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OIE – THE WORLD ORGANIZATION FOR ANIMAL HEALTH

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					WORLD ORGANISATION FOR ANIMAL HEALTH (OIE)




      FOURTH STRATEGIC PLAN
                  2006 – 2010

      Prepared by the Administrative Commission of the OIE
        for adoption by the International Committee at its
             73rd General Session, 22-27 May 2005



   Prepared on the basis of proposals made by the Regional
   Commissions. The text was developed by the Administrative
   Commission at Montebello, Québec, Canada, 22-25
   November 2004 and at OIE Headquarters, Paris, 23-25
   February 2005.

   The Administrative Commission wishes to express its
   appreciation for the assistance of Dr. Alan Randell, former
   Secretary of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, in the
   preparation of this document.
                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS.......................................................................................................................................2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY....................................................................................................................................3
CHAPTER 1
STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS................................................................................................................................................7
   BACKGROUND ......................................................................................................................................................7
   STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS AND FRAMEWORK .............................................................................................9
   THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................................................9
     Developments in OIE during the Third Strategic Plan .................................................................................. 9
     Achievements of the Third Strategic Plan and Changes in the International Environment ......................... 10
     New Challenges and Opportunities.............................................................................................................. 11
     Institutional Challenges ............................................................................................................................... 12
CHAPTER 2
MAIN STRATEGIC AREAS..............................................................................................................................................13
   PROVISION OF INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL DISEASE INFORMATION ......................................................................13
   DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF SCIENTIFICALLY-BASED STANDARDS ..............................................15
   PREVENTION, CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF ANIMAL DISEASES INCLUDING ZOONOSES ...............................17
   CAPACITY BUILDING FOR NATIONAL VETERINARY SERVICES ...........................................................................18
   STRENGTHENING OIE’S INFLUENCE ON POLICY DESIGN, RESEARCH AND GOVERNANCE IN ANIMAL
        HEALTH AND WELFARE............................................................................................................................19
CHAPTER 3
ACHIEVING THE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES........................................................................................................................21
   STRENGTHENING THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF THE ORGANISATION’S WORK ...........................................................21
   INCREASED ATTENTION TO ZOONOSES AND RELATED ISSUES ............................................................................21
   COMMUNICATING OIE INFORMATION ................................................................................................................22
     Public Information: Visibility and risk communication ............................................................................... 22
     Dissemination of OIE Information ............................................................................................................... 22
     Computer Systems Master Plan ................................................................................................................... 23
   COOPERATION WITH PARTNER ORGANISATIONS .................................................................................................23
CHAPTER 4
INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS...................................................................................................................................25
   MEMBERSHIP AND RESOURCES ..........................................................................................................................25
   BASIC TEXTS ......................................................................................................................................................25
   CENTRAL AND REGIONAL OFFICES.....................................................................................................................25
     OIE Headquarters ........................................................................................................................................ 25
     Regional Approaches ................................................................................................................................... 26
   THE INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE, ADMINISTRATIVE COMMISSION, REGIONAL COMMISSIONS AND
         REPRESENTATIONS ...................................................................................................................................26
     The International Committee........................................................................................................................ 26
     Administrative Commission.......................................................................................................................... 26
     Regional Commissions ................................................................................................................................. 27
     Regional Representations............................................................................................................................. 27
     Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories .................................................................................... 27
   SPECIALIST COMMISSIONS, WORKING GROUPS AND AD HOC GROUPS ..............................................................28
     Specialist Commissions ................................................................................................................................ 29
     Working Groups ........................................................................................................................................... 30
     Ad hoc Groups.............................................................................................................................................. 31
CHAPTER 5
PREPARATION OF THE DIRECTOR GENERAL’S PROGRAMME OF WORK ................................................................................32




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                                                                            Page 2
                                            EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Framework of the Fourth Strategic Plan

1.    The World Organisation for Animal Health was founded in 1924 as the Office International des Epizooties
      (OIE) to provide international cooperation and coordination against the spread of animal diseases. Eighty
      years later, the core mandate of the organisation has been modified to become “the improvement of animal
      health throughout the world” because it is recognized that controlling the spread of animal diseases is best
      achieved by ensuring the health of animals wherever they are.1 The improvement of animal health has net
      positive consequences for human health (including through food safety) and animal welfare and it has net
      benefits for economic development and the alleviation of poverty especially in rural populations.
      International cooperation and coordination of actions based on the scientific assessment of risks to animal
      health remain the principal means of achieving these benefits.

2.    The Fourth Strategic Plan addresses matters that affect countries’ abilities to trade in animals and animal
      products, raising issues of access to markets for safe and acceptable food products and the question of
      benefiting from the rights and obligations acquired by Members of the World Trade Organisation under the
      Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. It takes into account the economic,
      social and environmental consequences of animal disease control measures. It also addresses fundamental
      issues of protecting livestock from devastating diseases, the consequences of which and the subsequent
      economic losses are felt most severely in the poorest of the world’s countries. Reduction of the animal
      disease burden is linked to poverty reduction in these countries and is an essential element of the
      Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations to be achieved by 2015.

3.    The Plan also stresses the capacity of the Organisation to address the consequences of those animal diseases
      that are also diseases in humans (zoonoses), or have the potential to be harmful to public health. The OIE
      will remain the key international organization providing professional science-based advice on ways to
      identify, control and where possible eradicate these diseases, and will work in cooperation with other
      professional international organisations such as the FAO and the WHO to achieve this.

4.    Finally, the Fourth Strategic Plan proposes new solutions for delivering its strategic objectives, from
      strengthening the Organisation’s reputation for scientific excellence in its normative work to the
      introduction of new mechanisms for capacity-building for national Veterinary Services.

New Directions
5.    The Fourth Strategic Plan of the OIE covers the period 2006 to 2010 and was developed by the
      Administrative Commission of the Organisation following extensive and inclusive consultation with
      Regional Commissions of the OIE and the Member Countries.

6.    The global vision of the OIE enunciated in the Third Strategic Plan has been retained for the current
      planning period. In fact, the Fourth Strategic Plan retains three of the four strategic elements of the
      previous Plan, with minor modifications as these have been identified with the fundamental mandate of the
      Organisation:

        •     Provision of international disease information;
        •     Development and implementation of scientifically-based standards in relation with the World Trade
              Organisation (WTO); and
        •     Prevention, control and eradication of animal diseases, including zoonoses, and the determination of
              animal health status.




1
     Throughout the Strategic Plan reference to the terms “animals”, “animal disease(s)”, “animal products” and “livestock”
     should be taken to mean both terrestrial and aquatic animals unless otherwise stated.



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                                  Page 3
7.   Two new strategic elements are added. The first of these, capacity building, has been included as a result
     of overwhelming interest expressed by Member Countries for the Organisation to take an active role in this
     area. Because of its mandate, the primary role of the OIE in capacity building is seen as one of a catalyst,
     enhancing linkages between national Veterinary Services and financial and development institutions. One
     of the main channels of support is the Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF) operated by the
     World Trade Organisation in cooperation with the World Bank and in which the OIE is an active partner
     and which is intended to strengthen the role of developing Member Countries in the standards-setting
     process as described in the Doha Ministerial Declaration. In addition to its role as a catalyst for major
     capacity building activities, the OIE will also provide support to Member Countries wishing to become
     more fully engaged in the work of the Organisation in the form of training materials and training
     programmes for official Delegates, especially new Delegates.

8.   The second new element deals with strengthening OIE’s influence on policy design, research and
     governance in animal health and welfare. This element brings together a wide variety of activities
     undertaken by the Organisation especially in the policy design and research into animal diseases and the
     role of OIE’s Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres; it is not therefore entirely “new” but
     should bring a new impetus to the Organization’s work in this area. Within the part of this element dealing
     with “governance”, emphasis is also placed on the capacity of the OIE to assist Member Countries to
     resolve disputes, on a voluntary basis, in accordance with the procedures set out in the Terrestrial Animal
     Health Code.


         The Strategic Objectives 2006-2010:
              1.   To maintain and improve the provision of timely and accurate animal disease
                   information, including information on zoonoses, by making the best use of scientific
                   data modelling, modern information technologies and non official information tracking
                   systems.
              2.   To maintain and strengthen the role of the OIE as a reference organisation for
                   scientifically-based standards to the international community on all matters concerning
                   animal health and zoonoses, animal welfare, diagnosis and control of diseases including
                   the assessment of animal health status, and sanitary safety in international trade.
              3.   To provide scientifically-based recommendations on measures for the prevention,
                   control and eradication of animal diseases including zoonoses, taking into account the
                   economic, social and environmental impacts of such measures, and to provide services
                   for the determination of animal health status in relation to specific diseases.
              4.   In cooperation with partners, to strengthen the capacity of member countries in their
                   efforts to participate in the development of, and to apply international standards and
                   guidelines for animal health and welfare, including zoonoses.
              5.   To strengthen OIE’s involvement in policy design and governance related to decision
                   making in animal health and welfare including capacity building, policy research,
                   effective communication, and the “mediation” of potential disputes.



Delivering the Strategic Objectives

9.   The Fourth Strategic Plan introduces four issues that cut across the five major strategic elements and which
     are essential for their successful delivery. It is in these areas that the growth of the Organisation’s work
     will be concentrated between 2006 and 2010.

10. The first of these is the strengthening the OIE’s reputation for scientific excellence. OIE will continue to
    ensure that the work of its scientific bodies is soundly based and draws upon the best available scientific
    information. To enhance the depth and coverage of this information, the OIE will strengthen the work of
    its scientific Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories using techniques ranging from direct
    financial support to the encouragement of laboratory-to-laboratory cooperation (“twinning”). Transparency
    in the scientific decision-making processes will continue to be assured. The scientific decisions of the OIE
    will be such that they would be able to withstand external scientific scrutiny and peer-review.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 4
11. The OIE will also give strong attention to the implications of diseases transmitted from animals to
    humans (zoonoses). Lessons learned during the period of the Third Strategic Plan in handling issues such
    as Sudden Acute Respiratory Symptoms (SARS), Avian Influenza, and the occurrence in Asia and North
    America of BSE will provide the basis for international responses to unexpected or unusual animal disease
    outbreaks affecting human health, with the collaboration of other competent agencies such as the WHO.

12. One of the major means of delivering the strategic objectives of the Fourth Strategic Plan will be enhanced
    communication. Considerable efforts and resources will be dedicated to ensuring that the information
    technology, communications and publications systems of the Organisation will remain at the highest levels
    of efficiency and effectiveness throughout the planning period. The visibility of the OIE to the general
    public, media, decision-makers, veterinary professionals and farmers will be enhanced significantly.

