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March 2011 CUGLAT

Paper EC1 – Supporting information (NB This document is 15 pages)



Articulation of BSc (Hons) Applied Sports Science with Republic Polytechnic
Singapore
Articulation of BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation management with Republic
Polytechnic Singapore

                                 The University of Edinburgh

                          The Moray House School of Education

                                      Board of Studies
                                         10.11.10

Draft articulation of BSc (Hons) Applied Sport Science with Republic
Polytechnic Singapore

Brief description of the paper

The paper proposes a new agreement with Republic of Singapore to allow selected
students who have successfully completed their 3-year Diploma of Sport and Exercise
Science to enter year 3 of the BSc (Hons) Applied Sport Science at University of
Edinburgh to study for two years to achieve a honours degree from University of
Edinburgh in Applied Sport Science.

Action requested

For approval

Resource implications

Does the paper have resource implications? Yes

Additional income stream to the School of up to approx £150000/yr depending on number of
students recruited

If „Yes‟, in which section(s) of the paper are they described?

Risk assessment

Does the paper include a risk analysis? No

Equality and diversity

Does the paper have equality and diversity implications? No

Freedom of information
Can this paper be included in open business? Yes

Any other relevant information

Approved by School UGSC at its meeting on 21 October 2010 for recommendation to Board
of Studies. Approved by Board of Studies convener‟s action 18 February 2011 for
recommendation to CUGLAT.

Originator of the paper

Dr Simon Coleman, Programme Director BSc (Hons) Applied Sport Science.


Request from the School of Sports, Health and Leisure, Republic Polytechnic,
Singapore re articulation with the B.Sc. (Hons.) Applied Sport Science at the
University of Edinburgh

From:           John Sproule (Head of the Institute of Sport, Physical Education and
                Health Sciences)
Date:           27th September 2010


Introduction
Republic Polytechnic opened in 2003 and is the fifth polytechnic in Singapore. One of
the distinguishing features of Republic Polytechnic‟s education system is its unique
adaptation of Problem Based Learning. Republic Polytechnic‟s key objective is to add
value to each student‟s intellectual make-up in terms of problem-solving process
skills, life-long learning attitude and ready-to-use knowledge, as the student
progresses to become a diploma holder. Graduates will be knowledgeable team
players who have acquired skills necessary to handle situations, tackle problems and
complete tasks in a knowledge-driven environment. The Republic Polytechnic
embraces technology in every aspect of campus life and they have a Learning Online
Environment to prepare their students well in advance for the IT dependent modern
workplace.

The School of Sports, Health and Leisure
The School of Sports, Health and Leisure at the Republic Polytechnic is committed to
grooming suitably qualified professionals for the growing sports and leisure industry
in Singapore. They have a vision of becoming the leading educator in Singapore for
the sports, health and leisure industry, and this demands that their programmes are
both academically rigorous and industry relevant. Their mission is to nurture students
to be industry ready professionals, through innovative curriculum and research and
developments, in partnerships with stakeholders. They are attempting to do this using
innovative problem based learning approaches, involvement in industry-related R&D
projects, and a holistic individual development roadmap which seeks to prepare
students to be professionals for the sports and leisure industry. With Singapore aiming
to be one of the top ten sporting nations in Asia, there is a demand for sports science
specialists to help advance the performance of competitive athletes. Further, the
growing fitness and wellness industry in Singapore is creating demand for well
trained fitness and personal trainers. The School of Sports, Health and Leisure
endeavours to actively pursue collaborations with industry, by cultivating strong ties
with key industry drivers in Singapore through a programme of staff attachments,
joint research and development projects, as well as the establishment of cutting-edge
laboratories.

The language of instruction at Republic Singapore is English, so the students are
expected to have a good ability to debate and write in the language already.
Nevertheless, this will be tested at interview and competence will be made a condition
of entry, so that any weaker students can be required to take IELTS tuition or to
follow a course in IALS prior to the programme in I-SPEHS.

