Docstoc

2004-2005 Graduate School Catalog

Document Sample
2004-2005 Graduate School Catalog Powered By Docstoc
					2004-2005
Graduate School
Catalog

Graduate School and
  Professional Programs
College of Liberal Arts,
  Sciences, and
  Technologies
Table of Contents                                                                      For more information, visit Gallaudet University's website:
                                                                                       http://www.gallaudet.edu

About Gallaudet University ............................................1               The 2004-2005 Gallaudet University Graduate Catalog was
                                                                                       prepared by the Office of the Provost, Judy Berglund, Special
Academics .......................................................................5
                                                                                       Assistant to the Provost, and the Graduate School and Profes-
Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals,                                           sional Programs, Robert C. Johnson, Graduate Editor, and
     Graduation ............................................................ 11        Robert E. Johnson, Associate Dean, Graduate Education and
                                                                                       Extended Learning.
Academic Standards and Policies .................................17
Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment .............23                            Catalog Coordination and Composition: Robert C. Johnson
Campus Life ..................................................................32       Printing: Kirby Lithographic Company
                                                                                       Every effort was made to print information accurately as of
Courses of Study ...........................................................36         July 1, 2004.
Graduate School and Professional Programs ...............36
     Administration and Supervision ...........................37                      This catalog is not intended to serve as a contract between
                                                                                       any student and Gallaudet University. University procedures,
     Counseling............................................................46          programs, and courses are under constant review and revision.
     Education..............................................................53         Gallaudet University reserves the right to change any provision,
                                                                                       regulation, or requirement set forth within this document and
     Educational Foundations and Research ...............71
                                                                                       the right to withdraw or amend the content of any course. Please
     Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences ............75                             consult the department or appropriate office for possible changes
     Interpretation ........................................................86         and updated information.
     Linguistics ............................................................92        Gallaudet University is an equal opportunity employer/educa-
     Physical Education and Recreation ......................99                        tional institution and does not discriminate on the basis of race,
College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and Technologies..102                               color, sex, national origin, religion, age, hearing status, disabil-
                                                                                       ity, covered veteran status, personal appearance, sexual orienta-
     American Sign Language and Deaf Studies .......102                                tion, family responsibilities, matriculation, political affiliation,
     Biology ...............................................................106        source of income, place of business or residence, pregnancy,
     English ................................................................106       childbirth, or any other unlawful basis.
     Government and History ....................................106
     Psychology .........................................................108
     Social Work ........................................................ 117
The University Community ........................................125
Organizational Chart ...................................................134
Graduate Academic Calendar .....................................135
Campus Map ...............................................................136
Index ...........................................................................137
                                       About Gallaudet University

Campus Location                                                           our interests, our abilities and disabilities—but we are at one
   Gallaudet’s campus is located in Washington, D.C., within a            in the pursuit of excellence in education for deaf and other
short bus ride of the U.S. Capitol and the other cultural amenities       special populations and the equalization of opportunities for all
of the city. The 99-acre campus, called Kendall Green, is home            people. In no other single location will you find a comparable
to undergraduate and graduate programs, a number of research              concentration of teaching, research, learning, and service activities
units, and the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, a            on such a wide range of topics relevant to deaf people. The best
federally supported program for improving educational results             known names in the field, the top researchers, the resources, the
for deaf and hard of hearing children across the nation. The              opportunities are all here at Gallaudet.
Center includes the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School                   In the graduate programs of Gallaudet's Graduate School and
and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf.                              Professional Programs and College of Liberal Arts, Sciences,
          Gallaudet University's mailing address is:                      and Technologies you will have the opportunity to work with
          800 Florida Avenue, NE                                          leading individuals on any of a number of areas, including:
          Washington, DC 20002-3695.                                      • early childhood development of deaf children
          The main telephone number is (202) 651-5000.                    • the genetics of deafness
          Web site: www.gallaudet.edu                                     • the cultural and linguistic aspects of sign language
                                                                          • Deaf studies
Visiting Gallaudet                                                        • state-of-the-art hearing aids and assistive devices
   Visitors are welcome at Gallaudet University. The Visitors             • educational and psychological tests and measurements
Center is located in the Edward Miner Gallaudet Building and              • survey research in the disability field
can be reached by calling (202) 651-5050. The Center conducts             • the effects of technology on the deaf community
tours of the campus Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. and 2                • interpretation
p.m. by appointment. Student Tour Guides greet thousands of               • leading change
visitors annually. A wide variety of visitors tour the campus,
including prospective undergraduate and graduate students and                And the Gallaudet experience is not limited to our 99
their families, school groups, sign language clubs, educators of          acres. When you come to Gallaudet, you have come to
the deaf, and international visitors. For more information about          Washington, D.C., the nation’s capital and a great academic
scheduling a tour or for directions to the campus, go to our              center. In addition to being near the institutions of the Federal
website: http://gradschool.gallaudet.edu/gradschool/openhouse/            Government, you will be close to many important associations
index.html                                                                that deal with issues of importance to deafness-related fields.
                                                                          These include the Council for Exceptional Children, the National
Graduate Study at Gallaudet University                                    Education Association, the American Psychological Association,
   Welcome to graduate study at Gallaudet University!                     the American Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities, the National
Gallaudet has long been acknowledged to be a leader in                    Association of State Directors of Special Education, the
providing graduate education in a broad variety of fields                  American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the Alexander
relating to deaf and hard of hearing people, special education,           Graham Bell Association, and the National Association of the
and disability. Gallaudet is a living laboratory in which an              Deaf, as well as dozens more. They are all at hand, within a brief
exceptionally skilled and dedicated faculty, a special student            drive or a few minutes on Washington’s excellent Metro subway
body, and unequaled resources come together. Graduate study               system.
at Gallaudet University is not a study of them; it is a study of             In addition, Gallaudet University is a member of the
us. We are deaf; we are hearing; we are old; we are young; we             Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan
are from every corner of the United States; we are from every             Area. As a Gallaudet graduate student, you will have open
part of the globe. We are richly diverse in our backgrounds,              to you the vast resources of Georgetown University, George
                                                                      1
About Gallaudet University


University, the University of the District of Columbia, the                   The diplomas of the three graduates were signed by President
University of Maryland, American University, Trinity College,                 Ulysses S. Grant. Since that time, all Gallaudet diplomas have
George Mason University, and Marymount University.                            been signed by the President of the United States.
Gallaudet’s library contains the world’s most complete collection                Women were first admitted to the college in 1887. In 1891,
of materials related to hearing loss and deaf people. If your needs           a graduate department was started to prepare hearing graduates
extend beyond our campus resources, the Library of Congress—                  of other colleges to become teachers of deaf children. At the
perhaps the world’s greatest information depository—is only                   request of the alumni, in 1894 the Board of Directors renamed the
                                                                              college Gallaudet College in honor of Thomas Hopkins Gallau-
a short drive away, and the libraries of all the consortium
                                                                              det. The corporation (including Kendall School) continued to be
universities are open to you as well.                                         known as the Columbia Institution until 1954 when Public Law
   At Gallaudet, we believe in learning by doing as well as by                420 of the 83rd Congress changed the name of the entire institu-
reading, listening, and observing. Many of our graduate programs              tion to Gallaudet College. Public Law 420 also stated Congress’
offer outstanding opportunities for practicum and internship                  intent to continue adequate financial support of Gallaudet and
activities, and graduate assistantship activities. We also have               affirmed the importance of higher education for deaf people.
excellent resources for getting involved in the kinds of research                 In 1957, Gallaudet was granted accreditation by the Middle
you most want to pursue. We even have an internal grant fund,                 States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Every
intended specifically for graduate students and faculty, that                  10 years Gallaudet is reexamined by this association. Over the
supports research projects in any of the many fields that brought              years, the campus and its facilities have grown to meet the needs
you to Gallaudet.                                                             of its students, and its programs have evolved to serve deaf and
                                                                              hard of hearing individuals nationally and internationally. In
   Gallaudet is committed to providing students with the best
                                                                              1969, the Model Secondary School for the Deaf was established
educational experience possible. In any of the many fields related             on Kendall Green to devise, develop, and test innovative and
to deaf people, special education, rehabilitation, and disability,            exemplary courses of study for deaf and hard of hearing high
when you come to Gallaudet University, you have made the right                school students.
choice.                                                                           In 1970, Congress passed the Kendall Demonstration
                                                                              Elementary School Act (P.L. 91-587), which transformed the
History of Gallaudet                                                          historic Kendall School into a demonstration elementary school
                                                                              with programs for students from birth through eighth grade, ex-
   Gallaudet University had its beginnings in 1856 when Amos
                                                                              panding its role to include research and dissemination. The Ed-
Kendall, postmaster general during the administration of President            ucation of the Deaf Act in 1986 reauthorized KDES and MSSD
Andrew Jackson and a well-known journalist and philanthropist,                and established a national commission to study the education
established a school for deaf and blind children. He donated                  of students who are deaf and hard of hearing across the United
two acres of land and a house located on one corner of his estate             States. The Education of the Deaf Act Amendments of 1992
in Northeast Washington. In 1857, he persuaded Congress to                    (P.L. 102-421) not only reauthorized KDES and MSSD but also
incorporate his Kendall School as the Columbia Institution                    mandated the schools to maintain exemplary elementary and
for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind. The                   secondary educational programs and to institute projects and
President of the United States (then James Buchanan) was the                  activities for the primary purpose of developing, evaluating, and
school’s patron. Congress also agreed to pay the expenses of                  disseminating innovative curricula, materials, and instructional
poor children from the District of Columbia to attend the school.             techniques and strategies. Formerly called Pre-College National
                                                                              Mission Programs, the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education
   Following Congress’ action, Kendall hired Edward Miner
                                                                              Center ( “Clerc Center”) encompasses KDES, MSSD, and other
Gallaudet to be superintendent of the institution. Gallaudet was              units devoted to the research, development, and dissemination
the son of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, founder of the first school               functions mandated. For more information about the Clerc Cen-
for deaf children in the United States. Both Gallaudets believed              ter, please visit its Web page at: http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/
that a national college should be established for deaf students.                 Congress acted during the 1985-86 academic year to recog-
In 1864, Congress, persuaded by Edward Miner Gallaudet and                    nize the growth and development that has been an integral part
Amos Kendall, voted to authorize the Board of Directors of the                of Gallaudet’s history. On August 4, 1986, President Ronald
Columbia Institution “to grant and confirm such degrees in the                 Reagan signed into law the Education of the Deaf Act of 1986,
liberal arts and sciences . . . as are usually granted and conferred in       which bestowed university status upon Gallaudet.
Colleges.”                                                                       On March 6, 1988, Gallaudet students began a demonstra-
   President Abraham Lincoln signed the bill and became the                   tion, known as the Deaf President Now movement, to protest
                                                                              the hiring of a hearing president of the University. What began
first patron of the National Deaf Mute College. Edward Miner
                                                                              as a student protest grew into a civil rights movement for deaf
Gallaudet became president of both the institution and the                    people. Within less than a week, the hearing president, Dr. Elisa-
college. In 1865, blind students attending the Columbia Institution           beth Ann Zinser, resigned her post, and Dr. I. King Jordan was
were transferred to the Maryland School for the Blind, and the                selected by the Board of Trustees as the University’s first deaf
words “and the Blind” were dropped from the institution’s title. The          president. Philip Bravin became the first deaf chair of the Board
first class to take the entire college course graduated in 1869                of Trustees, and in February 1991, Gallaudet’s Board of Trustees
.
                                                                          2
                                                                                                           About Gallaudet University



reached its goal—set during the Deaf President Now move-                  language and written and spoken English. As a result, students
ment—of having a majority of deaf members.                                are able to participate fully in all aspects of campus life and
   President Jordan continues to be an important spokesman in             thereby acquire the comprehensive education and experience
the struggle to gain equal rights for people who are deaf or have         that is the goal of a liberal arts education.
other disabilities, which culminated in the July 1990 signing                Gallaudet University is committed to providing instruction in
of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This historic               the arts and sciences that is vital to intellectual development; to
legislation bans discrimination against people with disabilities in       conducting research aimed at enhancing the lives of deaf and
employment, public transportation, general services, accommo-             hard of hearing individuals; and to serving deaf and hard of hear-
dations, and telephone services.                                          ing people, families, friends, and professionals.

Accreditation                                                             The Gallaudet University Vision Statement
   Gallaudet University is accredited by the Commission on                  During 1992-93, the Gallaudet community developed the fol-
Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges             lowing statement to guide program planning as the University
and Secondary Schools (MSA). The teacher preparation program              moves into a new century:
is approved by the Council on Education of the Deaf. The
doctoral program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the                 The vibrant Gallaudet University of today is a tribute to our
American Psychological Association. The M.S. program in                   enduring heritage as an academic institution and cultural center.
Speech-Language Pathology and the clinical doctoral (Au.D.)               We are proud of our contributions to the success of genera-
program in Audiology are both accredited by the Council on                tions of deaf and hard of hearing leaders who have served our
Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-                   nation and international community well. Today, as powerful
Hearing Association (ASHA). The M.A. programs in Mental                   new forces generate encompassing change in society against a
Health Counseling and School Counseling are fully accredited              backdrop of an increasingly diverse America and an increasingly
by the Council on the Accreditation of Counseling and Related             interconnected world, we must redefine what the best education
Programs (CACREP). The social work MSW program is                         for deaf and hard of hearing students is. We must chart bold
accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The M.A.              new directions to guide our actions as we move toward the 21st
in Interpretation has been found to be in full compliance with the        century and beyond:
Interpreter Education Standards of the Conference of Interpreter            Gallaudet students will experience those intellectual and
Trainers (CIT). Gallaudet University has also been granted full           practical challenges that lead to productive work, community
unit accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation              service, and personal satisfaction.
of Teacher Education (NCATE). This NCATE unit includes
the following programs: MSW in School Social Work, M.A.                      The heart and soul of Gallaudet has been and must continue
in Teacher Preparation, M.A. in School Counseling; Ed.S. in               to be quality undergraduate education. We will challenge our
School Psychology; Ph.D. in Special Education Administration.             students to work up to their abilities and challenge our faculty to
                                                                          teach innovatively as they demand exemplary academic work.
                                                                          At the same time, we will continue to maintain excellence in our
Gallaudet's Goals and Mission                                             pre-college, graduate, and continuing education programs, and
  Gallaudet's goals and beliefs are guided by its formal state-
                                                                          encourage and support theoretical and applied research.
ments of mission, vision, sign communication, and its Credo.
                                                                            Learning at Gallaudet will occur not only in the classroom
The Gallaudet University Mission Statement                                but also through many other academic and extracurricular
   The mission of Gallaudet University is to serve as a compre-           activities.
hensive, multipurpose institution of higher education for deaf and
                                                                             Our definition of learning is inclusive. We will strive to be a
hard of hearing citizens of the United States and of the world. In
                                                                          community where everyone at every level teaches and learns,
addition to its undergraduate and graduate academic programs,
                                                                          leads and supports. We will view all aspects of the daily inter-
the University also offers national demonstration elementary and
                                                                          actions in our community together with organized activities as
secondary education programs.
                                                                          critical components of a liberal arts education.
    Located in Washington, D.C., the University extends its activ-
ities to a worldwide audience through a network of regional cen-            Gallaudet will value and nurture the wealth of cultural, lin-
ters, international agreements, and public service and advocacy           guistic, and ethnic diversity which enriches our community.
efforts. Gallaudet University’s undergraduate program is the
only university-level program in the world designed exclusively             Cherishing the different experiences each of us brings, we will
for deaf and hard of hearing students. Communication among                use them to enhance learning. Valuing freedom of expression,
faculty, staff, and students is through the use of both sign              we will view our entire community as a forum for the exchange

                                                                      3
About Gallaudet University


of ideas and scholarly debate. Striving to be a model multicul-            American Sign Language and English
tural community, we will ensure that at Gallaudet, deaf, hard of              Gallaudet University is a bilingual community in which both
hearing, and hearing people are able to communicate directly               American Sign Language and English thrive. We recognize that
without barriers. Respect for all will be a hallmark of everything         in our campus community ASL and English coexist in complex
we do.                                                                     ways; accordingly, this statement reflects the attitudes, philoso-
                                                                           phies, and realities of sign diversity on campus.
The Gallaudet University Credo
   Gallaudet’s Vision Statement expresses what the University              Sign Communication
aspires to become and achieve as the world’s premier academic                 The University is committed to creating a visual communica-
institution for deaf and hard of hearing people. Implicit in our vi-       tion environment which best supports scholarship and the basic
sion are core values that serve as guiding principles for the way          tenets of humanistic education. Three principles will be our
members of the campus community teach, study, work and live.               guide as we work together to ensure that clear visual communi-
The Gallaudet Credo identifies and realizes those core values.              cation is the norm in every University unit and department.

                                                                           Principle 1: At Gallaudet, effective sign communication sup-
    The Gallaudet University campus community includes stu-
                                                                           ports education.
dents, faculty, teachers and staff, all of whom share certain com-
mon goals and values that we all believe enrich our academic en-              Each of us has the right and responsibility to understand and
vironment. The community’s primary goal is to prepare students             be understood. Clear and well-paced visual communication is a
to be informed, literate, productive and responsible citizens. In          requirement for this learning community. Because Gallaudet is
pursuit of this goal, community members pledge to uphold the               an institution of higher education, the primary mission of which
following values: We believe that education is a dominant influ-            is to educate deaf and hard of hearing individuals,understanding
ence on our lives and recognize that learning is a lifelong quest.         the content we wish to convey must guide our actions more than
Therefore we will practice academic and personal integrity and             the mode of communication.
work to create a positive and welcoming environment that is
open to the free exchange of ideas among members of our com-               Principle 2: Sign communication at Gallaudet will be inclusive,
munity.                                                                    respectful, and flexible.
    We believe that every person should be treated with civility
                                                                              Our community will incorporate and respect ASL, and rec-
and that our community is strengthened by the broad diver-
                                                                           ognize that students, faculty members, and staff members may
sity of its members. Therefore, we will promote and applaud
                                                                           each have different visual communication needs. We will respect
behaviors that support the dignity of individuals and groups
                                                                           the sign language style of every individual and use whatever is
and are respectful of others’ opinions. We will especially
                                                                           necessary to communicate in a given situation. We will know and
discourage behaviors and attitudes that disrespect the diver-
                                                                           practice deaf/hearing communication etiquette so that public
sity of individuals and groups for any reason including reli-
                                                                           discourse, both formal and informal, is fully accessible.
gion, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability,
hearing status, or language and communication preference.                  Principle 3: Direct sign communication is central to the Gal-
    We believe that as members of the Gallaudet community we               laudet vision.
are the recipients of a proud and rich heritage, as well as con-
tributors to and benefactors of our institution’s bright future.              Since effective visual communication in this bilingual com-
Therefore, we will strive to bring credit to our community and             munity is fundamental to the successful achievement of our
ensure that the institution flourishes and succeeds in its mission.         academic mission, Gallaudet will develop the training and
                                                                           assessment programs necessary to ensure that all of us have the
                                                                           opportunity to become fluent signers. We will each be assertive
Sign Communication at Gallaudet University                                 and sincere in our efforts to attain sign language proficiency so
   In February 1995, Gallaudet University adopted the following            that we can all communicate directly with each other.
statement about sign communication:
                                                                           Equal Opportunity/Nondiscrimination
   Since its inception as an institution of higher learning, Gallau-          As an equal opportunity educational institution, Gallaudet
det University has endorsed direct visual communication among              encourages applications from racial and ethnic minorities. Gal-
deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing members of the community.               laudet is committed to a barrier-free environment and provides
Clear, understandable signing is the responsibility of each of us.         students who have physical disabilities (in addition to hearing
Because of the increasing social, cultural, and linguistic diversity       loss) the assistance they need to participate fully in campus
of our students, we have reexamined and described what effective           programs and activities.
sign communication means at Gallaudet.

                                                                       4
                                                        Academics
Different Ways to Learn at Gallaudet                                   The Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Extended
                                                                       Learning acts as advisor to graduate special students. All
                                                                       graduate special students must obtain the instructor’s permission
Kinds of Programs                                                      to register for any course. In the absence of the instructor, the
                                                                       program director or the chair of the department may provide
                                                                       permission for a graduate special student to register for a
Undergraduate and Graduate Programs of Study                           course. The signature of the program director or the chair will
    Gallaudet University offers programs of study for both             constitute permission for the Associate Dean to approve the
undergraduate and graduate students. We offer B.A., M.A., and          registration of the student. The person who signs is obliged to
M.S. degrees as well as Ed.S. and Ph.D. degrees. In addition,          inform the instructor of the additional student(s) enrolled in
we offer several professional degrees, such as the M.S.W., Psy.        the class. Enrollment in some graduate courses is limited to
S., and Au.D. professional practice degrees. A complete listing        degree students. Graduate special students may not enroll as a
of graduate programs can be found later in this catalog.               Gallaudet student in courses in other universities or colleges in
                                                                       the Consortium.
Certificate Programs
                                                                       Consortium Graduate Students
   In addition to the traditional degrees mentioned above,
Gallaudet University currently offers three graduate certificate           Matriculated graduate students from other universities in
programs. The graduate certificate is often called a “mini-             the Washington Consortium may take courses at Gallaudet
degree” and consists of courses offered for graduate credit.           University under the rules and provisions of the Consortium.
These credits may be applied to graduate degree programs and           Class limits will permit regular Gallaudet University graduate
are often taken in conjunction with a regular graduate degree.         students into the class before Consortium students.

                                                                       Professional Studies Students
Summer Programs                                                           Professional Studies Courses (with a PST prefix) are offered
   Some graduate programs require summer course work.                  widely at Gallaudet. Students who enroll for these courses are
Courses are listed in the Summer & Saturday @ Gallaudet                categorized as Professional Studies Students and will receive
Course Schedule available in January of each year and online           a separate transcript for these courses. Most sign language
at http://clast.gallaudet.edu/summer/. The S & S @ G office is          courses offered at Gallaudet are PST courses.
located in 151 Hall Memorial Building.
                                                                       Kinds of Courses
Kinds of Students
                                                                       Undergraduate and Graduate Credit Courses
                                                                          Courses listed in this catalog and in the undergraduate catalog
Degree-Seeking Graduate Students                                       are credit courses which have been approved by the Faculty
This classification refers to a student who has completed the           Governance process (either the Council on Undergraduate
application process for a graduate degree or graduate certificate       Education or the Council on Graduate Education). In general,
program and who has been accepted by the faculty of that               they may be applied to Gallaudet University degrees and
program.                                                               graduate certificate programs, unless there is a specific
                                                                       restriction linked to a particular course.
Graduate Special Students
   This classification refers to students who are enrolled in           Professional Studies Courses
courses offered by the Graduate School but are not pursuing a             Gallaudet University offers a wide range of professional
program of study leading to a graduate degree. The application         studies courses. These bear the prefix PST and have been
process for graduate special students is described below.              approved by the Advisory Panel on Professional Studies. PST

                                                                   5
Academics


courses carry Gallaudet University credit, but may not be               Academic Programs and Services
applied toward a Gallaudet University degree or certificate
program. Some other universities and accrediting organizations
do accept PST credits, however, so students should check                The Culture and Language Colloquium
to determine applicability of the coursework elsewhere.                     The Culture and Language Colloquium (CLC) is a program
The grades of PST courses are recorded on a separate PST                offered to entering graduate students prior to the fall semester.
transcript and do not appear on the regular Gallaudet University        It provides information thought to be critical to success at the
transcript. Some PST courses are offered as clusters that lead          University. The program is presented in the format of a two-
to professional certificates. These are listed on the Professional       credit course on diversity and culture, with a focus on issues
Studies web-page at                                                     related to deafness and the Gallaudet environment. The course
                                                                        combines on-line study and discussion with on-campus lectures
http://gspp.gallaudet.edu/shapes/pst/pst.html//.                        by well-known experts in the field of education of deaf people,
                                                                        and activities designed to increase student understanding of
                                                                        diversity. Equally important, the program is an opportunity for
                                                                        new deaf and hearing graduate students to learn how they can
Enrichment Courses                                                      build partnerships with each other and effectively assimilate
    Summer & Saturday @ Gallaudet/Enrichment (SSAGE                     into the Gallaudet milieu. Students who have attended the
courses) offers learning-for-pleasure courses throughout                colloquium in the past have consistently rated it as one of
the academic year. Some courses offer students Continuing               the most powerful educational experiences of their graduate
Education Credits (CEU’s). Enrichment courses may not be                studies. All new deaf and hearing graduate students are strongly
applied toward Gallaudet University degree programs. See the            encouraged to attend the colloquium due to its unique nature
list of current enrichment courses at                                   and the “jump start” it provides students prior to starting classes
http://clast.gallaudet.edu/summer//.                                    in the fall. Several levels of Intensive Conversational American
                                                                        Sign Language courses are offered concurrently with the CLC.
                                                                        Students are encouraged to hone their sign language skills as
Delivery Systems for Courses                                            much as possible before beginning graduate studies. These
   Gallaudet courses may be taken in a number of different              courses are offered at an additional cost to the entering student.
formats. While most of our classes are offered as face-to-              More information can be found on the Graduate School website
face classes on campus, an increasing number of courses are             at: http://gradschool.gallaudet.edu/clc2003/index.html.
involving some degree of technological transmission. Many of
our teachers combine face-to-face teaching with materials and           Graduate Student Orientation
exercises posted to a website. In addition, we offer a variety             Graduate Student Orientation takes place during the two
of online courses, both for graduate credit and for PST credit.         days after the culmination of the Culture and Language
Through our extension programs, we can also bring credit                Colloquium and just before the beginning of fall semester
courses or contract classes to your site if you have an adequate        classes. This orientation is required of all new, degree-seeking
group of participants. Gallaudet University also has up-to-date         graduate students and gives them the opportunity to meet with
facilities to provide tele-courses or video conferencing at the         their department advisors and to make final preparations for
Gallaudet University Regional Centers in various parts of the           the beginning of the semester. Graduate special students are
United States.                                                          welcome to attend the opening orientation meeting on Thursday
                                                                        morning and then to meet with members of the Office of
                                                                        Graduate Education and Extended Learning to receive advising.

                                                                        Center for American Sign Language Literacy
                                                                        (CASLL)
                                                                           The Center for American Sign Language Literacy provides
                                                                        sign language proficiency evaluation, diagnostic assessment, and
                                                                        instruction in ASL to both the Gallaudet University community
                                                                        and the general public. On-campus ASL classes include
                                                                        instructional modules and tutoring services designed to meet the
                                                                        needs of a specific professional discipline, department, or unit.
                                                                        Interaction lunches offer additional opportunities for informal
                                                                        interaction and skill application.




                                                                    6
                                                                                                                              Academics


As a part of the Office of Graduate Education and Extended                consultation. Information and referral services offer assistance
Learning, the CASLL also offers ASL classes and other                    in attendant care, wheel chair repair, Seeing Eye dog training,
related training opportunities tailored specifically for agencies,        tutoring, mental health care, medical services, and legal advice.
businesses, and other entities at sites throughout the greater           Programs and services that are offered by OSWD include:
Washington metropolitan area. An interpreter education                   adaptive technology assessment and training, Braille/large print
component, funded by Gallaudet University and a grant from
                                                                         services, faculty development seminars, scholarships, public
the U.S. Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services
Administration, provides for the provision of a variety of               service and outreach, support groups and advisory boards, and
training opportunities and materials to interpreters throughout a        compensatory/study skills training.
six-state region (MD, VA, WVA, DE, PA, and DC). Participants                 OSWD students are protected from discrimination under
in ASL and interpreter education classes or workshops may                Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the
receive Professional Studies (PST) academic credit, RID or               Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These mandates
IACET Continuing Education Units (CEU’s), and/or Certificates             include rules regarding the confidential treatment of disability
of Completion.                                                           related information. Because disability related information
                                                                         is treated as medical information, it is handled under the
Classroom Notetaking Services                                            same strict confidentiality rules as other medical information.
    Upon request from a registered graduate student, the Office           Disability related records provided by a physician, psychiatrist,
of Graduate Education and Extended Learning will provide                 psychologist, or other recognized professionals are not subject to
a student notetaker for on-campus, face-to-face, graduate
                                                                         free access under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
credit courses. Students who wish to have a notetaker in a
class should inform the instructor, who will attempt to solicit          of 1974. In general, OSWD must have written permission from
a notetaker from among the other students. Once a notetaker              a student before releasing any information from the student’s
is identified, the requesting student will fill out a request form,        record.
available from each departmental office and carry it to the                   Students may come directly to OSWD and request services.
office of the Coordinator of Enrolled Student Services in HMB             Faculty and staff may refer students to OSWD and request
S-446. Notetakers then distribute a copy of their notes to those         technical assistance from OSWD staff. Entering graduate
students who want them. Notetakers are reimbursed by the                 students who feel that they may require an accommodation for a
Graduate School for their service. In order to receive maximum
                                                                         disability should contact OSWD soon after acceptance to begin
compensation, students wishing to serve as a notetaker in their
classes should complete the free notetaker training course,              the processes required to verify the disability. Check the OSWD
offered each August on the Friday before classes begin. For              site at http://depts.gallaudet.edu/OSWD// for specific directions
more information, contact the Coordinator of Enrolled Student            on how to request services. It is important to note that the
Services.                                                                request for services might require some time, so early filing of
                                                                         the documentation is critical if services are being requested for
                                                                         the first semester of attendance.
Office for Students with Disabilities (OSWD)
    The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSWD) provides
individually tailored, comprehensive support services and                Global Internship Program
programs for students with disabilities. OSWD empowers                      The Global Internship Program (GIP) gives Gallaudet
eligible students to succeed in their pursuit of higher education        students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students) opportunities
by striving to assure equal access and opportunity to curricular         to become more involved in deaf world affairs by living and
and extracurricular activities. Faculty and staff, administrators,       working abroad for a specific period of time up to one full
alumni, paraprofessionals, and parents and families also benefit          semester. This program is administered by the Center for
from services and programs.                                              Global Education (CGE) under the direction of the Office of
    Support services and programs are designed to meet the               International Programs and Services (OIPS).
individual needs of those being served and are coordinated with          http://depts.gallaudet.edu/CGE//
services offered on campus and in the community. Support
services that are provided and/or coordinated with other on-             International Internship Program
or off-campus offices/agencies include: psycho-educational                    The Center for Global Education (CGE), under the direction
and psychological evaluations which assess for Learning                  Office of International Programs and Services (OIPS), also
Disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders, and              coordinates the International Internship Program. This program
Psychological Disorders; individualized support service plan             is designed to provide an opportunity for scholars, researchers,
development, support service counseling/advising, advocacy               professionals, and students from other countries to visit
training, academic advising, career development, interpreting,           Gallaudet University, without pursuing an academic degree.
note taking, specialized testing, study lab, orientation and             Participants usually audit courses, gain practical experience, and
mobility training, reader/scribe services, and accessibility             visit schools, organizations and agencies serving people who


                                                                     7
Academics


are deaf. Areas of interest include the education of deaf children,       agencies, social service organizations, and educational
teacher training, social work, career education, leadership               institutions.
development, sign language, and deaf studies.                                Working with our staff, students can arrange placement
http://depts.gallaudet.edu/CGE//                                          locally, nationally, and internationally. With staff guidance,
                                                                          students learn how to research and develop their own
                                                                          placements. Examples of placement sites include Duke
English Works!                                                            University Center for Emerging Cardiovascular Technologies,
   English Works! provides free tutorial assistance to students           the White House, University of Michigan Kresge Hearing
in English courses. In addition, it provides advice and guidance          Research Center, federal agencies and research facilities,
to students working on writing projects in any course in the              congressional offices, hospitals, public and private schools, and
undergraduate and graduate curricula. Most tutoring and writing           deafness-related educational and social organizations. Many
advice is conducted in one-on-one sessions. Both walk-in and              students participate in more than one placement, supplementing
ongoing services are available.                                           their academic studies with valuable hands-on experience.
                                                                          Undergraduate students may earn academic credit for their
                                                                          internship placements, up to a total of 12 credits. Credits for
Online Professional Writing Course                                        graduate internship placements are determined by the student’s
for Graduate Students                                                     program guidelines.
   The Office of Graduate Education and Extended Learning                     The Career Center sponsors a variety of career-related
offers an online professional writing course, available to                seminars, conferences, and programs throughout the year,
graduate students. It focuses on the organization and structure           including a series of career fairs and part-time on campus
of writing at the graduate and professional level. For more               student employment fairs; programs and services include
information see the Professional Studies website http://gspp.             credentials files for students and alumni, graduate school
gallaudet.edu/shapes/pst/pst.html//.                                      admission testing (Miller Analogies Test and Graduate Record
                                                                          Examination), and an undergraduate level business and
Tutorial Center                                                           professional communication course offered in collaboration with
   The Tutorial Center is an academic support service                     the Department of Communication Arts. The Career Center web
available at no cost to Gallaudet students who have academic              page can be found at: http://careercenter.gallaudet.edu//.
difficulties or wish to improve their grades. Tutoring is available
individually or in small groups for all courses except English.           Career Library
English language tutoring is provided by English Works! Tutors
                                                                             The Career Library is the center of student activity for the
will help students improve in their courses by working on
                                                                          Academic Advising and Career Center. It contains in-depth
specific problem areas and showing them study skills for the type
                                                                          information on Gallaudet majors and an extensive collection of
of course being taken. Tutoring for graduate-level courses may
                                                                          career-related books, catalogs and directories, employer files and
be more difficult to arrange, so requests should be placed as soon
                                                                          graduate school information, and other materials. A computer
as possible.
                                                                          network offers resume and federal job application software,
                                                                          computerized guidance programs, and disk-based and online
Career Center                                                             employment databases, including access to the World Wide
   The Career Center offers cooperative education and                     Web. The Career Center home page links to approximately 50
internships and job search consulting. Through the internship             major job search resources. Through a link to JobTrak, students
program, students can acquire work experience related to their            can learn about local and national internship opportunities and
major studies and career goals. With job search consulting,               part-time campus employment. Current job vacancies for all
students learn the process of the job search and receive assistance       fields and employment sectors are filed in the Career Library
with seeking part-time, summer, and full-time employment.                 Job Bank. The Career Library website is: http://depts.gallaudet.
The Career Center collaborates with academic departments and              edu/aacc/
employers to help students achieve experiential requirements
for select majors. More than 300 employer representatives visit
annually to conduct sessions and on-campus recruiting, and                Tutorial and Instructional Programs
to participate in classes, workshops, and career fairs. Both the              Tutorial and Instructional Programs (TIP) provides free
internship and job search programs offer training in job search           tutoring, writing advice, and instructional support services for
techniques, networking, resume and federal job application                all undergraduate and graduate students. Hours are Mondays
preparation, developing portfolios, interviewing, working with            through Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Fridays
interpreters, and using assistive technology. The emphasis                from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. during the regular academic year.
throughout is on empowering students for the challenges of                The TIP tutor training program is certified by the College
working in the business and professional world. The internship            Reading and Learning Association’s (CRLA) International Tutor
program places students in private industry, government                   Certification Program. See the TIP site at:
                                                                          http://depts.gallaudet.edu/TIP//.

                                                                      8
                                                                                                                             Academics



Academic Resources                                                           Resources for students include two computer labs, one
                                                                         located in Benson Residence Hall, and the other in the Student
                                                                         Academic Center. Named the Harkin Digital Learning Center, it
Merrill Learning Center                                                  is an interactive laboratory with:
                                                                             •     30 private study carrels equipped with desktop
                                                                                   computers, a few with personal iBOT web cams.
University Library
   The Gallaudet University Library, housed in the Merrill                   •     24 computers in an open area for student and faculty
Learning Center, serves University students, faculty, staff, and                   use.
researchers from around the world. Reference librarians are                  •     low vision accessibility.
available to help users and to give formal instruction in library            •     a student collaboration room with a large plasma screen
research to classes and other groups. In the Library’s collections
are approximately 239,433 books, more than 1,725 current                           to work on projects and prepare for classroom
periodical subscriptions, 5,699 videotape and media titles, and                    presentations.
an internationally renowned Deaf collection, with books dating               •     student video suites for video creation and editing
back to 1546.                                                                      that provide high-end tech equipment to record digital
   Gallaudet students can access more than 8,000 full text                         video of signed communication, and to produce
journals through the Library’s ALADIN catalog. The Library’s
web site includes: the Index to Deaf Periodicals and the Guide                     computer graphics, animation, and web-base design.
to Deaf Bibliographies, both created by Gallaudet librarians;                      Video productions can then be saved on DVD, CD-
answers to frequently asked deafness-related questions;                            ROM and VHS.
bibliographies; and links to ALADIN and many other sites.
                                                                             The HelpDesk is a one-stop site for students and can be used
   The Library is a member of the Washington Research Library
                                                                         for any technology-related request. In addition, all residence
Consortium (WRLC), a network of seven university libraries.
                                                                         hall rooms are Internet accessible, and e-mail is available
Gallaudet students have full access, including borrowing
                                                                         through IMAP or Web access at:
privileges, to more than four million volumes and 29,000 serials
                                                                         http://academic.technology.gallaudet.edu/.
subscriptions of member libraries. The Library web site is:
http://library.gallaudet.edu//.
                                                                         Student Academic Center
                                                                            Opened in 2002, the Student Academic Center is the most
Archives                                                                 contemporary student academic center for deaf and hard of
    The Archives houses 4,000,000 pages of historical documents          hearing students in the world. This deaf-friendly environment
from schools from the 1800s and 1900s; 1,250,000 news                    embraces visual technology providing each student full
clippings related to the world deaf community; 1,600 items or            accessibility to the learning process. It houses nine electronic
architectural drawings of deaf schools including deaf architects;        classrooms, technology services, academic programs and
slides, and 125,000 negatives. The oldest item in the Archives is        services, collaboration rooms, and computer labs. Video
a book published in 1546. The Archives is open for public and            conferencing facilities include three cameras that support
scholarly research on Deaf history and culture Monday through            distance learning and workshop opportunities to students,
Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. It provides the online catalog              faculty, and staff. Internet 2 capability allows for increased
ALADIN to search any Gallaudet or other archival materials and           clarity of signed communication. Students wanting to benefit
also has computer terminals that individuals may use to access           from a Gallaudet education will soon be able to participate from
the World Wide Web.                                                      off-campus sites, and Gallaudet students can interact via video
                                                                         with off-campus guest lecturers. Other uses by students include
Academic Technology                                                      interviews with prospective employ ers, and by faculty and staff
   Academic Technology is the umbrella organization for                  to supervise student internships across the nation and worldwide.
campus units providing end-user training and support and
maximizing academic uses of technology at Gallaudet                      Consortium of Universities
University. Academic Technology has five offices: Executive                   Gallaudet University is a member of the Consortium of the
Director’s Office, Academic Computing & Engineering, Client               Washington Metropolitan Area. The Consortium is a powerful
and Multimedia Services, Learning Technology, and Television             force for the advancement of higher education in and around
and Media Production Services. Working collaboratively with              the nation’s capital. Comprised of twelve universities and
Information Technology Services (ITS), Academic Technology               two colleges, the Consortium provides 130,000 students with
provides technology support to the community through an                  opportunities to benefit from the combined resources of its
integrated campus-wide helpdesk:                                         members. Consortium institutions educate students from all 50
(http://helpdesk.gallaudet.edu).                                         states as well as more than 14,000 from around the world. The




                                                                     9
Academics


Consortium program provides Gallaudet undergraduate students              Gallaudet Interpreting Service
with opportunities to supplement their academic curriculum.                   Gallaudet Interpreting Service (GIS) provides professional
Students can take advantage of diverse academic offerings,                interpreting services to students, faculty, staff and teachers for
enhance their major curriculum, or explore new interests.                 Gallaudet-sponsored events. GIS also provides close vision or
Members of the consortium include American University, The                tactile interpreting services to deaf/blind students, faculty,
Catholic University of America, George Mason University, The              staff and teachers when requested. Although GIS is primarily
George Washington University, Georgetown University, Howard               a campus resource, it also provides interpreters to students
University, Marymount University, Southeastern University,                attending the Washington area consortium of universities, for
Trinity College, University of the District of Columbia, and              internships, and for other academic or work-related activities
University of Maryland at College Park. All undergraduate                 in the immediate Washington metropolitan area. GIS provides
class schedules and catalogs are on file in the Registrar’s Office.         workshops on a variety of topics and provides mentoring,
                                                                          training, and supervision to practicum and intern interpreting
Registration rules and criteria for graduate students are detailed
                                                                          students and freelance interpreters. Hours of operation are
in the Enrollment section below. Opportunities to take additional         Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. You may contact
consortium courses are contingent on successful performance               GIS by telephone (202) 651-5199 (tty/v), fax
in the student’s currently enrolled consortium course. Students           (202) 651-5752, or e-mail: gis@gallaudet.edu. The GIS website
who are enrolled in consortium member institutions are able to            is: http://gis.gallaudet.edu/.
attend certain classes at the other campuses and have the credit
considered as resident credit at their own institutions.




                                                                     10
    Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals, Graduation

Admission to the Graduate School                                         campus is conducted in sign language. Prospective graduate
   Application forms for all categories of students are available        students are advised to prepare themselves as much as possible
by calling 202-651-5647 or are downloadable from the Graduate            to participate in this environment. For students whose home
School website at:                                                       institution does not provide sufficient sign language training,
http://gradschool.gallaudet.edu/gradschool/applications/gradap-          Gallaudet offers a wide selection of sign language courses each
pl2003.pdf//.                                                            summer as well as in the evenings during the regular school
                                                                         year. You may find listings of sign language courses at the
                                                                         website of the Center for American Sign Language Literacy
                                                                         (CASLL) at:
Admission to a Graduate Degree Program                                   http://gradschool.gallaudet.edu/casll//.