13. Delivery of the Fourth Strategic Plan will require cooperation with other partners at many institutional
    levels. During the period of the Third Strategic Plan, cooperative agreements were concluded with the
    principal international intergovernmental organisations working in related technical fields, as well as with a
    number of developmental and financial institutions, and with the private sector. In the period covered by
    the Fourth Strategic Plan, attention will be paid to issues of practical cooperation for improving
    international coordination.

Institutional arrangements

14. The Fourth Strategic Plan includes recommendations for a renovation of its basic texts to take into account
    the cumulative Decisions and Resolutions of its governing body, the International Committee. The Plan
    recognizes the important contribution to the overall strategic work of the OIE provided by its Regional
    Commissions and Regional Representations. Regional institutional arrangements, including budgeting
    provisions, will be addressed during the planning period. The relationship between the International
    Committee, the Administrative Commission and the Director-General will be examined with a view to
    ensuring efficient and transparent governance of the Organisation.

15. The vision of the Fourth Strategic Plan is for a stronger, energetic work programme. This will require
    adequate financial resources based primarily on the assessed contributions of OIE’s Member Countries and
    on voluntary contributions. For the first of these, the Fourth Strategic Plan foresees adjustments to the
    design and scale of assessed contributions in order to facilitate the recovery of contributions from all
    Members; new members will also be recruited. For voluntary contributions, there will be greater flexibility
    in how such contributions can be made and from which sources; nevertheless, the independence of the
    Organisation will not be affected.

Next Steps

16. The Strategic Plan is to be completed by an initial Programme of Work that gives effect to the objectives
    enunciated in the Plan. This will be submitted for adoption to the International Committee in 2006. It is
    recommended that the Administrative Commission review the progress towards achieving these objectives
    during the third year of the Plan (2008) with a view to making such adjustments to the Programme of Work
    as may be required to meet the objectives described by the year 2010.

17. The Director-General will also propose estimates of the resources required to implement the Strategic Plan
    on the basis of both regular and voluntary contributions including the new modalities for the use of Trust
    Funds, as well as proposals for the allocation of these resources according to the Programme of Work.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 5
Chapter

    1                                           Strategic directions

BACKGROUND
18. In 1990, following a long and distinguished history of providing services to its Member Countries, the OIE
    decided to embark on a formal strategic planning process to enhance its effectiveness in responding to the
    new challenges and opportunities that were being presented by the changing environment in world trade of
    animals and animal products and new demands of Member Countries on the scope of its mandate. The
    Organisation’s first Strategic Plan for the years 1991-1996 was adopted by the International Committee
    (General Assembly of Delegates of all Member Countries) in 1991 and subsequent Strategic Plans were
    adopted in 1996 and 2000. The Third Strategic Plan, adopted in 2000, set a new pattern for the
    Organisation’s planning process by looking forward to the new millennium while conserving and building
    on the strengths of the Organisation developed since its formation in 1924.

19. The core mandate of the Organisation is to improve animal health in the world. By a resolution of its
    governing body, the International Committee, in 2002 it is also the key international organisation for
    animal welfare and it also deals with the effects of zoonoses on veterinary public health including food
    safety. This is a global vision, but one that has various practical implications at regional and sub-regional
    levels as well as at the national level and frequently within countries. The implementation of these
    mandates has beneficial consequences for Member Countries of economic development including the
    alleviation of poverty especially in rural areas and access to regional and international markets,
    together with improvements to food safety and animal welfare with resulting benefits for a much wider
    population. These mandates impose obligations on the part of the Organisation to act as the international
    reference body on the animal disease status of countries with parallel obligations on its Member countries
    to provide timely and accurate animal disease information to the Organisation, as well as to respect
    international standards and to participate in their development.

20. The Third Strategic Plan took the opportunity to reassess the vision and mission of the Organisation. Its
    vision was described as follows:

                              The OIE will strive to become the pre-eminent world reference for animal
                              health by accessing and producing comprehensive scientific knowledge and
                              consensus on it. This knowledge will promote the improvement of
                              international animal health for the benefit of animal production and trade
                              world-wide, and for the protection of public health.

       Its global mission was formulated as:

                              To convert international scientific data on animal health into information
                              and to transform information into knowledge products that meet the needs of
                              Member Countries.

21. In pursuit of this global mission and in conformity with its core mandate and decisions of the International
    Committee, the Administrative Commission has now established the following specific missions for the
    Organisation:

       •     To ensure transparency in the global animal disease including zoonoses situation;
       •     To collect, analyse and disseminate relevant scientific information, especially on disease control
             methods and animal welfare;
       •     To provide expertise and encourage international solidarity in the control of animal diseases
             including zoonoses;
       •     Within its mandate under the WTO SPS Agreement, to assure safety of world trade in animals and
             animal products by publishing relevant health standards for such trade;




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 7
       •     To improve the legal framework, competency and resources of national Veterinary Services; and
             particularly their international public good components;2

       •     To influence policy design, research and governance on worldwide issues concerning animal health
             and animal welfare;

       •     To provide a better guarantee of the safety of food of animal origin from hazards originating in
             animal production; and

       •     To promote animal welfare through a science-based approach.

22. The strategic planning process attempts to establish a structured framework for the Organisation as a global
    body, and defines its goals for the medium term so that there will be net positive progress towards each of
    these objectives at the end of the planning period. The global strategic plan should then serve as a template
    for each of the Organisation’s five Regional Commissions to draw up regional strategic plans and plans of
    action to meet the specific requirements and specific conditions at the regional and sub-regional level.
    Finally, at the national level, governments, through the national Veterinary Services3, should be able to
    draw up national plans appropriate to their own circumstances to pursue the same core values expressed
    above.

23. This Fourth Strategic Plan spans the five-year period from 2006 to 2010. It builds on the success of the
    Third Strategic Plan (2001-2005), retaining both the vision of the future and the global mission described
    by the International Committee in 2000. Although the Fourth Strategic Plan could be seen as a progressive
    development of the previous plan by consolidating its achievements, it sets out new approaches to
    achieving the vision adopted by the Organisation’s General Assembly in 2000.

24. The foremost among these changes is the new emphasis to be given to capacity building. This is proposed
    without establishing the OIE as a development agency, but by using its ability to act as a catalyst and a
    major player for developing the capacities of national Veterinary Services within an overall international
    developmental framework with the support of other regional and international organisations.

25. A new strategic area emphasizes the status of the OIE as an international body that provides influence in
    the policy design and governance of issues regarding animal health and animal welfare. This aspect of the
    OIE’s work has been growing significantly, with the OIE taking a lead role in such regional initiatives as
    the African Regional Programme for Animal Disease Control (PACE), the African Livestock Programme
    (ALIVE), and the South East Asia Foot and Mouth Disease Programme (SEAFMD), as well as at the
    global level. It is proposed that these models of activities be described in a strategic manner and then
    further developed as a major new strategic direction for the Organisation. The principal outcomes of this
    new strategic area would be: to influence through involvement in the governance of regional and global
    organisations involved in policy design, research and implementation relating to animal health and welfare,
    including capacity building.

26. Within this new strategic area, increased emphasis will be given to the Organisation’s role to assist as a
    provider of expert advice in the “mediation” of disputes on sanitary issues affecting trade without affecting
    the rights and obligations of Member Countries under the SPS Agreement.

27. The Fourth Strategic Plan will also seek to enhance the application of its international standards by all of its
    Member Countries according to their animal health needs. Over the years considerable efforts and
    resources have been dedicated to building a compendium of scientifically-based standards aimed at
    improving animal health word-wide. The failure to apply these standards results in the waste of resources;
    opens the way to misunderstanding and disputes between countries on animal health matters; creates
    confusion and undermines public and consumer confidence; imposes significant unnecessary economic

2
    The concept of international public goods refers to activities having a priority social interest for the international
    community. International financial institutions recognize this quality in certain public components of national veterinary
    services (mainly early detection and rapid response to animal diseases including zoonoses).
3
    The same principles that apply to capacity building for Veterinary Services should also apply in countries where the
    responsibility for establishing or applying animal health measures is exercised by an organisation other than the
    Veterinary Services or by an authority or agency on behalf of the Veterinary Services (See Article 1.3.3.1 of the
    Terrestrial Code).



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                                    Page 8
     consequences; and results in failure to protect both animal and human populations from devastating
     diseases. All efforts will be made during the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan to improve the current rate
     of application of OIE standards by the Member countries.

28. Another major change incorporated into the Fourth Strategic Plan is the recognition of a series of cross-
    cutting issues that affect the delivery of the strategic objectives in all of the main strategic areas. Among
    these issues is the pursuit of scientific excellence and support to the OIE Collaborating Centres and
    Reference Laboratories. The Organisation will continue its efforts in support of applied scientific research
    (a former “strategic area”), but these activities will now be associated with strengthening the scientific
    excellence of decision-making in the principal areas identified in this Strategic Plan.

29. The Fourth Strategic Plan identifies communication as a principal issue cutting across all of its work and
    includes communication with decision-makers, the media, the general public and peer professionals in at
    appropriate levels.

30. The success of the Fourth Strategic Plan will depend on adherence to the core values of the mandate and to
    build on the identified strengths of the OIE as described in the mission statement. The main challenge to
    the success of the Fourth Strategic Plan will be the Organisation’s ability to meet the needs of all Member
    Countries regardless of their stage of development; the main risk to success is over-commitment and the
    subsequent loss of credibility. The planning process must balance challenges and risks, resources and
    commitments, aspirations and abilities. The outcome of this process is presented here.


STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS AND FRAMEWORK
31. The preparation of the Fourth Strategic Plan was managed by the Administrative Commission following
    consultations with the Regional Commissions and Specialist Commissions during 2003 and 2004. An
    analysis and summary outline of the plan were presented to the International Committee in May 2004 and
    then circulated to Member Countries to obtain their initial reactions and further input. In November 2004 a
    special meeting of the Administrative Commission was held in Montebello, Québec, Canada, to consolidate
    these views and to prepare a more complete draft of the Strategic Plan for consideration by the
    Administrative Commission in February 2005, with subsequent distribution to Member Countries and
    submission for adoption to the International Committee in May 2005.

32. The Strategic Plan is a statement of objectives to be achieved within the planning period. It is derived from
    the Vision enunciated by the International Committee in 2000 and shaped by the Mission Statement
    adopted at the same time. The Strategic Plan provides the basis for individual work plans to be developed
    and implemented over the next five years. The Strategic Plan must also be sufficiently flexible to allow
    responses to changes in the animal health, animal welfare and trading environments that are not foreseen at
    the current moment. These may take the form of new objectives or changes in priorities. Nevertheless, the
    framework established by the Vision and Mission statements will guide the Organisation in adjusting the
    Strategic Plan if the need arises.

