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             GENTLE TEACHING INTERNATIONAL / 2001 CONFERENCE / USA
                            [developed by] COMMUNITY LIVING SERVICES
                             35425 MICHIGAN AVE. W., WAYNE, MI. 48184
                                               ---- / USA----10/24/01----




G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                               PREFACE




O ur cul ture d eterm ines m uch ―of our view of th e w orld and it com es to us – often
very subtly – almost from the moment of birth, so that we tend to view our system
as th e ‗righ t‘or ‗ natural‘or ‗                                                          w
                                  scientific‘w ay of d oing th ings. A ny oth er w ay is ‗ ron g‘  ,
‗           ,i            .
 unnatural‘ ‗rrational‘ A nd b ecause our cul          ture governs our lives so com pletel ity,
provid es us w ith a b asis for jud ging th e lives of oth ers in great and cri                   .
                                                                                     tical d etail ‖
(Cultures in Crisis, 1975 edition, Downs).
GENTLE TEACHING is a REVOLUTION away from how many people have
interacted in th e past. A ctions and interacti           ons w h ich appeared ‗ natural‘ are not
always the BEST actions and ways of feeling & thinking about each other. Gentle
Teaching has to involve a conscious effort to change the prevailing culture.
                                                           s
G E N T LE T E A C H IN G IN T E R N A T IO N A L 2 0 0 1 i ―a part of th e solution‖.
This document has two sections:
The first section abstracts some of the information which is being addressed in the
Panel of Gentle Teachers from CLS here at the Conference.
Th e second section [―A d d itional Inform ation‖] includ es S am ple inform ation, and
individual materials reflective of the Culture of Life / Gentle Teaching view for
creating a kinder world.




        ―I h ave com e to a frigh tening concl usion. I am a d ecisive elem ent in the lives
         of the people I work with. It is my personal approach that helps to create
          the climate. It is my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I
                                                         s fe
        possess trem end ous pow er to m ake a person‘ li m iserab le or joyous. I can
            be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or
           humor, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that can decide
        whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a person humanized or
                                          d eh um anized.‖

                            [Adapted from the writings of Dr. Hiam Ginott]




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
CONTENTS:
PREFACE-------------------------------------------------------------------------3
CONTENTS----------------------------------------------------------------------4
PRESENTERS--------------------------------------------------------------------5
W H O IS ―C O M M U N IT Y LIV IN G S E R V IC E S ‖?-------------------------------6
FRAMES OF REFERENCE-------------------------------------------------------7
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS / GENTLE TEACHERS-----------------8
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION-----------------------------------------------15
       MORE IMPORTANT THAN MONEY-----------------------------------16
       YOU ARE THE ONE-----------------------------------------------------17
       HOW TO HELP PEOPLE FEEL SAFE & LOVED------------------------18
       WELLNESS SUPPORT PLAN (sample)---------------------------------20
       NOTES FROM G.T. PRACTICUM---------------------------------------23
       LIFE STORIES (samples)-----------------------------------------------24
       PROMOTING VIOLENCE or EVOKING PEACE------------------------31
       G.T. & RACISM-----------------------------------------------------------32
       G.T. & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS--------------------------------34
       ATTITUDES--------------------------------------------------------------36
       PEOPLE LEARN WHAT THEY LIVE-------------------------------------37
       HAPPINESS--------------------------------------------------------------38
       QUOTES------------------------------------------------------------------39




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                      PRESENTERS :
JIM GLICK is a Gentle Teacher at Community Living Services (CLS) in SE Michigan. He
previously served as Director of Psychology at CLS and served as a Psychologist with
Southgate Regional Center, Northville Residential Training Center, and at Fort Wayne State
Hospital & Training Center. He has experience working with people who have developmental
and psychiatric diagnoses.
MIKE OLVER is a Gentle Teacher at CLS. He is a Social Worker who has profound
experience as a Supports Coordinator (Casemanager) at CLS. He has also worked in
vocational programs and as an Intensive Probation Officer with violent offenders. He has
experience working with people who have developmental & psychiatric conditions.
LISA ROBERSON is a Gentle Teacher at CLS. She is a Social Worker who has worked as a
Supports Coordinator at CLS. She has also worked in Foster Care and Adoption for Youth
Living Services (now Starfish). She has worked with people who have developmental,
psychiatric, and various social needs.
LARRY SCHMIDT is a Gentle Teacher at CLS. He is also a Social Worker and has
considerable experience as a Supports Coordinator at CLS. He has been actively involved
with people who have psychiatric and developmental diagnoses and complex needs.
MICK STEVENS is a Gentle Teacher at CLS. He has worked as a Psychologist at CLS and at
Family & Neighborhood Services. He was a Pastor for 10 years and has run his own business.
He has worked with people who have psychiatric, emotional, and developmental disabilities.
CONNIE GLICK is a Gentle Teacher at CLS. She is an RN by training. She has worked as a
Community Nurse at CLS, at Clinton Valley Center, and at Ypsilanti Psychiatric Hospital.
She has worked with individuals with both psychiatric and developmental needs.
DON STROUD is a Gentle Teacher at CLS. He is a Psychiatric RN who has worked as a
Trainer at CLS. He has worked in psychiatric nursing at LaFayette Clinic, Northville
     d                                          ‘
R esi ential T raining C enter, S inai H ospitals Psych iatric U nit, and at th e F ort W ayne S tate
Hospital & Training Center. He has extensive experience with multiple populations.
JERRY LEISMER is in the Training Department @ CLS and a private consultant. He has
consulted for 37 states & 6 countries, serves as an associate editor for various publications,
writes & presents frequently, and is on several Boards. He is a Psychologist by training and
has worked for Mental Health agencies, the U.S.District Court, as an Expert Witness in
various Court Cases relative to deinstitutionalization, systems change, CQI, and community
development. He has visited over 45 institutions and numerous community programs.

Not scheduled to present, but also involved with Training for CLS relative to Gentle
Teaching, are Carolyn Tarrant, Julie Kraemer, Donna Conlin, and Cathy Turner.




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                          WHO IS
          ―C O M M U N IT Y LIV IN G S E R V IC E S ‖?
Community Living Services, Inc. (CLS) is a large support network that coordinates
services for over 1700 people in over 500 different settings. It began as a state
agency in 1992 when the community-oriented staff from three (now closed)
institutions merged. This created an organization to develop residential options and
to provide supports for people as they were being placed from institutions, nursing
homes, and, at times, from family homes. CLS became a private, non-profit
organization in 1992 (privatized by the state). It is governed by a volunteer Board
of Directors, one-third of whom are primary or secondary consumers.
CLS is located in a geographic section of Southeastern Michigan with a population
larger than the individual population of 17 states or the District of Columbia.
People provided with person-centered supports by CLS are individuals with a
number of personal strengths, talents, and interests. Almost 1000 have previously
been assessed in the severe or profound range of retardation, over 300 have
Cerebral Palsy, approximately 600 have seizures, 1/3 need assistance in walking or
m oving ab out, over 7 0 0 are cited as h aving som e form of psych iatric or ―b ehavioral‖
disability. CLS contracts with 56 residential and 32 vocational service providers.
Over 200 people are in more independent settings with individual budgets, and
there are individuals in Foster Care & Adoption settings. There are over 5000
persons serving in direct support roles for agencies under contract with CLS. CLS
trains over 1000 persons each year in Gentle Teaching, Person-Centered Planning,
Companionship, the philosophy of Self-Determination, Relationship Building, and in
other areas relative to their responsibilities.
CLS determined that GENTLE TEACHING is one of its critical philosophical
underpinnings. CLS determined that each person should feel SAFE and LOVED
while they receive supports to help them to achieve the life they would like to have.
CLS has also created seven full-time positions for GENTLE TEACHERS. This
document looks at GENTLE TEACHING as it is being facilitated at CLS and the
agencies that contract with CLS.




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                     FRAMES of REFERENCE :
ORGANIZATIONS & AGENCIES ARE DRIVEN BY :
  THEIR BELIEF SYSTEMS
  THEIR PERCEPTION OF THEIR ROLE IN THE SERVICE SYSTEM & IN THE
  WORLD
  AND BY THEIR FEELINGS.
SIMILARLY,
INDIVIDUALS ARE DRIVEN BY :
  THEIR BELIEF SYSTEMS
  THEIR PERCEPTION OF THEIR ROLE RELATIVE TO OTHER PEOPLE IN
  THEIR MILIEU & THEIR CHOSEN CIRCLE OF ASSOCIATES
  AND BY THEIR FEELINGS.

DOES THE ORGANIZATION (or the individual) BELIEVE THAT IT (s/he) IS
IMPORTANT, IS VALUED BY OTHERS, AND DOES IT (do they) FEEL SAFE,
CONNECTED, AND WORTHWHILE?

