CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM _CSP_ - Psychology

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					CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM
         2010-11


           University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
              Department of Psychology
         2530 Dole Street • Sakamaki C400
                Honolulu, HI 96822
    Phone: (808) 956-7644 • Fax: (808) 956-4700
             www.psychology.hawaii.edu


                   August 2010
                                        UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA
                                          DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

                                             CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM
                                                       2010-11


1   OVERVIEW........................................................................................................................................... 5
                  • Training Philosophy ............................................................................................................ 5
                  • Training Goals..................................................................................................................... 6
                  • Accreditation ....................................................................................................................... 7
                  • Admissions Procedures and Criteria ................................................................................... 7
                  • Affirmative Action .............................................................................................................. 8
                  • Enhancement Program for Underrepresented Minorities.................................................... 8
                  • Facilities and Resources ...................................................................................................... 9
                  • A Multiethnic Environment ................................................................................................ 9

2   DUAL-SPECIALTY TRAINING OPTION .......................................................................................... 9
                   • Examples of Dual-specialty Options................................................................................. 10

3   COURSE REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................................. 13
                  • Clinical Core Courses ....................................................................................................... 13
                  • Statistics and Methodology ............................................................................................... 14
                  • History and Systems.......................................................................................................... 14
                  • Basic Psychology (Four Corners) ..................................................................................... 15
                  • Clinical Electives............................................................................................................... 15
                  • Course Requirements for Licensure .................................................................................. 15
                  • Enrollment Requirements.................................................................................................. 15

4   LIABILITY INSURANCE .................................................................................................................. 16

5 CLINICAL PRACTICUM TRAINING............................................................................................... 16
                  • Goals ................................................................................................................................. 16
                  • Practicum Site Approval ................................................................................................... 17
                  • CSP Supervision of Practicum Experience ....................................................................... 18
                  • Trainee Evaluations........................................................................................................... 19
                  • Practicum Site Evaluations................................................................................................ 19
                  • Program-Sanctioned Practicum Experience (designation of clinical hours as
                      "practicum" versus "clinical work experience") ............................................................ 19
                  • Outside Activities Related to Clinical Psychology ........................................................... 20

6 PRACTICAL TRAINING EXPERIENCES FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS......................... 21
                   • Background ....................................................................................................................... 21
                   • General Guidelines............................................................................................................ 21
                   • Practical Training Experiences during Summer Months .................................................. 21
                   • Practical Training as Part of Didactic Courses ................................................................. 22



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                    • Providing Supervision and Receiving Supervision Training ............................................ 22
                    • Internships ......................................................................................................................... 22
                    • Volunteer Work................................................................................................................. 22

7 LEVEL OF TRAINING INVOLVEMENT ......................................................................................... 23

8    STUDENT FUNDING......................................................................................................................... 23

9 WAIVING AND SUBSTITUTING COURSES .................................................................................. 24

10 ACADEMIC ADVISING .................................................................................................................... 25

11 RESEARCH TRAINING..................................................................................................................... 26

12 MASTER'S DEGREE .......................................................................................................................... 27

13 DOCTORAL DEGREE........................................................................................................................ 28
                    • Dissertation ....................................................................................................................... 29
                    • Other Requirements for Thesis and Dissertations............................................................. 30

14 INTERNSHIP....................................................................................................................................... 31
                    • Applying for a Non-APA-accredited Internship ............................................................... 32

15 TIME LIMITATIONS AND ATTRITION.......................................................................................... 37

16 CLINICAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION............................................................................ 38
                    • Purpose .............................................................................................................................. 38
                    • Dossier Format .................................................................................................................. 38
                        - Example of Proposed Behavioral Objectives .............................................................. 40
                    • Procedures, Timelines, and Policies .................................................................................. 41
                    • Grading.............................................................................................................................. 41
                    • Grading Guidelines............................................................................................................ 42

17 STUDENT EVALUATIONS............................................................................................................... 49
                    • Student Evaluation Criteria ............................................................................................... 49

18 STUDENT REPRESENTATION ........................................................................................................ 51

19 A POSITIVE INTERPERSONAL AMBIENCE AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES..................... 52

20 CLINICAL RESPECIALIZATION PROGRAM ................................................................................ 53
                    • General Description........................................................................................................... 53
                    • Clinical Training................................................................................................................ 53
                    • Admission Procedures ....................................................................................................... 54




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21 CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM FACULTY .................................................................................. 55
                    • Department of Psychology Faculty ................................................................................... 56
                    • Cooperating Graduate Faculty........................................................................................... 57
                    • Affiliate Graduate Faculty................................................................................................. 58
                    • Clinical Affiliates .............................................................................................................. 58

22 CLINICAL STUDENTS (2010-11) ..................................................................................................... 59

APPENDICES .......................................................................................................................................... 61
   APPENDIX A Clinical Studies Program Basic Training and Professional Socialization Topics... 61
   APPENDIX B Approximate Clinical Program Course Schedule (Without a Dual-Specialty) ....... 66
   APPENDIX C Clinical Practicum Experience Log ........................................................................ 68
   APPENDIX D Proposed Clinical Position Form ............................................................................ 80
   APPENDIX E Evaluation of Practicum Student Form ................................................................... 81
   APPENDIX F       Practicum Site Evaluation ....................................................................................... 88
   APPENDIX G Sample Letter for Waiving Courses ........................................................................ 90
   APPENDIX H Clinical Studies Research Evaluation Form............................................................ 91
   APPENDIX I       Sample Petition for Admission to the PhD Program............................................... 92
   APPENDIX J       CSP Student Progress Form .................................................................................... 93
   APPENDIX K Clinical Comprehensive Examination - Proposal of Behavioral Objectives......... 106
   APPENDIX L Clinical Comprehensive Examination - Evaluation Form .................................... 107
   APPENDIX M Clinical Comprehensive Examination - Oral Presentation Evaluation Form........ 109
   APPENDIX N Common Student Petitions: Routing.................................................................... 110
   APPENDIX O Positive Accomplishments Checklist .................................................................... 111
   APPENDIX P Sample Petition of Dual-specialty......................................................................... 113




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                              UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA
                               DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

                                 CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM
                                          2010-2011


                                                     1
                                              OVERVIEW

•   Training Philosophy

    The Clinical Studies Program at the University of Hawaii is based on a scientist-practitioner
    (Boulder) model of training, as outlined in Belar and Nathan (1992). (see also Hayes, Barlow,
    Nelson-Gray, l999; Haynes, Lemsky, & Sexton-Radek, l987; Raimy, 1950; Spengler, Strohmer,
    Dixon, & Shivy, 1995, for discussions of scientist-practitioner models of training and practice).
    Within this model, we seek to train culturally competent psychologists who function at the highest
    standards in psychology in public service institutions, such as hospitals, mental health centers and
    organizations, colleges, and universities. Graduates from our program should be able to function as
    culturally competent clinical scholars in administrative, supervisory, research, and teaching roles in
    public service institutions.

    Within the scientist-practitioner model, the Clinical Studies Program’s specific goals are:

    1. To Integrate Science and Practice throughout all aspects of our didactic, clinical assessment,
       therapy, and research training and activities.

        a. All Clinical Studies Program faculty are scientist-practitioners.
        b. All clinical practicum experiences involve an emphasis on science-based best-practices.
        c. Science-based practice is emphasized in our core clinical coursework.
        d. Masters theses and Doctoral dissertations must be empirically based and address important
           clinical issues from a science-based perspective.
        e. Our Comprehensive Examination focuses on scientist practitioner skills including
           professional activities such as submission of a theoretical or empirical article to a peer-
           reviewed journal, a science-based case formulation and treatment plan, grant applications,
           and evidence of teaching.
        f. Student participation in clinical research. All students are expected to be actively engaged in
           clinical research throughout their graduate studies and many students publish and present at
           scientific conventions.

    2. To train Culturally Competent Scientist-Practitioners. An important goal of the CSP is to
       strengthen cultural competence throughout students’ didactic, clinical assessment, treatment, and
       research training. Culturally competent science practitioner model training is advanced in many
       settings and in many ways. Training in cultural competence is integral to clinical experiences in
       Hawai‘i because of our multiethnic society. Associated with a multiethnic society is acceptance
       of multiple sources of individual differences, such as age, sexual orientation, and physical
       abilities. Specific training foci where cultural competence is stressed and specific training
       methods include:



                                                     5
        a. Psychological assessment training. Students are provided with readings and discuss sources
           of individual differences, particularly cross-cultural and ethnic factors in psychological
           assessment.
        b. Intervention/treatment/consultation training and practice. Students are provided with
           readings and discuss sources of individual differences, particularly cross-cultural and ethnic
           factors in adult, child, and family treatment.
        c. Consultation and program evaluation.
        d. Research training and practice. Research in Hawai‘i necessarily involves a sensitivity to
           ethnic and cultural issues. Many publications have cultural factors as a main focus and
           cultural and ethnic variables are included in most of our research.
        e. Content of Clinical Core Courses. All clinical core courses (our three assessment courses,
           child and adult psychopathology, adult intervention, introduction to clinical psychology)
           address ethnic and cross-cultural issues.
        f. Specialized Cross-Cultural courses. The program and department offer specially designed
           courses in cross cultural psychology.

    3. To Encourage Dual-Specialty Training. The science and practice of clinical psychology is
       advanced by persons with broad training in clinical psychology who also acquire specialized
       training in a related field. We encourage students to acquire specialized areas of knowledge and
       competence through a Dual-Specialty program.

•   Training Goals

    Consistent with the scientist-practitioner model of training outlined above, the Clinical Studies
    Program aims to produce entry level clinical psychologists who are knowledgeable about and
    competent in:

    1. The history and social and professional context of clinical psychology

    2   Ethics and quality assurance in research, assessment and treatment

    3. Research development (e.g., rationale, integrative literature review, specifying research goals)

    4. Research design (e.g., factorial, qualitative, longitudinal, and time-series designs)

    5. Research methods (including subject, behavior, and time sampling; recruitment, informed
       consent, running and debriefing participants)

    6. The integration and presentation of research findings

    7. Statistical analysis (principles, general linear models, analyses of variance, multivariate analyses
       including multiple regression)

    8. The principles and scientific basis of measurement and cognitive, personality, and behavioral
       assessment

    9. The scientific basis of clinical interventions

    10. Basic clinical skills (e.g., interviewing, client-therapist/assessor interactions)




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    11. Skills in empirically supported clinical assessment, diagnosis, and treatments

    12. Strategies for a science-based integration of evaluation, quality assurance, assessment, and
        treatment (e.g., methods of quantitative process and outcome evaluation; assessment for
        accountability, clinical case formulation)

    13. The role of cultural, ethnic, and other sources of individual differences (e.g., age, sex) in
        assessment, treatment, and psychopathology, as well as in the core areas of psychology (e.g.,
        developmental/individual differences, cognitive, social psychology, and learning)

    14. The core areas of psychological knowledge that provide the foundations of clinical psychology
        (e.g., psychobiology and behavioral neuroscience, developmental psychology/individual
        differences, social psychology, learning)

    15. An area of specialized knowledge and skills (e.g., learning, serious mental illness, health
        psychology, quantitative methods)

    16. A scholarly and “critical-thinking” approach to clinical psychology

•   Accreditation

    American Psychological Association - The doctoral program in clinical psychology at the
    University of Hawai‘i has been accredited by the American Psychological Association since 1972.
    Questions can be addressed to the Committee on Accreditation, American Psychological Association,
    750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242, or (202) 336-5979. A list of APA-accredited
    doctoral programs in psychology can be found at www.apa.org/ed/accreditation/doctoral.html.

    Academy of Psychological Clinical Science - The doctoral program in clinical psychology became a
    member of the Academy of Psychological Clinical Science in 2001. The Academy is an alliance of
    leading, scientifically oriented, doctoral training programs in clinical and health psychology in the
    United States and Canada. Academy membership is open to doctoral programs with strong
    commitments to, and established records of, successful clinical science training. While there are
    nearly 200 APA accredited clinical programs, less than 60 become members of the Academy. More
    information on the Academy may be found at http://psych.arizona.edu/apcs/index.php.

•   Admissions Procedures and Criteria

    In 2010, out of a total of 112 applicants, 6 were accepted for admission to the Program. In 2009, out
    of a total of 122 applicants, 3 were accepted for admission. The average GRE scores of applicants
    admitted over the last two years were 620 (verbal), 720 (quantitative), and 4.8 (analytical writing).
    The average undergraduate GPA was 3.6. Most students accepted into the Clinical Studies Program
    had between 1 to 2 years of research experience at the undergraduate level.

    Information on application for admission can be obtained via the Psychology Department website and
    Clinical Studies Program link:

                                  www.psychology.hawaii.edu -and-
                     www.psychology.hawaii.edu/pages/graduate_programs/clinical.html




                                                     7
•   Affirmative Action

    The University of Hawai‘i is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution and does not
    discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, religion, handicap,
    or age in any of its programs, policies, procedures, or practices.

•   Enhancement Program for Underrepresented Minorities

    The goal of the program is to facilitate entry into the Clinical Psychology graduate program for
    students from targeted underrepresented minority groups (e.g., Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander)
    whose standardized test scores and academic GPAs may not accurately reflect their potential. The
    program is designed to expose these prospective graduate students to the scholarly and interpersonal
    ambience of the Clinical Studies Program and to allow faculty to more closely evaluate the students'
    suitability for graduate work.

    The program involves four aspects:

    (a) Graduate course work in basic psychology content areas. This would normally include a course
        in basic research methodology and at least one other basic psychology content area (e.g.,
        learning, developmental, social) each semester.
    (b) Frequent contact with Clinical Studies Program faculty members. This contact could involve
        frequent meetings and discussions with one or more clinical faculty members regarding course
        work, progress, interest areas and research.
    (c) An active involvement in ongoing research in the Department. This involvement would normally
        involve research programs in any area in psychology and at least 8 hours of research per week.
        Current research programs focus on eating disorders, depression, marital distress, hypertension,
        post traumatic stress disorders, biofeedback, behavioral psychology, attention deficit disorders in
        children, chronic mental illness, medication compliance, chronic pain, and cross-cultural
        psychology.
    (d) Assistance in improving performance on the Graduate Record Examination.

    No separate application process is necessary. Students from underrepresented groups who apply for
    admission to the Clinical Studies Program and who do not have competitive applications are singled
    out for the Enhancement Program during the yearly admissions meeting.

    Students admitted into the Enhancement program who are interested in formal admission into the
    Clinical Studies Program in subsequent years should reapply. Decisions regarding admission into the
    Clinical Studies Program are usually made after a student has completed two, three or four regular
    academic semesters of involvement in the Enhancement Program. Formal admission decisions are
    based upon merit and are highly competitive.

    Students will be admitted as unclassified graduate students. Financial assistance is sometimes
    available.




                                                      8
•   Facilities and Resources

    The Department of Psychology, University of Hawai‘i and the city of Honolulu offer multiple
    opportunities for clinical and research activities. The Department of Psychology maintains computer
    link-up with the well-equipped University Computing Center. There is also an extensive library
    system and computerized abstract services on campus, and office or desk space is provided for most
    students in the Program except during the internship year. Specialized clinical/research facilities are
    available in the Department Clinic as well as in local hospitals and medical centers, schools, and
    clinics.

•   A Multiethnic Environment

    The University is also one of the most interculturally mixed educational settings in the United States.
    Almost three-quarters of the students at the University are from ethnically diverse backgrounds such
    as Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, Samoan, and Vietnamese. The University offers
    more than 50 courses on various cross-cultural topics and the federally funded East-West Center is an
    international center for cross-cultural research and training. The Clinical Program reflects this
    diversity: About 40% of our students are from ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in clinical
    psychology. This cultural diversity, along with the extensive cultural, recreational, entertainment,
    and professional resources of Hawai‘i ensure an exciting and intensive educational environment.



                                                     2
                            DUAL-SPECIALTY TRAINING OPTION

In addition to their clinical, methodology, and psychology core courses, some students elect to specialize
in another area of study. The concept of a dual specialty is based on the idea that top-flight clinicians and
clinical researchers will benefit from the advances in allied specialties in psychology. Significant
advances have occurred in many basic areas of psychology and many of these advances are applicable to
the prevention, program development and outcome evaluation, policy development, and assessment and
treatment of behavior disorders.

All dual specialties are research oriented and emphasize the application of scientific principles to
important clinical issues. Dual specialties involve additional courses and research with an appropriate
dual specialty focus, and often, clinical experiences consistent with the dual specialty focus.
Requirements for the Dual-Specialty Training Program include a minimum of three content courses (9
hours) and two research courses (6 hours).

Students electing the dual-specialty option should submit a written proposal including: (a) goals of the
program, and (b) three didactic courses (in addition to those required by CSP), (c) two research courses
relevant to the dual specialty, and (d) the endorsement of a dual-specialty adviser. The proposal is
submitted to the Director of the CSP, who presents it to the clinical faculty for approval.

Because course offerings in the dual-specialty areas are dependent upon Departmental faculty resources
and may be variable, students should work closely with their dual-specialty and CSP advisors in planning
or revising their proposal.

All changes in a student's dual-specialty program must be approved by the dual-specialty advisor, the
clinical advisor, and the Director of the CSP. See Sample Petition of Dual-specialty (Appendix P).


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•   Examples of Dual-specialty Options

    1. Serious Mental Illness/Psychosocial Rehabilitation Specialty

       The dual specialty in Serious Mental Illness (SMI) is in collaboration with the Adult Mental
       Health Division of the Hawai‘i Department of Health. The Division operates Hawai‘i State
       Hospital and several community mental health centers throughout the State. The specialty
       focuses on serious mental illness, with an emphasis on schizophrenia and related psychotic
       disorders. Students receive training and practicum experience in empirically-derived assessment
       & treatment of SMI, managed health care, consumer and family advocacy, and quality assurance.

       The Department of Health often provides a stipend and tuition waiver to students in this dual-
       specialty.

       Courses for the specialty in SMI consist of a variety of seminars in the area. Three seminars, six
       credits of directed research, and two years practicum experience in Adult Mental Health Division
       placements are required for the specialty. Advisors for the program are Keith Claypoole, John
       Steffen, Stephen Haynes, and Elaine Heiby.

       Courses may include:

           PSY 773 Seminar in Psychopathology
                     a. Schizophrenia
                     b. Affective Disorders
                     c. Other Seminars
           PSY 774 Seminar in Clinical Psychology
                     a. Public Mental Health Service Delivery Systems
                     b. Epidemiology of Mental Illness
                     c. Other Seminars
           PSY 775 Seminar in Psychological Therapies
                     a. Innovations in the Psychological Management of Schizophrenia
                     b. Assessment and Treatment of Depression
                     c. Other Seminars
           PSY 731 Seminar in Physiological Psychology
                     a. Psychopharmacology
           SW 725 Social Work Practice in Mental Health

    2. Behavioral-Clinical Specialty

       The Behavioral-Clinical dual specialty trains students for research careers in basic behavioral
       research, applied clinical research and for clinical work in behavior therapy, cognitive-behavior
       therapy, behavior modification, other empirically supported treatments based on behavioral
       principles (e.g., self-reinforcement training), and behavioral assessment.




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   Courses may include:

       PSY 621 Behavioral Psychology         PSY 702 Seminar in History and Theory of Psychology
       PSY 622 Animal Learning               PSY 722 Seminar in Learning

3. Behavioral Neuroscience Specialty

   The Behavioral Neuroscience-Clinical dual specialty option focuses on the connection of the
   biological bases of behavior with clinical psychology. Biological bases of aggression, movement
   disorders, intelligence, anxiety, and other complex behaviors as well as the role of
   psychopharmacology in the cause and treatment of problematic behaviors are potential topics of
   study.

   Courses may include:

       PSY 634 Physiological Psychology
       PSY 622 Animal Learning
       PSY 731 Seminar in Physiological Psychology
                 a. Psychopharmacology
                 b. Psychobiology
                 c. Psychophysiology
       PSY 775 Seminar in Psychological Therapies
                 a. Behavioral Medicine

4. Ethnocultural Psychology Specialty

   The Ethno-Cultural/Ethnic-Minorities Clinical Dual Specialty (ECEM) is based on the idea that
   among the many challenges facing contemporary psychology is the ethnocentricity of its
   assumptions, theories, and applications, and the implications that it has for our nation's racial and
   ethnocultural minority populations. Increasingly, America's ethnocultural minorities have joined
   with cross-cultural researchers and practitioners in calling attention to the racial and cultural
   biases inherent in much of the psychological and behavioral knowledge that constitutes the
   accepted body of psychological theory and research.

   The ECEM option provides training in research, assessment, and clinical services that are
   relevant and valid for American ethnic minorities and international non-Western populations. The
   ECEM Dual Specialty emphasizes the importance of ethnicity, culture, race, and class in the
   conduct of research, assessment, and counseling and therapy. Attention is given to
   conceptualizing, planning and implementing culturally sensitive and appropriate mental health
   services and intervention strategies.

   In addition to completing a requirement of twelve hours in core courses, students are expected to
   demonstrate competence in at least one national or ethnocultural population through
   familiarization with that group's history, cultural traditions, and behavioral determinants.
   Multidisciplinary studies, linguistic/foreign language studies, and the completion of related non-
   psychology courses are encouraged, but not required, to demonstrate this competency.




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   Required courses:

       PSY 653 Cross-cultural Psychology
       PSY 774 Seminar in Clinical Psychology
                  a. Cross-cultural Psychopathology and Psychotherapy
                  b. Other Seminars
       PSY 699 Directed Readings in Cross-cultural and Ethnic Minority Studies (minimum of two
          courses)

   Optional courses:

       To encourage multidisciplinary breadth, students are encouraged to enroll in supplementary
       courses in the following fields and disciplines. Enrollment in all courses require prior ECEM
       faculty consultation and approval: Anthropology, Asian/Pacific Island Studies, Ethnic
       Studies, Philosophy, Public Health, Religion, and Social Work. These courses cannot replace
       the required core courses.

5. Health Psychology Specialty

   The Health-Clinical dual specialty option focuses on the understanding of behavioral lifespan
   factors, personality variables, and psychophysiological factors in health promotion and disease
   prevention. It is the philosophy of this dual specialty that the study of health psychology is best
   approached within the field of clinical psychology so that the methods and knowledge of this
   field can be applied to problems in the development and maintenance of physical well-being.

   Courses may include:

       PSY 776   Health Psychology
       PH 663    Principles of Epidemiology
       SW 662    HIV and the Human Condition
       SOC 616   Seminar in Stress and Health




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                                                     3
                                    COURSE REQUIREMENTS

•   Clinical Core Courses

    The clinical core courses are designed to provide the student with a strong background in the basic
    concepts, methods, current issues, and skills of clinical psychology. During their first year, students
    learn basic interviewing skills; intellectual/cognitive and personality assessment; clinical report
    writing and case conceptualization; psychopathology, ethics of clinical practice, and an
    empirical/scientific orientation toward clinical practice. During their second year, students take
    courses in adult and child therapy, and begin a minimum of 15 hours per week of clinical practicum
    training at a mental health agency in the community or in the Department's clinic, the Center for
    Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

    The amount of clinical training at UH provides students with a strong clinical and conceptual
    foundation for additional training during their internship.