33. The Strategic Plan is to be supplemented by an initial Programme of Work that gives effect to the
    objectives enunciated in the Plan to be submitted for adoption to the International Committee in 2006
    including an estimate of the resources required to implement the programme. The Administrative
    Commission recommends that it review the progress towards achieving these objectives during the third
    year of the Plan (2008) with a view to making such adjustments to the Programme of Work as may be
    required to meet the objectives described by the year 2010.


THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT
Developments in OIE during the Third Strategic Plan
34. The Third Strategic Plan analysed the opportunities and challenges, and strengths and weaknesses facing
    the Organisation in the period 2000-2005. The OIE greatly benefited from this analysis, maintaining and
    strengthening its pre-eminent role as the international scientific reference point on standards and related
    matters concerning animal health and animal welfare. The conclusion of cooperative agreements with the
    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO),


Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 9
     the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the Commission of the European Communities (EC), among
     others, have significantly strengthened the Organisation’s ability to respond quickly to Members’ needs for
     authoritative advice on new animal health, zoonotic, animal welfare and animal production food safety
     issues. The OIE has also entered into agreements with relevant international professional organisations
     representing the private sector including the International Meat Secretariat (IMS) and the International
     Dairy Federation (IDF).

35. The development of a new animal disease notification system during the period 2000-2005 based on single
    lists for terrestrial and aquatic diseases in line with the principles of the Agreement on the Application of
    Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) of the World Trade Organisation (WTO),
    represented a major step forward in transparency by classifying diseases as specific hazards and giving all
    listed diseases the same degree of importance in international trade based on defined epidemiological
    criteria. It further underscored the need to replace current trade-restrictive procedures with increased
    investments in surveillance and risk mitigation measures to facilitate safe trade in animals and animal
    products.

36. However, one of the most important changes that has come to the fore since 2000 has been recognition of
    the need to address the problems of developing countries in their capacities to participate fully and
    equitably in the standard-setting processes of the bodies referenced in the SPS Agreement, including the
    OIE, as well as deriving full benefit from and meeting their obligations under this Agreement in the animal
    health sector. Strong steps have been made in enhancing the capacity building framework for animal
    health, but much more needs to be done and will need to be addressed in the Fourth Strategic Plan.

37. Because the Fourth Strategic Plan is, in part, a progressive development of the Third Strategic Plan,
    changes within the international framework since 2000 need to be taken into account. Furthermore, the
    Fourth Strategic Plan must foresee, to the extent possible, changes that may occur in the period 2006-2010.

Achievements of the Third Strategic Plan and Changes in the International Environment
38. The Fourth Strategic Plan builds on the success of the Third Strategic Plan, the highlights of which were:

       •     Strengthening the Organisation’s capacity to provide comprehensive, accurate and timely
             international animal disease information;

       •     Strengthening the Organisation’s work in the development of scientifically-based standards for
             animal health and extending this work to cover animal welfare and the food safety aspects of animal
             health;

       •     Incorporating newly emerging and wildlife diseases, as well as diseases of non-conventional
             livestock, into the Organisation’s information systems and recommendations for the prevention,
             control and eradication of animal diseases;

       •     Shifting the paradigm for animal disease control from one of trade restriction to one of control,
             mitigation and management so as to allow safe trade in commodities of animal origin; and

       •     Enhancing the Organisation’s linkages with other international organisations, including those
             representing the financial and private sectors, with a view to influencing and strengthening overall
             international cooperation and coordination for improving animal health status throughout the world.

39. Changes in the international framework that occurred during the Third Strategic Plan include:

       •     Entry-into-force of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in September 2003 and its potential impact
             on genetically-modified aquatic and terrestrial animals, and on living modified organisms used as
             animal pharmaceuticals;




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                       Page 10
       •     Efforts by international agencies to mitigate the risks associated with the intentional use of
             biological agents to disrupt societies and economies;

       •     Development of a designated capacity-building framework under the Standards and Trade
             Development Facility (STDF) by FAO, OIE, WHO, WTO and the World Bank for the application of
             SPS-related standards;

       •     Development of the International Portal on Food Safety, Animal and Plant Health (IPFSAPH)
             implemented by the FAO with the support of the OIE and other relevant organisations as a resource
             for official information on SPS matters and matters covered by the Cartagena Protocol;

       •     Establishment by FAO and WHO of the International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN)
             as part of WHO’s Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network;

       •     Further development by WHO of new International Health Regulations that may include zoonoses;

       •     Development by the OIE of standards on animal welfare and animal production food safety;

       •     Increased reference to OIE standards by countries raising formal trade complaints in the SPS
             Committee;

       •     Extension of the framework of cooperative agreements between the OIE and other international,
             regional and professional bodies;

       •     Development of a common programme between OIE and FAO to address transboundary animal
             diseases (GF-TADs), and between OIE, FAO and WHO to exchange information on diseases
             (GLEWS – Global Early Warning System);

       •     Setting up a special fund for projects seeking funding from non-governmental sources.

New Challenges and Opportunities

40. The period of the Third Strategic Plan also saw a number of international health crises, in particular the
    outbreaks of sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), foot and mouth disease, BSE in Asia and North
    America and avian influenza that have had widespread, severe consequences. Lessons learned from the
    response to these outbreaks must be incorporated into the Fourth Strategic Plan, and questions that remain
    as to how to address future events in a timely and scientific manner must be studied and hopefully
    answered during the period of the Plan.

41. Some of the answers to these questions may challenge current methodologies for the management of
    animal health risks. However, new tools for risk management especially in systems and information
    management may allow the control of diseases within very small geographical areas. Such developments
    would open the way to new approaches on how to limit the spread of disease and then how to control it and
    eradicate it in ways that are minimally disruptive to trade in safe and socially acceptable products. The
    Fourth Strategic Plan must provide for the consideration of these new risk-management tools in the major
    strategic areas of animal disease information, standards-setting, and in the prevention (including increasing
    use of vaccination and new companion diagnostic tests), control and eradication of diseases.

42. Such changes create, in themselves, the challenge of response to change over the relatively short period
    covered by the Fourth Strategic Plan. Particular stresses will be placed on those countries that do not have
    the legal, administrative, and physical infrastructures necessary to be able to adapt rapidly to the changing
    environment. Consideration must be given, therefore, to capacity-building and other means of support that
    will allow those countries most affected to develop more rapidly than the overall rate of change.
    Importantly, capacity building should allow all countries to benefit from their rights under the SPS
    Agreement and to meet the obligations of that Agreement.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                       Page 11
43. Further changes that may be anticipated during the period covered by the Fourth Strategic Plan include:

       •     Further improvements in information tracking and exchange via internet and related technologies;

       •     Improvements in the scientific understanding of new and emerging animal diseases and zoonoses;

       •     Increasingly complex bi-lateral or regional agreements on animal health matters, especially in
             reference to official veterinary policies;

       •     Greatly increased demands for authoritative scientific and technical information as well as public
             information on animal health and related matters

       •     Continued concern about the intentional use of biological agents to disrupt societies and economies;

       •     Increased consumer interest in the safety of food products of animal origin as well as their
             provenance and methods of production;

       •     Development of and continuous improvement in disease control methods (vaccines, diagnostic
             assays, culling and disposal), biotechnologies and other new technologies; and

       •     Increasing social, economic and environmental constraints associated with eradication control
             programmes for the management of animal diseases, especially in outbreak situations.

Institutional Challenges

44. The Fourth Strategic Plan must continue the progress made under the Third Strategic Plan in establishing
    the OIE as the primary world reference point for animal health and welfare matters, including animal health
    matters affecting human health and food safety. Special attention will have to be given to the relationships
    between the Organisation and its partner organisations, especially FAO and WHO as well as the Codex
    Alimentarius Commission, in these matters so that the OIE will continue to contribute to the international
    system of rapid exchange of information and communication on these issues.

45. The Fourth Strategic Plan also creates challenges to the OIE as an institution by extending the
    Organisation’s activities in response to its broader mandate. In addition to the resource implications, there
    will be increased stresses placed on its administrative structures, including the Headquarters and regional
    representations and on the critical role and obligations of the Delegates within their own countries.
    Moreover, as is appropriate to an Organisation with a strong regional base, the Fourth Strategic Plan will
    address regional issues as a strategic element in its own right with the objective of enhancing regional
    cooperation and coordination in achieving its global objectives.

                                              _______________




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 12
Chapter

    2                                          Main strategic areas

46. As a result of the considerations described above, the main Strategic Areas of the Fourth Strategic Plan are:

     a)    Provision of international animal disease and zoonoses information;

     b)    Development and implementation of scientifically-based standards;

     c)    Prevention, control and eradication of animal diseases and zoonoses (including in aquatic animals and
           wildlife) and the evaluation of animal health status;

     d)    Capacity building for national Veterinary Services; and

     e)    Strengthening the Organisation’s influence internationally and nationally on policy design, applied
           research and governance in animal health and animal welfare (including in veterinary public health).

47. These main strategic areas cover the Organisation’s principal activities. They are described below in detail,
    with a description of the strategic objectives to be achieved or pursued within the time frame of the Fourth
    Strategic Plan. Other continuing activities will be maintained to the extent that they support these strategic
    objectives.

48. The following Chapter (Chapter 3) describes issues that cut across most, or all, of these main Strategic
    Areas. To a considerable degree, most of the changes in emphasis in the Fourth Strategic Plan occur in
    these cross-cutting areas, but to understand them it is first necessary to describe the main Strategic Areas
    and the objectives to be achieved in each of them.


PROVISION OF INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL DISEASE INFORMATION
                              Objective: To maintain and improve the provision of timely and accurate
                              animal disease information, including information on zoonoses, by making
                              the best use of scientific data modelling, modern information technologies
                              and non official information tracking systems.

49. The provision of timely and accurate animal disease information, including information on zoonoses,
    remains one of the core functions of the Organisation and is one in which the OIE is the world leader.
    Providing such information requires timely access by the OIE to all relevant data sources, both
    conventional and non-conventional (using in this case non official information tracking systems), followed
    by professional analysis, evaluation and interpretation of data including the views of the country affected
    before an official release is made.