Integration between Republic Polytechnic, Singapore and University of
Edinburgh
                      B.Sc. (Hons) Applied Sport Science


It is proposed that selected Republic Polytechnic students who have studied and
passed the 3-year Diploma in Sport and Exercise Sciences should be able to enter the
University of Edinburgh B.Sc. (Hons) Applied Sport Science at the start of Year 3.

The Singapore students would then follow the same courses and programme as
University of Edinburgh students, but with the only exit point being at Year 4
(Honours Degree). The students would exit with B.Sc. (Hons) in Applied Sport
Science from University of Edinburgh (and not a joint degree with Republic
Polytechnic).

The Diploma in Sports and Exercise Sciences at Republic Polytechnic has very
similar learning outcomes and content as the first two years of the Applied Sport
Science programme, and thus Singaporean students would be well-prepared for entry
into the honours courses in Applied Sport Science. A similar integration already exists
between Singapore and University of Queensland and Royal Melbourne Institute of
Technology, when the Republic Polytechnic students enter into Year 3 of four-year
Undergraduate programmes.

Year 1 of the Edinburgh Applied Sport Science degree consists of Sport Science 1A
and 1B (consisting of Exercise Physiology, Skill Acquisition, Sport Psychology and
Biomechanics), Sport and Social Context 1A and 1B and 40 credits of options from
any part of the University. Sport Science 1A and 1B would be covered by the
specialist module units that are studied in Singapore (Sports and Exercise Physiology,
Human Motor Development Sports and Exercise Psychology, Sports and Exercise
Biomechanics), and the topics within Sport and Social Context 1A and 1B would be
covered within the Republic Polytechnic‟s Sociology of Sports and Leisure, Inclusive
Physical Activity and Sports Administration modules.

In Year 2 of the Applied Sport Science programme, present students study Sport
Science 2A and 2B (consisting of Exercise Biochemistry, Skill Acquisition, Sport
Psychology and Anatomy), Sport Science 2C and 2D (Biomechanics, Information
Technology and Research Methods) and 40 further option credits. The first 2 courses
would be covered in Singapore by the modules listed in the paragraph above, with the
addition of the units in Anatomy and Physiology and Molecular and Cell Biology.
Sport Science 2C and 2D would be covered by those units in Sports and Exercise
Biomechanics, Introduction to Communication Practice and the Project modules.

It is acknowledged that the „core‟ sport science disciplines (Exercise Physiology, Skill
Acquisition, Sport Psychology and Biomechanics) are covered in both Year 1 and
Year 2 at the University of Edinburgh, and Republic Polytechnic has only single
modules in each of these areas. However, communication with the Republic
Polytechnic course director has ascertained that students cover 40-60 hours of content
in each of these modules – the same amount in each discipline that is covered over 2
years at Edinburgh.

Although there is currently a Year 3 exit point for BSc (Ordinary) Applied Sport
Science students, this would NOT be available for Republic Polytechnic students.

Entry requirements and process
The entry requirements to the Republic Polytechnic would normally include 26 points
or better for the net ELR2B2 aggregate score (English Language, 2 relevant subjects
and two other best subjects). This would be equivalent to GCSE English language
with two relevant subjects being the Science subjects.
The entry requirement to the Edinburgh BSc (Hons) Applied Sport Science for the
Republic Polytechnic students would be a grade point average of at least 3.40 (from
4.00). Given the small numbers envisaged, it would be expected that students
accepted for study at Edinburgh would have grades significantly above 3.40.
The Singapore students would complete an application form (not UCAS, but a
bespoke form) which would be submitted to the CHSS UG Admissions Office by end
January. This would also provide evidence of the English language ability. Any
applicant with a strong academic profile whose English (oral or written) was below
the equivalent of IELTS 5.5 score would be required to undertake an English
Language class in Singapore or in IALS, prior to joining the third (junior honours)
year of the B.Sc. (Hons.) Applied Sports Science.
B.Sc. (Hons.) Applied Sport Science staff member(s) would sift the forms and also
interview prospective students prior to acceptance (in March/April). By then, the
students would have received their second year results, and so the actual GPA results
would be available, and firm offers could be made. At the same time, the staff would
be able to provide pre-departure information for successful students.