    Core clinical courses must be taken in the sequence outlined in Approximate Clinical Program
    Course Schedule (Without a Dual-Specialty) (Appendix B). Exceptions to this policy will be
    made only in the following circumstances: a) Students may petition to take courses in a non-
    standard sequence, for reasons such as health problems; such petitions should be developed in
    collaboration with the student’s advisor and submitted and approved by the CSP-Director
    prior to the beginning of the semester in which the course would ordinarily be taken; b) by
    default, the expected timing of courses by year in the program is obviously waived when classes
    are not offered during the specified year. Students who have not conformed to the expected
    core clinical course sequence or timing will not be allowed to begin practicum placements.

    All clinical students are required to complete the following core courses:

        670   Introduction to Clinical Psychology*
        671   Introduction to Assessment I*
        672   Introduction to Assessment II*
        673   Introduction to Assessment III: Behavioral Assessment**
        674   Child Psychopathology***
        675   Treatment Research**
        676   Adult Psychopathology***
        677   Child Practicum and/or 678 Adult Practicum (total of four semesters)
        771   Child Treatment or 772 Adult Treatment: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
        778   Internship in Clinical Psychology

        *These courses must be completed prior to Practicum and must be taken in the first year
        **This course must be taken during the second year
        ***One of these courses must be taken in the first and the other in the second year

    In addition, clinical students are expected to enroll in PSY 779 (Research in Clinical Psychology) for
    three credits every semester except when enrolled in PSY 700 (thesis) or PSY 800 (dissertation) or
    when anticipating enrollment in thesis or dissertation credits, at which time students should enroll in
    PSY 699 which can be changed to PSY 700 or PSY 800 once proposals have been approved. In
    general, students should enroll for their research credits under PSY 779 rather than PSY 699, except


                                                     13
    when they intend to convert the credits to PSY 700 or PSY 800 or when they need variable credits for
    their research activities for some special reason for that particular semester.

    Note: Introduction to Assessment I, II, & III; and Child and Adult Practicum courses are open only to
    students enrolled in the Clinical Studies Program.

•   Statistics and Methodology

    Courses in statistics and methodology are designed to provide students with skills to conduct basic
    and applied research and to critically evaluate published research studies. Clinical students are
    required to take the following four courses in statistics and methodology:

        600 Methodological Foundations of Psychology (this course is offered in the Spring, and must be
            completed during the first year)
        610 Introduction to Quantitative Methods
        611 Design and Analysis of Psychological Experiments (ANOVA; this course is offered in the
            Fall, and must be completed during the first year)
        - and -
        At least one additional advanced course:
        612 Multiple Regression in Beh Res           616 Measurement and Evaluation
        613 Factor Analysis                               617 Scaling: Meas. of Attitude & Perception
        614 Multivariate Methods                          701 Seminar in General Psychology
        615 Nonparametric Methods for Beh Science              a. Structural Equation Modeling

    Note: As stated in the UH General and Graduate Information Catalog, several statistics courses have
    prerequisites (or consent of instructor). Unfortunately, these pre-reqs are not enforced during
    registration and some students have enrolled in advanced statistics courses without the expected
    background. Therefore, students, advisors, and the Graduate Chair are responsible for monitoring
    whether the pre-reqs have been met prior to enrollment.

•   History and Systems

    Students are required to demonstrate competency in the history and systems of psychology. This
    requirement may be met in any of the following ways:

    1. Submit to the CSP faculty a written essay on the history and systems of psychology
    2. Complete a course in History and Systems of psychology offered by the Department (PSY 702)
       or via distance learning
    3. Complete a Psy 699 directed reading in History and Systems of psychology. (Examples of
       resources that provide access to historical documents in psychology are):

            http://psychclassics.asu.edu/author.htm
            http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/

    4. Teach Psy 402, the Department's undergraduate course in History and Systems

    Please note that Psy 702 is not offered on a regular basis.




                                                      14
•   Basic Psychology (Four Corners)

    All clinical students must also take at least one 3-credit graduate course in each of the following four
    major areas of psychology:

    Biological Bases of Behavior: Physiological Psychology (PSY 634)
    Cognitive-affective Bases of Behavior: Cognitive Psychology (PSY 626) or Behavioral Psychology
        (PSY 621) or Animal Learning (PSY 622)
    Social Bases of Behavior: Social Psychology (PSY 650) or Personality Theory & Research (PSY
        660) or Intro to Community Psychology (PSY 680)
    Individual Differences/Developmental Psychology: Developmental Foundations (PSY 640) or
        Personality Theory and Research (PSY 660) or Cognitive Development (PSY 642)

    Two of the four required courses must be completed prior to the Master's Degree; the remaining two
    can be taken before the Ph.D. is granted. Students may petition to substitute courses.

•   Clinical Electives

    Clinical courses in consultation, supervision, psychotherapy, behavioral medicine, forensic
    psychology, substance use, program evaluation, trauma management, neuropsychology, multi-
    cultural issues, and other applied areas are offered on a regular basis. Students are encouraged to take
    these courses to supplement and enhance their clinical and research skills.

•   Course Requirements for Licensure

    CSP students intending to seek licensure should familiarize themselves with licensing requirements in
    each state. Requirements vary by state and change over time. In the State of Hawai‘i, the licensing
    board currently requires that the Ph.D. in clinical psychology be granted from an APA-approved
    program.

    Students should retain a library of all course syllabi because they may be needed for licensure
    applications and membership to various professional organizations and registers.

•   Enrollment Requirements

    University requirements specify that all graduate students must be enrolled every semester in order to
    preserve their status. Students who fail to register will be placed on inactive status, and must reapply
    for admission to the program. The only exceptions to this policy involve formal requests for Leaves
    of Absence (LOA), submitted in writing and approved in advance of the semester or year of intended
    absence. During LOAs, it is assumed that students are planning to be absent from UH, versus simply
    not taking classes. Students who intend to make use of University resources or faculty consultation
    should remain enrolled for credit.

    It should be noted that all CSP requirements are subject to modification.




                                                     15
                                                     4
                                        LIABILITY INSURANCE

As of 2007, all clinical students are required to purchase liability insurance through the Program
regardless of whether they are involved in clinical activities or have insurance coverage from another
provider (e.g., APA). This insurance must be purchased prior to participation in CSP-related classes,
assessment, therapy, or consultation activities in the community or on-site practicum positions. At the
beginning of each academic year (usually in August), the Program will notify students via e-mail when
payment for insurance is due. (Any student who fails to purchase insurance through the Program will be
required to submit a written statement that they will not engage in any consulting or clinical practice, or
clinical research activities associated with the Program. Such notification must be received by the date
set for receipt of liability insurance payment.)

It should be noted that the insurance policy that is coordinated by CSP does not cover clinical activities or
jobs other than those associated with practicum training or the fulfillment of other program requirements.
Many outside positions related to clinical psychology require employees to obtain and verify separate
liability insurance; other jobs leave coverage to employees’ discretion. The Clinical Studies Program
strongly advises students to obtain independent insurance coverage in addition to that through the
Program for work they undertake in any non-program-related clinical capacity.



                                                       5
                               CLINICAL PRACTICUM TRAINING

All clinical students are required to take at least four semesters of therapy practicum training, beginning
by the second year of study (PSY 677 and/or PSY 678). Practicum training can start earlier for students
who have taken the required prerequisite courses and with the permission of the Director of the CSP.
Each practicum placement involves a minimum of 15 hours per week. Some students elect to complete
additional practica by enrolling in PSY 679 for variable credit and with instructor's consent. PSY 679
credits do not substitute for required PSY 677 and PSY 678 credits.

•   Goals

    Clinical practicum experiences are designed to strengthen a science-based approach to clinical
    practice in a closely-supervised and supportive training environment. Clinical practicum experiences
    must include:

    1. Ongoing therapy contact with clients from diverse ethnic backgrounds

    2. An integration of assessment, treatment, program development, evaluation, and case formulation

    3. Regular (e.g., at least weekly) supervision from on-site and Clinical Studies Program supervisors

    4. On-site case conferences and seminars to discuss issues relevant to clinical assessment and
       treatment




                                                     16
    5. The integration of science and clinical practice. Students are expected to monitor the effects of
       their interventions using the most valid measures and measurement strategies available, to use
       empirically supported interventions when possible, and to use the most valid pretreatment
       assessment strategies

    6. Review and discussion of the current literature relevant to their clinical activities (e.g., research
       on psychopathology, assessment, clinical judgment, sources of individual differences, and
       therapy)

    7. Consideration of ethnic and cultural factors in clinical assessment and treatment

    8. A positive, collegial, and supportive relationship between students and supervisors

    9. A systematic and sequential training strategy to help students develop clinical skills

    Students in practicum sign up for 3 hours of PSY 677 or 678, each semester for four semesters.
    Many students elect to receive additional practicum experiences, although they are not counted for
    graduation, by enrolling in PSY 679.

    Students must complete PSY 670, 671, 672, and 674 or 676 (or their equivalent) prior to beginning
    practicum training. All students taking practicum are required to follow the Clinical Studies Program
    Practicum Handbook and complete the Clinical Practicum Experience Log (Appendix C).

    Practicum assignments are made by the Director and Associate Director/Practicum Coordinator, in
    consultation with students and practicum agencies. Each Spring, the Associate Director circulates a
    list of available practicum sites for the upcoming academic year. Students are then free to visit the
    practicum sites, consult with previous trainees and then provide the Associate Director with a
    hierarchy of choices. Within administrative constraints (e.g., the number of trainee slots at a
    particular agency, funding), agencies may then select the trainees of their choice, in consultation with
    the Director and Associate Director.

    Practicum training sites include community sites and the Department's Center for Cognitive Behavior
    Therapy's Child and Adolescent Stress and Anxiety Program and Eating Disorders Program. Many
    sites provide a stipend for practicum students, although the CSP has no direct control over funding
    and cannot guarantee stipends or the timely distribution of payments.

    Second year, third year, and advanced students have priority in practicum assignments, in that order.
    We recognize that other variables may be operational (e.g., requests from privately-funded agencies)
    but attempts will be made to respect this sequence.

•   Practicum Site Approval

    All practicum training sites must be approved by the clinical faculty. The approval process involves:
    (a) a site visit by the Associate Director and/or Clinical Training Director, and (b) approval of the site
    as a practicum training site by the Clinical Faculty.

    Criteria for approval of a practicum site include: (a) Regular supervision by on-site Ph.D.
    psychologists or an equivalently trained professional, (b) for second year students especially, and
    third year students preferably, a diversity of clinical experiences provided at the site (to avoid
    excessive specialization in early clinical training); specialized training (e.g., neuropsychology,



                                                      17
    behavioral medicine, forensic psychology) is appropriate for advanced assignments, and (c) type and
    adequacy of overall training experience (e.g., seminars, amount of assessment versus therapy,
    continuing contact with clients, professional ambience). It is expected that all practicum training will
    be congruent with the Goals outlined above.

    If a student develops a reason to change practicum sites, the student should petition the Director of
    Clinical Studies or the Associate Director, who serves as the Practicum Coordinator. Under no
    circumstances may a student withdraw from a practicum without approval from the Director and
    Associate Director. If a student is not comfortable speaking about practicum problems with the
    Director or Associate Director, then the reasons may be discussed with either the Chair of Graduate
    Studies or the Department Chair.

•   CSP Supervision of Practicum Experience

    All practicum students receive regular and direct supervision from CSP faculty members.
    Supervision will formally occur through courses 677 and 678. The format of the supervision will
    vary somewhat across supervisors but one-hour/week contact with each student through weekly
    individual meetings with students and/or weekly small-group meetings are representative of the
    formats that are used. The purposes of this supervision are to maintain close contact between
    program faculty and students in a clinical context, to encourage the adoption of a scientist-practitioner
    model in clinical practice, and to facilitate the development of clinical skills. All practicum students
    and supervisors agree to follow the CSP Practicum Handbook to maintain consistency across sites.

    The purpose of practicum supervision is to encourage the development of clinically skilled,
    conceptually knowledgeable, empirically focused, diversity-sensitive, accountable, socially aware,
    highly ethical clinician-scholars and scientist-practitioners.
    Supervision encourages:

    1. The integration of assessment and therapy: Using data from pretreatment psychological
       assessments to conceptualize clients, plan intervention strategies and evaluate therapy outcome.

    2. Ongoing evaluation of therapy: Systematically and frequently collecting process and outcome
       data, in a time-series format, before, during and after therapy.

    3. Knowledge of literature base: Students are encouraged to have an up-to-date knowledge of the
       literature regarding their client populations, behavior problems, assessment instruments, sources
       of individual differences, therapy procedures, etc.

    4. Skills acquisition: The therapy practicum courses are a major source of therapy skills acquisition
       in our program (e.g., cognitive therapies, family interventions, relaxation, social-skills training,
       contingency management).




                                                     18
•   Trainee Evaluations

    Once at the end of each semester, each trainee is evaluated by program and on-site practicum
    supervisors, using the Evaluation of Practicum Student Form (Appendix E). These forms provide
    feedback to students about their progress in the program and are used in yearly faculty evaluations.
    Each student should review the ratings and comments of their supervisors before submitting their
    form to the Program.

•   Practicum Site Evaluations

    At the end of each academic year, students evaluate their respective practicum training sites using the
    Practicum Site Evaluation form (Appendix F). This information is used to monitor the type and
    quality of practicum training experiences and to aid in the future placement of students.

•   Program-Sanctioned Practicum Experience (designation of clinical hours as "practicum"
    versus "clinical work experience")

    Applications for internship require candidates to divide hours into “practicum” and “clinical work
    experience.” The former must be subdivided into defined categories, and are considered (at least by
    some internship programs) to carry more weight in the calculation of applicants’ training experience.
    Obviously, all of the hours accumulated in formal practica for which students are enrolled fit this
    designation. In addition, APPIC specifies that students may count supervised experience that is
    “program sanctioned” as equivalent to practicum training.

    CSP policy is that students may petition to have additional training experiences (outside the two
    required years of enrollment at official practicum sites) counted in the “practicum” category. The
    petition should outline the nature of the position (hours, activities, population) and the type and
    amount of supervision received, as well as additional relevant information (such as previous
    experience at the same or similar sites and whether the site has served as a formal practicum in the
    past). A number of indicators will contribute to the decision to recognize activities as “program
    sanctioned” practicum experience. In general, it should be evident that the position is not solely
    service-oriented, but involves substantial components of training and supervision. Activities that are
    particularly likely to qualify as practica include: experience accrued in the same setting after an
    official practicum has ended; experience comparable to that obtained at the same site by other
    enrolled students (past or present); formal traineeships that have not sought ongoing affiliation with
    CSP as official practicum sites; unique training opportunities that are comparable to those available at
    established practicum sites.

    In some instances, paid clinical work may qualify for the practicum designation; however, it should
    be clear that the position sought is not “merely” a clinical job more appropriately noted under the
    “clinical work experience” category on internship applications. (As noted below, program approval
    must also be sought before taking any psychology-related position outside the Department of
    Psychology or official practicum sites; approval of such employment does not constitute program
    sanctioning of these jobs as “practica.”)

    Petitions should be developed through consultation with the student’s advisor and should include his
    or her signed endorsement. Petitions are then submitted to the Associate Director; after initial review,
    they will be approved or rejected by the Director. Applicants will be informed of the outcome, which
    will also be recorded in students’ files for reference at the time of internship application. Appeals of
    the decision can be brought to the CSP faculty as a whole for reconsideration.



                                                    19
•   Outside Activities Related to Clinical Psychology

    The Clinical Studies Program has an ethical responsibility to monitor the activities of its graduate
    students in domains related to clinical psychology. The purpose of monitoring is not to inhibit
    outside activities but to ensure that these conform to APA guidelines and are congruent with the
    student’s abilities.

    The Clinical Studies Program must give approval for outside jobs that students wish to take in
    areas connected to the practice of clinical psychology. Before accepting any outside positions
    related to professional activities (including therapy, assessment, evaluation, consultation,
    supervision, teaching, training, or research), students must secure approval from their advisor
    and then submit the Proposed Clinical Position Form (Appendix D) to the Director of Clinical
    Training. The form asks students to specify the nature of the position, to describe the
    supervision they will be receiving, and to outline their own relevant background experience and
    training. Proposed positions must be reviewed and approved before the position is accepted.

    The only positions for which students need not submit the form are those directly connected to the
    Department (e.g., practicum placements, internships, teaching within the Department or through UH-
    Mānoa Outreach/Continuing Education, or research positions with Department faculty) or those jobs
    that are manifestly unrelated to the profession of clinical psychology.

    Again, it is not our intent to make it difficult for students to help support themselves through graduate
    training by depriving them of the opportunity to take related positions. Indeed, the Clinical Studies
    Program strongly endorses the view that it is desirable to combine the requisite income-producing
    activities with the opportunity for additional experience within the field. The Program simply wants
    to guard against students’ direct participation and the program’s indirect participation in those
    activities that are inconsistent with professional guidelines and ethical responsibilities.




                                                     20
                                                     6
       PRACTICAL TRAINING EXPERIENCES FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

•   Background

    International students need to be sure all their practical training experiences are allowed under their
    student visas. The CSP-Director and the ISS staff met in Spring 2008 to share information about visa
    requirements and about the CSP training and education model. Through this process, the following
    guidelines have been established for international CSP students. The University of Hawaii
    International Student Services (ISS) office has the final say on whether your training experiences are
    allowed under federal rules. It is essential that you consult with the CSP-D and the ISS whenever
    needed. For more information, go to: http://www.hawaii.edu/issmanoa/

•   General Guidelines

    Curriculum Practical Training (CPT) may be part (<= 20 hours) or full-time (> 20 hours). Full-time
    CPT of 12 total months or more results in lost eligibility for Optional Practical Training (OPT). A
    post-doctorate position is an example of an OPT position that students might well want to have
    available after graduation.

    CPT approvals are for only one academic year at a time. Since CSP students are expected to
    complete multiple years of practical training (a minimum two years of practicum and one year of
    internship) students will need to re-apply for CPT as indicated. International students are expected to
    complete all of the same integral practical training components of the CSP curriculum as other
    students. CPT can be required or elective but must be integral to the student’s curriculum. As such,
    CPTs may be required on multiple occasions.

    .5 FTE Graduate Assistantships (GA) through UH, whether for research, teaching or practicum, do
    not require CPT approval, since these are considered “on campus employment”. Students considering
    other paid practica should consult with their advisor and/or CSP Associate Director and, as needed,
    then consult with ISS advisors.

    Students who are on a GA (e.g. teaching or research assistantship) who are also concurrently enrolled
    in a clinical practicum (whether the practicum is on or off campus) must complete a CPT application
    for this practicum. All off-campus practica (paid or unpaid) require a CPT application.

    Students enrolled in .5 FTE practicum, whether on or off campus, paid or unpaid, can not participate
    in additional practicum or paid experiences (e.g. supervision, teaching) other than the allowance for
    teaching and research assistantships stated above, and maintain their part-time CPT status. Such
    students can do such additional experiences under full-time CPT, but, when and if the student has
    accumulated 12 months of full-time CPT, this will result in the student losing eligibility for OPT.

•   Practical Training Experiences during Summer Months

    During the three summer months, international students can have GAs or other campus work and/or
    practical training that exceed .5 FTE. There are no hour limits under federal regulations in summer.




                                                    21
•   Practical Training as Part of Didactic Courses

    The limited practical exposure students get in our non-practicum assessment and treatment courses
    (e.g. role-playing, practice with professional clients, group projects in behavioral assessment) do not
    require CPT approval.

•   Providing Supervision and Receiving Supervision Training

    Receiving financial compensation for providing supervision to less advanced students (e.g.
    supervision of students in assessment classes) requires CPT approval. If there is no financial
    compensation, then no CPT approval is required in this case. All students conducting such
    supervision should enroll in PSY 779or some other suitable course, under the direction of their
    supervisor of this experience.

•   Internships

    Unlike practicum, psychology internships are full-time and last about one year. Given CPT can be
    approved for full-time training of this sort, students must complete a CPT and this training must be
    for less than one full year (e.g. 11 months and 29 days) if OPT is to be available for later use.
    Documentation from the student’s advisor and the internship training director about the beginning
    and ending dates of this training must accompany CPT application.

    Occasionally, CSP students enroll in part-time internships lasting two years. International students
    who elect this option and receive CSP faculty approval, must then apply for the suitable CPT.

    Like all CSP students, international students must be enrolled in class credit when engaged in any and
    all practical training during study (be this practicum, internship, supervised teaching, or other learning
    opportunities). OPT after completion of the Ph.D., such as a post-doctoral training experience, does
    not require course registration.

•   Volunteer Work

    International students may do volunteer work without submitting a CPT, but they must be careful that
    this work fits within the rules and regulations. Basically no CPT is required so long as the volunteer
    work is for a non-profit organization that must depend on volunteer labor, the volunteer labor does
    not displace or replace a paid employee, the volunteer work has no direct relationship to our training
    program and the volunteer receives nothing of value (e.g. no money, no lunch, no reimbursement for
    parking, no course credit).




                                                     22
                                                     7
                               LEVEL OF TRAINING INVOLVEMENT

Doctoral training in clinical psychology involves an intensive investment of time and energy. Students
are expected to devote full time to their graduate studies until they obtain their Ph.D. During the first 3-4
years, this involves enrolling for at least 10 credit hours during each regular academic semester. Students
are also expected to devote full time to the completion of their Theses and Dissertations. A sequence of
courses is presented in Appendix B. This sequence does not include Dual-specialty options. While the
program can be completed in 5 years including internship, the average number of years to the Ph.D. for
students who entered the program between Fall 2000 and Spring 2007 was 8.9 years.



                                                     8
                                         STUDENT FUNDING

The program strives to provide funding for as many students and we attempt to distribute funding across
students in an equitable manner. However, all students should plan according to the high cost of living in
Honolulu, the limited number of stipends and tuition waivers, and stipend rates that are not adjusted to the
cost of living. The following policies guide funding allocation decisions.

1. A student cannot receive two separate stipends that are administered by the University of Hawai‘i
   (e.g., TA, RA, practicum stipends).

2. If joint administration of a student's funding by the University of Hawai‘i is not an issue but the
   funded positions involve our Program (e.g., TA plus practicum position), the criterion of "equitable
   distribution of resources" is invoked—a student should not receive two Program-controlled stipends
   when another eligible student is receiving none. Thus, a student may receive funding from two
   sources controlled by our Program only when no other eligible student is unfunded.

3.   If a student receives funding from the University Program or Department, he or she may also receive
     funding from outside sources (e.g., part-time clinical work, consultation). It should be noted that it is
     against University policy for RAs and TAs to receive additional work-contingent funding.