DOES THE ORGANIZATION (does the person) FEEL CONTROLLED &
MANIPULATED OR INDEPENDENT & STRONG. DOES IT (does s/he) FEEL
VALUED & SUPPORTED OR DEVALUED & UNDERMINED. DOES IT (does she/he)
FEEL SAFE, LOVED, and CONNECTED OR INCIDENTAL, DIMINISHED &
DISENFRANCHISED. THESE FACTORS MAKE A DIFFERENCE. THEY MAKE A
DIFFERENCE FOR ORGANIZATIONS. THEY MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR STAFF.
MOST IMPORTANT, THEY MAKE A LARGE DIFFERENCE FOR THE PEOPLE WHO
RECEIVE SUPPORTS.




   G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
        FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS :
           STRATEGIES / APPROACHES
              OF GENTLE TEACHERS
     (approaches to spread, deepen, and nurture
              the Spirit of Gentleness)

1-       The Gentle Teachers use a number of approaches to assist people who work
         with others at growing a Sense of Gentleness. Among the strategies used to
         implement Gentle Teaching are:

A-        THE FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE MODEL                   -       bringing together two or
more people with developmental &/or other disabilities AND two or more caregivers
at least once a week to teach Safe & Loved (as well as to give love and engagement).
T h is is intend ed to teach caregivers to faci  litate C i               s
                                                           rcles in people‘ h om es.
B-        THE SYSTEMIC MODEL -                 bringing together of Home Managers and
A d m inistrative Lead ership from ‗    provid er organi   zations‘ for a form al teach ing
process. This involves at least monthly sessions for a period of six months with
follow-up on-site training in homes or settings throughout Provider organizations.
This systemically spreads Gentle Teaching to all people working in particular
Provider Organizations and helps to establish a culture & expectations relative to
how we treat each other AND the people we support. [example: Spectrum].
C-        BIG BROTHER / BIG SISTER-TYPE MODEL                   -      There are times
when the Gentle Teachers are asked to provide crisis supports to an individual or
home setting. This involves a Gentle Teacher providing intense, on-site, hands-on
assistance, I.E.,
          Initial contact with individuals who are experiencing difficulties to show and
                                          ri
          tell caregivers w hat th e S pi t of G entleness signifies. … M od eling th e
          process for those who would be expected to use it.
          Bring the Home Manager and at least three core caregivers into a process of
          at least 8 on-site, hands-on sessions related to building trust with the
          caregivers and developing a proactive plan for preventing crises.
          The purpose is to provide crisis intervention in troubled situations, and also
          to transmit values, knowledge, and skills to core caregiving staff.
D-        COMMUNITY-CENTERED CELEBRATION MODEL                         -       the     active
facilitation of person-centered pl     anning m eeti  ngs related to ‗  troubled ind ivid uals‘
who are involved with Gentle Teachers. The goal is to promote the development,
      G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
preparation, and follow-up of person-centered planning protocols (required By Law
in Michigan) based on a Spirit of Gentleness.
E-       FORMAL PRACTICUM MODEL              -      The bringing together of groups of
5-to-50 caregivers from various settings to conduct formal training generally for
up-to-6-hours on each of four consecutive days [including a minimum of 6-hours of
personal experience with troubled individuals who may not be familiar to the
participants]. This helps to disseminate a Spirit of Gentleness to large groups of
caregivers from a variety of settings. It also helps to promote future gentle
teaching projects. This needs to be done in a way respectful of the wishes and the
privacy of persons who receive supports. Unless they choose to be a part of the
process, they should not be subjected to what could be a provocative flow of
unfamiliar people.
F-       GENTLE TEACHING PROJECT MODEL -                   This      involves      the
implementation of a 2-to-3 month teaching relationship with ALL of the people who
reside in a particular residential setting plus caregivers [including the Home
Manager]. This aids in the development of a sense of trust with caregivers and
                                                        practiced m eaning‘ of persons
th ose w h o live in th e h om e. It sh ould teach th e ‗
having a feeling of being safe & loved.
G-       TRANSITION MODEL             -      This promotes the development of a
sense of trust with troubled individuals who are in the process of moving / being
moved from one setting to another due to chaos in that first setting. This brings
insights into the needs of the persons who are [or will be] moving and of the types
of caregiving characteristics which may be useful in this situation / with this
person. The intent is to ease the DIS-ease of moving and to reduce the potential
for discord by increasing the heart-to-heart bonds [& person-specific sensitivity]
among caregivers and those who are moving.
H-       FAMILY MODEL           -     To provide support and orientation to families
with troubled sons or daughters, you first focus on families and develop their trust.
You then share skills and values with parents and family members, advocating /
promoting a Spirit of Gentleness
I-       LIFE-STORY MODEL             -      Brining together caregivers and troubled
individuals to write Life-Stories based on the perspective of the Person receiving
supports. From their experience, what do they feel they need to feel Safe &
Loved. This can help caregivers to develop a sense of compassion & empathy for
the people they support. This will help staff to understand that ALL BEHAVIOR
MAKES SENSE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE PERSON WHOSE BEHAVIOR
                                                                              b
IT IS . If you can change th e perspective & ch ange th e h eart, often th e ‗ ehavior‘
will follow.




    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
2-       Staff often [also] feel vulnerable. How do you win their trust? [this looks at
         the importance of helping staff everyone in the setting to feel safe &
         loved ]… . A pproach es includ e:
     W e enter th e h om e as ‗                                                        has
                                servants‘ to h elp; not as a professional person w h o ‗
                                          ci
     th e answ ers‘and is read y to criti ze.
     Look for ways to praise the staff in the homes.
     Find at least one gift each staff person brings.
     Make at least one positive comment to each staff person.
     Connect with staff by helping them to feel Safe & Loved by: making physical
     contact with each staff (pat on the back; shaking hands); introduce yourself to
     them.
     Genuinely listen to them and acknowledge the difficult job they have.
          t
     D on‘ h ave a know -it-all or a superior attitude. Treat people as equals.
     Try to use humor to diffuse the tension as may be needed.


3-       The Home Manager is a key individual in establishing a Culture of Gentleness.
         What do you do when you have a Home Manager who is resistant to this
         approach?
     Treat the Home Manager as an equal.
     Respect their views and opinions.
     Build connections.
     Acknowledge the good things that staff are doing.
     Be patient. Recognize that it will take time to change the culture of a home
     setting.


4-       How do you get Providers and their upper management to commit to Gentle
         Teaching?
         t      ci
     D on‘ criti ze & focus on th e negatives of th e organization.
     Acknowledge common interests and goals.
     Explain how Gentle Teaching can help to reduce staff turn-over and injuries
     incurred d uring physical intervention (si                     t
                                                      nce you d on‘ have ph ysical
     interventions).
     Look at th e organi       s                                            r
                        zation‘ m ission & vision statem ents. R eview th ei b usiness
     plan.


5-      How do you respond to the criticism that the basic principles of GT are
        sim plistic: safe, loved , loving, and engaged … .
     Rather than being simplistic, these concepts are basic and fundamental to all
     human beings. People who we work with have often experienced isolation,
     neglect, abuse, and abandonment and do have needs to have their most basic
     needs met: to feel safe & loved.
     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                       th          B              ;
     M any of th e people w e w ork w i h ave had ‗ eh avior Plans‘ have b een told th at
           K            ,
     th ey ‗ now B etter‘ and have b een ‗program m ed‘ for years w ith out success. W e
     want to go deeper than just the intellectual knowledge because it is their heart
     that needs care in this regard.


6-      What do you say to criticism that GT only works with a certain population or
                    n types‘of people?
        w ith certai ‗
     Because ALL people have the same type of needs [as described by Maslow,
     McGee, Pearlman, Evers, etc.], GT seeks to go deeper than the head to the basic
                     s
     need s in people‘ h earts. E veryone need s to feel S afe & Loved .


7- How do you overcome initial resistance by co-w orkers w h o are reluctant to ‗ uy-b
   into‘gentle teach ing?
   Some people misunderstand GT and think that it is all about physical touch and
   is good only for ‗touch y-feely‘ people. Ph ysical T ouch , h ow ever, is only a sm all
                                                    touch ‘ a person. G T go es beyond
   aspect of G T and th ere are d ifferent w ays to ‗
                                      s
   th e cognitive and reach es people‘ h earts. It is a d eeper type of approach than
   Behaviorism. Once co-workers understand this, much of the resistance is
   diminished.


8- How do you spread GT throughout your agency?
   One of the best ways is through personal contact with staff (casemanagers,
   clinical staff, etc.), by taking them into the homes and demonstrating GT. At
   CLS, a GT Network has been started. Newsletters are good means for showing
   what works and how and for telling success stories (or other types of stories
   that we can learn from). Having a Recognition Board or Story Board with
   pictures of people and their staff and their homes who are working together to
                                                                            t
   establish cultures-of-gentleness can b e encouraging (so long as you d on‘ b reach
   confidentiality protocols). Any approaches to focus on and recognize good
   things people are doing in the homes are generally positive.