Fees and Visas
The Singapore students would pay the current international fee rate for the two years
of study at Edinburgh. Students who are not EU or EEA nationals must obtain either a
visa or prior entry clearance in order to come to the UK as a student.

Accommodation
Once the students at Republic Polytechnic have firmly accepted an offer, they will be
eligible to apply for University accommodation. They will be guaranteed a place in
University accommodation for the first year of study at Edinburgh

Cohort Size
There are currently 150 students on the Diploma in Sport and Exercise Sciences, and
large numbers would not be able enter University of Edinburgh programmes.
Therefore, only a small number of the highest calibre students will be accepted for
entry at Edinburgh. The Applied Sport Science Programme currently recruits 45
students/year, although the 2010 target has recently been reduced to 25. There is so
far no indication if this is a temporary or permanent reduction and so exact numbers
for the proposed integration cannot be suggested until further details are known of
future targets for home students. A current best guess is a entry cohort (from
Singapore) in 2011 in single figures, building up to perhaps 15 p.a.

In conclusion, the proposal for integration has the following benefits for University of
Edinburgh;

        An income stream independent of home-funded students, thus increasing the
         number of International Undergraduate students.
        An important link to an emerging market for UK Universities
        Chances for Applied Sport Science students to mix with students from another
         culture and widen their experience
        The possibility of further integration with Republic Polytechnic in other
         programmes at Moray House School of Education.

Conclusion
This presents an opportunity to meet the following strategic objectives:

        Increase number of International undergraduate students
        Produce an income stream that would support research and staffing for BSc
         ASS
        The programme has an opportunity to be proactive in engaging with an
         overseas institution that already has established contacts with RMIT and the
         University of Queensland.

John Sproule,
(Head of the Institute of Sport, Physical Education and Health Sciences)
School of Education
September 2010.

Appendix

Examples of the types of questions I explored with Dr Michael Koh and Mr Abdul
Kahlid

1. …Where within your existing modules do you cover 'research methods'?

“There is no research methods module in our programme. However, students
complete final year project module which is a 15 week module that requires students
to partake a research/ study in a team, with individual research/study results and
report as deliverable that is supervised by our academic staff on the research topic that
is aligned with the research roadmap of the diploma programme. In the 15 weeks, the
supervisors will address research method contents so that students submit an
individual report and are able to present a poster which are deliverables that will be
assessed.”

2.   How many hours per week and how many weeks per module and per elective?
“In a week, students complete 4-5 modules, which is inclusive of elective. Each
module per day is 4 hours of contact time with our academic staff and 2 hours of self
study/ research, i.e. in total 6 hours. This 6 hours can be a combination of class
contact and laboratory session. Each module runs for 15 weeks, hence each module is
60 hours of contact time with academic staff in class and 30 hours of self study/
research (includes lab sessions). This is not inclusive of the time students put in for
pre-reading of materials given to them before each class is commenced. Typically that
would be a minimum of 1 hour per module (if over 15 weeks, its 15 hours minimum
of pre-reading)”

3.   How many students do you have on each of your Diploma Courses?

“Student numbers are as follows:
Diploma in Sports and Exercise Sciences –                           150 students
Diploma in Sports and Leisure Management –                          210 students
Diploma in Outdoor and Adventure Learning –                         100 students
Diploma in Health Management and Promotion (new in 2010) –          50 students”

4. What are your entry requirements relative to English 'A' levels (e.g. our minimum
at Edinburgh for entry to Applied Sports Science is 280 points from English 'A'
levels)?

“All Government Polytechnic in Singapore‟s entry requirements for English is a O
level English requirement. So similarly, for our programmes, the English „O‟ level is
the requirements for entry. While they are here, they complete a year 1 module on
Communications.”