50. The OIE will continue, as a matter of high priority, to disseminate official information concerning the
    disease status of its Member Countries in a timely and efficient manner, based on official information
    received from Member Countries (confirmed by the official Delegate). All OIE Member Countries have an
    obligation to report information on animal diseases in an open and timely manner, especially when there is
    a change in disease status. Information technologies permit the rapid acquisition and processing of
    information as well its dissemination in a transparent, responsive and efficient manner.

51. Based on the new animal disease notification system based using single lists for terrestrial and aquatic
    animals and common interpretation of epidemiological data, ‘active’ search systems for animal disease
    information utilising geographical information systems are to be developed and made accessible as a result
    of a new computer systems master plan (see below). The Fourth Strategic Plan foresees changes in the




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 13
     frequency with which Member Countries should submit regular reports to the OIE and a significant
     increase in the number of emergency and follow-up reports by the Central Bureau based on this
     information.

52. In addition to the receipt and dissemination of official information, the Organisation will continue to collect
    and analyse animal disease information from other reliable sources, including the information transmitted
    by Reference Laboratories on the results of tests undertaken in this role. The role of Reference
    Laboratories in this regard will be strengthened.

53. Implementing these changes will mean completely redesigning the existing animal health information
    system, and taking full advantage of all the possibilities offered by the latest information and
    communication technology, including mapping software.

54. Within the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the OIE will strengthen aspects of this strategic area that
    will assist in the early detection and warning of the malicious or intentional use of biological agents to
    disrupt trade in animals or animal products or which have consequences for animal or public health.

55. Also within the period 2006 – 2010, the OIE will work towards the establishment of “Early warning
    systems” and emergency plans and strengthen its disease surveillance in wild animal populations. Both of
    these objectives will require a better knowledge of national and regional epidemiological surveillance
    systems and harmonization of such systems at the regional level or as required.               Epidemiological
    modelling should be considered and where appropriate supported so as to evolve from the status of a
    scientific tool to a practical applied instrument in veterinary administration. The programme of work under
    this Strategic Area will require substantial efforts on the part of the Specialist Commissions.

56. In order to ensure that the sanitary surveillance of wild animals and/or of aquatic animals is integrated into
    the general system of surveillance, the OIE will take steps to ensure that the Member Countries designate a
    national focal point for each of these areas of activity in those countries where this responsibility is
    attributed to a Ministry other than the one to which the Delegate to the OIE pertains. The appropriate
    relationship between such focal points and the official Delegate to the OIE will be defined.

57. In addition to the formal dissemination of animal disease information, efforts will be made to alert relevant
    international and regional organisations responsible for transport of goods and people to the risks associated
    with the international transmission of animal diseases and zoonoses, by means of cooperative agreements
    where appropriate.

58. Specific recommendations include:

       •     Improving animal health information, collection and dissemination for better control of diseases and
             safety of livestock products;
       •     Strengthening animal disease surveillance systems, including those of aquatic animals and wildlife;
       •     Improving the knowledge of epidemiological surveillance systems of animal diseases and
             harmonization of surveillance systems at the regional level;
       •     Strengthening the operations of the centralized Early Disease Warning Systems and Emergency
             Plans so as to avoid duplication at the regional level or the need for multiple reporting by individual
             Member countries;
       •     Strengthening the ability of the OIE Reference Laboratories to provide information on the results of
             tests undertaken in their official capacity;
       •     Providing information, through international institutions such as the International Air Transport
             Association (IATA) and others, on the risks associated with the importation of animals and animal
             products in specific countries;
       •     Developing ‘active’ search systems for non-official animal disease information and geographical
             information systems are currently being developed. Their optimal use will depend upon the adoption
             and implementation of a new computer systems master plan.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                          Page 14
DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION
OF SCIENTIFICALLY-BASED STANDARDS
                               Objective: To maintain and strengthen the role of the OIE as a reference
                               organisation for scientifically-based standards to the international
                               community on all matters concerning animal health and zoonoses, animal
                               welfare, diagnosis and control of diseases including the assessment of animal
                               health status, and sanitary safety in international trade.

59. One of the major roles of the OIE is to produce scientifically-based standards for animal health and
    zoonoses. Such standards are the most tangible examples of knowledge products developed by the
    Organisation. Since the recognition of these standards by the WTO as the scientific reference points for the
    safety of international trade of animals and animal products, as well as for the resolution of disputes
    concerning animal health and zoonoses, the development of OIE standards for international trade has
    assumed a prominent role. Critical to the continued acceptance of these standards is transparency during
    standards development and the use of scientific risk-based approaches.

60. The period of the Fourth Strategic Plan will also be used to encourage greater implementation of the OIE
    standards by Member Countries in accordance with their obligations under the WTO SPS Agreement and
    in line with the rights and obligations of membership in the OIE.

61. Scientifically-based standards are also essential in the determination of the health status of a country, zone
    or compartment, this being one of the most important risk management measures for the improvement of
    animal health. In addition to the development or maintenance of specific standards for this purpose,
    consideration will be given in the planning period to the development of scientifically-based principles to
    assist in the determination of whether or not additional specific diseases should be subject to official
    recognition of animal health status. Guidelines for the monitoring of health status will be developed.

62. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the Organisation will strengthen its standards-setting
    procedures by developing clear uniform principles and guidelines that outline the roles and responsibilities
    of the relevant Ad hoc Groups of experts, Working Groups and Commissions; provide advice on how to
    take into account diverse or dissenting scientific opinion; and provide for full documentation of the
    decision-making process.

63. Recognizing that standards provide some of the best tools for risk management in the fields of animal
    health and animal welfare, the OIE during the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan will ensure that its
    standards are maintained in a manner to ensure their consistency with the latest scientific knowledge
    utilising risk assessment as appropriate to the circumstances in each case. In particular, it will develop and
    publish clear policies to ensure that its standards are underpinned by scientific data that are of a quality that
    would withstand scientific peer review; that they identify risks and effective management options to
    address these risks4; and that they are developed by transparent processes and reflect international
    consensus.

64. The Third Strategic Plan gave examples of standards development and without repeating them here, many
    of them will continue to form part of the Work Programme for the period 2006 – 2010. In addition,
    consideration will be given to the following additional areas, although it should be noted that work on at
    least the first two has begun:

       •     animal welfare;

       •     animal production food safety;




4
    The selection of preferred risk management options by a Member Country will primarily involve a systematic evaluation
    of the likely impact of different measures in effectively managing identified risks. Wherever possible and practical, a
    risk-based control system will use risk assessment information to establish regulatory “targets” at a particular step in the
    exposure pathway that delivers a defined level of protection.



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                                     Page 15
       •     addressing ‘safe’ commodities in existing and new Code chapters;

       •     surveillance for animal diseases;

       •     compartmentalisation including appropriate detailed guidelines for implementation by Member
             Countries;

       •     interactive standards to allow development of appropriate and viable international health certificates
             established by veterinary services

       •     consequences of genetic modification in animals on animal health and zoonoses or where
             genetically modified organisms have been used as part of disease control or eradication procedures;

       •     animal vaccines, animal drugs and diagnostic materials based on living modified organisms and
             other GMO-derived materials;

       •     environmental impact of animal disease control measures including the recycling of animal by-
             products;

       •     standards for quality assurance of veterinary diagnostic and vaccine production laboratories;

       •     standards for determining the quality of vaccines;

       •     standards or guidelines for the validation of diagnostic tests;

       •     electronic certification;

       •     harmonizing the registration, recording and control of veterinary drugs;

       •     use of epidemiological modelling as an tool for veterinary administrations;

       •     ethics, quality, efficiency and evaluation of Veterinary Services

65. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, special attention will be paid to the development of
    standards or guidelines for animal registration and identification systems and traceability systems as
    economically feasible and practical tools for the management of animal health risks.

66. Further recommendations in this strategic area include:

       •     Guidelines or standards to validate diagnostic kits for which there is a commercial patent.

       •     Development of new standards in the area of animal production food safety for inclusion in the
             Terrestrial and Aquatic Codes and Manuals for pathogens and contaminants that represent hazards
             to human health even if they have not always effects on animal health;

       •     Harmonization of electronic certification procedures;

       •     Strengthening of incentives for compliance of Member Countries with standards, in particular on
             Veterinary Services and veterinary ethics;

       •     Guidelines on the auditing of Veterinary Services, and for quality assurance systems for diagnostic
             and vaccine production laboratories;

       •     Continued reviews of veterinary pharmaceuticals and other biological agents and publications of
             standards related to microbial resistance policies.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 16
67. The nature of some of these newer areas of work necessitates close cooperation and consultation with other
    relevant international bodies including FAO, WHO, Codex Alimentarius Commission, the Conference of
    the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and sometimes the ISO.

68. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the ‘horizontal’ standards applicable to both terrestrial
    animals and aquatic animals will be harmonized to the extent possible.


PREVENTION, CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF
ANIMAL DISEASES INCLUDING ZOONOSES
                              Objective: To provide scientifically-based recommendations on measures for
                              the prevention, control and eradication of animal diseases including
                              zoonoses, taking into account the economic, social and environmental
                              impacts of such measures, and to provide services for the determination of
                              animal health status in relation to specific diseases.

69. The Organisation will continue to serve as a reference organisation for its Member Countries during the
    implementation of national and regional animal and zoonotic disease prevention and eradication
    programmes, making use of all of the information and knowledge at its disposal including the
    implementation of its own standards. It will promote the international co-ordination and cooperation
    required to control animal diseases worldwide, in close collaboration with all those responsible for animal
    and human health and, where appropriate, with regional and international organisations specialised in
    financing cooperation. Prevention and control procedures against the malicious or intentional use of
    biological agents to disrupt trade in animals or animal products or that pose potential risks to animal or
    public health will be considered.

70. The OIE will continue to provide services to Member Countries wishing to recognise their territory, or a
    part of it, as free or provisionally from the four animal diseases already specified by the International
    Committee (foot and mouth disease, rinderpest, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and contagious bovine
    pleuropneumonia). Consideration may be given in the course of the Fourth Strategic Plan to the inclusion
    of additional diseases to this list, but such proposals will be treated with caution and evaluated to determine
    whether their inclusion is justified and whether or not the recognition of disease-free status is the most
    appropriate risk management technique for the control of these diseases or for the promotion of safe trade.

71. Because this strategic area is critically important to the mandate of the Organisation, the Fourth Strategic
    Plan seeks to strengthen the work programme by continuing the work begun during the Third Strategic Plan
    on Manuals. Linkages with corresponding activities under “standards” should be made clear and
    strengthened, including those related to animal production food safety. In this context the present
    worldwide network of OIE Reference Laboratories will be updated and expanded to incorporate as far as
    possible all the diseases mentioned in the Manuals.