Medical History and Immunization                                         Admission Requirements for U.S.
   All matriculated Gallaudet University students, both degree-
seeking and graduate special, must fill out and submit a medical          Degree-Seeking Students
history form to Student Health Services (SHS) before registra-             1. Completed Graduate School Application Form,
tion. This form must document a physical examination within                   including a $50 non-refundable application fee.
the last twelve months prior to enrollment.                                2. Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and
   In addition, by District of Columbia Law, students under the               graduate work, to be sent by the college or university
age of 26 at the time of matriculation must provide proof of the              directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions.
following immunizations:                                                      Applicants whose bachelor’s degree is not completed at
   (1) Tetanus/Diptheria booster within the past 10 years;                    the time of application will be considered for admission.
   (2) Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) twice at age 12 months                   If accepted, the applicant must submit a supple-
or older or evidence of immunity by titre;                                    mentary transcript showing completion of the degree
   (3) Tuberculin (Mantoux) PPD 5 TU within twelve months                     before registration.
prior to enrollment;                                                       3. At least a B (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) cumulative grade
   (4) Salk Polio vaccine within the past five years or evidents               point average (GPA) in undergraduate and previous
of oral polio vaccine (TOPV) series.                                          graduate work. Occasionally, applicants with a GPA
                                                                              lower than 3.0 may be admitted conditionally upon the
   Students over the age of 26 at time of matriculation need only             recommendation of the department. Most such students
the physical examination and the Tuberculin (Mantoux) PPD 5                   will be admitted on the condition that they achieve and
TU within twelve months prior to enrollment.                                  maintain an appropriate level of performance in their
   It is strongly recommended that all entering students also                 first year of graduate study.
receive the Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Varicella (Chicken Pox)          4. Official copies of scores indicating satisfactory
immunizations before starting at Gallaudet. Students accepted                 performance on the General Test of the Graduate
into the Graduate School will receive information regarding                   Record Examination (GRE), the Miller Analogies Test
required medical history and immunization in their acceptance                 (MAT), or the National Teachers Examination (NTE)
packet.                                                                       (if applicable). Some programs do not require
   For more information, call the Peter J. Fine Student Health                standardized tests; others accept only particular
Center at (202) 651-5090 (V/TTY).                                             examinations. Please check the admission require-
                                                                              ments of the program to which you are applying.
                                                                              GRE or MAT scores more than five years old are not
Sign Language Proficiency
                                                                              acceptable.
   Entry requirements for sign language proficiency differ
                                                                           5. Submission of the names of a minimum of three
by program. It is important to state, however, that Gallaudet
                                                                              referees—educators, employers, or others who will
University is a bilingual community in which American Sign
                                                                              evaluate the candidate’s personal and professional
Language and English exist side-by-side. Most classes are taught
                                                                              qualifications for graduate study and a professional
using signs. In addition, much of the social interaction on the
                                                                    11
Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals, Graduation



      career—from whom the applicant will request that                      2. Arrange for all agreements outlined in that section and
      recommendation forms be returned to the Office of                         provide documentation of permission from both depart-
      Graduate Admissions.                                                     ments involved.
   6. Applicant interviews and/or attendance at a Graduate                  3. Request reactivation of your original application files.
      School open house are highly desirable. Some                          4. Fill out an application form completely for the new
      academic programs require interviews.                                    program to which you are applying.
   7. Several programs have other specific admission require-                5. The application fee for the second degree is $50.
      ments. Refer to the application form or program                       6. New goal statements, letters of recommendation, and
      descriptions, or contact the department for details.                     transcripts may be required for the new application.
                                                                                  Check with the program advisor of the new program.
   Most programs use a wide range of materials and information
in making admission decisions. Performance in any one area,               Applying for a Graduate Certificate
while important, is usually not a sole determining factor.
                                                                          Program after Matriculation
                                                                            1. If you are interested in receiving a graduate certificate in
Admission Requirements for U.S.                                                addition to your degree, read the requirements for the
Graduate Certificate Students                                                   certificate program.
   1. Completed Graduate Certificate Student Application                     2. Talk with your advisor and the representatives of the
      Form, including a $50 non-refundable application fee.                    certificate program to be sure that you will be able to
   2. Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and                    meet all requirements of both programs and that your
      graduate work, to be sent by the college or university                   degree program will not be negatively affected by the
      directly to the Office of Admissions. Applicants whose                    additional coursework.
      bachelor’s degree is not completed at the time of                     3. Fill out an application form for the certificate program.
      application will be considered for admission. If accepted,            4. The application fee for the certificate program for
      the applicant must submit a supplementary transcript                     matriculated students is $25.
      showing completion of the degree before registering.                  5. Certain new information may be required for the
   3. Consult the program listing and the department to verify                 certificate application. Check with the program advisor
      other program-specific requirements for admission to                      of the new program.
      the certificate program.
                                                                          Admission as a Degree-Seeking
Reapplication                                                             International Student
   Files of applicants not accepted for a program of study will be
kept for two years from the initial date of application. To reap-         Admission Requirements
ply, applicants should send letters to the Graduate School Office            1. Applicants from countries where B.A.-level training is
of Admissions requesting reactivation of their files. Within the                available in the area for which application is being
first two years, applicants may reactivate their original files by               made to Gallaudet should have bachelor’s degrees to
submitting updated application materials that include academic                 be considered for admission. In addition, applicants
and professional information that has changed since the last                   must meet admission requirements stated previously.
application and current official transcripts of additional graduate          2. Applicants from countries where post-B.A. training is
courses completed. The fee for reapplying is $50.                              available in the fields applied for should have completed
                                                                               postsecondary training that would qualify them for
Applying to More than One Graduate                                             professional employment or advanced study in their
Program before Matriculation                                                   own countries. In addition, applicants must meet
   1. Fill out an application form completely for each program                 admission requirements stated previously.
      to which you are applying.                                            3. Applicants from countries in which B.A.-level training
   2. The first application fee is $50. Add $25 for each                        is available but who do not have a B.A. may be considered
      additional application.                                                  for admission if they have taken the GRE or MAT or
   3. Separate goal statements, letters of recommendation,                     have had professional experience felt to be appropriate
      and transcripts are required for each application.                       to the area and level of intended study.
                                                                            4. Prospective students from countries that do not have
                                                                               B.A.-level training in their fields must have completed
Applying to a Second Graduate Degree                                           the highest level training available in their countries.
Program after Matriculation                                                 5. Educational qualifications that allow individuals to
   1. If you are interested in receiving two degrees, read the                 teach in their countries will be considered and
      requirements for Cooperative Simultaneous Degrees                        reviewed by the Office of Graduate Admissions and the
      under the heading "Requirements for Degrees" in the                      appropriate departments.
      next section.

                                                                     12
                                                                      Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals, Graduation



   6. Competence in the English language must be demon-                        Gallaudet University has endorsed the Council of Graduate
      strated on the Test of English as a Foreign Language                  Schools agreement that potential students will not be asked to
      (TOEFL) examination. Exceptions may be considered                     make a final decision to accept admission or financial support
      on an individual basis.                                               before April 15.

Regulations                                                                 January and Summer Admissions
   The Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS,                   Although degree students are usually admitted in the fall
formerly INS) of the federal government requires that all                   semester due to the sequencing of courses, programs retain
graduate students in the United States on student visas be full-            the option to accept January applicants. Students interested in
time students (taking at least nine graduate credits per semester)          summers-only degree programs or January admission should
and that they make satisfactory progress toward their academic              contact the Graduate School office and the individual program
goals. United States immigration regulations require that                   for details.
international students accepted for study at Gallaudet provide
evidence of adequate financial support. The Immigration Form
I-20 will not be released without sufficient financial certification.          Admission as a Graduate Special Student
                                                                               1. Submit a Graduate School Application Form including
International Internship Program                                                  $50 application fee to the Graduate School office, to the
   The Center for Global Education provides an international                      attention of the Office of Graduate Admissions.
internship program for individuals from other countries who                    2. Provide the Graduate School office with one copy of
either do not qualify for regular admission to the University or                  undergraduate and graduate transcripts and evidence
are not interested in pursuing an academic degree. Individualized                 of a bachelor’s degree with at least a B (3.0 on a 4.0
programs are designed to meet the specialized needs of each                       scale) cumulative grade point average and graduate
intern. The duration of internships varies from one month to                      study (if applicable). Copies of transcripts need not be
one academic year. Recognition for successful completion of                       official copies.
a program is made as follows: individuals enrolled for one to                  3. Obtain and fill out a Course Selection Form for courses
three months receive the letter of recognition; a minimum of                      to be taken during the semester of graduate special
one semester of specialized study leads to the certificate of                      student status.
attendance; completion of a two-semester program that includes                 4. Check with the department offering the courses desired
four to six weeks of internship at a school or agency in the area                 to ensure that all prerequisites have been met and that
of deafness entitles an individual to the certificate of leadership.               graduate special students are permitted to take the
Interested individuals should apply to the Center for Global                      course. Obtain the instructor’s signature granting
Education.                                                                        permission for each course.
                                                                               5. Obtain the signature of the Graduate Special Student
                                                                                  advisor on all registration forms.
Admission for Fall Semester
    Applicants are encouraged to apply early. It is best if
applications and all supporting documents are received by the               Admission as a Graduate Special Student During
Graduate School by February 15. Although many departments                   Summer Sessions
will accept applications later than this date, most begin to                   Summer enrollment is handled by the Office of Summers
fill their incoming classes in late February. Application by                 and Saturdays @ Gallaudet (SSAGE). Contact that office, see
February 15 assures consideration of materials for placement                the summer catalog, or see the SSAGE website for specific
in the next incoming class. (Applications to the Clinical                   information.
Psychology program must be received by February 1, and
applications from international applicants should be completed              Admission as a Graduate Special Student for
by the end of December in order to complete all requirements                International Students
involved in issuing a student visa.) Specific application                       International applicants are defined as applicants who are
deadlines and other requirements are listed with the entry for              neither a United States citizen nor a Permanent Resident of
each program in the second half of this catalog.                            the United States. Admission as a graduate special student
    Applications received after the February 15 deadline will be            is available to international applicants in two ways. First,
accepted and reviewed only on a space-available basis. Please               international applicants who wish to take a course(s) on
consult the program you wish to apply for if you are applying               campus or to take an extension course in the United States, and
late.                                                                       who will be physically present for the classes, must hold an
    In most cases, all supporting documents are required before             appropriate visa, F-1 or J-l, during the semester the course is
the application will be reviewed by the department. The                     taken. Second, an international applicant who is not residing in
dean of the Graduate School and Professional Programs will                  the United States and who wishes to take only on-line courses
notify applicants when program decisions are made regarding                 from a department within Gallaudet University will be permitted
applications.


                                                                       13
Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals, Graduation



graduate special student status without visa restrictions. In both          Continuous Enrollment
cases, all other Gallaudet restrictions apply, including the tuition           Continuous enrollment is required for all matriculated
surcharge for international students.                                       graduate students. Continuous enrollment is defined as enroll-
                                                                            ment from the semester of admission until the completion of all
                                                                            degree requirements. (Summer sessions in which there are no
Student Classification                                                       program requirements are not included.) Students in summers-
                                                                            only programs must be enrolled in each fall, spring, and summer
Full-time Student                                                           semester. Students must be enrolled during the semester they
  A full-time graduate student has matriculated into a degree               complete the requirements of an incomplete course, take
program and is registered for at least nine credit hours per                candidacy or qualifying examinations, take comprehensive
semester. Students from programs that do not have summer                    examinations, or propose or defend a thesis or dissertation
course requirements, do not need to enroll for classes during the              The only other status options for a student wishing to take
summer. Students enrolled for their final semester of coursework             no courses during an academic semester either is the status of
may enroll for fewer than nine credits and remain classed as                “leave of absence," described below, or withdrawal from the
full-time if they are completing remaining degree requirements.             program of study and from the university.
Certain other exceptions may be made by the Dean of the                        For status of continuous enrollment, a student must register
Graduate School and Professional Programs at the request of the             for the course, GPS 798 or GPS 898: Continuous Enrollment
appropriate department chair and associate dean.                            through the offices of the Associate Dean for Graduate
                                                                            Education and Extended Learning. A student is responsible
Part-time Student                                                           to pay a $75 Continuous Enrollment Fee for each semester
   Part-time students are those who have applied and been ac-               of continuous enrollment. Procedures for enrollment can be
cepted to a Graduate School degree or certificate program but                found on the web site for the Office of Graduate Education.
who are enrolled for fewer than nine credit hours of courses dur-           A student will receive a grade of NG (no grade) at the end of
ing a particular semester. Students enrolled for fewer than nine            each semester. GSP 798 or 898: Continuous Enrollment earns
credits are subject to certain restrictions on dormitory residency          a student no graduate credit. Failure to enroll in GSP798 or
and financial aid. Typically, part-time study is negotiated with             898: Continuous Enrollment will result in termination from the
the appropriate program director and department chair. Part-time            program of study. A student wishing to return later will then
students typically must meet all statutes of limitations for their          need to reapply to the program of study.
program.
                                                                            Undergraduate Students in Graduate Classes
Graduate Special Student                                                       Under certain conditions, undergraduate students may
   This classification refers to students who are enrolled in                enroll for graduate classes. In general, this requires advanced
courses offered by the Graduate School but are not pursuing a               undergraduate standing, permission of the academic advisor,
program of study leading to a graduate degree. The Associate                and permission of the department and instructor offering the
Dean for Graduate Education and Extended Learning acts as                   course. Undergraduate students in graduate classes must
advisor to graduate special students. All graduate special students         compete exactly the same requirements as graduate students. In
must obtain the instructor’s permission to register for any course.         addition, undergraduate students must have met all prerequisite
In the absence of the instructor, the program director or the chair         requirements for the graduate course in which they wish to
of the department may provide permission for a graduate special             enroll.
student to register for a course. The signature of the program                 If the graduate class is to be used to fulfill requirements of
director or the chair will constitute permission for the Associate          a bachelor’s degree, the same credits may not be applied to a
Dean to approve the registration of the student. It will be the             graduate degree from Gallaudet University later. If the credits
obligation of the signing party to inform the instructor of the             are to be applied to a graduate degree, they should be excluded
additional student enrolled in the class.                                   from the undergraduate credit count.
   Enrollment in some graduate courses is limited to degree
students. Graduate special students may not enroll as a Gallaudet
student in courses in other universities or colleges in the                 Taking Courses Outside Gallaudet through the
Consortium and are not eligible for financial aid.                           Consortium of Washington Universities
   Admission as a graduate special student does not imply                      Degree-seeking graduate students who are in good academic
subsequent admission to a degree program. Graduate special                  standing may enroll in courses offered by another university in
students intending to become degree students should select                  the Consortium if those courses are not available at Gallaudet
courses in consultation with the appropriate graduate program               during the given semester or year. In general, students may not
and the Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Extended                  take more than half of their coursework in any given semester at
Learning. The appropriate academic department determines                    another Consortium university. This stipulation may be waived
eligibility for future enrollment in a degree program as well as            during a summer semester if the student must take Consortium
the potential application of credit hours earned as a graduate              courses but has no required courses to take on the Gallaudet
special student to future degree work.

                                                                       14
                                                                   Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals, Graduation



campus that semester. In general, this exception will apply to no           registrar reserves the right to verify all information provided on
more than two courses.                                                      the leave of absence contract. The registrar will send an informa-
  Cross registration at the other university is managed by the              tion packet to you prior to your expected date of return. Contact
Registrar’s office. Note that requesting cross registration does             the registrar’s office if you have any questions or have a change
not guarantee a place in the class. In addition, note that many             of address.
courses in other universities exclude participation by Consortium               The actual length of time permitted for the leave of absence
students.                                                                   is determined by the department. However, the leave of absence
  To be assured of the best chances of successful cross                     may not exceed four semesters (including summer). If a student
registration, begin early, meet all deadlines, be sure the course           is granted a leave of absence before the semester ends, that
you want is not excluded, be sure that you have met all pre-                semester will count as one of the semesters.
requisites and requirements for the course and that you have                    Students who plan to return to the University must notify the
gotten required permissions from the visited school. If you                 Department, the dean of the Graduate School and Professional
will need an interpreter for the course, it is critical to begin the        Programs, and the Registrar’s Office by the date determined at
process early, as the scheduling of classroom interpreters in the           the time the leave of absence was granted. If the student does not
Washington area is extremely difficult.                                      notify these three offices by the agreed date, then the student
   The deadline for cross registration for spring classes is the            will be automatically dropped from student status and have to
last day of final examinations in the preceding December.                    reapply for readmission.
   The deadline for cross registration for fall classes is the last             If a student receives any form of financial assistance, it is
day of the second summer session, usually in mid- to late July.             that student’s responsibility to notify sources about the leave of
   The deadline for cross registration for summer classes is the            absence status. The University is not in any way responsible for
last business day of the first week of May.                                  this. The office of the dean of the Graduate School reserves the
   Applications for cross registration received after the deadline          right to verify all information provided on the leave of absence
must be accompanied by a letter from the academic dean of the               contract.
school or college in which the student is enrolled. This letter
will document in detail the reasons that late registration is being         To Request a Leave of Absence
requested.                                                                     1. Talk with your advisor and write your letter of
                                                                                  justification.
Leaves of Absence and Withdrawals from the                                     2. Obtain a Leave of Absence Request Form from the
                                                                                  Graduate School Office.
University                                                                     3. Obtain all appropriate signatures, including that of the
                                                                                  Financial Aid Office.
Leave of Absence Policy                                                        4. Submit it to the Department Chair and obtain
   A student who who is a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident                    signature.
of the U.S. and who intends to stop taking courses for a period                5. Carry the form with all signatures to the Graduate
of time may request a leave of absence from the program in                        School Office.
which he or she is enrolled. Due to strict immigration laws,                   6. Keep a copy of the form for your records.
international students are not permitted to apply for leave of
absence status. Such requests must be made in advance of                    Medical and Emergency Withdrawal Policy
leaving the university, and programs and departments may                       A student who has a medical or other emergency may request
set their own additional requirements for granting a leave of               permission from the Office of the Provost to withdraw from
absence. If the program and department recommend a leave                    the University without academic penalty. The student will be
of absence, the request is then forwarded to the dean of the                required to provide full documentation of the reasons for with-
Graduate School and Professional Programs who approves or                   drawal.
denies it. Leave of absence will be automatically granted to
students who apply within the first eight weeks of the current               To Request a Medical or Emergency Withdrawal
semester.                                                                      1. Talk with your advisor.
   Students who are on leave of absence do not have access to                  2. Obtain a Withdrawal Request Form from the Graduate
university resources and faculty time and are not required to                     School Office.
pay for continuous enrollment during the period that the leave                 3. Obtain all appropriate signatures, including that of the
of absence is in effect. The length time on the leave of absence                  Financial Aid Office.
does not count toward the maximum number of years allowed                      4. Submit it to the Department Chair and obtain
for completion of a degree.                                                       signature.
   Students on leave of absence are not enrolled at the university             5. Carry the form with all signatures to the Graduate
and must return to the university by the date specified on the                     School Office.
leave of absence contract. Otherwise they will be dropped from                 6. Keep a copy of the form for your records.
student status and will have to reapply for readmission. The


                                                                       15
Enrollment: Admissions, Leaves, Withdrawals, Graduation



Withdrawal from the University                                            any applied area of professional study or failure to maintain
   A student may withdraw from their program and from                     minimum standards of scholarship.
the university at any time. Withdrawal means terminating                    A request for academic probation may only follow discussion
enrollment at the University. Students who leave theUniversity            of unsatisfactory performance with the student and must be
and enroll at another college or university are automatically             accompanied a written letter to the student from the department,
considered to have withdrawn. Students who withdraw from                  clearly specifying the conditions to be met and the time in which
the university and later wish to return will need to apply for            they are to be met.
readmission through the Graduate School Admissions Office.                   A student is not officially on probation until the Dean of
   A withdrawal becomes official when the Registrar has                    the Graduate School and Professional Programs approves the
accepted it. Students will remain responsible for all charges             department’s request.
incurred during the semester in which the withdrawal occurs.                When probationary requirements are met, the department chair
All charges and refunds are based upon the date on which                  should inform the associate dean and the Dean of the Graduate
withdrawal becomes official. These dates are available from                School and Professional Programs, who will inform the student.
the Business Office. Grades are dependent upon the last date of            Not meeting the requirements for removal of academic probation
class attendance.                                                         within the specified time may be grounds for dismissal from the
                                                                          program.
To Request a Withdrawal from the University
  1. Talk with your advisor.                                              Dismissal
  2. Obtain a Withdrawal Request Form from the Graduate                      Dismissal of a student from a graduate program is considered
  School Office.                                                           a very serious action. Files must show evidence of prior
  3. Obtain all appropriate signatures, including that of the             counseling with the student and other precautions taken and
  Financial Aid Office.                                                    should contain written documentation of requests to remediate
  4. Submit it to the Department Chair and obtain signature.              the problem. The Dean of the Graduate School and Professional
  5. Carry the form with all signatures to the Graduate                   Programs is responsible for dismissal of graduate students. The
     School Office.                                                        dean will act on recommendations from the department chair
  6. Keep a copy of the form for your records.                            through the appropriate associate dean. These recommendations
  7. Return all borrowed books to the Gallaudet Library.                  will be well documented and state clearly the justification for
  8. Return your I.D. card to DOSS if you live off campus.                dismissal. The Dean of the Graduate School and Professional
  9. File a change of address form with the Post Office and                Programs will obtain all information necessary in each case and,
     the Registrar’s Office.                                               if necessary, make inquiries through the academic associate dean
 10. Contact RA to start check out procedures.                            to the department chair. Dismissal from a program constitutes
 11. Return your room key and I. D. card to the RA of Housing             dismissal from the university, unless the student is actively
     Office within 48 hours of withdrawal.                                 enrolled in two programs simultaneously.
                                                                              Disciplinary actions or dismissals for non-academic reasons
                                                                          are handled under the direction of the Provost. Appropriate de-
Withdrawal from a Class During the Semester                               partment and campus officials will be notified of any dismissal.
  Conditions and dates for withdrawal from a particular class
during the semester are controlled by the Registrar’s Office.
The dates for timely withdrawal are recorded in the Academic              Application for Diploma
Calendar each academic year. The process is described below in                An application for the diploma must be filed with the Registrar’s Of-
the section entitled Grading System.                                      fice. The exact date is noted in the Academic Calendar. If for any reason
  University employees who are taking courses and wish to drop            students do not graduate at the end of the semester in which they apply
a course should see the registrar and complete the normal drop or         for a diploma, they must reapply for a diploma in the semester in which
withdrawal process. In addition, if the course is being taken with        they expect to graduate.
tuition assistance from the university, the employee should notify
the Business Office that the course has been dropped.                      Commencement
                                                                              Academic attire is required of all candidates at
Academic Probation and Dismissal                                          Commencement exercises. Caps and gowns may be obtained
                                                                          at the bookstore. Orders must be filed in the bookstore
                                                                          during the annual “Graduation Fest” held the week following
Academic Probation                                                        spring break. “Graduation Fest” provides an opportunity for
  A department chair, through the appropriate associate                   potential graduates to meet in one location on one day with
dean, may request that the dean of the Graduate School and                representatives from the Bookstore, Student Accounts, Campus
Professional Programs place a student on academic probation.              Life, The Office of the President, Alumni Office, Career Center,
  A student may be placed on academic probation for                       Graduate School, and others to make sure they have made the
unsatisfactory performance in any area of required academic               necessary arrangements to graduate. Gowns may be picked
activity, such as coursework, comprehensive or qualifying                 up through Commencement Day. Recipients of Graduate
examinations, field work, clinical, practicum, internship, or              Certificates do not participate in Commencement.

                                                                     16
                                          Academic Standards and Policies

Grading System                                                                                          A grade of Incomplete will be given only when the work
  The following grading system applies to graduate students                                         of the course has been satisfactory. The reasons for an Incom-
who matriculated in their Gallaudet graduate program prior to                                       plete will be decided by the instructor. To be eligible for credit
August 1, 2002.                                                                                     in a course in which an Incomplete is recorded, students must
                                                                                                    complete the requirements of the course by the end of the final
        A ..........................4.0 points ........................Outstanding                  day of classes of the following semester or a date agreed upon in
        B+ ........................3.5 points                                                       writing with the instructor; otherwise, the grade will automati-
        B .......................... 3.0 points ............................. Average               cally become an F. The student and the instructor must provide
        C+ ........................2.5 points                                                       the Registrar’s Office with written notification of the agreed
        C ..........................2.0 points .................. Below Average                     upon date before the time limit indicated above.
        F............................0.0 points ............................... Failing                 Course withdrawals are initiated by the student and require
        I ......................................................................Incomplete          signatures from the course instructor, the academic advisor, and
        WP ....................................................Withdrawn Passing                    the appropriate dean. Withdrawal from a degree program at any
        WF .................................................... Withdrawn Failing                   time must have the concurrence of the dean of the Graduate
        WD............................................... Withdrawn, No Credit                      School.
        Pass .......................................................................... Pass            WP indicates the grade recorded when a student withdraws
        AU ......................................................................... Audit          passing from a course after the first four weeks of a semester.
        NG ....................................................No Grade Reported                    WF indicates the grade recorded when a student is failing at the
                                                                                                    time of withdrawal after the first four weeks of the semester. WD
   The following grading system applies to graduate students                                        indicates official withdrawal from a course before the end of the
who matriculate in their Gallaudet graduate program after Au-                                       fourth week of a semester.
gust 1, 2002. Students who enrolled before this date, but who                                           Graduate courses may be audited following the regular regis-
have been inactive in their program for an extended time, may be                                    tration procedure. Students attend and participate in class activi-
subject to the new grading system.                                                                  ties without earning a grade or receiving credit toward a degree.
                                                                                                    To audit a course, the student must obtain permission from the
        A+..........4.0 points ........................................Exemplary                    instructor, register, and pay the normal tuition and fees. A change
        A ............4.0 points ......................................Outstanding                  from audit to credit may not be made after the add/drop period.
        A-...........3.7 points ...................................Commendable                      Should students wish to change from credit to audit, permission
        B+ .........3.5 points .........Exceeds Course Requirements                                 from the instructor and the academic associate dean must be ob-
        B ...........3.0 points .................Satisfactory Achievement                           tained and appropriate forms submitted to the Registrar’s Office
        B-...........2.7 points .Marginal Satisfactory Achievement                                  by the end of the fourth week of the semester. Audited courses
        C+ .........2.5 points..............Unsatisfactory Achievement                              are not counted as credit courses and are recorded as AU on the
        C ...........2.0 points..............Unsatisfactory Achievement                             student’s transcript.
        F.............0.0 points .............................................. Failing
        I ......................................................................Incomplete          Minimum Standards of Scholarship
        WP ....................................................Withdrawn Passing                       An average of 3.0 is required as evidence of satisfactory work.
        WF .................................................... Withdrawn Failing                   A grade point average below a 3.0, two or more grades below B,
        WD............................................... Withdrawn, No Credit                      or a grade of F are considered to be below the acceptable level
        Pass........................................................................... Pass        of performance. Any of these conditions automatically calls for
        AU ......................................................................... Audit          a review of a student’s performance and may be grounds for
        NG ....................................................No Grade Reported                    dismissal.

   Cumulative grade point averages are figured only on the basis
of those hours attempted for which letter grades were given.
Courses for which the grade is Pass are not included in grade
point averages.
                                                                                               17
Academic Standards and Policies


Standards of Professional Behavior and                                     both 400 level and 700 level. In this case, there are different
Communication                                                              requirements for the 700 and 400 level courses, but they will
   Knowledge of the theories and methodologies of a profession             meet together for lectures and thus be scheduled as one class.
and their application to professional practice are major                      A second situation is that the course may be cross listed as
components of graduate study. In addition to academic                      both 700 (master’s level) and 800 (doctoral level) in order to
accomplishments, which are evidenced in a student's grades,                make better use of departmental resources and to meet the need
graduate students must also demonstrate behavior and                       for topics that might not have sufficient enrollment in either
communication skills that are consistent with professional                 level alone.
standards. The principal elements of professional behavior                    A third is when two departments cross list their courses in
vary by discipline, but include tact; sensitivity to the needs and         order to provide something that neither would be able to provide
interests of clients, colleagues, and supervisors; good judgment;          alone. Cross-listed courses appear in listings for each program
and attention to professional responsibilities. Moreover, student          with a notation that they are cross listed.
conduct must conform to the codes of ethics established by the
particular professional associations that certify practitioners and        500-Level Courses
govern their professional behavior. The principal elements of                 500-level classes are open to upper division undergraduate
required communication skills include, but are not limited to              and graduate students. They may be listed as program require-
written, oral, and signed communication.                                   ments for undergraduate or graduate programs and may be
  Adherence to these professional standards of behavior and                applied as electives in undergraduate or graduate programs, with
communication are essential elements of professional com-
                                                                           permission of the department. Graduate students in 500-level
petence. Failure to meet these standards reflects adversely upon
the individual's suitability for professional service and may be           classes will be expected to complete graduate-level work.
grounds for dismissal from the Graduate School.
                                                                           Requirements for Degrees
                                                                              Students are responsible for knowing all policies and
Course Numbers                                                             procedures contained in this catalog and those procedures
   Courses offered in the University are numbered as follows:
                                                                           and requirements specific to the program of study. (Student
                                                                           handbooks are available in most academic departments.)
   Below 100 are non-degree courses.
                                                                           Requirements for degrees above the master’s level are listed
   100 through 199 are primarily freshman courses.
                                                                           with individual program descriptions.
   200 through 299 are primarily sophomore courses.
                                                                             A graduate degree is conferred primarily on the basis
   300 through 499 are primarily junior and senior courses.
                                                                           of the quality and scope of the candidate’s knowledge and
   500-599 are courses designed for both upper division
                                                                           demonstration of competence in the chosen field of study.
                 undergraduates and graduate students
                                                                              Students must complete a minimum number of credit hours
   600-699 are dual-listed graduate level courses.
                                                                           of graduate work (as described in program listings) with a grade
   700-799 are master’s level, graduate courses.
                                                                           point average of 3.0 or higher. A maximum of eight graduate
   800-899 are doctoral level, graduate courses.
                                                                           credits at a grade of B or higher may be transferred (at the
                                                                           discretion of the department).
   Double numbers separated by a hyphen (321-322) indicate a
                                                                              Students must also successfully complete the examination
two-semester course that must ordinarily be taken in sequence.
                                                                           requirements of the program of study. All requirements for the
   Double numbers separated by a comma (441, 442) indicate a
                                                                           master’s degree must be met within five years from the date of
two-semester course that may be taken for either one semester
                                                                           matriculation in the program of study. The time limits of doctoral
or both semesters. Figures in parentheses following course titles
                                                                           programs vary. Consult program chairs for details.
show credit in semester hours.
                                                                              Degree candidacy is the benchmark by which departmental
                                                                           decisions are made regarding a student’s continuation in a
Dual-Listed Courses
                                                                           degree program. Acceptance into a graduate program does
   Dual-listed courses, listed in both undergraduate and gradu-
                                                                           not imply admission to degree candidacy. Each program
ate catalogs, are defined as graduate level courses that are open
                                                                           specifies the conditions to be met for advancement to candidacy.
to advanced undergraduate enrollment. Dual-listed courses
                                                                           Typically these conditions must be met before the end of the
carry a 600 level number in both catalogs and have the same
                                                                           first year of study. Students who have met these conditions
course descriptions. Requirements are identical for graduate and
                                                                           must file an Application for Degree Candidacy with the dean
undergraduate students. Dual-listed courses may be included in
                                                                           of the Graduate School. Although advancement to candidacy is
graduate programs.
                                                                           not a guarantee of a degree, it does indicate that the student is
                                                                           considered capable of meeting degree requirements.
Cross-Listed Courses
   Cross-listed courses are courses that are defined at two
                                                                           Minimal Graduate Degree Requirements
different levels or that are defined and listed by two different
                                                                             Graduate students must meet the following graduate program
programs or departments. There are several possibilities for
                                                                           minimal degree requirements:
cross listed courses. One is that the course may be listed as
                                                                      18
                                                                                               Academic Standards and Policies



Progress Toward a Graduate Degree                                     Graduate Thesis/Dissertation

  1. Residency:                                                          1. Thesis option at the master’s level:
     Every graduate program must involve at least the                       Each master’s-level program shall make explicit
     equivalent of two semesters of on-site study, unless a                 provision for a thesis option, unless the program
     specific exemption is granted by the Council on                         includes a required master’s thesis. Specific require-
     Graduate Education for an experimental program.                        ments for design and format are available from the
                                                                            Office of the Dean of the Graduate School.
  2. Candidacy examinations:
     Each program must have some form of candidacy                       2. Dissertation/doctoral research paper:
     examination, occurring near the end of the second                      Each Ph.D. program shall require a formal research-
     semester of full-time study (or equivalent). The extent                based dissertation. Specific requirements for design
     and nature of this exam will be determined by the                      and format are available from the Office of the Dean of
     department, but it must involve some active participation              the Graduate School.
     by the student (i.e., not solely a faculty review of past
     performance).                                                    Cooperative, Simultaneous Degrees
                                                                         Some students may wish to pursue two master’s degrees
  3. Candidacy:                                                       simultaneouly. Such programs of study are called cooperative,
     After completion of two semesters of coursework (or              simultaneous degree programs and represent an elective activity
     the equivalent) and the candidacy examination, the               of the student rather than a program planned by the faculty. Such
     student may petition for candidacy. The petition is              programs are not offered as a matter of general practice, but
     reviewed and approved by the student’s advisor and               rather meet the unique needs of specific students who wish to
     department chair, and by the dean of the Graduate                receive training in two fields.
     School. Advancement to candidacy implies that in the                Each of the two cooperating programs is considered to be
     judgment of faculty and administration, the student              a full and complete program; neither is to be considered as
     has demonstrated the capability to complete the                  supplementary or minor in scope. Each degree received at the
     degree being sought. It further implies that the                 conclusion of the program will be considered to be the same
     institution will make a good faith effort to see the             degree as that received by a student pursuing only one degree.
     student through successful degree completion.
                                                                      Admission Procedures
  4. Comprehensive examination:                                          All students wishing to pursue cooperative, simultaneous
     This is required for doctoral and specialist-level               degrees must be admitted to each program through normal
     degree programs. Near the end of the entire degree               application procedures.
     program, the student is asked to demonstrate mastery                Students not yet admitted to either program should file two
     of the subject matter. The nature and extent of the              application forms with their application package. Only one
     examination are up to the department, but it is expected         application fee is necessary. In such cases, the desire to pursue
     to be substantial. The comprehensive examination                 a cooperative, simultaneous degree should not influence either
     should also include a professional self-assessment and           admission decision; however, each of the programs for which
     a program review by the student. The dean of the                 the student is applying should be informed of the student’s intent
     Graduate School may participate in comprehensive                 to pursue two degrees.
     examinations in any department at his or her option.                Students who are already matriculated in one of the programs
                                                                      must also apply to the second program, following normal
  5. Language requirement:                                            application procedures. Although supporting documentation
     Due to the special mission of Gallaudet University,              from the first application package may be reused at the
     every program is expected to have a sign communication           request of the student, departments may require field-specific
     proficiency requirement appropriate to the nature of              recommendations or documentation not contained in the
     the field as determined by the department. As a                   original package. The student will not be required to pay a new
     minimum, this will consist of two one-semester courses           admissions fee. In addition to meeting the ordinary admissions
     or faculty judgment that an individual’s skill is at             requirements, students who are already enrolled in one of the
     least equivalent to that of the typical student                  programs must submit a letter of support from the chair of
     completing two such semester courses. Departments                that department verifying good standing and indicating the
     may have more rigorous or extensive requirements as              willingness of that department to cooperate in the design and
     appropriate to the field. Each department shall have a            pursuit of the second degree. Such a letter of support does not
     formal equivalency/waiver procedure.                             guarantee admission to the second program.




                                                                 19
Academic Standards and Policies


Creation of Advisory Committee                                             Transcripts and Diplomas
   The student should consult with the advisors of each program               Students may obtain transcripts of their academic records
and undertake the creation of an advisory committee, consisting            from the Registrar’s Office. There is a $5 fee for each official
of their academic advisor from each program. This committee                transcript. Transcripts will be released only by signed request.
will assist the student in planning a sequence of courses that             No transcripts will be issued to a student who owes money to
provides adequate training in each field and that meets the                 the University. Gallaudet will not make copies of transcripts on
requirements of each program.                                              file from other colleges or universities.
                                                                              Diplomas are issued one time only, and any errors must be
Reduction of Credit Totals Resulting from Overlapping                      brought to the attention of the Registrar’s Office within 90 days
Core Courses                                                               of receipt.
   In general, the pursuit of cooperative, simultaneous degrees
will involve the completion of all the requirements of each
degree and thus will normally require more credits than                    Academic Regulations and Policies
the completion of either degree singly. However, certain
circumstances may result in a situation in which the total number          Academic Appeals
of credits taken is less than the sum of the requirements of both             A graduate student who wishes to appeal decisions involving
programs.                                                                  the application of academic regulations to a program of study
   One such situation results from identical core course                   may do so by submitting a petition to the Council on Graduate
requirements for each program or from core course requirements             Education Committee on Student Appeals through the office of
that are sufficiently close in content to justify the taking of only        the dean of the Graduate School. Such an appeal should be
one. Such overlapping core courses will reduce the total number            initiated by the graduate student and must be restricted to those
of hours the student must take by the number of credits of the             matters directly affecting decisions that bear on the student’s
course. These credits need not be substituted with additional              academic progress. A formal appeal should be initiated only after
credits. Some elective courses may also overlap with approval              resolution of the issue has been attempted at instructor, program,
of each advisor. In all cases, the student’s program must be               and/or department levels. The specific kinds of decisions that
approved by the chair of each department. Denial of approval by            may be appealed, and the appeals procedure, are described
either chair constitutes denial of the pursuit of two simultaneous         below.
degrees.                                                                      Note that the appeals process is not a procedure for filing
                                                                           grievances. Grievances about the conduct of faculty or staff
Limitation on Number of Credits Taken in a Semester                        members, or other matters not directly related to academic
   Students may not enroll for more than twenty-one (21) credits           decisions concerning a student’s academic progress, should be
of graduate courses in any semester. Program committees should             directed to the appropriate department chair or, lacking resolu-
monitor courses being taken simultaneously at universities or              tion at that level, to the appropriate associate dean.
colleges outside the Washington Consortium of Universities and
intended for transfer into the program. Ordinarily, such outside           Graduate Student Appeals Policy
courses are included in the computation of course load for a               I. Appeals Procedure
single semester. Credits taken during the pre-fall session (sign               Graduate students are expected to handle disagreements
language classes and the Culture and Language Colloquium)                  about grades or progress in a program of study with those
may account for a load above twenty-one credits in the fall                most directly involved at the program, department, or school
semester.                                                                  level. Ordinarily, the professional judgment of the instructor,
   The purpose of this requirement is to ensure that students              program director, or department chair will be final. However,
obtain the full benefit of study at Gallaudet University, which             if the student feels that his or her treatment has been arbitrary
is considered to include out-of-class reading, writing, and study          and capricious, or that there was not reasonable procedural or
appropriate to graduate level courses. Cooperative simultaneous            substantive due process, he or she may appeal the decision by
degree programs will require more semesters than either of the             submitting a petition to the Council on Graduate Education
constituent programs taken individually.                                   through the office of the dean of the Graduate School.

Limitation on Sequential Application of Cooperative,                       II. Actions Subject to Student Appeals
Simultaneous Degree Procedures                                                Graduate students may appeal decisions regarding the
   The description of cooperative, simultaneous degree proce-              application of academic regulations to a program of study.
dures is intended for students who wish to pursue two degrees              Appeals are restricted to those matters directly affecting the
simultaneously. Ordinarily, degrees taken in sequence are not              student’s academic progress. Specific kinds of decisions that
eligible for the reduction of credits from overlapping courses             may be appealed include:
taken as a part of the earlier program.                                        1. Grades that may lead to probation or dismissal.
                                                                               2. Comprehensive or qualifying examination results.



                                                                      20
                                                                                                    Academic Standards and Policies


   3. Other performances that lead to probation or dismissal.                 Selection of the two graduate student members will be based
   4. Accusations/penalties for plagiarism and/or cheating.                on the following: Each graduate department will nominate one
   5. Faculty decisions concerning personal/ethical behaviors              graduate student from its department who indicates interest in
   of the student, or student’s personal suitability for                   membership. The chair of the Committee on Student Appeals will
   work in the profession.                                                 select two students from the list of names submitted. The term
                                                                           of service for students will expire with the resolution of the
III. The Appeals Process                                                   individual case.
   A graduate student wishing to appeal an academic decision                  The petitioning student and the department involved will
must make all possible efforts to resolve the issue at the                 each have the ability to challenge up to two members of the
instructor, advisor, department, and school dean levels. If efforts        committee for no cause. Individual members who are challenged
at these levels fail to achieve resolution, the student may submit         will be dismissed. An alternate member (student or faculty) will
a petition to the Council on Graduate Education Committee on               be selected from the list of nominations.
Student Appeals. The petition must be submitted within one
semester of the date of the decision that the student wishes to            Academic Honesty Policy
appeal. The council will convene the Committee on Student                     Gallaudet University students are expected to represent
Appeals, which will review the petition and collect information,           themselves honestly at all times and in all contact with
as necessary, from the parties involved. Following this review,            University faculty, administration, and staff personnel.
the Committee on Student Appeals will conduct a mandatory                  Misrepresentation on University documents, course assign-
meeting of principals within one month of receipt of the petition,         ments, or examinations is in conflict with the spirit and teachings
excluding University recess days. Following that meeting, the              of a university. Thus, all students are expected to learn and abide
Committee on Student Appeals will make its recommendation                  by the rules and
to the dean of the Graduate School. The dean will render a final            regulations of Gallaudet University, to provide full and accurate
decision in writing to the student, with copies of the dean’s              information on University documents, and to fully acquaint
decision to the department and other appropriate parties.                  themselves with proper procedures for doing research, writing
   The petition must include:                                              papers, and taking examinations.
    1. The reason(s) for the appeal.                                          If a student knowingly provides false information or forges
    2. Documentation of efforts made to resolve the                        or conceals relevant information on admissions, registration, or
       disagreement at the instructor, program, department,                any other University document, the student’s registration may be
       and/or dean levels.                                                 canceled. If such a discovery is made after a student is officially
    3. Presentation of the case.                                           enrolled in the University, that student may be dismissed.
    4. Desired outcome(s).                                                    A professor who discovers that a student is involved in
                                                                           unethical practices in connection with required coursework or
  It is the student’s responsibility to file copies of the                  examinations has full discretion to give a failing grade for the
petition with the instructor (if appropriate), the advisor, the            particular assignment or for the course and/or to recommend
program coordinator, the department chair, the dean of the                 dismissal.
appropriate school or college, the dean of the Graduate School,               Dismissal actions for academic dishonesty will be made by
and the chair of the Council on Graduate Education.                        the Provost. Students dismissed for academic dishonesty will be
                                                                           ineligible to return to the University, except by special action of
IV. Standard Of Review                                                     the Committee on Faculty and Student Affairs.
    1. Was treatment of the student “arbitrary or capricious”?
    2. Did the department follow its own guidelines with the               Protection Against Sexual Harassment
       student?                                                               Sexual harassment is a violation of Title VII of the Civil
    3. Did the student have adequate advance notice and                    Rights Act of 1964, as amended. The University is committed
       opportunity to respond?                                             to providing an environment that is free of unlawful sexual
                                                                           harassment and does not condone sexual harassment in any
V. The Council on Graduate Education Committee on                          form. Reports of sexual harassment are investigated thoroughly,
Student Appeals                                                            promptly, and objectively.
   Student appeals are reviewed by the Council on Graduate                    The University policy for protection against sexual
Education Committee on Student Appeals. The Committee                      harassment applies to all faculty, staff, and students in all offices
is made up of five members: one member of the council, two                  and divisions of Gallaudet University. Copies of the entire policy
graduate faculty who are not council members, and two graduate             are available in the Personnel Office, College Hall, Room 106.
students. Graduate faculty members who are not members of the
Council on Graduate Education will be appointed by the chair
of the council from a list of those who have indicated interest in         Student Right-to-Know Act
serving on the committee. This list will be prepared by the chair             The Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act, Public
of the council at the beginning of each academic year. The term            Law 101-542, is a federal law that requires that Gallaudet
of service will expire with the resolution of the individual case.         University make readily available to its students and prospective
                                                                           students the information listed below:

                                                                      21
Academic Standards and Policies


•   Financial Aid                                                                 3.4.     Auditors inspecting the operations of
•   Costs of Attending Gallaudet                                                           Gallaudet University offices may inspect
•   Refund Policy                                                                          student records.
•   Facilities and Services for People with Disabilities                          3.5.     Information from student records may be
•   Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation                               released to parents who financially support a
•   Completion/Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students                                 student (under IRS regulations).
•   Loan Deferral under the Peace Corps and Domestic                              3.6.     Information from student records may be
•   Volunteer Services Act                                                                 released to individuals or organizations
•   Campus Safety and Security                                                             providing financial aid for a student, or
•   Campus Crime Statistics                                                                evaluating a student’s eligibility for financial
                                                                                           aid.
   Should you wish to obtain any of this information, please
send a letter to the following address:                                  Information Included and Excluded
      Gallaudet University                                               from Student Records
      Enrollment Services Office                                             Only information directly related to the educational process
      800 Florida Avenue, NE                                             is maintained in student records. Official student records do not
      Washington, DC 20002-3695                                          include references to political or social beliefs and practices.
                                                                         Students may list memberships in professional associations,
Confidentiality of Student Records                                        honorary societies, or student activities as part of their student
         Gallaudet University follows the requirements of the            records. Memberships in other organizations not listed by the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Buckley               student will not be included in student records. Medical records,
Amendment) regarding student records. Under this act, all                mental health records, and parents’ financial statements are not
official student records are considered confidential. The act              subject to this law.
applies to records of anyone who is enrolled as a student or has            Such records are confidential and privileged and may not be
in the past been enrolled as a student of Gallaudet University or        reviewed or seen by anyone except as provided by applicable
Gallaudet College.                                                       law of the District of Columbia and the federal government.
    All University officers and personnel must observe the                   Questions about student records should be directed to the
following policies:                                                      University officials indicated.
    1.   Students have the right to inspect their own official               1.    Academic Transcripts and Grade Listings Location:
         records. Corrections or challenges to records may be                     Registrar’s Office Official Responsible: Registrar,
         presented by the student in writing to the office                         Chapel Hall;
         maintaining the record. Each office responsible for an              2.    Academic Support Unit Files Location: Academic
         official student record must have a policy for how and                    Advising, Tutorial Center, English Works!, Microlab,
         when students may read, copy, and, if necessary,                         Insight Program, Foreign Studies, EPOC Program:
         challenge information in the record.                                     Official Responsible: Associate Dean, the College of
    2.   Gallaudet University personnel who need particular                       Liberal Arts, Sciences, and Technologies;
         information in order to perform their assigned duties              3.    Disciplinary Records Location: Office of Campus Life
         may have access to these records.                                        Official Responsible: Director, Campus Life, Ely
    3.   Disclosure of information contained in student records                   Center;
         to other persons or agencies is prohibited, with the               4.    Campus Law Enforcement Records Location: Depart-
         following exceptions.                                                    ment of Safety and Security Official Responsible:
         3.1.      Information from a student record will be                      Manager, Safety and Security, Carlin Hall;
                   released upon written request of the student.            5.    Financial Aid Records Location: Financial Aid
         3.2.      Directory information (name, home address,                     Office Official Responsible: Director, Financial
                   local address, class, year, major, verification                 Aid, Chapel Hall.
                   of enrollment) may be released to anyone                 6.    Student Employment Records - Student Accounts
                   upon request. Students who do not wish this                    Location: Accounting Office Official Responsible:
                   information to be available may request in                     Controller, College Hall,
                   writing to have their names removed from the             7.    Student Insurance Information Location: Student
                   directory. Such requests should be made to                     Health Service Official Responsible: Director, Peter J.
                   the registrar.                                                 Fine Student Health Center
         3.3.      The University must release official records              8.    Foreign Student Files Location: Office of Admissions
                   upon subpoena or court order. The University                   Official Responsible: Director, Office of Admissions
                   will attempt to notify the student that the              9.    Library Files Regarding Money Owed Location:
                   records are being released.                                    Gallaudet University Library, Merrill Learning
                                                                                  Center Official Responsible: Librarian