5. Can you clarify re Queensland University & RMIT - do your Singaporean
students enter into year 4 or year 3 or year 2?

 “Our students are admitted into year 3 of the 4 yrs programme (with honours) at the
University of Queensland and year 3 at RMIT” (Australia).
                                 The University of Edinburgh

                          The Moray House School of Education

                                      Board of Studies

                                      9 February 2011

Draft articulation of BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management with Republic
Polytechnic Singapore

Brief description of the paper

The paper proposes a new agreement with Republic of Singapore to allow selected
students who have successfully completed their 3-year Diploma of Sport and Leisure
Management to enter third year of the BSc (Hons) at University of Edinburgh to study
for two years to achieve an Honours degree from University of Edinburgh in Sport
and Recreation Management

Action requested

For approval

Resource implications

Does the paper have resource implications? Yes

Additional income stream to the School of up to approx £100,000 depending on number of
students recruited

If „Yes‟, in which section(s) of the paper are they described? Section 4

Risk assessment

Does the paper include a risk analysis? No

Equality and diversity

Does the paper have equality and diversity implications? Yes – section 2.3.

Freedom of information

Can this paper be included in open business? Yes

Any other relevant information

Approved by School UGSC at its meeting on 20 January 2011 for recommendation to Board
of Studies. Approved by Board of Studies convener‟s action for recommendation to
CUGLAT.

Originator of the paper

Sharon Clough
Programme Director B.Sc. (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management
BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management/Republic Polytechnic Singapore
Diploma in Sports and Leisure Management – Proposal for 2011 entry

1. Introduction
It is proposed that suitable students with the RP Diploma in Sport and Leisure
Management (DSLM) could be considered for entry in 2011 into third year of the BSc
(Hons) Sport and Recreation Management (SRM) Programme and, with successful
completion of 240 credits, would qualify for an Honours degree. The RPP students
would exit with BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management from University of
Edinburgh, not a joint degree with Republic Polytechnic.
The Singapore students would follow the same courses and programme as University
of Edinburgh students.

2. Rationale
The rationale for the DSLM appears to be similar to the BSc SRM programme in that
it provides students with opportunities to develop a set of core and specific skills and
specialised knowledge in developing both local and international sports initiatives and
leisure programmes.

2.1 The DSLM is a three year programme of study and there are 210 students on the
    RP Diploma Sport and Leisure Management, their largest cohort.
2.2 In mapping the two Programmes (section 6) it is evident that the content and
    learning outcomes of modules in the first two non-Honours years are very similar
    to those of the BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management. The benefit to RP
    students would be to extend their knowledge and understanding to Honours level
    with an academically rigorous two year programme of study.
2.3 The proposal is that DSLM students would take the third year and fourth year
    courses of BSc SRM Programme fully integrated with the cohort. This presents an
    opportunity for SRM undergraduates to mix with students from another culture
    and widen their experience, particularly as the Programme focuses on global
    issues and emerging markets in sport fourth year courses. It would increase the
    diversity of undergraduates in this area and contribute to the internationalisation
    of the School. The staff team have six years experience delivering the M.Sc Sport
    and Recreation Business Management, that predominantly recruits international
    students.

3. Courses 2011-12
3.1
Year 3
Sociology of Sport 3 – 20 credits
Strategic Sport and Recreation Management 3 – 20 credits
Social Policy and Sport 3 – 20 credits
Sports Development 3 – 20 credits
Coaching Children 3 – 20 credits
Advanced Research Methods 3– 20 credits

Year 4
Dissertation - 40 credits
Social History of Sport 4 – 20 credits
Sport in Global Contexts 4 – 20 credits
Sport Performance Indicators, Measurement and Management 4 – 20 credits
Sport, Media and Society 4 – 20 credits


3.2 This proposal requires some minor revisions to the BSc SRM programme that are
being made to respond to TPR 2009. The main revision is to move Placement back to
semester 2 of the second year to the non-Honours programme. This would enable RP
students to enter a taught Programme. RP students complete an Industrial Orientation
Programme (IOP) and Professional Profiling (PP) as part of the DSLM. The
integration of RP DSLM students with BSc SRM students would not entail the
introduction of any new courses that would require validation. Any new courses
developed as part of the Programme Review and would, if validated, add to option
choices.


4. Resources
The BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management current intake is 20 students
(including overseas) into first year with an exit number of 18-20.

A viable entry cohort from Singapore in 2011, given current staff resources, would be
in single figures, building to approximately 5-10 per annum. This number would be in
proportion with the existing cohort and would be feasible given the impact of extra
students for dissertation supervision.