72. OIE Reference Laboratories are obliged to provide standard diagnostic tests if no commercial tests are
    available. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the OIE will examine opportunities to develop
    the capabilities of the Reference Laboratories in this regard, especially those located in developing
    countries.

73. In addition to the guidelines currently under consideration, the work programme for the Fourth Strategic
    Plan will include guidelines with regard to humane culling practices, suitability of culled animals for
    human consumption or suitability for diversion to non-food purposes, taking also into account the
    environmental and social acceptability of prevention, control, disposal and eradication measures.

74. The Organisation will also encourage the use of new tools for the identification, diagnosis and prevention
    of animal diseases including genomics, proteomics and other modern technologies as they become
    available.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 17
75. Compensation programmes have been incorporated in many countries into the system for the prevention
    and control of animal diseases. Compensation for animal losses is a key factor in animal disease reporting
    and control and its efficacy at least as high as that of direct control measures. Compensation measures are
    aimed at promoting farmers’ cooperation in the prevention and control of animal diseases and mitigation of
    economic losses for farmers by stamping out of diseased or suspected animals. The successful
    development of such schemes requires the cooperation of all interested parties including farmers’
    associations, veterinary practitioners, the private and financial sectors, and rural communities. The Fourth
    Strategic Plan therefore includes proposals for the publication and exchange of information on different
    models in place in Member Countries, covering public and private inputs including insurance schemes, and
    how various combinations of these might be used. It is proposed that this would be done through the OIE
    website. In order to encourage the use of compensation schemes and to influence politicians and other
    decision makers, cost/benefit analyses of selected models will be undertaken and published, and the more
    successful models will be promoted, through the OIE Regional Representations, for consideration by
    Member Countries.


CAPACITY BUILDING FOR NATIONAL VETERINARY SERVICES
                              Objective: In cooperation with partners, to strengthen the capacity of
                              member countries in their efforts to participate in the development of, and to
                              apply international standards and guidelines for animal health and welfare,
                              including zoonoses.

76. The Fourth Strategic Plan includes for the first time specific reference to capacity-building for Member
    Countries to enable them to benefit from their membership in the OIE and the WTO and also to fulfil their
    obligations of membership by meeting international standards. The inclusion of capacity building as a
    strategic element also engages the OIE in fulfilling the aspirations of the Doha Ministerial Declaration so
    that developing countries will be more able to take part effectively in the standards-setting activities of the
    OIE.

77. Implementation of capacity building activities will be done by both the OIE Headquarters and the Regional
    Representations. OIE Headquarters will be mainly in charge of activities at the governmental level, e.g.,
    highlighting the rights and obligations of OIE Member Countries and the tasks, responsibilities and crucial
    role played by Delegates and relevant staff.

78. Because the OIE is not established as a capacity-building, funding or developmental organisation per se, its
    work in this area must be as a catalyst for other bodies, international or regional, public or private, to invest
    in building the capacities of the national Veterinary Services of its Member Countries5. The main current
    instrument of cooperation is the Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF), a mechanism
    established jointly by FAO, WHO, OIE, the World Bank and the WTO to support developing countries in
    building a capacity to correctly apply sanitary and phytosanitary measures. OIE will also develop materials
    for capacity-building and training consistent with its mandate, scope of operations and its available
    resources, and in cooperation with partners as appropriate.

79. The Regional Representations will organize, if necessary with other international organisations, seminars
    and courses at the regional level in all relevant technical topics in accordance with OIE priorities. The
    relevant collaborating centres of the OIE for training of official veterinarians will provide educational
    materials to the Regional Representations and Delegates, including information on how to benefit from the
    STDF. Delegates will be encouraged to use the materials provided by the OIE to organise training courses
    at the national level, with the support of the Regional Representation when appropriate.

80. One objective of capacity building will be the application at the national level of adopted OIE Standards for
    Terrestrial and Aquatic Animal Diseases, and the quality and evaluation of Veterinary Services depending
    on the needs of the individual countries.



5
    The same principles that apply to capacity building for Veterinary Services should also apply in countries where the
    responsibility for establishing or applying animal health measures is exercised by an organisation other than the
    Veterinary Services or by an authority or agency on behalf of the Veterinary Services (See Article 1.3.3.1 of the
    Terrestrial Code).



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                             Page 18
81. The Fourth Strategic Plan therefore establishes OIE’s role as a catalyst and major player in promoting
    capacity building for national Veterinary Services through the established international funding patterns,
    and especially the STDF, the Global Framework for Trans-boundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs), the
    African Regional Programme for Animal Disease Control (PACE), and the African Livestock Programme
    (ALIVE) with the aim of implementing OIE standards and recommendations in relevant national or
    regional legislation, and strengthening compliance with standards. This includes reinforcing the
    applicability of national and/or regional legislation concerning animal diseases.

82. The benefits expected from capacity building programme will be, among others:

       •     Facilitation of the dialogue between importing and exporting countries on health measures for safe
             trade; and

       •     Improvement of national and regional policies and programmes on prevention and control of animal
             diseases and zoonoses with positive impact, mainly for developing countries, in the alleviation of
             poverty, improved public health including food safety, and regional and international market access.

83. Among the priority areas for capacity building are:

       •     Consultation services to national Veterinary Services in Member countries;

       •     Establishment of on-site models for the evaluation of national Veterinary Services; disease control
             and surveillance compliance; cost-effective animal disease control programs; eradication
             programmes for animal diseases (including compensation measures); and evaluation of animal
             health status in relation to trade issues;

       •     Workshops for upgrading executive skills in epidemiological surveillance, notification and control
             and evaluation of Veterinary Services.

84. In addition, that training sessions for OIE Delegates (particularly new Delegates) and other relevant
    national officials, and through “training the trainer” programmes at regional level are incorporated into the
    work programme to be established under this strategic element.


STRENGTHENING OIE’S INFLUENCE ON POLICY DESIGN, RESEARCH AND
GOVERNANCE IN ANIMAL HEALTH AND WELFARE
                              Objective: To strengthen OIE’s involvement in policy design and governance
                              related to decision making in animal health and welfare including capacity
                              building, policy research, effective communication, and the “mediation” of
                              potential disputes.

85. This is a newly-defined strategic area for the OIE. It brings together for planning purposes a number of
    previously disparate activities that have been on-going for several years and, in some cases, a long time as
    well as new activities. The reason for consolidating these activities within a single strategic area is to
    provide additional synergy and therefore strength and to provide a consolidated vision for the future role of
    the Organisation in influencing global, regional and national policies on animal health and welfare.

86. This strategic area foresees OIE involvement on international and regional bodies designing and supporting
    policy research on:

       •     Improvement of vaccines and diagnostic tests in order to address better the control and eradication if
             listed animal diseases;




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 19
       •     Improvement, through the OIE Reference Laboratories’ network of exchange of biological
             materials, of world-wide knowledge of epidemiological events and to develop efficient vaccines for
             animals and humans (where relevant);

       •     Influence the public and private sectors to support the development of new tools for the control of
             animal diseases, in particular emerging diseases and diseases for which adequate tools are not
             commercially available; and

       •     Encourage partnerships between existing OIE Reference Laboratories and laboratories in developing
             countries, with donor support where relevant.

87.    This strategic area also foresees the development of an effective communication programme that would
      provide accurate and authoritative information on animal health and animal welfare issues to decision-
      makers, veterinarians and other professionals, including farmers, and the media and public. It would
      include communication in association with the risk management measures and other advice recommended
      by the Organisation. Within this framework, special efforts will be made to reinforce the role and status of
      the official OIE Delegates within their own countries as effective communicators of OIE policies and
      standards and their ability to engage in dialogue at the national level with the authorities that represent the
      country at FAO, WHO, CBD and other relevant bodies such as the Codex Alimentarius Commission or the
      IPPC.

88. Within this new strategic area, increased emphasis will be given to the Organisation’s role to assist as a
    provider of expert advice as envisaged in Article 1.3.1.4 of the Terrestrial Code, in the “mediation” of
    disputes on sanitary issues affecting trade. Such assistance will be at the request of Member Countries
    involved with participation on a voluntary and cost-recovery basis without affecting the rights and
    obligations of Member Countries under the SPS Agreement. The OIE will seek an understanding with the
    SPS Committee of the WTO to promote the use of OIE’s role in mediation as a cost-effective alternative to
    the formal Dispute Settlement Procedure of the WTO.

89. In the coordination of applied research and the collection of relevant scientific information, as required by
    its mandate, the OIE will continue to pursue the constant objective of gathering, using and disseminating
    new information and knowledge from scientific research, based largely on its network of Collaborating
    Centres and Reference Laboratories. It will continue to support and encourage applied research in all areas
    where this appears necessary, classify such areas in order of priority (mainly in line with their importance
    for animal disease surveillance and international trade) and support some fields of applied research if
    resources permit. It will undertake to support the scientific information and research needs of the Scientific
    and Code Commissions for the development of scientifically-based standards and other measures required
    for improved animal health and welfare, within its resources.

                                                _______________




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                           Page 20
Chapter

    3                                Achieving the strategic objectives


90. The five main strategic areas identified in the previous Chapter are supplemented in the Fourth Strategic
    Plan by four principal cross-cutting areas aimed at achieving the objectives outlined in the previous
    Chapter. The strengthening of these areas across all of the main strategic areas constitutes a major change
    of emphasis between the Third and Fourth Strategic Plans. These cross-cutting areas are:

         a)   Strengthening the scientific basis of the Organisation’s work;
         b)   Increasing the attention given to zoonoses and related issues;
         c)   Communicating OIE information; and
         d)   Cooperation with partner organisations


STRENGTHENING THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF THE ORGANISATION’S WORK
91. The credibility of the OIE in providing advice to its Member Governments, the WTO, the veterinary
    profession and the general public depends on the excellence of its scientific work. During the period of the
    Third Strategic Plan, significant efforts were made to ensure the excellence of decision-making in the
    preparation of standards relating to animal health, especially on trade related issues. The period of the
    Fourth Strategic Plan will see an extension of the scientific basis to cover its work in the main strategic
    areas concerning: Provision of International Animal Disease Information; Development and
    Implementation of Scientifically-based Standards; and recommendations on the prevention, control and
    eradication of animal diseases and zoonoses.

92. The output of the Specialist Commissions, Working Groups and Ad hoc Groups will increasingly have to
    demonstrate that their decisions and recommendations have a sound scientific basis and that they have been
    developed transparently, openly and inclusively. Such an emphasis will require additional resources in
    order to ensure that the scientific basis is as complete as possible and able to withstand external scrutiny or
    peer-review.