                                                                    22
                  Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment

Enrollment Fees                                                          admission fee and the $150 room deposit. All applications
   Gallaudet University assumes a substantial portion of the cost        should be received no later than June 1 for the fall semester.
of each student’s education. The remainder of the cost is charged        New and returning students accepted after June must return room
to the student. Gallaudet strongly urges that bills rendered to          applications as soon as possible and will not be guaranteed
students for enrollment charges be paid in full at or before             residence hall space. To be eligible for University housing,
registration for a semester or summer term.                              students must be carrying at least nine graduate credit hours.
   If financial assistance is needed to cover enrollment expenses,        This academic load must be maintained throughout the semester.
applications for aid from vocational rehabilitation agencies,
Gallaudet’s Financial Aid Office, Guaranteed Student Loans, or            Board Plans
other financial aid organizations and agencies should be made                Three meals per day are provided seven days a week in the
well in advance of registration.                                         University Dining Hall. Meal plans do not include spring and
   Payment of all charges is required at registration unless             winter recesses. Board plans are:
written authorization to cover student charges has been received             250 Block Plan = 250 Block Meals plus $50 Dining Dollars:
from vocational rehabilitation agencies, Gallaudet’s Financial           This is the meal plan that offers the best value for the
Aid Office, or other supporting organizations. The student may            dollar, approximately 15 meals per week. Students have the
sign a legally binding promissory note for the balance of the            opportunity to eat every day at Cafe Bon Appetit (University
unpaid charges. If a promissory note is signed, payment must             Dining Hall) or for a meal deal or $50 in dining dollars in the
be made during the semester as stated in the note agreement.             Rathskeller, Starbucks, or Marketplace. Blocks can be utilized at
Failure to pay all charges during a given semester or summer             the Cafe Bon Appetit any time, all semester, without restriction.
term will result in the denial of future registration and the            Total cost per semester is $1,850.
withholding of grades, transcripts, and degrees until full                   220 Block Plan = 220 Block Meals plus $50 Dining Dollars:
payment is received.                                                     This meal plan is a great value for someone looking to eat daily
   For full-time (9 credits or more) students who are U.S.               with unlimited seconds along with some extra spending money
citizens, the tuition rate per semester for fall 2004 and spring         to use at the Rathskeller, Starbucks, or Marketplace during off
2005 is $5,300.00. The part-time rate for fall 2004 and spring           hours. Blocks can be utilized at the Cafe Bon Appetit any time,
2005 is $589.00 per credit hour. For international students, add         all semester, without restriction. In addition, blocks may be used
100 percent to these tuition rates as required in amendments             for a meal deal at the Rathskeller or Marketplace. Total cost per
to the Education of the Deaf Act. Students from developing               semester is $1,775.
countries may apply for a reduction in the percent of tuition                190 Block Plan = 190 Block Meals plus $150 Dining
surcharge after their first semester.                                     Dollars:
                                                                         This plan provides the most flexibility, offering approximately
Room and Board                                                           12 block meals per week. This plan works best for someone
Room                                                                     who usually goes off campus on weekends. This plan also
   Students are not required to live on campus. Students living          offers $150 in Dining Dollars to spend in either the Rathskeller,
off campus may buy meals individually at the University cafeteria        Starbucks, or Marketplace throughout the semester. Blocks
or snack bar, or choose from a variety of board plans. Room              can be utilized at the Cafe Bon Appetit any time, all semester,
arrangements on campus are made on the basis of a room                   without restriction. In addition, blocks may be used for a meal
contract covering the academic year. Rooms are available                 deal at the Rathskeller or Marketplace. Total cost per semester
only to those who also pay board for meals served in student             is $1,775.
dining facilities. The room contract provides for a room and the             150 Block Plan = 150 Block Meals plus $150 Dining
necessary furnishings. The room fee for the fall 2004 or spring          Dollars:
2005 semester is $2,360 and does not include the winter recess.          This plan provides approximately 10 block meals per week,
   University residence hall space is limited. For this reason,          along with $150 to spend in the Rathskeller, Starbucks, or
the application for housing is accepted only with the $50                Marketplace throughout the semester. Blocks can be used at the


                                                                    23
                                                                   Graduate Student Tuition and Fee Schedule*                                                        Gallaudet University
                                                                                                                                                                     Office of the Controller
                                                                                  Fall/Spring 2004-2005                                                              Student Accounts
                                                                                                                                                                     800 Florida Avenue, NE
                                                                                 Basic Costs Per Semester                                                            Washington, DC 20002-3695


                                                                                           U.S. Citizens
     Tuition. Amount indicated is for full-time students.
     A full-time course load for graduate students is nine            Tuition                                          $5,300.00
     credits or more for billing purposes. The part-time
     rate per credit during fall 2004 and spring 2005 is                                                                                 Unit Fee. Required for full-time graduate students to
                                                                      Unit Fee                                            $115.00        cover the cost of student activities.
     $589.00 for U.S. graduate students.
     Room. Two people per sleeping-study room.                        Room                                             $2,360.00
                                                                                                                                         Board. Meal plans and costs vary. See “Room and
                                                                      Board                                            $1,775.00         Board” section for details.
     Health Insurance Fee. This is an annual fee billed in
     the fall semester that covers the entire academic year           Health Insurance Fee                             $1,295.00
     (August 1, 2004 at 12:01 a.m. until 12:01 a.m. August                                                                               Health Service. Required for all full-time graduate stu-
     2005).                                                           Health Service Fee                                   $50.00        dents for fall and spring semesters.

                                                                      Total                                           $10,895.00
24




                                                                                    International Students
     Tuition. Amount indicated is for full-time students. A
     full-time course load for graduate students is nine credits      Tuition **                                      $10,600.00
     or more for billing purposes. The part-time rate per
                                                                                                                                         Unit Fee. Required for full-time graduate students to
     credit during fall 2004 and spring 2005 is $1,178.00             Unit Fee                                           $115.00         cover the cost of student activities.
     for international graduate students.
     Room. Two people per sleeping-study room.                        Room                                             $2,360.00
                                                                                                                                         Board. Meal plans and costs vary. See “Room and
                                                                      Board                                            $1,775.00         Board” section for details.
     Health Insurance Fee. This is an annual fee billed in
     the fall semester that covers the entire academic year           Health Insurance Fee                             $1,395.00
     (August 1, 2004 at 12:01 a.m. until 12:01 a.m. August                                                                               Health Service. Required for all full-time graduate stu-
     2005).                                                           Health Service Fee                                   $50.00        dents for fall and spring semesters.

                                                                      Total                                           $16,295.00



      * Fees are subject to change.
     ** This reflects the 100 percent tuition surcharge required by amendments to the Education of the Deaf Act. Students from developing countries may apply for a reduction in the percent of
        tuition surcharge.
                                                                                      Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


Cafe Bon Appetit any time, all semester, without restriction. In               Criminal Background Checks for Student Training
addition, blocks may be used for a meal deal at the Rathskeller             are required for graduate students in programs that require
or Marketplace. Total cost is $1,700 per semester.                          practicum, internship, or student teaching training at sites on
   100 Block Plan = 100 Block Meals plus $125 Dining                        Gallaudet's campus. Those who pursue training experiences
Dollars: This plan provides approximately 7 block meals per                 at off-campus sites may be required to complete another
week, along with $125 to spend in the Rathskeller, Starbucks, or            background check. Students will bear the cost of these
Market-place throughout the semester. Blocks can be used at the             inquiries. They are encouraged to discuss the cost and timing of
Cafe Bon Appetit any time, all semester, without restriction. In            background checks with their academic advisor as they begin
addition, blocks may be used for a meal deal at the Rathskeller             their courses of study.
or Marketplace. Total cost is $1,625 per semester.
                                                                               Education Courses for Graduate Students (summers only)—
Room and Board Changes or Cancellations                                     The materials fee for EDU 733.01, EDU 734.01, and EDU
   If a student moves out of Gallaudet housing during the                   735.01 courses are $50 for each course, and for EDU 795.04
semester, refunds will be made using the same criteria as for               through 795.10 courses the cost is $25 for each course.
withdrawals. If a student moves into Gallaudet housing during
the semester, charges will be made based on the number of                      Graduation Fee ($50), required of all students applying for
weeks remaining in the semester.                                            their diplomas.

Living Expenses                                                                Graduate School Fee ($10), required of all graduate students
   In addition to the charges made by the University, students              at time of registration for first semester each year.
will also incur expenses for transportation, books, supplies,
clothing, and personal expenditures. The amount needed to meet                 Health Insurance Fee ($1,295 for U.S. Citizen students
such demands will vary with individual taste and the distance               and $1,395.00 for International students), for all full-time
from home. It is suggested that students arrive with at least $100          or residential students unless proof of adequate insurance
beyond known expenses at the start of a year; they can then                 coverage is submitted to the Student Health Service prior to fall
determine what further allowance will be necessary.                         registration. The annual fee is billed as a one-time charge in the
                                                                            fall semester for coverage from August 1, 2004 at 12:01 a.m. and
                                                                            continues until 12:01 a.m. August 1, 2005.
Additional Fees
   Certain other fees are required, payable on or before the                   Health Service Fee ($50), required for all full-time
beginning of the applicable semester or summer term.                        undergraduate and graduate students for fall and spring
                                                                            semesters and all part-time and full-time undergraduate and
  Add/Drop Fee ($5), per successful transaction during the                  graduate students for summer. Every current registered student is
period designated as Add/Drop.                                              eligible to use the Student Health Service. The purpose for this
                                                                            fee is for educational material and office visits.
   Admission Fee ($100), required of all certificate or degree-
seeking students. Fifty dollars ($50) of that amount is a fee                  International Student Tuition Fee: Add 100 percent to
for the admissions process and is non-refundable. The other                 regular tuition fee (students from developing countries may
$50 will be posted to the student's account (i.e., refunded) for            apply for a reduction in the percent of tuition surcharge after
students who enroll during the semester they originally applied             their first semester).
for; otherwise, it will be forfeited. To ensure that a space is held
for you, the Admission fee must be forwarded to the Graduate                  Late Registration Fee ($50), required for all students who
Admissions office before the deadline shown in your admission                complete registration after the official registration dates.
letter.
                                                                              Parking Fee ($40 per semester), required for students who
   Application Fee ($50), must be submitted with completed                  register their cars to park on campus.
application materials for all graduate applications. The fifty
dollar fee is for application to one program; there is also a $25              Part-time Tuition—The part-time rate per credit during fall
fee for application to each additional program submitted at the             2004 and spring 2005 is $580.00 for U.S. graduate students and
same time. Later submissions to a second program incur another              $1178.00 for international graduate students. A full-time course
$50 fee.                                                                    load for graduate students is nine credits or more.

   Books and Supplies ($500), estimated amount a student needs                 Recreation Fee (summer only-$11 per week), required
each semester. Some classes charge additional fees to cover                 for all part-time and full-time students for student recreation
the cost of special services or class materials. The approximate            activities.
amount needed for summer sessions is $200.



                                                                       25
Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


  Registration Fee ($10), required of all first-time students at            Refunds for Summer Session
Gallaudet University.                                                         Refunds for the unexpired portion of the summer session will
                                                                           be made according to the time of withdrawal as follows:
   Room Deposit ($150), required of all new and returning                     Per three-week session—75 percent of tuition and room
students requesting a room for the fall semester; must be paid             charges are canceled if withdrawal is during the first week
before the room application can be accepted. This deposit is               of class, 25 percent during the second week of class, and no
refundable only when students leave school, move off campus,               refunds or cancellations thereafter.
or graduate at the end of any semester, if all debts owed to                  Board—Pro rated refund based on full weeks only.
Gallaudet have been paid. However, the room selection fails                   Fees—No refunds or cancellations.
to adhere to the deadline dates to notify Campus Life of room
cancellation. Contact the Campus Life Office for specific dates.

   Service Charge for Dishonored Checks ($25)
                                                                           Financial Aid
  Unit Fee ($115), required for all full-time graduate students.           Nancy Goodman, Director
This fee covers some of the costs of student activities.                   Marian Dickson, Assistant Director
                                                                           Chapel Hall, Room G02
   Note: All charges are subject to change without notice. For
current list of enrollment fees, contact the Student Accounts                 Gallaudet University makes every effort to provide financial
Office at (202) 651- 5145 or write to the Student Accounts                  aid to students who are able to demonstrate that they are in need
Office.                                                                     of assistance to continue their education. With the exception
                                                                           of grants-in-aid and Gallaudet scholar-ships, which are limited
                                                                           to regular full-time degree-seeking students, financial aid is
Withdrawals and Refunds                                                    awarded to students who are degree-seeking and are eligible for
   Termination of enrollment, at any time other than upon                  Title IV programs. Graduate special students are not eligible for
graduation or suspension, is contingent upon a signed official              financial aid.
withdrawal form submitted by the student. A student wanting
to withdraw should discuss plans to withdraw with his or her               Financial assistance is based on the following calculation:
academic advisor and the dean of the Graduate School. Further
instruction will be given at that time. All charges and refunds are           Student Expense Budget, less student/family contribution, less
based on the date the withdrawal is received in the Registrar’s            other outside resources, equals financial need for which aid may
Office and should, in all cases, be made before the student leaves          be awarded.
campus. Withdrawals will not be accepted after the last day of
classes.                                                                       The student/family contribution is calculated using the
   Withdrawal from individual courses shall be unrestricted                Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is
for the first four calendar weeks of a semester. Forms for                  a standard method of determining contributions from taxable
withdrawing from individual courses may be obtained from                   and nontaxable income and assets. This includes the student’s
the Registrar’s Office. WP or WF grades will be given for                   summer earnings and all types of Social Security. All applicants
withdrawals after the first four weeks of the semester.                     for financial aid through Gallaudet must submit both the
                                                                           Gallaudet Application for Financial Aid (Form 2000) and the
Refunds for Fall and Spring Semesters                                      Free Application (FAFSA).
  Refunds for the unexpired portion of the semester will be                   Prospective students seeking financial aid will receive a
made according to the time of withdrawal as follows:                       financial aid packet with instructions after their application
                                                                           for admission is received. (The financial aid application will
Tuition and room charges—                                                  not be acted upon until an applicant is actually accepted into a
   During first week of classes, 80 percent of the charge.                  program.) Presently enrolled students may obtain financial aid
   During second week of classes, 60 percent of the charge.                packets during the spring semester for the following academic
   During third week of classes, 40 percent of the charge.                 year.
   During fourth week of classes, 20 percent of the charge.                   Award offers are sent to eligible financial aid applicants as
   Thereafter, no refund.                                                  early as the spring or summer prior to the award year. The award
   Board—Pro rated refund.                                                 offer must be accepted, signed, and returned to the Financial
   Fees—No refund.                                                         Aid office within a designated period of time. Any award not
                                                                           accepted is subject to cancellation.
                                                                               Students determined to be ineligible for financial aid are
                                                                           notified after the applications are received and reviewed.




                                                                      26
                                                                                     Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


Deadlines                                                                   Appeals
    The Office of Financial Aid accepts applications at any                      Students who do not meet the academic standards for
time before or during the academic year; however, there are                 financial aid may submit an appeal to the Financial Aid Office
priority deadlines that are enforced for the awarding of any                if they feel that there were special circumstances that affected
institutional grants and scholarships. The deadlines typically are          academic performance. Appeals must be submitted within the
the first Friday in July preceding the academic year (for students           first four weeks of the semester following ineligibility. Further
enrolling Fall semester), and the second week of January (for               information is available from the Financial Aid Office regarding
students who were not enrolled Fall semester and are planning               these regulations.
to enroll for Spring). For the 2004-2005 Academic year, these
priority deadlines are July 2, 2004, and January 14, 2005. Funds            Return of Financial Aid Funds/Student Withdrawal
are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis; so it is important               When a student leaves the University during a semester
to apply long before the priority deadlines. Institutional funds            during which federal or institutional aid has been received, some
may be exhausted before the priority deadline dates.                        or all of the financial aid received may have to be cancelled.
   Applications received after the priority deadline dates will be          The amount of aid which must be cancelled (refunded to the
reviewed for federal grant, work study, and loan eligibility (if a          federal/institutional program) is calculated on a pro-rata basis
loan request has been made).                                                according to the length of time (in days) a student has been
                                                                            enrolled. For example, if the semester is 110 days in length and
Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid                            a student withdraws on the 28th day, the student has attended
   In order to continue receiving any federal financial aid,                 39% of the semester, and has “earned” 39% of his/her aid. (110
students must: 1) be meeting the University's GPA standards                 divided by 28 = 39%) The remaining 61% (unearned amount)
of minimum scholarship and 2) be successfully completing a                  of the financial aid must be cancelled. In this example, a student
minimum number of credit hours per academic year.                           who receives a total of $5,000 in financial aid will keep $1,950
   Students enrolled in master's degree programs must complete              (39%). The remaining $3,050 will be refunded to the financial
their degree program within three years, if full time. The number           aid program source. If all or part of the financial aid was given
of credit hours master's students must successfully earn each               to the student as a financial aid refund, the student may be
year must be one third (1/3) of the total required for program              responsible for repaying a portion of this “unearned” financial
completion. Doctoral students are expected to earn one fourth               aid. Required financial aid refunds to Title IV Programs will be
of the total number of degree credits each year; four year limit            made in the following order: Federal Stafford and Plus Loans,
(not including dissertation research). All graduate students are            Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, and
expected to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0. Students may be               other Title IV assistance.
expected to earn a greater number of credit hours per year and to               Please be aware that the above required policy governing the
complete their degree programs in less than the maximum time                return of financial aid funds as a result of student withdrawal is
indicated. More information can be found at http://financialaid.             different than the University’s policy for refunds of University
gallaudet.edu/financialaid/standards.htm                                     charges. Financial aid refunds may be required even though
                                                                            there may be no reduction to the student’s charges. Please
Probation                                                                   read the section titled, “Withdrawals and Refunds” for further
   Students not meeting the standards outlined above will be                information on adjustments to University charges.
placed on financial probation for one semester, during which
aid may be received. If the minimum standards are not met by                Unofficial Withdrawal
the end of the probationary semester, students will be ineligible               All financial aid is awarded to students with the
for federal aid. This includes Federal Perkins, Stafford Loans,             expectation that they will attend classes for the entire
Federal SEOG, and Federal College Work-Study. Students also                 semester or award period. Students who cease attending
cannot receive financial aid if they have been on academic                   classes but who do not officially withdraw (identified by
or Financial Aid probation for more than one semester                       failing grades for all attempted credits) will be considered as
(consecutive), or if they have been in a probationary status                having "unofficially withdrawn" and will be subject to financial
three or more times during their academic career. Financial                 aid cancellation at a 50% unearned rate (or according to the
aid eligibility will be reinstated only when a student meets                date attendance ceased as provided by faculty). This means,
the required GPA and earned credit standards, and is not on                 regardless of charges for the period, a student who has ceased
Academic Probation or Warning. Students who have completed                  attending classes will be considered to have attended no more
the equivalent of five full-time years (not including condition              than one half the semester, will have 50% of his/her financial
year) will be ineligible for federal financial aid unless the student        aid canceled, and may be subject to repayment of any financial
can provide documentation that additional time is required for              aid disbursed. If any loans have been disbursed, repayment
academic program reasons.                                                   requirements will take effect as of the unofficial withdrawal
                                                                            date.




                                                                       27
Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


   Students who cease attending classes and are considered as              degree; (b) not be in default on a Perkins or Stafford loan; (c)
unofficial withdrawals will NOT BE ELIGIBLE for financial                    not owe a refund on a Federal Title IV grant or Perkins loan; and
aid for the subsequent semester and/or until future semester               (d) sign an affidavit of educational purpose stating that he or she
courses have been completed and satisfactory academic progress             shall use the funds solely for education-related expenses.
standards are met.
                                                                              Federal Work-Study (FWS): This program is designed to
Campus Communications                                                      assist students who must earn part of their education costs by
   All students are issued, or may request, a campus post                  working part time. The amount a student can earn under FWS
office box and e-mail account. Students are advised that all                is determined on the basis of need and the amount of funds
communications from the Financial Aid Office are sent to the                available in the program. Federal Work-Study funds awarded
campus post office box or via campus e-mail once the semester               to students are paid as they are earned for employment. The
has started. Students need to check their paper mail and e-mail            salary begins at minimum wage and increases depending on the
frequently in order to get essential information from this Office.          nature of the job and the job requirements. Eligibility for this
Financial aid will be delayed or terminated if students do not             program is determined by the Office of Financial Aid, while all
respond to requests for information or other required activities           job placement assistance is handled through the Career Center.
sent to the post office box or through e-mail.                              A portion of FWS funds will be made available to students
   Gallaudet post office boxes, addresses, and e-mail accounts              working in community service positions.
are maintained in Gallaudet's central database, and this
information determines where our communications are sent.                     Federal Perkins Student Loan Program: The Perkins Student
Students must be sure that this information is current and                 Loan is a low-interest (5 percent) federal loan administered
accurate. Any changes to this information should be made                   by Gallaudet. Perkins loans are available to students who
through the Registrar's Office.                                             have "exceptional financial need." Undergraduate students
                                                                           may borrow a maximum of $4,000 per year, depending on the
Overawards                                                                 availability of funds and individual financial need. Graduate/
   The Financial Aid Office is charged with the responsibility              professional students may borrow a maximum of $6,000 per
for compliance with federal aid program guidelines, which                  year, depending on availability of funds and individual financial
include ensuring that students do not receive more aid than                need.
that for which they are eligible (exceeding the “financial need”               The aggregate Federal Perkins Loan Program limit is
amount). In cases where a student has been awarded financial                $20,000 for a student who has not yet completed a program of
aid and other financial assistance received exceeds the financial            undergraduate study and $40,000 for a graduate or professional
need amount, the Financial Aid Office must reduce or cancel any             student, including loans borrowed at the undergraduate level.
aid it has awarded to avoid “overawards” of federal aid.                      Repayment begins nine months after a student graduates,
Students who are awarded institutional grants, and subsequently            withdraws, or drops below half-time. (Grace periods may vary
receive departmental Assistantships, Stipends, VR support,                 for less-than-half-time students.) Students are allowed up to
Waivers, or outside assistance, may have their institutional               10 years to repay, with a minimum monthly payment of $30 to
grants reduced. Institutional grants are limited, and if awarded           $40 per month (depending on date of loan disbursement and
without knowledge of “other” assistance, may be reduced to                 aggregate amount borrowed). Deferments, forbearance, and/or
make grant funds available to students who do not receive such             cancellations of payments are available to eligible students and
other assistance.                                                          must be requested.
   It is essential that students notify the Financial Aid Office
of any assistance expected or received from outside sources                   Federal Stafford Loans: The Federal Stafford Loan programs
(private scholarships, VR); or from other University departments           provide loans through lenders such as banks, credit unions,
or offices (such as tuition scholarships/waivers, stipends, grants,         or savings and loan associations. In order to be considered
or other assistance/scholarships) in order to determine what               eligible for Stafford Loans, students must be enrolled at least
effect, if any, this assistance will have on aid awarded by the            half time (a minimum of 6 credit hours) in course work that
Financial Aid Office.                                                       applies toward the graduate degree program. Non-degree credits
                                                                           and undergraduate credits do NOT count toward half-time
Types of Financial Aid                                                     enrollment for loan purposes. Subsidized Stafford Loans are
   In order to establish eligibility for Title IV programs, such as        those for which the government pays the interest while a student
Federal Work-Study (FWS), Federal Perkins Loans, and Federal               is enrolled at least half-time or in applicable loan deferment.
(subsidized and unsubsidized) Stafford Loans, a student must be            Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are those that are not need-based,
enrolled in a degree-seeking program at Gallaudet.                         and the student is responsible for paying the interest that accrues
   The student must meet the requirements of U.S. citizenship.             during in-school and loan deferment periods.
All of these federal programs are based on need. In order to                   Interest rates vary, depending on Stafford Loan history and
receive assistance from these programs, the student must (a) be            on the date on which the loan is disbursed, but are not higher
making satisfactory progress toward the completion of his or her           than 8.25 percent for new borrowers after October 1992.
                                                                           New borrowers are those with no outstanding balances on

                                                                      28
                                                                                    Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


Federal Stafford, PLUS, Supplemental, or Consolidation loans.             * Entrance Loan Counseling session is required of all first-time
Variable interest rates are set each June. For prior borrowers            Gallaudet loan borrowers at the time of application. Entrance
with outstanding loan balances, interest rates will be the                counseling may also be completed in person or on the web:
same as previous loans. Graduate students may borrow up to                Student Loan Counseling. The loan request will not be processed
$8,500 subsidized and $10,000 unsubsidized per year. (Actual              until this requirement is satisfied.
loan amounts may be less, depending on individual student                 * Exit Loan Counseling is required of Stafford Loan borrowers
eligibility.)                                                             who withdraw, drop below half-time (6 credits), or graduate.
    Loans will be certified for the entire year (fall and spring),         Exit Loan Counseling may also be completed in person, by mail,
unless the student is planning to graduate in December of the             or on the web: Student Loan Counseling. Failure to complete
award year; or the student is enrolled for Spring only. Loans are         exit interview/counseling requirements will result in a “hold” on
disbursed in two payments, one half each semester. All one-               transcripts, grades, and diplomas.
semester loans will be disbursed in two payments, the first after
the official add-drop date, and the second not before the mid                 Alternative Loan Program: Students who do not qualify for
point of the semester. (For first-time Freshman who are first-time          Federal Stafford Loans (or who have reached annual maximum
borrowers, the first disbursement will be made no sooner than              limits) may consider applying for an Alternative Student Loan.
30 days after the term start date.)                                       These loans are not subsidized, but offer competitive interest
    The majority of loans are disbursed electronically and are            rates and deferment options. These loans also may be used to
automatically credited to students’ accounts. Loans received in           cover previous outstanding balances to the University, depending
the form of a paper check must be endorsed by the borrower                on the student’s last enrollment period. All applications for
and must be paid to the University cashier to cover outstanding           alternative loans must be requested by November 22, 2004 for
school charges. All loan funds in excess of those needed to cover         the fall semester and April 16, 2005 for the spring semester.
charges will be refunded to the student borrower.                         Qualifications and guidelines will vary among alternative loan
    Stafford Student Loans are not automatically packaged by the          providers. For more information, go to www.citiassist.com or
Financial Aid Office. Students who wish to apply for a Stafford            Signature Loan.
Loan must complete a Loan Request Form, available in the
Financial Aid Office, or on line at http://financialaid.gallaudet.              Gallaudet Grant-in-Aid (GIA): Gallaudet makes available
edu/financialaid/program.htm : Federal Stafford Loans.                     from its general income a limited number of grant-in-aid awards
    Loan Deadlines: Loans requests must be submitted no                   to full-time, regular degree-seeking undergraduate and graduate
later than November 22, 2004 for fall loan funds, or April 16,            students. These grants are used for tuition, unit fees, and campus-
2005 for spring loans funds. No loan applications (Stafford or            based living expenses (room and board). No student refunds
Alternative) will be processed after those dates.                         may be made from GIA funds. These grants are supplemental
    Repayment begins six months after a student withdraws,                to the student’s personal funds, the support provided by parents,
graduates, or drops below half-time attendance. Students with             and possible financial aid from state agencies. Included in the
unsubsidized Stafford loans will be responsible for the interest          student’s resources are stipends, traineeships, FWS, and Perkins
that accrues during the six-month grace period. Deferments are            and Stafford loans.
available and depend on the loan date. Questions about your                  Remaining funds from the academic year are used to provide
deferments should be directed to the holder of your loan.                 summer session grants for students enrolled full time during
    Master Promissory Notes: Students who are first-time Federal           either semester of the preceding academic year. Applications for
Stafford Loan borrowers, or students who are borrowing at                 summer are available during the spring semester.
Gallaudet for the first time (e.g., transfer students) are required
to complete and sign a Master Promissory Note (MPN). The                     Scholarships: As part of the total financial aid package,
Financial Aid Office will notify students when the MPN has                 scholarships funded by clubs, organizations, individual donors,
arrived for their signature. Stafford Loans will be canceled for          and foundations are awarded annually. Scholarships are
students who do not complete the MPN requirements within                  restricted based on donor requirements; however, most are based
30 days from notification. (Loan funds will not be approved or             on financial need and academic performance. The Financial
disbursed by the lender without a signed promissory note.)                Aid office matches students with scholarship requirements.
    Student Loan Counseling: Federal law requires institutions            Awards vary with donations and donor restrictions. Applicants
to inform students of their borrower rights and responsibilities.         for scholarships should complete the appropriate applications
To meet this federal requirement, students may be required to             (FAFSA, the Application for Financial Aid Form 2000, and the
complete an entrance interview/counseling session. This session           scholarship application supplement). Students applying for a
can be completed on the web (see below). Please complete                  scholarship must be full time and degree seeking.
only the entrance sections. Students cannot receive their
Federal Stafford Loan funds until they have met this federal                 Emergency Loans: The Office of Financial Aid provides
requirement. After linking to the website, students should follow         short-term loans for students with emergencies. Emergency
the instructions carefully. If a student is unable to complete the        loans may not be used to cover charges made by the University,
entrance loan counseling session on the web, the student may              rent, automobile payments, usual living expenses, or books and
complete it in the Financial Aid Office.                                   supplies. These funds are for the purpose of covering unseen


                                                                     29
Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


and necessary expenses only, those for which students cannot                   Students or students’ vocational rehabilitation counselors
plan. Repayment is due within the semester for which the                     having any questions can contact the Office of Financial Aid,
loan is given. The terms of the loan depend on the nature of                 Chapel Hall, Room G02.
the emergency. Applications are available in the Financial Aid
Office.                                                                       Processing of Financial Aid
                                                                                Financial aid will not be processed until the University add-
   Graduate Assistantships: Graduate assistantships for degree               drop period is completed and student enrollment is verified. In
students are frequently available in academic departments and                addition, all required documentation must be received (e.g.,
through the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These                  FATs, tax forms) before aid will be released for individual
positions are filled on a competitive basis. Students interested              students. All financial aid administered by the University must
in graduate assistantships are encouraged to apply early to their            first be used to cover University charges; refunds of financial
department.                                                                  aid will not be given to students until all semester charges are
                                                                             satisfied. All grants and scholarships are credited directly
    Vocational Rehabilitation: Vocational rehabilitation (VR)                to students’ accounts. Loan checks for Federal Stafford,
is a program that exists in each state to help individuals who               Perkins, and PLUS loans must be endorsed by the borrower
are disabled become work ready. VR may be able to provide                    and submitted to the University cashier so that charges can be
financial assistance to help with the cost of attending college and           credited. Loan checks may not be deposited into private checking
may also provide assistance for hearing aids, glasses, and other             or savings accounts or otherwise negotiated by students.
disability-related devices. To be eligible for VR, students must                Since financial aid is not disbursed at the beginning of the
have a disability that limits their ability to obtain or advance in a        semester or released to students as a refund until all charges are
job, and there must be some indication that VR services will be              satisfied, it is essential that students be financially prepared to
able to better prepare them for future employment. Students who              cover expenses for books and usual living costs with personal
think that they may be eligible for VR services should apply to              funds.
the VR agency in their home state.
   Many VR agencies have changed their policies and will not
authorize support until they have received the results of all                Financial Aid for International Students
financial aid applications. This means that many students may                    Foreign students must document sufficient support
start the semester without any VR authorization. It is absolutely            from personal or private resources in order to obtain valid
necessary that students apply for all financial aid programs early            immigration permits; therefore, no aid is awarded to first-
and inform their VR counselor of the results as soon as they are             year international students. Foreign students are expected to
known. Students should see that VR authorizations are sent to                be responsible for meeting education expenses for the entire
Gallaudet.                                                                   length of their programs. Very limited aid is available to foreign
   If a student’s VR authorizations are not received by Gallaudet            students. Assistance through the University is provided only
before registration, the student will be expected to pay his or              with documentation of unexpected reductions or cancellations of
her expenses or sign a promissory note before he or she can                  previously planned support. Awards determined by the Gallaudet
register. When the student’s financial aid and VR assistance                  Financial Aid Office are made to eligible students who are full
come through, the student will be reimbursed for any payments                time and degree seeking only. These awards currently depend
made. It is extremely important that each student talk with his              on availability of funds and individual need. Foreign students
or her VR counselor prior to each semester to find out what                   who are receiving ongoing family/private support or assistance
assistance he or she may or may not be receiving. Students                   through other University departments are not eligible for
should not assume that the VR assistance will automatically be               financial aid.
sent to Gallaudet University.
   If any agency is supplying funds or assistance directly to                Financial Policies and Procedures
a student rather than to Gallaudet, Gallaudet considers that                 Policy
the student is paying for his or her expenses. Students will be                 It is the policy of Gallaudet University that 1) charges to
requested to pay for charges on or before the beginning of the               students for registration are due at the time of registration, and
semester.                                                                    2) all other charges are due and payable within 30 days of the
   Students expecting any VR support for books and supplies                  date of assessment except where a satisfactory written agreement
should come prepared to buy these materials with their own                   has been signed stipulating other terms. Central Administration
money. Many times, the VR authorizations are not received                    recognizes its fiduciary responsibility to vigorously pursue the
in time for students to have credit at the bookstore. Students               collection of all just debts owed to Gallaudet.
should keep all receipts received; they will be reimbursed by
the Business Office. Gallaudet’s Office of Financial Aid will not              Student Financial Responsibility and Student Aid
make loans for books and supplies.                                              Gallaudet University recognizes its role in fostering personal
                                                                             initiative, planning, and responsibility in financial affairs as
                                                                             an integral part of the educational process. The administration


                                                                        30
                                                                                Fees, Financial Aid, and Student Employment


believes each student has primary responsibility for arranging             student has the primary responsibility for his or her charges.
financing and payment of his or her charges. Each student will              Therefore, the student is ultimately responsible for the bill.
therefore be held responsible for his or her bill.
   Gallaudet maintains an Office of Financial Aid to make               B. Each student is expected to complete registration promptly.
every effort possible to provide financial aid to any deserving            In the event that a student does not complete the business
student eligible to attend the institution. This aid may be in            portion of registration by the end of the first week of
the form of scholarships, grants-in-aid, loans, or part-time              classes, the student will be denied admission to classes, and
employment. Further, this office provides assistance to help the           if living on campus, will be denied space in a dormitory.
student as much as possible in his or her application for funds           Reinstatement will be made only when written notification
available from federal government programs, state vocational              is received from the Business Office that the registration has
rehabilitation, and other agencies and organizations.                     been satisfactorily completed.

Procedures                                                             C. If a student is unable to pay his or her current semester
A. All registration charges to students are due and payable               charges at the time of registration, he or she may be
    at the time of registration. Charges for which a student              permitted to borrow the necessary money to pay the bill by
    has a written authorization for payment from a vocational             signing a promissory note.
    rehabilitation agency will be deferred. If a student is
    expecting an authorization from a vocational rehabilitation        D. All charges due from a student for a prior semester,
    agency, and the authorization is not received, the student            including summer sessions, must be paid before the student
    is responsible for payment of the bill. Students with a               will be permitted to register for a new semester. A student
    formal written authorization from a foreign government or             will be denied the privilege of preregistering for the
    agency will be given the same privilege as students with              following semester if he or she is currently delinquent in
    an authorization from a domestic vocational rehabilitation            paying his or her account.
    agency. However, as indicated above under the heading
    “Student Financial Responsibility and Student Aid,” each




                                                                  31
                                                     Campus Life

   Welcome to the Gallaudet experience, unique in its mission            Housing for Students with Children and Married Stu-
to provide full access and open communication to scholars                dents without Children
and students who are deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing. The                Housing is available on a limited basis in unfurnished
campus’s new “Main Street” can be found in the Student                   apartments located on the upper level of the Kendall
Academic Center (SAC) and Student Union Building (SUB).                  Demonstration Elementary School for those students who have
The light-filled atrium of the Student Academic Center                    children. To reside in an apartment with a child, a parent must be
welcomes the Gallaudet community and visitors to its high tech,          a full-time student. Also, space permitting, special arrangements
state-of-the-art classrooms and labs. Connected to the SAC is the        may be made in the fall/spring semester to provide residence
Student Union Building with its multimedia theatre, information          hall housing for a limited number of married students without
desk, meeting rooms, the university bookstore (“Bison Shop”),            dependent children. In order to qualify for such housing, both
post office, food court, and the Rathskellar Pub. The physical            partners must carry a full academic load. Double occupancy
connection of academic and student life spaces establish this            rooms with regular residence hall furniture and a private bath
facility as the educational and social center of Gallaudet.              may be assigned. Children may not live with parent(s) who are
                                                                         students residing in the residence halls.
Residential Life
                                                                         Food Service
Residence Halls                                                              The University’s food services are provided by Bon Appetit
    Students are not required to live on campus, however living          Management Company. All students who live on campus are
in one of the University’s six residence halls offers students           required to participate in the university Meal Program. Students
a unique opportunity to become an integral part of a campus              who live off campus may participate in the Meal Program if they
community. By living in the residence halls, opportunities for           wish. There are eight different meal plans that include options
social, mental, and emotional growth are greatly enhanced.               at the student dining hall, and the Food Court and Rathskellar
Gallaudet encourages an appreciation of diversity, and residence         in the Student Union Building. Residents may sign up for a
life offers real-life opportunities to increase understanding            particular meal plan during business registration; students who
and interactions with students from a variety of cultural,               do not sign up during business registration will be billed for the
geographical, educational, and communication backgrounds.                lowest meal plan. Special dietary plans can usually be arranged
    Residents are also offered the opportunity to participate in         for those students who need them by contacting the Food
theme floors, designed for students who want to develop a                 Service Manager.
community based on similar interests or academic discipline.
Theme floor communities establish their own rules, hold                   Department of Public Safety
meetings, create community bulletin boards, and are responsible              The mission of the Department of Public Safety (DPS)
for the stability of their community. Students can apply to              is to direct all resources toward preserving life, protecting
participate in theme floors at the Office of Campus Life.                  property, maintaining human rights, and promoting individual
    Residence halls are staffed by teams of professional staff,          responsibility, community commitment, and involvement in
graduate student paraprofessionals, and undergraduate student            preventing crime. Officers are on duty 24 hours each day,
paraprofessionals.                                                       365 days a year, and patrol the campus on foot, on bicycles,
    Eligibility criteria for on-campus housing are: Student must         and in marked and unmarked vehicles. Gallaudet’s public
have a full-time course load in any academic program [defined             safety officers are considered “special police officers” and are
as twelve (12) credits for undergraduate students or nine (9)            commissioned by the District of Columbia. The Department of
credits for graduate students per academic semester] in order to         Public Safety emphasizes “community policing,” which means
live on campus. Anyone carrying less than this number of credits         that the department works collaboratively with the community to
must have permission from the Housing Office in order to live             prevent, identify, and resolve problems and causes of crime and
on campus.                                                               disorder.



                                                                    32
                                                                                                                               Campus Life



   The Department of Public Safety offers a variety of services             Student Services
to assist the community such as escort service after dark,
personal safety checks when students or employees are studying
or working late, photos for passports, fingerprinting for job
                                                                            Student Health Services
                                                                                The Gallaudet University Student Health Services (SHS) is
applications, vehicle battery jumps, and a lost and found.
                                                                            committed to providing students with high quality and efficient
                                                                            primary health care. In addition to treatment, the medical staff
Identification/Access Cards                                                  helps students to understand the causes of medical conditions
   Identification cards, which also serve as access cards to many            or injuries and how these might be avoided in the future. SHS
buildings and residence halls, are prepared by the Department of            also works closely with the Health and Wellness Program in
Public Safety.                                                              Student Affairs to help students learn about reducing the risks for
                                                                            illnesses and injuries.
Vehicle Registration                                                            Services are provided Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.
   The Department of Public Safety is also responsible for                  to 4:30 p.m. Student Health Services is closed weekends,
issuing parking permits. Full- or part-time employees or students           University holidays, and Wednesdays from noon to 2 p.m.
must register their vehicle and display a parking permit. There             The student health fee entitles students to a number of basic
s a charge for parking on campus. The Department of Public                  health services without charge, including: 1) primary medical
Safety web site is: http://af.gallaudet.edu/safety/safety.html.             care visits; 2) tests conducted by SHS; 3) immunizations; 4)
                                                                            allergy injections (medication must be provided by the student
                                                                            with instructions from his/her physician); 5) HIV counseling
Transportation Services                                                     and referral; 6) referral to medical specialists; 7) health
    The Transportation Department offers free shuttle bus service           education materials; and 8) screening and treatment for sexually
to Union Station daily. Faculty, teachers, and staff are entitled to        transmitted diseases.
use the shuttle bus upon presentation of their identification card.              Health insurance is required for all full-time students.
Visitors and family members of students are also invited to use             Students covered under a plan with their parents or employer
the shuttle service. A temporary pass must be secured from the              do not have to purchase the student health insurance available
Transportation Department.                                                  through the University. Students who do not need the
    Shuttle service schedules, as well as Web links to other metro          University’s health insurance must complete a waiver form. If
transportation services can be found on the Transportation web              a waiver form is not completed, enrollment in the University’s
site above.                                                                 health insurance plan will be automatic See the website at:
                                                                            http://studenthealth.gallaudet.edu/.

                                                                            Mental Health Center
Child Care: The Child Development Center                                       The Mental Health Center (MHC) offers students
    The Child Development Center (CDC), a unit of the Laurent               comprehensive mental health services, including counseling,
Clerc National Deaf Education Center, is an accredited campus               psychotherapy, assessment, psychiatric services, and prevention
child care center. CDC serves preschool and kindergarten                    education. Through its training programs, it also provides
children and their families who work and study at Gallaudet,                mental health services to deaf and hard of hearing individuals
University alumni parents, the deaf community and the general               and their family members in the Washington Metro area.
metropolitan area community. The Child Development Center                   Services are provided by supervised trainees and licensed
is a 12-month program which has a special 8-week summer                     staff who are fluent in American Sign Language and other
program that serves children up to age 10. The Center is                    modes of communication used by deaf and hard of hearing
accredited by the National Academy of Accredited Programs, a                people in order to provide effective diagnostic and therapeutic
division of the National Association for the Education of Young             services. Trainees are graduate students from the departments
Children. The website is:                                                   of Counseling, Psychology, and Social work at Gallaudet
http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/cdc//.                                     University, as well as from other health care providers and
                                                                            programs outside of Gallaudet. The MHC website is:
                                                                            http://mhc.gallaudet.edu/.