9- A re som e people ‗  just too aggressive, violent, or m anipulative‘ for G T to b e
   successful?
   Though we recognize that some people have ways of interacting with others
   which are very complex, ALL people can benefit from having their basic human
   needs respected and addressed. Everyone needs to be treated with dignity and
   respect as an individual human being. The quality of the interaction is often
   directly related to the degree of respect extended to that other individual. By
   changing our attitudes and our posture in working with them, we can promote
   trust, instill a sense of being safe, and reduce a need to defend-or-confront. It


     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
   is no guarantee or assurance of an easy-fix or it would likely already be in place.
   Patience and kindness remain crucial.


10- What is a Friendship Group and How does it work?
    Friendship Groups connect people who live with one another. It recognizes the
    turn-over in staff and the need for staff to be able to connect with the people
    to whom they provide supports / assistance / friendship. A Friendship Group
    begins with two people who live together and one-or-two staff who will help
    them to feel safe with and loved by one another.


11- What are some of the biggest pains / obstacles / roadblocks / difficulties tied
    to making GT real at CLS?
    The concept that GT is Just About Touching.
    Resistance by some departments or individuals / coworkers.
    Difficulty getting Provid ers O rgani  zations to ‗             .
                                                         buy into it‘ T oo m any m ay see it
            F avor of th e M onth ‘ th ey w ant to w ai for th ings to change.
    as th e ‗ l                   ;                    t
               ll
    People w i agree b ut not follow through . T h ey ‗                              t w
                                                            talk -the-talk‘ b ut d on‘ ‗ alk-
             k‘
    the-w al .
                             m
    People w anting to see ―i m ed i ate results. ‖
    Staff turn-over.
    Bureaucracy. Everyone in the administration [at any level] may not fully
    understand/appreciate GT.


12- What approaches do you see as being the most successful or hopeful in helping
    individuals feel connected / safe / loved ?
    Friendship Circles.
    Big Brother / Sister-type Model.
    In-Home Training
    Life Stories


13- What is the role of Gentle Teachers at CLS?
    The Gentle Teachers are a group of seven full-time employees @ CLS whose job
    it is to promote GT in the Agency, in the Provider Organizations under contract
    with CLS, and (most important) in the 500+ settings where persons who fall
    under the CLS umbrella reside. CLS Gentle Teaching is more than seven people
    at CLS whose job is to promote a Culture of Gentleness. It is all of the people
    who believe in a Culture of Gentleness      all of the managers, administrators,
    and professionals who promote it. It is, most significantly, those individuals
    whose lives have improved as a result of Gentle Teaching efforts.



    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
14- Who else does GT training at CLS?
    The CLS Training Department (5 full-time teachers / instructors) provides
    specialized training to over 1000 direct care staff each year. Training includes
    considerable focus on Gentle Teaching, Working with People, Understanding
                                  p   ld
    Human Feelings, Relationsh i B ui ing… A d d i  tional inform ation on classes is
    available on request.


15- How did we get from Physical Management approaches to Gentle Teaching?
    The response to this question looks at the Human Rights / Civil Rights transition
    from the Institutional era with horrible staff-to-‗ client‘ ratios, w h ere C ontrol
    became a Goal in residential care settings. Focus was on Challenging Behaviors
    (rather than on individual wants, needs & desires or dreams), and where physical
    techniques were Tools used to achieve the goal. It moves ahead to the era of
    Deinstitutionalization & Gentle Teaching where Interdependence is a Goal.
    Focus is on the Value of the Person (Person-Centered Planning, on the person
    having the power to make choices about things that affect their life, Community
    Connections), and where the preferred Tool is Unconditional Love. The response
    to this question explores the movement into Gentleness, Safe & Loved.


16- Why are LIFE STORIES important?
                                                 re                      re
    E x plore w hat Life S tories are, w hy th ey‘ im portant, h ow th ey‘ d eveloped and
               re              m
    h ow th ey‘ used . T h e i portance to a caregiver of und erstand ing h ow som eone
    is experiencing THEIR WORLD is profound. What are they feeling; what are
    they thinking; how does this relate to how they act, interact & react; what do
                                     re                    r
    they w ant & need w h en th ey‘ experiencing th ei life. H ow d o you open th e
    hearts of caregivers to the particular sadness, fear, frustration, joy, and
    interests of others. How can you incorporate this knowledge into improving
    som eone‘ life. T h ese are issue s about which you should spend time. [notice
              s
    Samples of Life Stories in the back of this document ].




***This is not a definitive document capturing all information relative to
Gentle Teaching at CLS. Please feel free to talk directly with Gentle Teachers for
more specific information or for a response to particular questions. We are ALL IN
THIS TOGETHER.




    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
GENTLENESS
MATTERS




   G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
   MORE IMPORTANT THAN
       MONEY ($$$$) :
                             SELF-RESPECT
                                  LOVE
                               KINDNESS
                              HAPPINESS
                              FRIENDSHIP
                                FAMILY
                                 FAITH
                            SATISFACTION
                           GOOD MEMORIES
                                SAFETY
                          ______________
                          ______________




G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
GENTLE TEACHING CAN BE LIKE
         S
PE O PLE ‘ S E N IO R Y E A R IN H IG H
SCHOOL:      SOMETHING THAT THEY
LOOK BACK ON FONDLY; SOMETHING
THAT WAS GOOD & MEMORABLE BUT
                    … OR… . IT C A N BE A
T H A T IS G O N E . .
GROWING MOVEMENT THAT HELPS
TO TRANSFORM LIVES AND TO
PROTECT VULNERABLE PEOPLE.
YOU       ARE     THE      DETERMINING
CRITERIA.
YOU                    ARE                    THE                    ONE                     WHO
DETERMINES: IS THIS A LIVE
REVOLUTION       OR                                                  IS             IT                AN
HISTORIC ARTIFACT.




  G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
 HOW TO HELP PEOPLE TO FEEL
SAFE, LOVED, LOVING & ENGAGED
     WORK ON THEIR HEART. MAKE ALL INTERACTIONS WARM AND
     UNCONDITIONAL.

     ALL PEOPLE HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR; JOKE WITH THEM WHEN
     YOU ARRIVE AT WORK, GREET EACH PERSON BY NAME AND
     PROVIDE SOME TYPE OF PHYSICAL CONTACT: A HANDSHAKE,
     PAT ON THE BACK, A HUG, A SHOULDER HUG, ETC.

     SPEND A FEW MINUTES EACH HOUR THAT A PERSON IS IN THE
     HOME TALKING WITH THEM.

     EVEN WHEN YOU ARE BUSY YOU CAN SAY A FEW WORDS AND
     TOUCH THEM.

     WHEN DOING THE DISHES, SEEK TO ENGAGE PEOPLE IN
     CONVERSATION AND (when feasible) INVOLVE THEM IN THE
     PROCESS.

     REMEMBER TO SMILE A LOT (people take their lead from YOU).

     WHEN YOU WANT TO HAVE PEOPLE DO SOMETHING, TRY TO
                                             E,
     W O R D IT IN A PO S IT IV E W A Y , I. . ―C O U LD Y O U ‖ O R ―W O U LD
                                                S
     Y O U PLE A S E … ‖, ―D O Y O U K N O W IT ‘ T IM E F O R D IN N E R … ‖
     RATHER THAN AS A COMMAND OR A DEMAND. BETTER YET,
           S
     ―LE T ‘ D O IT T O G E T H E R .‖

     THROUGHOUT YOUR CONTACTS, PROVIDE WARM EYE CONTACT
     AND SOFT TONES IN YOUR VOICE.

     THE PEOPLE IN A PARTICULAR HOME MAY REQUIRE A LOT OF
     PHYSICAL ASSISTANCE; BE AWARE OF HOW MUCH
     ENCOURAGEMENT & SUPPORT YOU USE. SOME PEOPLE REQUIRE
     A LOT. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS TALK WITH PEOPLE; TELL THEM
 G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                   R
     W H A T Y O U ‘ E D O IN G A N D W H Y ; H E LP T H E M T O U N D E R S T A N D
             S
     W H A T ‘ G O IN G O N .

     EVEN THOUGH PART OF YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES MAY INCLUDE
     DOING THINGS LIKE CLEANING AND WASHING DISHES,
     REMEMBER THAT THE MAIN PART OF YOUR JOB IS TO
     INTERACT WITH PEOPLE AND TO HELP THEM TO FEEL GOOD
     ABOUT THEIR LIVES.

     DURING THE SHIFT. PLAN TIME TO ENGAGE IN VARIOUS TYPES
     OF INTERACTION (TABLE TOP GAME, CONVERSATIONS, WALKS
     ON WARM DAYS, ETC.) AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF
     SPONTANEOUS OPPORTUNITIES.