Intrinsic to these criterion are several assumptions: (a) Students can make their own choices about
reimbursed activities within the constraints of our Program's commitment to equitable distribution of
resources (and constraints enforced by the University); (b) We will continue to expect high-quality, full-
time progress through the program and a second job will not be considered as a valid rationale for poor
performance or progress in the Program; and (c) Students are required to inform the Clinical faculty about
all clinical activities outside of our regular program offerings.

Most students receive a TA, RA, or an Achievement Scholarship (aka tuition waiver) during the first year.
Many students receive a practicum stipend during the second and third years. Advanced students often
obtain RAs, lectureships, consultancies, and clinical jobs.




                                                     23
                                                     9
                             WAIVING AND SUBSTITUTING COURSES

Sometimes, courses taken at other universities may substitute for Departmental and Program
requirements. At other times, a student may wish to substitute one course for another required course. In
each case, the following procedure should be followed:

l.   The student should type a letter in the form of Sample Letter for Waiving Courses (Appendix G).

2. A course syllabus, grade, reading material, textbook, etc. should be submitted to the instructor of the
   course that is to be waived.

3. A signature must be obtained from the course instructor.

4. The materials are submitted to the Clinical Training Director for signature; the letter will be placed in
   the student's file, and the student should keep a copy.

5. The same materials, along with the signed letter, are finally submitted to the Chair of Graduate
   Studies and his or her signature is obtained.

For those students entering the CSP with a Master's degree in psychology from another institution (or
department within the University of Hawai‘i), the clinical faculty will review the requirements that were
met in fulfillment of the degree and assess the student's competence in research related skills. If there are
deficiencies in comparison to our own Master's students, the faculty will require a research project to be
completed under PSY 779. Except under rare circumstances, no more than three core courses will be
exempted. For those students entering with a Ph.D. outside psychology, each case will be determined on
an individual basis.

Substitutions likely to be accepted will be courses that (a) thoroughly survey broad areas of behavioral
science (e.g., theories of personality, social psychology, physiology, child development), (b) are at an
intense, graduate level, and (c) expose the student to current journal literature and research such that (d)
the student may eventually draw upon the material in an applied and/or academic setting. Because the
data and methods of many areas are evolving, courses taken five years prior to petition are reviewed with
particular caution.




                                                     24
                                                    10
                                         ACADEMIC ADVISING

Students are assigned to an advisor at the time of admission. This will normally be the faculty member
with whom the student is most strongly affiliated through a research association or through proposed
work on a Thesis or Dissertation. Students are free to change advisors if their research and clinical
interests change to resemble more closely those of another faculty member. Students may affiliate with
more than one faculty member. Each student should keep his or her advisor informed about progress
through the program and other training-relevant activities. In addition, if a student's adviser leaves the
Program, then the student is required to find a new CSP adviser. Under certain circumstances a student
may continue working with a faculty member who leaves the Program to finish up projects begun under
his or her supervision. In these situations, however, the student is also required to have an on-site advisor
who is an active member of CSP.

With reference to working with more than one faculty member simultaneously, it should be noted that
individual faculty members have the right to expect a reasonable ongoing time commitment from all
students remaining involved in research groups or on particular projects; the definition of “reasonable”
will obviously vary from project to project and role to role. A faculty member may inform a student that
if she or he is unable to maintain that reasonable commitment of time and effort for any reason (because
of competing demands from practicum training, coursework, outside job, personal life, or work with
another faculty member), she or he should readjust commitments so that the work does not suffer, or
should withdraw from the project. However, it would not be appropriate for a faculty member to assume
in advance that involvement with other research activities would impair the student’s ability to contribute
to ongoing projects or to prohibit such involvement on that basis; it would not be appropriate for a faculty
member to treat competing demands from other research activities differently from competing demands
from other activities in making assessments of the “reasonable commitment” expected for continued
participation.

It is generally desirable for students to inform both (or all) faculty members with whom they are working
about their involvement in multiple projects; it is basic courtesy for students to inform their current
advisers about an intended switch to a different adviser prior to making that change.

It should be noted that different conditions do apply to changing advisors or committee members once a
formal Thesis and Dissertation proposal meeting has been held. In such circumstances, there must be
compelling reason(s) for making the change; however, it is recognized that these do exist in specific
instances, and can be examined through petition to the Graduate Chair and Graduate Division.




                                                     25
                                                    11
                                       RESEARCH TRAINING

As indicated in the list of CSP publications, all students are expected to be actively engaged in clinical
research and many students publish and present at scientific conventions. Between 2000 and 2008, 40
students were co-authors in 100 publications, of which 22 students were first author. Clinical Studies
faculty published about 289 articles and served on 28 editorial boards.

Students are expected to begin research activities early in their graduate training and to continue a
research involvement throughout their graduate career. Incoming students use their first semester to
become acquainted with the research and scholarly interests of the clinical (and optional dual-specialty)
faculty members. Often during the first semester and certainly by the end of the second semester, each
student will affiliate with at least one faculty member and begin research/scholarly activities. Although
the type and structure of scholarly involvement will vary across students and faculty, each student can
expect to spend at least eight hours per week in scholarly affiliation every semester throughout his or her
graduate career and are encouraged to enroll in PSY 779 each term.

Students may choose to maintain an affiliation with one faculty member throughout their graduate
training, to change research affiliation across years or to affiliate with more than one faculty member in
any given semester. Each student is free to make a choice of scholarly affiliation based upon his or her
perceived training needs.

In addition to this ongoing scholarly work, each student completes a Master's Thesis and a Dissertation.
Masters theses and Doctoral dissertations must be empirically based and address important issues from a
science-based perspective.

The Thesis is proposed to and reviewed by at least three members of the Psychology Department faculty
and the Dissertation is proposed to and evaluated by five members of the Psychology Department faculty
and a member from outside the Department who is not a psychologist. (see below for detailed instructions
concerning committee composition). Theses and Dissertations must present a publishable quality
integration of research, rationale, measurement, procedures, data analysis, and discussion.

At the end of each year, each student is evaluated on the quality of his or her research involvement by all
of his or her research supervisors using the Clinical Studies Research Evaluation Form (Appendix H).
Students are also evaluated on their overall productivity (e.g., presentations, publications, etc.) by their
completion of the CSP Student Progress Form (Appendix I).




                                                     26
                                                    12
                                           MASTER'S DEGREE

Although it is assumed that students accepted in the clinical program will be working towards their
doctorates, it is a University of Hawai‘i requirement that the Master's degree be obtained as a step toward
the doctorate. Students are expected to have made major progress toward the completion of the thesis by
the end of the second year of study and to have defended the thesis by the end of the third year. However,
the CSP recognizes some thesis projects may involve time-series and longitudinal data and require more
time for completion. However, if the thesis is not defended in five years, the CSP will not recommend
doctoral candidacy to the Department. Once the Master's thesis is successfully defended, all departmental
students must apply to the departmental faculty for doctoral candidacy. CSP students apply via the
Clinical Director.

The requirements for the M.A. include the following:

l.   Formal application for candidacy on Masters Plan A Student Progress Form I. This should be
     completed in the first term of admission with the assistance of the Psychology Graduate Studies
     Chair. (The psychology graduate chair usually assists students with this form at the new graduate
     student orientation about one week before the Fall semester begins.)

2. The accumulation of a minimum of 30 credit hours, including a minimum of 18 credits of course
   work in courses numbered 600-790 including at least one graduate seminar in clinical or a related
   field (excluding PSY 699 AND 7X9),between 6-12 credits of thesis research (See Graduate
   Information Bulletin and Departmental requirements for further details) and two of the four required
   four-corner courses.

3. Declaration of the intent to obtain the degree at the completion of the term at the time the registration
   package for that term is obtained, at which point the student will be given instructions including
   deadlines for completing the steps toward the degree.

4. Thesis research and writing, the steps for which are the following:

     a. Enrollment in PSY 779 (or 699 if these credits are to be converted to thesis credits; consult with
        advisor).
     b. Writing of a thesis proposal by the student in consultation with the advisor/thesis supervisor.
     c. Selection of a 3-member thesis committee from the graduate faculty, including the thesis
        supervisor to act as chair, one other member in the student's area, and a third member from that
        area or from another related to the thesis topic. At least one committee member must be from the
        CSP; however, students are encouraged to include two members from the CSP. For the purposes
        of committee composition, a “member from the Clinical Studies Program” is defined as a full-
        time member of the core clinical faculty or a clinical faculty member holding a joint appointment.
     d. Report of the selection of this committee by the student on Student Progress Form II, and
        approval of the selection.
     e. An oral defense of the thesis topic by the student before the thesis committee, and the obtaining
        of the committee's approval on Masters Plan A Student Progress Form II.
     f. Submission of the title of the thesis proposal by the student on Student Progress Form II.




                                                     27
     g. Registration in PSY 700, usually at the beginning of the term following the approval of the thesis
        proposal; students must be enrolled in at least 1 credit of PSY 700 during the semester of
        graduation. Students must have 6 credit hours of Psy 700 to graduate. Five credit hours of Psy
        699 may be converted to Psy 700.
     h. Research and writing of the thesis under the direction of the supervisor and according to
        instructions for thesis preparation available at the Graduate Division, with progress reports to the
        other members of the thesis committee.
     i. Filing of application for a diploma at the Graduate Division, and payment of graduation and
        thesis-binding fees at the time of registration for the term in which work for the degree is to be
        completed.
     j. Notification of the final oral examination to the Department Chair of Graduate Studies for
        announcement within the department, including the following information: Name of candidate,
        advisor and committee members; degree sought; title of thesis; location, date, and time of
        examination.
     k. Taking the final oral examination including defense of the thesis, after which members of the
        thesis committee confer and either accept and sign the copies of the thesis or request the student
        to make revisions/additions before final approval is granted.
     l. Depositing the signed original and first copies of the thesis with the Graduate Division, in
        conjunction with a report of the results of the final oral examination by the committee and of the
        judgment of the thesis on Masters Plan A Student Progress Form III.

Form numbers and types can change; consult with Chair of Graduate Studies and Graduate
Division. Forms can be downloaded at: www.hawaii.edu/graduate.



                                                    13
                                        DOCTORAL DEGREE

Specific requirements for the Ph.D. in general are analogous to those listed above as required for the
M.A., with the following exceptions:

l.   Petition for admission to the PhD program and approval of the petition usually take place during the
     term in which the work for the Master's degree is completed, and must be approved by the entire
     Department faculty, following a recommendation by the Clinical faculty. (See Appendix I for a
     sample petition cover letter). Students defending their MA should immediately submit their petition
     for candidacy (so that it can be reviewed the same semester) or they should delay submitting their
     paperwork for MA graduation until the following semester. As noted earlier, the clinical faculty will
     not recommend doctoral candidacy if the Masters thesis is not successfully defended within 5 years of
     entering the program. The petition should include a letter addressed to the Clinical Studies Director
     requesting to be considered for doctoral candidacy and outlining any accomplishments that might not
     be listed on the Progress Report (see "a" below) as well as training and professional goals.

     a. An updated CSP Student Progress Form (Appendix J)
     b. An updated curriculum vitae
     c. When relevant, letters of support from faculty or outside professionals who are not part of the
        CSP (e.g., nonclinical research supervisors).




                                                     28
2. There are no specific course requirements except those described earlier; as noted, clinical students
   must complete all four of the specified four-corner courses for the doctoral degree. The student's
   advisor or program faculty, however, may recommend additional courses in accordance with the
   student's particular interests and needs. As outlined in Appendix B, the student will normally have
   completed roughly between 90 and 109 credit hours.

3. Although most students present an excellent scholarly and clinical record when petitioning for
   doctoral candidacy and receive a positive recommendation, approval of Ph.D. candidacy is not
   automatic and is based on academic, research, and clinical performance at the Master's level. A
   student must have completed and successfully defended and turned in to the Graduate School the
   M.A. thesis before applying for doctoral status. Application to candidacy should occur in the same
   semester as submission of Masters Plan A Student Progress Form III. Advancement to Ph.D.
   candidacy is documented by submission of Doctorate Student Progress Form I to the Chair of
   Graduate Studies and Graduate Division. Students must also complete an application to the Ph.D.
   program available from the Graduate Division.

4. Completion of a 2,000 hour APA-approved internship or approved equivalent is required.

•   Dissertation

    Dissertation research and writing is accomplished by the same steps as those for thesis research and
    writing, except for the following items:

    1. Enrollment in PSY 800 rather than PSY 700. (Only 1 credit of 800 is required for graduation vs.
       six credits of 700.)

    2. Selection of a five-member dissertation committee, three from the Psychology Department and
       one from another field of study. All committee members must have Graduate Faculty status. At
       least two committee members must be from the CSP. For the purposes of committee
       composition, a “member from the Clinical Studies Program” is defined as a full-time member of
       the core clinical faculty or a clinical faculty member holding a joint appointment; on dissertation
       committees, at least one of these must be from the former category. “University Representatives”
       must be based outside the Department of Psychology, and may not hold a Ph.D. in psychology.

    3. Defense of the dissertation proposal as well as its title must be filed with the Chair of Graduate
       Studies and Graduate Division on Doctorate Student Progress Form II.

    4. Notice of the final oral examination must be announced in the University Calendar via the UH
       website:

            http://www.hawaii.edu/site/calendar/index.php

    Results of the dissertation defense are reported on Doctorate Student Progress Form III.

    Form numbers and types can change; consult with Chair of Graduate Studies and Graduate
    Division.




                                                    29
•   Other Requirements for Thesis and Dissertations

    1. All dissertation committees must include two clinical faculty members, as defined above;
       however, students are encouraged to include three members from the Clinical Studies Program.

    2. Theses and Dissertations are normally chaired by CSP or Psychology Department faculty
       members. The chair of a student’s dissertation committee must have full graduate faculty status.
       A faculty member with associate graduate faculty status can co-direct the dissertation with a CSP
       faculty member with full graduate faculty status. Persons outside the CSP or Psychology
       Department who have graduate faculty status can co-direct theses and dissertations with
       permission of the CSP faculty. When a CSP faculty member leaves the Program (e.g., through
       retirement, relocation) prior to completion of the student's Proposal Defense, that faculty member
       can co-direct the dissertation along with a CSP faculty member.

    3. Data Collection and Analysis: Theoretical manuscripts, literature reviews, metaanalyses, research
       proposals, and grant proposals are valuable scholarly activities; however, they do not satisfy the
       goals of the Master’s Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation. Theses and dissertations are designed to
       promote the integration of conceptual issues, research design, and knowledge of basic
       psychology, and to provide students with the basic skills required in empirical research.
       Consequently, all theses and dissertations must involve the collection and analysis of original
       data. In exceptional circumstances, the use of an archival data set may be accepted through
       petition to the CSP. Petitions for approval of projects using archival data must be submitted to
       the Clinical Studies Program in writing. The petition should (a) briefly outline the nature of the
       proposed research and the source of the data, (b) indicate whether the student participated in any
       aspects of the study design or data collection in the project from which archival data sets might be
       drawn, (c) outline the student’s prior experience with all phases of the research enterprise in other
       projects, and d) be reviewed and signed by the student's advisor before submission to the CSP
       faculty.

        If there is any doubt on the part of either the student or his/her adviser or any committee member
        that a proposed research project involves the use of an archival data set, a petition to consider the
        use of such data should be submitted to the CSP faculty as a whole prior to the student’s proposal
        meeting. CSP faculty approval to use archival data is not an approval of the project as a whole.
        This responsibility is maintained by the thesis or dissertation committee.

        APA publication guidelines should be followed in the preparation of thesis and dissertation
        manuscripts.

    4. Proposal Meeting: Data for theses and dissertations can be collected only after the proposal has
       been approved by the thesis or dissertation committee and the Committee on Human Subjects.
       CHS approval must be attached to Masters and Doctorate Student Progress Form II.

    These policies are designed to increase the involvement by Program faculty with students during their
    dissertation, to enhance our ability to monitor student progress, and to maintain the scholarly quality
    of dissertations.

    In recognition of the fact that some students may pursue dissertation topics in which nonclinical
    faculty are better qualified than clinical faculty to serve as committee members and that scholars
    outside of Psychology may be better qualified than Department member to serve as dissertation
    committee chairs, a student may petition the Clinical Studies Faculty to waive these rules.



                                                     30
                                                    14
                                              INTERNSHIP

Beyond practicum training, the major clinical training of all clinical students is a 2,000-hour APA-
approved internship, which may be taken after successfully passing the comprehensive examination.
Notices of available internships and deadlines for applications are available in the Clinical Studies Office.
All APA-approved internships are listed in the December issue of the American Psychologist and at
www.apa.org/ed/accreditation/intern.html. The number of APA-approved internships in Hawai‘i is
limited, and students should be prepared to go elsewhere for this part of their clinical training. Students
may apply to non-APA approved internships only after successfully petitioning the Clinical Studies
faculty.

Internships require a "letter of readiness" from the Director of CSP certifying that an applicant has
completed all Program requirements and is ready to leave for an internship. A student must finish all
Program and Department requirements, up to and including the dissertation proposal, before this letter is
written and students can apply for internship. Therefore, all of these requirements must be completed by
November 1st preceding the internship year. Exceptions to this will be considered on rare occasions (e.g.
in meeting a comprehensive exam requirement, a manuscript was submitted well in advance of the
deadline but the journal has been unusually slow in providing a review).

Each semester (Spring and Fall), there will be a meeting of all students planning to apply for internship
during the upcoming year. The meeting will focus on Program requirements, procedures for applying,
criteria used by internship facilities, methods of enhancing your opportunities for selection, etc.

Students on internship must sign up for 1 credit of (PSY 778 – Internship in Clinical Psy) in the Fall and
Spring semesters while on internship.

There has been some ambiguity regarding graduation and completion of internship. APA accreditation
requires that internship actually be completed before the Ph.D. is awarded. This can create difficulties for
students who have completed their dissertation prior to internship. The internship frequently ends after
the cut-off date for filing for graduation, creating problems for accepting employment immediately after
completion of degree. After consultation with Graduate Division, the following policy has been
established:

1) Clinical students may use PSY 778 (Internship in Clinical Psychology) rather than 800 credits for
their final semester's enrollment.

2) In cases where the timing of the internship extends beyond the close of the second semester in which
they are registered in PSY 778, they will be given an I grade for the course, which will be converted to a
letter grade as soon as the internship ends. Further, those students will be allowed to graduate, without
registering for any additional credits, in the semester in which they actually finish the internship. For
example, this means that students who receive an I grade in PSY 778 in the spring semester of their
internship year will graduate either in the following summer or fall without needing to register for more
credits. In addition, as soon as the I grade is removed, students can request a letter from Grad Division
certifying that all requirements for the degree have been met, allowing them to accept positions requiring
the Ph.D. degree.



                                                     31
Students are expected to relinquish their offices while on internship.

•   Applying for a Non-APA-accredited Internship

    The CSP strongly encourages students to attend APA-accredited internships. This policy is to insure a
    high-quality training experience. The CSP faculty approves non-accredited internships only when the
    student demonstrates that the quality of the training is similar to that associated with accredited
    internships and there is an exceptionally strong reason for not attending an APA-accredited
    internship. Plans for attending a non-accredited internship should be made in consultation with the
    student’s academic advisor.

    Petitions for approval of non-accredited internships should address each of the criteria listed in the
    APA accreditation Guidelines listed below.

    Domain A: Eligibility

    The proposed internship must be consistent with the goals and principles of APA accreditation
    guidelines. The internship must be pursued in institutional settings appropriate for the education and
    training of professional psychologists. The following guidelines

    1. The program offers internship education and training in psychology, one goal of which is to
       prepare students for the practice of professional psychology.

    2. The program is sponsored by an institution or agency, which has among its primary functions the
       provision of service to a population of recipients sufficient in number and variability to provide
       interns with adequate experiential exposure to meet its training purposes, goals, and objectives.

    3. The program is an integral part of the mission of the institution in which it resides and is
       represented in the institution’s operating budget and plans in a manner that enables the program
       to achieve its goals and objectives.

    4. The program requires of each intern the equivalent of 1 year full-time training to be completed in
       no less than 12 months (10 months for school psychology internships) and no more than 24
       months.

    5. The program engages in actions that indicate respect for and understanding of cultural and
       individual diversity. This is reflected in the programs policies for the recruitment, retention, and
       development of staff and interns and in didactic and experiential training that fosters an
       understanding of cultural and individual diversity as they relate to professional psychology.

    Domain B: Program Philosophy, Objectives, and Training Plan

    The program has a clearly specified philosophy of training, compatible with the mission of
    Its sponsor institution and appropriate to the practice of professional psychology. The internship is an
    organized professional training program with the goal of providing high quality training in
    professional psychology. The training model and goals are consistent with its philosophy and
    objectives. The program has a logical training sequence that builds upon the skills and competencies
    acquired during doctoral training.




                                                     32
1. The program’s philosophy must also be consistent with the following two principles of the
   discipline:

   (a) Psychological practice is based on the science of psychology which, in turn, is influenced by
       the professional practice of psychology; and

   (b) Training for practice is sequential, cumulative, and graded in complexity.

2. The program specifies education and training objectives in terms of the competencies expects of
   its graduates. Those competencies must be consistent with:

   (a) The program’s philosophy and training model; and

   (b) The substantive area(s) of professional psychology for which the program prepares its interns
       for the entry level of practice.

3. The internship is an organized program. It consists of a properly administered, planned,
   structured, and programmed sequence of professionally supervised training experiences that are
   characterized by greater depth, breadth, duration, frequency, and intensity than practicum
   training. The training program includes the following:

   (a) The program’s training activities are structured in terms of their sequence, intensity, duration,
       and frequency as well as planned and programmed in the modality of the training activities
       and their content;

   (b) The primary training method is experiential (i.e., service delivery in direct contact with
       service recipients). The experiential training component includes socialization into the
       profession of psychology and is augmented by other appropriately integrated modalities, such
       as mentoring, didactic exposure, role modeling and enactment, observational/vicarious
       learning, supervisory or consultative guidance;

   (c) Intern supervision is regularly scheduled and sufficient relative to the intern’s professional
       responsibility assuring at a minimum that a full-time intern will receive 4 hours of
       supervision per week, at least 2 hours of which will include individual supervision;

   (d) The content of internship training activities addresses the application of psychological
       concepts and current scientific knowledge, principles, and theories to the professional
       delivery of psychological services to the consumer public; professional conduct and ethics;
       and standards for providers of psychological services;

   (e) The program has an administrative structure and process which systematically coordinates,
       controls, directs, and organizes the training activity and resources; and

   (f) The program has a designated leader who is a doctoral psychologist, appropriately
       credentialed (i.e., licensed, registered, or certified) to practice psychology in the jurisdiction
       in which the internship is located and who is primarily responsible for directing the training
       program.




                                                 33
4. In achieving its objectives, the program requires that all interns demonstrate an intermediate to
   advanced level of professional psychological skills, abilities, proficiencies, competencies, and
   knowledge in the areas of:

    (a) Theories and methods of assessment and diagnosis and effective intervention (including
        empirically supported treatments);

    (b) Theories and/or methods of consultation, evaluation, and supervision;

    (c) Strategies of scholarly inquiry; and

    (d) Issues of cultural and individual diversity that are relevant to all of the above.