93. The Fourth Strategic Plan also foresees the allocation of resources from the Organisation’s regular budget
    to support the work of the OIE Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories, especially those in
    developing countries. Up until now, these laboratories have provided scientific support principally in the
    confirmatory diagnoses of disease outbreaks as part of the OIE mandate to provide international animal
    health information. A much greater use is foreseen of this function, but the main change that is anticipated
    is the role of the Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories in underpinning the scientific decision-
    making of the Organisation as a whole.

94. The OIE Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories will be required to contribute to this process.
    The Work Programme of the Fourth Strategic Plan will envisage means of supporting these institutions to
    develop or contribute to the excellence of the scientific basis of the Organisation’s work.


INCREASED ATTENTION TO ZOONOSES AND RELATED ISSUES
95. The Fourth Strategic Plan stresses the capacity of the Organisation to address the consequences of those
    animal diseases that are also diseases in humans (zoonoses), or have the potential to be harmful to public
    health. This is a cross-cutting issue involving all of the strategic objectives described in Chapter 2 and
    involves some of the Organization’s strongest comparative advantages in the areas of animal disease
    information, science-based standards, and advice on control and eradication measures. The OIE will
    remain the key international organization providing professional science-based advice on ways to identify,
    control and where possible eradicate these diseases, and will work in cooperation with other professional
    international organisations such as the FAO and the WHO to achieve this.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 21
96. As has already been noted, the period of the period of the Third Strategic Plan also saw a number of
    international health crises in the area of zoonoses, in particular the outbreaks of sudden acute respiratory
    syndrome (SARS), continued occurrences of BSE and the occurrence of avian influenza. These zoonoses
    have drawn widespread attention of politicians, the media and the general public to the role that animal
    health plays in the protection of public health and food safety. Although zoonoses constitute only about
    30% of animal diseases subject to OIE regulation, the control and eradication of these diseases occupies
    more than 50% of the technical work of the Organisation.

97. The lessons learned from the efforts to control these diseases will form the framework for OIE’s responses
    to further outbreaks of zoonoses. In particular, emphasis will be placed on effective notification of
    outbreaks, on the application of standards to protect consumer’s health and international trade from risks
    associated with affected animal products (and where necessary the development of new standards); and on
    measures to control or eradicate these diseases from affected animal populations.

98. OIE’s responses will involve consultation and cooperative action with other partner agencies, in particular
    the FAO, WHO and the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Also in this area, the work of the OIE
    Reference Laboratories will need to be strengthened.

99. The OIE will also support its Member Countries that wish to improve the capacities of their national
    Veterinary Services to deal with zoonoses. It will also encourage an active interface between national
    Delegates and their public health counterparts on national and international approaches when dealing with
    zoonotic diseases.


COMMUNICATING OIE INFORMATION
100. Although the communication function of the OIE has been considerably developed over the period of the
     Third Strategic Plan, it is vital that it be further strengthened. The OIE is moving towards greater
     transparency and this approach will continue under the Fourth Strategic Plan.

Public Information: Visibility and risk communication

101. Recent years have seen increased public interest in animal diseases, their zoonotic potential and measures
     for their control, for example in the outbreaks of avian influenza. There is an acknowledged need for better
     understanding by the public and the media of the animal health situation and the means of controlling
     animal diseases, especially in emergency situations. Improving public information is therefore a major
     strategic element for the planning period.

102. Efforts will also be made during the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan to providing technical information
     and information about the work of the Organisation to the attention of members of the veterinary profession
     (including those in private practice and students) to enable them to communicate factually with the public
     on issues in animal health and to gain a better professional understanding of the world-wide issues in
     animal health and animal welfare.

103. Accurate communication of disease risks is an essential element of the OIE communication policies. This
     communication must be aimed not only at the national Veterinary Services of Member Countries, but also
     at governments, industry and consumers. To this purpose, it will be necessary to strengthen the number and
     the veterinary expertise of the staff belonging to the unit in charge of communication within the OIE
     Headquarters, to improve the support to the Regional Representations in performing this task.

Dissemination of OIE Information

104. Transparency of OIE information is critical to the acceptance of OIE standards by Member Countries as
     well as veterinary and other professionals and the general public. The adoption and implementation of the
     new computer systems master plan will assist greatly in this. The Fourth Strategic Plan include a work
     programme throughout the planning period to ensure that all official OIE information is available to
     interested parties, for example at universities, veterinary schools, veterinary statutory bodies and private
     veterinary associations, and laboratories as well as to industry (including farmers) in Member Countries.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                       Page 22
105. In addition to the work of OIE, the International Portal on Food Safety, Animal and Plant Health
     (IPFSAPH) will make available all official information developed by the OIE, Codex Alimentarius, the
     IPPC, and the WTO on sanitary and phytosanitary matters with clear mention of the origin of the different
     sources.

106. The website of the STDF, hosted by WTO, provides comprehensive information in relation to capacity
     building for the implementation by member Countries of sanitary and phytosanitary standards. Continued
     cooperation in these inter-agency projects is foreseen for the Fourth Strategic Plan.

107. A stronger policy of promoting OIE publications, both in hard copy and in electronic format, will be
     pursued during the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan: increase in the number of recipients of OIE
     Publications catalogues; increase in the number of distributors in the countries and regions; and increased
     participation in international events and conferences.

108. The publications sales system will be modernised (electronic shop and contract with a specialised
     company) and the OIE Web site will be made even more user-friendly.

109. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the Administrative Commission will analyse the current
     content of the OIE publications catalogue including the Scientific and Technical Review and the Bulletin.
     Consideration will be given to the publication of scientific conferences organised by the OIE, including
     those organized in cooperation with other scientific bodies such as the FAO and the WHO. The scientific
     excellence of the OIE publications will be strengthened. The mechanism leading to the choice of the
     technical items addressed during the General Session and the Regional Conferences will be reviewed in
     order to be in closer correlation with relevant current topics and scientific and media reporting. Experts
     responsible for the presentation of technical items during the General Session and Regional Conferences
     will be designated after consultation with the Director General.

Computer Systems Master Plan

110. The Computer Systems Master Plan adopted in 2004 aims at improving the animal health information
     system, the administrative and financial management system, the management system of OIE documents
     and publications and the internal and external communication system, in order to better meet the
     expectations of Member Countries and the needs of OIE’s Departments. These information technology
     tools will be operated in a technically secure environment and fully implemented during the period of the
     4th Strategic Plan.


COOPERATION WITH PARTNER ORGANISATIONS
111. During the Third Strategic Plan, the OIE concluded 12 cooperative agreements with other international
     organisations, most notably those with FAO, WHO and the WTO, and with professional organisations
     representing the private sector (See paragraph 34). The Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF)
     was established. The Fourth Strategic Plan foresees further inter-agency cooperation, especially in the
     cross-linked areas of animal health and food safety and support for cooperative activities at regional and
     sub-regional levels and more ambitious but selective cooperation with world-wide bodies representing the
     private sector. There is particular interest in the work of the FAO, WHO, the Codex Alimentarius
     Commission and WTO.

112. The Fourth Strategic Plan recognizes the need for cooperation with all the above-mentioned bodies,
     consistent with the mandates of the organisations concerned and with the terms of the Agreements
     concluded with the respective organisations. The new agreements signed with the WHO and the FAO must
     be implemented with a mutual respect of the OIE’s mandates and of the above-mentioned organisations.
     Particular attention will be given to the contradictory positions sometimes expressed by representatives of
     the Member Countries within these organisations.

113. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, consideration will be given to the convening of meetings of
     representatives of the OIE and its partner agencies at the global and regional levels with a view to
     promoting the objectives of the Fourth Strategic Plan and ensuring effective communication between the
     OIE and interested funding and technical agencies, representatives of the professional and private sectors.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                      Page 23
     These meetings would have as their main objective an improved cooperative mechanism for the delivery of
     the Fourth Strategic Plan and an enhanced recognition of the role of the OIE as a strategic partner in the
     delivery of the UN Millennium Development Goals.

114. The OIE Delegates will be encouraged to ensure that decisions made within the OIE are communicated to
     the SPS Committee, to the Codex Committees and to the Codex Alimentarius Commission, as well as
     during the ministerial meetings of the WHO and of the FAO. They will also be encouraged to make sure
     that the mandates given to the OIE by its Member Countries are familiar to and respected by the other
     organisations.

                                             _______________




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                     Page 24
Chapter

    4                                    Institutional arrangements


MEMBERSHIP AND RESOURCES
115. The Fourth Strategic Plan addresses three major directions under this category:

       •     Recruitment of new members
       •     Adjustment and improved recovery of contributions
       •     Increase in voluntary contributions from Member Countries and public and private donors.

116. There are currently 167 Member Countries of the OIE, which ranks reasonably well with the Membership
     of other standards-setting bodies recognized in the SPS Agreement: 171 Members of the Codex
     Alimentarius Commission (as well as the European Community) and 127 Contracting Parties to the
     International Plant Protection Convention. There are 148 Members of the WTO, including the European
     Community. The Fourth Strategic Plan foresees a slight increase in membership with mechanisms at the
     regional level to foster the full participation of all OIE Members in the work of the Organisation.

117. On the question of assessed contributions, the Fourth Strategic Plan foresees readjustments to the design
     and scale of contributions to be undertaken as a matter of priority in order to facilitate and increase the
     scope and recovery of contributions from all members. However, the ability of Member Countries to
     choose freely the category of obligatory contributions will remain unchanged. A modification of the
     categories of contributions will therefore be proposed to the International Committee for consideration.

118. Consideration will also be given to the use of voluntary contributions by Members (including the placement
     of national civil servants in the Central Bureau and Regional representations) and the increased use of
     additional voluntary resources, including funding from private sources; potential to allow for sponsorship
     of development of certain standards; donations from eligible private individuals and foundations; projects
     with World Bank and other donors, bearing in mind the need to maintain the independence of the
     Organisation.


BASIC TEXTS
119. Within the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the Organisation will undertake a modernization of its basic
     texts, including the consolidation into the basic texts of the decisions and resolutions of the International
     Committee taken in recent years and the modernization of the terminology.


CENTRAL AND REGIONAL OFFICES
OIE Headquarters

120. The design of the staffing structure in the OIE will be adapted to the requirements of the Fourth Strategic
     Plan. Conditions will be developed to ensure that highly qualified and experienced staff are retained and
     new staff are recruited to meet the high standards of the Organisations.

121. The OIE Management will continue to use the best international procedures in order to reduce the cost of
     purchase of goods and services.