     PRIOR TO LEAVING YOUR SHIFT, SPEND A FEW MINUTES
                                   G
     V IS IT IN G A N D S A Y IN G ‗ O O D B Y E ‘ T O T H E PE O PLE W H O LIV E
     THERE.

     RESPECT THE CHOICES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN THE HOME;
     WHILE BEING MINDFUL OF THEIR SAFETY NEEDS.

     R E M E M B E R T H A T T H E IM PO R T A N T F O C U S IS O N T H E T H E M …
     MAKE LIFE FUN.

     ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO TELL YOU AT LEAST ONE GOOD THING
     ABOUT THEMSELVES.                        BE PREPARED TO GIVE THEM AN
     ANSWER IF THEY HAVE A DIFFICULT TIME THINKING
     OF ONE.


(THIS PAGE EXTRAPOLATED FROM GENTLE TEACHING MATERIALS DEVELOPED BY MICK STEVENS)




 G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                              Community Living Services
                                Wellness Support Plan
                                (sample/NOT AN ACTUAL PLAN)

   Name: Judy_____
   Home: ________

                                              WELLNESS NOTES :
                  (SECTIONS UNDERLINED BELOW WOULD NOT BE INCLUDED ON A PAGE
                                             S
             TO BE KEPT A T T H E PE R S O N ‘ H O M E W H E R E N E G A T I V E S T A T E M E N T S C O U LD H A V E
                  A –NEGATIVE- IMPACT ON HOW PEOPLE PERCEIVED OR TREATED JUDY)


   JUDY is progressing towards feeling safe with others (will result in decreased
   SIB, aggression toward others, and increased feelings of contentment).

                                         GOAL :
   JUDY will feel safe and loved, as evidenced by smiling more, having a relaxed
   face, less pacing & touching objects, and more reaching out to others (Judy will
   have less self-injurious actions and aggression toward others).

1. WAYS to help JUDY feel SAFE & LOVED (gentle teaching) :
   Talk quietly and softly to Judy.
                                             s                               m
   T ell J ud y as often as you can that sh e‘ a good w om an (a th ousand ti es a day).
   Reach out to her and use human touch. Start with brief touches and progress
   upward as Judy feels safe.
   Reassure her that you care about her (a thousand times a day).
   Praise her for any small effort she makes to interact with you or others.
   When she does something disruptive or self-injurious, reassure her that you
                               t‘
   care ab out h er and th at i s okay that she makes some mistakes (we all do).
                            t
   A llow for failure… i is only through fai      lure that w e learn ab out ourselves…
   What better place to fail than in the presence of caring people who offer the
   encouragem ent to try again…
   Give Judy the opportunity to make CHOICES. Offer her choices. She too
   wants to have some say about her own life (as evidenced by her actions).



    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
   R espect that J ud y has preferences… th ings th at sh e likes ―a certain w ay‖. E ven
   though we may not understand her logic, she is a person with preferences and
   wants to make choices just like everyone else).
   Offer praise & support to each other every day as often as possible. Remind
   yourself and each other that you/we are good & try to do some good things.
   Promote & encourage HOPE in the people you support and in staff.
   Remember that, oft times, when the person we support is at their very worst,
   we have to be at our very best.
   Gently guide Judy to what it is you would like her to do and assist her to
   complete the task (i.e., if she needs to wash her hands, gently talk with her and
   ask her to come with you to the sink and help her to wash her hands, lather-up
                                    le      re
   w ith soap, and praise h er w h i you‘ involved in w ash ing h er h and s… :‖Y ou're a
                             re
   good w om an J udy. Y ou‘ d oing a good job w ashing your hand s.   ‖
                           s
   R em em b er that J ud y‘ m em ory is like an onion, it has years of layers of neglect,
   abuse, assaults, starvation, deprivation, behavior modification, conditioning,
                                               l                                  s
   lovelessness, fear, and terror. W e w il h ave to start out earning J ud y‘ trust.
   We will have to teach Judy that we deserve to be trusted. We will have to help
   Judy to feel safe and loved. Through the concept of gentle teaching, we can
   help Judy to feel safe & loved. This is a slow process that may not show
   immediate results and, like Judy who has waited a lifetime to feel safe & loved,
   we too shall have to wait to earn her trust.
                         t                          m            s            ll
   B e patient and d on‘ give up. O ur, and ulti ately J udy‘ success w i b e a long
   journey. WE CAN help Judy to feel safe & loved.

2. Ask for guidance and support on how to help Judy if you feel that you are at a
   stand-still point, are frustrated, and/or if you feel like nothing is working.
   Always feel free to call your Community Nurse or Supports Coordinator or
   Gentle Teacher or Psychologist for support, ideas, or encouragement.

3. Be supportive of one another. Encourage one another when times are difficult.
   Work as a team.

                   s
4. B uild on J ud y‘ strength s.

5. Focus on the whole person, on HER feelings, and not so much on a behavior.

6. Use simple language; give brief explanations.

                s     al                                            l
7. W atch J ud y‘ faci and b od y expressions… som etim es th ey tel m ore th an h er
   words.



    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
8. Remember to praise, praise, praise Judy and each other (a thousand times a
   day).

9. Share your suggestions and solutions with others. You may have an idea that will
   work and help Judy.

10. Try to state whatever you say from a positive perspective (i.e., instead of saying
                                                 ‖                 s                 re
    ―J ud y, stop slapping yourself in th e face! S ay ―S h h h, it‘ okay J ud y, you‘ a
    good w om an. ‖). W h en J ud y b egins self-injurious actions or becomes highly
    active running through the home, she is expressing her need to be comforted.

11. Practice compromise. Try to minimize demands on Judy during transitional
                          . ,
    tim es of th e d ay (i e. on com ing h om e from w ork)… . T h ese seem to b e h igh ly
    chaotic times in the home. Make yourself available to Judy and to the other
    people in the home to help to minimize aggressive interactions and to help them
                                               t an
    through th ese tim es of th e day. D on‘ pl to d o h ousekeeping or oth er such
    tasks until later when there is less immediate stress.




    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
 NOTES               from     Gentle Teaching Practicum                                         9/24-9/28/01

This week was a time of sharing together in the Spirit of Safe & Loved. The people
who attended were able to explore how a gentle environment can be created or is
already present in some of the homes we are a part of. Some of the homes we
visited th is w eek includ ed _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ , and _ _ _ _ & _ _ _ _ s‘ h om e.
During these visits we participated in teaching how to help people feel safe and
loved, to become engaged in their lives, and we encouraged caregivers who share in
th e everyd ay joys and chal  lenges or people'‘lives.
One of the Questions that was presented to the group by John McGee was:
                                                    s
H ow d o w e as caregivers gentle our w ay into folk‘ lives?
   Some of the answers the group came up with include:
   Move and speak slowly.
   Whisper.
   Have small amounts of engagement initially.
   Have frequent contact.
   Observe the responses of the person and react in a kind manner.
   Become familiar with or know what is the space between you and the person.
   (fear, anger, acceptance, bad memories, frustration, control issues, etc.).
   Watch for signs of acceptance & tolerance.
   Be aware of how your eye contact affects people.
   Be aware of the power of your facial expressions.
   Know how your presence brings a person up or down and moderate your actions
   appropriately.
   Appear transparent until your presence is tolerated.
   Become familiar with your own personal gifts.
   Make no demands.
   Be flexible.
Another question— >How do we gentle our way into the lives of other caregivers?
   Be a good listener.
   Learn to encourage.
   Be kind.
   Have an understanding demeanor.
   Be humble.
   Have a positive attitude.
   Let them know that they are good people doing good things.
   Advocate for them here at CLS.
   Spend time with them.
   Make yourself available to them.
   Be supportive.