5. The program has the responsibility to further the training experiences of its interns and to
   promote the integration of practice and scholarly inquiry. Consistent with these responsibilities,
   the program should:

    (a) Demonstrate that intern’s service delivery tasks and duties are primarily learning oriented and
        that training considerations take precedence over service delivery and revenue generation;
        and

    (b) Ensure that the intern’s educational and practicum experiences are consistent with the
        program’s model, philosophy, and training goals and are appropriate for doctoral training in
        professional psychology.

    Furthermore, given its stated goals and expected competencies, the program is expected to
    provide information regarding the minimal level of achievement it requires for interns to
    satisfactorily progress through and complete the internship program, as well as evidence that it
    adheres to the minimum levels it has set.

Domain C: Program Resources

The program demonstrates that it possesses resources of appropriate quality and sufficiency to
achieve its training goals and objectives.

1. The program has formally designated intern training supervisors who:

    (a) Function as an integral part of the site where the program is housed and have primary
        responsibility for professional service delivery;

    (b) Are sufficient in number to accomplish the program’s service delivery and supervision of
        training activities and goals;

    (c) Are doctoral-level psychologists who have primary professional (clinical) responsibility for
        the cases on which they provide supervision, and are appropriately credentialed (i.e.,
        licensed, registered or certified) to practice psychology in the jurisdiction in which the
        internship is located;

    (d) Are responsible for reviewing with the interns the relevant scientific and empirical bases for
        the professional services delivered by the interns;



                                                  34
    (e) Are of appropriate quality for the program’s philosophy or training model and goals;

    (f) Participate actively in the program’s planning, its implementation, and its evaluation; and

    (g) Serve as professional role models to the interns consistent with the training goals and
        objectives.

    In addition to the designated intern training staff, the program may include appropriately
    qualified adjunct staff/supervisors to augment and expand intern’s training experiences, provided
    these adjuncts are integrated into the program and are held to standards of competence
    appropriate to their role/contribution within the program (as in 1 d, e & g above).

2. The program has the necessary additional resources required to achieve its training goals and
   objectives. The program works with the administration of the sponsor institution to develop a
   plan for the acquisition of those additional resources that may be necessary for program
   development. These should include:

    (a) Financial support for its intern stipends, staff, and training activities;

    (b) Clerical and technical support;

    (c) Training materials and equipment;

    (d) Physical facilities and training settings; and

    (e) Training settings appropriate to the program’s training model

3. An internship program may consist of, or be located under, a single administrative entity
   (institution, agency, school, department, etc.) or may take the form of a consortium. A consortium
   is comprised of multiple independently administered entities that have, in writing, formally
   agreed to pool resources to conduct a training or education program. Written consortia
   agreements should articulate the specific role of each participating agency/institution in the
   internship.

Domain D: Cultural and Individual Differences and Diversity

The program recognizes the importance of cultural and individual differences and diversity in the
training of psychologists.

1. The program has a thoughtful and coherent plan to provide interns with relevant knowledge and
   experiences about the role of cultural and individual diversity in psychological phenomena and
   professional practice. It engages in positive efforts designed to ensure that interns will have
   opportunities to learn about cultural and individual diversity as they relate to the practice of
   psychology. The avenues by which these goals are achieved are to be developed by the program.




                                                  35
Domain E: Intern-Staff Relations

The program demonstrates that its education, training, and socialization experiences are characterized
by mutual respect and courtesy between interns and training staff and that it operates in a manner that
facilitates intern’s training and educational experiences.

1. The program recognizes the rights of interns and staff to be treated with courtesy and respect. In
   order to maximize the quality and effectiveness of the interns’ learning experiences, all
   interactions among interns, training supervisors, and staff should be collegial and conducted in a
   manner that reflects the highest standards of the profession (see APA "Ethical Principles of
   Psychologists and Code of Conduct" American Psychologist, December 1992). The program has
   an obligation to inform interns of these principles and of their avenues of recourse should
   problems arise.

2. Program staff is accessible to the interns and provide them with a level of guidance and
   supervision that encourages successful completion of the internship. The staff provides
   appropriate professional role models and engages in actions that promote the intern’s acquisition
   of knowledge, skills, and competencies consistent with the program’s training goals.

3. The program shows respect for cultural and individual diversity among their interns by treating
   them in accord with the principles contained in Domain A, Section 5 of this document.

4. At the time of admission, the program provides interns with written policies and procedures
   regarding program requirements and expectations for interns’ performance and continuance in the
   program and procedures for the termination of students. Interns receive, at least semiannually,
   written feedback on the extent to which they are meeting these requirements and performance
   expectations. The feedback should address the interns’ performance and progress in terms of
   professional conduct and psychological knowledge, skills and competencies in the areas of
   psychological assessment, intervention, and consultation. Such feedback should include:

    (a) Timely written notification of all problems that have been noted and the opportunity to
        discuss them;

    (b) Guidance regarding steps to remediate all problems (if remediable); and

    (c) Substantive written feedback on the extent to which corrective actions are or are not
        successful in addressing the issues of concern.

    The student should supply to the CSP Director a letter from the sponsoring agency/institution
    outlining important commitments encoded in the above guidelines: e.g., type and extent of client
    contact, hours of training and service, hours of supervision per week, resources and facilities
    made available to the intern, personnel, orientation. Vitae from supervisors should be supplied.




                                                36
                                                    15
                               TIME LIMITATIONS AND ATTRITION

The CSP encourages students to complete the Master's degree within three years. The Graduate Division
of the University of Hawai‘i requires all students to complete the Master’s degree within seven years of
admission, and the doctoral degree within seven years of admission to the doctoral program. Failure to do
so requires application for readmission. However, the clinical faculty requires successful defense of the
Masters thesis within 5 years in order to be recommended for doctoral candidacy. Exceptional
circumstances (such as serious health problems) may be considered a basis for extending this five-year
period in rare cases. Students requesting such consideration must present written petitions to the Clinical
Studies Program well before the five-year period has ended; however, it should be emphasized that in
most cases the policy of not advocating candidacy for students who exceed the five-year period will
stand. It should be stressed that the five-year period is a cut-off rather than an expectation; completion of
the master’s degree by the third or fourth year of training is strongly encouraged. The average time for
completion of both the MA and Ph.D. has been 8 years. The program has had a 6% attrition rate due to
termination. An additional 6% elect to leave the program for personal reasons.




                                                     37
                                                    16
                       CLINICAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

•   Purpose

    All clinical doctoral students must complete a Comprehensive Examination Dossier before proposing
    their dissertation and/or applying for internship. The purpose is to promote the professional activities
    consistent with the scientist-practitioner model of the CSP and its goals of training scholars
    (researchers and academics) and scholar-clinicians. Students who wish to propose their dissertation
    prior to completion and approval of the Comprehensive Examination Dossier must petition CSP
    faculty via the CSP Director after gaining approval from their advisor. Guidelines provided below
    are subject to change.

•   Dossier Format

    The dossier involves successful completion one of the two behavioral objective options (work
    products) for three of four Professional Activity Domains (PADs). The PADs are: A) Research; B)
    Government Proposals and Policy; C) Teaching; and D) Clinical Practice and Consultation. One
    PAD of the dossier must include the Research Domain. To propose the dossier, see Clinical
    Comprehensive Examination – Proposal of Behavioral Objectives (Appendix K – see examples listed
    at the end of this section). Approval must first be obtained from the student's advisor, then from the
    CSP faculty.

    The PADs and the two behavioral objective options (work products) for each are as follows:

    Professional Activity Domain A: Research (required)

    A1: Submit a review or theoretical article, to a peer-reviewed journal in psychology or related
        discipline and obtain editorial and reviewers’ feedback. Submit manuscript and feedback from
        the journal editor and reviewers. If there is more than one author, indicate the percent of
        contribution of each author.

     – or –

    A2: Submit an empirical article to a peer-reviewed journal in psychology or related discipline and
        obtain editorial and reviewers’ feedback. Submission based on an empirical Masters thesis is one
        option, including a thesis in psychology completed at another university. The submission may
        not derive from work done as an unclassified graduate student. For students entering the CSP
        with a Masters degree in psychology, a previously published empirical article completed while a
        graduate student may fulfill this requirement upon approval by the clinical members of the
        doctoral committee and CSP faculty. Submit manuscript and feedback from the journal editor and
        reviewers. If there is more than one author, indicate the percent of contribution of each author.

    Professional Activity Domain B: Government Proposals and Policy

    B1: Write a grant proposal that conforms to federal guidelines. The grant proposal may include a Co-
        PI. The proposal may be designed for a private funding agency as long as the proposal is
        comparable to the standards required by federal agencies (e.g., PHS 398). Submit grant proposal
        to clinical members of the doctoral committee and indicate percent of contribution of each PI.


                                                    38
– or –

B2: Track a mental health related bill at the Hawai‘i State Legislature, attend hearings, submit and
    present testimony, and provide an analysis of the bill’s impact and progress. Submit written
    testimony presented to the appropriate committees, demonstrating a scholarly approach to mental
    health legislation, and documentation of the tracking and analysis process.

Professional Activity Domain C: Teaching

C1: Teach one undergraduate psychology course or an undergraduate course in a related discipline.
    Submit a syllabus, lecture notes, examinations, course evaluations, and written feedback from a
    clinical member(s) of the doctoral committee who has (have) directly observed at least two
    lectures (a third lecture will be at the observer's discretion). Mid-year course evaluations must be
    completed using the Oral Presentation Evaluation Form (Appendix M) or some other suitable
    mid-term evaluation tool. End-year course evaluations must be completed using the University of
    Hawaii CAFÉ system or a suitable substitute if the course is taught elsewhere. (see later section
    on "Grading Guidelines").

 – or –

C2: Prepare and give 10 presentations; these can include guest lectures in the UH Department of
    Psychology or a related discipline, psychology conference papers or posters, and psychology
    workshops. Submit lecture notes of each presentation, a copy of conference presentation(s),
    workshop announcement and handouts, a modified course evaluation form for each oral
    presentation, and written feedback from a clinical member(s) of the doctoral committee who has
    (have) directly observed at least two presentations.

Professional Activity Domain D: Clinical Practice and Consultation

D1: Prepare as the sole author a written clinical case conceptualization that includes a literature
    review relevant to the presenting problems and measurement instruments, assessment results and
    interpretation, case formulation, and treatment design. The case should be an individual, family,
    or couple for whom the student was a primary clinician. The case also should involve a client
    with multiple problems and systems issues (e.g., family, school, staff) and the application of
    multiple assessment methods. If there was more than one clinician involved in the assessment,
    indicate the extent of your contribution.

 – or –

D2: Prepare a proposal to develop and evaluate a treatment/prevention program. Submit a written
    proposal with citation of relevant literature, assessment procedures, treatment or prevention
    strategies, cost analysis, and outcome evaluation procedures.




                                                39
                               Clinical Comprehensive Examination
                        EXAMPLE OF PROPOSED BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES
 Prof'l     Brief Description of the
Activity     Professional Activity
Domain             Domain                                      Proposed Behavioral Objective
DOMAIN A: RESEARCH (REQUIRED)
  A2   Submit for publication an I plan to submit for publication to the Journal of __________ a portion of
       empirical article to a peer- my Master's Thesis entitled: "_______." The Journal of ___________ is a
       reviewed journal             bimonthly international peer-reviewed journal featuring research on the
                                    paradigm, practice, and policy of non-Western therapies. Its primary goal
                                    is to establish rigorous and appropriate research methodologies, including
                                    reliable measurement, data collection, analysis, and interpretation. I will
                                    submit the original manuscript, feedback from the editor including copies
                                    of all reviews and any follow-up action I have taken (e.g. re-vision of
                                    manuscript, etc).
DOMAIN B: GOVERNMENT PROPOSALS AND POLICY
  B1   Write a grant proposal       I plan to write and submit a grant proposal to ______ seeking funds for a
       that conforms to federal     research study focused on ____________. I will be the primary
       guidelines                   investigator on the proposal, with _____________serving as Co-
                                    Investigator (Co-I), responsible for constructing the program narrative and
                                    gathering supporting documentation (i.e., literature necessary for
                                    establishing the potential significance of the project, description of its merit
                                    and appropriateness, delineation of the management of resources, etc.). I
                                    will be responsible for over ____% of the grant proposal preparation,
                                    including developing specific aims, conducting the pertinent literature
                                    search, developing and writing the background and significance section,
                                    creating and describing the research design, methods and data analysis
                                    (including power analyses), creating a budget and project timeline,
                                    obtaining letters of support, securing IRB approval, and coordinating the
                                    grant submission process. I will submit the full grant proposal and any
                                    accompanying letters or other materials, along with an indication of the
                                    percentage contributions of my and Co-I’s contributions to the CSP faculty
                                    as part of my comprehensive dossier.
DOMAIN C: TEACHING
  C2   Prepare and give 10          I intend to teach an undergraduate psychology course (e.g., Introduction to
       presentations; can include Clinical Psychology) to fulfill the requirements of the clinical
       guest lectures, conference comprehensive examination. I will receive supervision on the development
       posters or presentations,    and implementation of this course from _______________. My supervisor
       and psychology               will observe at least two class presentations and provide written feedback
       workshops                    from those observations. I will solicit mid-term and end-of-term student
                                    evaluations. I will submit all pertinent documents from this course,
                                    including but not limited to the syllabus, all lecture notes and exams, and
                                    all course evaluations (supervisor and student).

Student Name: __________________________________
I approve the above proposal of the three Professional Activity Domain behavioral objectives for fulfillment of the
clinical comprehensive dossier requirements.

Print Name ________________________________ Signature ______________________                   Date
Advisor Name ______________________________ Signature ______________________                   Date




                                                         40
•   Procedures, Timelines, and Policies

    After obtaining doctoral candidacy, students submit a proposal for their comprehensive examination
    dossiers to their clinical faculty advisor for initial approval. Upon receiving the clinical advisor’s
    approval, the comprehensive examination dossier proposal is then submitted to the CSP Director for
    CSP faculty's review and approval. The completed comprehensive examination is graded by the
    clinical faculty members of the doctoral committee. Approval (or not) is recorded on the Clinical
    Comprehensive Examination – Evaluation Form (Appendix L). The completed form should be
    placed with the dossier and submitted to the CSP Director, who will review and place in the student’s
    file.

    Upon approval of the dossier proposal by the CSP faculty, students must successfully complete the
    dossier within two years. If this time limitation is not met, those incomplete PADs of the
    comprehensive examination will be graded as failed.

    Each PAD is graded pass or fail. All three PADs must be passed in order to pass the comprehensive
    examination. When any PAD is failed, students must resubmit the revised PAD(s) within one year.
    If the time limitation of one year for passing failed PAD(s) is not met, those incomplete PADs of the
    comprehensive examination will be graded as failed.

    Two failures of any PAD will result in termination from the CSP.

    When a behavioral objective involves a work product with more than one author (e.g., an article or
    grant proposal), the CSP student must serve as either the first or second author. The percent of
    contribution of each author must be noted.

    If the work product involves a case conceptualization, only one CSP student may submit the product
    for the comprehensive examination dossier.

    For behavioral objectives not requiring direct observation for grading, the student may propose to
    submit work that was completed at UH since beginning the CSP but prior to admission to doctoral
    candidacy. For the Research PAD, publications prior to doctoral candidacy may also be proposed if
    they meet the guidelines described above.

•   Grading

    The clinical faculty members of the doctoral committee grades as pass or fail each behavioral
    objective in the dossier according to guidelines provided below. Upon completion and grading of all
    comprehensive examination PADs, the doctoral committee submits the dossier, documentation, and
    grades to the CSP Director.

    A majority of the clinical faculty members of the doctoral committee must provide a passing grade for
    each PAD for the comprehensive examination to be considered successfully completed.




                                                    41
•   Grading Guidelines

    Professional Activity Domain A: Research (required)

    A1: Submit as senior or second author a review or theoretical article to a peer-reviewed journal in
        psychology or a related discipline, such as Psychological Bulletin or Psychological Review. The
        paper may not derive from work done as an unclassified graduate student. For students entering
        the CSP with a Masters degree in psychology, a reprint of a previously published review or
        theoretical article completed while a graduate student may fulfill this requirement upon approval
        by the clinical faculty members of the doctoral committee and CSP faculty. For other students,
        submit manuscript and feedback from the journal editor and reviewers. If there is more than one
        author, indicate the percent of contribution of each author. Evaluation of the paper is conducted
        by the clinical faculty members of the doctoral committee.

     – or –

    A2: Submit as senior or second author an empirical article in a peer-reviewed journal in psychology
        or related discipline journal. Submission of an article based on the Masters thesis is one option,
        including a thesis in psychology completed at another university. The submission may not derive
        from work done as an unclassified graduate student. For students entering the CSP with a
        Masters degree in psychology, a previously published empirical article completed while a
        graduate student may fulfill this requirement upon approval by the clinical faculty members of the
        doctoral committee and CSP faculty.

        Empirical manuscripts must be written in APA or journal specific format and submitted to a peer-
        reviewed psychology journal, or other appropriate psychologically oriented discipline journal
        (e.g., psychiatry, educational psychology, mental health, cross-cultural). Fulfillment of the
        research PAD criteria is evidenced by submitting to the clinical faculty members of their doctoral
        committee. either (a) a reprint or a preprint and a letter from the journal's editor (or associate
        editor when appropriate) indicating that the manuscript has been accepted for publication and will
        appear in a future volume of the journal; or (b) a copy of the submitted manuscript, the editor's
        letter, and reviewers feedback. If there is more than one author, indicate the percent of
        contribution of each author. Evaluation of the paper is conducted by the clinical faculty members
        of the doctoral committee.

        Students are strongly encouraged to discuss fulfillment of the research component of the
        comprehensive examination with their major professor, and when possible, all doctoral committee
        members prior to beginning the project. In instances in which the student wishes to fulfill the
        research component prior to forming a doctoral committee (e.g., by submitting their masters
        thesis or some other manuscript accepted for publication and completed while a graduate
        student), a majority vote by the student’s clinical faculty members of the doctoral committee and
        the CSP faculty determines whether the published article fulfills the research component of the
        comprehensive examination.




                                                   42
Professional Activity Domain B: Government Proposals and Policy

B1: Write a grant proposal that conforms to federal guidelines. The grant proposal may include a Co-
    PI. The proposal may be written for a private funding agency as long as the proposal is
    comparable to the standards required by federal agencies (e.g., PHS 398). Submit to the clinical
    members of the doctoral committee the grant proposal and percent of contribution of each PI.

    Students are strongly encouraged to work closely with their research advisors and, if possible,
    their doctoral committee in selecting an appropriate granting agency , particularly if the grant is
    actually submitted for funding. Because NIMH is the largest federal granting agency providing
    extramural support exclusively for mental health research, examples of NIMH research grants are
    listed below.

    The Investigator Initiated Research Grant (R01) is the award received by most investigators
    (there is no specific program announcement). This type of grant currently is open to applicants
    throughout their research careers, including those applying for the first time.

    The NIMH Small Grant Program (R03) provides research support of up to $50,000 per year for
    up to two years for new research projects relevant to the mission of the Institute. This program
    currently provides support in any of the following four categories: (1) Newer, less experienced
    investigators; (2) Investigators at institutions without well developed research traditions and
    resources; (3) More experienced investigators, for exploratory studies that represent significant
    change in research direction for them; and (4) More experienced investigators, for testing new
    methods or techniques.

    The Behavioral Science Track Award for Rapid Transition (B/START) (R03) is designed to
    facilitate the entry of newly independent investigators into behavioral sciences research by
    providing support for up to one year for small scale, exploratory or pilot projects or for a project
    that entails relatively novel research approaches.

    A limited number of grants to support Dissertation research Grants (R03) are available to students
    to encourage them to pursue mental health research careers. Minority Dissertation Research
    Grants in Mental Health are designed to support racial/ethnic minority students in their
    dissertation work in any area of research relevant to NIMH. The Dissertation Research Grants
    involving Child and Adolescent Developmental Psychopathology; HIV/AIDS Research; and
    Mental Health Services Research are available to any graduate student working in one of these
    substantive areas of research.

    The first three types of NIMH grants listed above would require a faculty member to be PI and
    the student a Co-PI if the proposal is actually submitted for funding. Regardless of whether the
    proposal is submitted for funding, the student must provide a significant proportion of the
    preparation and effort in planning, designing, and writing, and the proposal. The student must
    indicate the percent of contribution to the proposal. In the fourth category, the student would
    need to be the PI.

    Both the R03 and R01 grant mechanisms currently use the same application packet, with the only
    difference being that there are much greater page limits on the R03 awards (e.g., the narrative
    cannot exceed 5 pages). The applications can be downloaded from the following site:
    http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html




                                                 43
    With respect to grant writing, students should first check the University's ORS (Office of
    Research Services) website that lists several grant writing resources:
    http://www.hawaii.edu/ors/grantlifecycle_proposal_creation.html. How a grant proposal is
    written depends on the targeted sponsor (e.g., NIH, NSF, private foundation), type/purpose of
    grant (e.g., research, training, service), and the sponsor's "instructions." Therefore, what is
    emphasized will vary. For examples, see NIMH's grant-writing assistance website:
    http://www.nimh.nih.gov/research-funding/grants/grant-writing-assistance.shtml, and NSF's
    website: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04016/start.htm. Students should also seek guidance
    from faculty advisors who have or have had grants.

 – or –

B2: Track a mental health related bill at the Hawai‘i State Legislature, attend hearings, submit and
    present testimony, and provide an analysis of the bill’s impact and progress. Submit written
    testimony presented to the appropriate committees, demonstrating a scholarly approach to mental
    health legislation, and documentation of the tracking and analysis process.

    A student who successfully demonstrates competency in this area will provide a written summary
    of legislative activities with supporting documentation. The legislative session typically runs
    from Mid-January through April in Hawai‘i and students must be prepared to spend considerable
    time at the legislature to fulfill the requirements of this objective. It is the responsibility of each
    student completing this objective to develop this document independently of other students who
    may be completing this objective during a given legislative session. In addition to items
    discussed below, the written summary should discuss and demonstrate access and use of web-
    resources of the Hawai‘i State Legislature and include a timeline of legislative events (the
    legislative calendar). In addition, a compilation or listing of key state legislators with contact
    information and committee assignments should be provided. Students should interact with
    committee clerks and legislative aides of key legislators to obtain legislative information, provide
    the names and contact information for these committee clerks and/or legislative aides in the final
    written summary, and describe and evaluate the nature of interactions.

    The primary focus of the objective is to become familiar with all mental health legislation being
    proposed during a legislative session and track at least one piece of legislation through the entire
    legislative process. In order to successfully track one piece of legislation through the entire
    legislative process, it will be necessary to track a number of pieces of legislation during the
    session because most will not successfully pass all stages of the process. In tracking legislation,
    students should demonstrate the ability to obtain copies of mental health legislation and
    committee reports, including the ability to obtain information from the legislative print shop.
    Legislation will likely undergo considerable revision during the legislative session and hearings
    will occur on numerous revisions of a piece of legislation. Students should obtain and retain
    copies of each revision of the primary mental health bill(s) that they are tracking during the
    session. In addition, students must demonstrate the ability to identify the committee assignments
    for mental health legislation and identify mental health bills which "cross over" during the
    session. Students should also explain legislative processes and concepts like "1st, 2nd, and 3rd
    reading" and "decking."