122. The verification work the two auditors of the Administrative Commission elected by the International
     Committee have to perform will be organised in such a way as to enable them to consecrate all the
     necessary time to this task, in addition to controls currently provided by internal and external audit
     mechanisms.



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 25
Regional Approaches
123. The Fourth Strategic Plan will pay considerable attention to regional and sub-regional matters and the
     specific concerns of the Regional Commissions. During the planning period the roles and responsibilities
     of Regional Representatives, Regional Commissions and the OIE Headquarters will be clarified and the
     relations between will be better defined. Major proposals include:

       •     Continuing strengthening the role of Regional Commissions and better defining their relations with
             the Regional Representations and the OIE Headquarters and extending cooperation between the OIE
             Regional Representations and Regional Commissions;

       •     Establishment, when relevant, of additional sub-Regional bureaux under the authority of the relevant
             Regional Representation, according to needs and subject to the availability of resources, as well as
             sub-regional Focal Points; and

       •     Clarifying the organic rules for proposing and establishing regional Ad hoc Groups of experts.

124. The work programme of the Fourth Strategic Plan outlines a continuing strategy to resolve the different
     questions concerning regional institutional arrangements, including the budgetary provisions, be adopted by
     the mid-point of the planning period, and implemented by the end of the planning period. This includes:

       •     Better definition of the mandates of the Regional Commissions and the Regional Representations
             including their respective responsibilities;

       •     Including resources for regional activities in the Regular Budget of the OIE based on both
             compulsory, voluntary and other contributions;

       •     Consideration of mechanisms to involve Regions in concrete action and policy development and, as
             appropriate, to harmonize the activities of the Regional Representatives; and

       •     Improved arrangements for meetings of the elected members of the Bureaux of the Regional
             Commissions in the presence of the Regional Representative (with appropriate finance).


THE INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE, ADMINISTRATIVE COMMISSION, REGIONAL
COMMISSIONS AND REPRESENTATIONS
The International Committee

125. The International Committee of the OIE is the Organisation’s supreme governing body and consists of the
     annual General Assembly of the official Delegates appointed by the OIE’s Member Countries. In order to
     strengthen its role as the governing body of the Organisation, a review of its functions and operations will
     be undertaken by the Director General of the OIE and the Administrative Commission. The review will
     involve all Member Countries at the senior government level and will address, among other matters, how to
     highlight the importance of the role and functions of the official Delegates appointed by governments to the
     International Committee.

Administrative Commission

126. The respective responsibilities of the Director General, the President and the Administrative Commission
     will be reviewed and, if necessary, clarified on the basis of the statutes of the OIE at the first meeting of the
     Administrative Commission following the adoption of this Strategic Plan (in 2006). A study will be
     undertaken to identify and analyse the possible options including modification of the basic texts of the OIE
     (See para. 119, above). The most efficient management model for the OIE will be selected and applied.

127. Efforts will be made to facilitate the visa arrangements for travel to OIE meetings by official Delegates and
     elected members of the Administrative and Specialist Commissions.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                           Page 26
Regional Commissions
128. The Regional Commissions play important roles. Their main task is to assist Member Countries to fully
     and actively participate in the OIE, and to derive the benefits of such participation. The second principal
     task is to assist in adapting OIE recommendations, strategies, programs and activities to the prevailing
     conditions and needs of the individual regions and, where necessary, sub-regions. The Regional
     Commissions provide for coordination and continuity for these tasks at the regional level. The Regional
     Commissions are official legal bodies recognized as such by the International Committee and by all
     countries in their respective Regions, and constituted also by ministerial decisions. They provide general
     orientation on OIE policies on animal health and animal welfare at a regional level. These
     recommendations are all submitted to the International Committee for endorsement. They then become
     subject to implementation by the Director General.

129. Regional Commissions have the strategic objective of strengthening the capacities of Veterinary Services in
     the areas of provision of animal health information, sanitary safety in regional and international trade; the
     development of such trade; the protection of animal health, animal welfare and public health; and for
     achieving a greater contribution of livestock to the national economy by contributing to international
     exchanges in poverty alleviation. The new Plan will specify how the elected bureaux of the Regional
     Commissions can be better involved in the co-governance of the Regional Representations under the
     guidance of the Director General. In this regard, the mandates of the Regional Commissions will be
     strengthened by clarifying the relationships between the Regional Commissions and the OIE Regional
     Representations.

130. For example, in the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the Regional Commission for Africa will make
     more visible the existence of the OIE in Africa and in the World and reinforce the technical capacities of
     the Regional OIE Africa Representation in Bamako by seeking funds to that effect. Sub-regional
     representations, which will report to the Bamako office will be established for North Africa and Southern
     Africa.

Regional Representations
131. The OIE Regional Representations will pursue their activities, reporting directly to the Director General.
     The latter will verify that the work programmes of these Representations correspond to those adopted by
     the OIE Regional Commissions and that the administrative and financial management of these
     Representations conform to the Mandates and Regulations adopted by the International Committee in 1995
     (Resolution XIX). In particular, the Director General will ensure absolute transparency in the management
     of voluntary contributions provided for the operation of these Regional Representations and total
     independence for the OIE Representations with respect to the national authorities of their host countries.

132. The Regional Representations will be called upon to play an active role in the new strategic area of
     capacity building, in particular in facilitating the training of Delegates both in regard to their status as
     representatives of their countries at meetings of the International Committee and other OIE bodies as well
     as their role and obligations within their own countries. The Regional Representatives will also be called
     upon to provide information and training to for Delegates in the important function of ensuring that official
     OIE positions are taken into account at the national level when formulating national inputs to the work of
     the FAO, WHO, WTO, the Codex Alimentarius Commission and other bodies whose work has an impact
     on the work of the OIE.

133. The resources made available to the regional bodies of the OIE will be strengthened by making use of all
     potential forms of resources including trust funds and the secondment of staff. This strengthening will take
     the form of permanent contacts with international and regional specialised financial organisations through
     which the Director General can identify, negotiate and mobilise funding to support projects in the regions
     and the Veterinary Services in Member Countries which request such assistance. Member Countries in the
     region in question will be informed on a regular basis of the activities of their Representation.

Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories
134. The obligations of the Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories were reviewed and defined during
     the period of the Third Strategic Plan. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan they will continue to
     pursue their work in accordance with their Mandates and Internal Rules.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 27
135. As described in Chapter 3, the Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories will be called upon during
     the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan to play an increasingly important role in ensuring the scientific
     excellence of the Organization’s decision-making. Where appropriate and depending on available
     resources, they will receive the support of the OIE when they are made responsible for certain research
     work considered to be a priority for the health security of international trade. An important approach for
     enhancing the capacities of the Collaborating Centres and Reference Laboratories is the “twinning” of
     laboratories working on similar disease issues in a manner that gives mutual support to the capacities of
     both parties.

SPECIALIST COMMISSIONS, WORKING GROUPS AND AD HOC GROUPS
136. The OIE Specialist Commissions, Working Groups and Ad hoc Groups rely on the services of recognized
     experts highly competent in their respective fields. This level of excellence underpins the principal
     knowledge base of the OIE. The OIE will continue to try to secure the highest level of scientific expertise
     from around the world to ensure that its knowledge base represents inputs from all of its regions.

137. The experts participating in Specialist Commissions, Working Groups and Ad hoc Groups do so without
     additional remuneration and their services are granted to the OIE by their employer or institution without
     charge, other than the costs of travel and per diem expenses. This level of voluntary support ensures both
     the independence of the scientific opinion and the ability of the OIE to take on the wide variety of animal
     health and animal welfare issues demanded of it by its Member Countries.

138. The Member Countries which accept to also cover the travel and per diem expenses of their experts are of
     course encouraged to pursue this policy in the interest of the OIE. It is recommended that other Member
     Countries should follow this example.

139. New terms of reference, aimed at clarifying and strengthening the competence of each of the Commissions
     have been adopted and the number of Working Groups and Ad hoc Groups in support of these
     Commissions has been increased. It is expected that oversight of the work of the Specialist Commissions,
     Working Groups and Ad hoc Groups will form a continuing element of the Fourth Strategic Plan.

140. The standards development activities of the Specialist Commissions, Working Groups, Ad hoc Groups and
     discussions at Scientific Conferences convened at the request of the Specialist Commissions will be
     supported by increasing the resources of the current special account established for this purpose to enhance
     the active participation of experts from developing countries and the private sector, using both regular
     budget, voluntary contributions and other external resources.

141. Within the period covered by the Fourth Strategic Plan the outputs of the Specialist Commissions,
     especially in regard to standards development and the provision of scientific advice will be fully
     documented and published so that the decisions of the Specialist Commissions will be readily
     understandable by all interested parties (see Box). Criteria for the establishment of Ad hoc Groups will
     also be published.

                                   REPORTING THE SCIENTIFIC WORK OF THE OIE
In order to guarantee the transparency, excellence and efficacy of the Specialist Commissions, as well as the
full participation of Member Countries in the elaboration of the OIE standards, the following procedure for
document circulation will be used:
Ad Hoc Group meetings
Finalised reports of Ad hoc Group meetings of experts are to be sent:
• to Members of the responsible Specialist Commission for information, and for discussion at the next
     Commission or Bureau meeting;
• if relevant, to members of the responsible Working Group for information, and for discussion at the next
     Working Group meeting or via an electronic forum; the report is then to be sent to the responsible
     Specialist Commission with working group comments, for discussion at the next Commission or Bureau
     meeting;
• to other relevant OIE Departments and from them to any relevant Specialist Commission president(s), for
     information and for comment to the responsible Commission.
At this time, they are not placed on the OIE Web site nor in the Bulletin.




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                       Page 28
Working Group meetings
Finalised reports of working Group meetings are to be sent:
•   to Members of the responsible Commission for information, and for discussion at the next Commission or
    Bureau meeting;
•   to other relevant OIE Departments and from them to any relevant Specialist Commission president(s), for
    information and for comment to the responsible Commission.
At this time, they are not placed on the OIE Web site nor in the Bulletin.
Meetings of the Specialist Commissions
Reports of Specialist Commission meetings are to contain the full reports of the meetings of the Working
Groups and Ad hoc Groups for which the Commission is responsible.
An unofficial version of Commission reports, in English only, is to be circulated by e-mail to Delegates and
placed on the Delegates’ Web site, as soon as possible after each meeting. At the same time, these reports are
to be sent by e-mail to international organisations with which the OIE has a formal agreement.
After translation into French and Spanish, the official versions of Commission reports (in the three languages)
are to be circulated by e-mail and mail to Delegates and to the international organisations with which the OIE
has a formal agreement, and placed on the OIE public Web site. At this time, references to the reports of
Commission meetings are to be published in the Bulletin.
After each General Session, a report of any changes agreed by the International Committee (for example the
relevant Resolution(s)) is to be placed on the OIE public Web site adjacent to the relevant Commission reports.