                                                                            Hearing and Speech Center
                                                                               Students, faculty, and staff are provided a full range of
                                                                            audiological, communication, and speech-language services
                                                                            at no cost. Audiological services include hearing assessment,
                                                                            hearing aid evaluations and checks, central auditory tests,
                                                                            counseling and assistive devices consultations, demonstrations,
                                                                            and evaluations. Hearing aids may also be purchased through the
                                                                            Center. The Center conducts a walk-in service for hearing aid

                                                                       33
Campus Life



troubleshooting, ear mold fitting/adjustment, hearing aid repairs,         Judicial Affairs
and loaner hearing aids.                                                     The Judicial Affairs program provides an instructional
                                                                          approach to student behavioral resolution. The Judicial Affairs
International Student Services                                            process allow for the determination of the critical facts of an
  (See International Internship Program under the heading                 alleged violation of the established standards of behavior set
"Academic Programs and Services" in the Academics section.)               forth in the Student Code of Conduct and other University
                                                                          policies, and appropriate disciplinary processes for the resolution
Student Accounts Office                                                    of complaints made against students. Underlying this unit is a
    The Student Accounts Office is the main point of contact for           deep regard for discipline as a constructive element of education,
all inquiries concerning students’ accounts. Students may check           and the process is handled to maximize the educational
their current account balance, the status of third-party payments,        experience of the student(s) involved. Judicial Affairs also
pick up Tuition & Fees schedules, and obtain information about            offers mediation meetings between students and/or student
their accounts. Account balances can also be checked electroni-           organizations as an alternative means of resolving disputes.
cally using Gallaudet’s Bison system. The Office coordinates
paperwork related to Vocational Rehabilitation authorizations,
tuition and fees calculations, and student billings.                      Student Activities

                                                                          Athletics and Intramural Sports
Student Development Programs                                                 Gallaudet students have participated in intercollegiate sports
                                                                          since 1883. The University is a member of the Capital Athletic
Multicultural Student Programs                                            Conference and the National Collegiate Athletic Association
   Multicultural Student Programs (MSP) is a cultural                     (NCAA) Division III. Varsity sports at Gallaudet include men’s
advocacy and resource unit within the department of Student               and women’s basketball, indoor and outdoor track and field,
Affairs. It provides support and services primarily to racial             cross country, swimming, soccer, and cheerleading. Exclusive
and ethnic minority students and their organizations. MSP                 women’s sports are volleyball, softball, swimming, and tennis.
assists Gallaudet in its mission to value and nurture the wealth          Exclusive men’s sports are football, baseball, and wrestling.
of cultural, linguistic and ethnic diversity that enrich the                 The Athletics department also offers an intramural sports
University community. Programs and activities include: Cultural           program including: flag football, women/men’s volleyball, coed
celebrations, leadership development, and the Multicultural               Wallyball, racquetball, men/women’s basketball, coed softball,
Mentoring Project (MMP). The MSP website is:                              and indoor soccer.
http://sa.gallaudet.edu/mspinfo/index.htm
                                                                          Campus Ministries
Health and Wellness Programs                                                 The Office of Campus Ministries, staffed by volunteer
   The Health and Wellness Programs (HWP) office seeks to                  and part-time religious workers (Assembly of God, Baptist,
empower students to make informed health and lifestyle choices            Episcopal, Lutheran, Jewish, Latter Day Saints, Methodist,
in accordance with their own values and belief systems. By                Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, and Seventh Day Adventist)
supporting students in behavior and lifestyle change, the HWP             offers regular religious services as well as these activities:
office helps students become more productive members of the                counseling on religious matters; special discussion groups
academic community. Outreach to the campus community is                   dealing with moral issues, world problems, and premarital
achieved through several different programs: New Directions,              concerns; special community service projects with student
an innovative alcohol and other drug prevention program; the              involvement; vocational counseling for students interested in
Peer Health Advocate Program trains students to educate their             work as clergy, lay workers, or workers in religious schools for
peers about current health issues;                                        deaf students; social activities; and student religious fellowship
   E-MAIL Health is a service available to students who need              groups for the various denominations and faiths.
answers to health and wellness-related questions; Don’t Cancel
That Class encourages faculty who would otherwise cancel a                Graduate Student Association
class session due to an illness or other obligation to keep their            The Graduate Student Association (GSA), a division of the
students in class. HWP sends either a Peer Health Advocate or             Student Body government, is the organization through which
professional staff to conduct a workshop during the class time.           graduate students govern themselves, plan activities for the
Sexual Misconduct Response: The coordinator of HWP serves                 campus, and work with the faculty, staff, and administrators
as the central source of information and referral for students            on matters of general interest to the graduate school. Students
who may have experienced sexual misconduct on campus and                  automatically become members of the GSA.. The GSA has
for faculty and staff who desire assistance in helping a student          representatives from each department and presents many
who has come to them. Health Promotion Resources includes a               academic and cultural activities during the year. Through the
variety of educational pamphlets, publications, articles, books,          GSA, graduate students sit on many faculty and university
and videotapes available to the campus community.                         committees.
                                                                     34
                                                                                                                             Campus Life



Student Organizations                                                      Performing Arts
   The Campus Activities unit supports a variety of student                   Recent productions by Gallaudet’s Theatre Arts department
organizations including student government, student newspaper              include: Zoot Suit, a Latino musical staged for the first time in
and year book, fraternities and sororities, and other organizations        American Sign Language, and The Martian Chronicles.
of students with similar interests or backgrounds.
                                                                           Gallaudet Dance Company
Student Publications                                                          The Gallaudet Dance Company is a performing group
    The Buff and Blue is an independent campus newspaper                   of approximately 15 dancers, all undergraduate or graduate
published weekly by University students from September to                  students at Gallaudet. Each dancer’s background is different—
May. Students interested in reporting, writing, or editing can             both in terms of hearing loss, preferred communication
become members of the Buff and Blue staff. The Tower Clock                 mode, secondary school education, and current major field of
is the University year book and offers opportunities for students          study as a University student. Regardless of background and
who are interested in layout, photography, or editing.                     experience, all the dancers are excellent communicators. They
                                                                           rely on their vision as their primary mode of communication
                                                                           and communicate through their dancing in a range of styles,
Cultural Activities                                                        including dance that uses American Sign Language as its
                                                                           foundation.

Visual Arts                                                                Scholarly Lecture Series
    The newly renovated Washburn Arts Center houses the Art                   The University invites scholars, authors, government
Department and boasts a beautifully designed, 2,500 square-                leaders, and others to its campus every year for a variety of
foot gallery with hardwood floors, temperature and humidity                 presentations, workshops, and conferences. Each semester, one
controlled environment, and multi-directional lighting capability.         class day is devoted to a campus-wide discussion of important
The first floor also includes a large lobby area, 13 offices for              issues pertaining to academic enrichment or diversity.
faculty and staff members, an office work area, and an enlarged                Gallaudet University Kellogg Conference Center is the site
ceramics/sculpture studio. On the second floor are three                    for many national and international conferences and seminars.
technology-equipped classrooms, two large computer graphics                The campus community is often invited free of charge to attend
labs, a full photography suite, painting and drawing studios, and          keynote lectures of these conferences.
a design studio.
    Visiting artists offer master classes and lectures, and student
art exhibitions are often on view. The Deaf Way II Arts Festival
held during Deaf Way II in 2002 brought deaf artists from all
over the world, who exhibited in Washburn as well as other
galleries in the Washington, D.C. area. Deaf Way II art works
can now be seen in many campus buildings.
    The old Gate House, used as a residence for the school
watchman until 1927, was also recently refurbished, and has
become a studio where artists can work regardless of medium. It
is also used for both student and visiting artist exhibits.




                                                                      35
                                                 Courses of Study
                                                                          Physical Education and Recreation
Graduate School and                                                       • M.S. in Leisure Services Administration
Professional Programs                                                         In addition, GSPP houses centers and institutes of advanced
                                                                          studies, outreach, and research. The Gallaudet Research Insti-
Thomas E. Allen, Ph.D., Dean                                              tute is world renowned for its studies of deaf and hard of hearing
Fowler Hall, Room 210                                                     people in the United States. The Center for Global Education
                                                                          coordinates Gallaudet's international efforts, maintaining liaisons
    The Graduate School and Professional Programs (GSPP)                  throughout the world and facilitating exchanges of students
offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees and certificates            and faculty. The Center for ASL Literacy provides training
leading to professional preparedness and certification in a variety        and assessment of ASL skills for Gallaudet and neighboring
of fields. Students enter Gallaudet's graduate programs to receive         communities and provides professional development courses
advanced training to become leaders in their fields. A graduate            in interpreter education. The Office of Graduate Education
degree from Gallaudet signifies the highest level of professional          coordinates the central functions of the Graduate School,
training available for individuals working in deafness-related,           including recruitment and admissions, financial aid, student
human service occupations. GSPP departments with graduate                 records, graduate student orientation, and commencement. The
programs and the degrees or certificates they offer include:               Office of Graduate Education and Extended Learning facilitates
                                                                          the development and marketing of educational products through
Administration and Supervision:                                           online courses and through courses offered off campus through
• Ph.D. in Special Education Administration                               the Gallaudet Regional Centers and other venues. The Office
• Education Specialist in Change Leadership in Education                  of Sponsored Programs coordinates efforts to acquire external
• M.S. in Administration                                                  grants and contracts for faculty and staff throughout the campus
• Certificate in Leadership                                                community. The Office of Technical and Information Services
• Certificate in Management                                                provides technical support and dissemination services for the
Counseling                                                                research and outreach functions of GSPP.
• M.A. in Mental Health Counseling                                            The Dean of the Graduate School and Professional Programs
• M.A. in School Guidance and Guidance                                    has academic oversight of the eight departments making
Education                                                                 up the school, but also maintains oversight of the graduate
• Ph.D. in Deaf Education                                                 programs offered in the College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and
• M.A. in Education, with specializations in Family- Centered             Technologies in the departments of American Sign Language
   Early Education, Elementary Education, Secondary                       and Deaf Studies, Government and History, Psychology, and
   Education, Multiple Disabilities, and Advanced Studies                 Social Work. The Dean is an ex officio member of the Council
Educational Foundations and Research                                      on Graduate Education, which develops and maintains policies
• Graduate Certificate in Integrating Technology in the                    and standards for all Gallaudet graduate programs.
   Classroom                                                                  The Office of the Dean of the Graduate School and
• Graduate Certificate in International Development                        Professional Programs also offers the following courses in
Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences                                    support of students at different stages in their graduate careers at
• Ph.D. in Audiology                                                      Gallaudet.
• Au.D. in Audiology
• M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology
• Non-clinical M.S. in Hearing, Speech, and Language                      Courses Offered:
   Sciences
Interpretation                                                            GPS 700 Culture and Language Colloquium (2-5)
• M.A. in Interpretation                                                     The Culture and Language Colloquium (CLC) is a unique
Linguistics                                                               and dynamic program offered each year to all incoming graduate
• Ph.D. in Linguistics                                                    students (deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing) during the three
• M.A. in Linguistics                                                     weeks before they begin their studies. The CLC has two major

                                                                     36
                                                                                                                      Courses of Study


components. The first is a two-credit course beginning with                  4. Graduate Certificate in Leadership
online assignments that can be taken from any location and                  5. Graduate Certificate in Management
ending with lectures and small group discussions at Gallaudet.
These lectures and discussions relate to multicultural issues                Faculty members have extensive practical experience in
with specific attention to Deaf Culture and its place in American         administration and are recognized for their national and interna-
society. The second component is a three-credit, intensive sign          tional leadership in professional associations as well as for their
language course for incoming graduate students who need such             research and publications in the field.
a course. Courses range from introductory ASL classes for                   The department has established a consortium-like
novice signers to advanced ASL classes for more skilled signers.         agreement with the University of Arizona’s Ph.D. program in
Fluent ASL signers need not take this optional course. While at          special education and rehabilitation. This program allows
Gallaudet, CLC students may also enjoy special events presented          doctoral students from both institutions to take a semester
by deaf entertainers and spend time exploring Washington, D.C.           of coursework at each other’s campuses with no additional
All new graduate students are strongly encouraged to participate,        charge in fees or tuition. The department also has a joint-degree
even if certain programs do not specifically require CLC.                 master’s program with the University of New Hampshire at
                                                                         Plymouth, N.H., in Special Education Administration.
GPS 798 Continuous Enrollment (0)                                            The Doctor of Philosophy and Education Specialist degree
   This course provides continuous enrollment for master's               programs within the department are fully accredited as parts of
students who are not on leave of absence and are not currently           Gallaudet's Professional Education Unit by the National Council
enrolled in any other Gallaudet course. Please see the                   on Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Students who
Coordinator of Enrolled Student Services in the Graduate School          wish to qualify for an administrative or supervisory certificate
Office to enroll in this course.                                          from their state or from the Conference of Educational Ad-
Course Fee: $75                                                          ministrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf (CEASD)
                                                                         must request a copy of their state department of education's or
GPS 898 Continuous Enrollment (0)                                        CEASD certification requirements and tailor their programs of
   This course provides continuous enrollment for doctoral               study accordingly.
students who are not on leave of absence and are not currently               Students who have been enrolled in another Gallaudet
enrolled in any other Gallaudet course. Please see the                   graduate program for at least a semester may apply to enter the
Coordinator of Enrolled Student Services in the Graduate School          department's Master of Science or Education Specialist program
Office to enroll in this course.                                          as "simultaneous degree students." According to Gallaudet's
Course Fee: $75                                                          simultaneous degree policy they may transfer up to nine credits
                                                                         (three courses) from their home program. Since both the M.S.
                                                                         and Ed. S. degree programs are 30 credits long, the simultane-
                                                                         ous degree option may allow students to obtain one of these de-
                 Administration and                                      grees after earning 21 credits within the department (18 credits
                                                                         of coursework and a 3 credit internship or field experience). To
                 Supervision (ADM)                                       exercise the simultaneous degree option, students must discuss
                                                                         the possibility with the Administration and Supervision faculty
Graduate Faculty:                                                        coordinator of simultaneous degrees, must secure signatures on
  William J. A. Marshall, Ed.D. (Chair);Francis M. Duffy, Ph.D.          a letter of agreement from a faculty advisor and the department
                                                                         chair of the "home program," and must complete and submit a
                                                                         new graduate school application and pay the appropriate fees.
About the Department:                                                    If a student accepted into the simultaneous degree program
   The Department of Administration and Supervision, estab-
                                                                         decides to resign from his or her home program, then he or she
lished in 1975, prepares future leaders for positions in spe-
                                                                         may not continue in the simultaneous degree program and must
cial education and deaf education administration at K-12 and
                                                                         also resign from the Administration and Supervision program.
postsecondary levels, change leadership, and human services
administration. Programs are open to hearing, deaf, and hard of
hearing students. In addition to a broad assortment of required          Ph.D. in Special Education Administration
and elective course offerings from the department, elective                 The doctoral program in special education administration
courses are available through the Consortium of Universities of          is available to experienced professional educators and human
the Washington Metropolitan Area.                                        services professionals who meet admission requirements for
   The department currently offers the following degrees and             this program. Applicants must have a master's degree in special
certificates, which are described, along with admission require-          education, deaf education, or human services. This program
ments, on subsequent pages:                                              is not for applicants seeking an advanced degree in business
    1. Doctor of Philosophy in Special Education Administration          administration.
    2. Education Specialist in Change Leadership in Education               The program of study for each student is designed in coopera-
    3. Master of Science in Administration                               tion with a Program Advisory Committee (PAC) composed of
                                                                         faculty members and the student. The student selects his or her

                                                                    37
Courses of Study


own PAC. A minimum of two members must be from the Depart-                   Standardized Testing             No
ment of Administration and Supervision, while the third member               Substitute for Prerequisite
may be from outside the department.                                          Recommended Prior                No
                                                                             Coursework
Admission Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy                               Prior Professional          Minimum 5 Yrs. Paid, Full-time Pro-
                                                                             Experience                       fessional Experience in Special or
Program in Special Education Administration                                                                   Deaf Education, or Human Services
                                                                             Prior Certification               Yes for Education Administration
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                                                  Students
University graduate program:                                                 Health Certification              No
                                                                             Requirements
     Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including               Police or Other                  No
     evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an                 Background Check
     accredited university.
     Official transcripts of all graduate study.                                Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
     A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in            Last Date to Submit              No Set Date
     all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,           Completed Application
     applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condition          First Date for Consideration     No Set Date
     ally upon the recommendation of the department.)                        of Application
     An application fee of $50.                                              Summer Admission Possible?       Yes
     A completed graduate school application form.                           Fall Admission Possible?         Yes
                                                                             Winter Admission Possible?       Yes
     Goals statement.
                                                                             Part-time Study Possible?        Yes
     TOEFL scores for all international applicants.                          Summers-Only Study               No
                                                                             Possible?
Checklist of requirements specific to this program:                           Weekend and Evening              Yes
                                                                             Study Possible?
    Are additional application materials required?
     Standardized Test Scores    GRE or MAT                                Transfer Credit Hours
     References                  Three Names + Phone Nos.                     Doctoral students may transfer a maximum of 12 credit hours
                                 and E-mail Addresses                      from appropriate previous post-master’s coursework taken
     Reference Citing                                                      within the last five years. Decisions about transfer credit hours
     Sign Language Skills        No                                        are made by the department chair in consultation with the stu-
     Resume                      Yes                                       dent and concurrent approval by the PAC.
  Writing Sample                 Yes. Essay
  Videotape of Signing and/or    No                                        Program of Study: Ph.D. in Special Education
  English                                                                  Administration
                                                                           1. Major Core (30 credit hours).
   Are there additional application requirements?
      On-Campus Interview        Required                                    ADM 788* Organization and Administration of the
  Month of Interview             No Set Dates                                         American Education System (3)
      Sign Language Evaluation   SCPI                                        ADM 796 Executive Communication Skills (3)
      English Evaluation         TOEFL for Foreign Students                  ADM 809 Theories of Management and Leadership (3)
      Culture and Language       Recommended                                 ADM 810 Public Policies and Persons with Disabilities (3)
  Colloquium Required?                                                       ADM 821 Issues in the Administration of Programs for
                                                                                      Special Populations (3)
    Are there additional background requirements?                            ADM 822 Executive Management Skills Seminar (3)
     Prior Master’s Degree       Yes, in Special Education or Human          ADM 834 Program Development and Evaluation in
                                 Services                                             Special Education and Human Services (3)
  Required Undergraduate         No                                          ADM 837 Interpersonal and Group Behavior in
  Major                                                                               Organizations (3)
  Recommended                    No                                          ADM 838 Organization Development and the
  Undergraduate Major                                                                 Management of Change (3)
       Prerequisite Coursework   3 Credits Each in Multicultural             ADM 880 Human Resource Management (3)
  (May be taken simultaneously   Education, Research, and                    ADM 888 Higher Education Organization and
  with required courses)         Deafness, and 12 Credits in                          Administration (3)
                                 Special Education                         *ADM 888 may be substituted for ADM 788

                                                                      38
                                                                                                                      Courses of Study


2. A minimum 12 credit hour sequence of Research Tools is                4. Internship ADM 890 (3 credit hours). Students without
mandated for all doctoral students. Students without prior               substantial administrative experience must design and
graduate coursework in research are required to take EDF 720,            participate in an internship in special education administration.
Introduction to Research in Education and Human Services, prior          The internship is for a minimum of 360 clock hours. The
to beginning this sequence. Once the sequence is started, it must        internship requirement may be waived for students who have
not be interrupted.                                                      substantial documented administrative experience.
   EDF 801 Principles of Statistics I (3)
   EDF 802 Principles of Statistics II (3)                               5. Dissertation ADM 900 (minimum of 6 credit hours). Every
   EDF 810 Advanced Research Design I (3)                                doctoral student must complete a dissertation. The dissertation
   EDF 811 Advanced Research Design II (3)                               must be an original and empirical effort that moves the frontier
  Students are encouraged to take EDF 803, Multivariate                  of knowledge forward in special education administration.
Statistics (3). If students are contemplating a dissertation             During the fall and spring semesters wherein dissertation work
study involving qualitative analysis methodology, then EDF 812,          is underway, the student must register for three credit hours of
Qualitative Research Methods (3), is mandatory, in addition to           ADM 900, even if the minimum of six credit hours has already
the existing 12 credit hour core.                                        been reached. Summer registration is not required.
                                                                            Students select their own Dissertation Advisory Committee
3. Electives in the Major Field (15 credit hours). Students must         (DAC). Each DAC is composed of exactly five members, who
select a minimum of 15 credit hours of electives that are in syn-        themselves possess earned doctorates. The student selects one
chrony with the student’s professional goals and are approved by         member as the chair and one member as the research advisor.
the student’s PAC. The following listing of courses is simply a          This latter member is approved in conjunction with the Dean
representative sampling and is not meant to be all-encompassing:         of the Graduate School and Professional Programs (GSPP).
   ADM 839 Organization Theory and Design (3)                            Except for highly unusual circumstances approved by the
   ADM 840 Organization Diagnosis (3)                                    department’s chair and the Dean of the GSPP, the chair of the
   ADM 841 Redesigning Organizations (3)                                 DAC is a faculty member of the Department of Administration
   ADM 842 Advanced Seminar in Educational                               and Supervision. A minimum of two members of the DAC must
                Administration (Spring) (1-3)                            be from the Department of Administration and Supervision, and
   ADM 845 Curriculum Development (3)                                    at least one member must be from outside the department and/or
   ADM 852 School Law (3)                                                University.
   ADM 855 Field Experience in Special Education                             The student works with the chairperson of the DAC and
                Administration and Supervision (1-3)                     his or her research advisor to develop a defensible dissertation
   ADM 858 Supervising and Evaluating Teaching (3)                       proposal using the guidelines in the Gallaudet University
   ADM 860 Ethics in Management (3)                                      Dissertation Handbook available from the offices of the
   ADM 862 Gender Issues in Management (3)                               GSPP. Proposals consist of fully developed Chapters 1,2, and
   ADM 888 Higher Education Organization and                             3, including appendices of instruments and informed consent
                Administration (3)                                       letters approved by Gallaudet's Institutional Review Board
   ADM 896 Computer Applications in Educational                          (IRB). When the DAC chair and the research advisor approve
                Administration (3)                                       the draft proposal, the proposal is distributed to the remaining
   ADM 899 Independent Study (1-3)                                       members of the DAC for their review and comments. Once the
   COU 713 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling (3)                 full committee has reviewed the proposal, the student schedules
   COU 726 Medical Aspects of Disability (3)                             a defense. At the conclusion of a successful defense, the DAC
   COU 795 Seminar in Special Populations (3)                            members sign Form 05, approving the continuation of the
   COU 761 Vocational Diagnosis/Placement (3)                            dissertation research.
   EDF 803 Multivariate Statistics (3)                                       Students complete their dissertation research as described
   EDF 812 Qualitative Analysis (3)                                      in their proposal, working with their dissertation committee
                                                                         chairperson and research advisor to develop a defensible
   Students may also select courses from other departments at            dissertation. Once the DAC chair and the research advisor
Gallaudet University or from the Consortium of Universities of           approve the dissertation draft, it is then distributed to remaining
the Washington Metropolitan Area (subject to approval of the             members of the DAC for their review and comment. Permission
Program Advisory Committee).                                             of the chair of the DAC is necessary to schedule and announce
   The Ph.D. program comprises a minimum of 57 credit hours              the dissertation defense. The defense will only be scheduled
of coursework, plus three credit hours of internship, plus six           when all members of the DAC have reviewed all chapters of the
credit hours of dissertation. This 66 credit hour total is in            dissertation and all substantive and editorial changes have been
addition to whatever has not been satisfied by the 21 credit hours        incorporated into the document to the DAC chair’s satisfaction.
of prerequisites. Seventy percent of all credit hours (excluding         The student is responsible for coordinating with the department
the hours for the dissertation and internship) must be taken at          staff to schedule his or her defense. The student must assure that
Gallaudet University. This percentage will satisfy the residency         all timelines and procedures for which he or she is personally
requirement.                                                             responsible for are followed. Appropriate forms must be
                                                                         completed and submitted to the office of the Dean of GSPP.
                                                                    39
Courses of Study


    The DAC and the Dean of the GSPP must receive the                              writing on their comprehensive examination to avoid
completed document a full 14 calendar days prior to the defense                    dismissal following that examination. The PAC
date. If participation in the public commencement event during                     approves the evaluation of proficiency in sign language
May is expected by the student, the dissertation defense must                      via the Sign Communication Proficiency Interview
occur no later than one calendar month prior to Study Day.                         (SCPI). Proficiency levels are determined on a student-
Unless otherwise noted, the faculty of the department are under                    by-student basis according to his or her career goals.
no obligation to participate in more than one defense per week.                    Oral/Written Competency is also evaluated. Evidence
Thus, early scheduling of defenses must be tentatively made                        of competence in these areas is attested to by either
with the department’s secretary, with the concurrence of the                       (a) a professional paper presented at a professional
DAC. Actual permission to proceed with the scheduled defense                       conference or (b) a publishable article.
is arrived at conjointly between the DAC chair and the Dean of                  e. Maintain High Academic Performance. Another
the Graduate School and Professional Programs.                                     obviously important criterion for admission to
                                                                                   candidacy is a student's performance in courses. This
6. Other Mandatory Requirements for the Ph.D. Program. In                          criterion is discussed in the "Minimum Standards of
   addition to the curricular requirements for the program, each                   Scholarship" section of the Academic Standards and
   student must comply with the following requirements.                            Policies chapter in this catalog.
      a. Pass the Qualifying Examination. Students must                         f. Avoid Dismissal from the Program. Students must be
         successfully complete the seven-hour Qualifying                           aware that faculty have the authority to recommend the
         Examination at the conclusion of 24 credit hours of                       dismissal of a student from graduate programs if, in
         coursework. Program Advisory Committee (PAC)                              their professional judgment, that student does not
         permission is needed for further coursework beyond                        possess the attitudes, knowledge, or skills, partially
         this milestone, pending results of the Qualifying                         outlined above, that are needed to join a profession.
         Examination. Successful completion of the                                 The "Standards of Professional Behavior and
         examination admits a student to Ph.D. candidacy                           Communication" section of the chapter on Academic
         status.                                                                   Standards and Policies in this catalog describes other
      b. Achieve Candidacy. To continue in the doctoral                            possible grounds for dismissal.
         program, students must be admitted to candidacy.
         The PAC may grant candidacy on either a provisional              7. Statute of Limitations Policy. Once “Full Candidacy” status is
         or full basis. Provisional candidacy means the student              granted at the completion of the Qualifying Examination,
         has deficiencies that he or she must remediate. Full                 the student will have 60 months to mount a successful
         candidacy means the faculty believe the student is fully            defense of the dissertation. An additional 12 months may
         capable of completing the program successfully,                     be granted by petitioning the department chair. If, during
         including completing the dissertation.                              that 12 months, the dissertation proposal is successfully
      c. Possess a Disposition for Leadership. A student's                   defended, then an automatic additional 12 months is
         disposition for leadership is an important part of                  granted to complete and to defend the dissertation itself.
         the ongoing assessment of student attitudes, knowledge,             Otherwise, this second 12 month extension is retracted.
         and skills. A student's disposition is reflected in his or
         her demeanor with peers in class, in his or her                  7 (a). Restrictive Re-Entry Option. When all extensions have
         expressed attitudes about leading people, and in his or             been exhausted, the student may re-apply to the program
         her dominant personality traits as identified in a                   within 12 months of the separation date. The department
         leadership assessment instrument administered in the                re-interviews the applicant, giving special attention to the
         program. If, in the opinion of the faculty, a student is            applicant's ability to muster the financial and motivational
         not disposed to leadership, he or she may be dismissed              resources necessary to complete the following conditions of
         from the program at any time.                                       the 15+ credit hour, 36 month re-entry program, to wit:
      d. Have Excellent Communication Skills. Another
         important aspect of disposition for leadership is a                 • 09 credit hours of course work within 12 months of
         student's communication skills, including verbal,                     matriculation to update the applicant's knowledge base:
         nonverbal, written, and signed communication.                         (a) in special education policy; (b) in administration or
         Platform presentation skills are also important. Future               ethics; and, (c) in advanced statistics or research
         leaders in special education and deaf education need                  methodology.
         superior communication skills and these will be                     • 01 credit hour under Continuous Enrollment while taking
         evaluated throughout the program. It should be                        within 14 months of matriculation a closed-book Compre-
         emphasized here that wtiting skills are of paramount                  hensive Examination, pending successful completion of
         importance to students wishing to successfully                        all course work within the prescribed time period.
         complete the doctoral program. Students with weak                   • 03 credit hours Dissertation Research per semester, while
         writing skills may be admitted to candidacy on a                      successfully composing and defending a dissertation
         provisional basis, but they will need to develop a                    proposal within 24 months of matriculation, pending
         remediation plan and demonstrate proficiency in
                                                                     40
                                                                                                                           Courses of Study


     successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination                    Are there additional application requirements?
     within the prescribed time period.                                       On-Campus Interview          No
   • 03 credit hours Dissertation Research per semester, while                    Sign Language Evaluation SCPI
     successfully completing and mounting the final disserta-                      English Evaluation       TOEFL for foreign
     tion defense within 36 months of the matriculation.                                                     students
                                                                                   Culture and Language      Recommended
Education Specialist (Ed.S.) in Change Leadership                                  Colloquium Required?

in Education                                                                  Are there additional background requirements?
   The Education Specialist (Ed.S.) Degree in Change
                                                                                  Prior Master’s             Deaf Education or Special
Leadership in Education is a 30-credit hour program preparing
                                                                                  Degree                     Education with GPA of B or
experienced educators from deaf education and special                                                        Better
education settings with the dispositions, knowledge, and skills                   Required Undergraduate     Special Education or Deaf
they need to lead transformational change in their school                         Major                      Education
systems (which include programs, schools, and entire school
                                                                                  Prerequisite Coursework    3 Credits Each in Deafness,
districts). Applicants must have at least three years of teaching
                                                                              (May be taken simultaneously   Multicultural Foundations of
or school administration experience and they must have a
                                                                              with required courses)         Education, and Basic Education
current professional certificate from their State Department                                                  Research
of Education. The Ed. S. degree program is also offered in                    Standardized Testing           No
collaboration with the Gallaudet Leadership Institute (GLI) for               Substitute for Prerequisite
educators working in the field of deaf education. Applicants                   Recommended Prior              No
interested in the GLI should contact the director of that program             Coursework
for admission information. A brief description of the GLI
                                                                                  Prior Professional         3+ Years Paid, Full-Time,
follows the description of this progam.                                           Experience                 Licensed (Certified) Experience in
                                                                                                             Deaf or Special Education
Requirements for the Ed.S. Program in Change                                      Prior Certification         Yes (Teaching or
Leadership in Education                                                                                      Administrative Certificate)
                                                                              Health Certification            No
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                  Requirements
University graduate program:                                                  Police or Other                No
                                                                              Background Check
    Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
    evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an                    Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
    accredited university.                                                    Last Date to Submit            No Deadline
                                                                              Completed Application
    Official transcripts of all graduate study.
                                                                              First Date for                 No Set Date
    A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
                                                                              Consideration of
    previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
                                                                              Application
    applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
                                                                              Summer Admission Possible?     Yes
    tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
                                                                              Fall Admission Possible?       Yes
    An application fee of $50.                                                Winter Admission Possible?     Yes
    A completed graduate school application form.                             Part-time Study Possible?      Yes
    Goals statement.                                                          Summers-Only Study             Yes
    TOEFL scores for all international applicants.                            Possible?
                                                                              Weekend and Evening            Yes
Checklist of requirements specific to this program:                            Study Possible?

   Are additional application materials required?                           Program of Study: Education Specialist in Change
      Standardized Test Scores     No
                                                                            Leadership in Deaf Education
      References                   Three Names + Phone Nos.
                                                                            1. Major Core of Courses (15 credit hours).
                                   and E-mail Addresses
  Reference Citing
                                                                               ADM 821 Issues in the Administration of Programs for
  Sign Language Skills             No
                                                                                          People with Disabilities (3)
                                                                               ADM 837 Interpersonal and Group Behavior in
      Resume                       Yes
                                                                                          Organizations (3)
      Writing Sample               Yes. Essay                                  ADM 838 Organization Development and the
  Videotape of Signing
                                                                                          Management of Change (3)
  and/or English                   No

                                                                       41
Courses of Study


  ADM 839 Organization Theory and Design (3)                               Master of Science in Administration
  ADM 841 Redesigning Organizations (3)                                       This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level
                                                                           leadership positions in nonprofit human service organizations,
2. Supporting Courses (12 credit hours).                                   special education, and deaf education. Only applicants with
   Students must select 12 credit hours of supporting courses              undergraduate degrees in special education, deaf education, or
   from the following list. Six of these 12 credits may be                 human services will be considered. This is not a business admin-
   transferred from previous graduate study. Transfer credits              istration program.
   must be approved by program faculty.
   ADM 711 Basics of Management (3)
   ADM 796 Executive Communication Skills (3)
                                                                           Admission Requirements for the M.S. Program in
   ADM 809 Theory of Management and Leadership (3)                         Administration
   ADM 810 Public Policy and Persons with Disabilities (3)
   ADM 834 Program Development and Evaluation (3)                          Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
   ADM 840 Organization Diagnosis (3)                                      University graduate program:
   ADM 845 Curriculum Design (3)
   ADM 858 Supervising and Evaluating Teaching (3)                              Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence
   ADM 860 Ethics in Management (3)                                             of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
   ADM 862 Gender Issues in Management (3)                                      university. (Those applying during their final undergraduate year
   ADM 865 School-Community Relations (3)                                       will be required to submit a final transcript after completion of
   ADM 880 Human Resource Management (3)                                        their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first semester
   ADM 895 (Special Topic Course) Principles of Finance and                     of graduate study.)
                 Budget (3)                                                     Official transcripts of all graduate study.
   ADM 895 (Special Topic Course) Educational Leadership                        A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
                Issues (6) (Gallaudet Leadership Institute students             previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
                only)                                                           applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
                                                                                tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
3. Internship/Field Experience (3 credit hours)                                 An application fee of $50.
   ADM 890 Internship (for students without administrative                      A completed graduate school application form.
                experience) (3); OR,                                            Goals statement.
   ADM 855 Field Experience (for students with documented,                      TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
                substantial administrative experience) (3)
                                                                           Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
Total: 30 Credit Hours

4. Final Project.                                                             Are additional application materials required?
   All students must design and submit a final change leadership              Standardized Test Scores         No
project that reflects what they learned in the program.                           References                   Three Names + Phone Nos.
                                                                             Reference Citing                 No
                                                                             Sign Language Skills
                                                                                 Resume                       Yes
The Gallaudet Leadership Institute (GLI)                                         Writing Sample               Yes. Essay
   The Ed. S. Program in Change Leadership in Education has a                Videotape of Signing             No
unique and vital partnership with the Gallaudet Leadership                   and/or English
Institute (http://gli.gallaudet.edu/). The GLI was established in
October of 2002 as an institute uniquely qualified to provide
                                                                              Are there additional application requirements?
deaf and hard of hearing professionals with programming
                                                                             On-Campus Interview          No
specifically tailored to their personal and professional needs. The
                                                                                 Sign Language Evaluation SCPI
GLI was also chartered to address acute leadership shortages in
education and other social service professions, including "deaf-                 English Evaluation       TOEFL for foreign
                                                                                                              students
centric" for-profit and non-profit agencies and corporations.
                                                                             Culture and Language             Recommended
   GLI participants enrolled in the Ed. S. Program in Change
                                                                             Colloquium Required?
Leadership in Education are engaged in a variety of non-
traditional learning experiences, including cohort building and
leadership development activities, online courses, and web-                  Are there additional background requirements?
                                                                             Prior Master’s Degree            No
based and other forms of experiential learning. An extensive six-
week summer residency is required, followed by an internship or                  Required Undergraduate       Special Education, Deaf Education,
field experiences, as well as the design of a final change project.            Major                            or Human Services (only people
                                                                                                              with degrees in these areas may
Questions about specific GLI admission requirements should be
                                                                                                              apply)
directed to Dr. Joseph Innes at joseph.innes@gallaudet.edu.
                                                                      42
                                                                                                                        Courses of Study


      Prerequisite               3 Credits Coursework in                     ADM 834 Program Development and Evaluation in
      Coursework                 Deafness (may be added to                           Special Education and Human Services (3)
      (required)                 Program After Admission)                    ADM 838 Organization Development and the
                                 2 courses in Sign Language (must                    Management of Change (3)
                                 be completed during student's first          ADM 839 Organization Theory and Design (3)
                                 year in the program)                        ADM 840 Organization Diagnosis (3)
  Standardized Testing           No                                          ADM 841 Redesigning Organization (3)
  Substitute for Prerequisites                                               ADM 845 Curriculum Development (3)
      Prior Professional         Minimum 3 Years Paid, Full-time             ADM 858 Supervising and Evaluating Teaching (3)
      Experience                 Professional Experience in Special          ADM 860 Ethics in Management (3)
                                 Education, Deaf Education, or               ADM 862 Gender Issues in Management (3)
                                 Human Services                              ADM 880 Human Resource Administration (3)
      Prior Certification         Yes (for people interested in               ADM 896 Computer Applications in Educational
                                 education administration)
                                                                                     Administration (3)
  Health Certification            No
                                                                             ADM 899 Independent Study (1-3)
  Requirements
  Police or Other                No
                                                                           D. Internship/Field Experience (3 credit hours)
  Background Check
                                                                             An internship of a minimum of 360 clock hours is required of
                                                                             all students without substantial administrative experience.
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                              Students with substantial administrative experience are
  Last Date to Submit            No Deadline
                                                                             required to design a set of field experiences.
  Completed Application
  First Date for Consideration   No Set Date
                                                                              ADM 890 Internship (for students without documented
  of Application
                                                                              substantial administrative experience) (3)
  Summer Admission Possible?     Yes
                                                                              ADM 855 Field Experience (for students with documented
  Fall Admission Possible?       Yes
                                                                              substantial administrative experience) (3)
  Winter Admission Possible?     Yes
  Part-time Study Possible?      Yes
                                                                           E. Comprehensive Examination
  Summers-Only Study Possible?   Yes
  Weekend and Evening            Yes
                                                                              All master's degree students must pass a comprehensive ex-
  Study Possible?
                                                                           amination in their last semester. This examination is designed in
                                                                           collaboration with the student's faculty advisor.
Program of Study: Master of Science in Administration

A. Prerequisite Areas
                                                                           Certificates in Administration
   A course on deafness (Gallaudet University's Culture and
     Language Colloquium satisfies this requirement)                        Certificate of Leadership
   Sign language skill (students must complete a minimum of 2                This is a 24-credit learning experience designed in
     sign language courses during their first year in the                   collaboration with an advisor from the Department of
     program)                                                              Administration and Supervision. There are no examination
                                                                           requirements for the certificate (although specific courses taken
B. Core Requirements (18 credit hours)                                     may have examination requirements).
  EDF 720 Introduction to Research in Education and
              Human Services (3)                                           Certificate of Management
  EDF 730 Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)                          There are two kinds of Certificates of Management: general
  ADM 711 Basics of Management (3)                                         and specialized. The general Certificate of Management is a
  ADM 796 Executive Communication Skills (3)                               12-credit learning experience composed of 4 courses selected
  ADM 821 Issues in the Administration of Programs for                     by the student. All courses must be from the Department of
              People with Disabilities (3)                                 Administration and Supervision. The specialized Certificate of
  ADM 837 Interpersonal and Group Behavior in                              Management focuses on organization improvement. To qualify
              Organizations (3)                                            for this special certificate, applicants must have a minimum of
                                                                           three years of paid, full-time employment in special education,
C. Electives in the Major Field (9 credit hours)                           deaf education, or human services. The courses for this special
  ADM 788 Organization and Administration of the                           certificate are ADM 838, ADM 839, ADM 841, and ADM 837 or
                American Education System (3)                              ADM 840.
  ADM 810 Public Policy and Persons with Disabilities (3)



                                                                      43
Courses of Study



Courses Offered:                                                           ADM 821 Issues in the Administration of Programs for
                                                                           People with Disabilities (3)
ADM 711 Basics of Management (3)                                              This course focuses on current issues of import and emerging
   Presents basic management principles and concepts. Topics               trends in the management of special education programs from
include: the historical evolution of management thought and                federal, state, and local perspectives. Concentration is on the
practice; effective techniques for planning, decision making,              broadest understanding of special education and disabilities.
problem solving, information management, and reporting;                    Each topic covered in the seminar will begin with a review of
organizing and staffing; and principles of budget administration.           the historical trends, theoretical underpinnings, philosophical
Technology in the workplace, supervision of diverse individuals and        foundation, and sociological bases of that topic in order to
groups, and interpersonal communication styles are featured.               develop management practices that can be coherently and
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             consistently implemented on a daily basis.
                                                                              Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
ADM 788 Organization and Administration of the American Edu-               Course Fee: $50
cation System (3)
   Provides an introduction to the organizational structure of             ADM 822 Executive Management Skills (3)
the American educational system at the federal, state, and local             The theory and application of the following managerial skill
levels; governance patterns; policy; finance; administrative                repertoires are presented: interviewing techniques, resume
roles and relationships; and current trends and issues. Particular         writing, time management, stress management, meeting
attention is given to the organization and administration of               management, parliamentary procedure, conflict management,
deaf and hard of hearing people within the context of the larger           and assertiveness training. Several case study leadership events
system.                                                                    are presented. Attention is given to actual management problems
                                                                           that are currently being experienced by the participants. Core
ADM 796 Executive Communication Skills (3)                                 requirement for Ph.D. students.
   Grammar is not the problem! Attitude is! This seminar                      Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
helps the administrator avoid the tics plaguing his or her                 Course Fee: $175
memoes, letters, and position papers—tics such as taking
forever to get to the point at hand; using marathon sentences              ADM 834 Program Development and Evaluation in Spe-
to say what could be said in a dash; mixing metaphors and                  cial Education and Human Services (3)
misplacing modifiers; burying the antecedents of pronouns in the               This course focuses on the design, development, and
underbrush of prose; and masquerading behind the obscurity of              evaluation of programs for individuals with disabilities.
the passive voice. Analysis of the style and tone of writing. Core         Topics to be covered in this course include interpreting policy
requirement for Ph.D. students.                                            statements into relevant programmatic goals and objectives;
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             determining organizational components and functions;
Course Fee: $75                                                            establishing staffing patterns; setting up program-based budgets;
                                                                           and formulating ongoing process evaluation, product evaluation,
ADM 809 Theory of Management and Leadership (3)                            and cost analysis plans. Students will be required to submit a
   Theory follows practice. The application of classical                   proposal in response to a Request for Proposals (RFP), thereby
management thought; the conundrum of power, authority,                     increasing their managerial skills through simulation of an
and responsibility; the principles of motivation; the option of            actual grant-writing experience. (Cross-listed as EDF834).
Japanese management thought; the influence of personality type;                Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
and the ingredients of leadership training—all are interwoven
into a masterful tapestry that contributes to the development of           ADM 837 Interpersonal and Group Behavior
each participant’s emerging management philosophy. Leadership              in Organizations (3)
styles are measured and demonstrated in weekly events. Core                   The emphasis of the course is on interpersonal and group
requirement for Ph.D. students.                                            behavior in organizations. Through experienced-based
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             learning activities, small group discussions, and short lectures,
Course Fee: $125                                                           students learn about interpersonal interactions and dynamics
                                                                           in an organization setting. Topics include power and politics,
ADM 810 Public Policy and Persons with Disabilities (3)                    decision making, conflict, and organizational culture. This is a
   The focus of this course is on the history, development,                core requirement for the Ph.D., Ed.S., and master’s programs.
implementation, and analysis of social policies designed to                   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
reconcile concerns and to overcome obstacles faced by citizens
of this democracy who have disabilities. The major activity of             ADM 838 Organization Development and the
the seminar will be the analysis of a national policy relative to          Management of Change (3)
the provision of services to people with disabilities.                        This course focuses on the processes of organization devel-
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             opment and the management of change. In the course students
                                                                           learn how to diagnose organizational problems and how to plan

                                                                      44
                                                                                                                               Courses of Study


ways to solve the problems. The process of change manage-                   manage effectively the organizational improvement process.
ment is explored in depth. The course uses a combination of                   Prerequisites: ADM 838, ADM 839, and ADM 840, or ADM
structured activities, small group discussions, and short lectures.         837 and permission of the instructor.
Because of the nature of the course, active student participation
is essential. It is designed for current or future administrators in        ADM 842 Advanced Seminar in Educational
schools, universities, and public sector organizations. This is a           Administration (1-3)
core requirement for the Ph.D. and Ed.S. programs.                            This seminar focuses on issues and trends in educational
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                              administration and supervision. The particular issues and trends
                                                                            are determined at the beginning of each course in collaboration
ADM 839 Organization Theory and Design (3)                                  with the students.
   Students are introduced to principles of organization                       Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.
theory and design. They examine topics such as organization
design; the external environment of organizations; the                      ADM 845 Curriculum Development (3)
impactof organizational goals on organizational effectiveness;                 This course is designed for the educational leader and deals in-depth
organizational technology; organizational bureaucracy;                      with the place of schooling in the American experiment (which is
classic organizational structures; the impact of structure on               American society), the nature of curriculum, theories of curriculum,
innovation, change, information, and control, decision-making               and important trends at the early childhood, elementary, and secondary
in organizations; power and politics; integrating all parts of an           levels in general education; provides a curricular and instructional basis
organization; and organizational learning and renewal. This                 for educational courses which are a part of the future leader’s program
course, when combined with ADM 838, ADM 840, and ADM                        of studies; and includes trends and issues in classroom organization,
841, provides students with solid preparation for managing the              program development, curriculum design, instructional options, and
process of organizational improvement.                                      strategies of assessment. With this knowledge, the curriculum leader
   Prerequisite: ADM 838 and permission of the instructor.                  can be an agent of change.