    In addition, students should identify one or more pieces of legislation of which they will provide
    detailed analysis. For this legislation, they should attend all committee hearings and develop
    testimony, submit testimony and present testimony at all committee hearings relative to the
    identified legislation. They should obtain all committee reports and revisions of the identified



                                                  44
    legislation. In addition, for the identified legislation, students should obtain copies of testimony
    of other individuals testifying at hearings and include an issues statement when documenting
    completion of this objective which outlines the perspectives of various groups (obtained through
    personal contact with those testifying and/or from testimony). Minimally, information from the
    public policy director of the Mental Health Association in Hawai‘i, the National Alliance for the
    Mentally Ill – Oahu, the legislative liaison of the Adult and/or Child and Adolescent Mental
    Health Divisions of the Hawai‘i Department of Health and the legislative liaison of the Hawai‘i
    Psychological Association should be obtained.

    Legislation passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate goes to "conference
    committee" for final revision and action. Students should attend scheduled conference committee
    meetings pertaining to identified legislation. Students should obtain a final copy of legislation
    and report on action by the Governor. Bills passing the legislature which are signed into law
    become "Acts" which are published in the Session Laws of Hawai‘i and eventually codified in the
    Hawai‘i Revised Statutes (e.g., see mental health code at Chapter 334, HRS or forensic mental
    health code at Chapter 404, HRS). In demonstrating competency in this area, students should
    obtain copies of mental health legislation as codified in the Session Laws of Hawai‘i (may be
    from previous session laws) and the Hawai‘i Revised Statutes (may be from existing Statutes) and
    discuss the relationship between Bills, Acts, Sessions Laws and Statutes.

    The materials documenting the above process are submitted to the clinical members of the
    doctoral committee.

Professional Activity Domain C: Teaching

C1: Teach one undergraduate psychology course or an undergraduate course in a related discipline.
    Submit a syllabus, lecture notes, examinations, a mid-year course evaluation using the Oral
    Presentation Form (Appendix M) or a suitable substitute, an end-year CAFE course evaluation,
    and written feedback from a member(s) of the doctoral committee who has (have) directly
    observed at least two lectures.

    CAFE course evaluation forms should be developed under the guidance of the doctoral
    committee. CAFE forms can be obtained from:

    http://www.cafe.hawaii.edu/

C2: Prepare and give 10 presentations; these can include guest lectures in the UH Department of
    Psychology or a related discipline, psychology conference papers or posters, and psychology
    workshops. Submit lecture notes of each presentation, a copy of conference presentation(s),
    workshop announcement and handouts, a modified course evaluation form for each oral
    presentation, and written feedback from a member(s) of the doctoral who has (have) directly
    observed three presentations.

    Oral presentations should be evaluated using the Clinical Comprehensive Examination – Oral
    Presentation Evaluation Form (Appendix M) or a comparable form approved by the clinical
    members of the doctoral committee.




                                                 45
Professional Activity Domain D: Clinical Practice and Consultation

D1: Prepare as the sole author a written clinical case conceptualization that includes a literature
    review relevant to the presenting problems and measurement instruments, assessment results and
    interpretation, case formulation, and treatment design. The case should be an individual, family,
    or couple for whom the student was a primary clinician. The case also should involve a client
    with multiple problems and systems issues (e.g., family, school, staff) and the application of
    multiple assessment methods. If there was more than one clinician involved in the assessment,
    indicate the extent of your contribution.

    I.   Overall goals and structure
         A. Goals
            1. Illustrate abilities and a scholarly approach to
                 a. clinical assessment
                 b. case formulation
                 c. treatment design
                 d. outcome evaluation design
         B. Type of case—child or adult client, assessment issues involving multiple persons (e.g.,
            child and family; marital; inpatient child/adult and staff)

    II. Assessment strategies
        A. Multiple assessment sessions
        B. Multiple methods
           1. Required: analogue and natural environment observation; multiple client and
               informant interviews (parents, teachers, staff, psychologists); questionnaires; self and
               participant monitoring
           2. When appropriate: personality and psychophysiological; medical, school, psychiatric
               records review; cognitive/intellectual/neuropsych

    III. Product
         A. Write up (e.g., 35 page write up of case and relevant literature)

    IV. Contents of paper
        A. Usual information (background, referral, descriptors, overview of methods/strategies)
        B. Review of research relevant to all assessment strategies used in case
           1. E.g., 2 page overview of research on criterion/convergent validity, reliability, sources
                of measurement and inferential error in analogue observation of parent-child
                interactions for case of family with child with oppositional behaviors.
           2. E.g., 2 page overview of validity, sources of error in interviews with young child
                with social anxiety, or inpatient with diagnosis of schizophrenia
        C. Description of rationale for selecting assessment strategies
        D. Results of assessment strategies, organized by foci (e.g., results of assessment on parent-
           child interactions, which could involve multiple methods; results of assessment on social
           anxiety/skills which could involve multiple methods)
        E. Overview of research relevant to important behavior problems presented in case – e.g.,
           with a case of child with ODD involving depressed married parent, paper would review
           literature on relationship between marital distress and depression, effects on parental
           depression on parent-child interactions, research on causal factors associated with
           ODD—all tied into assessment strategies and treatment decisions (e.g., 5 pages)




                                                46
          F. Formal clinical case formulation; integration of assessment data (including relevant
             literature, limitations, sources of error (e.g., 3-5 pages)
          G. Design of treatment strategies (e.g., 2-3 pages)
             1. Tie into results of assessment
             2. Review of relevant treatment outcome/process research
          H. Ethical/professional issues raised in the case (citing relevant publications)
          I. Appendix – with all obtained measures (e.g., WISC/WAIS scale scores; data from
             observation sessions)

   V. Graded variables
      A. Assessment strategies (methods, scholarly basis)
      B. Clinical case formulation
      C. Treatment design and outcome evaluation
      D. Paper write up (as with theses)
      E. Oral presentation (scholarly, organized)

 – or –

D2: Prepare proposal to develop and evaluate a treatment/prevention program. Submit a written
    proposal with citation of relevant literature, assessment procedures, treatment or prevention
    strategies, cost analysis, and outcome evaluation procedures to the clinical members of the
    doctoral committee. The proposal should be prepared with the following format and guidelines:

   I.     Description of target problem or disorder
          A. Brief history of problem or disorder including theories of etiology
          B. Personal and social impact of problem or disorder
          C. Previous treatments or interventions and their effectiveness

   II. Assessment procedure that will be used to identify the target problem or disorder (i.e.,
       identifying the "experimental" group)
       A. Evidence for reliability of assessment procedure
       B. Evidence for validity of assessment procedure
       C. Evidence for sensitivity of assessment procedure

   III. Identification of other, potentially relevant subject characteristics, such as demographic and
        "clinical" variables, and exclusion criteria

   IV. Recruitment procedure for "experimental" group

   V. Rationale for control group or "condition"
      A. Control group
          1. Strategies and rationale for equivalence of experimental and control groups
          2. Recruitment procedure for control group
      B. Control "condition"
          1. Baseline comparisons with explicit consideration of the course of the target problem
              or disorder
          2. Quasi-experimental designs with description of the strategies and rationale to ensure
              equivalence of "experimental" and "control" groups.

   VI. (If applicable) Recruitment procedure for control group or "condition"



                                                 47
VII.     Description and history of, and rationale for, treatment or intervention protocol
    A.   Major human subjects concerns (i.e., risk/benefits)
    B.   Procedures to ensure "Treatment Integrity"
    C.   Procedures to handle "dropouts" and missing data.
    D.   Procedure for maintenance of treatment gains

VIII. Rationale for outcome measures
    A. Evidence for reliability of outcome measures
    B. Evidence for validity of outcome measures
    C. Evidence for sensitivity of outcome measures
    D. Identification of primary and secondary outcome measures

IX. Research personnel
    A. Rationale for qualifications
    B. Major responsibilities
    C. Recruitment procedure

X. Rationale for statistical analysis of outcome data

XI. Procedure and rationale for follow-up evaluation

XII.Summary statement with supporting evidence
    A. What works (or does not work)?
    B. For Whom?
    C. Under what conditions?




                                             48
                                                      17
                                     STUDENT EVALUATIONS

Each student's progress is evaluated each year by the entire clinical faculty. Evaluations are based on
academic grades, progress through the program, ethics, research, clinical skills, professional
responsibility, and extracurricular activities such as attendance at colloquia, conferences and publication
of research papers. Evaluations by the advisor, practicum supervisors, and research supervisors are
particularly important. In addition, each faculty member completes the Positive Accomplishment
Checklist (Appendix O) for their advisees for positive feedback in students' evaluation letters. To
facilitate student evaluations, students must update their CSP Student Progress Form (Appendix J) by
April 15th of each year.

Whenever a student earns a grade of 'C+' or lower in any graduate course, he/she will be placed on
probationary status. A grade of 'B-' or better is necessary for a course to fulfill a requirement.

The following criteria were approved by faculty and serve as operational guidelines for evaluations.

•   Student Evaluation Criteria

    1. Certificate of Commendation

        This status is the highest evaluative rating that can be assigned by the CSP faculty. It is assigned
        to students who meet the following performance standards. It will be awarded only in those rare
        instances in which student performance is truly exceptional:

        A. Academics: Uniformly outstanding academic achievement in coursework;
        B. Progress: Timely progress toward the completion of a degree;
        C. Research: Excellence in research and scholarly skills and abilities as reflected through high
           quality work and participation in research activities beyond those needed for degree;
        D. Presentations: Presentations at scientific and professional meetings;
        E. Publications: Publications in scientific and professional outlets and forums;
        F. Clinical Work: Excellence in clinical skills in assessment, diagnosis, therapy and/or
           consultation as reflected through practicum and internship experiences;
        G. Professional: Positive professional demeanor and presentation in interpersonal relations and
           professional activities with faculty, peers, and colleagues;
        H. Adjustment: Positive personal and professional behaviors such as self-confidence, maturity,
           sensitivity, responsibility, cooperation, etc.
        I. Ethics: Personal behaviors that reflect adherence to APA Code of Ethics.

    2. Outstanding

        This status is assigned to those students whose performance is clearly above average, but which
        has not yet achieved the level and breadth of excellence to warrant criteria used in the certificate
        of commendation section.




                                                     49
    3. Satisfactory

        This status is assigned to those students whose performance is clearly adequate, but not yet
        distinguished in its levels and productivity and/or achievement. It is however, an acceptable
        evaluation level and is the most typical evaluation given to students in the CSP. It reflects timely
        progress toward completion of degree and the maintenance of expected academic and
        professional standards.

    4. Satisfactory with Concerns

        This status is assigned to those students whose performance is clearly adequate, but whose
        achievements are more limited and, in some cases, problematical, because of either personal,
        professional, and/or academic difficulties. Recommendations for addressing and resolving the
        problematic areas will be made by CSP faculty. Failure to meet recommendations in a timely
        manner may result in the student being assigned unsatisfactory or probationary status. One of the
        most common reasons for assignment to this status is lack of timely progress toward completion
        of degree.

    5. Unsatisfactory

        This status is assigned to those students whose performance is inadequate and unacceptable in
        either academic, personal, and/or professional areas of functioning. The assignment of this status
        may or may not be followed by the recommendation of probation and/or dismissal. This status is
        often assigned to students who have failed to demonstrate timely progress toward completion of a
        degree. This status is often given prior to probation. It signals the presence of a serious problem
        that must be resolved.

    6. Probation

        This status is assigned to those students whose performance has failed to meet expectations and
        standards for performance in either academic, personal, and/or professional areas of functioning.
        In all instances, when this status is assigned, the CSP faculty will offer guidelines and
        recommendations for its removal through effective and positive student action. Students failing
        to meet faculty guidelines and recommendations in a prompt and judicious manner will be
        recommended for termination from the program.

        It is the intention of the current standards to inform students that the issuing of probation letter is
        a serious matter and that every effort should be made to meet the conditions for its removal. The
        presence of a probationary letter in the pre-doctoral candidacy phase of the student's career could
        lead to rejection of applications for doctoral candidacy.

    7. Dismissal Letter

        A letter recommending dismissal from the program is made by CSP faculty to those students who
        have failed to meet the minimally acceptable standards of performance in either academic,
        professional, and/or personal areas of functioning. Students may appeal this decision to the CSP
        faculty. Formal dismissal is made through the graduate school.

All students receiving either "satisfactory with concerns", "unsatisfactory" or "probation" status letters are
required to meet with their advisor to develop a plan for the improvement of their performance. In



                                                      50
general, no student will be placed on probation without adequate warning through the issuance of
"satisfactory with concerns" or "unsatisfactory" status letters or other written documentation. Students
who have been placed in any of these categories during the annual evaluation meeting during the Spring
semester are reviewed again at the mid-year evaluation meeting (usually held in January), and receive an
updated letter at that time.

For confidentiality purposes, student evaluation letters will not be sent via e-mail. Instead, an e-mail
notification will be sent to students to alert them that an evaluation letter has been placed in their mailbox.
As such, it is the student's' responsibility to check e-mail on a regular basis.



                                                     18
                                   STUDENT REPRESENTATION

Students are encouraged to be involved actively in the decision-making of the Clinical Studies Program.
The Director of Clinical Training meets periodically with students; students are invited to some CSP
meetings; students are encouraged to initiate meetings with their advisor, the CSP-Director or Associate
Director or other CSP faculty to discuss any issues of interest or concern; student input is sought on all
program policy changes and personnel matters.

The students also elect representatives to attend CSP meetings when student or personnel evaluations are
not discussed. Students [may elect one representative per cohort for years 1-5. Two additional
representatives may be elected for advanced students] elect seven representatives, one per cohort for years
1 – 5 plus 2 advanced students. Cohorts determine the selection process. Representatives can be removed
by a 2/3rds vote of cohorts. Representatives are encouraged to meet monthly to determine who will
attend the CSP meeting and what issues to raise or questions to ask. The CSP Director will notify
students of upcoming meetings.

Student representatives are encouraged to organize monthly meetings for CSP faculty and students. The
purpose of the meetings is to encourage timely completion of the Masters thesis and Doctoral dissertation.
However, the forum of each meeting will depend upon student needs. Some students might use the
meetings to consult on research ideas while others might elect to present research findings.




                                                      51
                                                    19
   A POSITIVE INTERPERSONAL AMBIENCE AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

It is the policy of the CSP to provide safe, comfortable and positive learning and working environment for
students, faculty, and staff. Any discrimination or harassment based on gender, race, ethnicity, sexual
orientation, religious preference, disability or age will not be tolerated. Additionally, interactions
between and about students, faculty and staff should occur in a professionally responsible manner and be
consistent with APA ethical guidelines.

The faculty recognizes that in spite of our attempts to maintain a positive interpersonal ambience in the
CSP, conflicts between students and faculty can occur on a variety of dimensions. We encourage both
students and faculty to attempt to resolve these conflicts quickly and in a responsible manner.

A variety of options are available to students who believe that a conflict cannot be resolved through
discussions with the faculty member involved. We recommend that concerns be expressed to faculty in
the following order: (a) the student's advisor, (b) the Clinical Studies Director, (c) the Chair of Graduate
Studies and (d) the Department Chair. However, this logical hierarchical order may not be appropriate in
all cases and students may express their concerns to any faculty member.

The Clinical Studies Faculty will initiate procedures to address the issues raised. In addition, formal
grievance procedures are available through the Department Governance Guidelines and University Sexual
Harassment Policy and Procedural Guidelines, Student Handbook, and the Academic Grievance
Procedures in the Office of Student Affairs. In line with clearly established University policy, retribution
based on student complaints or grievances will not be tolerated.

Students are responsible for checking their e-mail on a regular basis, as this is the Program's primary
means of communication. All communication is sent via the student’s Hawaii.edu e-mail account.

Links to formal and detailed grievance procedures can be found at:

Http://studentaffairs.manoa.hawaii.edu/policies/academic_grievance/table_of_contents.php (7 screens and
an available PDF document for academic grievance)

http://www.hawaii.edu/graduate/policies/html/grievance.htm (academic grievance geared toward graduate
students0

www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/archives/a9920.9012.pdf (access to pdf document for discrimination
complaints)

http://manoa.hawaii.edu/mco/Gender_Equity/Sexual_Harassment/Page3.html (complaints about sexual
harassment)




                                                     52
                                                   20
                         CLINICAL RESPECIALIZATION PROGRAM

•   General Description

    The Clinical Studies Respecialization Program provides clinical training for individuals holding a
    Ph.D. in a basic area of psychology from a regionally accredited university (or foreign equivalent).
    Individuals who are already licensed in psychology or who hold an applied degree (e.g., Ed.D.,
    Psy.D.) are not appropriate for this program. Upon satisfactory completion of core clinical courses,
    practica, and internship, the Respecialization student receives a certificate from the University of
    Hawai‘i Graduate Division and is competitive for clinical research and teaching positions as well as
    eligible to sit for licensure in most states. CSP is APA-approved and is a member of the Academy of
    Psychological Clinical Science. The CSP follows a scientist-practitioner, broadly-behavioral, dual
    specialty approach to training, in which it is encouraged of all graduate and respecialization students
    to integrate the literatures of a basic area of psychology with related clinical phenomena.

•   Clinical Training

    Respecialization Students are enrolled in practicum courses in their first year whenever feasible.
    Students receive training offered at a variety of settings in Honolulu, such as the Department's Center
    for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, the state hospital, mental health centers, schools, hospitals and
    medical centers, a veterans outpatient clinic, the Department of Corrections, the Department of
    Health, and Mental Health Clinics. Each student will be affiliated with a clinical training center for
    10-20 hours per week for at least two academic years, although extensive summer training is
    sometimes possible. These centers provide experiences with a variety of populations and behavior
    problems such as children, families, veterans, outpatient and inpatient adults, substance abuse, eating
    disorders, medical/psychological disorders (e.g., pain, headaches, hypertension, smoking), school
    behavior problems, depression, and marital and family distress.

    The required clinical core courses are as follows and typically require two years of on-campus
    training in the conceptual, practical and empirical bases of clinical psychology:

        670   Introduction to Clinical Psychology
        671   Introduction to Assessment I
        672   Introduction to Assessment II
        673   Introduction to Assessment III: Behavioral Assessment
        674   Child Psychopathology
        675   Treatment Research
        676   Adult Psychopathology
        677   Child Practicum and/or 678 Adult Practicum (total of four semesters)
        771   Child Treatment/or 772 Adult Treatment: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
        778   Internship in Clinical Psychology

    The Respecialization student is required to complete a 2000-hour APA-approved internship in clinical
    psychology (PSY 778). The number of APA-approved internships in Hawai‘i is extremely limited
    and individuals should be prepared to go elsewhere for this aspect of training. Students may apply
    for a non-APA approved internship only after successfully petitioning the CSP faculty.




                                                    53
•   Admission Procedures

    Admission to the Clinical Studies Respecialization program is competitive. Application forms and
    related information may be accessed via the Psychology Department and Graduate Division websites,
    and the Clinical Studies Program webpage:

       www.psychology.hawaii.edu
       www.hawaii.edu/graduate
       www.psychology.hawaii.edu/pages/graduate_programs/clinical.html

    Individuals should apply as a Special Nondegree Student. Application deadlines are the same as
    those for graduate student application.




                                                  54
                                                    21
                          CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM FACULTY

Clinical Studies Program (CSP) faculty members have diverse academic backgrounds and research
interests and provide theoretically integrative training with applied-empirical, modern behavioral and
biopsychosocial orientations. In addition to teaching and research, the clinical faculty provides service to
the community, including assessment and therapy, program evaluation, external grant activity and agency
consultation. Many also serve on editorial boards and are active in professional organizations.

Stephen N. Haynes (Ph.D., University of Colorado): Director, Clinical Studies Program;
    Psychopathology, behavioral medicine, assessment.
Elaine M. Heiby (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago): Clinical Respecialization Coordinator;
    Depression, compliance to health-related regimens, measurement of self-control, assessment,
    integrated behavioral theory chaos theory.
Velma A. Kameoka (Ph.D., University of Hawai‘i): Director, Social Sciences Research Institute (SSRI);
    Cross-cultural, assessment, statistics and methodology, program evaluation, substance abuse
    prevention.
Janet D. Latner (Ph.D., Rutgers University): Associate Director, Clinical Studies Program; Obesity and
    eating disorders; stigmatization, self-help treatments.
Charles W. Mueller (Ph.D., Iowa State University): Psychological adjustment to life threatening events
    or illness; health promotion and illness prevention; disruptive behavior disorders; family violence;
    mental health service delivery and social support and social burden networks.
Brad Nakamura (Ph.D., University of Hawaii): Youth treatment outcome, mechanistic, and modularity
    issues within cognitive-behavioral interventions; youth assessment and diagnostic issues;
    internalizing disorders; dissemination concerns as they relate to diffusing evidence-based practices
    into community-based settings.
Kelly M. Vitousek (Ph.D., University of Minnesota): Eating and anxiety disorders, cognitive-behavioral
    treatments.
Yiyuan Xu (Ph.D., University of Southern California): Affiliate Faculty-CSP; Developmental
    psychology; Shyness/social withdrawal; Aggression and peer victimization; Acculturation, ethnic
    identity, and adjustment of immigrant children; Peer relationship in varying cultural contexts.