There are currently 210 students on the DSLM, and large numbers would not be able
to enter University of Edinburgh programmes. Therefore, only a small number of the
highest calibre students will be accepted for entry at Edinburgh.

Numbers on each course would be increased in line with the numbers of Singaporean
students involved, but the Honours groups are relatively small and have the capacity
to accommodate Applied Sport Science, visiting International students and non-
programme students who already choose SRM courses as options and are taught
successfully with Programme students.

There would be an orientation programme introducing DSLM students to Sport
Management during induction week. This would be arranged with entrants to BSc
ASS and the International office.

5. Articulation
From the following DSLM module descriptors, which are mapped against the BSc
SRM core course titles in red), it appears that they more than adequately cover key
areas of BSc SRM.
Some modules include principles related to Asia, e.g. Asian sport events, structure of
sport in Singapore, which will be very useful in extending home students‟
understanding of sport in other countries. This is already recognised as a benefit of
current overseas students on the programme from the USA, Japan, Russia and visiting
students to the University from New Zealand, Australia and the US taking SRM
courses.
6. DSLM Core modules

6.1 General modules aim to help prepare the ground for generic skills that cover
cognitive thinking processes, communication skills, entrepreneurial concepts and
skills, mathematical methods, science and marketing concepts, as well as a web and
new media design.
Discipline-specific modules focus on developing knowledge of Sports and Leisure
Management
Specialisation-specific modules are designed to deepen understanding of the specific
area within Sports and Leisure Management.

The General modules are important skill development with similar content to BSc
SRM PDP. The 3 DSLM Discipline –specific modules in Health and Well Being,
Inclusive Physical activity and Sociology of Sport cover important areas of non –
Honours core courses in BSc SRM.

6.2 The Specialisation modules outlined below with descriptors from the RP web
site are similar to first and second year BSc SRM content.

6.2.2 Entrepreneurial skills – year 1 Organisation Behaviour and Financial
Management
“This includes the importance of understanding self, team, leadership and motivation,
and the key factors in the organisation‟s environment that impact on how managers
and organisations work. In addition, this module also seeks to provide the basic
personal financial skills for individuals in the society. All these are achieved through
the examination of different approaches beginning with the individual (micro) level
through to the organisational (macro) level.”

6.2.3 Sport Business - year 1 Introduction to Sport Management
“This module explores the business aspects in sports and contrasts the sporting
climate in Singapore against other global players. Students will be introduced to
financial and economic issues that govern decision-making in sports, and learn about
the importance of “positioning” for sporting organizations. Students will learn how
sports businesses create value, and how they manage opportunities and threats in the
global environment. Topics include business in: sports media, sports tourism, event
sponsorship, and player endorsement.”

6.2.4 Sociology of Sport - year 1 Sport in Social Context: Contemporary Issues
“This module examines the social factors that influence behaviour within the sports
and leisure industry in modern society. Issues covered include attitude formations
and change, conformity, persuasion, personal behaviour, gender participation,
aggression and violence in sports, impact of media on modifying behaviour, and
factors affecting participation in sports and physical activity.”

6.2.5 Sport Administration – year 1 Sport in Social Context: Historical and
Organisational Development
“This module seeks to address issues pertaining to the administration of associations
and organizations established to promote and develop sports within the community,
from the grassroots to elite sports (e.g. NOCs, SSC, NSAs, CDCs, clubs). Students
will develop a working knowledge on the different national sports policies used by
different countries, with emphasis on the vision to create Team Singapore. Topics will
include the constitution, organizational decision making process, administrative
functions and sources of funding of sports and recreational associations and
organizations.”

6.2.6 Sports Facilities Management – year 2 Operations Management
“This module aims to offer an understanding of how events are conceptualized and
managed. Complementing this would be an understanding of the use of different
types of venues and facilities in supporting the hosting of sports events. Learners will
be introduced to the processes of event management. Areas will include planning,
marketing, budgeting, risk assessment, legal implications and operations. Learners
will also gain an appreciation of facilities as event venues. These will include its
structure, limitations and operations.”