     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                 LIFE STORY : Sample # 1

                                                   t
T h ey say that m y m oth er is d ead , b ut I d on‘ b elieve th at it is true. I w ant to go to F lint to
find my (biological) father and to find the real truth. I would very much like to reunite with
my father, sister, brother, and mother. There has been a void in my life for so long. I hope
that some day I will be able to fill this void and be united with my family. I would like to
love and be loved. I am tired of being depressed and stressed out.
                                                                      s
I w as b orn on J anuary 17 , 19 7 6 . I w as b orn w ith m y fath er‘ nam e. I am very proud of th is
and would like my known name changes back to what it was before. My name may have
                             th                                           ly
ch anged w h en I entered ‗ e system ‘ or it m ay h ave b een legal changed w h en I w a s young.
                                                               s
W h atever, it h urts m e to not carry on m y real father‘ nam e. C ould som eone pl        ease h elp m e
to get this done?
                                      ly
I w as taken aw ay from m y fam i w h en I w as ab out four. T his b roke m y h eart. I haven‘           t
grown up with the love that some feel. I missed out on the family picnics and vacations
                   t       l                                              ng              th
togeth er. I d on‘ recal com ing h om e from sch ool and w atch i cartoons w i m y b rother
and sister. I was never able to develop normal sibling relationships with them because we
were all in different foster care facilities. Instead of living together in a home with love
and care, I lived in institutions with brick walls painted with rules, and was monitored with
treatm ent pl           s                                   d
               ans. It‘ no w ond er th at I have th is voi that is never fil .    led
                                                                                     d   s
I had a bright spot of hope w h en I w as placed at th e M eth od ist C h il ren‘ H om e and m y
mother would visit me often. I was respected as a person at this facility. I remember Ann,
          al                                              t    l       t ke
th e soci w orker. S h e let m e see m y m om b ut i stil w asn‘ li h om e. T hat w as th e last
time I saw my mom. Ann then told me my mother had passed away. I remember my family
                            oth             t                                          n
b eing d ressed in b lack cl es. I d on‘ b elieve that sh e d id pass. I looked i th e casket and
                                t                           s
it w as not h er. W h at I d on‘ und erstand is th at th i w as th e l          m
                                                                         ast ti e I saw her and this is
                                                 d
confusing to m e. W h en I w as 15 years ol , I saw m y m om in F l                               t
                                                                           int. I knew sh e w asn‘ d ead .
I was very happy to see her but the staff hurried me away just when my mom was about to
give me her phone number. I never saw her again, but I still believe my mom and dad are
living in Flint together.
          ng          t
O ne th i you d on‘ know ab out m e is th at m y m om kept m e w h en I w as b orn. S h e used to
carry me around in a little pouch she wore. She would block the sun out of my face and hold
me. This is my memory of her. This is where I felt most safe and most loved. I feel good
when I share this with you. My mother was a beautiful person and I continue to love her
                                                    t
very m uch . It b oth ers m e w h en people d on‘ b elieve th ese th ings ab out h er. I know sh e is
still alive and I want to contact her. Can someone help me to do this?

I want someone to take me up to Flint to find my family. We could search the local
government records to find out information. My dream is to become reacquainted with my
mother and my father. This is quite a change from being at the different hospitals and
group homes. I have 24-hour caregivers that I am beginning to bond with. I have also
bonded with Valerie, my previous home manager from the group home. When at the other
group home, Valerie helped me to deal with the stress and rules they had and that made me
feel good --> that she was understanding. She is still a part of my life and continues to be
my friend and to advocate for me.


     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
I do not want people to impose programs on me. I have had them all my life and they have
only brought about the disconnectedness I have in my life now. Since I know what it feels
like to feel unsafe and unloved, I would like to have my caregivers accept me for who I am.
With nurturing and constant reassurance that I am somebody, I will learn to respect others
and not be only thinking of myself. Right now, due to my history, I.E., LIFE STORY, my life
has been one disaster after another. I have developed bad habits, become very
materialistic, and appear very selfish to others. This is not the real me.
                                                                  d
T h e real m e yearns to b e loved , respected , trusted , vali ated , and m end ed . I just d on‘    t
know how to express it. Instead, I want to show the world that I am important. My
methods include, but are not limited to: being quiet so you have to get close to me when I
speak; buying expensive clothes and brand name items; ignoring you; being cool; and focusing
on possessions. When I begin to feel safe and loved by others I will learn that relationships
are more important than clothes and brand names. I would like to become closer to God and
my family. My caregivers are very instrumental in helping me to accomplish this. Joe and
Angie have been very encouraging to me. They have been extremely understanding. Joe
always encourages positiveness and love w h en I‘ tellm                                            e
                                                             ing one of m y sad m em ories. A ngi is
very tolerant of me when I take touch too far. She is very kind in explaining what
appropriate touch is. My caregivers are examples to me and are helping me to feel safe and
loved. I am learning what it means to reciprocate this. My current methods are not always
‗                   s
 proper‘ b y society‘ stand ard s, b ut rem em b er th at m y w hole life has b een d ictated b y w hat
                              system ‘
society has d eveloped : th e ‗        .
My life has not been assisted by love and acceptance up to this point. I have been
diagnosed many times by many different psychiatrists. As far as I am concerned, none of
their diagnoses mean a damn thing. They have called me schizophrenic, depressed, having an
extra X chromosome, aggressive, etc. They have had me on numerous medications. I
         y                                                          t
currentl am sleepy a lot d ue to too m uch K lonopin. I d on‘ und erstand w hat all of th ese
labels and meds mean. What I really need are people who understand me and can have a
relationship with me. I need these people to help me feel safe and loved and to help me
accomplish my dreams. These include: finding out about my mother; finding my father,
sisters, and brother; going to Flint to accomplish this; getting my GED; and finding a job.
But before all of this, I need to feel safe and loved.
In closing, my life has been one disaster after another. In this, I have developed bad
habits; I have become a materialistic, selfish type of person, and I feel that the whole
world owes me. But I hope that I can become closer to God and that this will help me to
overcome my pain. In Gentle Teaching, we were taught how to feel safe, loved, loving, and
engaged; and how to become a better person and to get rid of all of my bad habits.
Thank you,
_____________




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                 LIFE STORY : Sample # 2

This is my life story. It is a work in progress that will change annually, monthly, daily, or
even hourly. I am Charlie Salmon and this is my story. This is who I am, where I have been,
and where I want to go.

I am Charlie Salmon. I was born on July 26, 1950. That makes me 51. I have many big name
diagnoses that have been given to me over the years. Each hospital stay has contributed to
this long list. Each hospital stay has contributed to every behavior I exhibit. Aurora
Hospital, Heritage Hospital, Holy Cross Hospital, Northville regional Psychiatric Hospital,
Michigan Health Center, Detroit Psychiatric Institute, Southgate Regional Center, and,
most recently, Riverview Hospital. These are Michigan hospitals I have been in. I am sure
that I was also in some hospitals in my home state of Kentucky. Like you, my history makes
me who I am today. Nine long-term hospital stays have created an insecure, untrusting,
volatile person with little control over my own life. With all I have been through, I am still a
beautiful and God-loving person. I would probably go to church every Sunday if I could.
God is my strength. When no one was there, He rocked me to sleep and comforted my soul.
God carried me through the tough times and gave me strength. Family is another strength.
I yearn for my family. I have a big family. Four of my siblings live in Detroit. My youngest
                ns             th          s           le                                 ly
sister m aintai contact w i m e. It‘ b een a w h i since I have seen other fam i m em b ers
and I yearn for th em . I yearn for that uncond itional l    ove and that ―h om e‖ feeling. I have
lived in many different places but they were not home. I am afraid that if I say or do
something wrong I will be put out and placed in a hospital. This is not a home. A home
accepts you uncond itional                       th
                             ly… … th e good w i th e b ad .
I get angry and frustrated because I remember the good times. The times when I was
                                               ly
―norm al‖. T h e tim es w h en I h ad m y fam i around m e. T h e tim es w h en I had a m an. B efore
I become sick at the age of 19, I was fine. I had teeth, a great smile, a beautiful
complexion, and a body to die for. I had make-up and perfume to make me feel good about
myself. I had it all!! I was stripped from my life because of a senseless act. My then
boyfriend slipped something into my drink. This story is tragic but the most important
thing is, I remember a time when I was free to do what I wanted, smoke when I wanted,
went out to dinner when I wanted. I remember a time when I was in control of my destiny,
in control of my life. I say to all my staff: nurture me, support me,and guide me in a gentle
way.
I have mental and physical health issues. What are they? I could not start to name them
all. I know I am a diabetic who struggles with eating the right foods. This is common with
         ab cs. I also know that I h ear voices. I learned th at you d on‘ tal ab out th e
m any d i eti                                                                       t    k
voices. I wish that I could have experienced life the way that you have experienced it. I
cope with this desire by exaggerating my life experiences. I often say that I have had
children and have been married. I say to all my staff, let me dream, let me wish.
Many people remember me as the person who would walk away from homes, get angry, and
curse people out. It amazes me that no one remembers why I did these things or seems to
care why I did these things. My behavior reflects how I am being treated. I am 51 years
old, a grown woman who has had a hard life. 1) RESPECT me. Talk to me like I am 51, not 7.
     t                              T                      T
D on‘ b oss m e around , I D O N ‘ LI K E T H A T . D O N ‘ M A N IPU LA T E M E . 2 ) T h e cigarette

     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
issue. I have been smoking since I was 19. I AM A GROWN UP PERSON WHO HAS MADE
THE DECISION TO SMOKE. IT HELPS ME TO RELAX. When I get frustrated or
irritated, I use cigarettes to cope with the stress. If I ask for a cigarette, please give me
                                                                    t             s       m
a cigarette. (Y O U S M O K E R S U N D E R S T A N D ). Please d on‘ tell m e ―it‘ not ti e‖ or that I
need to wait. This is a sure way to get me upset and angry. 3) LISTEN. I definitely can
talk and share my history. You can learn everything about me by listening to me. I can tell
                     s                                       l
you everyth ing that‘ in and not in C LS reports. A l you need to d o is listen. Y ou can h ear
the hurt, the pain, my likes and my dislikes. You will definitely hear the love I have for my
family. LISTEN. Sit down with me and give me your undivided attention. If you smoke,
have a cigarette with me. If you drink Pepsi, have a Diet Pepsi with me.
I am Charlie Salmon and this is my life story. This story may change annually, monthly,
weekly, or even hourly. If you know my life story, you will know and understand me.




