in place                   All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  13. We have sought and used advice on the best hardware and software for dyslexic

      and dyscalculic children – audio-taped texts, portable word processors, speech-

      supported texts, spellcheckers, mind mappers, software to be used within a

      programme of teaching in order to practise phonics and spelling, or promote recall

      of number facts and the order of numbers, software which provides images and

      models to help the child understand the number system.

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place               Year 5

      Area for development                      Year 3, 4 & 6




  14. We write down homework instructions, so that the child can concentrate on

      listening to the teacher, and not misunderstand what needs to be done.

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      Strategy fully in place                  Year 4

      Strategy partially in place              Year 3, 5 & 6

      Area for development



  15. We make sure we use special arrangements available for National Curriculum

      tests for children with special educational needs.

      Strategy fully in place                  All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  16. If work has to be marked in the child‟s absence, and there are lots of errors in

      spelling, for example, or recalling number facts and doing calculations, we highlight

      one or two rather than highlighting all the errors. We use these errors as teaching

      points, suggesting a way of avoiding the mistakes in the future. For example, we

      highlight the similarity of the spelling to other known words, the nearness of a

      number fact to other known facts, a resource (like a tables square or alphabet

      chart) they should be sure to use when in doubt.

      Strategy fully in place                  Year 3, 4 & 5

      Strategy partially in place              Year 6

      Area for development



  17. We make frequent use of techniques that work for visual and kinaesthetic learners,

      as well as those that work for auditory/verbal learners – for example:

             Mind mapping as a way of recording ideas, planning writing, or showing the

              steps involved in approaching mathematical problems;




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             Providing diagrams, illustrations ans practical equipment (for example, bead

              strings) to model ideas and techniques.

      Strategy fully in place                      All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  18. We design worksheets so that the layout is uncluttered and the reading level

      accessible. We use large print (12-14 point) and a clear font such as Arial.

      Important information is in bold or coloured; we use cream or buff paper wherever

      possible, to reduce glare.

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place                  Year 3, 4 & 5

      Area for development                         Year 6



  19. We recognise that sequences such as counting on or back in different steps,

      months of the year, or the alphabet may be difficult to learn, and provide the child

      with aids (for example, a pocket alphabet or calendar, number grids and squares).

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place                  All Year groups

      Area for development



  20. Where children struggle to remember things by rote, we help them to overcome the

      problem by drawing on their strengths in the use and recognition of pattern and

      meaning – for example:

             Morphemes and spelling rules;

             Patterns in multiplication tables;

Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                       23
             Subtraction as the inverse of addition, multiplication as the inverse of

              division, deriving new number facts from known facts.

      Strategy fully in place                  Year 3, 4 & 5

      Strategy partially in place              Year 6

      Area for development



  21. We understand that some children find it hard to hold questions, information or

      instructions in their heads for long enough to act on them (short term memory

      difficulty). For these children, we:

             Repeat instructions/questions;

             Chunk them rather than saying in one long string;

             Jot them down on a sticky note, ot encourage the child to do so;

             Allow time for processing (for example, paired discussion with a partner

              before putting hands up).

      Strategy fully in place                  Year 4, 5 & 6

      Strategy partially in place              Year 3

      Area for development



  22. We frequently praise children‟s ideas, effort and any success in reaching personal

      targets, using at least four positive comments to every one negative, so as to boost

      their self esteem.

      Strategy fully in place                  All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                      24
  23. We vary pupil groupings according to purpose and learning objective, avoiding

      arrangements which lead any group to class themselves as „low ability‟.

      Strategy fully in place                 Year 3, 4 & 5

      Strategy partially in place             Year 6

      Area for development



  24. We never ask a child with dyslexic difficulties to read aloud in front of other

      children, unless they volunteer.

      Strategy fully in place                 Year 3 & 4

      Strategy partially in place             Year 6

      Area for development



      Year 5 did not put this strategy in any envelope as they said that they expect all

      children to read aloud, even if it is only a few words, and that the child would be

      supported if they were struggling.