6.2.7 Marketing – year 2 Sport Marketing, Sponsorship and Events Management
“The marketing function will conceptualise, execute, price, promote and distribute
their products. Students will be exposed to promotion and advertising, market
research, consumer behaviour, distribution, branding, pricing and writing marketing
proposals. Newer marketing techniques such as e-mail marketing, network marketing,
and internet advertising will also be covered.”

6.2.8 Sport and the Law – year 2 Operations Management
“The module provides an introduction to the legal considerations linked to sports and
leisure initiatives. You will learn about the legal framework governing sports and
leisure, resolution of contractual disputes, mediation and the role and jurisdiction of
the court of arbitration for sports. You will also address key issues on the
establishment and protection of rights, antitrust law, intellectual property rights,
contract negotiations and transactional skills, with particular focus on its impact in
Asia.”

6.2.9 Events Logistics and Facilities Management – year 2 Marketing,
Sponsorship and Events Management
“This module will help students to understand the principles and practices relating to
planning, managing and staging of events, with the emphasis on event-related
operations. Students will learn to appreciate the impact of time frames, pre-event
preparation, on-site management and post-event requirements in relation to the
different scales and intended target groups of events. It is designed to provide students
with the necessary skills to work in the events management sector and to fully
understand the importance of a successfully-run event through interactive discussions,
presentations, site visits and actual experience in executing an event via JIVE Fiesta.
Topics include: Introduction of event logistics and the event team, developing en
event framework and proposal, formulating the event branding, developing an
effective program, pre-event planning and logistical arrangements, managing onsite
operations, post-event evaluations, usage of IT applications in events and engaging in
environmental planning.”

6.2.10 Leisure Organisations and Issues – year 1 Introduction to Management
“This module addresses issues surrounding the establishment of leisure enterprises
and activities. It covers factors that affect the set up, operations and sustainability of
leisure organizations, including the impact of government decisions and policies,
social impact, scalability and extension of services that these organizations can offer.
This module will also explore the need to adopt a multi-platform approach to evaluate
the hosting of international programmes within the Asian region. Other key
components include quality management, environmental audit, performance tracking
and legal aspects.”

6.2.11 Industrial Orientation Programme (IOP) and Professional Profiling (PP) -
SRM Placement
“It is a compulsory module where students will profile a subject/topic. The subject or
topic should discuss aspects of a company, a business, technology, industry sector, a
strategic issue/problem, case study, or an area of a fundamental, industrial or an
applied nature. Student is expected to be able to diligently research, critically analyse
and creatively reflect on the factors and dynamics that drive the chosen profiled
subject/topic using analytical tools or theories that are known or explored. The
programme aims to develop students‟ personal development skills, career enrichment
skills and discernment skills with appropriate level of engagement with industry or
professionals. To pass this module, students will have to submit a final report and give
a presentation on their findings in front of a panel of assessors.”

7. Entry requirements and process
The entry requirements to the Republic Polytechnic would normally include 26 points
or better for the net ELR2B2 aggregate score (English Language, 2 relevant subjects
and two other best subjects). This would be equivalent to GCSE English language
with two relevant subjects being the Science subjects.
The entry requirement to the Edinburgh BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation
Management for the Republic Polytechnic students would be a grade point average of
at least 3.40 (from 4.00). Given the small numbers envisaged, it would be expected
that students accepted for study at Edinburgh would have grades significantly above
3.40.
The Singapore students would complete an application form (not UCAS, but a
bespoke form) which would be submitted to the CHSS UG Admissions Office by end
January. This would also provide evidence of the English language ability. Any
applicant with a strong academic profile whose English (oral or written) was below
the equivalent of IELTS 5.5 score would be required to undertake an English
Language class in Singapore or in IALS, prior to joining the third (junior honours)
year of the BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management.
BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management staff member(s) would sift the forms
and also interview prospective students prior to acceptance (in April). By then, the
students would have received their second year results, and so the actual GPA results
would be available, and firm offers could be made. At the same time, the staff would
be able to provide pre-departure information for successful students.