Specialist Commissions

142. The respective tasks and responsibilities of the four OIE Specialist Commissions, whose members are
     elected every three years by the International Committee, are defined in the statutes. They will not be
     modified, but the activities of the members of these Commissions will be refocused.

143. To the extent that it is consistent with their mandates, all Specialist Commissions will address questions
     relating to the malicious or intentional use of biological agents to disrupt trade or to threaten animal or
     public health.

Scientific Commission for Animal Diseases
144. The Commission will emphasise its role as the scientific point of reference concerning the prevention and
     surveillance of animal diseases, in order to control diseases and determine animal health status and to
     answer to any request of other specialist Commissions related to scientific questions.

145. When Member Countries wish, on a strictly voluntary basis, to have their territory or a zone of their
     territory recognised as free from the four animal diseases currently specified by the International
     Committee (foot and mouth disease, rinderpest, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and contagious bovine
     pleuropneumonia), their candidacy will be examined by Ad hoc Groups dealing with each of the 4 current
     diseases. These groups will be comprised of independent consultants designated by the OIE, which will
     report its conclusions to the Commission after discussions, if necessary, with the applicant country. The
     Commission will verify that conclusions are relevant and in conformity to the OIE guidelines and will then
     issue a final opinion on the requests presented to the OIE. In certain cases, the Commission may decide to
     undertake a verification of the findings. The opinion of the Commission will be submitted for comments by
     Member Countries before final adoption by the International Committee (except in the case of fast track
     procedures already or to be decided by the International Committee.) See also paragraph 70 on the matter
     of diseases subject to this process.

Terrestrial Animal Health Standards Commission ("Code Commission")
146. The Commission will work to ensure the Terrestrial Code continues to be a first-class tool for Member
     Countries to use in the development of their import regulations in line with the principles in the WTO SPS
     Agreement. Modernisation and updating of the Terrestrial Animal Health Code will be actively pursued
     and older standards will be reviewed to ensure that they are based on scientific principles and risk
     assessment as appropriate to the circumstances; where necessary and scientifically justified to ensure the



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                      Page 29
     safety of international trade, standards will include measures specifically addressing commodities. Products
     of animal origin which do not present risk for international trade with regard to specific diseases shall be
     listed in the Code in a manner as clear and visible as possible. The Terrestrial Code shall continue to state
     that the use of its standards by Member Countries should be their first option as compared to other methods
     such as the use of risk analysis. The main role of OIE standards in ensuring the safety of international trade
     will be reaffirmed. The Commission will continue to oversee the work of the Working Groups on Animal
     Welfare and Food Safety. The financial resources needed to support the work of the Commission will be
     increased. Human resources will also be increased, notably by fostering the use of temporary and
     permanent experts made available to the OIE by its Member Countries.

Aquatic Animal Health Standards Commission
147. The same principles that apply to the work of the Terrestrial Code Commission will also apply to the
     Aquatic Animals Commission. It will continue to prepare, and update as required, OIE international health
     standards for international trade in aquatic animals and their products, as well as on the diagnostic and
     surveillance techniques required to ensure the safety of such trade. It will pursue its efforts to provide
     information and disease control methods on aquatic animal diseases.

148. During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the Commission will seek opportunities to identify more
     aquatic disease reference laboratories with a view to obtaining additional expert advice on aquatic animal
     diseases so as to accelerate its work programme.

Biological Standards Commission
149. The Commission will work to complete and update the Manual of Standards for Diagnostic Tests and
     Vaccines. The Commission will strengthen its work on the recognition of diagnostic tests and kits including
     those of commercial origin, and on the quality of vaccines. It will continue its work on means to minimize
     the possibility of the development of antimicrobial resistance. It will also provide advice to the OIE on
     strengthening Reference Laboratories capacities on applied research mainly through inter-Reference
     Laboratories twinning programmes of Reference Laboratories so as to strengthen the world-wide capacity
     in these areas. This Commission will also answer to any request from other Specialist Commissions in the
     field of its competencies.

150. In the areas of veterinary drugs, including antimicrobials, the Commission will strengthen its liaison with
     the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods and with programme on International
     Cooperation on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Veterinary Medicinal
     Products (VICH) so as to implement the recommendations of these bodies on a world-wide scale. A focal
     point on Veterinary Drugs and Vaccines will be nominated by OIE Delegates within each Member
     Country.

Working Groups

Working Group on Wildlife Diseases
151. Due to the increasing number of problems associated with the detection, notification, surveillance and
     control of diseases spread by, or with reservoirs amongst, wild animals, the role of this Working Group has
     grown constantly since its creation in 1991. Its work in the fields of gathering information on wild animal
     diseases and on the standardisation of diagnostic techniques and control measures against such diseases will
     thus be pursued and strengthened. This Group will report to the Scientific Commission and work in close
     collaboration with the Terrestrial Code Commission, and the Biological Standards Commission.

Working Group on Animal Production Food Safety
152. The Working Group on Animal Production Food Safety was established during the period of the Third
     Strategic Plan (2002). During the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, it will continue to work with other
     relevant organisations, especially the Codex Alimentarius Commission, in reducing food-borne risks to
     human health due to hazards arising from animals. In this context, a hazard is defined as a biological,
     chemical or physical agent in food with the potential to cause an adverse health effect in humans, whether
     or not it causes disease in animals. The Working Group will continue its programme for the development of
     standards on animal production food safety covering pre-slaughter issues and those prior to the first



Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                         Page 30
     transformation of animal products, with a primary focus on food safety measures applicable at the farm
     level. This work will include hazards which do not normally cause disease in animals. The development of
     a “Guide to Good Farming Practices” in order to address public health risks arising from hazards at the
     farm level and of guidelines on the “Control of hazards of public health and animal health importance
     through ante- and post-mortem meat inspection” are examples of the tasks. The Working Group will also
     provide advice to the OIE on the inter-related roles and functionalities of veterinary and food safety or
     public health services and agencies through the publication of Guidelines on “The Role and Functionality
     of Veterinary Services in Food Safety throughout the Food Chain”.

153. The Working Group will form the focal point for cooperation with the Codex Alimentarius Commission,
     WHO and FAO on food safety issues, and relevant Codex Committees to avoid gaps and inconsistencies
     between the standards of the OIE and the Codex.

Working Group on Animal Welfare
154. The Working Group on Animal Welfare was established by the International Committee in 2002 to provide
     international leadership in animal welfare through the development of science-based standards and
     guidelines, to provide expert advice and to promote relevant education and research through:

       •     Promotion of science-based understanding of animal welfare,
       •     Use of appropriate expertise;
       •     Consultation with relevant stakeholders;
       •     Recognition of regional and cultural dimensions;
       •     Liaison with academic and research institutions.

155. In the period of the Fourth Strategic Plan, the Working Group will continue to oversee the development of
     standards and guidelines within the framework of the Guiding Principles and Policies adopted by the OIE
     in 2004 and continue to develop and communicate scientifically-based information on animal welfare
     issues to all interested parties. The welfare of aquatic animals will be included in this programme.

Ad hoc Groups

156. The Ad hoc Groups systematically report to the Working Group or Specialist Commission which has
     requested its expert advice. The reports of ad hoc groups will be published in appendices to the reports of
     the Specialist Commissions. The Specialist Commissions are the only ones to propose draft standards to the
     International Committee for adoption.

157. Any Ad hoc Groups needed to provide information or technical support for the work of the Specialist
     Commissions and Working Groups will be formed as required by the Director General. The principal
     requirements for the selection of experts in these groups are international recognition, excellence,
     geographic balance and availability under the conditions of the OIE (See paragraph 136). In cases where it
     proves more effective than organising traditional meetings of such groups, OIE will create ‘virtual teams’
     composed of international experts who will be consulted electronically and/or through video conferencing
     to minimise the need for physical meetings.

158. The Fourth Strategic Plan foresees a need to re-constitute, as an Ad hoc group, the former Working Group
     on Biotechnology which ceased its work in 2000, with a new and broader mandate to consider new
     technologies, such as xenotransplantation, transgenics and nanotechnologies that are expected to become
     important within the period 2006-2010. This Group will concentrate on collecting and analysing
     information on these technologies applicable to the surveillance and control of animal diseases. It will work
     closely with the Biological Standards Commission on the international standardisation of diagnostic
     techniques and the development of new drugs and vaccines.

159. Given the increasing importance of emerging and re-emerging diseases (especially zoonoses), an Ad hoc
     Group will be created to work on this issue. It will report to Scientific Commissions, in close collaboration
     with the Code Commission.

                                              _______________




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 31
Chapter

    5                            Preparation of the Director General’s
                                         programme of work

160. The adoption of the Fourth Strategic Plan will be followed by the preparation of an initial Programme of
     Work that gives effect to the objectives enunciated in the Plan. This will be submitted by the Director-
     General for adoption to the International Committee in 2006. This Programme of Work will address the
     resource requirements of the OIE to ensure that its human and financial resources are fully adequate for
     implementing the recommendations of the new Strategic Plan.

161. Firstly, the OIE must increase the number of permanent staff in the OIE headquarters and in the Regional
     Representations.

162. The second issue to be tackled concerns the human and financial resources allotted to the participation of
     OIE representatives to the various relevant international and regional meetings, essential for discussing
     scientific issues and subsequent new standards and guidelines, as well as the costs related to the
     organisation of international scientific conferences proposed by the OIE.

163. The third and last issue to be addressed concerns the resources to be allotted to the Reference Laboratories
     in order for them to perform in a more effective manner the mandates with which they have been invested
     by the International Committee and to be able to carry out priority applied research programmes on disease
     control methods and animal welfare.

164. With respect to the OIE permanent staff, on 1 January 2005, the OIE Headquarters employed 45 personnel
     of 24 different nationalities and the five Regional Representations and the SEAFMD Unit employed 18
     personnel of 9 different nationalities. It is estimated that the implementation of the current Strategic Plan
     will require the recruitment of 8 additional staff at the Headquarters and 6 additional staff within the
     Regional Representations and SEAFMD Unit.

165. The recourse to Trust Funds and other sources of funding will be systematic, especially to support the
     participation of experts from developing countries in the elaboration and negotiation of international
     standards, as well as for scientific conferences and training programmes for Delegates and national
     Veterinary Services.

                                              _______________




Fourth OIE Strategic Plan: 2006 – 2010                                                                        Page 32

				
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