Emeritus Faculty (Clinical)

Anthony J. Marsella (Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University)
Walter Nunokawa (Ph.D., University of Oregon)
Arthur W. Staats (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)




                                                     55
•   Department of Psychology Faculty

    Charlene K. Baker (Ph.D., Georgia State University): Chair, Psychology Graduate Studies;
        Community and culture, violence and PTSD.
    Robert J. Blanchard (Ph.D., University of Iowa): Behavioral neuroscience; psychobiology of
        emotion, specifically fear, anxiety and aggression, and neural and pharmacological control of
        emotion-based behaviors.
    Patricia A. Couvillon (Ph.D., University of Hawai‘i): Behavioral neuroscience; comparative
        analysis of learning.
    Leonidas "Alex" Doumas (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles): Cognitive psychology.
    Richard Dubanoski (Ph.D., University of Minnesota): Dean, College of Social Sciences;
        Developmental psychology; child maltreatment, behavioral toxicology and behavioral effects of
        food sensitivity.
    Adrian Dunn (Ph.D., Cambridge University): Behavioral neuroscience; neurochemistry and
        endocrinology of stress, especially the roles of norepinephrine and of the corticotropin-releasing
        factor (CRF) family of peptides (CRF and urocortins 1, 2 and 3); interactions between the
        nervous system and the immune system, especially the role of cytokines as 'immunotransmitters'
        to the brain.
    Brandy Frazier (Ph.D., University of Michigan): Developmental psychology.
    Kentaro Hayashi (Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill): Quantitative psychology
        (psychometrics); biostatistics.
    Stephen N. Haynes (Ph.D., University of Colorado): Director, Clinical Studies Program;
        Psychopathology, behavioral medicine, assessment.
    Elaine C. Hatfield (Ph.D., Stanford University): Social-personality; emotions, close relationships.
    Elaine M. Heiby (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago): Clinical Respecialization Coordinator;
        Depression, compliance to health-related regimens, measurement of self-control, assessment,
        integrated behavioral theory chaos theory.
    Leon A. James (Ph.D., McGill University): Social-personality; language analysis, driving behavior,
        health psychology, information seeking and religious behavior.
    Velma A. Kameoka (Ph.D., University of Hawai‘i): Director, Social Sciences Research Institute
        (SSRI); Cross-cultural, assessment, statistics and methodology, program evaluation, substance
        abuse prevention.
    Janet D. Latner (Ph.D., Rutgers University): Associate Director, Clinical Studies Program; Obesity
        and eating disorders; stigmatization, self-help treatments.
    Ashley E. Maynard (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles): Chair, Department of
        Psychology; Developmental trajectory of children’s teaching abilities; interacting roles of culture
        and cognitive tools (e.g., books, media, or weaving tools) in the development of thinking; the
        impact of historical change and changing cultural models on child socialization; and the role of
        siblings in cognitive and social development.
    Charles W. Mueller (Ph.D., Iowa State University): Psychological adjustment to life threatening
        events or illness; health promotion and illness prevention; disruptive behavior disorders; family
        violence; child and family mental health service delivery.
    Brad Nakamura (Ph.D., University of Hawaii): Youth treatment outcome, mechanistic, and
        modularity issues within cognitive-behavioral interventions; youth assessment and diagnostic
        issues; internalizing disorders; dissemination concerns as they relate to diffusing evidence-based
        practices into community-based settings.
    Clifford O'Donnell (Ph.D., University of Kentucky): Community and culture, crime, behavior
        ecology and community-based intervention and prevention.




                                                    56
    Samuel I. Shapiro (Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University): Social-personality, Asian psychology,
       the psychology of knowledge and wisdom, transpersonal psychology, and the advancement of
       teaching in higher education.
    Scott Sinnett (Ph.D., Universidad de Barcelona): Cognitive psychology.
    Catherine Sophian (Ph.D., Michigan): Developmental psychology; with research interests in early
       cognitive development, especially young children's understanding of numbers.
    Lorey K. Takahashi (Ph.D., Rutgers University): Chair, Psychology Undergraduate Studies;
       Behavioral neuroscience, experimental psychopathology.
    Kelly M. Vitousek (Ph.D., University of Minnesota): Eating and anxiety disorders, cognitive-
       behavioral treatments.
    Yiyuan Xu (Ph.D., University of Southern California): Affiliate Faculty-CSP; Developmental
       psychology; Shyness/social withdrawal; Aggression and peer victimization; Acculturation, ethnic
       identity, and adjustment of immigrant children; Peer relationship in varying cultural contexts.

    Emeritus Faculty (Department)

    M. E. Bitterman (Ph.D., Cornell University)
    John G. Carlson (Ph.D., University of Minnesota)
    Robert E. Cole (Ph.D., University of Hawai‘i)
    David H. Crowell (Ph.D., University of Iowa)
    Louis M. Herman (Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University)
    Karl A. Minke (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin)
    Anthony J. Marsella (Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University)
    Walter Nunokawa (Ph.D., University of Oregon)
    Arthur W. Staats (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)
    David L. Watson (Ph.D., Yale University)

•   Cooperating Graduate Faculty

    D. Bhawuk, Ph.D. – culture and community
    R. W. Brislin, Ph.D. – social-personality
    P. W. Dowrick, Ph.D. – video research
    E. S. Hishinuma – health, cross-cultural
    P. E. Nachtigall, Ph.D. – marine mammal behavior
    K. A. Tokuno, Ph.D. – developmental, teaching, learning, and cognition
    A. M. Wylie, Ph.D. – clinical
    L. A. Yamauchi, Ph.D. – educational psychology




                                                  57
•   Affiliate Graduate Faculty

    H. S. Bracha, M.D. – stress, neuropsychiatry
    B. F. Chorpita, Ph.D. – clinical childhood anxiety disorders
    G. Fein, Ph.D. – neurobehavioral research
    E. Kubany, Ph.D. – clinical
    D. Landis, Ph.D. – psychology
    A. Pack, Ph.D. – marine mammal behavior
    J. E. Schiffman, Ph.D. – child clinical
    C. W. Stephan, Ph.D. – social psychology
    W. G. Stephan, Ph.D. – social psychology
    W. T. Tsushima, Ph.D. – neuropsychology

•   Clinical Affiliates

    Rosemary Adam-Terem, Ph.D.      Private practice, Pacific Business News Bldg.; Honolulu, HI
    Kathleen S. Brown, Ph.D.        Pain Rehab. Program, Tripler Army Medical Center; Honolulu, HI
    June W. J. Ching, Ph.D.         Private practice, Pacific Business News Bldg.; Honolulu, HI
    Eric L. Daleiden, Ph.D.         Kismetrics, LLC; Satellite Beach, FL
    Patrick H. DeLeon, Ph.D.        Senator Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senate; Washington, DC
    Joan P. Dubanoski, Ph.D.        Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research; Honolulu, HI
    Raymond A. Folen, Ph.D.         Dept. of Psychology, Tripler Army Medical Center; Honolulu, HI
    Gayle Hostetter, Ph.D.          Queen's Clinical & Counseling Services; Honolulu, HI
    Leigh W. Jerome, Ph.D.          The Institute for Triple Helix Innovation; Honolulu, HI
    Aaron Kaplan, Ph.D.             Waikiki Integrative Health Clinic; Honolulu, HI
    Michael A. Kellar, Psy.D.       Dept. of Psychology, Tripler Army Medical Center; Honolulu, HI
    Melinda Kohr, Ph.D.             CARE-Hawai‘i, Inc.; Honolulu, HI
    Frederic Manke, Ph.D.           State of Hawaii Adult Mental Health Division; Hilo, HI
    Kim Meyer, Ph.D.                Psychosocial Rehab. Prog., Hawai‘i State Hospital; Kaneohe, HI
    Steven M. Miyake, Ph.D.         VA Pacific Islands Healthcare System; Honolulu, HI
    Scott Shimabukuro, Ph.D.        State of Hawaii Child & Adoles. Mental Hlth. Div; Honolulu, HI
    Lesley Slavin, Ph.D.            State of Hawaii Child & Adoles. Mental Hlth. Div; Honolulu, HI
    Allyson M. Tanouye, Ph.D.       Univ. of Hawaii Couns. & Student Development Ctr.; Honolulu, HI
    David Weiss, Ph.D.              Dept. of Pediatrics, Tripler Army Medical Center; Honolulu, HI




                                                    58
                                                    22
                                       CLINICAL STUDENTS
                                             (2010-11)

Below is the list of the current (50) students and their educational background at the time of admission.

Acra, Caroline Francoise (R) (1) – PhD, Univ of Miami; MS, Univ of Miami; BS, McGill University
Bello, Iruma (adv) – BA, University of Miami
Brown, Krista (3) – BA, University of British Columbia; MA, University of British Columbia
Bury, Marcin (5) – M.D., University of Warsaw; Ph.D., University of Warsaw
Chang, Jaime (4) – BA, University of San Diego
Chao, Puihan (adv) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Cho, Sungkun (adv) – BA, Seoul Theological U.; BA, Chung Ang U.; MS, Illinois Inst. of Technology
Ciao, Anna (5) – BA, Trinity University
Coffee, Allana (R) (3) – BS, University of Hawaii; MS, Chaminade Univ; PhD, University of Hawaii
Denenny, Danielle (3) – BS, Brown University
Dodge, Stephanie (adv) – BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; BA, University of Hawai‘i
Durso, Laura (adv) – BA, Harvard University
Ebneter, Daria (3) – Diplom, Universitat Osnabruck
Essayli, Jamal (1) – BS, University of California-San Diego
Fast, Kathrine (adv) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Grubbs, Kathleen (adv) – BA, Yale University
Hermosura, Andrea (adv) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Huang, Yue (3) – BA, Peking University
Izmirian, Sonia (1) – BA, University of California-Los Angeles
J'Anthony, Cynthia (adv) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Kappenberg, Erin (R) (1) – PhD, Claremont Graduate Univ; MA, Univ of Hawai‘i; BA, Univ of Hawaii
Kloezeman, Karen (adv) – BS, University of California-San Diego
Lam, Tony (1) – BA, University of Hawaii
Larsen, James (3) – BS, Brigham Young University
Li, Jeanie (Chun-I) (adv) – BA, National Tsing-Hua University-Taiwan; MA, University of Hawai‘i
Lin, Susan (5) – BA, University of British Columbia
Love, Allison (5) – BA, College of Charleston
Lynch (Stumpf), Roxanna (adv) – BA, Yale University
Maeda, Justin (adv) – BA, Washington University
Mathis, Gloria (adv) – BS, Florida State University
Morrisette, Nova (2) – BA, University of New Mexico
Murakami, Jessica (1) – BA, University of Southern California
Okamura, Kelsie (2) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Orimoto, Trina (3) – BA, University of California-Los Angeles
Pestle, Sarah (adv) – AB, Harvard University
Pinson, Catherine (adv) – BA, University of Texas-Austin



                                                    59
Polokoff, Rachel (3) – BS, University of California-San Diego; MS, University of Edinburgh
Raab, Drew (Phillip) (5) – BA, Williams College
Schaper, Kim (adv) – BA, Indiana University
Selbo-Bruns, Alexandra (3) – BA, Smith College
Smith, Shana (5) – BA, George Washington University; MA, New School University
Stalk, Henri-Lee (3) – BA, Colombia University; MA, University of Edinburgh
Subica, Andrew (adv) – BA, Pomona College
Takishima, Yurie (Julie) (4) – BA, Santa Clara University
Teh, Lisa (2) – BS, University of Toronto
Tomei, Tiffany (adv) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Tsunemoto, Michelle (adv) – BA, University of Hawai‘i
Wilson, Diane (adv) – BA, Skidmore College
Wilson, Rebecca (4) – BA, Pomona College
Zhang, Yiling (adv) – BA, Nankai University; M.Ed., Peking University

(1) = First year student
(2) = Second year student
(3) = Third year student
(4) = Fourth year student
(5) = Fifth year student
(adv) = advanced student
(R) = Respecialization student




                                                 60
                                           APPENDIX A

                    CLINICAL STUDIES PROGRAM BASIC TRAINING
                     AND PROFESSIONAL SOCIALIZATION TOPICS

The following are major topics covered in our Clinical Studies Program or courses and resources
available to students.

TOPIC AREAS, COVERAGE, AND COMMENTS

1) Adult Behavior Therapy
      Coverage: 675, 678, 679, 673
      Comments: Integrated in appropriate areas.
2) AIDS Issues
      Coverage: 670
      Comments:
3) Analysis of Variance
      Coverage: 611
      Comments:
4) Assessment Interviewing
        • Intake Assessment
               Coverage: 670, 672, 677, 678, 679, 673
               Comments:
        • Personality Interview
               Coverage: 671, 672, 677, 678, 679, 673
               Comments:
        • Diagnostic (DSM)
               Coverage: 671, 672, 676
               Comments:
        • Child/Family
               Coverage: 674, 774
               Comments:
5) Assessment Report Writing
      Coverage: 672, 677, 678, 679, 673
      Comments:
6) Assessment/Treatment Integration
      Coverage: 677, 678, 679; practicum supervision
      Comments:
7) Behavioral Assessment
      Coverage: 673
      Comments:
8) Behavioral Medicine
      Coverage: 774
      Comments: Several research programs; optional Health Dual-specialty
9) Behavioral Psychology
      Coverage: 621; 62X
      Comments: Optional Behavioral Dual-specialty




                                                  61
10) Biopsychology
        Coverage: 634; 63X
        Comments: Optional Behavioral Neuroscience Dual-specialty
11) Child Behavior Therapy
        Coverage: 674; 774
        Comments: Optional Child Dual-specialty
12) Child Psychopathology
        Coverage: 674; 774
        Comments: Optional Child Dual-specialty
13) Chronic Mental Illness
        Coverage: 677, 678, 679, 676, 774
        Comments: Clinical and research supervision by CSP and Joint DOH faculty; optional severe
                         mental illness Dual-specialty
14) Clinical Case Conceptualization
        Coverage: 672, 674, 677, 678, 679, 774
        Comments: Severe mental illness Dual-specialty
15) Clinical Skills (not clearly specified elsewhere)
         • Client-centered Skills
                Coverage: 670; 672; 675; 677; 678; 679; 673
                Comments:
         • Behavioral Marital Therapy
                Coverage: 675; 677; 678; 774*
                Comments: *Irregular elective
         • Behavioral Family Therapy
                Coverage: 675; 677; 678; 774*
                Comments: *Irregular elective
         • Classroom Management
                Coverage: 677, 774
                Comments:
         • Contingency Management
                Coverage: 675; 677, 678, 679
                Comments:
         • Cognitive Therapies
                Coverage: 675; 774
                Comments:
         • Behavioral Medicine Therapies
                Coverage: 675; 772; 779
                Comments: Optional Behavioral Health, & Behavioral Neuroscience Dual-
                                   specialties
         • Behavioral Anxiety Reduction Therapies
                Coverage: 675; 774
                Comments:
         • Crisis Intervention
                Coverage: 774
                Comments: Irregular elective
         • Interpersonal Therapies; Social Skills Training
                Coverage: 774
                Comments: Irregular elective




                                                 62
           • Treatment Planning
                  Coverage: 672, 674, 675, 677, 678, 679
                  Comments:
16)   Clinical-research Integration
          Coverage:
          Comments: Conceptually stressed throughout coursework; emphasized in practicum courses;
                         reflected in research activities.
17)   Cognitive/Affective Psychology
          Coverage: 621, 626, 627, 722
          Comments:
18)   Community Psychology
          Coverage: 772, 680
          Comments: (optional)
19)   Conceptual Integration Across Areas
          Coverage:
          Comments: Comps, thesis, dissertation; optional dual-specialty work.
20)   Clinical Consultation
          Coverage:
          Comments: Practicum-site training; supervision of assessment courses.
21)   Cross-cultural Psychology
          Coverage: 774
          Comments: Integrated in all clinical courses; special seminars; optional Ethno-cultural Dual-
                         specialty
22)   Current Issues/Trends in Clinical Psychology
          Coverage: 670; 774
          Comments: Integrated in all courses
23)   Dual Specialty Expertise
          Coverage:
          Comments: Various courses (optional)
24)   Dual Specialty/Clinical Integration
          Coverage:
          Comments: Comps; thesis; dissertation (optional)
25)   DSM-IV
          Coverage: 677, 678, 679, 676
          Comments: Major focus in 676; Introduction in 670; some focus in 671, 672, 674, and 675
26)   Ethical Principles
          Coverage: 670
          Comments: Integrated into all courses.
                • Practice
                     Coverage: 671; 672, 674, 677, 678, 679, 771, 774
                     Comments: Integrated into all courses.
                • Research
                     Coverage: 600; 675, 699, 779
                     Comments: Integrated into all courses.
27)   Ethnic Minority and Diversity Issues
          Coverage: 653; 670; 774
          Comments: Integrated into all courses; optional Ethno-cultural Dual-specialty




                                                     63
28) Exposure to Community Treatment Facilities
        Coverage: 603, 604, 670; 677, 678, 679
        Comments: Includes visits to agencies, talks by community professionals; community
                        practicum placements
29) Health Psychology
        Coverage: 776; 779
        Comments: Optional Health Dual-specialty
30) History of Psychology
        Coverage: 702, 774, 779
        Comments: Integrated in all courses; special course is optional; 702 offered irregularly.
31) Individual Differences
        Coverage: 640, 65X
        Comments: Focus of all courses.
32) Intellectual/Cognitive Assessment
        Coverage: 671, 672
        Comments: Practicum
33) Learning Principles
        Coverage: 621, 62X, 72X
        Comments: Optional Behavioral Dual-specialty
34) Minority Health Psychology
        Coverage: 774
        Comments: Ethno-cultural Dual-specialty
35) MMPI
        Coverage: 671; 672
        Comments: Practicum
36) Multiple Regression
        Coverage: 612, 613, 614
        Comments: 779
37) Multivariate Statistics
        Coverage: 614; others are optional
        Comments: 779
38) Neuropsychological Assessment
        Coverage: 671, 672, 774
        Comments: Basic Introduction in 671; continued minor treatment in 677, 678, or 679 along
                        with integration with other assessments.
39) Personality Assessment
        Coverage: 671; 672
        Comments: Practicum
40) Professional Issues/APA
        Coverage: 670
        Comments: All clinical courses
41) Psychometric Principles
        Coverage: 616, 617, 671; 719, 774
        Comments:
42) Psychopharmacology
        Coverage: Introduced in 634; optional seminar 731
        Comments: Some focus in 674, 675, 676




                                                  64
43) Research Design
        Coverage: 600
        Comments:
               • Traditional
                    Coverage: 600; 610; 611, 671
                    Comments:
               • Single Subject
                    Coverage: 600; 670, 774
                    Comments:
               • Psychotherapy
                    Coverage: 674, 675, 774
                    Comments:
44) Scientist-practitioner Model
        Coverage: Major introduction in 670; 671; 675
        Comments: Integrated into all courses and into practicum experiences and supervision.
45) Scientific Writing Skills
        Coverage:
        Comments: All courses; stressed in thesis and dissertation.
46) Social Psych
        Coverage: 650
        Comments:




                                                  65
                                        APPENDIX B

              APPROXIMATE CLINICAL PROGRAM COURSE SCHEDULE
                       (WITHOUT A DUAL-SPECIALTY)

FIRST SEMESTER
 Course                                                                      Credit   Cumulative
 Number    Semester and Course Title                                         Hours    Credit Hours
  670      Introduction to Clinical Psychology                                 3*
  671      Introduction to Assessment I                                        3*
  610      Introduction to Quantitative Methods                                3
  779      Research in Clinical Psychology                                    1-3
  XXX      4-Corner course (optional)                                         0-3
                     Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:   10-15       10-15

SECOND SEMESTER
 Course                                                                      Credit   Cumulative
 Number   Semester and Course Title                                          Hours    Credit Hours
  600     Methodological Foundations of Psychology                             3
  672     Introduction to Assessment II                                        3*
  674/676 Child Psychopathology/or Adult Psychopathology                       3*
  611     Design & Analysis of Psychological Experiments (ANOVA)               3
  779     Research in Clinical Psychology                                     1-3
                     Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:   13-15       23-30

THIRD SEMESTER
 Course                                                                      Credit   Cumulative
 Number   Semester and Course Title                                          Hours    Credit Hours
 675      Treatment Research                                                   3
 677/678  Child Practicum/or Adult Practicum                                   3
 673      Introduction to Assessment III: Behavioral Assessment                3
 779      Research in Clinical Psychology                                     1-3
 XXX      4-Corner course                                                      3
                     Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:   13-15       36-45

FOURTH SEMESTER
 Course                                                                      Credit   Cumulative
 Number   Semester and Course Title                                          Hours    Credit Hours
 674/676  Child Psychopathology/or Adult Psychopathology                       3
 677/678  Child Practicum/or Adult Practicum                                   3
 612      Multiple Regression in Beh Res                                       3
 771/772  Child Treatment/Adult Treatment: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy        3
 779      Research in Clinical Psychology                                     1-3
                     Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:   13-15       49-60




                                               66
FIFTH SEMESTER
 Course                                                                                       Credit     Cumulative
 Number    Semester and Course Title                                                          Hours      Credit Hours
  677/678  Child Practicum/or Adult Practicum                                                   3
  779      Research in Clinical Psychology                                                     1-3
  700**    Thesis (Total of 6 credits required, incl. 1 in graduating semester)                 3
  XXX      Statistics course/4-Corner course                                                    3
                           Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:              10-12          59-72

SIXTH SEMESTER
 Course                                                                                       Credit     Cumulative
 Number    Semester and Course Title                                                          Hours      Credit Hours
  677/678  Child Practicum/or Adult Practicum                                                   3
  61X/701  Statistics course                                                                    3
  779      Research in Clinical Psychology                                                     1-3
  700**    Thesis (Total of 6 credits required, incl. 1 in graduating semester)                 3
  XXX      4-Corner course                                                                      3
                           Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:              13-15          72-87

SEVENTH SEMESTER
 Course                                                                                       Credit     Cumulative
 Number.  Semester and Course Title                                                           Hours      Credit Hours
  800**   Dissertation (Repeatable. Total of 1 cr. required in semester of completion           1
  779     Research in Clinical Psychology                                                      1-3
  XXX     4-Corner/Elective/Statistics                                                          6
                           Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:               8-10          80-97

EIGHTH SEMESTER
 Course                                                                                       Credit     Cumulative
 Number   Semester and Course Title                                                           Hours      Credit Hours
  800**   Dissertation (Repeatable. Total of 1 cr. required in semester of completion)          1
  779     Research in Clinical Psychology                                                      1-3
  XXX     4-Corner/Elective/Statistics                                                          6
                           Total semester credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:               8-10         88-107

INTERNSHIP (1 YEAR)
 Course                                                                                       Credit     Cumulative
 Number    Semester and Course Title                                                          Hours      Credit Hours
  778      Internship in Clinical Psychology (1 credit in Fall, 1 credit in Spring)             2
                                        Total credit hours; Cumulative credit hours:                2          90-109***
 *Required before practicum placement (except Respecialization students)
 **At least 1 credit of 700/800 is required in semester of MA graduation and dissertation completion, respectively
 ***Dual-specialty optional courses are not included and are scheduled following consultation with CSP and specialty
      advisors.




                                                          67
                                            APPENDIX C

                         CLINICAL PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE LOG


Student’s name              ______________________________________________________

Semester                    ______________________________________________________

Practicum site(s)           ______________________________________________________

Approved clinical job site(s)______________________________________________________

CSP supervisor(s)           ______________________________________________________

Site supervisor(s)          ______________________________________________________

Date of log submission      ______________________________________________________


All CSP students are required to maintain this Log documenting experience in therapy and other
psychological interventions. Because this Log is a general form, it lists a large number of experiences
one might have had. No student is expected to have experience in all or even most of these areas. See the
last two pages for definitions of terms.




                                                   68
1. Therapy Experience: See Definition Page to complete.

                               Total # of hours     # different individuals,
   a. Individual Therapy       face-to-face         couples, families, or groups

       1.   Adults
       2.   Adolescents
       3.   School-Age
       4.   Pre-School Age
       5.   Infants/Toddlers

   b. Group Therapy: Provide number of groups conducted with each of the following populations
      (Count each group as one unit. For example a group with 12 adults is counted as 1 in #1. Adults,
      below.)