8. Fees and Visas
The Singapore students would pay the current international fee rate for the two years
of study at Edinburgh. Students who are not EU or EEA nationals must obtain either a
visa or prior entry clearance in order to come to the UK as a student.
9. Accommodation
Once the students at Republic Polytechnic have firmly accepted an offer, they will be
eligible to apply for University accommodation. They will be guaranteed a place in
University accommodation for the first year of study at Edinburgh

10. Conclusion
This presents an opportunity to meet the following strategic objectives:

      Increase number of International undergraduate students in line with School
       Strategy
      Produce an income stream that would support the staffing base for BSc SRM
      An important link to an emerging market for UK Universities
      The programme has an opportunity to be proactive in engaging with an
       overseas institution that already has established contacts with RMIT and the
       University of Queensland
      Enable DLSM students to start at the same time as Sport Science students
       from Singapore
      Maximise opportunities for cultural exchange with overseas students from an
       emerging economy.

Sharon Clough
Programme Director
BSc (Hons) Sport and Recreation Management
December 2010.
Appendix 1

Examples of the types of questions I explored with Dr Michael Koh and Mr Abdul
Kahlid

1. …Where within your existing modules do you cover 'research methods'?

“There is no research methods module in our programme. However, students
complete final year project module which is a 15 week module that requires students
to partake a research/ study in a team, with individual research/study results and
report as deliverable that is supervised by our academic staff on the research topic that
is aligned with the research roadmap of the diploma programme. In the 15 weeks, the
supervisors will address research method contents so that students submit an
individual report and are able to present a poster which are deliverables that will be
assessed.”

2.   How many hours per week and how many weeks per module and per elective?

“In a week, students complete 4-5 modules, which is inclusive of elective. Each
module per day is 4 hours of contact time with our academic staff and 2 hours of self
study/ research, i.e. in total 6 hours. This 6 hours can be a combination of class
contact and laboratory session. Each module runs for 15 weeks, hence each module is
60 hours of contact time with academic staff in class and 30 hours of self study/
research (includes lab sessions). This is not inclusive of the time students put in for
pre-reading of materials given to them before each class is commenced. Typically that
would be a minimum of 1 hour per module (if over 15 weeks, its 15 hours minimum
of pre-reading)”

3.   How many students do you have on each of your Diploma Courses?

“Student numbers are as follows:
Diploma in Sports and Exercise Sciences –                            150 students
Diploma in Sports and Leisure Management –                           210 students
Diploma in Outdoor and Adventure Learning –                          100 students
Diploma in Health Management and Promotion (new in 2010) –           50 students”

4. What are your entry requirements relative to English 'A' levels (e.g. our minimum
at Edinburgh for entry to Applied Sports Science is 280 points from English 'A'
levels)?

“All Government Polytechnic in Singapore‟s entry requirements for English is a O
level English requirement. So similarly, for our programmes, the English „O‟ level is
the requirements for entry. While they are here, they complete a year 1 module on
Communications.”

5. Can you clarify re Queensland University & RMIT - do your Singaporean
students enter into year 4 or year 3 or year 2?

 “Our students are admitted into year 3 of the 4 yrs programme (with honours) at the
University of Queensland and year 3 at RMIT” (Australia).
Appendix 2 Proposed BSc (Hons) SRM Programme Revisions December 2010 –

Summary of Key Changes

Rationale
   - Update content
   - Adjust according to staff base
   - Enable RP Singapore entry to year 3
   - Rationalise research methods for Placement and Dissertation

Year 1 – no changes

Year 2 /3
Placement move to semester 2 second year from sem1 third year
 – reduce from 10 to 7 weeks and
 – reduce assessment from two reports to one report and presentation
Research Methods semester 2 – „short delivery‟ in weeks 1-3 prior to Placement
Interpreting Sport in a Social Context 2 move to third year and revise course to
Honours level „Sociology of Sport 3‟
Advanced Research Methods semester 2 in third year focussed on dissertation
planning

Yr 4 – no changes

Attached copies of revised courses:
Sociology of Sport 3
Sport Management Placement 2

				
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