  25. We provide the child with a study pack containing, for example, highlighter pens,

      sticky notes, a line tracker for following text, blank audio tapes, index cards for

      subject vocabulary or spelling mnemonics, sticky labels to use to correct or

      conceal, a tables square, place value cards, a pocket number line, number cards,

      a hundred square, a calendar, a shapes chart.

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place             Year 4

      Area for development                    Year 3, 5 & 6




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                      25
  26. We use children who are fluent readers to tape texts and mathematical tasks and

      problems so as to boost our library of taped materials, including, where

      appropriate, bilingual materials.

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place            Year 6

      Area for development                   Year 3, 4 & 5



  27. Handwriting models and mnemonics are on display so that the child can avoid

      reversals.

      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place            Year 3, 4 & 6

      Area for development                   Year 5



  28. There is a clear understanding of the difference between two aspects of writing-

      composition and transcription.

      Composition:                           Transcription:

      Thinking what you want to write and Handwriting, spelling, punctuation –

      choosing appropriate language          the secretarial aspects of writing



      We know that children can be good writers even of their transcription skills are

      poor; we highlight the strengths whilst working on the weaknesses.

      Strategy fully in place                Year 4, 5 & 6

      Strategy partially in place            Year 3

      Area for development




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                   26
  29. Where children have difficulty with transcription – the secretarial aspects of writing

      – we provide alternatives to paper and pencil recording: for example, paring the

      child with another child who acts as a scribe, use of suitable ICT (on screen word

      grids, predictive word processing, speech feedback).

      Strategy fully in place                  Year 6

      Strategy partially in place              Year 3, 4 & 5

      Area for development



  30. We make sure that someone (parent, carer, peer, older child) is reading aloud to

      the child things that they can‟t or won‟t read for themselves.

      Strategy fully in place                  Year 3, 4 & 6

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development                     Year 5




  31. We provide practical aids which anticipate possible difficulties – for example, an

      alphabet strip, spelling resource box, word mats, words on the wall, words on

      bookmarks, spelling dictionaries.

      Strategy fully in place                  All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development




  32. We give the children the books or text to be used in shared and guided reading

      ahead of time, so that they can practise; we also plan for them to have pre-tutoring

      on the texts, with an adult or peer.

Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                        27
      Strategy fully in place

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development                      All Year groups



  33. We make sure we use age-appropriate reading material (high interest/low reading

      age) in guided and individual reading so that the Key Stage 2 child does not have

      to be seen to read, for example, texts which children will associate with Key Stage

      1.

      Strategy fully in place                   Year 3, 4 & 5

      Strategy partially in place               Year 6

      Area for development



  34. There is a clear understanding of the difference between numerical fluency and

      mathematical understanding.

      Mathematical understanding:               Numerical fluency:

      Perceiving      regularities,   grasping Rapid recall of number facts, tables,

      principles                                the sequence of numbers



      We know that children can be good at other aspects of mathematics even if their

      numerical fluency is poor; we highlight the strengths while working on the

      weaknesses.

      Strategy fully in place                   All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                       28
  35. In mathematics, there is an understanding that some children find mental

      calculations difficult because their short-term memory problem makes it hard for

      them to hold a question or a multi-step operation in their heads while they work out

      the answer. For this reason, we encourage the use of jottings (for example, on

      sticky-notes).

      Strategy fully in place                 Year 3, 4 & 5

      Strategy partially in place             Year 6

      Area for development



  36. Where children have difficulty in retrieving basic number facts we encourage them

      to use aids – like small times tables square, place value cards, pocket number line

      or pocket number ruler for pairs of 10 as shown below:

      0       1        2      3       4   5   6        7      8   9      10

      10      9        8      7       6   5   4        3      2   1      0



      Strategy fully in place                 All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  37. We use numbers that children can manipulate successfully when introducing new

      mathematical procedures, so that the child can focus on the method and not on the

      numbers themselves.