       1.   Adults
       2.   Adolescents
       3.   School-Age
       4.   Pre-School Age
       5.   Infants/Toddlers

   c. Family Therapy (Count each family as one unit---see explanation in group therapy above.)

   d. Couples Therapy (Count each couple as one unit---see explanation in group therapy above.)

            TOTAL of Therapy Hours (a-d): ____________

   e. List types of therapy provided (e.g., systematic desensitization, behavior rehearsal, problem-
      solving, cognitive behavioral therapy)




                                                  69
2. Other Experience
                                                   Total # of hours for each activity
    a.   Psychodiagnostic Testing**                        ____________
    b.   Interview/observation-based assessment            ____________
    c.   Sports Psychology/Performance Enhancement         ____________
    d.   Career counseling                                 ____________
    e.   Medical/Health-related interventions              ____________
    f.   Supervision of other students                     ____________
    g.   Teaching                                          ____________
    h.   Experience with Manage Care Providers (yes/no)    ____________
    i.   Consultation*                                     ____________
    j.   Presentations/Programming*                        ____________
    k.   Program Development                               ____________
    l.   Outcome Assessment                                ____________
    m.   Systems Intervention                              ____________
    n.   Performance Improvement/Quality Improvement____________
    o.   Other (specify)      ______________________________________
    p.   List types of groups led or co-led:




    q.    List specialized practicum experiences (e.g., neuropsychological assessment, sports psychology,
          behavioral medicine, career counseling, etc.):




*Describe psychoeducational programs, consultation activity, and supervision of practicum fully in your
   vita.

**See Test Administration Forms (both Adult and Child/Adolescent) for documentation of number of
   tests administered.




                                                   70
3. Support Activities:

   a. Number of practicum hours spent in activities supporting direct intervention (e.g., chart review,
      literature review, consulting with other professionals about cases, video/audio tape review of your
      own cases, etc.):

   b. Number of practicum hours spent reviewing charts, scoring, interpreting, and writing reports for
      psychological assessment purposes:

           TOTAL OF SUPPORTING HOURS (a-b): ____________

4. Treatment Setting:

   a. Please indicate the number of the following types of therapy clients seen in each of the following
      settings:

                                        TYPE OF SETTING

                                                                University    Dept/School
                                    Hospital     Hospital       Counseling    Psychology
Type of Client           CMHC       Inpatient    Outpatient     Center        Clinic           Other
Individuals
Couples
Families
Groups
Elderly (65+)
Adults (18-64)
Adolescents (13-17)
Children
Infants/Toddlers
Men
Women

5. Supervision you received:

   a. Number of hours spent in one-on-one, face-to-face supervision:
   b. Number of hours of group/class supervision:
   c. Number of hours of peer supervision and case discussion on specific cases:

   Check if you have audio or videotaped clients and reviewed these tapes with your clinical supervisor:
      Audiotape review         Videotape review

       TOTAL SUPERVISION HOURS: ____________.
       TOTAL THERAPY HOURS: ____________.
       TOTAL SUPPORT HOURS: ____________.
       TOTAL SUPERVISION HOURS: ____________.
       TOTAL PRACTICUM HOURS AS OF (GIVE DATE) ________________________.
       TOTAL PRACTICUM HOURS AS OF (GIVE DATE) ________________________.




                                                  71
6. Diversity Experience:

   a. Languages spoken in addition to English (including American Sign Language):

   b. Level of fluency: (Are you fluent enough to conduct psychotherapy/assessment in this
      language?)

   c. Please describe (within 100 words) your experience and training in work with diverse
      populations.
      Please include in your discussion the way an awareness of multicultural/diversity issues
      influences your clinical practice and case conceptualization:

   d. Indicate your degree of clinical experience with the following diverse populations:

       0 = (None)    1 = (1 to 5) patients seen   2 = (6 to 20) patients seen   3 = (20+) patients seen

       African-American             0       1         2        3
       Asian-American (total)       0       1         2        3
       Japanese-American            0       1         2        3
       Chinese-American             0       1         2        3
       Korean-American              0       1         2        3
       Vietnamese-American          0       1         2        3
       Singapore-American           0       1         2        3
       Thai-American                0       1         2        3
       Cambodian-American           0       1         2        3
       Clients with Disabilities    0       1         2        3
       Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual         0       1         2        3
       Latino-a/Hispanic            0       1         2        3
       Hawaiian/Part Hawaiian 0         1         2        3
       Other Pacific Islander       0       1          2       3
       Native American              0       1          2       3
       Mixed                        0       1          2       3
       Other (specify)              0       1          2       3

7. Other Clinical Experiences: (Please describe settings and activities)
   This includes professional work experience separate from practica. Identify using
   the same criteria for therapy hours, support hours, and supervision hours. This form may be
   duplicated to provide that information.




                                                      72
ADULT TEST ADMINISTRATION
(Indicate all instruments used by you in your assessment experience, excluding “practice
administration.” To indicate that you administered, scored, interpreted, and wrote a report for a
test, count in both columns.)

                                                                # Administered    # Reports
Instruments                                                     & Scored          Written
16 PF
Aphasia Screening Exam
Basic Personality Inventory
BASIS
Beck Depression Inventory
Bender Gestalt
Benton Facial Recognition
Benton Judgment of Line Orientation
Benton Visual Retention Test
Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE)
CAI
Campbell Interest and Skill Survey
Category Test (Short or Halstead)
Controlled Oral Word Association Test
CPI-R
Draw-A-Person/H-T-P
Edwards Personal Preference
GATB
Gorham’s Proverbs
Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychology Battery (#Brief, #Full)
Jackson Personality Inventory
Luria Nebraska Neuropsychology Battery
Mattis Dementia Rating Scale
MicroCog (Computer Battery)
Millon Behavioral Health Inventory
Millon Clinical Multi-Axial Inventory (Any version)
MMPI-2 (MMPI)
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
NEO-PI-R
Norris Educational Achievement Test (NEAT)
Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI)
POI
PRF (Personality Research Form-E)
Rey Osterrieth Complex Figure
Rorschach (indicate scoring system used)
Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank
Self-Directed Search (SDS)
Shipley-Institute of Living Scale




                                                73
                                                    # Administered   # Reports
Instruments (continued)                             & Scored         Written
Strong Interest Inventory
TAT
Trail-Making Test
Vocational Card Sorts (e.g., Missouri, etc.)
WAIS-R or III
Wechsler Memory Scale (Revised)
Wide Range Achievement Test III
Wisconsin Card Sorting Test
Word Association Test
Other:




                                               74
How many carefully supervised integrated psychological reports have you written? These would
include: 1) history; 2) interview; 3) objective personality tests; 4) possibly projective personality
tests, and 5) intellectual/cognitive/neuro-screening tests:


                                                       Total # Adult Integrated Reports: ____________


CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENT TEST ADMINISTRATION (Indicate all instruments used by
you in your assessment experience, excluding “practice administration.” To indicate that you
administered, scored, interpreted, and wrote a report for a test, count in both columns.)

                                                                   # Administered     # Reports
Instrument                                                         & Scored           Written
Adaptive Behavior Scales
Batelle Developmental Inventory
Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener (BINS)
Bayley Scales of Infant Development – Second Edition (BSID-II)
Behavioral Assessment Scale for Children (BASC)
Benton Tests of Neuropsychological Abilities
California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)
CAT
Childhood Autism Rating Scale – Revised
Children’s Behavior Checklist (CBCL)
Children’s Category Test (CCT)
Children’s Depression Inventory
Children’s Problem Checklist
Clinical Evaluation of Language Functions (CELF)
Cognitive Functions Checklist
Connors Scales (ADD Assessment)
Continuous Performance Tests (Indicate scoring system used)
Curriculum-Based Mathematics Assessment
Curriculum-Based Reading Assessment
Curriculum-Based Writing Assessment
Denver Developmental Inventory
Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration
Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents (DICA)
Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC)
Differential Ability Scales (DAS)
Direct Observation Scale
Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised
Finger Tapping Test
Goodman Lock Box
Grip Strength Test
Halstead-Reitan




                                                  75
                                                       # Administered   # Reports
Instrument (continued)                                 & Scored         Written
Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC)
Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT)
Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (K-TEA)
Kinetic Family Drawing
Learning Disabilities Evaluation Scale
Leiter International Performance Scale – Revised
Luria Nebraska Children's Revision
Matching Familiar Figures
McCarthy Scales
Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory
Minnesota Child Development Inventory
MMPI-A
Parenting Stress Index
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised
Personality Inventory for Children-Revised
Purdue Pegboard
Raven’s Matrices
Reitan-Indiana
Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scales (RCMAS)
Rey Auditory Verbal Learning
Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS)
Roberts Apperception Test for Children
Rorschach (indicate scoring system used)
School Consultation
School Observation
SCL-90
Seashore Rhythm Test
Sentence Completion Instruments
Social Skills Rating System
Speech-Sounds Perception Test
Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale IV
Stroop Color-Word Test
Structured Behavioral Assessment
Symbol Digit Modalities Test
Symbolic Play Test
Tell Me A Story (TEMAS)
Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales
Visual Motor Integration Test
WAIS-R
Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT)
Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML)
WISC-III
WISC-R




                                           76
                                                             # Administered   # Reports
Instrument (continued)                                       & Scored         Written
Woodcock Johnson Revised Cognitive Scales (WJ-R Cognitive)
Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-Revised (WRMT-R)
Woodcock-Johnson Revised Tests of Achievement (WJ-R
Achievement)
WPPSI-R
Other:




                                              77
How many carefully supervised integrated psychological reports have you written? These would
include: 1) history; 2) interview; 3) objective personality tests; 4) possibly projective personality
tests, and 5) intellectual/cognitive/neuro-screening tests:


                                           Total # Child/Adolescent Integrated Reports: ____________


DEFINITION OF TERMS FOR DOCUMENTING PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE. Only count
hours for which you received formal academic training and credit or program-sanctioned training
experience (e.g., VA summer traineeship).

Practicum hour - A practicum hour is a clock hour. This may actually be a 50-minute client/patient
hour, but is calculated by actual hours, not quarter hours, or semester hours.

1. Therapy Experience – These are actual clock hours in direct service to clients/patients. Hours
   should not be counted in more than one category. These divisions are meant to be mutually exclusive
   and hours should not be double counted across sections. The sum of all the subdivisions should equal
   the Subtotal of Direct Service Hours. Time spent gathering information about the client/patient but
   not in the actual presence of the client/patient is recorded as Supporting Activities (3).

    This section is subdivided by:

    1a-d) Direct face-to-face intervention by number of client(s) (i.e., individuals, couples, families, or
    group units). Count a couple, family, or group as one (1) unit, rather than counting a couple as two or
    a group as six.

2. Other Experience – Formal consultation and primary prevention services rendered which includes
   outreach and psychoeducational activities.

3. Supporting Activities – For students in training, the time spent outside the counseling/therapy hour
   focused on the client/patient is vital learning time. Whether the activity is chart review, process notes
   or video/audio tape review, the time spent contemplating the client and planning interventions is
   necessary for a rich learning process.

    3a) Document the more quantifiable activities of informal consultation with other professionals on
    specific cases and video/audio tape review.

4. Treatment Setting – This section delineates types of treatment modalities (e.g., individual/group and
   setting in which they were seen.

5. Supervision – Supervision is broken into one-to-one, group, and peer supervision.

    5a) Hours are defined as regularly scheduled, face-to-face individual supervision with specific intent
    of dealing with psychological services rendered by the student.

    5b-c) The hours recorded in the group supervision category should be actual hours of group focus on
    specific cases. Many excellent practicum courses incorporate both didactic and experiential




                                                    78
    components in the course activity. While the didactic portion is excellent training, it should not be
    recorded as supervision activity. This may necessitate breaking the hours spent in a practicum course
    into intervention, supervision, and didactic activities by actual course hours. For example, if you
    present on the “Psychosocial Issues of HIV Infection” using examples of cases, it is didactic activity.
    Grand Rounds that consists of in-service education on specific topics would not be considered
    supervision for the purposes of documenting practicum hours. These are highly valued activities, but
    will not count as supervision.

    Supervision is one of the common activities for psychologists regardless of setting. Training in
    supervision is becoming a more common practicum experience. Count the hours of supervised
    supervision rendered by the applicant to less advanced students in the context of teaching supervision
    skills. Time spent in supervision of other students should be counted in the section “Other experience
    2f”

Total Practicum Hours should be the sum of the three subtotals listed that section (1, 3 and 5). These
will be the total practicum completed for the semester indicated.




                                                    79
                                             APPENDIX D

                           PROPOSED CLINICAL POSITION FORM


This form must be completed by all CSP graduate students prior to beginning an outside (non-practicum)
job related to the professional activities of clinical psychology (therapy, assessment, evaluation,
supervision, teaching, training, research). CSP students should not accept such positions without
obtaining program approval. Completed forms should be turned into the Director of Clinical Training.

Student Name:                                                                  Date:
Proposed Position Title:
Agency or Employer:

Duties involved (please be specific – e.g., population with which you will be working, measures you will
be administering, type of therapy/training you will be providing, evaluations/reports you will be
producing, etc.):




Supervision you will be receiving (please specify names, degrees, and license status of supervisors, and
note approximate structure/extent of supervisory oversight):




Approximate hours you will be working:



Training/experience (through CSP or elsewhere) that you consider relevant background toward your
qualification for this position:




                                                    80
                                             APPENDIX E

                     EVALUATION OF PRACTICUM STUDENT FORM


Name of Student _______________________ Name of Supervisor _________________________

Agency _______________________________ Evaluation Period: F Sp Su 20____

Two copies of this form should be filled out separately, one by the student and one by the supervisor.
They should then be discussed jointly by both parties at the end of each semester. The supervisor's
evaluation should be sent to the Associate Director of Clinical Studies following this meeting.

CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX:
[ ]  Student's Own Evaluation
[ ]  Supervisor's Evaluation of Student

        Supervisor's Context for Evaluation (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY)
        ____ Supervision ____ Audiotape        ____ Group Therapy Supervisor
        ____ Co-therapy ____ Observation ____ Other ____________________
        ____ Videotape      ____ Seminar

There are four sections to this evaluation form: I. Professional and Ethical Conduct,
II. Clinical Competence and Performance, III. Use of Supervision, and IV. Open-ended Comments for
Student's Strengths and Recommendations for Professional Growth.

CIRCLE THE MOST APPROPRIATE RATING, using as your reference group pre-doctoral graduate
students in training.

1=      UNSATISFACTORY - behavior that is either consistently problematic or of serious nature. If
        circled, elaborate under "Comments/Recommendations" at end of section, noting behavioral
        changes needed to warrant future satisfactory performance.

2=      MARGINAL - behavior that is problematic but not consistently demonstrated or behavior
        needing improvement but not of serious nature. If circled, elaborate under
        "Comments/Recommendations" at end of section, noting behavioral changes needed to warrant
        satisfactory performance.

3=      SATISFACTORY - refers to behavior considered average or expected for practicum students at
        this level of training

4=      GOOD - refers to behavior that is better than average to very good

5=      EXCELLENT - refers to behavior that is outstanding

NA =    Refers to "Not Ascertained"




                                                    81
I. PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL CONDUCT

                                             Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

  1.   Shows sensitivity to ethical issues        1            2           3         4       5       NA
       and knowledge of APA ethical
       guidelines.

  2.   Demonstrates professional                  1            2           3         4       5       NA
       demeanor, behavior, and attire.

  3.   Shows appropriate role                     1            2           3         4       5       NA
       differentiation. Does not engage
       in activities with client that are
       inappropriate to therapist-client
       relationship.

  4.   Completes commitments in                   1            2           3         4       5       NA
       prompt and professional manner.

  5.   Shows no impairment in                     1            2           3         4       5       NA
       professional functioning as a
       result of emotional interference
       or personal problems (or if
       impaired, seeks professional
       help).


  COMMENTS/RECOMMENDATIONS:




                                                   82
II. CLINICAL COMPETENCE AND PERFORMANCE

  A. ASSESSMENT                               Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

  1.   Able to identify and classify                1           2           3         4       5       NA
       (DSMIV) nature of disorder or
       problem using all DSMIV Axes.

  2.   Appropriately assesses danger of             1           2           3         4       5       NA
       client's behavior to self or others.

  3.   Knows when and how to consult                1           2           3         4       5       NA
       with others and refer.

  4.   Able to apply cognitive and/or               1           2           3         4       5       NA
       behavioral assessment methods.

  5.   Demonstrates knowledge and                   1           2           3         4       5       NA
       skill in administering and
       interpreting psychometric tests
       and/or other assessment measures
       used at this training site.

  6.   Engages in ongoing assessment                1           2           3         4       5       NA
       of problems and treatment
       effectiveness throughout therapy.


  B.   INTERPERSONAL THERAPY
       SKILLS                                 Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

  1.   In regard to agency, has smooth              1           2           3         4       5       NA
       working relationship with other
       treatment team members and is
       aware of agency dynamics.

  2.   In regard to clients, conveys                1           2           3         4       5       NA
       empathy and acceptance.

  3.   Uses questions, reflection, and              1           2           3         4       5       NA
       summarizing statements
       effectively when working with
       clients.




                                                     83
C.   GENERAL THERAPEUTIC
     SKILLS & CONCEPTUAL
     INTEGRATION                           Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

1.   Shows evidence of an organized              1           2           3         4       5       NA
     conceptual understanding of
     client's problem and uses this
     conceptualization to guide
     assessment and/or treatment.

2.   Shows knowledge of empirical                1           2           3         4       5       NA
     literature and theories relevant to
     problem/behavior disorders and
     uses this to guide assessment
     and/or treatment.

3.   Able to respond sensitively and             1           2           3         4       5       NA
     effectively to client resistance or
     negative affect.

4.   Able to summarize and analyze               1           2           3         4       5       NA
     therapy process or important
     aspects of a therapy session.

5.   Keeps regular, clear progress               1           2           3         4       5       NA
     notes containing relevant data
     regarding problem, issues,
     changes, treatment, and goals.

6.   Acknowledges limitations.                   1           2           3         4       5       NA

7.   Acknowledges professional                   1           2           3         4       5       NA
     strengths.


D.   SPECIFIC THERAPEUTIC
     SKILLS                                Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

1.   Demonstrates skill in cognitive             1           2           3         4       5       NA
     interventions.

2.   Demonstrates skill in behavioral            1           2           3         4       5       NA
     interventions.

3.   Demonstrates skill in crisis                1           2           3         4       5       NA
     intervention and suicide
     management.




                                                  84
                                               Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

4.      Demonstrates skill in other
        therapeutic techniques/modalities
        used at this practicum training
        site (please list and rate)

     ___________________________                     1           2           3         4       5       NA

     ___________________________                     1           2           3         4       5       NA

     ___________________________                     1           2           3         4       5       NA


E.      ABILITY TO WORK WITH
        DIVERSE POPULATIONS                    Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

1.      Able to work effectively with                1           2           3         4       5       NA
        persons of both genders; is aware
        of own sex role attitudes and
        impact on others.

2.      Able to work effectively with                1           2           3         4       5       NA
        persons of different racial, ethnic,
        and cultural backgrounds.

3.      Demonstrates respect for clients             1           2           3         4       5       NA
        of differing sexual orientation,
        political or religious values.

4.      Able to work effectively with                1           2           3         4       5       NA
        persons of different age groups.


COMMENTS/RECOMMENDATIONS:




                                                      85
III. USE OF SUPERVISION OR BEHAVIOR IN PRACTICUM

                                          Unsatisfact.   Marginal   Satisfact.   Good Excellent

  1.   Consistent and punctual in               1           2           3         4       5       NA
       attendance.

  2.   Comes prepared with appropriate          1           2           3         4       5       NA
       materials.

  3.   Open and responsive to feedback          1           2           3         4       5       NA
       and suggestions from supervisor.

  4.   Actively participates, raises            1           2           3         4       5       NA
       questions or issues to expand
       knowledge and skills of self (or
       others).

  5.   Accepts responsibility for               1           2           3         4       5       NA
       learning and enlarging body of
       knowledge and experiences.

  6.   Consults supervisor when unsure.         1           2           3         4       5       NA

  7.   Overall quality of work                  1           2           3         4       5       NA
       produced.


  COMMENTS/RECOMMENDATIONS:




                                                 86
IV. ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

  A.   STUDENT'S STRENGTHS




  B.   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STUDENT'S PROFESSIONAL GROWTH




  __________________________________________________   _____________________
  Signature of Practicum Student                       Date



  __________________________________________________   _____________________
  Signature of Practicum Supervisor                    Date

                                                                               Rev. 05/03/05




                                           87
                                              APPENDIX F

                               PRACTICUM SITE EVALUATION

Please fill out this form and return to the Associate Director. The purpose of this form is to monitor
practicum experiences of students and to aid the Clinical Studies Program in future practicum placement
decisions. This form will be turned in only to the Associate Director and no copy will be given to your
site supervisor.


Name                                  ___     Practicum Site ________________________________


1. Total client contact hours in individual/couples/family therapy              __________

2. Total contact hours in group therapy (including psychoeducational)           __________

3. Total client contact hours in assessment                                     __________

4. Total hours of on-site supervision (include group supervision, but not hours
   noted below for case conferences)                                            __________

5. Total research hours                                                         __________

6. Total hours in on-site seminars/workshops                                    __________

7. Total hours in case conference/staffings                                     __________

8. Percent of time devoted to specific populations (can be overlapping %):

        a) Single adult outpatient                              __________
        b) Group                                                __________
        c) Family                                               __________
        d) Marital                                              __________
        e) Adult inpatient                                      __________
        f) Child/adolescent inpatient                           __________
        g) Community consultation                               __________
        h) Individual child outpatient                          __________
        i) Severely mentally ill                                __________
        j) Ethnic/racial minorities                             __________

9. Mean number of sessions per client                           __________

10. Total number of different individuals/families/couples/groups seen in therapy __________

11. Theoretical orientation of supervision     _____________________________________________

                                                 (OVER)




                                                   88
Please use the following scale in answering questions 12-15

                       1                    2               3            4             5
                   not at all                           adequately                thoroughly

12. To what degree were the science and practice of clinical psychology integrated at this practicum site?

         1     2        3       4       5

13. To what degree were assessment and treatment integrated at this practicum site?

         1     2        3       4       5

14. To what extent was this training experience consistent with an emphasis on sensitivity to gender,
    ethnic, and other individual differences?

         1     2        3       4       5

15. If any difficult ethical issues concerning either clients or staff arose during the course of your
    practicum, to what extent do you feel that they were satisfactorily resolved? (If you did have a
    problem in this area, please describe on an additional page).

         1     2        3       4       5       NA

16. If any problems or conflicts arose during the course of your on-site supervision, to what extent do you
    feel that they were satisfactorily resolved? (If you did have a problem in this area, please describe on
    an additional page).

         1     2        3       4       5       NA

17. What do you wish you had known before beginning your training on this practicum site that might
    have made your experience more beneficial? (Please answer on an additional sheet.)