ADM 840 Organization Diagnosis (3)                                          ADM 855 Field Experiences (3)
    This course teaches students how to plan and conduct a                    An individualized set of experiences designed to give the
comprehensive organization diagnosis for the purpose of                     graduate student in administration an understanding of the
improving organizational performance. The classic diagnostic                operation of several different education-related organizations.
procedures of interviewing, surveying, observing, and                         Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program and
artifact analysis are taught. Students learn to diagnose “root”             permission of the fieldwork supervisor.
problems related to an organization’s work processes, its social
“architecture,” and its relationship with a broader environment.            ADM 858 Supervising and Evaluating Teaching (3)
Students also learn how to choose effectiveness criteria for                   This course provides students with an introduction to concepts
diagnosing organization performance, accessing the quality                  and principles for supervising and evaluating teaching. Through
of work life, how to organize and diagnose data into useable                experienced-based learning activities, small group discussions,
feedback for decision makers, and how to conduct a feedback/                and short lectures, students examine basic models of supervising
action planning meeting. The ethics and politics of organization            teaching, two advanced models of supervision (clinical and
diagnosis are also examined. When combined with ADM 838,                    diagnostic), basic supervisory skills for observing teaching, and
ADM 839, and ADM 841, this course provides future managers                  basic skills for conducting supervisory conferences.
of education and human service organizations with solid                        The course also provides students with an introduction
preparation for managing organizational improvement processes.              to concepts and principles of teacher evaluation and staff
    Prerequisites: ADM 838 and ADM 839; and permission of                   development. Through experienced-based learning activities,
the instructor.                                                             small group discussions, and short lectures, students learn
                                                                            about evaluating teaching, conducting performance evaluation
ADM 841 Redesigning Organizations (3)                                       conferences, and developing staff development plans based on
   This course is an advanced course in organizational improve-             the results of evaluation.
ment that expects students to apply what they learned from ADM                 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
838, ADM 839, and ADM 840. Students learn a systemic and
systematic model for transforming professional organizations                ADM 860 Ethics in Management (3)
into high performing learning organizations by making                          A classical seminar offered every other spring semester during
simultaneous improvements in three sets of key organizational               even-numbered years by a team of three to four instructors. The
variables; the organization’s work processes, its internal social           nine-evening, once-a-week seminar covers the gamut of ethical
“architecture,” and its relationship with its external environment.         concerns dealt with by line and staff administrators. Instead of
Students design an organizational improvement intervention in               traditional papers and examinations, the seminar requires class
a real or fictitious organization. This course, when combined                participation.
with other courses on organizational improvement, will prepare                 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
future administrators of education and human service agencies to            Course Fee: $65

                                                                       45
Courses of Study


ADM 862 Gender Issues in Management (3)                                    ADM 899 Independent Study (1-3)
   A classical seminar that alternates with ADM 860 and is of-                Individualized studies focusing on a problem, issue, or topic
fered every other spring semester during odd-numbered years.               of special interest to the graduate student. Must be sponsored by
The nine-evening, once-a-week seminar involves outside lectur-             a faculty member and approved by the chair of the department.
ers addressing various issues confronting women administra-                Available only to doctoral students. A special independent study
tors. Instead of traditional papers and examinations, the seminar          form needs to be completed before permission can be granted.
requires participation in class discussions.                                  Prerequisites: Permission of PAC and the department chair.
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
                                                                           ADM 900 Dissertation Research (3-6)
ADM 880 Human Resource Administration (3)                                    Available only to Ph.D. students in the Department of
   Designed to assist school administrators and educators in               Administration and Supervision. Minimum of six credit hours
developing legal literacy skills through an orientation to the             required.
U.S. legal system: local, state, and federal government roles in             Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.
education; church-state controversies in schools; law in compul-
sory education and curriculum; student rights; desegregation;
mainstreaming; teacher rights; collective bargaining; tort law
in education; and school finance law. Considerable reading and                                 Counseling (COU)
class participation are expected.
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             Graduate Faculty:
                                                                             Roger Beach, Ed.D.; Howard Busby, Ph.D.; Marita Danek,
ADM 888 Higher Education Organization and
Administration (3)                                                         Ph.D.; Jeffrey Lewis, Ph.D.; William P. McCrone, Ed.D, J.D.;
   The historical development of universities, colleges, and               Diane Morton, Ph.D.; Francine White, Ed.D.; Frank R. Zieziula,
community colleges; philosophies and objectives of the various             Ph.D.
kinds of institutions; governance of public and private higher ed-
ucation; organizational structures; funding of higher education;           Adjunct Faculty:
administrative roles and functions; improving administrative                 Ruth M. Schilling, M.A.
effectiveness; and standards, accrediting bodies, and evaluation
criteria and processes will be covered.
                                                                           About the Department:
ADM 890 Internship (3)                                                        Gallaudet University’s Department of Counseling, founded in
   The internship requirement for the degree programs within the           1971, prepares highly qualified M.A.-level counselors eligible
department is sometimes waived in the advisory process, pend-              for licensure as professional counselors in most states. The
ing evidence the student can produce. The advisor(s) reserve               training provided in this department uniquely prepares gradu-
the right to determine the weight of such written evidence                 ates to work with individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing,
attesting to breadth and depth of administration experience prior          with or without additional disabilities, by developing a core set
to entry into the program. The internship involves a minimum               of competencies in all students with specializations in school
of 360 clock hours of work in an administrative context in any             and mental health counseling. Since 1971, the department has
education or human services setting. A written proposal on how             graduated and placed more than 600 outstanding counselors now
the internship will be designed is required before the start of the        working in a wide range of counseling settings throughout the
semester in which it will be done. The department has proposal             United States.
guidelines available.                                                         The department offers the following M.A. programs:
   Prerequisite: Acceptance into a degree program by the                       1. M.A. in Mental Health Counseling
Department of Administration and Supervision.                                  2. M.A. in School Counseling and Guidance

ADM 895 Special Topics (3)                                                    The programs of study are broadly designed to include formal
                                                                           classes and extensive supervised practicum and internship
ADM 896 Computer Applications in Educational                               experiences leading to the master of arts degree. The curriculum
Administration (3)                                                         includes courses from the departments of Counseling; ASL and
   The workshop covers basic skills in computer use; operating             Deaf Studies; Educational Foundations and Research; and Hear-
systems; application of the computer to administrative process-            ing, Speech, and Language Sciences. Elective courses are also
es; characteristics and applications of leading software programs          available through the Consortium of Universities of the Wash-
in word processing, budget management, database management,                ington Metropolitan Area. All counseling programs are open to
project management, graphics, communications, and desktop                  deaf, hard of hearing, hearing, physically disabled, and physi-
publishing; bases for evaluation and selection decisions; and              cally able people who are eligible for admission to the Graduate
administration of computer resources and support.                          School. Provisions are made to facilitate participation of deaf
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             and hard of hearing students in all phases of the programs, via
                                                                           the use of sign language and notetakers.

                                                                      46
                                                                                                                                 Courses of Study


   In addition to the teaching faculty, a large number of outstand-                   Goals statement.
ing professionals from the Washington, D.C., area lecture and                         TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
participate in the training programs. Practicum sites are available
on and off campus. They include day and residential schools                     Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
for deaf students as well as public and private agencies serving
deaf people. Internship sites are located around the country and                   Are additional application materials required?
include residential schools and postsecondary programs, commu-
                                                                                      Standardized Test Scores      GRE or MAT
nity-based counseling centers, and mental health agencies.
   Federal grant funds, stipends, and tuition assistance have                         References                    Four Letters
been made available for students in the mental health counseling                      Reference Citing              Yes
program through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, and                       Sign Language Skills
for school counseling and guidance majors (including summers-                         Special Essay                 Yes
only) through the U.S. Department of Education.                                   Resume                            No
                                                                                      Writing Sample                Yes. 3 Essays
                                                                                  Videotape of Signing              No
Mental Health Counseling                                                          and/or English
   This program prepares counselors for placement in mental
health agencies, facilities, and programs serving deaf people.                        Are there additional application requirements?
Practicum and internship resources include state, local, and                         On-Campus Interview           Highly recommended
federal mental health agencies, addiction programs, psychiat-
                                                                                     Month of Interviews           Rolling
ric hospitals, and educational programs serving the needs of
emotionally disturbed deaf children, adolescents, and adults. The                    Sign Language Evaluation      SCPI on enrollment
master’s degree program suggests a minimum of 66 credit hours                     English Evaluation               No
and requires two academic years and one summer semester to                           Culture and Language          Highly recommended
complete. The program offers students the opportunity to have a                      Colloquium Required?
clinical or community counseling emphasis through the field-
work placement.                                                                    Are there additional background requirements?
   In addition to the Graduate School requirements, the mental                    Prior Master’s Degree            No
health counseling program requires nine undergraduate or gradu-                   Required Undergraduate           No
ate credit hours in psychology, specifically, a course in child                    Major
development and one in abnormal psychology before entering                        Recommended                      No
the program.                                                                      Undergraduate Major
   The Mental Health Counseling Program is accredited by the                          Prerequisite                 Child Development, Abnormal
Council on Accreditation of Counseling-Related Educational                            Coursework                   Psychology, plus 3 additional
Programs (CACREP). Students are eligible to sit for the National                       (Required)                  credits in Psychology
Counselor Examination during their last semester of studies.                      Standardized Testing             No
                                                                                  Substitute for Prerequisite
Admission Requirements for M.A. Program in Mental                                     Recommended Prior            ASL I & II
Health Counseling                                                                     Coursework
                                                                                  Prior Professional               No
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                      Experience
University graduate program:                                                      Prior Certification               No
                                                                                  Health Certification              No
                                                                                  Requirements
      Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence          Police or Other                  No
      of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited univer-           Background Check
      sity. (Those applying during their final undergraduate year will
      be required to submit a final transcript after completion of their
                                                                                   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
      bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first semester of
                                                                                  Last Date to Submit
      graduate study.)
                                                                                  Completed Application            No Deadline
      Official transcripts of all graduate study.                                  First Date for
      A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all            Consideration of                 November 15
      previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,                   Application
      applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-                 Summer Admission                 No
      tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)                        Possible?
      An application fee of $50.                                                  Fall Admission Possible?         Yes
      A completed graduate school application form.                               Winter Admission                 No
                                                                                  Possible?

                                                                           47
Courses of Study


  Part-time Study Possible?       Yes                                        Checklist of requirements specific to these programs:
  Summers-Only Study              No
  Possible?                                                                     Are additional application materials required?
  Weekend and Evening Study       No                                           Standardized Test Scores        No
  Possible?                                                                        References                  Three letters
                                                                                   Reference Citing Sign       Yes
School Counseling and Guidance                                                     Language Skills
   This program prepares school counselors for placement in ed-                    Special Essay               Yes
ucational settings serving deaf and hard of hearing children and               Resume                          No
deaf children with additional special needs. The program gives a               Writing Sample                  No
mental health emphasis to the training of school counselors. The               Videotape of Signing            No
age range of deaf students with whom trainees work varies from                 and/or English
preschool through postsecondary. The master’s degree consists
of a minimum of 65 credit hours and requires two academic                       Are there additional application requirements?
years to complete, including the summer between the first and                      On-Campus Interview          Recommended
second year of study. A special summers-only track (60 credit                     Month of Interviews          Rolling
hours) exists for professionals who are seeking a career change                   Sign Language Evaluation     SCPI on enrollment
or additional educational credentials. Preference is given to ap-              English Evaluation              No
plicants having prior experience in educational programs serving                  Culture and Language         Strongly recommended
deaf and hard of hearing people and to those with a degree in                     Colloquium Required?
education to facilitate certification at the state level. Federal
grant funding is provided to students for most tuition and room                 Are there additional background requirements?
and board during three summer semesters.                                       Prior Master’s Degree           No
   The program of study is accredited by the National Council                  Required
on Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs (NCATE) and                     Undergraduate Major             No
the Council on Accreditation of Counseling-Related Education                   Recommended
Programs (CACREP). In addition to the Graduate School require-                 Undergraduate Major             No
ments, the school counseling and guidance program requires                         Prerequisite Coursework     Child Development, Abnormal
undergraduate or graduate courses in child development and                         Required for full-time      Psychology, plus three addi-
abnormal psychology, and one additional course in psychology                       students                    tional credits in Psychology
(nine hours total).                                                                Prerequisite Coursework     General Psychology,
                                                                                   required for summers-only   Abnormal Psychology,
                                                                                   students                    Audiology
Admission Requirements for M.A. Program in School
                                                                               Standardized Testing            No
Counseling and Guidance (Including Requirements for                            Substitute for Prerequisite
the Summer-Only Option)                                                        Recommended Prior               No
                                                                               Coursework
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                       Prior Professional          Experience working with
University graduate program:                                                       Experience                  Children
                                                                               Prior Certification              No
     Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including                 Health Certification             No
     evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an                   Requirements
     accredited university. (Those applying during their final                      Police or Other             Prior to practicum placement
     undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript           Background Check
     after completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling
     in their first semester of graduate study.)                                 Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
     Official transcripts of all graduate study.                                Last Date to Submit             No Deadline
     A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all          Completed Application
     previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,                 First Date for                  November 15
     applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-               Consideration of
     tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)                      Application
     An application fee of $50.                                                Summer Admission                Only for Summer-Only
     A completed graduate school application form.                             Possible?                       Option
     Goals statement.                                                          Fall Admission Possible?        Yes (except
     TOEFL scores for all international applicants.                                                            Summer-Only)
                                                                               Winter Admission Possible?      No
                                                                               Part-time Study Possible?       Yes



                                                                        48
                                                                                                                               Courses of Study


  Summers-Only Study             Yes                                                       Semester II - Spring
  Possible?                                                                 COU 709 Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness (3)
  Weekend and Evening            No                                         COU 737 Organization and Administration of School
  Study Possible?                                                                   Counseling Programs (3)
                                                                            COU 748 Principles of Assessment in Counseling (3)
Core Program of Study                                                       COU 758 Counseling Deaf Students with Additional
   Here is a listing of core courses required of students majoring                  Special Needs (3)
in either school counseling and guidance or mental health counsel-          COU 716 Psychopharmacology for Counselors (1)
ing. Students usually take 12-15 credit hours per semester.                 COU 740 Practicum in School Counseling (3)

Required Courses for Mental Health Counseling Majors                                         Summer Session
                                                                            COU 702 Play Therapy (3)
                    Semester I - Fall                                       COU 703 Substance Abuse Prevention for Children and
  COU 710 Orientation to the Profession of Mental                                   Youth (3)
           Health Counseling (3)
  COU 717 Lifespan Development (3)                                                          Semester III - Fall
  COU 721 Foundations in Helping Skills I (3)                               HSL     Introduction to Audiology (2)
                                                                                    707
  COU 732 Theories and Approaches in Counseling and                         COU     Lifestyles and Career Development (3)
                                                                                    734
           Psychotherapy (3)                                                COU     Practicum in School Counseling II (4)*
                                                                                    740
  EDF: 730 Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)                       COU     Group Counseling with Deaf Students in
                                                                                    751
                                                                                    Schools (4)
                       Semester II - Spring                                 EDF 720 Introduction to Research in Education and
  COU    709   Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness (3)                                 Human Services (3)
  COU    714   Adult Psychopathology (3)                                    COU 715 Family Therapy (3)
  COU    716   Psychopharmacology for Counselors (1)
  COU    740   Practicum in Mental Health Counseling (4)*                                  Semester IV - Spring
  COU    748   Principles of Assessment in Counseling (3)                   COU 790 Internship in School Counseling (12)*
  COU    753   Group Psychotherapy (3)
                                                                          Required Courses for Summers-Only School Counseling
                    Summer Session                                        and Guidance Majors (Emphasis on Mental Health)
  COU 728 The Cycle of Substance Abuse (3)
  COU 736 Organization and Administration of Human                                            First Summer
          Services (3)                                                      COU 712 Orientation to the Profession of School
  COU 740 Practicum in Mental Health Counseling (2-4)*                              Counseling and Guidance (3)
                                                                            COU 721 Foundations in Helping Skills I (3)
                   Semester III - Fall                                      COU 732 Theories and Approaches in Counseling and
  EDF 720 Introduction to Research in Education and                                 Psychotherapy (3)
          Human Services (3)
  COU 715 Family Therapy (3)                                                                     Spring
  COU 734 Lifestyles and Career Development (3)                             COU 795.01 Seminars on Child Disorders
  COU 740 Practicum in Mental Health Counseling (4)*                                   and DSM IV (1)
  COU 768 Advanced Skills in Psychotherapy (3)
                                                                                             Second Summer
                 Semester IV - Spring                                       COU 709 Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness (3)
  COU 790 Internship in Mental Health Counseling (12)*                      COU 728 Cycle of Substance Abuse (Emphasis on
                                                                                    Children) (3)
Required Courses for School Counseling and Guidance                         COU 751 Group Counseling with Deaf Students in
Majors                                                                              Schools (4)

                   Semester I - Fall                                                         Fall or Spring
  COU 712 Orientation to the Profession of School                           COU 740 Practicum in School Counseling
          Counseling (3)                                                            (150 hours) (3)*
  COU 717 Lifespan Development (3)                                        ________________
                                                                             *Each student will be required to take a Sign Communication Proficiency
  COU 721 Foundations in Helping Skills (3)
                                                                          Interview (SCPI) and attain a rating of Intermediate before being allowed to
  COU 732 Theories and Approaches in Counseling and                       enter COU 740: Practicum. A rating of Intermediate Plus must be attained
          Psychotherapy (3)                                               before beginning COU 790: Internship.
  EDF 730 Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)
                                                                     49
Courses of Study


                     Spring                                               COU 702 Play Therapy (3)
  COU 716 Psychopharmacology for Counselors (1)                              This course is designed to give students exposure to the
                                                                          various play therapies: play room, sand tray, art, movement, and
                     Third Summer                                         psychodrama. Through reading, lecture, class discussion, case
  COU 734 Lifestyles and Career Development (3)                           presentations, and role play simulations, students will become
  COU 737 Organization and Administration of School                       familiar with various techniques used with children in therapy
          Guidance Programs (3)                                           and counseling. Students will discuss the applicability of these
  COU 748 Principles of Assessment in Counseling (3)                      theories in working with deaf and hard of hearing children
                                                                          and youth, as well as in working with children and youth with
                 Fall, Spring Semester                                    differing cultural backgrounds.
  COU 790 Internship in School Counseling
          (600 hours) (12)*                                               COU 703 Substance Abuse Prevention for Children and
                                                                          Youth (3)
  The following courses or their equivalent must be taken, with              This course reviews current practice in the area of substance
prior approval of the faculty of the Department of Counseling,            abuse prevention for children and youth, as well as focusing on
during the regular academic year at a college/university near             current research in this area. Through readings, lectures, class
the home site of the student. There is no time during the regular         discussions, class projects and presentations, and role play simu-
scheduled summer semester to take these additional courses.               lations, students become familiar with different methods and
                                                                          programs to use with children and youth of different ages. This
  COU 717 Lifespan Development (3)                                        course will include discussion of various factors, including deaf-
  EDF 720 Introduction to Research in Education and                       ness, cultural differences, socioeconomic differences, gender
          Human Services (3)                                              differences, and other factors which may contribute to substance
  EDF 730 Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)                      use/abuse and the subsequent treatment methods.
  COU 799 Independent Study Modules on Mental Health
          Disorders (Three one-credit modules must be                     COU 709 Psychosocial Aspects of Deafness (3)
          completed: Loss Issues; Depression in Children;                    An investigation of psychological and sociological aspects
          Conduct and Behavioral Disorders; Suicide                       of growth and development among deaf people. Includes an
          Treatment and Prevention; Attention Disorders;                  in-depth analysis of adaptive and maladaptive behaviors of
          Conflict Resolution as a Means to Solve School                   deaf individuals and implications of these behaviors for mental
          Violence; and Anxiety Disorders.) (3)                           health. Areas of adjustment include family, school, social,
  COU 799 Independent Study Modules on Special Mental                     vocational, leisure, sexual, marital, old age, and interpersonal
          Health Techniques Used with Deaf Children                       relations contexts. Emphasis is given to compensatory
          (Three one-credit modules must be completed:                    techniques and intervening measures used in achieving
          Play Therapy; Sand Tray; Psychodrama; Family                    adjustment.
          Therapy (required); Art Therapy; Dance                             Prerequisite: Matriculation in the department.
          Therapy; Behavior Modification; and
          Consultation.) (3)                                              COU 710 Orientation to the Profession of Mental Health
                                                                          Counseling (3)
Total Number of Core Hours Required: 60                                      The course provides an orientation to basic mental health
                                                                          counseling principles, processes, counselor roles and functions,
                                                                          professional ethics, issues, organizations, and publications.
Courses Offered:                                                          Specific emphasis will be placed on mental health counseling
                                                                          with deaf individuals and deaf people with multiple disabilities,
COU 701 Seminar on Loss: Death, Dying, and Living (3)                     networking with other agencies, advocacy, and professional
   This course is intended to better understand LIFE, particularly        responsibilities.
as it is affected by serious loss—that is, loss related to life-             Prerequisite: Special students require permission of
threatening illness, loss related to disability, and the ultimate         instructor.
loss caused by death. It is the intent of the professor that the
course provide a solid theoretical and practical knowledge                COU 712 Orientation to the Profession of School
base about the topic of serious loss. Second, and more                    Counseling and Guidance (3)
importantly, this course will provide an opportunity for                     Overview of the issues and techniques involved in providing
hearing and Deaf people to discuss issues of loss as they are             guidance and counseling services to children and young adults
related to our professional responsibilities. Topics of loss and          in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary educational
thanatology are multidisciplinary; therefore, the course will be          settings. Includes an introduction to the profession of school
designed for professionals from a variety of fields, including             counseling, theories, and organizations and publications related
education, counseling, social work, psychology, audiology, and            to the field. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the roles
administration.                                                           and functions of school counselors who serve deaf and hard of
                                                                          hearing children.
                                                                     50
                                                                                                                           Courses of Study


COU 714 Adult Psychopathology (3)                                           COU 723 Counseling Deaf Students with Special Needs (3)
  This course provides an understanding of normal and                          This course is designed to expose school counseling
psychopathological variants of adult functioning and                        majors to the deaf child with special needs and low incidence
development. Diagnostic criteria, psychodynamic issues,                     disabilities in the school program. During the semester, school
and applications of DSM III-R (Diagnostic and Statistical                   counseling graduate students will study the various medical
Manual for Mental Disorders) (or DSM-IV, as applicable) will                and psychosocial issues of deaf students who have multiple
be discussed. Treatment implications of various diagnostic                  disabilities. Additionally, the graduate student will discuss
categories will be included.                                                various approaches to providing both preventative and remedial
  Prerequisite: COU 732.                                                    mental health services to deaf students with special needs, and
                                                                            consultation services to parents, families, teachers, and staff
COU 715 Family Therapy (3)                                                  members when appropriate. Specific instruction in developing
   Students will examine the major theories of family therapy               the social/emotional component of the IEP, developing behavior
and the family life cycle and relate this to deafness in the                plans, and providing consultation in behavior management,
family. Activities include discussion of various family therapy             social skills-developing behavior plans, and providing
techniques, role playing, and simulation exercises based on case            consultation in behavior management, social skills development,
studies.                                                                    independent living skills training, and transition planning will
   Prerequisite: COU 732.                                                   also be discussed.
                                                                               Prerequisites: COU 717, 721, and 732.
COU 716 Psychopharmacology for Counselors (1)
   This is an introduction to current psychoactive                          COU 728 The Cycle of Substance Abuse (3)
medications used most often in schools and counseling/                         The goal of this course is to help professionals working with
psychiatric settings today. The course will explore the conditions          deaf and hard of hearing people understand the impact of drug
which respond best to psychoactive drugs, the specific drugs                 and alcohol abuse throughout the individual’s life span as well
used to treat specific conditions, and the typical dosages used.             as within family and social systems. The course will examine
In addition, it will explore when it is appropriate to suggest              current trends in alcohol and drug abuse; legal implications;
medication and also alternative medication, side effects to be              street names and drug symptom identifiers for counselors; the
aware of, and the benefits gained from the use of psychoactive               medical implications for prescription and non-prescription drug
drugs.                                                                      abuse; substance abuse terminology; the historical context of
   Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.                                 substance abuse in American society; community responses
                                                                            to substance abuse; essentials of substance abuse prevention;
COU 717 Lifespan Development (3)                                            deafness, family dynamics, and substance abuse; and substance
   This course is designed to review theories and principles                abuse treatment strategies and service accessibility.
of lifespan development currently guiding work in the field and                 Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
development as it applies to deaf persons. It is also designed to
familiarize the candidate with current knowledge concerning                 COU 730 Law for School Counselors, Psychologists, and
disorders and disabilities particularly as this knowledge relates to        Social Workers (3)
normal development. Important issues in lifespan development                   This course gives counselors, school psychologists, and
will be presented for discussion, including biological,                     social workers an academic orientation to the U.S. legal
multicultural, and environmental influences. This is a required              system and topics intersecting law, counseling, and psychology
first semester course for all candidates in the Department of                in schools. The course includes legal aspects of client
Counseling. It provides a foundation for understanding normal               confidentiality, civil and criminal liability, student privacy rights
and diverse development as part of ongoing course work and                  regarding educational records and psychological testing, legal
preparation for practicum in subsequent semesters.                          developments involving special education students, behavior
   Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in child/adolescent                 control and discipline, and child abuse as well as general school
development and in abnormal psychology.                                     rights. Particular attention will be given to these topics as they
                                                                            apply to deaf and hard of hearing students.
COU 721 Foundations in Helping Skills I (3)                                    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
   This is an introductory course focusing on basic human
relations skills necessary to be an effective helper. Activities            COU 732 Theories and Approaches in Counseling
will include lecture and discussion of components of                        and Psychotherapy (3)
positive interpersonal skills related to helping as well as role               This course is a general introduction to the major philo-
playing and videotaping of helping relationships. A specific                 sophical systems and theoretical viewpoints used in counseling
interpersonal relations model for the purpose of helping will be            and psychotherapy. The key facets of various theories such as
presented, demonstrated, and analyzed. The course will discuss              phenomenology, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, Gestalt, person-
multicultural issues. Emphasis will be placed on developing                 centered, and existentialism are discussed, and each theory is
human relations skills needed to provide services to deaf and               evaluated as to its applicability with deaf clients.
hard of hearing individuals.                                                   Prerequisite: Special students require the permission of the
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                              instructor.
                                                                       51
Courses of Study


COU 734 Lifestyles and Career Development (3)                             COU 752 Counseling Individuals with Multiple
   This course is designed to provide students with knowledge             Disabilities (3)
of theories, materials, programs, and practices in the career                This course addresses the counseling needs of deaf/hard
development area. It specifically seeks to identify practices              of hearing individuals with physical, emotional, or mental
used with or potentially useful with deaf people. A central               disabilities or chronic illness. Focus is on current and historical
theme is the recognition of the role of career and work with the          issues of stigma, difference and discrimination as barriers
integration of personality. The course will discuss multi-cultural        to empowerment of people with disabilities. Included is an
issues. Emphasis will be placed on discussing the career needs of         overview of major disabling conditions that may affect deaf
deaf and hard of hearing people.                                          individuals: developmental disabilities, chronic mental illness,
   Prerequisite: COU 710 or 712 and permission of instructor.             deaf-blindness, learning disabilities, AD/HD, and HIV+.
                                                                          Resources, advocacy issues, self-help, and family issues will
COU 736 Organization and Administration of                                also be addressed.
Human Service Programs (3)                                                   Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
   This course focuses on the principles and procedures for
establishing and maintaining counseling services in a variety of          COU 753 Group Psychotherapy (3)
school and human service settings. Special emphasis is given to             This is an introduction to the theory and practice of group
the systems approach, needs assessment, program development,              counseling and psychotherapy, with application to group work
and program evaluation.                                                   with deaf individuals. There are didactic and experiential
   Prerequisite: COU 710, 712, or 713.                                    components in this course, which provide students with the
                                                                          opportunity to develop an understanding of group development,
COU 737 Organization and Administration of School                         dynamics, and counseling theories; group leadership styles;
Guidance Programs (3)                                                     group counseling methods and skills; and other group
   This course focuses on the principles and procedures for               approaches.
establishing and maintaining counseling services in a variety               Prerequisites: COU 710 or 713 and 732.
of school settings. Special emphasis is given to the systems
approach, needs assessment, program development, and program              COU 758 Counseling Deaf Students with Additional Special
evaluation of effective guidance programs in schools.                     Needs (3)
   Prerequisite: COU 712.                                                    This course is designed to expose school counseling
                                                                          majors to the deaf child with special needs and low incidence
COU 740 Practicum in Counseling Deaf People (4-8)                         disabilities in the school program. During the semester, school
   Under close supervision, students perform intake interviews,           counseling graduate students will study the various medical
counsel with clients, prepare reports, and work directly with ex-         and psychosocial issues of deaf students who have multiple
perienced counselors in the school and agency setting. Emphasis           disabilities. Additionally, the graduate student will discuss
is placed on developing counseling skills in one-to-one situa-            various approaches to provide both preventative and remedial
tions and in small groups.                                                mental health services to deaf students with special needs, and
   Prerequisites: COU 710, 712 or 713, and 721, 732, and per-             consultation services to parents, families, teachers, and staff
mission of program director and chair.                                    members when appropriate. Specific instruction in developing
                                                                          the social/emotional component of the IEP, developing behavior
COU 748 Principles of Assessment in Counseling (3)                        plans, and providing consultation in behavior management,
   Introduction to the purposes, concepts, and techniques of              social skills development, independent living skills training, and
psychological, vocational, and educational assessment and how             transition planning will also be discussed.
assessment information is used in counseling. Includes a review              Prerequisites: COU 717, 721, and 732
of fundamental statistical concepts, an overview of assessment
procedures, ethics, and legal implications. Emphasis will be              COU 768 Advanced Techniques and Skills in
placed on describing assessment techniques, including a variety           Psychotherapy (3)
of psychological tests used widely with deaf and hard of hearing             This is an advanced course in techniques and skills in
people.                                                                   psychotherapy, designed expressly for second year or advanced
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.                               students in mental health counseling and related disciplines.
                                                                          Emphasis will be on the application of selected theoretical
COU 751 Group Counseling with Deaf Students in                            constructs in working with clients in general and with deaf and
Schools (4)                                                               hard of hearing clients in particular. An important aspect of the
   This course introduces the student to the theory and practice          course is on therapist attitude, techniques, and skills essential
of group counseling with application to work with individuals             in effective treatment of clients with specific psychological
who are deaf and hard of hearing. It stresses understanding of            problems and disorders. Psychotherapy approaches with difficult
group dynamics and group process.                                         clients or those resistant to treatment will be an integral aspect
   There are didactic and experimental components included in             of the course. It is a student therapist-centered course, attentive
this course.                                                              to his or her development and growth as a therapist. The method
   Prerequisite: COU 710, 712, or 713.                                    of instruction is primarily hands-on experiential activities and
                                                                     52
                                                                                                                          Courses of Study


will include supervised simulated therapy sessions, role play,                 The department currently offers the following graduate pro-
student-therapist videotape replay and feedback, videotapes                 fessional preparation programs:
of actual therapy sessions featuring real clients and master                    1. Ph.D. in Deaf Education.
therapists, psychotherapy case presentations, demonstrations,                   2. Ed.S. (Education Specialist) in Deaf Education.
and live observations. The didactic aspect will include reviewing                  (available only by special arrangement).
and analyzing psychotherapy research.                                           3. M.A. in Deaf Education: Teacher Preparation Program
   Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.                                      (specializations in family-centered early education,
                                                                                   elementary, secondary, or multiple disabilities).
COU 790 Internship in Counseling Deaf People (8-12)                             4. M.A. in Deaf Education: Accelerated Program in Deaf
   Advanced fieldwork experience in an approved setting.                            Education (at the elementary or secondary level).
Supervised work in diagnosis, individual and group counseling,                  5. M.A. in Deaf Education: Advanced Studies
program planning, and case study. The major goal of this course                    (for experienced teachers of deaf and hard of hearing
is to provide practical application for the training that has                      students).
preceded the internship.                                                        6. M.A. in Deaf Education: Special Programs in Deafness
   Prerequisites: COU 740 and permission of the instructor.                        (for individuals not seeking teacher certification).
                                                                                Both coursework and practicum experiences are important
COU 795      Special Topics (1-3)                                           preparation components. All programs involve exposure to
                                                                            professional organizations, agencies, and educational facilities
COU 799 Independent Study (1-3)                                             related to the education of deaf and hard of hearing students,
    This course provides students with the opportunity for more             and provide for involvement in schools and classes. The
concentrated study of particular topics than can be provided                department strongly recommends that students have both a car
in regular classes. The end product and the number of credit                and a computer in order to benefit fully from course work and
hours to be given must be mutually agreed to by the student and             field experiences.
teacher prior to registration.                                                 The department has 18 highly qualified and experienced full-
   Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.                        time faculty members with national and international reputations
                                                                            in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.
                                                                            Publications and presentations based on faculty research and
                                                                            development work contribute to the advancement of knowledge
                                                                            and techniques for working with deaf and hard of hearing
                                                                            children and youth.
                                                                               The department’s philosophy statements reflect an overall
                                                                            theme of excellence and appreciation/value of diversity;
                    Education (EDU)                                         they emphasize the rights of deaf individuals to maximum
                                                                            participation and leadership in all aspects of life; as well as the
                                                                            rights of access to communication and education which will
Graduate Faculty:                                                           enhance the development of knowledge and skills to make
    Cynthia N. Bailes, Ph.D.; Barbara Bodner-Johnson, Ph.D.;                decisions and to assume responsibilities in all aspects of society.
Carol J. Erting, Ph.D. (Chair); Laurene Gallimore, Ph.D.; Simon                The fundamental theme of the teacher education program is:
I. Guteng, Ph.D.; Jan Hafer, Ed.D.; Patricia L. Hulsebosch,
Ph.D.; Joseph Innes, Ph.D.; Andrea Izzu, Ph.D.; Judith Johnson,               The preparation of teachers of deaf children as facilitators
Ph.D.; Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D.; Richard Lytle, Ph.D.; Fred                     of Deaf cultural knowledge and the society at large in which
R. Mangrubang, Ph.D.; Robert T. Mobley, Ph.D.; Donald F.                      the role of the teacher is to maximize the individual’s
Moores, Ph.D.; Marilyn Sass-Lehrer, Ph.D.; Helen R. Thumann,                  opportunities to participate in all aspects of life.
M.A.; Lillian Tompkins, Ph.D.
                                                                               The Department of Education’s model of professional
About the Department:                                                       preparation and development values American Sign Language
   The history of Gallaudet University’s Department of                      and English as equally important for facilitating curriculum
Education dates back to 1891 when a “Normal Department” was                 content and cultural literacy; the model supports the
established on campus to train teachers of deaf children. Although          development of reflective professionals who review the
the department values its history, it prides itself primarily on its        teaching-learning process and engage in critical appraisal
ability to adapt to changing times and new challenges in the field           and problem-solving. The Department of Education prepares
of educating deaf and hard of hearing students.                             professionals to interact and communicate fluently with deaf
   The department today offers graduate and postgraduate                    people and with children and youth with diverse family
programs to prepare professional personnel to work with all                 backgrounds and learning characteristics. The department’s
ages of deaf and hard of hearing children in various kinds of               programs prepare graduates for advocacy and leadership roles,
educational programs and settings. Programs are designed to                 and to establish partnerships with deaf adults, parents, colleagues
meet students’ individual needs and interests and are open to               from multiple disciplines, and community and professional
hearing, deaf, and hard of hearing individuals.                             organizations.
                                                                       53
Courses of Study


   The program philosophy indicates that graduates of our                                of graduate study.)
programs must have a strong general studies background                                   Official transcripts of all graduate study.
with specialized knowledge in their selected content areas.                              A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
The acquisition of specialized knowledge and skills in the                               previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
foundations of special education (including deaf studies),                               applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
communication and language, and the application of curricular                            tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
and instructional principles and professionalism are emphasized                          An application fee of $50.
in the teacher education program.                                                        A completed graduate school application form.
   Students desiring licensure by state education agencies should
                                                                                         Goals statement.
seek advisement about meeting the requirements for a particular
state. These requirements vary, and it is the responsibility of                          TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
the students to be familiar with them and to develop a plan                       Checklist of requirements specific to these programs:
for meeting them. Students who complete the Department of                             Are additional application materials required?
Education’s state-approved programs of preparation are eligible
                                                                                     Standardized Test Scores            GRE
for District of Columbia licensure with reciprocity in most states.
   Financial assistance may be available to qualified applicants                      References                          Three Letters
through both the Department of Education and the Office of                            Indication of American Sign         Yes
Financial Aid at Gallaudet. Students are responsible for practi-                   Language Fluency
cum-related costs. These costs vary, but it is recommended that                      Special Essay                       No
students be prepared to spend an average of $1,000 for expenses
                                                                                     Resume                              Yes
related to practicum activities. Many opportunities for part-time
employment on campus are available to graduate students.                             Writing Sample                      Yes
    All teacher preparation programs at Gallaudet University are                     Indication of Written English       Yes
approved by the District of Columbia Board of Examiners under                      Language fluency
the standards of the National Association of State Directors of
Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC).                                            Are there additional application requirements?
   The Department of Education is accredited by the National                         Interview                           Required
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The                        Sign Language Evaluation              No
graduate programs are also approved by the Council on Educa-
                                                                                   English Evaluation                    No
tion of the Deaf (CED) and the Council for Exceptional Children
(CEC). Gallaudet University is accredited by the Middle States                     Culture and Language Colloquium       No
                                                                                   Required?
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
                                                                                      Are there additional background requirements?
Ph.D. in Deaf Education
   The department offers the doctor of philosophy degree                           Prior Master's Degree                 Education or Related Field
in Deaf Education to prepare future teacher educators with                         Required Undergraduate Major          Education or Related Field
a focus on research expertise. The program of study is
                                                                                     Prerequisite Coursework             Introduction to Audiology
available for experienced educators who meet the University’s                            (Students accepted from         Amplification Systems
Graduate School and the Department of Education's admission                              programs other than deaf        Speech Development
requirements. Students select a concentration area of study                              education programs may          Reading and Deafness
under the mentorship of scholars in Deaf Education. Students,                            take these courses while        Language Acquisition and
the student's advisor, and the Department Doctoral Studies                               pursuing their doctorate         Cognitive Development
Committee (DDSC) cooperatively design programs of study.                                 in Gallaudet's Department       Deafness: Educational
                                                                                         of Education.)                   Perspectives
Admission Requirements for the Ph.D. Program in                                      Prerequisite Coursework             Classroom Applications of
Deaf Education                                                                       (Continued)                          Sign Communication
                                                                                                                         Curriculum Development/
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                                                               Instructional Methodology
University graduate program:                                                                                             Individual Instruction: Special
                                                                                                                           Needs
       Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence                                                Structure of Language:
                                                                                                                           English and ASL
       of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited uni-
       versity. (Those applying during their final undergraduate year               Standardized Testing Substitute for
                                                                                   Prerequisite                          No
will be required to submit a final transcript after completion of
       their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first semester         Recommended Prior Coursework          No
   ________________                                                                  Prior Professional Experience       3+ Years in Deaf Education
Note: Full-time students will be admitted into the Ph.D. program in                                                      (Teaching Preferred)
2004 and 2006. No full-time students will be admitted in 2005. Part-               Prior Certification                    No
time students may be admitted annually. For more information, contact
                                                                                   Health Certification Requirements      No
the Department of Education.
                                                                                   Police or Other Background Check      No
                                                                             54
                                                                                                                  Courses of Study


  Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                          EDF 810: Advanced Research Design I (3)
 Last Date to Submit Completed Ap-                                      EDF 811: Advanced Research Design II (3)
 plication                             April 15                         LIN 707: Structure of Language: English and
 First Date for Consideration of Ap-                                                 American Sign Language (3) OR
 plication                             April 15                                      Structure of English (2)
 Summer Admission Possible?            No                                            Structure of ASL (2)
 Fall Admission Possible?              Yes                           2. Concentration Area Coursework
                                                                        Students take 15-18 semester hours of coursework in their
 WInter Admission Possible?            No
                                                                        concentration area of study. Coursework is primarily taken at
 Part-time Study Possible?             Yes                              Gallaudet. Some or all concentration area coursework may be
 Summers-Only Study Possible?          No                               taken, with prior approval by the Department Doctoral Stud-
 Weekend and Evening Study Pos-                                         ies Committee (DDSC), through universities in the Consor-
 sible?                                Yes, Evening Study               tium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area or
Transfer Credit Hours                                                   other accredited universities.
   A maximum of 12 post-master’s semester credit hours               3. Practica/Internships
taken before admission to Gallaudet’s Ph.D. program may                 Students complete a 2-3 credit practicum in university
be transferred to Gallaudet’s Ph.D. program on the condition            instruction supervised by a department faculty member, and
that: (1) course grades are at least B (3.0); (2) courses are           research internships designed to develop competencies in
relevant to the planned program; and (3) credits have been              research and teaching.
earned within five years prior to admission into the doctoral         4. Dissertation
program. A maximum of 12 additional credits of coursework               Every student must complete a dissertation for the doctor
may be transferred into the Ph.D. program after admission               of philosophy degree. The dissertation must incorporate a
on the condition that: (1) the coursework was preplanned and            research design capable of addressing a theoretical problem
preapproved by the Department Doctoral Studies Committee,               in education of deaf children and youth. Once enrolled for
(2) the sum of all transfer credits applied toward Ph.D. core           dissertation credit, the candidate must maintain continuous
coursework does not exceed 24 credits.                                  enrollment. Over the course of the program, students must
Residency Requirements                                                  register for a minimum of nine credit hours of dissertation.
   A minimum of two consecutive semesters, excluding summer             In the event that more than nine hours are accrued, only nine
sessions, must be spent at Gallaudet University in full-time            hours will be reflected on the transcript at the satisfactory
study.                                                                  completion of the dissertation defense.
                                                                     5. Other Requirements
Program of Study: Ph.D. in Deaf Education                               Please note the following important deadlines: (a) October
1. Core Courses*                                                        15 of Year I: Preliminary Degree Plan, (b) October 15 of
   All students admitted to the program must complete the               Year II: Final Degree Plan, (c) October 15 or March 1 for
core program of studies with grades of B or better:                     the following semester: Proposals are due for 1) Internship,
   EDU 880 Introduction to Doctoral Studies in Deaf                     2) Practicum in University Instruction, 3)Comprehensive
                          Education (3)                                 Exam Committee membership, and 4) Dissertation Commit-
   EDU 881 Trends and Issues in General and Special                     tee membership. All proposals are submitted to the program
                Education (3)                                           Director and DDSC.
   EDU 883 Doctoral Seminar in Professional Writing and
                Presentation Skills (1)                              Qualifying Examination
   EDU 884 Ongoing Doctoral Seminar in Deaf                            The qualifying examination consists of six to eight clock
                Education (1)                                        hours of written examination and one to two clock hours of
   EDU 885 Seminar in Language, Culture, and Literacy:               oral examination. The student is eligible to take the qual-ifying
                Issues in Deaf Education (3)                         examination upon completion of second semester.
   EDU 886 Trends and Issues in Theory and Research
                Related to Reading and Writing Instruction           American Sign Language Proficiency Interview
                with Deaf Students (3)                                 Students are expected to pass the University’s Sign
   EDU 887 Assessment and Evaluation in Education of                 Communication Proficiency Interview with a rating of Interme-
                Deaf Students (3)                                    diate Plus prior to being advanced to candidacy and enrolling in
   EDU 889 Trends and Issues Related to Curriculum and               the practicum in university instruction.
                Academic Achievement of Deaf Children and
                Youth (3)                                            Advancement to Candidacy
   EDU 893 Practicum in University Instruction (2-3)                   To be eligible for candidacy, students must have completed all
   EDU 897 Doctoral Internship in Deaf Education (1-6)               program requirements except the dissertation defense, includ-
   EDF 801 Principles of Statistics I (3)                            ing: (a) completion of all core and contration area coursework
   EDF 802: Principles of Statistics II (3)                          with grades of B or better, (b) successful completion of both
___________                                                          the qualifying and comprehensive exams, (c) completion of the
* Note: The curriculum is currently under revision. For more
information, contact the Department of Education.               55
Courses of Study



practicum in university teaching and role-related internship, (d)          at schools in the Consortium of Universities of the Washington
meeting the department’s criterion for passing the Sign Com-               Metropolitan Area.
munication Proficiency Exam, (e) meeting the department's
residency requirement, (f) attaining a grade point average of              Master of Arts in Deaf Education:
3.25, excluding transfer credits, and (g) approval of the disserta-
tion proposal. Students must reach candidacy within three years
                                                                           Teacher Preparation Program
                                                                              The M.A. teacher preparation program prepares entry-level
and complete all program requirements within seven years after
                                                                           educators seeking state licensure in the area of deaf and hard
matriculation.
                                                                           of hearing students and CED certification in the education of
                                                                           deaf and hard of hearing students. Students may follow a course
Comprehensive Examination
                                                                           of study in one of four areas of specialization: family-centered
  The comprehensive examination consists of written and oral
                                                                           early education, elementary, secondary, and multiple disabilities.
parts and is usually scheduled on completion of formal course-
                                                                               The program is designed to develop students’ abilities to
work, practicum in university instruction, and internship. It must
                                                                           communicate, to collaborate, and to become reflective teachers.
be passed prior to the dissertation defense.
                                                                           Many of the specific areas developed at Gallaudet are listed in
                                                                           the Student Handbook. The most important of these include a
Specialist (Ed.S.) in Deaf Education                                       commitment to the importance of sign language in deaf educa-
   The education specialist degree (Ed.S.) is offered only by              tion, collaborations with other professionals, consistent attention
special arrangement. The Ed.S. in deafness provides specializa-            to fostering self-esteem in deaf and hard of hearing students,
tions in family-centered early education, multiple disabilities,           and respect and understanding of the cultural context of those
and reading. The Ed.S. program is designed for teachers who                students’ experiences.
have master’s degrees in education of deaf and hard of hearing                 Applicants who need prerequisites may have to take an
students and who wish to advance their careers.                            additional year of studies. Since all undergraduate courses at
                                                                           Gallaudet are conducted in sign language, students who fulfill
Admission Requirements                                                     prerequisites at Gallaudet are strongly encouraged to do so
  1. The general admission requirements of the Graduate                    only if they possess adequate sign language skills. It is strongly
     School described in this catalog.                                     recommended that applicants complete prerequisites before
  2. A master’s degree from an accredited institution with                 entering the M.A. teacher preparation program.
     a grade point average of 3.0 or better.                                   The Graduate School admission requirements and program
  3. At least two years of successful teaching experience                  requirements presented here are essentially the same for all four
     with deaf and hard of hearing students (as shown in                   specializations. Further specifications and information for each
     supporting documentation from applicant’s supervisor).                specialization are described.
  4. Provisional-level CED certification in the education of                    By 2004, applicants will be required to take an American
     deaf and hard of hearing students or equivalent                       Sign Language Proficiency Interview (ASLPI) test prior to
     coursework and practicum.                                             admission to the M.A. in deaf education program. By then, a
  5. Completion of a survey course on the nature and                       pre-professional program (pending approval) will be available to
     needs of people with disabilities and completion of any               provide ASL immersion and cultural studies to those who need
     prerequisite courses for the student’s major.                         to acquire ASL skills. For more information, visit the website:
  6. Verification of sign skills sufficient to converse with                 http://depts.gallaudet.edu/Education/programfiles/FAQ.html.
     deaf individuals.
                                                                           Admission Requirements for the M.A. Teacher Prepa-
Program of Study: Specialist (Ed.S.) in Deaf Education
   The 30-35 credit hour program is designed to be completed in            ration Program in Deaf Education (Including Elemen-
three consecutive semesters (fall, spring, summer) or four                 tary or Secondary Courses of Study and Specializations
summers, and includes professional issues courses (5 credit                in Multiple Disabilities and Family-Centered Early
hours); major field or specialization courses (15 credit hours); ex-        Education)
panded major, minor, or elective courses (9 credit hours); intern-
ship (1-6 credit hours); and proficiency in sign communication.             Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
A major research project and paper are also required. Possible             University graduate program:
minor study areas include linguistics, supervision, counseling,
                                                                                 Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
Residency Requirements
                                                                                 evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
   Eight credit hours of graduate-level coursework meeting re-
                                                                                 accredited university. (Those applying during their final
quirements of the program may be transferred from another
                                                                                 undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript
college or university if approved by the student’s advisor and the
                                                                                 after completion of their graduate study.)
department chair. The education specialist professional issues
                                                                                 Official transcripts of all graduate study.
course and at least 9 credit hours toward the major must be taken
at Gallaudet. Remaining courses must be taken at Gallaudet or                    A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
                                                                                 all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
                                                                      56
                                                                                                                                Courses of Study


       Program                   Credits                   Typical Time Frame                                 Licensure and Certification

  Family-Centered                                    Two calendar years, including                State licensure in both deaf education and
  Early Education                 68-69              summers.                                     Early Childhood Special Education; CED
                                                                                                  certification in Early Childhood.