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                 LIFE STORY : Sample # 3

My name is Fred Perch and I was born on January 17, 1969. I have two brothers and two
sisters whom I love very much. I lived with my parents until Jan.28, 2001 when I came to
live here with Don Walleye. My parents moved to Florida but come back to Michigan to visit
            l                                  m      ly i
m e. I stil m iss m y m om and d ad a lot. I‘ legal b l nd b ut am ab le to get around real w ell.
                            s                                                         m
I like going to W end y‘ and love car rid es, b eing in m y b ed room , sw i m ing, and th e
whirlpool. The whirlpool is my favorite. Warm baths are nice, grasping hands with someone
is fun, small toys are great and loud music is good. I like to eat pickles, cheese, pot roast,
               s                                                              t
and W end y‘ h am b urgers. S om etim es I get so h ungry th at I can‘ w ait and need to eat
              y,                                          gh                  m
im m ed iatel so please give m e som eth ing to eat ri t aw ay w hen I‘ h ungry. T h is m ay b e
             m                                                              y
b ecause I‘ d iab etic and m y sugar level m ay b e real low . U suall w hen I get h om e from
                                                                n                    m      ll
A rkay I like to eat and th en go to m y room . I feel safe i m y room . S om eti es I‘ com e out
of my room to see staff or go places, but mostly I like staying in my bed room. I like to feel
safe but sometimes my roommate, Don, scares me. He has pinched and scratch ed m e. I‘                   m
            d                                                   t
also afrai b ecause th is is a new place and m y m om isn‘ h ere and I feel all alone and sad .
Please help me feel safe and loved by being my friend. I need lots of touches and hugs.
           t
A lso, d on‘ let D on h urt m e. Y ou can com e into my room and talk to me.
                              n
S om etim es I grab people i th e ch est or pi                                   t
                                                 nch th em or h it th em . I d on‘ know w h y I d o th is.
                  d
M ayb e you coul h elp m e b y teaching m e to b e kind and gentle… . … b y b eing an ex am pl I    e.
need lots of love from you since my mom is far away. Sometimes at Arkay I become anxious
and upset and may scratch people. This may happen around snack time or lunch or just
before transportation home. This could be related to my diabetes so I might need a protein
snack like cheese & crackers or crackers & peanut b utter and perhaps som e m il I d on‘     k.          t
want to hurt people or make them afraid of me. Perhaps some people could deepen and
strengthen their friendship with me by talking softly and kindly, giving me touches, and
involving me in a good activity before transporting me home. My OT suggested that people
could use deep pressure touch. This felt good when she did it. I like it when people sign to
                                  d
m e and som e signs you coul use are ―please‖ and ―w ait‖. W h en I get upset and try to
scratch, you could sign and tell me to stop.




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                 LIFE STORY : Sample # 4

Hi, my name is Carrie Trout. I was born on February 21, 1958. I am 43 years old. I live in
my own apartment in Canton, Michigan. I really enjoy living on my own. For 8 hours every
day I have caregivers come into my home to help me with things like getting to and from
work, helping me to keep track of my medications, and companionship. I can cook for myself
and often cook for my staff and friends. I have a cat that I play with and care for. I work
at Meijer in Livonia for 4 hours a day, Monday through Friday. I enjoy my job. I help stock
the groceries that people take to the register but decide not to buy.
My family and friends:
I have one older brother, Jerry, and two sisters, Valerie & Janet. Janet is older and
Valerie is the youngest. I enjoy seeing them and my nieces and nephews. My mother is very
involved in my life and helps me to make many decisions. I often rely on her and Jerry for
their opinions on life issues. My father passed away a few years ago, and I miss him dearly.
It is still difficult to talk about him. It bothers me when people talk about him or bring him
up in conversations. He worked for Channel 7 News in Detroit for more than 30 years. I
                               s                y
think of him often. F ath er‘ D ay is especiall hard on m e.
I enjoy doing things with my family and friends. When I am alone, I spend time watching
movies at home or playing video games on my new Playstation 2. I sometimes have family
and friends come over for dinner. I like to cook for people. I visit with my family on
weekends. I like to go camping, to the movies, to carnivals, parks, and swimming.
If you have any suggestions for things we can do together, please let me know. Some days I
like to relax after work and other days, I like to go out and to do things with people.
Time with my caregivers:
I want my caregivers to really know me. I am a person as complex as you are and I like to
be treated with respect. I am a fun-loving guy, but it takes time for me to get to know you
and trust you. Trust is very important to me. Trust is earned over time. I have had many
caregivers in my life. Some were good, and some were Not So Good. I want you to
understand that I come with a history just like you and I want to be treated with respect
just like you do. If you are just getting to know me, please help me to build a relationship
with you that is based on trust and respect. I need to know that I am safe with you. You
see, my family is the only group of people that has remained constant in my life. It is
difficult for me to understand why so many caregivers have come into my life and then have
left so quickly without keeping in touch with me. I have a fear that you may do the same. I
                                                               ly
hope to develop lifelong friend sh ips w ith people… … especial th ose I learn to feel safe w ith
and to trust.
I like it when people help me to make decisions and when they show me both sides of an
issue to help me to make the proper decisions in my life. Especially my family. I like to be
spoken to with kindness and respect. I feel uncomfortable when people put demands on me
or when they talk down to me. During these times I get very upset. Please do not talk down
to me. I will treat you with respect if you do the same.
Currently I take my own medication. I appreciate my caregivers helping me to keep track of
when I need to take each of my meds. I have a difficult time reading and may get
frustrated when I do not know what is being written about me, so please take the time to

     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
explain what you are writing in my book and why. I also appreciate it when I am part of
phone conversations between staff and my family. If you are helping me to set something
up with them, please let me know what is being said. I have had caregivers that walk outside
when talking to people about me. Others have walked into my bathroom and shut the door
when speaking to someone about me. I perceive this as sneaky and very troublesome. This
type of behavior puts me at risk of becoming very angry. This is my home and everything
needs to be out in the open. I need caregivers who develop trust with me. I have also had
caregivers use my belongings without asking first. This also puts me at risk. Remember
that you are in my home and I want to be treated with the same respect that you have in
your home.
Thank you for taking the time to read my life story and for being patient in building trust
with me. I have many people who care about me and help me in my life. If you are one of
these people, then God bless you.
Always remember that I am human and doing the best I can to have a happy and fulfilling
life just like you.
Sincerely,

______ ______.




    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                 PROMOTING VIOLENCE or EVOKING PEACE
                                                                                          J. Leismer---6/29/01


To survive, emotions are essential. Emotions include love, fear, aggression.
John Bowlby explored the importance of Bonding between parents & infants for
assuring nourishment and for learning.
John McGee, in discussing Gentle Teaching, talks about the importance of Learners
feeling safe & feeling loved. [note the link between bonding and feeling loved].
Feeling safe & loved is the antithesis of feeling unsafe & hated.
Certain points are worth noting:
    PEOPLE LEARN [see John Dewey] BY DOING.
    PEOPLE ARE MORE INCLINED TO LEARN FROM SOMEO N E T H E Y ‘ E                            V
    BONDED WITH AND WITH WHOM THEY FEEL SAFE.
                                              B
    A C T IO N S T H A T E R O D E T H E ‗ O N D ‘ (safe & loved ), D IM IN IS H T H E
    POTENTIAL FOR LEARNING & FOR PEACEFUL COHABITATION.
    ACTIONS WHICH ENHANCE THE SENSE OF COMPANIONSHIP &
    ACCEPTANCE, INCREASE THE POTENTIAL FOR POSITIVE, ENJOYABLE
    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES.
    PEOPLE LIKE TO BE LIKED (unconditionally).
    PEOPLE         WITHDRAW            FROM       THREATENING           SITUATIONS           or
    DISRESPECTFUL SITUATIONS.
    WHEN SOMEONE FEELS DISENFRANCHISED, THEY WITHDRAW AND
    LOSE SELF-ESTEEM &/or THEY BEGIN TO BUILD FRUSTRATION.
    UNRESOLVED FRUSTRATION CAN LEAD TO ANGER.
    U N R E S O LV E D A N G E R C A N LE A D T O V IO LE N C E [―anger‖ is just 1 letter from
    ―d anger‖].
    SAFE— LOVED— BONDED— CONNECTED                      CAL       LEAD      TO     PEACE      &
    SATISFACTION.
***WE NEED TO BE MINDFUL OF WHAT WE CREATE, REPRESENT & EXUDE.
***VIOLENCE AND ANGER ARE INFECTIOUS.
***PEACE GROWS PEACE.