18. Overall rating of the training experience at this practicum site:

              1                     2                   3            4           5
             poor                                    adequate                 excellent

19. Did you get what you hoped you would from this training experience? What, if anything, was
    lacking? What, if anything, exceeded your expectations? Please use an additional sheet.




                                                            89
                                           APPENDIX G

                        SAMPLE LETTER FOR WAIVING COURSES



Date ________________



Dr. ________________________
Director, Clinical Studies Program

Re: Name petition for waiving course ___________________________________

I have examined the materials provided me by ___________________ regarding (course and institution)
and have found that this course satisfies the requirements for ________________________ offered at the
University of Hawai‘i.

Sincerely,



_____________________________
(Name of instructor)

_____________________________
(Director, Clinical Studies Program)

_____________________________
(Chair, Graduate Studies)




                                                  90
                                               APPENDIX H

                                        Clinical StudiesProgram
                                    RESEARCH EVALUATION FORM


Semester/Year: _______________________________________

Student:      __________________________________________________

Evaluator:        __________________________________________________

Context of Evaluation:

      _____ Masters Thesis                 _____ Dissertation
      _____ Research Assistant             _____ Independent Research Project

Please rate the student using the following scale:

      1  = Unsatisfactory
      2  = Satisfactory
      3  = Good
      4  = Excellent
      NA = Not Applicable (e.g., no information, not relevant)


      DIMENSION                                                                 RATING
1.    Ability to function independently
2.    Knowledge of research designs
3.    Research supervisory abilities
4.    Amenability to supervision
5.    Competence in data reduction and analysis
6.    Timely progress (thesis, dissertation)
7.    Degree of research interest, enthusiasm
8.    Writing skills
9.    Collegiality
10.   Reliability, responsibility
11.   Knowledge of content area
12.   Takes initiative
13.   Knowledge of specific methods used (e.g., measures, procedures)

Comments
(Please use back of this page)

                                                                                         (Rev. 06/03)




                                                       91
                                         APPENDIX I

                     Sample Petition for Admission to the PhD Program


Date



Dear Dr _________ (CSP-D):

I am writing to petition the Clinical Studies Program Faculty and the Department Faculty for
admission to the PhD program. Attached is a copy of my curriculum vitae and my current
Student Progress Form for review.

I entered the Clinical Studies Program in ______ (semester and year). I have now completed all
requirements for my Master’s Degree, including course work, practica and my thesis _______
(title and defense date, supervisor). Add a brief statement of your accomplishments while
earning the master’s degree (e.g. publications, professional presentations, GPA, awards,
positive evaluations)

My major area of interest, and one I hope to pursue during doctoral candidacy, is
_____________. I am particularly interested in _______________ and I plan to make this a part
of my dissertation studies. Briefly describe your plans for doctoral studies including
dissertation, advanced training, developing professional competencies, etc. Describe a
timeline you intend to follow, including comprehensive exams, dissertation and internship.

In summary, I think my prior accomplishments and my plans for doctoral study prepare me well
for success as a doctoral student. Thank you for your consideration and review of this petition.

Sincerely,



Student Name




                                               92
                                            APPENDIX J


                                   CSP STUDENT PROGRESS FORM


Academic Year:                2010-11                  Date:

Name:

Address:

City, State, Zipcode:

Home Phone:

Work Phone:

Cell Phone/Other:

E-mail Address:

Year Admitted to CSP

Clinical Advisor:

Optn'l. Dual-specialty:

Dual-specialty Advisor:

• Graduate Status (please "X" one):

        1) Regular

        2) Respecialization

• University Status (please "X" one):

        1) Enrolled

        2) Leave of Absence (Dates):

        3) Graduated M.A. (Date):

        4) Graduated Ph.D. (Date):

• Do you consider yourself subject to the American Disabilities Act?   Yes   No

• What is your ethnic identity?:




                                                  93
                                                  A

                                           COURSES TAKEN

                             F =     Fall         CE =   Currently Enrolled
                             S =     Spring       TR =   Transfer Credit
                             Su =    Summer       W =    Waived

1. CLINICAL COURSES
 Course Number & Title                             Semester/Year    Professor   Grade

 670 Introduction to Clinical Psychology

 671 Introduction to Assessment I

 672 Introduction to Assessment II

 673 Introduction to Assessment III: Beh'l Asst

 674 Child Psychopathology

 675 Treatment Research

 676 Adult Psychopathology

 677 Child Practicum/678 Adult Practicum

 677 Child Practicum/678 Adult Practicum

 677 Child Practicum/678 Adult Practicum

 677 Child Practicum/678 Adult Practicum

 771 Child Treatment/772 Adult Treatment: CBT

 778 Internship in Clinical Psychology

 778 Internship in Clinical Psychology

2. METHODOLOGY & STATISTICS COURSES - 600 and 611 required during first year,
    610 required for MA, one additional for Ph.D., NA = Not Applicable
 Course Number & Title                             Semester/Year    Professor   Grade

 600 Methodological Foundations of Psychology

 610 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

 611 Design & Analysis of Psy Experiments


                                                  94
 612 Multiple Regression in Behavior Res

 613 Factor Analysis

 614 Multivariate Methods

 615 Nonparametric Methods for Beh Sciences

 616 Measurement & Evaluation

 617 Scaling

 719/701 Structural Equation Modeling

3. DUAL-SPECIALTY REQUIRED COURSES (if applicable)
 Course Number & Title                            Semester/Year     Professor            Grade




4. FOUR CORNERS - One 3-hour semester course in 1) biological, 2) social, 3) learning-
     cognitive, and 4) individual (2 required for MA, 2 additional for Ph.D.)
 Course Number & Title                            Semester/Year     Professor            Grade




                                                95
5. ADDITIONAL COURSES
 Course Number & Title              Semester/Year   Professor             Grade




6. LIST INCOMPLETES AND EXPECTED COMPLETION DATES
 Course Number & Title              Semester/Year   Professor             Grade




7. RESEARCH

                                                       Psy
                                                       699/779           Study
 Yr.   Supervisor        Focus                         Cr Hrs.   Grade   Funded?

 1

 2

 3

 4

 5

 6

 7




                                  96
(CONTINUED - 7. RESEARCH)

 8

 9

 10

 11

8. HISTORY & SYSTEMS (NA = Not Applicable)

 Written essay; date passed:
  - or -
 Course (No. & Title):

 Sem/Yr:                                                 Grade:
     - or -
 PSY 699 (Sem/Yr):                                       Grade:
     - or -
 Taught PSY 402 (Sem./Yr.):



                                             B

                               THESIS & DISSERTATION PROGRESS

1. MASTERS THESIS

 Level of Progress                                Date

 Preliminary Conference (Advisor)

 Admission to Candidacy (M.A.)

 Appointment of Committee

 Approval of Topic

 Completion of Proposal Meeting

 Final Oral Examination

 Judgment of Thesis
 (continued on next page)




                                             97
(CONTINUED - 1. MASTER'S THESIS)

 Thesis Advisor
 Thesis Title:




2. DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

 Level of Progress                       Date

 Preliminary Conference (Advisor)

 Admission to Candidacy (Ph.D.)

 Appointment of Committee

 Approval of Topic

 Completion of Proposal Meeting

 Final Oral Examination

 Judgment of Dissertation

 Dissertation Advisor
 Dissertation Title:




                                    98
                                                  C

                                   PRACTICUM PLACEMENTS


NOTE: For Setting Codes, please refer to chart below
                                                                                                       Setting
 Yr.       Placement                           Supervisor(s)                                           Code

 1

 2

 3

 4

 5

 6

 7


                              Setting Codes for Practicum and Internship:

 1   =   Community Mental Health Center                10   =   Correctional Facility
 2   =   Health Maintenance Organization               11   =   School District/System
 3   =   Medical Center                                12   =   University Counseling Center/Clinic
 4   =   Military Medical Center                       13   =   University Teaching Facility
 5   =   Private General Hospital                      14   =   Independent Practice
 6   =   General Hospital                              15   =   Consortium
 7   =   Veterans Affairs Medical Center               16   =   State DOH-AMHD special programs*
 8   =   Private Psychiatric Hospital                  17   =   State DOE/DOH-AMHD/subcontracts*
 9   =   State/County Hospital                         18   =   Other (e.g., consulting); please specify

 *For practicum placements only




                                                  99
                                                    D

                          COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION DATES



 Dates written essay exam was taken and passed:
 - OR -

 Date dossier proposal was approved by doctoral committee:

 Date dossier proposal was approved by clinical faculty:

 List members of doctoral committee:



Indicate the date each Behavioral Objective was passed by the doctoral committee for 3 of the 4
     Professional Activity Domains:
 Domain A - Research (Required)
 Behavioral Objective                                                                      Date Passed



 Domain B - Government Proposals & Policy
 Behavioral Objective                                                                      Date Passed



 Domain C - Teaching
 Behavioral Objective                                                                      Date Passed



 Domain D - Clinical Practice & Consultation
 Behavioral Objective                                                                      Date Passed




                                                   100
                                                       E

                         INTERNSHIP LOCATION AND INFORMATION



Internship Name:

Internship Address:



City, State, Zipcode:

Phone:

E-mail:

Dates of Internship:

1. Was internship APA-approved?

2. Did you receive a stipend?

3. Facilities' funding (e.g., private-for-profit, private-not-for-profit, state/county, VA, military, other

          federal):

4. Did you receive training in empirically-based services?

5. Were you involved in research?

6. Type (e.g., CMHC, HMO, hospital, correctional school, university, independent practice,

          consortium):

7. Setting code (please refer to page 7):

8. How many times did you have to apply for an internship before being placed?


                                                       F

                                            PH.D. CANDIDACY


Date Ph.D. candidacy was approved:




                                                      101
                                                 G

                                    PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES


1. PUBLICATIONS & GRANTS (Provide complete references on an attached cv)
                                        Number Published or Funded   Cumulative Number Published
 Type                                   This Academic Year           or Funded

 Books

 Book Chapters

 Journal Articles

 Technical Reports

 Grants (give agency and amount):



 Other (please specify):



2. TEACHING EXPERIENCE
 Dates (or Terms) of Instruction
  (e.g., Fall, 1999)                    Course Number & Title




                                                102
3. COLLOQUIA, WORKSHOPS, TALKS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS, ETC-
    ATTENDED
 Date Attended              Title




4. COLLOQUIA, WORKSHOPS, TALKS, CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS, ETC. -
       GIVEN
                                            Number Given This
 Type                                       Academic Year               Cumulative Number Given

 Colloquia

 Workshops

 Talks

 Conference Presentations

 Other (please specify):



5. MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
 List Professional Organizations with Which You
 Are a Member or Student Member                     Indicate Honors or Awards




                                              103
6. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
 Type of Funding Received                                            Year(s) Received

 Grant (please specify):

 Scholarship (please specify):

 Teaching Assistant (TA)

 Tuition Waiver (Merit)

 Tuition Waiver (PAS)

 Lectureship

 Graduate Assistant (GA)

 Research Assistant (RA)

 Practicum Stipend

 Other (please specify):

7. CLINICAL SERVICE ACTIVITIES
                                 Please provide a brief description and indicate the year(s) of
 Types                           involvement

 Community

 University/Department/Program

 Consultancies

 Clinical Job

 Clinical Supervision

 Other (Please specify):




                                              104
8. HONORS/AWARDS/GRANTS
 Type                                            Date




                     PLEASE ATTACH A CURRENT CV.
   REVIEW WITH YOUR ADVISOR & SUBMIT TO DIRECTOR OF CLINICAL STUDIES.

                             MAHALO!!!

                                                           (Rev. April, 2001)




                                  105
                                                 APPENDIX K

                              Clinical Comprehensive Examination
                           PROPOSAL OF BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

 Prof'l
Activity                       Brief Description of the
Domain                      Professional Activity Domain                         Proposed Behavioral Objective

DOMAIN A: RESEARCH (REQUIRED)
  A1    Write a review or a theoretical article


   A2       Submit for publication an empirical article to a peer-reviewed
            journal

DOMAIN B: GOVERNMENT PROPOSALS AND POLICY
  B1    Write and submit a grant proposal that conforms to federal
        guidelines

   B2       Track a mental health related bill at the Hawai‘i State
            Legislature – attend hearings, submit and present testimony,
            and provide an analysis of the bills impact and progress

DOMAIN C: TEACHING
  C1    Teach one undergraduate course in psychology or a related
        discipline

   C2       Prepare and give 10 presentations; can include guest lectures,
            conference posters or presentations, and psychology
            workshops

DOMAIN D: CLINICAL PRACTICE AND CONSULTATION
  D1    Prepare a written and oral clinical case conceptualization that
        includes a relevant literature review and measurement
        devices

   D2       Prepare a written proposal to develop and evaluate a
            treatment/prevention program


Student Name: ___________________________________

I approve the above proposal of the three Professional Activity Domain behavioral objectives for fulfillment of the
clinical comprehensive dossier requirements.

Print Name ________________________________ Signature ________________________________________
Date     ___________________________________




                                                        106
                                             APPENDIX L

                                Clinical Comprehensive Examination
                                       EVALUATION FORM

For each Professional Activity Domain (PAD), please: 1) Specify the PAD and Behavior Objective
Option that was met (see next page for a summarized list of options); 2) Have committee members
indicate rating, followed by their signature and date; 3) Make one copy to keep for your own records; and
4) Submit the original form to the Director of Clinical Studies. (Note: The comps committee should
consist of at least two clinical faculty members, preferably those who will serve on the dissertation
committee.)

Name of Student:                                                                 Date:


1) Professional Activity Domain:
    - Behavioral Objective Option:
       Typed or Printed              (Check one):
   Name of Committee Member          Pass    Fail         Signature of Committee Member           Date




2) Professional Activity Domain:
    - Behavioral Objective Option:
       Typed or Printed              (Check one):
   Name of Committee Member          Pass    Fail         Signature of Committee Member           Date




3) Professional Activity Domain:
    - Behavioral Objective Option:
       Typed or Printed              (Check one):
   Name of Committee Member          Pass    Fail         Signature of Committee Member           Date




                                                    107
                                 Summary Listing of Dossier Format Options

The dossier involves successful completion one of the two Behavioral Objective Options (work products) for three
of four Professional Activity Domains (PADs). The PADs are: A) Research; B) Government Proposals and Policy;
C) Teaching; and D) Clinical Practice and Consultation. One PAD of the dossier must include the Research
Domain.

The PADs and the two Behavioral Objective Options (work products) for each are as follows:


        Professional Activity Domain (PAD):                          Behavioral Objective Option:

A. Research (required)                                   A1: Review/Theoretical Article-Submitted
                                                         A2: Empirical Article - Submitted

B. Government Proposals and Policy                       B1: Grant Proposal
                                                         B2: MH Legislation Bill

C. Teaching                                              C1: Undergrad Course
                                                         C2: (10) Presentations

D. Clinical Practice and Consultation                    D1: Clinical Case Conceptualization
                                                         D2: Treatment/Prevention Program Proposal




                                                      108
                                              APPENDIX M

                             Clinical Comprehensive Examination
                         ORAL PRESENTATION EVALUATION FORM

(Professional Activity Domain C: Teaching; Behavioral Objective C2: Prepare and Give 10 Presentations)


Course/Conference/Agency:
Location:
Date:
Speaker:

Please rate the speaker for each of the statements on the following rating scale:

Very Strongly Agree          5
Strongly Agree               4
Agree                        3
Disagree                     2
Strongly Disagree            1
Very Strongly Disagree       0

1. Speaker was well prepared

2. Speaker presented the material in a clear and organized manner

3. Speaker demonstrated mastery of subject matter

4. Speaker displayed enthusiasm for material

5. Speaker communicated respect for students

6. Speaker motivated and inspired students to learn

7. Speaker encouraged class interaction and discussion

8. Speaker encouraged and tolerated differences in opinion

9. Speaker supported and reinforced students

10. Class material will be useful for future scientific and professional activities and responsibilities

11. Handouts/readings were interesting and valuable

12. Assignments/exercises were reasonable in their time demands




                                                     109
APPENDIX N




   110
                                                            APPENDIX O

                                              POSITIVE ACCOMPLISHMENT CHECKLIST

       Please indicate accomplishments of this student by checking those that apply. Add comments as indicated. One or
       more accomplishments will be included in the annual or mid-year evaluation letter to student.

       Student Name:                                                         Advisor:

                                COURSEWORK                                                       Comments
                                                                  Good
                                                              Very good
                                                               Excellent
                                  PRACTICUM                                                      Comments
                                     Positive remarks from supervisors
                               Very positive remarks from supervisors
                                  INTERNSHIP                                                     Comments
                    Success on securing an APA-approved internship
                                     Positive remarks from supervisors
                               Very positive remarks from supervisors
                                    Successful completion of internship
                                     COMPS                                                       Comments
                                     Timely completion of PROPOSAL
                                       Timely completion of DEFENSE
                                     THESIS                                                      Comments
                                     Timely completion of PROPOSAL
                                       Timely completion of DEFENSE
                                DISSERTATION                                                     Comments
                                     Timely completion of PROPOSAL
                                       Timely completion of DEFENSE
                                   RESEARCH                                                      Comments
Contributions to research other than as RA or own thesis/dissertation
                                 Your developing program of research
                           SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES                                                  Comments
      Membership (active involvement) in professional organizations
          Recent/continuing scholarly productivity (e.g. papers, pubs)
       Participation in other scholarly activities (e.g. journal reviewer)
                                                   Honors/awards/grants
                                COLLEGIALITY                                                     Comments
Helpful support for other students (e.g. peer support, mentoring, etc)
              Helpful contribution to the functioning of the department
                                                   (e.g. committee work)


                                                      (continued on next page)




                                                                    111
PERSONAL/PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT & DEVELOPMENT                         Comments
   Positive attitude toward graduate school and own learning
                  Your nice integration of science and practice
                   Ability to productively incorporate feedback
                    Continued progress after earlier difficulties
 Efforts to advance education via attending talks, workshops,
                                         conferences, colloquia
                          MISC./OTHER                               Comments
                                Your development as a teacher
                    Strong performance as graduate assistant
                          Your progress on your dual specialty
                                          Other (please specify)




                                                          112
                                              APPENDIX P

                                    Sample Petition of Dual-specialty


Date



Dear Clinical Studies Program Faculty:

I am writing this letter to petition the Clinical Studies Program (CSP) faculty for approval in the dual-
specialty training option in the specialty of Serious Mental Illness/Psychosocial Rehabilitation
(SMI/PSR). This specialization and petition is under the supervision and support of Stephen Haynes,
Ph.D.

Goals of the SMI/PSR Specialty

The SMI/PSR specialty training focuses on adults with Serious Mental Illnesses. The goal of the training
is that through clinical practice and research, students will gain expertise in the assessment and treatment
of these individuals as well as achieve an in-depth understanding in conducting research with this
population.

Requirements for the Specialty

The requirements for this specialty include a minimum of three content courses (9 credit hours) specific to
the specialty, a minimum of two research courses (6 credit hours), and the completion of two years
practicum experience with the Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD).

         Content Course Requirement. With respect to the course requirement, I have completed the
required 3 seminars that focused on the topic of SMI/PSR. Specifically, I completed PSY 774 Culture and
Psychology in Public Mental Health (Deborah Altschul, Ph.D.) and PSY 774 Forensic Clinical
Psychology (Keith Claypoole, Ph.D.) These courses provided insight into factors that should be taken into
consideration when working with adults with Serious Mental Illnesses. In particular, Dr. Altschul’s
course focused on the importance of culture (our own as well as the consumer’s) when working within the
public mental health system. We had the opportunity to attend various cultural events and examined
specific cultures with respect to the conceptualization of mental health as well as treatment. Dr.
Claypoole’s course provided an overview of forensic issues that many consumers face. The course also
highlighted specific programs that target consumers with legal issues (e.g., Mental Health Court). We also
had the opportunity to complete a forensic risk assessment with an AMHD consumer. The third seminar I
completed was PSY 731 Psychopharmacology (Adrian Dunn, Ph.D.). This course provided an overview
of psychiatric medications and highlighted the mechanisms of action behind medications often prescribed
to consumers (e.g., anti-depressants, mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics). Continuing my interest in
this specialty, I am currently enrolled in PSY 774 Program Evaluation (John Steffen, Ph.D.), a research-
based course that focuses on the application of evaluation methods.

        Research Course Requirement. Upon admission to the Clinical Studies Program in August, 2002,
I worked closely with the AMHD, specifically the Mental Health Services Research, Evaluation, and
Training Program (MHSRET), and faculty who held joint appointments with the AMHD and the CSP
including, Deborah Altschul, Ph.D. (faculty advisor), John Steffen, Ph.D., and A. Michael Wylie, Ph.D. I



                                                    113
have completed 21 credit hours of directed research (PSY 699) and 6 hours of thesis research (PSY 700).
This research was completed with the MHSRET Program under the advisement of Deborah Altschul,
Ph.D. I completed by Master’s thesis, which involved conducting a fidelity assessment on a local
Supported Employment program. I was also involved in writing technical reports and supervised the
Consumer Assessment Team in a project that assessed consumers’ knowledge of Hawaii’s Mental Health
Advance Directive law. I also authored a federally-funded grant that brought funds to Hawaii for a
conference that focused on Evidence-Based Practices.

          Practicum Experience in the Adult Mental Health Division. I completed 3 years of clinical
practicum with the AMHD, with 2 years at the Hawaii State Hospital (HSH) and one year at the Diamond
Head Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). During my first year at HSH (2003-2004), under the
supervision of Frederic Manke, Ph.D. and Kim Meyer, Ph.D., I was involved in co-facilitating courses in
the treatment mall. These courses involved occupational therapy, as I am interested in employment for
consumers, and symptom and medication management. During the second semester, I was involved with
the Behavioral Assessment Team, a referral-based program that uses assessment, intervention
development, and implementation to decrease problem behaviors displayed by hospital patients. During
my second year at HSH (2004-2005), I was involved in neuropsychological assessments under the
supervision of Daryl Fujii, Ph.D. These assessments involved patient assessment, test scoring, and
completion of comprehensive reports that included test results and treatment recommendations. I also co-
facilitated cognitive remediation groups in the acute unit. During my third year of practicum (2006-2007),
I worked at the Diamond Head CMHC. Under the supervision of Marcia Deaton, Ph.D., I conducted
eligibility assessments, co-facilitated a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy group, and provided individual
therapy. Eligibility assessments consisted of interviewing individuals who were interested in receiving
mental health services from the State. The assessments involved determining eligibility for services (i.e.,
meeting a diagnosis of a serious and persistent mental illness), and writing a report with the eligibility
decision and relevant background information.

I believe these opportunities have provided me with invaluable experience and knowledge in the areas of
Serious Mental Illness and Psychosocial Rehabilitation. This training option requires 3 seminars, 6 credits
of directed research, and 2 years of practicum with the AMHD. As outlined above, I have completed the
requirements necessary for this option and respectfully ask the CSP faculty to consider my petition for
dual-specialization in the area of SMI/PSR. Thank you for your time and consideration.


Sincerely,



(Student's Name)

c: (Name of Advisor)




                                                   114

				
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