  Elementary                      57-59              Two academic years, excluding                State licensure in deaf education; CED
                                                     summers.                                     certification in Elementary.

  Secondary                       57-59              Two academic years, excluding                State licensure in deaf education; CED
                                                     summers.                                     certification in Secondary.

                                                     Two academic years, excluding                State licensure in both deaf education and
  Multiple Disabilities           63-65              summers.                                     multiple disabilities; CED certification in
                                                                                                  Multihandicapped Hearing Impaired.




     applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-               Standardized Testing               No
     tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)                      Substitute for Prerequisite
     An application fee of $50.                                                     Prior Professional            At least 200 hours of successful
     A completed graduate school application form.                                  Experience                    paid or volunteer work with
     Goals statement.                                                                                             infants, children, or adolescents,
                                                                                                                  corresponding to the level for
     TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
                                                                                                                  which the applicant is applying
                                                                                    Prior Certification            Preferred
Checklist of requirements specific to these programs:                           Health Certification                No
                                                                               Requirements
   Are additional application materials required?                              Police or Other                    No
  Standardized Test Scores       No                                            Background Check
     References                  Three Letters
  Reference Citing Sign          No                                             Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
  Language Skills                                                              Last Date to Submit                No Deadline
  Special Essay                  No                                            Completed Application
  Resume                         No                                            First Date for Consideration       No Deadline
  Writing Sample                 No                                            of Application
  Videotape of Signing           No                                            Summer Admission                   Yes
  and/or English                                                               Possible?
                                                                               Fall Admission Possible?           Yes
   Are there additional application requirements?                              Winter Admission Possible?         Yes
  On-Campus Interview            No                                            Part-time Study Possible?          Yes
  Sign Language Evaluation       No                                            Summers-Only Study                 No
  English Evaluation             No                                            Possible?
      Culture and                Strongly recommended, even if you             Weekend and Evening                No
      Language                   have taken a course in deaf culture,          Study Possible?
      Colloquium Required?       for learning about graduate studies
                                 and meeting other students                  Program Requirements
                                                                               To complete the M.A. degree in the teacher preparation pro-
   Are there additional background requirements?                             gram, students must satisfy the following requirements.
  Prior Master's Degree          No
       Required                  B.A. in Education or                          1. Completion of graduate degree requirements, as
       Undergraduate Major       appropriate coursework                           described in the appropriate section of the catalog.
       (Coursework prerequisites for the various specializations               2. Successful completion of all academic and practicum
       within the M.A. teacher preparation program in deaf                        requirements specified by the Department of Education.
       education are listed separately in subsequent pages                        Successful completion means that a grade of “B” or
                                                                                  better is obtained in each required course.
       under the "Program of Study" descriptions for each
                                                                               3. Successful completion of student teaching or intern-
       specialization.)
                                                                        57
Courses of Study


      ship (grade of “B” or better). All required coursework              parentheses are approximate): education and deafness (3); infant
      must be successfully completed prior to the start of                development and assessment (4); working with families and oth-
      student teaching or internship.                                     er professionals (5-8); American Sign Language (9); linguistics
   4. A minimum of one year of full-time enrollment in the                and language acquisition (7); audiology and speech development
      program (usually the last year) is necessary to                     (6); curriculum, instruction, and classroom management (10-16);
      complete the master’s degree program in teacher                     research and foundations in education (6); field experiences and
      preparation due to practicum requirements and the                   seminars (12). Copies of the complete sequence of study for the
      integration of these with coursework. Although                      family-centered early education specialization are available from
      students may begin the program on a part-time basis,                the Department of Education.
      they cannot obtain the master’s degree in the teacher
      preparation program through part-time study only.                      Prerequisite Coursework for Family-Centered Early
   5. Sign Communication Proficiency Interview (SCPI)                         Education Specialization
      rating of Intermediate Plus prior to advancing to
      candidacy and beginning the second year of graduate                        Prerequisite              Child Development or
      study.                                                                     Coursework                  Child Psychology
                                                                                 (or other evidence        Introduction to Exceptional
   With the exception of the family-centered early education                     of knowledge                Children
program, the M.A. teacher preparation program is designed                        in each area)             General Psychology
                                                                                                           Educational Psychology
to be completed in two academic years, excluding summers.                                                    or Learning Theory
Students are strongly encouraged to take sign language or other                                            Foundations of Education
prerequisite coursework during the summer prior to beginning                                               Curriculum Development
the program, however. In addition, some students may elect                                                 Early Childhood
to take courses during the summer between the two years to                                                 Instructional Methods (a
lighten the course load during the academic year or to meet                                                  minimum of 6 credits covering
sign proficiency requirements. Completion of the program of                                                   language arts, mathematics,
study for the family-centered early education program requires                                               science, and social studies on
coursework during two calendar years, including summers.                                                     early childhood level)
                                                                                                           Methods of Teaching Reading or
   The table two pages preceding this page shows the typical
                                                                                                             Emerging Literacy
program length and professional credential outcomes for each of                                            Children’s Literature
the four M.A. teacher preparation programs.                                                                World Literature
                                                                                                           Art
Family-Centered Early Education Specialization                                                             Philosophy
   The family-centered early education (FCEE) specialization                                               Mathematics (6 credits college-
in education of deaf and hard of hearing children prepares                                                   level)
                                                                                                           Science (6 credits college-level)
specialists to work with children from birth through 5 years
                                                                                                           Social Sciences (12 credits,
of age, who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have multiple                                                      including one course in world
disabilities and their families. Graduates are prepared to fill a                                             history or cultures and one
variety of roles including early childhood specialist, parent/                                               course in American history)
family educator and consultant, family-child advocate, program                                             Deaf Culture (a course, demon-
developer and manager, and transdisciplinary team member. As                                                 strated experience, or
such, graduates are qualified to work in public school, clinic,                                               participation in Gallaudet's
and residential school settings with home or center-based early                                              "Culture and Language
education programs. The course of study in the family-centered                                               Colloquium")
early education specialization leads to state licensure in Special                                         Sign Language (2 semesters
                                                                                                             or demonstrated proficiency)
Education/Deaf Education K-12 and to Council on Education of
the Deaf (CED) certification in infant/preprimary. An additional
endorsement in Early Childhood may be recommended with                    Practicum
evidence of specific performance outcomes in early childhood                  An integral part of the family-centered early education
education.                                                                specialization is the fieldwork with families and early educa-
                                                                          tion programs, undertaken during four semesters of the program.
                                                                          Supervision and coordination with the campus-based course work
Program of Study                                                          facilitates the development of skills for working with families
   Students must satisfactorily complete a prescribed course
                                                                          in each practicum. The practica are developmental both in terms
of study for the family-centered early education specialization
                                                                          of the amount of time in the field, which ranges from 42-60
teacher certification program. The required program of studies
                                                                          hours the first semester to 350 hours the fourth semester, and the
requires two full years plus two summers; a three-year plan of
                                                                          increased responsibility and skill level required of the students.
studies is recommended for many students. The program consists
of course work in the following areas (credit hours indicated in

                                                                     58
                                                                                                                                                Courses of Study




                 A NOTE ABOUT GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY'S TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM

    Gallaudet University offers two teacher preparation degrees:                       I test (also known as the PPST) which measures basic skills in
the B.A. in Education and the M.A. in Deaf Education.                                  reading, writing, and mathematics. Most teacher candidates are
Gallaudet's Professional Education Unit is accredited by the                           also required to pass one or more Praxis II standardized tests in
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education                                their content or subject area.
(NCATE) and its teacher preparation programs are state-                                       The pass rates are listed below for Gallaudet teacher
approved by the District of Columbia. The M.A. in Deaf                                 preparation program completers who completed a program that
Education program is also approved by the Council on                                   leads to an initial teaching license, and who also took one or
Education of the Deaf (CED). During Academic Year 2002-                                more of the standardized tests required for teacher licensure by
2003, Gallaudet University enrolled 30 full-time students in                           the District of Columbia. Please note that these pass rates are
its B.A. in Education program and 64 full-time and part-time                           not given for Academic Year 2002-2003 because in no category
students in the M.A. in Deaf Education Program. The students                           was there a cohort that reached 10, which is the minimum
who completed the B.A. in Education program were required to                           number required under Title II legislation for calculating a pass
spend an average of 350 hours of supervised practice teaching.                         rate. However, the pass rates are given for the follow-up report
M.A. in Deaf Education students spent an average of 320 hours                          on academic year 1999-2000. The reason for including the fol-
in student teaching. During Academic Year 2002-2003, the                               low-up report for that year is to determine whether or not some
student/faculty ratio for student teaching in the B.A. program                         program completers passed one or more of the required tests
averaged 1.67 to 1.                                                                    after the initial Title II report year. Most of the scores reported
    Title II of the Higher Education Act requires all institutions                     in Gallaudet's Title II reports for the past two years are from
with teacher preparation programs to prepare annual reports                            persons who completed the B.A. in Education program at Gal-
on the characteristics of these programs, including the pass                           laudet. However, during the first report year (AY 1999-2000),
rates of program completers on required standardized tests for                         the pass rate includes program completers in both the B.A. and
teacher licensure. The District of Columbia Public Schools,                            the M.A. programs. Beginning in 2001-2002, Gallaudet has ex-
the government agency that sets the test requirements for                              cluded from its Title II reports those program completers from
teacher certification by the District of Columbia, requires all                         the M.A. in Deaf Education program who either already had
teacher candidates to submit passing scores on one or more                             a teaching license or had already completed an initial teacher
standardized tests. All teacher candidates must pass the Praxis                        preparation program before entering the M.A. program.



             Academic Year 2002-2003                                  Assessment            Taking           # Passing            Institutional         Statewide
         (Total Program Completers = 13)                                  Code #            Assessment        Assessment            Pass Rate             Pass Rate
                Type of Assessment
Basic Skills: PPST Reading                                                  710                  8                   *                   *                   95%
Basic Skills: PPST Writing                                                  720                  8                   *                   *                   94%
Basic Skills: PPST Mathematics                                              730                  8                   9                   *                   85%
Basic Skills: CBT PPST Reading                                              711                  1                   *                   *                  100%
Basic Skills: CBT PPST Writing                                              721                  1                   *                   *                  100%
Basic Skills: CBT Mathematics                                               731                  1                   *                   *                   90%
           Aggregate: Basic Skills**                                                             9                   *                   *                   86%
           Aggregate: Professional Knowledge**                                                   1*                  *                   *                   77%
           Aggregate: Academic Content Areas**                                                   2*                                                          90%
           Aggregate: Teaching Special Populations                                               3*                  *                   *                    91%
               (Special Education)**
Summary of Individual Assessments***                                                             9                   *                   *                    79%


           * Pass rates are not reported for an assessment if fewer than ten program completers took that assessment during the report year.
           ** Aggregate Pass Rate - Numerator: Number who passed all the tests they took in a category (and within their area of specialization).
                    Denominator: Number of completers who took one or more test in a category (and within their area of specialization).
           *** Summary Pass Rate - Numerator: Number who passed all the tests they took within their area of specialization.
                    Denominator: Number of completers who took one or more tests used by the state (and within their area of specialization).

Information about Gallaudet University's teacher preparation programs may be obtained by contacting: Dr. Carol J. Erting, Chairperson, Department of Education, Fowler
Hall 304, Gallaudet University, 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002-3695, or by e-mailing Carol.Erting@gallaudet.edu. To obtain a copy of the most recent Title II
Report for Gallaudet University, please send your request to: Title II Coordinator, Office of the Dean, Graduate School and Professional Programs, Fowler Hall 206,
Gallaudet University, 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002-3695.



                                                                                  59
Courses of Study


Single-Assessment Institution-Level Pass-rate Data: Regular Teacher Preparation Program

Institution Name: Gallaudet University
Academic Year: 1999-2000 Follow-Up
Number of Program Completers: 41

Type of Assessment                                          Assessment         # Taking        # Passing          Institution       Statewide
                                                              Code #           Assess.          Assess.           Pass Rate         Pass Rate
Basic Skills
  Assessment 1 PPST Reading                                      710              21               15                71%               94%
  Assessment 2 CBT Reading                                       711               5                                                   99%
  Assessment 3 PPST Writing                                      720              21               15                71%               95%
  Assessment 4 CBT Writing                                       721               6                                                   99%
  Assessment 5 PPST Mathematics                                  730              22               15                68%               88%
  Assessment 6 CBT Mathematics                                   731               4                                                   96%
  Assessment 7 Computerized PPST Reading                        5710               4                                                   79%
  Assessment 8 Computerized PPST Writing                        5720               3                                                   73%
  Assessment 9 Computerized PPST Mathematics                    5730               4                                                   58%
Professional Knowledge
  Assessment 1 Eng Lang Lit Comp Pedagogy                        043                1                                                  85%
Academic Content Areas (math, English, biology, etc.)
  Assessment 1 Eng Lang Lit Comp Content Knowledge               041                1                                                100%
  Assessment 2 Social Studies Content Knowledge                  081                1                                                100%
  Assessment 3 Social Studies Pedagogy                           084                1                                                100%
Other Content Areas (elementary education,
career/technical education, health education, etc.
  Assessment 1 Early Childhood Education                         020                1                                                  91%
Teaching Special Populations (special education,
ESL, etc.)
  Assessment 1 Special Education                                 350               21              16                80%               90%




Aggregate and Summary Institution-Level Pass-rate Data: Regular Teacher Preparation Program

Institution Name: Gallaudet University
Academic Year: 1999-2000 Follow-Up
Number of Program Completers: 41

Type of Assessment                                                             # Taking         # Passing         Institution       Statewide
                                                                               Assess.            Assess.         Pass Rate         Pass Rate
Aggregate: Basic Skills*                                                          30                16               53%               87%
Aggregate: Professional Knowledge*                                                 1                                                   82%
Aggregate: Academic Content Areas (math, English, biology, etc.)*                  3                                                   93%
Aggregate: Other Content Areas (elementary education, career/technical
education, health education, etc.)*
Aggregate: Teaching Special Populations (special education, ESL...)*              20                16               80%               93%
Summary of Individual Assessments**                                               33                18               55%               84%

         * Aggregate Pass Rate - Numerator: Number who passed all the tests they took in a category (and within their area of specialization).
                 Denominator: Number of completers who took one or more test in a category (and within their area of specialization).
         ** Summary Pass Rate - Numerator: Number who passed all the tests they took within their area of specialization.
                 Denominator: Number of completers who took one or more tests used by the state (and within their area of specialization).




                                                                       60
                                                                                                                  Courses of Study


   Practicum sites are chosen to provide students with the oppor-                Prerequisite        Instructional Methods (a minimum
tunity to work with young children, from birth through 5 years                   Coursework for        of 6 credits covering language
and with different disabilities including deafness, and their fami-              Elementary Deaf       arts, children's literature,
lies, to provide experience in a variety of programs (e.g., school,              Education             mathematics, science, and
agency, and clinic), and in different types of settings, e.g., home              (Continued)           social studies)
and/or center-based. Programs frequently used as practicum sites                                     Instructional Development,
in the Washington, D.C., area include the Kendall Demonstra-                                           Educational Technology, or
tion Elementary School (on the Gallaudet University campus),                                           Media Production
                                                                                                     Methods of Teaching Reading
the Maryland School for the Deaf, early intervention centers
                                                                                                     World Literature
and public schools in Prince George’s County and Montgomery
                                                                                                     Art
County, Maryland, and Fairfax County, Virginia.
                                                                                                     Philosophy
   In addition, students are usually placed in programs out of the
                                                                                                     Mathematics (6 credits college-
area for their final 10-week, full-time internship. These programs
                                                                                                       level)
include the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf; Virginia School
                                                                                                     Science (6 credits college-level)
for the Deaf; Colorado Home Intervention Program; Boys Town
                                                                                                     Social Sciences (12 credits,
National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska; and the Rhode
                                                                                                       including one course in world
Island School for the Deaf.
                                                                                                       history or cultures and one
    Students should also be prepared to pay for security clear-                                        course in American history)
ance checks when these are required by a school. These security                                      Deaf Culture (a course, demon-
checks cost approximately $40-$50.                                                                     strated experience, or par-
                                                                                                       ticipation in Gallaudet's "Culture
                                                                                                       and Language Colloquium")
Deaf Education at the Elementary                                                                     Sign Language (2 semesters or
or Secondary Level                                                                                     demonstrated proficiency)
   Students may follow courses of study that build on back-
grounds of various levels and focus on elementary or secondary             Prerequisite Coursework for Secondary Deaf
(junior and senior high school) levels. Graduates are qualified             Education Specialization
to accept teaching positions in residential, day school, and day              Prerequisite           Adolescent Psychology or
class programs and to teach in self-contained, departmental-                  Coursework for           Development, or Developmental
ized, and mainstreamed settings. The course of study leads to                 Secondary Deaf           Psychology
state licensure in education of deaf and hard of hearing children             Education              Introduction to Special Education
and to Council on Education of the Deaf (CED) certification in                 (or other evidence     General Psychology
elementary or secondary education.                                            of knowledge in        Educational Psychology
                                                                              each area)               or Learning Theory
Program of Study                                                                                     Foundations of Education
                                                                                                     Curriculum Development
   Students must satisfactorily complete prescribed courses
of study for the elementary or secondary specialization. The                                         Instructional Methods for
program typically consists of work in these areas (credit hours                                        applicant's content area
in parentheses are approximate): education and deaf-ness (3);                                          Instructional Development,
                                                                                                       Educational Technology, or
audiology and speech development (6); sign communication                                               Media Production (Cont'd)
(9); language development (10); curriculum and instruction (9);                                      Content Area Courses (thirty or
research and foundations in education (6); and practicum (10).                                         more credits)
Copies of the complete sequence of required courses for each                                         Methods of Teaching Reading
level are available from the department.                                                             Children’s Literature
                                                                                                     World Literature
                                                                                                     Art
   Prerequisite Coursework for Elementary Deaf Education                                             Philosophy
   Specialization                                                                                    Mathematics (6 credits college-
       Prerequisite              Child or Adolescent Psychology                                        level)
       Coursework for              or Development, or                                                Science (6 credits college-level)
       Elementary Deaf             Developmental Psychology                                          Social Sciences (12 credits, includ-
       Education                 Introduction to Special                                               ing one course in world history
                                                                                                       or cultures and one course in
       (or other evidence          Education
                                                                                                       American history)
       of knowledge in           General Psychology                                                  Deaf Culture (a course, demon-
       each area)                Educational Psychology                                                strated experience, or par-
                                   or Learning Theory                                                  ticipation in Gallaudet's "Culture
                                 Foundations of Education                                              and Language Colloquium")
                                 Curriculum Development                                              Sign Language (2 semesters or
                                                                                                       demonstrated proficiency)

                                                                      61
Courses of Study


Practicum                                                                             Prerequisite Coursework for Multiple Disabilities
   Practical, classroom-based experiences are incorporated                            Specialization
into each semester of the program. These experiences include                              Prerequisite              Child or Adolescent Psychology
directed observation in school programs and at various agencies                           Coursework                  or Development, or
and organizations for deaf and hard of hearing people; directed                           (or other evidence          Developmental Psychology
participation during which students serve as teacher aides for two                        of knowledge in           Introduction to Special Education
or three half-days per week; and one 10-week period of full-time                          each area)                General Psychology
student teaching. Practicum sites are chosen to provide students                                                    Educational Psychology
with a variety of experiences in settings of different types—day/                                                     or Learning Theory
residential, mainstreamed/self-contained/departmentalized—and                                                       Foundations of Education
in classes using a variety of communication modes and instruc-                                                      Curriculum Development (at
tional approaches. Programs typically used in the Washington,                                                         appropriate level)
                                                                                                                    Instructional Development,
D.C., metropolitan area include the Kendall Demonstration El-
                                                                                                                      Educational Technology, or
ementary School and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf                                                           Media Production
(both on the Gallaudet University campus), the Maryland School                                                      World Literature
for the Deaf, and day schools and classes in Fairfax County,                                                        Methods of Teaching Reading
Virginia, and in Prince George's and Montgomery counties,                                                           Art
Maryland. Students are also placed in out-of-state assignments.                                                     Philosophy
Programs used in recent years have included public and private                                                      Mathematics (6 credits college-
programs for deaf students in Delaware, Massachusetts, Con-                                                           level)
necticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, New York, Georgia, and                                                          Science (6 credits college-level)
Virginia. A limited number of international placements may be                                                       Social Sciences (12 credits,
                                                                                                                      including one course in world
available.
   Students should also be prepared to pay for security clear-                                                        history or cultures and one
ance checks when these are required by a school. These security                                                       course in American history)
checks cost approximately $40-$50.                                                                                  Deaf Culture (a course, demon-
                                                                                                                      strated experience, or par-
                                                                                                                      ticipation in Gallaudet's
Multiple Disabilities Specialization                                                                                  "Culture and Language
   The multiple disabilities specialization prepares teachers to                                                      Colloquium")
work with deaf and hard of hearing students with accompany-                                                         Sign Language (2 semesters or
ing disabilities such as mental retardation, learning disabilities,                                                   demonstrated proficiency)
behavior problems, physical disabilities, or visual disability.
The noncategorical preparation addresses needs of students                         Practicum
with multiple disabilities across a range of developmental levels                     An integral part of the multiple disabilities specialization is
and ages. Graduates may obtain positions as teachers in self-                      the practicum undertaken during four semesters of the program.
contained classes, resource rooms, or as itenerant teachers for                    Supervision and coordination with the campus-based course-
students with multiple disabilities, working in day or residential                 work facilitate the development of instructional and management
programs in mainstream or special school settings. The course of                   competencies in each practicum. The practica are developmental
study in this specialization leads to dual state licensure in “Deaf/               both in terms of the amount of time in the field, which ranges
Hearing Impaired” and “Multihandicapped” and Council on                            from 42-60 hours the first semester to 350 hours the fourth
Education of the Deaf (CED) certification in “Multihandicapped                      semester, and the increased responsibility and skill level required
Hearing Impaired.”                                                                 of the students. Many practicum facilities are used to provide
                                                                                   students with a variety of experiences in settings of different
Program of Study                                                                   types and with students with different developmental levels,
   Students must satisfactorily complete a prescribed course of study              combinations of disabilities, and ages. Programs frequently used
for the multiple disabilities specialization. The program typically                in the Washington, D.C., area include the Kendall Demonstration
consists of coursework in the following areas (credit hours indicated in           Elementary School (on the Gallaudet University campus), the
parentheses are approximate): education and deafness (3); nature and               Maryland School for the Deaf, and day schools, classes, resource
needs of students with multiple disabilities (3); audiology and speech             rooms, and itinerant placements in Fairfax County, Virginia, and
development (6); sign communication (9); language development                      Prince George’s County, Maryland, public schools. In addition,
(10); curriculum and instruction for students with multiple disabilities           students may be placed in programs out of the area for their final
(15); working with families (3); research and foundations in education             10-week, full-time student teaching placement. These programs
(6); and practicum (10). Copies of the complete sequence of required               include the Lexington School for the Deaf, Perkins School for
courses for the multiple disabilities specialization are available from the        the Blind, Beverly School for the Deaf, Western Pennsylvania
department.                                                                        School for the Deaf, and the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf. A
                                                                                   limited number of international placements may be available.


                                                                              62
                                                                                                                                  Courses of Study


   Students should also be prepared to pay for security clear-              Admission Requirements for the Accelerated M.A.
ance checks when these are required by a school. These security             Program in Deaf Education: Elementary and Second-
checks cost approximately $40-$50.
   Note: A grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Office
                                                                            ary Courses of Study
of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services makes pos-
sible generous stipends and tuition assistance awards to qualified           Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
teacher candidates from the U.S. Visit the web site at http://depts.        University graduate program:
gallaudet.edu/education/md.                                                        Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
                                                                                   evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
Project Achieve                                                                    accredited university.* (Those applying during their final under-
Professional Development School Partnership Program                                graduate year must submit a final transcript after completing
   The Department of Education has established a collaborative                     their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first
relationship with several programs serving children who are                        semester of graduate study.)
deaf or hard of hearing—the Kendall Demonstration Elementary                       Official transcripts of all graduate study.
School, the Model Secondary School for the Deaf, the Maryland                      A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
School for the Deaf, the Fairfax (Virginia) Mainstreaming Pro-                     previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
gram, the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, and Montgomery                         applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
County (Maryland) Public Schools program for students who are                      tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
deaf and hard of hearing. The Professional Development School                      An application fee of $50.
Partnership Program enables Program enables experienced                            A completed graduate school application form.
school personnel from partner schools who qualify for admission                    Goals statement.
to the master's degree teacher preparation program to take sum-                    TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
mer courses on campus, on site, or through distance education
during the academic year in a planned sequence leading to the
                                                                            Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
degree. Two summers of full-time study (6 credits each summer)
is required to meet the "residency" requirement. Recognition of                Are additional application materials required?
some prior school experience is provided in the determination of
                                                                              Standardized Test Scores    No
the student’s program; the competencies required for completion
of the program, however, are the same as those in the previously                  References                        Three Letters
described master’s degree teacher preparation program. Potential              Reference Citing
applicants should consult first with their program supervisors and             Sign Language Skills                  No
                                                                              Special Essay                         No
then send an inquiry in care of Project Achieve to the Depart-
                                                                              Resume                                No
ment of Education.
                                                                              Writing Sample                        No
                                                                              Videotape of Signing                  No
Master of Arts in Deaf Education:                                             and/or English
Accelerated Program                                                           Are there additional application requirements?
   Targeted toward graduates of its undergraduate program, the                On-Campus Interview                   No
Department of Education offers the accelerated program as an
                                                                                 Sign Language Evaluation           SCPI Advanced
option leading to a master’s degree in deaf education. Designed
                                                                              English Evaluation                    No
to meet the needs in the field for an increased number of teach-
                                                                                 Culture and Language               Recommended
ers who are deaf, the accelerated program can be finished in
                                                                                 Colloquium Required?
one calendar year after completion of the bachelor’s degree in
education. Coursework in the program will begin with the senior
                                                                                Are there additional background requirements?
year. Students in the program specialize in deaf education at the
                                                                              Prior Master’s Degree                 No
elementary or secondary (middle and high school) level. Gradu-
                                                                                  Required                          B.A. in Education from
ates are qualified to accept teaching positions in residential, day
                                                                                  Undergraduate Major               Gallaudet
school, and day class programs, and to teach in self-contained,
departmentalized, and mainstreamed settings. The course of                        Standardized Testing              Praxis
study leads to state licensure in education of deaf and hard of                   Substitute for Prerequisite
hearing children and to Council on Education of the Deaf (CED)                    Prior Professional                Some Deaf Education
certification in elementary or secondary education.                                Experience
                                                                                  Prior Certification                Preferred
                                                                              Health Certification                   No
                                                                              Requirements

                                                                            ________________
                                                                            * Only Gallaudet education majors are eligible for the accelerated programs.

                                                                       63
Courses of Study


  Police or Other                 No                                       the equivalent) and who are currently working in the field. Each
  Background Check                                                         student follows an individually tailored course of study based on
                                                                           educational background and teaching experience with deaf and
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                            hard of hearing students.
  Last Date to Submit             No Deadline                                 The program is designed to provide experienced teachers
  Completed Application                                                    an opportunity to acquire additional knowledge and skills in
  First Date for                  No Deadline                              deafness and a related area. Graduates may be prepared for an
  Consideration of Application                                             additional specialization and/or certification area.
  Summer Admission Possible?      Yes
  Fall Admission Possible?        Yes                                      Admission Requirements for the M.A. Program in Deaf
  Winter Admission Possible?      No
                                                                           Education: Advanced Studies
  Part-time Study Possible?       Yes
  Summers-Only Study Possible?    No
  Weekend and Evening Study       No                                       Checklist of requirements for application to any Gallaudet
  Possible?                                                                University graduate program:

Program of Study                                                                 Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence
   Students must satisfactorily complete the prescribed course of                of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
study for the accelerated program. The program typically con-                    university. (Those applying during their final undergraduate year
sists of work in these areas (credit hours indicated in parentheses              must submit a final transcript after completing their bachelor’s
are approximate): education and deafness (3); language develop-                  degree and before enrolling in their first semester of graduate
ment (10); curriculum and instruction (9); research and founda-                  study.)
tions of education (6); audiology and speech development (6);                    Official transcripts of all graduate study.
and practicum (8).                                                               A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
                                                                                 previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
                                                                                 applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
Practicum
                                                                                 tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
   Practical, classroom-based experiences are incorporated into
the fall and spring semesters of the program. These experiences                  An application fee of $50.
include directed participation during which the students work                    A completed graduate school application form.
in classrooms for three half-days per week, and one 10-week                      Goals statement.
period of full-time student teaching.                                            TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
    Practicum sites provide students with a variety of experiences
in settings of different types—day/residential, main-streamed/             Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
self-contained/departmentalized—and in classes using a va-
riety of communication modes and instructional approaches.                    Are additional application materials required?
Programs typically used in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan                Standardized Test Scores    No
area include the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School and
                                                                                 References                    Three Letters
the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (both on the Gal-                    Reference Citing                  No
laudet University campus), the Maryland School for the Deaf,                 Sign Language Skills
and day schools and classes in Fairfax County, Virginia, and in              Special Essay                     No
Prince George’s and Montgomery counties, Maryland. Students                  Resume                            No
are also placed in out-of-state assignments. Programs used in                Writing Sample                    No
recent years have included public and private programs for deaf              Videotape of Signing              No
students in Delaware, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island,              and/or English
New Jersey, New York, Georgia, and Virginia. A limited number
of international placements may be available.                                 Are there additional application requirements?
    Students should also be prepared to pay for security clear-              On-Campus Interview               No
ance checks when these are required by a school. These security              Sign Language Evaluation          No
checks cost approximately $40-$50.                                           English Evaluation                No
                                                                                 Culture and                   Recommended
Master of Arts in Deaf Education:                                                Language Colloquium
                                                                                 Required?
Advanced Studies
   The advanced studies in deaf education master of arts pro-                 Are there additional background requirements?
gram is a 34-36 semester hour program designed specifically                   Prior Master’s Degree             No
for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students who have state             Required Undergraduate            Deaf Education
licensure in deaf education or provisional CED certification (or              Major

                                                                      64
                                                                                                                        Courses of Study


  Recommended                    Deaf Education                          Special Master of Arts Programs in Deaf
  Undergraduate Major
     Prerequisite                Deaf Education
                                                                         Education
     Coursework                                                             Special M.A. degree programs are provided, at the discretion
     (Required)                                                          of the department, for full-time or part-time students who do
                                                                         not wish to pursue the standard teacher preparation curriculum,
     Standardized Testing        Praxis
                                                                         (e.g., graduates of undergraduate programs majoring in educa-
  Substitute for Prerequisite
  Recommended Prior              No
                                                                         tion of deaf and/or hard of hearing students; teachers of deaf
  Coursework
                                                                         and hard of hearing students seeking professional-level CED
                                                                         certification; teachers who wish to pursue further study; inter-
     Prior Professional          Two Years in Deaf
                                                                         national students). These programs are designed in consultation
     Experience                  Education
                                                                         with the individual student and do not lead to teacher certifica-
     Prior Certification          Provisional CED or State in
                                                                         tion or licensure. For a master’s degree, the student must satisfy
                                 Deaf Education
                                                                         general admission requirements of the Graduate School and the
  Health Certification            No
  Requirements
                                                                         Department of Education, complete the individually planned
  Police or Other                Yes                                     program, and fulfill all Graduate School degree requirements as
  Background Check                                                       listed in this catalog. In addition, a Sign Communication Profi-
                                                                         ciency Interview rating of Intermediate Plus is required prior to
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                          being advanced to candidacy.
  Last Date to Submit            No Deadline
  Completed Application                                                  Admission Requirements for Special M.A. Programs
  First Date for                 No Deadline                             in Deaf Education
  Consideration of
  Application                                                            Checklist of requirements for application to any Gallaudet
  Summer Admission Possible?     Yes
                                                                         University graduate program:
  Fall Admission Possible?       Yes
  Winter Admission Possible?     Yes
  Part-time Study Possible?      Yes                                           Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
  Summers-Only Study             Yes                                           evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
  Possible?                                                                    accredited university. (Those applying during their final under-
  Weekend and Evening Study      No                                            graduate year will be required to submit a final transcript after
  Possible?                                                                    completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in
                                                                               their first semester of graduate study.)
                                                                               Official transcripts of all graduate study.
Program of Study: M.A. in Deaf Education:
                                                                               A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
Advanced Studies                                                               previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
   The advanced studies course of study is individually designed               applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
by the student and advisor within the following framework
                                                                               tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
(approximate credit hours indicated): advanced foundations in
education (9); education and deafness (11-12); cognate area                    An application fee of $50.
(11-12); independent study (3); and proficiency in sign commu-                  A completed graduate school application form.
nication.                                                                      Goals statement.
   The cognate areas from which a student may select an area                   TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
of specialization or related study include multiple disabilities,
family-centered early education, language, reading, supervi-             Checklist of requirements specific to these programs:
sion, and counseling. The independent study is usually done in
the cognate area and involves the development of a project or               Are additional application materials required?
research paper. A Sign Communication Proficiency Interview                  Standardized Test Scores         No
(SCPI) rating of Intermediate Plus is required prior to being                  References                   Three Letters
advanced to candidacy.                                                     Reference Citing Sign            No
   The program may be completed by attendance during sum-                  Language Skills
mers only or through full- or part-time study during the academ-           Resume                           No
ic year and summer. Eight hours of graduate-level coursework               Writing Sample                   No
meeting the requirements of the program may be transferred                 Videotape of Signing             No
from another college or university.                                        and/or English

                                                                            Are there additional application requirements?
                                                                           On-Campus Interview              No


                                                                    65
Courses of Study


  Sign Language Evaluation        No                                     maintenance of auditory/oral skills in an interdisciplinary edu-
  English Evaluation              No                                     cational environment. Course section reflects the diversity of
      Culture and Language        Recommended                            specialization areas and students enrolled.
      Colloquium Required?                                                 Prerequisite: HSL 707 or permission of the instructor.