             R
   ―IF Y O U ‘ E N O T A PA R T O F T H E S O LU T IO N , Y O U A R E A PA R T O F T H E PR O B LE M .‖
                                         --Eldridge Cleaver




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                              ce
                      ―Injusti anyw h ere is a th reat to justice everyw h ere.‖
                                          -M.L.King, Jr.
                                                                                         J. LEISMER      5/12/01


There are NO cultures where there are not differences between people. Race, religion,
color, weight, height, gender, political party, caste, sexual preference, in-groups, out-
groups… S tatistically, in each area, th ere is a d om i   nant cul ture (d om inant by numbers &/or
                          m
b y pow er). J ust as ani als try to estab lish a h ierarch ical ‗        ng        ,
                                                                    pecki ord er‘ so too d oes th is
frequently happen with people. The sense of status, whether based on ecomonics or other
factors, is common in the world. The sense of equality and the presence of justice are not
so much things that exist everywhere as they are ideals that we aspire toward. Similarly,
equality (brotherhood/sisterhood/person-hood) remains something to be aspired toward. In
                                                                              s
America, European immigrants did not say: ―th is is a b ig country, let‘ ask if w e can sh are i     t
w ith N ative A m eri     ‖           d
                     cans. T h ey d i not say: ―this is a b ig country, lets send a cruise liner to
                                d ke                          ‖
A frica to see if anyone w oul li to com e and join us. T h e h istory of A m erican racism is
horrible (as is the history of racism in most countries). Stealing people from their families;
taking away their religion & their language & their names; forcing them into slavery and
consid ering th em l  ess th an ‗          ;                                and
                                   people‘ d riving th em from th eir l s; forcing th e m onto
reservations and sending their children away from them to boarding schools so they could
learn th e d om i nant cul       s
                            ture‘ b el  iefs…    … th ese jux tapose poorly w ith the D eclaration
ofIndependence. Thomas Jefferson (with whatever shortcomings he had) did not write:
                                                         b                      t
"All, except the following, are entitled to Life, Li erty, and th e Pursui of H appiness… ‖ B ut
we persevere. Our words and our declared beliefs include Justice and Equality. Our laws
                        s                t      dy
d em and it. E veryone‘ h eart d oesn‘ rapi l follow th at course but we are compelledto live
            ts                                d             ve
as h ypocri or to aspire tow ard th ose i eals. S o w e‘ com e a long w ay. W e h ave not full       y
arrived. How does this tie into Gentle Teaching ?
Come back to the basics. The pillars of gentle teaching: being Safe, Loved, Loving, and
E ngaged . If people feel S afe w ith each oth er, regard less of d ifferences… If people feel
                                                     ued
Loved b y oth ers (or at least respected and val )… If people feel Loving tow ard oth ers (or
at least respectful & th ey value th e d iversity of th eir nation)… . If people are Engaged in
sh ared ex peri                               ly)               ng
                ences w h ere th ey (m utual h ave som eth i to gain b y th e ex peri      ence… T o
the extent that these factors are in place, we are much closer to Social Justice. To the
extent that these things occur, we have a chance at Solidarity. The absense of Solidarity is
why Brown Vs. the Board of Education w as essenti … . ‗ eparate‘ w as never ab le to m ean
                                                           al     S
 E     ‘n                                                                aw
‗ qual i ed ucation or anyw h ere else. T h is is w h y C ivil R igh ts l s and th e A m ericans w ith
     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
Disabilities Act are so important. All people need to feel safe. All nations need laws that
require equal treatment and to outlaw discrimination.
What about the reverse of the Gentle Teaching pillars? What if we continue to exclude
                                                                                          ll
people (to marginalize, ostracize & disenfranchise people… )? If w e d o th is, w e w i continue
to breed resentment, fear, loneliness, suicide, violence, and hate. Building prisons will
continue to be a growth industry. The dozens of News Magazine television shows will never
run out of horror stories of crimes performed by bitter and thrown-away, angry people. To
the extent that we focus on our differences, we feel apart. To the extent that we look at
sim i                                                ife
     larities and at th e sh ared ex periences of l on th is pl     anet… … to that ex tent, w e feel
together. To the extent that we help people connect with one another and to honestly look
         sh
at th e ‗ ortcom i  ngs‘ of h istory, w e can also look at th e sh ared opportunities of th e future.
The Choice is ours. Everything we do each day either erodes or supports a good future and
a ‗                                                                         ly
   kind er and gentler‘ present (G H W B ). C h ange d oes not general com e from th e top.
Changes come from each person, one at a time. Change comes from reaching out and
beginning. Change comes from looking at who is most likely to be excluded and finding a way
to h elp th em to feel val                                           t
                           ued and connected . ―G ood things d on‘ just h appen, they are m ad e to
                                                                                               d
h appen‖ (J F K ). B e a part of G row ing Peace and O vercom ing R acism . R acism is a w orl w id e
cancer that does not deserve to survive anywhere on the planet. We are better than that.
Our grandchildren deserve better.




                                    (IT REALLY DOES ALL ADD UP)




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                                                                         J. LEISMER      5/12/01


There are interesting similarities between personal relationships and relationships between
nations. Having a sense of respect for the other person or nation has an impact on how you
(as a person or as a nation) act with & toward others. Recognizing that there are
                              s
d ifferences is fine. ―It‘ norm al to b e d ifferent‖ (G unnar D yb w ad ). C om panionsh ip w ith
other nations does not mean we agree on everything. It means that, because we have a
relationship, we can have a genuine dialogue. It means that, because we have a relationship
                            s
and respect each oth er‘ righ t to feel                                k
                                           ing as they d o, w e can tal and l   earn to m ove c loser.
W e h ave m ore of an opportunity to ach i   eve greater und erstand i  ng… A n E ast Ind ian saying
                                l                                                  d‖
notes that: ―a fish in a sm al pond often th inks th at th is is th e w h ole w orl . O nce w e know
that there is more to the world yet to be discovered (not conquered), our journey can begin.
If we have shared activities with other nations, we can learn more from them (and we can
grow closer to one another). It takes aw ay som e of th e m ysti         que and m yth s ab out ―th e
                           ly
oth er‖ w h en you actual know oth ers and see & h ear p eople from that nati         on. It d oesn‘ t
                                    d         ty                             t
m ean that you think th ey provi e equali for w om en and it d oesn‘ m ean you are of th e
                             t
sam e religion. It d oesn‘ m ean that th ere are no h um an righ ts viol     ations or th at th ere is
political purity. It means that, because you have a relationship, you have some place to
begin to have a positive impact on one another. It means that you do care if their health
care system is not adequate, if their schools are insufficient, if the people of that nation do
not have enough to eat. A funny thing happens when you care about these factors. All of a
sudden, there are some shared interests and there is a place to open dialogues. If you
never open relationships & dialogues, you can never overcome myths & misconceptions about
each other (or see the true horror that may have gone on or which may still be going on that
    l                                                          t
w il have to b e ad d ressed ). T o th e ex tent that w e d on‘ know th e people of any nation or
                                                                             T
group and h ave som e sh ared interests, w e are A LL at risk. T h e ‗ ruth & R econci         liation
                           ca                                                          d          l
H earings‘ in S outh A fri b rough t out a d epth of h orror th at m uch of th e w orl (w ith al of
                                                         ly                    th
th e new s m ed ia com peting for stories) had never ful grasped . T o b e ‗ ere‘can give people
a chance to see each other in the light of day, not in the shadows of innuendoes. This does
                                                                d    E l
not m ean that you have relationsh ips w ith w hat you consi er ‗ vi E m pires‖ and th en ignore
                                      cs
th eir b reaching international eth i or th e precepts of justice, equality & freed om … . It
does mean that, if you never take the first step, you can never get to the second step in
achieving a rel  ationsh ip and opportunities for m utual grow th . It d oes m ean th at you d on‘   t
                            ld                             re     l
genuinely care ab out ch i ren in anoth er nation if you‘ sti l d ealing w ith ―th em & us‖ rath er
than with the humanity of each person and the serious needs of each child born on this
planet. Each child and each person deserves to feel Safe & Loved. Each child and each
     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
person deserves to have an opportunity to be engaged with others, regardless of where
they were born, in making this a better world for their grandchildren.
Look for a moment into your own history books (and remember that most history books tend
to be ethnocentric). How many examples can you find where the absence of relationships
between people and nations brought greater wealth and brotherhood/sisterhood and safety
to the world? Compare that to examples you can find where people working together
developed relationships to fight injustice or to promote well being or to move the world
positively ahead. For the short time that we are each on this planet, we need to be mindful
                                              t                                      re
of th e consequences of w hat w e d o (or d on‘ d o). T h is is a tiny planet and w e‘ each h ere
for only a blink of the eye. We need to enjoy life. We need to treat each other well. We
                           y                                        re
need to w ork cooperativel to m ake th ings b etter w hile w e‘ h ere. If you think this is
oversimplifying things, We Need to Talk.