      Strategy fully in place                 All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                      29
  38. We make sure that the older child can use a calculator when problems in

      numerical fluency are holding them back from solving problems that are within their

      level of understanding.

      Strategy fully in place                 All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  39. We encourage flexible approaches to working out calculations, building on

      previous knowledge – for example, 40 + 29 derived from known 40 + 30 and 36 –

      10 + 1.

      Strategy fully in place                 All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development



  40. We encourage a variety of ways of learning the number facts for multiplication – for

      example, doubling, halving, finger multiplication, using the cumulative law, the

      pattern of 9s.

      Strategy fully in place                 All Year groups

      Strategy partially in place

      Area for development




Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                      30
    Resources for Dyslexia-friendly classrooms                           Appendix D

Year 3 resources for priorities                 Costings
Alphabet strips for children and for the wall   Autopress
                                                Wall alphabet line £6.00
                                                Child‟s alphabet line £0.36
Alphabet magnetic letters and boards            TTS
                                                Class box of letters and boards £96.70
Coloured overlays for reading books             www.dyslexiahelp
                                                Reading rulers 10 for £8.95
                                                A4 pack of 10 for £23.95
Phoneme frames                                  Phoneme frames to download £1.45

Year 4 resources for priorities
Calculators with larger keys                    TTS
                                                Big button calculators £13.80 for 6
Clock class set                                 GLS
                                                Big time 12 hour class set £42
Left handed pens                                TTS
                                                Left handed pens £14.95 for 5
                                                Refills £1.99

Year 5 resources for priorities
Spell checkers                                  TTS
                                                Spell checkers £19.99
Dictaphones                                     TTS
                                                Voice recorder £36.99

Year 6 resources for priorities
Bigger calculators                              TTS
                                                Big button calculators £13.80 for 6
Large child friendly clocks for classroom       John Lewis
                                                 £25

Resources identified by whole school            Costings
Buff paper for all photocopying for children    Lestons
                                                Ream (500 sheets) £2.95
Card to make resources                          Adler
                                                Ream (500 sheets) £2.99
Laminating pouches to make resources            Adler
                                                100 for £4.95
Study packs for all teaching assistants         TR to price a study pack for each TA for
including post its, labels, a calendar,         September
highlighter pens, index cards, 100 square,
times tables square etc.
Posters of days of the week and months of       Amazon
the year for every classroom                    Poster £3
Further training                                TR to ask for further CPD slots in the next
                                                year
Time to identify children                       TR to organise cover for assessments to

     Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                              31
                                               take place once staff have been trained

Suggestions for spending                       Cost
Buff paper for photocopying for all years      100 reams @ £2.95 = £295
Buff card for each year group                  25 reams @ £2.99 = £72.50
Laminating pouches for each year group         25 packs of 100 @ £4.95 = £123.75
Wall alphabet line for every class             16 @ £6.99 = £111.84
Alphabet lines for 150 children                150 @ 0.36 = £54
4 class boxes of magnetic letters for year 3   4 @ £96.70 = £386.80
Big button calculators for years 4, 5 and 6    138 @ £13.80 for 6 = 23 packs = £317.40
Time set for year 4                            1 @ £42 = £42
Left handed pens for year 4                    25 @ £14.95 for 5 = 5 packs = £74.75
                                               25 refills @ £1.99 = £49.75
Spell checkers for year 5                      12 @ £19.99 = £239.88
Voice recorders for year 5                     4 @ £36.99 = £147.96
Overlays for each year group                   4 @ £8.95 = £35.80
                                               4@ £23.95 = £95.80
Clocks for each classroom                      16 @ £25 = £400

                                                                Grand total = £2447.23
                                                              (costs correct as at June 2010)




     Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                         32
                                                                                                                             Appendix E
                                                   Results of Pupil Survey