   Are there additional background requirements?                         EDU 706 Development of the Young Child (2)
  Prior Master’s Degree           No                                        Development of the young child 0-5 and differences that may
      Required                    B.A. in Education or
                                                                         result from deafness. The interrelationship of physical, per-
  Undergraduate Major             Appropriate Coursework                 ceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development and the
  Prerequisite Coursework         No                                     impact of deafness on the family. Emphasis on linking theory
  (Required)                                                             to practice with young children in diverse cultural and family
  Other Undergraduate             No                                     contexts from an early intervention specialist’s perspective.
  Coursework                                                                Prerequisite: Matriculation in the family-centered early edu-
  Standardized Testing            No                                     cation specialization or permission of the instructor.
  Substitute for Prerequisite
  Recommended Prior               No                                     EDU 708 Assessment of the Young Child:
  Coursework                                                             A Transdisciplinary Approach (2)
      Prior Professional          Yes                                      The examination of various approaches to assessment of the
      Experience                                                         young child with particular emphasis on adaptations for chil-
      Prior Certification          Preferred
                                                                         dren who are deaf or hard of hearing. An emphasis on develop-
  Health Certification             No                                     ment of transdisciplinary team-building skills, assessment, and
  Requirements                                                           parent involvement.
  Police or Other                 No                                       Prerequisite: EDU 706 or permission of the instructor.
  Background Check
                                                                         EDU 709 Reading and Deafness: Instructional
                                                                         Methods (3)
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
                                                                            Overview of literature in reading and deafness. Reading
  Last Date to Submit             No Deadline
  Completed Application
                                                                         theory, applications, diagnostic procedures, and instructional
  First Date for Consideration    No Deadline
                                                                         methods for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  of Application                                                            Prerequisites: Basic reading methods course; LIN 795 or
  Summer Admission Possible?      Yes
                                                                         permission of the instructor.
  Fall Admission Possible?        Yes
  Winter Admission Possible?      Yes                                    EDU 711 Field Experience and Seminar: Early
  Part-time Study Possible?       Yes                                    Education (1)
  Summers-Only Study              Yes                                       This course provides introductory information and experi-
  Possible?                                                              ence relating to early education programs for infants and
  Weekend and Evening             No                                     preschoolers with special needs and their families. The field ex-
  Study Possible?                                                        perience component includes directed visits and participation in
                                                                         early education programs; visits with families/caregivers; and
                                                                         supervised observation and interaction assignments. The semi-
Courses Offered:                                                         nar component focuses on educationally relevant inquiry-based
                                                                         topics related to professional practices and work in family-cen-
EDU 665 Children’s Literature (3)                                        tered early education programs, observation strategies, reflec-
An in-depth study of children’s literature primarily for early child-    tive journaling, and student-professional portfolio building.
hood and elementary education majors. Focuses on the evaluation,            Prerequisite: Matriculation in the graduate program in educa-
selection, and sharing of children’s books in instructional settings.    tion of the deaf, family-centered early education specialization.
Participants will read, respond to, and evaluate picture books and
chapter books of various genres. Emphasizes the identification            EDU 713 Language Acquisition and Cognitive
and teaching of literary elements in context, strategies for shar-       Development (3)
ing books with children, and the importance of using authentic              This course addresses several theories and theorists on lan-
children’s literature in schools.                                        guage acquisition and cognitive development, with a focus on
                                                                         educational applications with deaf children. The instructor
EDU 702 Speech Development and Auditory                                  presents information, facilitates cooperative learning activi-
Habilitation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children                       ties, and models educational strategies. Class participants fully
and Youth (3)                                                            participate in cooperative learning activities, complete required
  Theories, research, methods, and perspectives pertaining to the        readings and journal response activities, and complete projects/
development of auditory/oral skills in deaf and hard of hearing          assignments, individually or in teams.
youth. Knowledge of the development, improvement, and/or                    Prerequisite: LIN 795.
                                                                    66
                                                                                                                           Courses of Study


EDU 714 Family-Professional Collaboration in Early                         EDU 734 Teaching Thinking Skills, Level II (2)
Communication Planning (3)                                                    The theoretical and methodological background for teaching
   Knowledge and skills for establishing parent-professional               the second level of thinking skills curriculum, “Instrumental
partnerships and interdisciplinary collaboration in the early              Enrichment,” a program that focuses on teaching cognitive skills
identification and management of communication development                  such as categorization, sequencing temporal relationships, verbal
for infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing. Under-           instructions, and hierarchical relationships. Applications of these
standing the audiologic/oral and visual/motor development and              skills to all subject areas and to lifelong learning for deaf and hard
the assessment process; skills for collaborative planning and              of hearing students.
implementation of goals for facilitating family and parent-child              Prerequisites: EDU 733 and permission of the instructor.
communication. Knowledge of communication and language
approaches and interventions and skills for facilitating family            EDU 735 Teaching Thinking Skills, Level III (2)
decision making.                                                              Theoretical and methodological background for teaching the
   Prerequisite: LIN 795 and HSL 707.                                      thinking skills curriculum, “Instrumental Enrichment,”
   Corequisite: EDU 713.                                                   a program that focuses on teaching such cognitive skills as
   Or permission of the instructor.                                        orientation in geographic space, symbolic logic, syllogisms, and
                                                                           general cognitive synthesis. Analysis of the changes in teacher
EDU 719 Deafness: An Educational Perspective (3)                           behavior required for teaching cognitive skills.
   Orientation to cultural, historical, philosophical, psychologi-            Prerequisites: EDU 733, 734, and instructor's permission.
cal, and social aspects of deafness and the deaf community.
Introduction to issues and research in the education of deaf and           EDU 737 Development of Self-Help and Motor Skills
hard of hearing children and youth, including historic and cur-            in Students with Severe Disabilities (2)
rent objectives, techniques, and results.                                     Educational assessment, planning, and programming in
                                                                           the curricular areas of gross and fine motor development,
EDU 721 Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers (2-3)                       self-help, and orientation and mobility.
  Classroom application of reinforcement, contingency man-                    Corequisite: Practicum placement.
agement, and related techniques of observing, describing, and
modifying social, linguistic, academic, and personal behaviors.            EDU 744 Life Skills Training for Secondary Age
Application especially to students with multiple disabilities.             Students with Multiple Disabilities (3)
                                                                              General case programming, individualized program planning,
EDU 724 Classroom Applications of Sign                                     instructional methods, transition issues, and classroom opera-
Communication (2)                                                          tions for secondary age students with multiple disabilities. Issues
   Focuses on the educational application of the principles                relating to vocational, leisure, and independent living domains
of sign communication within the framework of a total com-                 which are age-appropriate, community-referenced, and future-
munication philosophy. Procedures and strategies for effective             oriented.
communication in the educational setting are discussed. Feedback              Prerequisite: EDU 727 or permission of the instructor.
on communicative effectiveness provided.
   Prerequisite: Pass Sign Communication Proficiency Interview              EDU 745 Teaching Academics to Students with
or permission of the instructor.                                           Multiple Disabilities (2)
                                                                             An overview of the flexible modifications that can be intro-
EDU 727 Educational Implications of Cognitive, Vision,                     duced to the traditional curriculum in order to meet the needs of
and Physical Disabilities in Deaf Students (3)                             moderately involved deaf and hard of hearing children and youth
   An overview of accompanying disabilities frequently found               with multiple disabilities. Special emphasis on the functional
in infants, children, and youth who are deaf or hard of hearing,           adaptations that enhance achievement.
how such disabilities interact with deafness to create unique                Prerequisite: EDU 727 or permission of the instructor.
educational needs, and implications for teachers of students
with such needs. In addition to an overview of normal vision               EDU 746 Developing Relationships with Families
functioning and the application of learning theory to students             and Children (2)
with cognitive disorders, the course addresses a variety of                   This course provides basic knowledge and skills needed for
disabilities including common vision impairments, mental                   establishing effective and nurturing relationships with parents,
retardation, learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, and other              families, children, and students. Students read about and discuss
physical disabilities.                                                     a model for helping relationships, as well as engage in group
                                                                           processes and practice the component skills that define a helping
EDU 733 Teaching Thinking Skills, Level I (2)                              relationship.
   The theoretical and methodological background for teaching
the first level of the thinking skills curriculum, lifelong learning        EDU 747 Families with Deaf Children (3)
for deaf and hard of hearing students. Research results with deaf             The family as the child’s most significant resource and support
learners will be discussed.                                                system, the impact on the family of the diagnosis of hearing
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                             loss, procedures and strategies for developing relationships with
                                                                      67
Courses of Study


families with deaf children, and designing family programs and              hardware and software and other non-auditory technologies to
approaches based on theory, research, and current practice in               enhance early learning experiences.
family development and function.
   Prerequisite: Admission to the family-centered early educa-              EDU 761 Individualizing Instruction for Students with
tion or multiple disabilities specialization or permission of the           Special Needs (3)
instructor. Corequisite: Practicum placement.                                  This course prepares teachers to work with deaf students with
                                                                            a broad range of educationally relevant needs or disabilities in
EDU 754 Methods of Developing Writing for Deaf Stu-                         the same classroom. The course fosters acceptance of wide di-
dents (3)                                                                   versity among deaf students and develops skills in individualized
   This course is composed of two components: the instructional             assessment, individualized instruction, working as a member of
component, and the writing workshop component. In the instruc-              a team, classroom management, and developing Individualized
tional portion of each class session, the instructor presents infor-        Education Plans (IEPs). Special emphasis is placed on cognitive
mation, facilitates cooperative learning activities, and/or models          and behavioral theories that account for learning differences in
the writing process steps. In the writing workshop component of             children and that have implications for instruction. The course
each class, class members participate as a community of learners            addresses the content areas of functional academic and life skills.
in a writing workshop, processing personal writing ‘‘pieces’’
from rehearsal to publication.                                              EDU 762 Curriculum Development and Instructional
                                                                            Methods for Deaf Youth: Secondary (3)
EDU 756 Communication and Collaboration with Fami-                             Curriculum planning and special adaptations in teaching
lies and Other Professionals in Early Education with Deaf                   school subjects to deaf and hard of hearing students at the inter-
Children (2)                                                                mediate and secondary levels. Selection, development, modifica-
   Communication, collaboration, and microcounseling prin-                  tion, evaluation, and use of instructional media.
ciples and skills for early education specialists. Focus is on team            Prerequisite: EDU 713. Corequisites: EDU 709 and EDU
and family interactions, group processes, and problem-solving               789; or permission of the instructor.
techniques. Interdisciplinary approach is taken to working with
families through a collaborative teaching model including facul-            EDU 769 Field Experience and Seminar: Multiple
ty in related academic departments, parent consultants, and pro-            Disabilities (1)
fessionals in the field working with young children who are deaf                Directed observation and participation in educational pro-
and hard of hearing and their families, including early education           grams for students with multiple disabilities; directed visits to
specialists and clinicians specializing in family interventions.            schools and classes; and seminars focusing on these experiences
                                                                            and on professional, instructional, and child-related topics.
EDU 757 Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children:                         Prerequisite: Matriculation in the graduate program in educa-
An Interdisciplinary Approach (3)                                           tion of deaf students and specialization in multiple disabilities.
   The planning of learning experiences, information, and
techniques needed to develop curriculum and instruction for par-            EDU 771 Practicum I and Seminar: Early Education (1)
ent-infant/early childhood programs. Practical applications based              Supervised 10-week practicum (minimum of 60 clock hours)
on integration of theories and research in the fields of infant/child        in an assigned program for deaf children from birth through age
and family development, early childhood special education, edu-             5 and their families. Practicum is with an assigned family with a
cation of deaf children, and curriculum. An emphasis on inter-              deaf or hard of hearing child. Seminars focus on practicum ex-
disciplinary planning, instruction, and program implementation.             periences and applications of information in areas such as child
   Prerequisites: EDU 706, EDU 708, and EDU 713.                            observation, communication and language acquisition and use,
   Corequisites: EDU 772; or permission of the instructor.                  family involvement, and cultural perspectives.
                                                                               Prerequisites: Matriculation in the graduate program in educa-
EDU 759 Curriculum Development and Instructional                            tion of the deaf in the family-centered early education specializa-
Methods for Deaf Children: Elementary (3)                                   tion; EDU 706, EDU 711.
   Curriculum planning and instructional strategies for teaching               Corequisites: EDU 708, EDU 713.
elementary level deaf students. Focus is on selection, modifica-
tion, and evaluation of curriculum methods and materials.                   EDU 772 Practicum II and Seminar: Early Education (2)
  Prerequisite: EDU 713. Corequisites: EDU 709 and EDU 789; or                 Supervised 10-week practicum (minimum of 90 clock hours)
permission of instructor.                                                   in an assigned program for deaf children from birth through age
                                                                            5 and their families. Practicum experiences with an assigned
EDU 760 Computers and Related Technologies in Early                         family with a deaf or hard of hearing child. Seminars offer
Childhood Special Education (2)                                             opportunities to focus on practicum experiences and share
  This course focuses on the use of computers and related tech-             applications of knowledge in areas such as child development,
nologies with deaf children aged 0 to 5. Adaptations for meet-              assessment, behavior management, instructional approaches,
ing the special educational needs of such children in a variety             interdisciplinary teaming, family involvement, and cultural
of early education environments are discussed. Laboratory and               diversity.
demonstration experiences enable students to utilize computer
                                                                       68
                                                                                                                       Courses of Study


  Prerequisites: Matriculation in the graduate program in edu-           language acquisition and use, and multi-cultural considerations.
cation of the deaf in the family-centered early                          Limited to matriculated students.
education specialization; EDU 711, EDU 771.                                 Prerequisite: EDU 785. Corequisite: EDU 713.
  Corequisites: EDU 757, EDU 727.
                                                                         EDU 789 Practicum II and Seminar: Deaf Education (2)
EDU 781 Practicum I and Seminar: Multiple                                   Supervised practicum in an assigned program for deaf chil-
Disabilities (1)                                                         dren, at the student’s level or area of specialization, for a period
   Supervised 10-week practicum (minimum of 60 clock hours)              of 10 weeks (minimum of 90 clock hours). Experiences include
observing and instructing in an assigned program for deaf chil-          observation and instruction. A series of seminars involves discus-
dren, at the student’s level or area of specialization. Seminars         sion of student's classroom experiences, with special emphasis
involve discussions of students’ classroom experiences, with             on areas such as interdisciplinary teaming, Individualized Educa-
emphasis on areas such as interdisciplinary teaming, Individual-         tion Plan development, instructional strategies, and multicultural
ized Education Plan development, instructional strategies, and           considerations.
multicultural considerations.                                               Prerequisites: EDU 785 and EDU 787.
   Limited to matriculated students.                                        Corequisite: EDU 759 or EDU 762
   Prerequisite: EDU 769.
   Corequisites: EDU 713 and EDU 737.                                    EDU 792 Seminar for Student Teachers (1)
                                                                            A seminar in which students and faculty practicum super-vi-
EDU 782 Practicum II and Seminar: Multiple                               sors discuss student teaching and professional activities. Pro-
Disabilities (2)                                                         vides for exchange of ideas on materials, teaching strategies, and
   Supervised 10-week practicum (minimum of 90 clock hours)              other aspects of instruction and classroom manage-ment based
observing and instructing in an assigned program for deaf chil-          on students' levels of specialization.
dren, at the student’s level or area of specialization. Seminars            Prerequisite: Completion of all requirements for the ele-men-
involve discussions of students’ classroom experiences, with             tary, secondary, or multiple disabilities specialization.
emphasis on areas such as interdisciplinary teaming, Individual-            Corequisite: EDU 797B, 797C, or 797D. Open to matriculated
ized Education Plan development, instructional strategies, and           students only.
multicultural considerations.
   Prerequisite: EDU 769 and EDU 781.                                    EDU 793 Field Experience in Education:
   Corequisites: EDU 744 and EDU 745.                                    Deafness (1-6)
                                                                            Supervised experience of an advanced nature and in a variety
EDU 785 Field Experience and Seminar:                                    of settings related to the education of students who are deaf and
Deaf Education (1)                                                       hard of hearing.
   Directed observation and participation in educational pro-               Prerequisite: Open to matriculated students only.
grams for deaf children; directed visits to schools and classes;
and seminars focusing on these experiences and on professional,          EDU 795 Special Topics (1-3)
instructional, and child-related topics.
   Prerequisite: Matriculation in the graduate program in educa-         EDU 797E Student Teaching with Deaf Students:
tion of the deaf.                                                        Elementary (8)
                                                                           Supervised student teaching in the area of specialization for a
EDU 786 Seminar for Student Teachers: Early                              minimum of 40 clock hours per credit hour.
Education (1)                                                              Prerequisites: Completion of all other program requirements
   A seminar involving students and faculty practicum supervi-           except EDU 792 and approved admission to student teaching.
sors for discussions related to student teaching and professional
activities. Provides for an exchange of ideas on family-centered         EDU 797F Internship in Family-Centered Early
early education practices. Emphasis on interdisciplinary and             Education (8)
interagency collaboration.                                                 Supervised internship in a family-centered early education pro-
   Prerequisite: Completion of all requirements for the family-          gram for a minimum of 40 clock hours per credit hour.
centered early education specialization.                                   Prerequisites: Completion of all other program requirements
   Corequisite: EDU 794. Open to matriculated students only.             except for EDU 786 and approved admission to internship.

EDU 787 Practicum I and Seminar: Deaf Education (1)                      EDU 797M Student Teaching with Deaf Students:
   Supervised practicum in an assigned program for deaf chil-            Multiple Disabilities (8)
dren, at the early childhood, elementary, and secondary levels,            Supervised student teaching in the area of specialization for a
for a period of 10 weeks (minimum of 60 clock hours). Experi-            minimum of 40 clock hours per credit hour.
ences include observation and instruction. A series of seminars            Prerequisites: Completion of all other program requirements
involve discussions of student’s classroom experiences, with             except EDU 792 and approved admission to student teaching.
special emphasis on areas such as communication methodologies,

                                                                    69
Courses of Study


EDU 797S Student Teaching with Deaf Students:                                   EDU 881 Trends and Issues in General and Special
Secondary (8)                                                                   Education (3)
  Supervised student teaching in the area of specialization for a                  This course is designed for future educational leaders in Deaf
minimum of 40 clock hours per credit hour.                                      Education whose primary focus is addressing needs of deaf and
  Prerequisites: Completion of all other program requirements                   hard of hearing children and youth. The course deals in-depth
except EDU 792 and approved admission to student teaching.                      with the history and role of schooling in American society. It ad-
                                                                                dresses the nature and roots of curriculum as well as trends and
EDU 799 Independent Study (1-3)                                                 issues at the early childhood, elementary and secondary levels in
   Provides for individually directed study in subjects of special              general education, including special education. Students in the
interest and preparation. To be arranged. (Repeatable.)                         course will be expected to critically analyze and synthesize the
                                                                                professional literature related to trends and issues in general and
EDU 840 Professional Issues Seminar (2)                                         special education that impact on Deaf Education and to develop
   A variety of professional issues in the education of students                and defend positions on controversial issues.
who are deaf or hard of hearing related to the student’s major                     Prerequisites: Doctoral student in the Department of Educa-
field of study. Guidance in selecting problems related to the                    tion and permission of the instructor.
student’s specialization and planning a method for studying one
problem in depth. An Ed.S. course.                                              EDU 883 Doctoral Seminar in Professional Writing and
                                                                                Presentation Skills (1)
EDU 844 Guided Professional Studies (3)                                             This seminar addresses professional writing abilities needed
   Guidance in the review, analysis, and synthesis of data relat-               by leadership personnel in deaf education. Ph.D. students regis-
ing to the problem the student identified in EDU 840. A manu-                    ter for this seminar a minimum of three semesters. They prepare
script comparable to the quality of professional journal articles               manuscripts (literature reviews or theoretically- and/or empiri-
is to be produced. An Ed.S. course.                                             cally-based position papers on timely issues in Deaf Education,
                                                                                including diversity and multicultural issues) for submission to a
EDU 845 Curriculum Development (3)                                              variety of print forums, including professional journals, chapters,
   This course, designed for the educational leader, deals in-                  and magazines. They also assist in the writing of grant proposals
depth with the place of schooling in the American experiment                    and prepare media-enhanced presentations for a variety of pro-
(i.e., American society), the nature of curriculum, theories of                 fessional audiences, including parents, teachers, school admin-
curriculum, and important trends at the early childhood,                        istrators, organizations serving deaf individuals, and researchers
elementary, and secondary levels of general education. The                      and scholars in deafness and related fields.
course provides a curricular and instructional basis for the future                Prerequisite: Admission to the doctoral program in deaf education.
educational leader’s program of studies, including trends and is-
sues in classroom organization, program development, curriculum                 EDU 884 Ongoing Doctoral Seminar in Deaf
design, instructional options, and strategies of assessment. With               Education (1)
this knowledge the curriculum leader can be an agent of change.                    This seminar provides a forum for new and continuing doc-
                                                                                toral students to explore and discuss a variety of current profes-
EDU 880 Introduction to Doctoral Studies in Deaf                                sional issues and emerging topics of interest in the field of deaf
Education (3)                                                                   education that are not being addressed in other courses. Doctoral
   This core course gives incoming doctoral students a broad                    students in the Department of Education register for this seminar
overview of the history of Deaf Education and current trends                    each semester. Student expectations include assigned readings
and issues in the field, as well as an introduction to the essential             related to seminar topics.
skills of doctoral study and scholarship. The course serves as                     Prerequisites: Matriculation as a doctoral student in the De-
the foundation for ensuing doctoral core courses in the areas of:               partment of Education or permission of instructor.
curriculum, language, culture, literacy, assessment and instruc-
tion with deaf and hard of hearing children and youth. This                     EDU 885 Seminar in Language, Culture and Literacy: Is-
course provides significant preparation for the content and skills               sues in Deaf Education (3)
addressed by the Qualifying Examination. Students will be ex-                       This course examines the complex relationships among lan-
posed to the literature related to demographics, contextual issues              guage, culture, and literacy, and the implications for education in
in Deaf Education, including legal, public policy, and placement                a diverse society. The course specifically addresses language and
issues, and interdisciplinary trends and issues related to home, school,        literacy issues in the education of a diverse population of deaf
professional organizations, advocacy groups, the Deaf Community,                students.
funding sources, research units, and legislative bodies.                            Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in deaf
  Prerequisites: Doctoral student in the Department of Education.               education.




                                                                           70
                                                                                                                         Courses of Study


EDU 886 Trends and Issues in Theory and Research                            in which the student has expertise. Students earn one to three
Related to Reading and Writing Instruction with Deaf                        credits for the practicum depending on the level of involvement
Students (3)                                                                in designing and/or teaching the course.
    This course addresses current trends and issues in reading                 Prerequisite: Doctoral student in the Department of
and writing instruction for deaf students. Students are exposed             Education with a passing rating on the SCPI.
to theoretical and research literature related to fluent reading
and writing processes for deaf and hard of hearing readers,                 EDU 895 Special Topics (1-3)
including deaf learners from diverse cultural backgrounds.
Topics addressed include relationships among speech, language,              EDU 897 Doctoral Internship in Education:
cognition, memory, background knowledge, and reading; the                   Deafness (1-6)
role of ASL in developing literacy; methods for developing                    Advanced fieldwork experience in an approved setting.
conversational forms of print English for deaf students;                    Supervised work in program coordination, teacher education,
the role of parents in literacy development; readability and                or educational research. The major goal of the internship is to
reading assessment for deaf learners; alternative instructional             provide role-related, practical application of the training
frameworks; instructional reading and writing strategies for                that has preceded the internship.
deaf students; and trends and issues in reading instruction in                 Prerequisites: Doctoral student in the department, an Inter-
bilingual-bicultural programs.                                              mediate Plus rating on SCPI, passing score on qualifying exams,
    Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in deaf                and permission of the DDSC and department chair.
education.
                                                                            EDU 899 Independent Study (1-3)
EDU 887 Assessment and Evaluation in Education of Deaf                         Individualized studies focusing on issues or topics of special
Students                                                                    interest to the graduate student.
    Students will explore issues and procedures essential for                  Prerequisites: Doctoral student in the department, permission
pragmatic and culture-sensitive assessment for deaf learners                of the instructor, and independent study form.
in school achievement, cognitive/intellectual functioning, and
social emotional adjustment. Theoretical and practical issues               EDU 900 Dissertation Research (1-9)
of assessment will be studied, with implications for valid and                Prerequisites: Permission of DDSC and department chair.
reliable assessment. Traditional assessment procedures as
well as alternative assessment options appropriate for deaf
learners will be considered. The impact of regular education
requirements, especially mandated "high stakes" tests, on the
education progress of deaf students will be an additional focus
of the course.
                                                                                          Educational Foundations
   Prerequisites: Doctoral student in the Department of                                     and Research (EDF)
Education and permission of the instructor.

EDU 889 Trends and Issues Related to Curriculum and                         Graduate Faculty:
Academic Achievement of Deaf Children and Youth (3)                           Thomas E. Allen, Ph.D.; Kenneth I. Epstein, Ph.D.; Barbara
   This course addresses curricular trends and issues related               Gerner de Garcia, Ed.D.; Michael A. Karchmer, Ph.D.; Cynthia
to educating deaf children and youth in the full spectrum of                M. King, Ph.D.; Thomas N. Kluwin, Ph.D. (Chair); Donna M.
educational programs. Students will become familiar with the                Mertens, Ph.D.; Martin R. Noretsky, Ph.D.
journal literature in this area as well as the literature pertaining
to academic achievement of deaf students.                                   About the Department:
   Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in deaf                    Offering foundations courses is the major role of the
education.                                                                  Department of Educational Foundations and Research (DEFR).
                                                                            In providing foundations courses in educational psychology,
EDU 890 Internship (1-6)                                                    multicultural education, social science statistics, research
   Provides an intensive field-based experience for Ed.S. stu-               methods, school law, and other areas, DEFR provides required
dents who are expanding their teaching skills into specialized              and elective courses in areas that provide underpinning for
areas. Minimum of 60 clock hours per credit hour.                           various professional preparation programs.
                                                                               Each of the courses offered by the department has a multi-
EDU 893 Practicum in University Instruction (1-3)                           disciplinary orientation and each speaks broadly to the needs
   The student assumes a major role in teaching a graduate                  of students who are training for professional roles in education
course in the Department of Education under the supervision of              and human services settings. Whether students are seeking to
a faculty mentor. The primary purpose of this practicum is to               become teachers, counselors, or administrators, they will have to
develop the doctoral student’s ability to plan, teach, and evalu-           work collaboratively with professionals from other fields.
ate the effectiveness of a graduate-level course in a content area

                                                                       71
Courses of Study


    In order to be effective, DEFR recognizes that its faculty must          Resume                            No
model what they teach by being leaders in their own fields. This              Writing Sample                    No
leadership is evident in a number of ways: by the research and               Videotape of Signing              No
publication records of the faculty, by the number and scope of                   and/or English
funded projects they have led, by their influence in professional
organizations and on campus, and by their work with education                 Are there additional application requirements?
and human services agencies. In all that they do, the faculty                On-Campus Interview               No
seek ways to apply scholarship so that it can make a difference              Sign Language Evaluation          No
in the lives of the members of the community Gallaudet seeks to              English Evaluation                No
serve.                                                                       Culture and Language              No
    DEFR is a pioneer department in the integration of technology                Colloquium Required?
in its own teaching practices. The faculty employ state-of-the-art
instructional techniques involving multiple formats and delivery              Are there additional background requirements?
systems. The goal in doing so is to provide an intellectually                Prior Master’s Degree             No
stimulating interactive environment that challenges students to              Required Undergraduate            No
become active agents in their own professional development.                      Major
Whether the formats involve the use of advanced communication                Recommended                       No
systems in the DEFR laboratory classrooms or the creative use of                 Undergraduate Major
on-line course delivery systems, the object is to promote student            Prerequisite Coursework           No
learning in an exciting way that points to the future.                           (Required)
    As teachers of deaf and hard of hearing children throughout              Standardized Testing              No
the United States struggle to incorporate technology in their own                Substitute for Prerequisite
instructional efforts, DEFR offers a graduate certificate program                 Recommended Prior             Experience with
to prepare these teachers to develop and employ learning                          Coursework                   word processing software
environments that use information technologies. A guiding                        Prior Professional            Currently employed working
assumption of this program is that the effective use of technology               Experience                    with deaf children
by teachers can have positive impact on teachers' planning and               Prior Certification                No
thinking and thus on the learning outcomes of their students.                Health Certification               No
                                                                                 Requirements
Graduate Certificate Program in Integrating                                   Police or Other                   No
                                                                                 Background Check
Technology in the Classroom
   This graduate certificate program gives in-service teachers of
                                                                              Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
deaf and hard of hearing students as well as other educational
                                                                             Last Date to Submit               No Deadline
specialists the information and skills needed to use technology                   Completed Application
effectively to increase student learning. Four courses are taught            First Date for Consideration      No Set Date
through distance education strategies, over four semesters.                       of Application
Coursework covers instructional, management, and interpersonal               Summer Admission                  Yes
issues involved in establishing classroom learning environments                   Possible?
using technology.                                                            Fall Admission Possible?          Yes
                                                                             Winter Admission Possible?        Yes
Admission Requirements for the Graduate Certificate                           Part-time Study Possible?         Yes
Program in Integrating Technology in the Classroom                           Summers-Only Study                No
                                                                                  Possible?
                                                                             Weekend and Evening               Yes
      Evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
                                                                                  Study Possible?              (Distance Education Format)
      accredited university.
      Transcripts of all graduate study.
                                                                           Required Courses for Certificate
      An application fee of $50.                                             EDF 752 Integrating Technology into the Classroom (3)
      A completed graduate certificate application form.                      EDF 753 Internet Applications for the Classroom:
                                                                                        Part 1 (3)
   Are additional application materials required?                            EDF 754 Internet Applications for the Classroom:
  Standardized Test Scores        No                                                    Part 2 (3)
      References                  Letter from Supervisor                     EDF 755 Advanced Product Development (3)
      Reference Citing Sign       Yes
      Language Skills
  Special Essay                   No


                                                                      72
                                                                                                                      Courses of Study


Graduate Certificate Program in                                              Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
International Development                                                  Last Date to Submit               No Deadline
   This graduate certificate program, consisting of five courses,            Completed Application
introduces professionals to the field of international development          First Date for Consideration      No Set Date
and prepares them to work with federal agencies and non-                   of Application
                                                                           Summer Admission                  No
governmental organizations in fashioning, implementing, and
                                                                           Possible?
evaluating programs with people with disabilities in developing
                                                                           Fall Admission Possible?          Yes
countries domestically or overseas.
                                                                           Winter Admission Possible?        Yes
                                                                           Part-time Study Possible?         Yes
Admission Requirements for the Graduate Certificate                         Summers-Only Study                No
Program in International Development                                       Possible?
                                                                           Weekend and Evening               Yes (EDF 772 and EDF 727)
     Evidence of having received a bachelor's degree from an               Study Possible?
     accredited university.
     Transcripts of all graduate study.                                  Required Courses for Certificate
     An application fee of $50.
                                                                           EDF 770 Introduction to International Development (3)
                                                                           EDF 772 International Development with People with
     A completed graduate certificate application form.
                                                                                      Disabilities in Developing Countries (3)
                                                                           EDF 834 Program Development and Evaluation in
   Are additional application materials required?                                     Special Education and Human Services (3)
  Standardized Test Scores           No                                    EDU 727 Educational Implications of Cognitive, Vision,
  Reference Letter                   No                                               and Physical Disabilities in Deaf Students (3)
      Reference Citing Sign          Yes                                   GOV 791 International Relations (3)
      Language Skills
  Special Essay                      No
  Resume                             No
                                                                         Courses Offered:
      Writing Sample                 Yes
  Videotape of Signing               No
                                                                         EDF 720 Introduction to Research in Education
      and/or English                                                     and Human Services (3)
                                                                            This course is intended for professionals in the fields of
   Are there additional application requirements?                        education and human services including classroom teachers,
  On-Campus Interview                No                                  counselors, and school psychologists. Research, as a strategy
  Sign Language Evaluation           No                                  of inquiry, will be the guiding theme throughout instruction.
  English Evaluation                 No                                  The critical, major steps in the research process, along with
  Culture and Language               No
                                                                         related methodological issues, will be examined. These include
  Colloquium Required?                                                   consideration of a variety of research methodologies and
                                                                         related problems of measurement, statement and clarification
   Are there additional background requirements?                         of research problems, research studies, and basic statistical
  Prior Master’s Degree              No
                                                                         methods for describing data. Emphasis will be placed upon
  Required Undergraduate             No
  Major                                                                  the application of major concepts of specific research studies
  Recommended                        No                                  through the process of reading, describing, and interpreting
  Undergraduate Major                                                    research reports.
  Prerequisite Coursework            No
  (Required)                                                             EDF 730 Multicultural Foundations of Education (3)
  Standardized Testing               No                                     This course focuses on the importance of multicultural
  Substitute for Prerequisite                                            education and culturally pluralistic educational practices for
  Recommended Prior                  No                                  all students, and considers the impact of personal, social,
  Coursework                                                             political, educational and cultural factors on school success or
  Prior Professional Experience      No                                  failure. Topics include educational equity, anti-racist education,
  Prior Certification                 No                                  bilingual education, school reform, and diversity in U.S. society
  Health Certification Requirements   No                                  and the Deaf community in particular. This course considers the
  Police or Other                    No                                  Deaf to represent a separate cultural and linguistic group, and
  Background Check                                                       furthermore that the situations of multicultural deaf children
                                                                         and adults, based in two distinct communities, differ from the
                                                                         majority Deaf experience. Emphasis will be on the communities
                                                                         of multicultural deaf children and adults and their families that

                                                                    73
Courses of Study


we as professionals and practitioners are most likely to come              -
into contact with, including African Americans, Hispanic/
Latinos, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans.                     EDF 755 Advanced Product Development (3)
Additionally, issues of class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic             This course description has changed since the printing
origin, religious diversity, and disability will be considered.            of this catalog. To see an updated course description, please
                                                                           click here.
EDF 740 Introduction to Statistical Analysis (3)
   This course covers the univariate and bivariate statistical             EDF 760 School Law (3)
techniques frequently used by human service professionals.                     This course provides participants with the historical context
Students are given the opportunity to gain statistical skills              of law in schools, as well as information regarding current
regarding analysis and interpretation of data. Practical                   educational/special education legal issues, that will contribute
applications of these techniques are emphasized. This course               to legal literacy essential for leadership in general education
presumes no statistical background other than college-level                and special education settings. Topics to be addressed include:
algebra or its equivalent. The course goal is to develop many of           Overview of U.S. legal system; historical context of law in
the basic conceptual theories underlying statistical applications.         schools; state/federal roles in education; local governance in
Students develop skills in descriptive statistical analysis, simple        education; schools and the church-state relationship; compulsory
correlation procedures, and hypothesis testing. Computer-                  education and curriculum; student rights; desegregation;
assisted analysis (such as SPSS) complements coursework.                   mainstreaming; teacher rights; collective bargaining; tort law in
   Prerequisite: EDF 720 or equivalent.                                    education; and school finance law.

EDF 752 Integrating Technology into the Classroom (3)                      EDF 770 Introduction to International Development (3)
This course description has changed since the printing                        This course introduces students to the theories and strategies
of this catalog. To see an updated course description, please              of international development from the end of the Cold War until
click here.                                                                the current era of globalization. Development organizations
                                                                           possess varying theoretical assumptions and strategies about
EDF 753 Internet Applications for the Classroom (3): Part 1                development. The students will study and critically analyze these
       This course description has changed since the printing              assumptions in order to analyze which strategies work best and
of this catalog. To see an updated course description, please              to create their own theory of development. Special attention will
click here.                                                                be given to the effect of development on people with disabilities
                                                                           in developing countries.
EDF 754 Internet Applications for the Classroom (3): Part 2
   This course description has changed since the printing                  EDF 772 International Development with People with Dis-
of this catalog. To see an updated course description, please              abilities in Developing Countries (3)
click here.                                                                   This course introduces professionals to the political, social,
                                                                           and developmental issues surrounding disability that result in
                                                                           the continual oppression and marginalization of disabled people
                                                                           throughout the developing world. Drawing upon disability
EDF 714 Critical Pedagogy (3)                                              studies, models of development, current overseas development
This course has been added since the printing of this catalog.             assistance programs, case studies, and reflections from leaders in
To see the course description, please click here.                          the field, the course examines issues and conditions that impact
                                                                           people with disabilities in developing countries. Strategies are
                                                                           discussed which include and empower people with disabilities at
                                                                           both the international and grassroots level.




                                                                      74
                                                                                                                          Courses of Study


EDF 801 Principles of Statistics I (3)                                       EDF 812 Qualitative Research Methods (3)
   This introductory course sequence develops the primary                       This course introduces graduate students to the major
statistical concepts and techniques needed to conduct research.              concepts, issues, and techniques of qualitative research methods.
This course presumes no previous statistical background other                Students practice interview and participant obser-vation skills
than college-level algebra or its equivalent. The course goal is             and analyze and interpret data. Class topics include formation
to develop many of the basic conceptual theories underlying                  of research questions: ethics of fieldwork, descriptive validity,
statistical applications. Students will develop skills in descriptive        and theory building. Case study methods, content, history, and
statistical analysis, simple correlation procedures, and hypothesis          foundations are addressed.
testing. Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) complements
coursework.                                                                  EDF 834 Program Development and Evaluation in Special
   Prerequisite: College-level algebra.                                      Education and Human Services (3)
                                                                                This course focuses on the design, development, and
EDF 802 Principles of Statistics II (3)                                      evaluation of programs for individuals with disabilities.
   The purpose of this second course in statistics is to develop             Topics to be covered include interpreting policy statements
specific concepts and techniques to conduct basic inferential                 into relevant programmatic goals and objectives; determining
statistical analysis. The course emphasizes application skills,              organizational components and functions; establishing staffing
i.e., the ability to fit the appropriate analysis to a particular data        patterns; setting up program-based budgets; and formulating
set. Students learn to conduct and interpret the most often used             ongoing process evaluation, product evaluation, and cost
inferential tests for research and evaluation projects. Computer-            analysis plans. Students will be required to submit a proposal in
assisted analysis (such as SPSS) complements coursework.                     response to a Request for Proposals (RFP), thereby increasing
    Prerequisite: EDF 801.                                                   their managerial skills through simulation of an actual grant-
                                                                             writing experience. (Cross-listed as ADM834).
EDF 803 Multivariate Statistics (3)                                             Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
   This is the third course in statistics, the purpose of which
is to develop statistical concepts and techniques needed to                  EDF 795, 895     Special Topics (1-3)
conduct research. This course presents a theoretical basis as
well as a rationale for and practice with selected multivariate              EDF 799, 899 Independent Study (1-3)
statistical techniques. Techniques that are offered in this course              This course provides for individually directed study in
include multiple regression, canonical correlation, analysis of              subjects of special interest and preparation. Students and faculty
covariance, discriminant function analysis, and factor analysis.             develop programs of study that address critical issues in the
Computer-assisted analysis (such as SPSS) will complement                    philosophical, social, or psychological foundations of education,
coursework.                                                                  as well as more specialized topics related to research and
   Prerequisites: EDF 801, 802.                                              statistical design.

EDF 810 Advanced Research Design I (3)
   This course is designed to develop the ability to locate,
review, and critically evaluate research studies. The course
focuses on the proper format for research proposals and reports,
ethics in research, measurement issues, and sampling. In
                                                                                           Hearing, Speech, and
addition, the student is introduced to quantitative and qualitative                       Language Sciences (HSL)
approaches to research. The student develops critical analysis
abilities using the criteria of internal and external validity as
explicated in experimental design principles.                                Graduate Faculty:
   Prerequisite: EDF 801.                                                       Steven Ackley, Ph.D.; Matthew Bakke, Ph.D.; Scott Bally,
                                                                             Ph.D..; Corrine Bickley, Ph.D.; Cynthia L. Compton, Ph.D.;
                                                                             Carol LaSasso, Ph.D.; James Mahshie, Ph.D. (Chair); Mary
EDF 811 Advanced Research Design II (3)                                      June Moseley, Ph.D.; Gregory Snyder, Ph.D.; Wendy Hanks,
   This course is intended to develop professional competencies              Ph.D.
in two areas: (a) knowledge and use of the following
approaches to research: experimental, quasi-experimental,                    Adjunct Faculty:
causal-comparative, qualitative, correlational research, and                    Claire Bernsteine, Ph.D. ASHA; Col. David Chandler, Ph.D.,
survey research; and (b) development of formal research                      Walter Reed Army Medical Center; Amy Georgeadis, M.S.,
proposals. This course completes a four-course sequence                      National Rehabilitation Hospital; Peter Fitzgibbons, Ph.D., Gal-
designed to develop knowledge of research design options for                 laudet University; Elizabeth Kipila, M.S., Gallaudet University;
evaluators and researchers.                                                  Kenneth Henry, Ph.D., Professional Hearing Services; Therese
    Prerequisite: EDF 810.                                                   Walden, Au.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center


                                                                        75
Courses of Study


Professional Staff:                                                         The Doctor of Audiology Program (Au.D.)
  Kathi Balestino-Estes, M.S.; Karen Cotton, M.S.; Lisa Devlin,                The Au.D. program is designed to produce audiologists who
M.S.; Dawn Ellis, M.S. (Clinic Director); Robin Goffen, M.A.T.;             are fully competent to function independently in all diagnostic
Sharon Goldstein, M.A.; James Lee, M.S.; Michelle Malta,                    and rehabilitative settings, serving individuals of all ages who
M.S.; Rala Stone, M.A.; Mary Pat Wilson, M.S.                               are deaf or hard of hearing. The program offers an intensive,
                                                                            broadly based academic curriculum together with integrated
About the Department:                                                       sequential clinical experience. The curriculum was developed
   The Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathol-                  in accordance with the recommendations and guidelines of the
ogy has offered graduate courses since 1957. It currently offers            American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), the
the following graduate degree programs:                                     American Academy of Audiology (AAA), and the Academy of
    1. Au.D. in Audiology                                                   Rehabilitative Audiology (ARA).
    2. Ph.D. in Audiology                                                      In addition to providing traditionally strong academic and
    3. Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology                       clinical experience, the Gallaudet University Au.D. program
    4. Non-Clinical M.S. in Hearing, Speech, and Language                   has the unique charge of training audiologists who are profi-
Sciences.                                                                   cient in American Sign Language (ASL), who possess extensive
   The department’s M.S. degree program in speech-language                  understanding of deafness, and who have particular expertise in
pathology was established in 1987. A clinical doctorate in                  serving members of the deaf community.
Audiology (Au.D.) was initiated in 1998 to replace a long-                     The Au.D. staff includes 10 full-time faculty and clinical
standing M.S. program in audiology. Both programs are                       supervisors, with additional contributions from members of the
accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the                  Speech-Language Pathology faculty, faculty of other University
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).                        departments, and outstanding adjunct faculty from throughout
The programs prepare highly trained audiologists and speech-                the Washington, D.C. area.
language pathologists for a variety of educational, clinical, and
rehabilitative settings.                                                    Admission Requirements for the Au.D. Program in
    Each graduate program offers unique opportunities for                   Audiology
instruction and independent study within a framework designed
to meet the goals and needs of the individual student. Close                Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
interaction among students, supervisors, and faculty is provided            University graduate program:
in a setting that offers a wide array of academic and clinical
experiences. The clinical practicum varies from student to                       Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence
student. On-campus sites include the University’s Hearing                         of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
and Speech Center, the Child Development Center, Kendall                          university. (Those applying during their final undergraduate
Demonstration Elementary School, and the Model Secondary                          year will be required to submit a final transcript after completion
School for the Deaf. Housed in the Hearing and Speech Center                      of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first
are the audiology, speech-language pathology, and aural                           semester of graduate study.)
rehabilitation clinics. The center’s professional staff provides the              Official transcripts of all graduate study.
highest quality
                                                                                  A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all
supervision for students in audiology and speech-language
                                                                                  previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
pathology, while also providing services to the Gallaudet and                     applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
metropolitan D.C. communities.                                                    tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
   In addition to the variety of on-campus sites, off-campus
                                                                                 An application fee of $50.
affiliations offer the student an opportunity to gain experience
through exceptional clinical internships. Among those facilities                 A completed graduate school application form.
available are Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Bethesda                          Goals statement.
Naval Medical Center, Kennedy-Krieger Institute, Professional                    TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
Hearing Services, Montgomery County Society for Crippled
Children and Adults, Easter Seal Treatment Center, Maryland                 Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
School for the Deaf, Arlington-Fairfax Hearing and Speech
Center, Fairfax County Health Department, George-town                          Are additional application materials required?
University Hospital, Veterans Administration Hospital, hospitals                 Standardized Test             GRE or MAT
in Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, and Prince George’s County,                     Scores
the Listening Center at Johns Hopkins University, and several                    References                    Three Letters (application may be
private practice and public school sites.                                                                      initially reviewed following receipt
                                                                                                               of two letters)
                                                                              Reference Citing Sign            No
                                                                              Language Skills
                                                                              Resume                           No

                                                                       76
                                                                                                                       Courses of Study


 Writing Sample                No                                        HSL 822 Speech and Language Characteristics of Deaf
 Videotape of Signing                                                            and Hard of Hearing Individuals (2)
 and/or English                No                                        HSL 834 Diagnostic Audiology I (3)
                                                                         HSL 840 Introduction to Practicum (1)*
   Are there additional application requirements?                        ASL ___ Sign Language (2-3)**
     On-Campus Interview       Recommended
 Sign Language Evaluation      No                                                          Year I - Spring
 English Evaluation            No                                        HSL 784 Research Methodology in Audiology and
 Culture and Language                                                            Speech-Language Pathology (3)
 Colloquium Required?          Yes                                       HSL 818 Acoustic Phonetics (3)
                                                                         HSL 835 Diagnostic Audiology II (3)
   Are there additional background requirements?                         HSL 840 Introduction to Practicum (1)*
 Prior Master’s Degree         No                                        HSL 846 Clinical Applications of
 Required Undergraduate        No                                                Sign Communication I (1)
 Major                                                                   HSL 866 Electrophysiological Measures in Audiology (3)
     Recommended               Speech-Language Pathology/                ASL ___ Sign Language (3)**
     Undergraduate             Audiology or related discipline
                                                                         HSL 850 Amplification I (3)
     Majors                    Communication Sciences/Disorders
     Prerequisite              (Contact department for details)                        Year I - Summer Session
     Coursework                                                          HSL 818 Acoustic Phonetics (3)
     (Required)                                                          HSL 824 Aural Rehabilitation: Adults (3)
 Standardized Testing          No
                                                                         ____ ___ Elective (2-3)
 Substitute for Prerequisite
      Other Recommended        Sign Language course                      Total Credits for Year I: 39-41
      Prior Coursework
 Prior Professional            No
                                                                                             Year II - Fall
 Experience                                                              HSL 821 Informational Counseling and Interviewing
 Prior Certification            No
                                                                                 Skills for Audiologists and Speech-Language
 Health Certification           No
                                                                                 Pathologists (3)
 Requirements
                                                                         HSL 841 Clinical Practicum: Diagnostic (2)
 Police or Other               For some practicum
                                                                         HSL 842 Clinical Practicum: Aural Rehabilitation (1)
 Background Check              settings
                                                                         HSL 847 Clinical Applications of Sign
                                                                                       Communication II (1)
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
                                                                         HSL 852 Amplification II (3)
 Last Date to Submit           No Deadline
 Completed Application
                                                                         HSL 861 Pediatric Audiology (3)
 First Date for                February 15
 Consideration of                                                                          Year II - Spring
 Application                                                             HSL     Aural Rehabilitation: Pediatric (3)
                                                                                826
 Summer Admission              No
                                                                         HSL     Clinical Practicum: Diagnostic (2)
                                                                                841
 Possible?                                                               HSL     Clinical Practicum: Aural Rehabilitation (1)
                                                                                842
 Fall Admission Possible?      Yes                                       HSL     Clinical Applications of Sign
                                                                                848
 Winter Admission Possible?    No                                                      Communication III (1)
 Part-time Study Possible?     No                                        HSL 855 Communication Technology (3)
 Summers-Only Study            No                                        HSL 862 Central Auditory Processing (2)
 Possible?                                                               HSL 883 Research Project in Audiology (1) (optional)
 Weekend and Evening           No
 Study Possible?                                                                       Year II - Summer Session
                                                                         HSL 895 Cultural Diversity (1)
                                                                         HSL 842 Aural Rehabilitation Practicum (1)
Program of Study: Au.D. in Audiology                                               (Four weeks off-campus)
                                                                       _____________
                Year I - Pre-Session                                   *There is a fee associated with this course.
 GPS 700 Culture and Language Colloquium (2)                           **ASL III or the equivbalent proficiency is required. Students with
                                                                       sign language above the ASL III level, as determined by the Center for
                    Year I - Fall                                      American Sign Language Literacy, satisfy this requirement.
 HSL 814 Acoustics and Instrumentation (3)
 HSL 817 Anatomy and Physiology of Audition (3)