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
―T h e longer I live, th e m ore I realize th e im pact of attitud e on
life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more
important than the past, than education, than money, than
circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other
people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance,
giftedness or skill. It w ill m ake or b reak a com pany… a ch urch …
or home. The remarkable thing is that we have a choice every day
regarding the attitude that we will embrace for that day. We
cannot ch ange our past… w e cannot ch ange th e fact th at people
will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The
only thing we can do is to play the one string we have, and that is
our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me
and 9 0 % h ow I react to it. A nd so w ith you… w e are in ch arge of
our attitud es.‖

                                      --Charles Swindoll




   G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                              If a person lives with criticism,
                                    He learns to condemn.
                              If a person lives with hostility,
                                     He learns to fight.
                               If a person lives with ridicule,
                                     He learns to be shy.
                               If a person lives with jealosy,
                                   He learns to feel guilty.
                              If a person lives with tolerance,
                                   He learns to be patient.
                           If a person lives with encouragement,
                                    He learns confidence.
                   If a person lives with praise, he learns to appreciate.
                               If a person lives with fairness,
                                      He learns justice.
                               If a person lives with security,
                                   He learns to have faith.
                              If a person lives with approval,
                                  He learns to like himself.
                      If a person lives with acceptance and approval,
                            He learns to find love in the world.

                (A d apte d from ―C h ild ren L earn W h at T h ey Live‖ b y Pare nts A nonym ous)
                                                    (JL/2001)




G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                              .
                                           … .h appiness… .
                                                                                           J. LEISMER 9-23-01


                                                              s
W h eth er w e ch oose to b e responsib le for oth er people‘ h appiness or not, m erely b y b eing a
part of their lives, we do play a (positive or negative) role.
Several traits have been identified as being com m on in ―happy people‖. T h ese includ e: (1)
high self-esteem ; (2 ) feeling personal control over your life (―th ose w i li th ttle or no control
                               ly                                     th
over th eir lives… ‖ general ―have low er m orale and w orse h eal ‖); (3 ) th ey are usually m ore
                              ve
optimistic (maybe they‘ learned to anticipate good th ings h appening); (4 ) m any happy
                               s                           n       d          t
people are ex troverts (it‘ h ard to b e an ex trovert i a w orl that isn‘ interested in you and
your b eliefs or feel                        d             t
                         ings; or in a w orl that d oesn‘ ask for your input); (5 ) having close
personal relationships is also seen in people who are happy; and (6) having religious
affiliations seem s to rel     ate to h appiness and life satisfaction (―som e research ers b elieve
th at rel             li                           al
         igious affi ation entails greater soci support and h opefulness‖). T h is information
on h appiness is ‗                ‘                      t
                   correlational in nature and w e d on‘ know if th ese trai ‗ ts cause‘ h appiness or
if happiness causes these traits [just that they often go hand-in-hand].
Visiting a new friend some time back, I asked him about one of the people who assists him
and w h y he values th eir friend sh ip. H e said : ―B ecause w e l  ike d oing th ings togeth er‖ and
―b ecause _ _ _ _ _ _ loves m e and treats m e good ‖. H e w as h onest and si ncere.
We each need to discover how we can help to promote happiness and friendship for others.
Do we know what the people we work with like; have we asked them &/or the people who
know them best? Do we provide opportunities for people to do things they enjoy with
people they like? Do we promote: high self-esteem; opportunities for people to have more
control over their own lives; reasons to be optimistic; circumstances where they feel free
expressing themselves; situations for establishing or maintaining close personal
relationships; opportunities for developing religious affiliations; a chance to do things with
people they like and have things in common with; a chance to choose where and with whom
they will live and work; a chance to love and to be loved by others; and opportunities for
them to be valued, appreciated, and treated well ?     …
Particular assistance needs to be provided to people with very limited verbal & physical
    ls                     im
skil and people w ith l ited social graces (people w h o currently have ―reputations‖ b ecause
of their unique behaviors). If you can help them to build good memories and positive social
relationships, you will assure that they have greater life satisfaction. This short article is
not i                       m
      ntend ed to oversi plify th e issue, m erely to say ‗                               .
                                                               give happiness a ch ance‘ It is not
often easy to help some people achieve increased life satisfaction & happiness. The
challenge brings out the best in all of us. The victories, as you know, are well worth the
effort.




     G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                                         QUOTES :

                                                                          ty
                                            ―T rue strength is th e ab ili to stay calm even
                                                                                 …
                                        in th e m id st of violence and discord . … … .-Remsiel


                                                                   ‖
                  ―If th ere is no struggle, th ere is no progress. –Frederick Douglas


                                            ―U nd erstand th e frustration w h en people think
                                                                       ‖
                                                th ey have no w ay out. -Coretta Scott King


                                     ―W h eth er one b elieves in a religion or not, everyone
                                    appreci                                ‖
                                            ates kind ness & com passion. –The Dali Lama


                 ―T h e pessim ist sees th e d ifficulty in every opportunity; an optim ist
                                        ty                    ty.
                   sees th e opportuni in every difficul ‖ --Sir Winston Churchill


                                                                              l
                             ―T h e m an w h o w ants to d o som eth ing, w il find a w ay. T h e
                                              t, l                    ‖
                           m an w h o d oesn‘ w il find an ex cuse. --Stephen Dolley, Jr.


                         ―T h e true m easure of som eone is h ow h e treats som eone w h o
                                                 m                     ‖
                                      can d o h i ab solutely no good . -Samuel Johnson


                                                                          ‖
                             ―A ll grand th oughts com e from th e h eart. -Vauvenargues


                                         ―O nly free m en can negoti    ‖
                                                                    ate. -Nelson Mandella


 ―I am not interested in picking up crumbs of compassion thrown from the table
                                                m                 ‖
                of som eone w h o consid ers h i self m y m aster. -Desmond Tutu


                                   re                      n             ‖
         ―W ith out ed ucation, you‘ not going anyw h ere i th is w orld. -Malcolm X


                  ―W e m ust com b ine th e tough ness of th e serpent w ith th e softness
                                                                        ‖
                      of th e d ove; a tough m ind and a tend er h eart. -M. L. King, Jr.


                       y                            e              ‖
―A n eye for an eye onl end s up m aking th e w h ol w orld b lind. –Mahatma Gandhi




G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page
                ―T o th ose w eak of und erstand ing, m ake not over your property, w h ich
               Allah hath made a means of support for you, but feed and clothe them
                                                                        ‖
       th erew ith, and speak to th em w ord s of kind ness and justice. –Koran 004.005


―H atered s d o not ever cease in this w orld b y h ating, b ut b y love: th is is an ex ternal
      truth. Overcome anger by love; overcome evil by good; overcome the miser by
                                                                 ‖
                         giving; overcom e th e lyer b y truth. -Dhammapada 1.5 & 17.3


        ―G o b eh ind th e apparent circum stances of th e situation and locate th e love in
                                                                        on.
                    yourself and in all oth ers involved in th e situati ‖ -Mother Teresa


                        ―T h ere is a soul force in the universe, which, if we permit it, will
                     flow through us and prod uce m i                ts.
                                                       raculous resul ‖ -Mahatma Gandhi

                                                                        s
                                                                ―A m an‘ true w ealth is in th e good
                                                                                         ‖
                                                                h e d oes in th e w orld. –Mohammed


                                                   w                           l
                                               ―A l ays d o righ t. T h is w il gratify som e people,
                                                                                      ‖
                                                            and astonish the rest. –Mark Twain


                                                            re
                             ―… W h at d oes th e Lord requi of you b ut to d o justly, to love
                                                                                     ‖
                                      m ercy, and to w alk h um bly w ith your G od . –Micah 6:8


                                                  ―H e w h o w ish es to secure th e good of oth ers,
                                                     h as alread y secured h is ow n. ‖ -Confucius


                                              ―K ind w ord s can b e sh ort and easy to speak, but
                                                   r                            ‖
                                              th ei ech oes are truly endless. –Mother Teresa


NOTE:          IF YOU HAVE QUOTES, MATERIALS, VIDEOS, OR OTHER RESOURCES THAT YOU WOULD
LIKE TO SHARE, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO SEND COPIES TO:
                        JERRY LEISMER
                        2172 DENBY DRIVE
                        WATERFORD, MCIHIGAN 48329 USA

                     ***Thank You to Cathy Turner & Carrie Wahab for
                         assistance in reviewing this document.***

    G.T.I.   2001 / Glick, Glick, Olver, Roberson, Schmidt, Sigworth, Stevens, Stroud, Leismer / Page

				
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