  Question1       PE        Art       Literacy      Reading           DT         L&S       Maths        Handwriting         Topic       Science          Drama
                  (1)       (2)          (3)          (4)             (5)         (6)       (7)            (8)               (9)         (10)             (11)
    Year 3        4         3              4              0           1            2          1               1                 0             0            0
    Year 4        4         4              3              0           0            0          3               1                 1             0            0
    Year 5        2         3              1              1           0            0          2               0                 1             2            0
    Year 6        2         2              2              2           0            0          1               0                 1             0            1




Question     Everything     Science        Maths        Interventions           Handwriting       Literacy    Topic        PSHE         RE         Art    Spelling
   2            (1)           (2)           (3)               (4)                  (5)               (6)       (7)          (8)         (9)       (10)     (11)
 Year 3          0             2             4                 0                    2                 7         0            0           0          0        1
 Year 4          0             2             4                 0                    0                 4         0            0           1          1        2
 Year 5          0             0             3                 0                    1                 3         1            1           1          0        2
 Year 6          1             1             1                 1                    1                 2         2            2           1          1        2




                LH             Word         White          Buff                        Alphabet                                                          Working
Question     pen/pencil        banks       boards         paper       Displays         on desk        Dictionary       Interventions      Clock          ladder
   3            (1)             (2)          (3)           (4)           (5)              (6)             (7)                (8)          (9)              (10)
 Year 3           1               3            1              1             1             1               0                 1                 0             0
 Year 4           1               1            2              0             4             0               3                 1                 0             0
 Year 5           0               2            1              0             4             0               0                 1                 2             0
 Year 6           0               2            0              0             3             0               0                 0                 0             1




                                  Letters
                                   And                                                                                       Midday
     Question         Family      Sounds            PE        Displays          Laptop    Interventions       Friends       Assistants        Teachers
        4              (1)          (2)             (3)          (4)              (5)           (6)              (7)           (8)               (9)
      Year 3            0              0            0             0               0               3                0                1                3
      Year 4            1              0            0             1               0               2                1                0                1
      Year 5            0              0            1             2               1               0                0                0                1
      Year 6            2              1            0             0               0               0                0                0                0




           Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                                                                                    33
                      Teaching                                Head      Midday          Learning
      Question        Assistants   Teachers      Friends     Teacher   Assistants       Mentors
         5               (1)          (2)           (3)        (4)        (5)             (6)
      Year 3             11           11           1           0             1               0
      Year 4              6            4           5           1             1               1
      Year 5              7            6           4           1             1               1
      Year 6              5            5           3           0             1               1



                                                                       Drama
             Teaching     Midday                                         And                               School     Learning
Question    Assistants   Assistants   Teachers     Friends    SENCO    singing      Interventions   ICT    Council     Mentor
   6           (1)          (2)          (3)          (4)       (5)      (6)              (7)        (8)     (9)        (10)
 Year 3          2            2            5           5           0     0               1           0       1            1
 Year 4          1            0            2           2           2     0               1           1       0            0
 Year 5          2            0            0           0           0     1               1           0       0            0
 Year 6          2            0            0           0           0     0               0           0       0            0




          Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                                                     34
                                                                              Appendix F
Action Plan
         Action                        By Whom               By When               Costings

  1. To purchase               SENCO to collate    End of the spring term and      £2000

      suitable resources       the requests from   then at the start of the next

      as highlighted by        the year teams      academic year

      the training.

  2. To apply for a            SENCO and Head      31/3/10                         £10000-

      National Award for       teacher                                             £15000

      ICT

  3. To request further        SENCO at SMT        31/3/10                         Nil

      CPD for staff

  4. To make children          SENCO in an         End of the summer term          Purchase

      more aware of            assembly                                            or

      dyslexia and                                                                 production

      promote positive                                                             of posters

      role models.

  5. Training for the          SENCO               Summer and autumn term          Nil

      learning support

      team.




 Creating a Dyslexia Friendly School
                                                                                           35

				
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