                                                                  77
Courses of Study


  HSL 880 Internship (4)                                                 excellent research opportunities within the department as well as
  HSL 883 Research Project in Audiology (1)                              through extensive established clinical and research associations
  Total Credits for Year II: 34                                          regionally.
                        Candidacy Exam
                                                                         Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
                          Year III - Fall                                University graduate program:
  HSL 849      Clinical Applications of Sign
                                                                               Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
               Communication IV (1)
                                                                               evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
  HSL    858   Cochlear Implants (2)
                                                                               accredited university. (Those applying during their final
  HSL    863   Community and Industrial Audiology (3)
                                                                               undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript
  HSL    880   Internship (4)
                                                                               after completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling
  ____   ___   Elective (2-3)
                                                                               in their first semester of graduate study.)
  HSL    883   Research Project in Audiology (1)
                                                                                Official transcripts of all graduate study.
                        Year III - Spring                                       A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
  HSL    815   Psychoacoustics (3)                                              all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
  HSL    860   Aging (3)                                                        applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
  HSL    870   Seminar in Medical Audiology (2)                                 tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
  HSL    880   Internship (4)                                                  An application fee of $50.
  HSL    883   Research Project in Audiology (1)                               A completed graduate school application form.
                Year III - Summer Session                                      Goals statement.
  HSL 873 Private Practice/Clinic Management (3)                               TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
  HSL 875 Professional Issues (1)
  ____ ___ Elective (if not taken in fall) (2-3)                         Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
  Total Credits for Year III: 31-33                                          Are additional application materials required?
              Year IV - Fall and Spring                                     Standardized Test Scores            GRE or MAT
  HSL 890 Residency (6 credits per semester) (12)                           References                          Three Letters (application may be
                                                                                                                initially reviewed following receipt of
 Total Credits: 114-116 plus 2 for Culture and Language                                                         two letters)
Colloquium
                                                                          Reference Citing Sign                 Yes
Additional Requirements for the Au.D. Program
   Students must take a minimum of two electives following the            Language Skills Resume                No
first semester of the program. Following the third semester of the         Writing Sample                        Yes
program, students must register for A&S 883 (Research Project             Videotape of Signing and/or English   No
in Audiology) for each semester until the research project is
formally completed.                                                          Are there additional application requirements?
   Also, students must: 1) complete all academic and practicum              On-Campus Interview                 Recommended
requirements for the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence               Sign Language Evaluation              No
in Speech-Language Pathology, 2) successfully complete
                                                                          English Evaluation                    No
candidacy exams, 3) adher to the provisions of the ASHA and
AAA code of ethics, and 4) Successfully complete ASL III and              Culture and Language Colloquium
demonstrate ability to effectively communicate with clients.              Required?                             Yes

Ph.D. in Audiology                                                         Are there additional background requirements?
  The Ph.D. program in audiology is a post-Au.D. degree
                                                                            Prior Post-graduate Degree          Au.D. Degree
program that is primarily designed to prepare candidates for
faculty and research positions in universities and other research           Required Undergraduate Major        No
facilities. The program is unique in that Gallaudet students will           Recommended Undergraduate           Speech-Language Pathology/
be afforded a six-year Au.D.-Ph.D. option, which is similar               Majors                                Audiology or related discipline
to the M.D.-Ph.D. degree in medicine. Candidates who are                                                        Communication Sciences/
                                                                                                                Disorders,Biology, Psychology,
graduates of the four-year entry level clinical doctoral (Au.D.)                                                Linguistics
program and who possess sign language skills are given priority.
                                                                            Prerequisite Coursework (Re-
Individuals from traditionally under-represented groups (deaf or          quired)
hard of hearing, and individuals from underrepresented racial-
                                                                          Standardized Testing Substitute for
ethnic groups) are especially encouraged to apply. The Ph.D.              Prerequisite                        No
program is unique in that it has a sign language requirement
for both its students and faculty, thereby ensuring that all                Other Recommended Prior Course-
classes will be fully sign-accessible to deaf and hard of hearing         work                              Sign Language course
students. Students in the Audiology Ph.D. program will have                 Prior Professional Experience       No
                                                                    78
                                                                                                                        Courses of Study



 Prior Certification                    ASHA CCC-A certification          completed. All dissertation requirements must be completed and
                                                                        the dissertation must be successfully defended.
 Health Certification Requirements      No
 Police or Other Background Check      For some practicum               The Speech-Language Pathology Program
  Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                             This two-year (including one summer) program involves
                                                                        coursework and practicum experience designed to provide a
 Last Date to Submit Completed Ap-     No Deadline                      broad background in speech and language disorders with a
 plication
                                                                        special emphasis on the communication needs of deaf and hard
 First Date for Consideration of Ap-   February 15                      of hearing individuals.
 plication
                                                                           The program involves coursework in normal aspects of
 Summer Admission Possible?            No
                                                                        speech, language, and hearing; aural rehabilitation; voice;
                                                                        organic and swallowing disorders; phonological disorders;
  Program of Study: Ph.D. in Audiology                                  fluency; language disorders; neurogenic disorders affecting
                                                                        speech and language; and other areas important to the
                      Prerequisites                                     development of a well-trained speech-language pathologist.
EDF 801 Introduction to Statistics I (3)                                An equally important part of the program is the supervised
EDF 802 Principles of Statistics II (3)                                 clinical practicum experience, obtained through a combination
GPS 700 Culture and Language Colloquium (2)                             of practica on campus and at various sites throughout the
                         Year I - Fall                                  Washington, D.C. area.
EDF    810 Advanced Research Design I (3)                                  Opportunities are provided for conducting a master’s thesis
HSL    888 Advanced Topics in Audiology I (2)                           and for elective coursework in other departments or through
HSL    891 Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar I (1)                      the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan
HSL    893 Seminar in Higher Education Instruction and                  Area.
             Supervision in Audiology (3)
                                                                        Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
             Qualifying Examination at end of semester                  University graduate program:
Total Credits for fall semester: 9
                                                                             Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
                           Year I - Spring                                   evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
EDF 811       Advanced Research Design II (3)                                accredited university. (Those applying during their final
                 OR                                                          undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript
EDF    812    Qualitative Research Methods (3)                               after completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling
HSL    889    Advanced Topics in Audiology II (2)                            in their first semester of graduate study.)
HSL    892    Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar II (1)                        Official transcripts of all graduate study.
HSL    894    Seminar in Higher Education Publication,                        A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
                 Grant Writing, and Presentation Skills (3)                   all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
HSL 896       Practicum in University Instruction (2-3)                       applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
                                                                              tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
Total Credits for spring semester: 11-12
                                                                             An application fee of $50.
                    Year I - Summer                                          A completed graduate school application form.
HSL 897 Doctoral Internship (4-6)                                            Goals statement.
                                                                             TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
                       Year II - Fall
HSL 900 Dissertation Research (proposal expected) (5)
                                                                        Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
           Comprehensive Exam before proposal defense
                                                                           Are additional application materials required?
                           Year II - Spring                                  Standardized Test             GRE or MAT
HSL 900       Dissertation Research (oral defense expected) (5)              Scores
                                                                             References                    Three Letters (Application may be
Additional Requirements for the Ph.D. Program                                                              initially reviewed after receipt of
  Students must have completed an Au.D. or equivalent to be                                                2 letters)
considered for regular Ph.D. admission. Other applicants may              Reference Citing Sign            No
be considered for conditional Ph.D. admission. There is a 2-year          Language Skills
Ph.D. program residency requirement. Students must obtain an              Resume                           No
SCPI score of Intermediate Plus prior to doing the practicum in           Writing Sample                   No
university instruction and taking the comprehensive examination.          Videotape of Signing             No
The comprehensive examination must be successfully                        and/or English

                                                                   79
Courses of Study


                                                                                 Pathology (1)
   Are there additional application requirements?                        HSL 746 Clinical Applications of Sign
     On-Campus Interview       Recommended                                       Communication (1)
 Sign Language Evaluation      No                                        ASL ___ American Sign Language II (or equivalent) (3)*
 English Evaluation            No
 Culture and Language          Recommended                                              Semester II - Spring
 Colloquium Required?                                                    HSL 755 Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders (3)
                                                                         HSL 764 Language Disorders (3)
   Are there additional background requirements?                         HSL 765 Seminar in Diagnostics in Speech-Language
 Prior Master’s Degree         No                                                Pathology (1)
 Required Undergraduate        No                                        HSL 774 Clinical Practicum: Aural Rehabilitation (1)
 Major                                                                   HSL 784 Research Methodology in Audiology and
     Recommended               Speech-Language Pathology/                        Speech-Language Pathology (3)
     Undergraduate Majors      Audiology or related discipline           ASL ___ American Sign Language III (or equivalent) (3)*
                               Communication Sciences/Disorders
      Prerequisite             (Contact department for details)                                Summer
      Coursework                                                         HSL 720 Seminar in Assessment and Habilitation with
      (Required)                                                                 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children (3)
 Standardized Testing          No                                        HSL 716 Audiology: Educational and Habilitative
 Substitute for Prerequisite                                                     Implications (3)
      Other Recommended        Sign Language Course                      HSL 774 Clinical Practicum: Speech-Language
      Prior Coursework                                                           Pathology (1) [optional]
 Prior Professional            No
 Experience                                                                               Semester III - Fall
 Prior Certification            No                                        HSL 719 Aural Rehabilitation II (3)
 Health Certification           No                                        HSL 760 Organic and Swallowing Disorders (3)
 Requirements                                                            HSL 771 Aural Rehabilitation Practicum (1) (May
      Police or Other          For some practicum settings                       alternatively be taken during Semester IV)
      Background Check                                                   HSL 791 Internship in Speech-Language Pathology (4)
                                                                         HSL 821 Informational and Interviewing Counseling
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                                  Skills for Audiologists and Speech-Language
 Last Date to Submit           No Deadline                                       Pathologists (3)
 Completed Application
 First Date for                February 15                                                      Semester IV - Spring
 Consideration of                                                        HSL     750    Voice Disorders (3)
 Application                                                             HSL     751    Stuttering (2)
 Summer Admission              No                                        HSL     754    Seminar in Phonology/Articulation (3)
 Possible?                                                               HSL     791    Internship in Speech-Language Pathology (4)
 Fall Admission Possible?      Yes
 Winter Admission Possible?    No                                      Additional Requirements
 Part-time Study Possible?     No                                         Students must take a minimum of one elective following the
 Summers-Only Study            No                                      first semester of the program. For students opting for the M.S.
 Possible?                                                             thesis, thesis credit may be substituted for the elective.
 Weekend and Evening           No
 Study Possible?                                                       Department Requirements
                                                                         1. Completion of the academic and practicum requirements
Typical Program of Study: Master of Science in Speech-                   for the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence in
Language Pathology                                                          Speech-Language Pathology.
                                                                         2. Successful completion of candidacy examination.
                  Semester I - Fall                                      3. Adherence to the provisions of the ASHA Code of Ethics.
 HSL 713 Advanced Topics in Normal Language                              4. Successful completion of ASL III and demonstrated
         Development (2)                                                    ability to effectively communicate with client.
 HSL 714 Advanced Topics in Speech Science (3)
 HSL 763 Clinical Procedures for Communication                         _______________
         Disorders (3)                                                    *ASL III or the equivalent proficiency is required. Students with sign
                                                                       language above the ASL III level, as determined by the Center for American Sign
 HSL 765 Seminar in Diagnostics in Speech-Language
                                                                       Language Literacy, satisfy this requirement.
         Pathology (2)
 HSL 774 Clinical Practicum: Speech-Language
                                                                  80
                                                                                                                          Courses of Study


Non-Clinical M.S. Degree in Hearing, Speech,                                HSL 710 Aural Rehabilitation—Educational and Psycho-
                                                                            social Implications (3)
and Language Sciences                                                         Principles and methods of aural rehabilitation with children;
   The non-clinical M.S. in Hearing, Speech, and Language                   hearing aids, classroom amplifiers, and acoustics will be dis-
Sciences provides, at the discretion of the department, a degree            cussed.
in Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences for full-time stu-                   Prerequisites: HSL 707, 709.
dents who will not pursue the standard curriculum in audiology
or speech-language pathology that would lead to obtaining the               HSL 712 Seminar in Cued Speech (1)
credentials required for clinical practice (e.g. ASHA certifica-               Seminar on instruction of the entire Cued Speech system.
tion, state licensure, etc.). This degree is available to two groups        History, theory, and practical application of Cued Speech.
of students: 1) Newly admitted students who wish to obtain a
non-clinical master's degree in hearing, speech, and language sci-          HSL 713 Advanced Topics in Normal Language
ences, and 2) Students who start in the Clinical Audiology                  Development (2)
(Au.D.) or Speech-Language Pathology program, who have sat-                    Advanced study of the development of language in the
isfactorily completed at least forty-nine credit hours of non-clini-        normal child. Emphasis will be given to the cognitive and social
cal coursework and have satisfied all other non-clinical require-            bases of language development in the preschool child.
ments of the program. Students should contact the department
for details about this program.                                             HSL 714 Advanced Topics in Speech Science (3)
                                                                              This course provides basic information about how speech is
Courses Offered:                                                            produced, the nature of the speech signal, linguistic and
                                                                            phonetic frameworks for viewing speech, the anatomy and
HSL 690 Introduction to Cued Speech (2)                                     physiology of the speech production and auditory system, and
   This course covers the history and development of Cued                   processes of speech perception.
Speech (CS) with a focus on learning the CS system. Topics in-
clude: CS interpreting; application of CS to various populations;           HSL 715 Pediatric Audiology and Auditory
compatibility of CS with methodologies designed for deaf and                Habilitation of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children (3)
hard of hearing people; benefits of CS to speech-reading, pre-                 This course is intended for parent-infant majors and is
reading skills, auditory training techniques, and oral language             co-taught with the Department of Education with a focus on
development.                                                                theory and practice of auditory habilitation with children.

HSL 707 Audiology and Hearing Technology for Educators                      HSL 716 Audiology: Educational and Habilitative
and Counseling Professionals (3)                                            Implications (3)
   This course is designed for professionals who work or are                  Study of the fundamentals of hearing, diagnostic audiologic
preparing to work with individuals with hearing loss. Using an              procedures, special diagnostic procedures for infants, children,
ecological perspective, this course facilitates an understanding            and difficult-to-test clients, and interpretation of audiologic test
of the biological aspects of hearing loss as well as implications           data for communication, psychosocial, and educational
for the psychosocial systems. Areas examined include the scope              purposes.
of practice for Audiology, sound and hearing, the anatomy and
physiology of the hearing mechanism, etiologies of hearing loss,            HSL 719 Aural Rehabilitation II (3)
hearing measurement, audiometric interpretation, aural reha-                   The study of the speechreading, auditory and non-auditory
bilitation, and hearing technology including hearing aids, group            assistive technology, and educational management of deaf and
listening systems, cochlear implants, telecommunication devices,            hard of hearing children; advanced discussion of techniques of
and alerting systems which facilitate communication in educa-               aural rehabilitation. A laboratory is required.
tional and social contexts. Practical applications of these topics             Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
for education and the counseling professionals are explored.
                                                                            HSL 720 Seminar in Assessment and Habilitation with
HSL 708 Amplification Systems (1)                                            Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children (3)
  The purpose of this course is to provide students working                    Study of the characteristics, process, and procedures of
toward the master’s degree in Deaf Education with information               assessment of and intervention for speech, language, and
about hearing aids and assistive technology used with deaf and              communication problems of deaf and hard of hearing children.
hard of hearing people. The focus is on the use of hearing aids,            The class will present an interdisciplinary integrative approach
assistive listening systems, telecommunication devices, and alert-          to habilitation of the deaf or hard of hearing child and will be
ing systems for educational purposes.                                       accompanied by a practicum.
  Prerequisite or Corequisite: HSL 707.
                                                                            HSL 721 Seminar in Assessment and Rehabilitation with
HSL 709 Speech Science (2)                                                  Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adults (3)
  A study of the speech mechanism, speech production, and the                 Study of the characteristics, processes, and procedures of
acoustics of speech.                                                        assessment of and intervention for speech, language, and
                                                                       81
Courses of Study


communication problems for deaf and hard of hearing adults.             HSL 763 Clinical Procedures for Communication
The class will present an interdisciplinary integrative approach        Disorders (3-4)
to habilitation of the deaf or hard of hearing adult and will be           Principles and methods of diagnosis and appraisal, and
accompanied by a practicum.                                             methodology in speech and language remediation as it pertains
                                                                        to individuals whose communication disorder is associated with
HSL 725 Applied Phonetics (2)                                           peripheral and central auditory problems. Observation and
    Theories of the history of language; development of the Eng-        practicum are required.
lish language; the International Teaching Alphabet; analysis and            Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
transcription of American English.
                                                                        HSL 764 Language Disorders (3)
HSL 746 Clinical Applications of Sign                                      Description, evaluation, and remediation of language disor-
Communication (1)                                                       ders in children and adults.
   This course focuses on the clinical application of the prin-            Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
ciples of sign communication in the field of Speech-Language
Pathology/Aural Rehabilitation.                                         HSL 765 Seminar: Diagnostics in Speech-Language
                                                                        Pathology* (1-2)
HSL 750 Voice Disorders (3)                                                Principles and processes associated with the diagnosis of vari-
   Study of normal phonatory processes, disruption in phonation         ous speech and language disorders will be studied. Participation
caused by organic and nonorganic factors, procedures for assess-        in evaluation is required. May be taken more than once. Content
ing phonatory disorders, remediation of phonatory disruptions in        will vary from semester to semester.
various ethnic populations.                                                Prerequisite: Permission of the department.
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
                                                                        HSL 771 Clinical Practicum: Aural Rehabilitation (1-4)
HSL 751 Stuttering (2)                                                    Supervised student-administered rehabilitation. May be taken
  Study of the etiology, theory, nature, development, and treat-        more than once.
ment of fluency disorders.                                                 Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

HSL 754 Seminar in Phonology/Articulation (3)                           HSL 774 Clinical Practicum: Speech-Language
   Study of research and principles associated with symptom-            Pathology (1)
atology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of phonological/               Supervised student-administered speech-language therapy. May
articulation disorders in children and adults. Emphasis is on a         be taken more than once.
broad understanding of the effect of phonology/ articulation               Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
disorders, including multicultural issues.
                                                                        HSL 784 Research Methodology in Audiology
HSL 755 Neurogenic Speech and Language                                  and Speech-Language Pathology (2-4)
Disorders (3)                                                              Evaluation of research in audiology and communication disor-
   Provides information concerning etiology, assessment, and            ders. The course describes how to read, understand, and evaluate
treatment of speech and language disruptions associated with            research appearing in the literature, and provides an introduction
various neurological disorders. Includes review of neural               to research design. Although the major focus is for the research
anatomy and physiology, description of right hemisphere com-            consumer, many of the principles presented will apply to the
munication disorders, cognitive language disorders secondary to         design and implementation of research.
head injury and dementia, and speech apraxia.
                                                                        HSL 791 Internship in Speech-Language Pathology (4)
HSL 760 Organic and Swallowing Disorders (3)                               The internship provides students with supervised clinical
   This course provides information on the etiology, assessment,        practicum in treating individuals with a variety of communica-
and treatment of organic and swallowing disorders. Primary              tive disorders. Students will be involved in the diagnosis of com-
emphasis is given to the pediatric population. Communication            munication disorders, planning and implementation of therapy,
disorders secondary to congenital (orofacial anomalies, cerebral        and assessment of the outcome of therapy with a broad range of
palsy), developmental (developmental apraxia), and acquired             both functional and organically based communicative disorders
conditions (tracheostomy, head trauma) are addressed. Informa-          resulting from hearing loss and/or other causes. May be taken
tion is provided on the anatomy and physiology of swallowing,           more than once.
diagnosis of dysphagia across the lifespan, and evaluation and
treatment methods used in school, clinic, and hospital settings.        HSL 794 Preparing a Research Proposal in Audiology
Ethical and cultural considerations in service delivery are ex-         and Speech-Language Pathology (1)
plored.                                                                    Provides guidance to students interested in writing a master's
   Prerequisite: Intended for majors with a background in               thesis, with a focus on the research proposal. Areas covered
speech-language pathology.                                              ___________
                                                                        *A fee may be associated with this course.
                                                                   82
                                                                                                                       Courses of Study


include selecting and researching the topic, developing aims and          loss-related needs. Cultural and ethical issues related to the
questions, writing a literature review, and developing appropriate        counseling aspects of audiology and speech-language pathology
methods to address the aims. Pass/fail.                                   are explored.
   Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Must be taken con-
currently or following HSL 784.                                           HSL 822 Speech and English Language Characteristics
                                                                          of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals (2)
HSL 795    Special Topics (1-3)                                              The development of speech and English language in deaf
                                                                          and hard of hearing children and adults, with attention to how
HSL 797 Thesis (3)                                                        this development may be impacted and/or altered by deafness.
   This course is for students pursuing research associated with          Emphasis on examining deaf and hard of hearing children and
a thesis option in the audiology or speech-language pathology             adults using verbal and written forms of English.
program. Research is directed by a graduate faculty member and
entails developing and designing the research project, conducting         HSL 824 Aural Rehabilitation: Adults (3)
the project, and writing and making oral presentations of                    Principles and methods of teaching adults with hearing loss
findings. May be taken more than once.                                     to integrate auditory and visual cues for the comprehension of
   Prerequisite: Permission of the department.                            spoken language and the improvement of speech perception and
                                                                          communicative efficiency.
HSL 799 Independent Study (1-3)
   Directed individual investigation in special areas not fully           HSL 826 Aural Rehabilitation: Pediatric (3)
covered by regular course work. Title indicating the content must            All aspects of audiological habilitation and rehabilitation in
be available at registration.                                             culturally diverse settings with deaf or hard of hearing children,
  Prerequisite: Permission of the department.                             focusing on both home and school. The course has astrong
                                                                          interdisciplinary focus, considering ethnic and cultural issues in
HSL 814 Acoustics and Instrumentation (3)                                 rehabilitation.
   Study of basic electricity, acoustics and measurement of                  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
sound properties, wave analysis, transducers, measuring and
calibration systems, speech processing systems, and system                HSL 834 Diagnostic Audiology I* (3)
interaction and integration.                                                 Consideration of case history, auditory disorders, pure tone
                                                                          and speech audiometry, masking, immittance testing, and
HSL 815 Psychoacoustics (3)                                               interpretation of the basis test battery. An equipment lab is
    Study of the principles, procedures, and research involved            included.
in the field of psychoacoustics and of the relationships between              Prerequisite: HSL 817
the physical dimensions of auditory stimuli and the resultant
perceptual experience; as well as the relationships among                 HSL 835 Diagnostic Audiology II (3)
psychoacoustic testing and both auditory physiology and the                  Advanced audiologic assessment, including peripheral
audiologic evaluation process.                                            and central auditory nervous system site-of-lesion testing,
                                                                          electrophysiologic techniques, and procedures for evaluating
HSL 817 Anatomy and Physiology of Audition (3)                            pseudohypacusis .
  Anatomy and physiology of auditory, vestibular, and central                Prerequisite: HSL 834.
auditory nervous systems, including phylogeny, ontogeny, and
genetics of hearing and balance; mechanical and biophysical               HSL 840 Introduction to Practicum (1)
factors in afferent and efferent signal transduction.                        Guided observations of a variety of audiologic activities
                                                                          and preliminary structured participation as aide in diagnostic
HSL 818 Acoustic Phonetics (2)                                            evaluations. Students observe preparations for, administration
   Acoustic characteristics of speech sounds and their relation           of, and follow-up to clinical evaluations. Limited hands-on
to articulatory physiology. Use of sound spectrograph. Clinical           experience is included.
application of speech analysis.
   Prerequisite: HSL 725.                                                 HSL 841 Clinical Practicum (Diagnostic) (2)
                                                                             Clinal experience, encompassing the entire range of audio-
HSL 821 Informational and Interviewing Counseling Skills                  logical procedures, including hearing aid selection, on the Gal-
for Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists (3)                     laudet University campus.
   Students learn ways to address the biopsychosocial effects of             Prerequisite: Permission of the department.
hearing loss on clients. The impact of hearing loss on infants,
children, adults, older adults, and significant others is examined         HSL 842 Clinical Practicum (Aural Rehabilitation) (1)
from an ecological systems perspective. Students develop inter-             Supervised experience in all phases of communication therapy
viewing and counseling skills to help clients address hearing             on the Gallaudet campus with clients who are deaf or hard of
                                                                          ___________
                                                                          *A fee is associated with this course.
                                                                     83
Courses of Study


hearing. May include teaching speech-reading classes,                    HSL 861 Pediatric Audiology (3)
conducting hearing aid orientations/communication strategies                The course covers variousaspects of audiology as it relates to
workshops or other rehabilitation activities.                            infants and children, including case history/interviewing; parent
  Prerequisite: Permission of the department.                            counseling; normal and abnormal auditory development; normal
                                                                         motor, cognitive, language, and psychosocial development;
HSL 846 Clinical Applications of Sign                                    identification audiometry; diagnostic audiometry; hearing aids;
Communication I (1)                                                      audiologic counseling; and educational audiology. Ethnic and
   The focus of this course is upon applying the principles of           cultural differences are considered.
sign communication in the field of clinical audiology.
                                                                         HSL 862 Central Auditory Processing (2)
HSL 847 Clinical Applications of Sign                                       This course focuses on central auditory processing disorders
Communication II (1)                                                     and how they are assessed and managed in home, school,
   Continued focus upon the application of sign communication            work, and therapeutic environments. Topics include differential
principles to the profession of audiology.                               diagnosis, the collaborative model, counseling, and advocacy.
                                                                         The course has an interdisciplinary focus.
HSL 848 Clinical Applications of Sign
Communication III (1)                                                    HSL 863 Community and Industrial Audiology (3)
  Continuation of previous class.                                           Public school, community, industrial, and military hearing
                                                                         programs, including screening tests, noise control, and medical-
HSL 849 Clinical Applications of Sign                                    legal problems associated with acoustic trauma and noise-
Communication IV (1)                                                     induced hearing loss.
  Continuation of previous class.                                           Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HSL 850 Amplification I (3)                                               HSL 866 Electrophysiological Measures in Audiology (3)
   Study of amplification systems and hearing aids, including                Review of the anatomy and physiology of the auditory
hearing aid design, electroacoustic characteristics and                  and vestibular systems and their relationship to other balance
specifications, spectral shaping, earmold acoustics, candidacy            mechanisms. Discussion of disorders of the auditory and
issues, and fitting techniques.                                           vestibular systems. Differential diagnostic procedures for the
   Prerequisites: HSL 717, 734, or permission of instructor.             balance mechanism, including the electronystagmography
                                                                         (ENG) battery, dynamic platform posturography, rotation
HSL 852 Amplification II (3)                                              testing, and computerized assessment procedures; along
   Advanced study of amplification systems including special              with rehabilitation of individuals with balance disorders.
clinical procedures, new technology, digital processing,                 Electrophysiological measures of audition, including Auditory
programmable hearing instruments, and counseling techniques.             Evoked Potentials such as auditory brainstem response (ABR)
 children and adults using verbal and written English.                   and middle and late potentials, otoacoustic emissions (OAE),
                                                                         electrocochleography (ECoG), electroneuronography (ENOG),
HSL 855 Communication Technology (3)                                     and intraoperative monitoring.
   The study of auditory, visual, and vibrotactile receptive com-
munication technologies designed to meet the needs of deaf and           HSL 870 Seminars in Medical Audiology (3)
hard of hearing individuals. Emphasis is on needs assessment,               Otoaudiologic and neurologic considerations in the differen-
selection, evaluation, and verification process. Legal rights and         tial diagnosis of auditory and vestibular disorders.
responsibilities of clients are discussed.                                   Prerequisite: A&S 835.

HSL 858 Cochlear Implants (2)                                            HSL 871 Seminar in Audiology and Speech (2)
  This course includes description of the various cochlear                  A review of current experimental and clinical literature
implants that have received FDA approval, discussion of                  in audiology, speech and language pathology, audition,
candidacy issues, follow-up procedures including programming             otolaryngology, and related areas. May be repeated for different
and habilitation, positive and negative outcomes with emphasis           content areas.
on research results. Controversies surrounding implantation of              Prerequisite: Permission of the department.
children will be considered.
                                                                         HSL 873 Private Practice/Clinic Management (3)
HSL 860 Aging (3)                                                           Issues related to establishing a private practice, including
   This interdisciplinary course examines the biological,                clinical management, small business and accounting practices,
psychological, and social aspects which are normal correlates            models of private practice, referrals, reimbursement, and
of the aging process, and those changes which are disorders.             managed care.
Within this context, emphasis is placed upon the identification
and diagnosis of speech, language, and hearing problems
associated with the aging process and their rehabilitation.
                                                                    84
                                                                                                                           Courses of Study


HSL 875 Professional Issues (1)                                             include: teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities
   The study of issues of professional importance not addressed             of college and university faculty; professional organizations
in other courses. The issues addressed are those that are current           of higher education; faculty publications related to higher
at the time the course is taught; content will change from year to          education; professional ethics; professional liability; institutional
year.                                                                       review boards; curriculum vitae; electronic portfolios; the roles
                                                                            of administrators and faculty in curriculum development and
HSL 880 Internship in Audiology (2-6)                                       faculty evaluation; shared governance; and mentoring.
   Advanced diagnostic and aural rehabilitation practicum in 1) a              Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. in Audiology Program.
rehabilitation or medical facility and 2) school programs for deaf
and hard of hearing students (day classes and residential).                 HSL 892 Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar II (1)
   Prerequisites: A&S 826, 835, 771, 772 (120 clock hours), and                This seminar complements Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar
permission of the department.                                               I and addresses topics of interest to Ph.D. students who are
                                                                            interested in learning about faculty positions in academic
HSL 883 Research Project in Audiology (1)                                   settings. Topics include, but are not limited to: faculty service
   Students develop a research proposal based upon a topic of the           in academic settings; scholarship expectations for faculty;
student’s choice. Students will describe a problem area, develop            institutional research boards for protection of human subjects;
a rationale for a study through the literature review, develop and          ethical and unethical behavior; mentoring in academic settings;
explore a research hypothesis, and collect pilot data for the study.        roles and functions of Offices of Sponsored Programs and
May be taken more than once.                                                Development Offices in Higher Education.
                                                                               Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. in Audiology Program.
HSL 888 Advanced Topics in Audiology I (2)
   This seminar is designed to bring the most current informa-              HSL 893 Seminar in University Instruction and Supervi-
tion available to the Gallaudet Audiology Ph.D. program. Topics             sion (3)
will include cochlear implant updates, new techniques in aural                  This seminar is intended to be a prerequisite for students
rehabilitation, hearing amplification technological innovations,             in the Ph.D. in Audiology Program who will be enrolled in
balance testing and treatment advances, electrophysiology test              a Practicum in University Instruction the following Spring
updates, to name some. In addition, current research will be                semester. Students in this seminar become familiar with trends
the focus of the course with recent publications in professional            and issues in higher education instruction and supervision of
journals serving as the catalyst for discussion and additional              interns in higher education audiology programs.
research. Guest speakers representing the various topic areas will              Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. in Audiology Program.
be invited to campus.
   Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. in Audiology Program.               HSL 894 Seminar in Higher Education Publishing,
                                                                            Grant-Writing, and Presentation Skills (3)
HSL 889 Advanced Topics in Audiology II (2)                                     This seminar addresses professional writing, grant-writing,
    This seminar is a second semester Ph.D. offering which                  and presentation abilities needed by higher education faculty in
follows the same format as the Advanced Topics in Audiology                 personnel preparation programs in audiology. Students analyze
I seminar, but covers separate and unique topics from the first              and evaluate manuscripts and articles that are either literature
seminar. This seminar is designed to bring the most current                 reviews or theoretically and/or empirically based position papers
information available to Gallaudet's Ph.D. in Audiology                     on timely issues in educational audiology. They construct short
Program. Topics include intraoperative monitoring procedures,               articles that adhere to the American Psychological Association
auditory neuropathy, industrial hearing conservation, central               style format. In addition, students prepare media-enhanced
auditory processing disorder, and educational audiology and ASL             presentations for a variety of professional audiences, including
fluency. In addition, current research will be the focus of the              parent groups, teachers, school administrators, conferences
course with recent publications in professional journals serving            attended by educational audiologists, organizations serving deaf
as the catalyst for discussion and additional research on campus.           and hard of hearing individuals, and researchers and scholars in
Guest speakers representing the various topic areas will be                 audiology, deaf education, and related fields.
invited to campus.                                                              Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. in Audiology Program.
    Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. in Audiology Program.
                                                                            HSL 895 Special Topics (1-3)
HSL 890 Residency (6)                                                         Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  Full-time clinical experience in a professional setting.
Generally analogous to the current CFY, with substantial                    HSL 896 Practicum in University Instruction (2-3)
involvement of the department. Can be a full-time paid                         The student assumes a major role in teaching a graduate
professional experience. May be taken more than once.                       course in the Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language
                                                                            Sciences. The primary purpose of this practicum is to develop
HSL 891 Ph.D. Professional Issues Seminar I (1)                             the doctoral student's ability to plan, teach, and evaluate the
  This seminar addresses topics of interest to Ph.D. students               effectiveness of a graduate level course in a content area in
who plan to seek faculty positions in academic settings. Topics             which the student has expertise. Students earn 2-3 credits for the
                                                                       85
Courses of Study



practicum, depending on the level of involvement in designing               Master of Arts in Interpretation
and/or teaching the course.                                                    The M.A. in Interpretation program is designed to prepare
   Prerequisite: Approval of Ph.D. Program Director and                     and educate deaf, hard of hearing and hearing persons in
completion of A&S 894: Seminar in Higher Education Publish-                 working as interpreters in deaf and hearing communities. The
ing, Grant-Writing, and Presentation Skills.                                program provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary
                                                                            approach to interpretation, centered around the department's
HSL 897 Ph.D. Internship (4-6)                                              award-winning interactive interpretation laboratory. This
   Advanced fieldwork experience in an approved setting.                     program is recognized and approved by the Conference of
Supervised work in program coordination, clinical supervision,              Interpreter Trainers for meeting interpreter graduate education
or audiological research. The major goal of the internship is to            standards. The M.A. in Interpretation program consists of a
provide role-related, practical application of the training that has        comprehensive, sequenced, and integrated series of courses
preceded the internship.                                                    and experiences that are intended to provide students with the
   Prerequisite: Approval of the Ph.D. Program Director.                    necessary mastery of knowledge, techniques, and skills required
                                                                            for entry to professional work in the field of interpretation or
HSL 899 Independent Study (1-3)                                             advanced graduate study. Close interaction among students,
  Directed individual investigation in special areas not fully              mentors, and faculty is provided in a setting that offers a wide
covered by regular coursework. Title indicating the content must            array of academic and interpreting experiences. The interpreting
be available at registration.                                               practicum and internship varies from student to student. The
   Prerequisite: Permission of the department.                              M.A. interpreter preparation program mainly is in a two-year
                                                                            format, which consists of four semesters and one summer
HSL 900 Dissertation (10)                                                   internship. The program requires the completion of 59 credit
   The dissertation is the culminating activity of the Ph.D. in             hours of course work. The program is available in a three-year
Audiology Program. Students may register for 1-10 credits.                  format for students who need an additional year of advanced
In no instance will more than 10 credits be accrued. A grade                language classes. Part-time study is also available.
of NG is recorded for dissertation credits until the student has
satisfactorily defended the dissertation.
                                                                            Admission Requirements for the Two-Year and Three-
                                                                            Year M.A. Programs in Interpretation

                                                                            Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
                                                                            University graduate program:
                  Interpretation (ITP)
                                                                                 Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
Graduate Faculty:                                                                evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
  Steven D. Collins, M.A., CDI; Valerie L. Dively, Ph.D., RSC,                   accredited university. (Those applying during their final
CDI (Chair); Melanie Metzger, Ph.D., CT; Risa Shaw, M.S.,                        undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript
CSC, CI, SC:L.                                                                   after completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling
                                                                                 in their first semester of graduate study.)
                                                                                 Official transcripts of all graduate study.
About the Department:                                                            A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale)
    The Department of Interpretation offers a graduate program                   in all previous undergraduate and graduate study.
in interpretation to prepare deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing                  (Occasionally, applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may
interpreters for interpreting work in a variety of settings. The                 be admitted conditionally upon the recommendation of the
department prepares interpreters to interact and communicate                     department.)
fluently with deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing people, with an                  An application fee of $50.
appreciation of diversity in deaf and hearing communities.                       A completed graduate school application form.
    The department has four highly qualified and experienced                      Goals statement.
full-time faculty members with national and international                        TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
reputations in the fields of interpretation and interpreter
education. Publications and presentations based on faculty                  Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
research and development work contribute to the advancement
of knowledge in interpretation and interpreter education and of                Are additional application materials required?
quality interpreting services in deaf and hearing communities as                 Standardized Test             GRE or MAT
well as contribute to the advancement of knowledge in spoken                     Scores
language and signed language linguistics and sociolinguistics.                   References                    Three Letters
                                                                                 Reference Citing Sign         One of the 3 letters should
                                                                                 Language Skills               cite sign language skills
                                                                              Special Essay                    No
                                                                       86
                                                                                                                    Courses of Study


  Resume                           No                                   ITP    725 Cognitive Processing Skills: American Sign
  Writing Sample                   No                                              Language (2)
      Videotape of Signing         Required                             ITP    728 English Translation (2)
      and/or English                                                    ITP    729 American Sign Language Translation (2)
                                                                        ITP    732 Consecutive Interpretation (4)
   Are there additional application requirements?                       ITP    738 ASL to English Simultaneous Interpretation:
        On-Campus Interview        Yes                                             Monologues (2)
        Sign Language Evaluation   Required                             ITP    739 English to ASL Simultaneous Interpretation:
        English Evaluation         Required                                        Monologues (2)
        Culture and Language       Strongly recommended                 ITP    740 Simultaneous Interpretation: Interactive (4)
        Colloquium Required?                                            ITP    745 Interpreting English Signing: Dialogues and
                                                                                   Monologues (4)
   Are there additional background requirements?                        ITP    747 ASL to English Simultaneous Interpretation II:
  Prior Master’s Degree            No                                                    Monologues (2)
  Required Undergraduate           No                                   ITP    748 English to ASL Simultaneous Interpretation II:
  Major                                                                                  Monologues (2)
      Recommended                  ASL Studies                          ITP    750 Simultaneous Interpretation: Cultural
      Undergraduate Major          Deaf Studies                                    Mediation (2)
                                   Interpretation                       ITP    751 Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation I (1)
                                   Linguistics                          ITP    752 Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation II (1)
                                   Social Science                       ITP    775 Research Methods in Interpretation (3)
                                   English
                                                                        ITP    780 Practicum Seminar: The Interpreting
  Prerequisite Coursework          No
                                                                                   Profession (3)
  (Required)
                                                                        ITP    781 Practicum Seminar: Cultural Mediation (3)
  Standardized Testing             No
  Substitute for Prerequisite
                                                                        ITP    785 Internship (3-9)
  Recommended Prior                No
                                                                        LIN    705 Introduction to Language and
  Coursework
                                                                                   Communication (3)
  Prior Professional               No
                                                                        LIN    707 Structure of Language: English and
  Experience                                                                       American Sign Language (4)
  Prior Certification               No                                   LIN    741 Sociolinguistics of the U.S. Deaf Community (3)
  Health Certification              No
  Requirements                                                        2. Practicum and Internship
  Police or Other                  No                                    Practical classroom-based experiences are incorporated
  Background Check                                                    into each semester of the program. These experiences include
                                                                      directed observation in interpreting events on the university
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                       campus and in Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia.
  Last Date to Submit              March 1                            Internship experience is designed to provide students with the
  Completed Application                                               opportunity to synthesize practical and academic experiences
  Summer Admission                 No                                 gained during the in-residence portion of the M.A. in
  Possible?                                                           Interpretation program. Students and the internship coordinator
  Fall Admission Possible?         Yes                                will agree upon a suitable site, supervision, and plan of activity.
  Winter Admission Possible?       No                                 Internship sites can be in any state in the U.S. and/or in other
  Part-time Study Possible?        Yes                                countries.
  Summers-Only Study               No
  Possible?                                                           3. Examinations
  Weekend and Evening              No
  Study Possible?                                                        Qualifying Examination
                                                                             At the end of the first year (in the two-year format),
Core Courses for M.A. in Interpretation                                  all students must successfully complete a qualifying
1. Core Courses                                                          examination including a conceptual component and a skills
   All students admitted to the two-year program must complete           component. Students unable to achieve a passing score will
the following core courses with grades of B or better:                   be asked either to do remedial work and retake the exami-
                                                                         nation or to withdraw from the program. Failure on this
  ITP      714 Formal American Sign Language (4)                         examination may be grounds for probation.
  ITP      718 Building Translation Skills: English (2)
  ITP      719 Building Translation Skills: American Sign                Comprehensive Examination
               Language (2)                                                 During the final semester of full-time coursework, all
  ITP      724 Cognitive Processing Skills: English (2)                  students must successfully complete a comprehensive
                                                                 87
Courses of Study


   examination that will include a conceptual component and             Courses Offered:
   a skills evaluation. This examination is offered to students
   in the final semester of the program each spring semester.
   Students must take this exam in the semester immediate-              ITP 600 English Skills for Interpreters (1)
   ly preceding internship. Enrollment in internship is                   This course is designed for interpreters or future interpreters
   contingent on passing this exam.                                     who have a good command of English and would like to further
                                                                        develop their English skills. Understanding the source message
4. Lab Fee                                                              when it is in English is a crucial skill, often overlooked in inter-
   Students enrolled in the M.A. in Interpretation program must         preter education. The exercises deal with English only. Topics
pay a lab fee for using the program's classroom and laboratory's        include finding the main point, outlining, abstracting, prediction
equipment and facilities.                                               skills, cloze skills, finding key words and propositions and text
                                                                        analysis. Also included will be exercises on figurative language,
Typical Program of Study                                                metaphors, and similes. This course is not included in the major.
                          Semester I
  ITP    718 Building Translation Skills: English (2)                   ITP 605 The U.S. Deaf-Blind Community (1)
  ITP    719 Building Translation Skills: American Sign                   This is an introductory course designed for deaf-blind people,
             Language (2)                                               parents, educators, interpreters, and other interested people who
  ITP    724 Cognitive Processing Skills: English (2)                   would like to learn about deaf-blind individuals and the U.S.
  ITP    725 Cognitive Processing Skills: American Sign                 Deaf-Blind community.
             Language (2)
  LIN    705 Introduction to Language and                               ITP 660 Practical Skills for Interpreter Educators (1)
             Communication (3)                                             This course is designed for interpreter educators who would
  LIN    707 Structure of Language: English and ASL (4)                 like to develop or enhance their skills in teaching interpretation.
                                                                        Basic approaches to learning theory will be introduced. The
                         Semester II                                    emphasis of this course is on development of specific skills used
  ITP    714 Formal American Sign Language (4)                          in teaching the cognitive tasks associated with interpretation and
  ITP    728 English Translation (2)                                    the evaluation of those skills. This course is not included in the
  ITP    729 American Sign Language Translation (2)                     major.
  ITP    732 Consecutive Interpretation (4)
  ITP    738 ASL to English Simultaneous Interpretation:                ITP 661 ASL Intralingual Skills for Interpreters (1)
             Monologues (2)                                                This course is designed for interpreters or future interpreters
  ITP    739 English to ASL Simultaneous Interpretation:                who would like to develop their American Sign Language (ASL)
             Monologues (2)                                             skills. Understanding the source message when it is in ASL is a
                                                                        crucial skill often overlooked in interpreter education. The exer-
                         Semester III                                   cises deal with ASL only. Topics include finding the main point,
  ITP    740 Simultaneous Interpretation: Interactive (4)               abstracting, prediction skills, finding key signs, rephrasing, and
  ITP    747 ASL to English Simultaneous                                text analysis. Also included will be exercises on simple and com-
             Interpretation II: Monologues (2)                          plex ASL utterances. This course is not included in the major.
  ITP    748 English to ASL Simultaneous
             Interpretation II: Monologues (2)                          ITP 662 Introduction to Translation (1)
  ITP    775 Research Methods in Interpretation (3)                        The practical and theoretical applications of translation to the
  ITP    780 Practicum Seminar: The Interpreting                        development of sign language interpreters are explored. Methods
             Profession (3)                                             for creating translations to ASL and to English are demonstrated.
                                                                        Approaches to evaluating a translation are included. Practical
                           Semester IV                                  experience in translations is an integral part of the course.
                                                                        Students will work in small groups and individually to prepare
  ITP    745 Interpreting English Signing: Dialogues and                translations.
             Monologues (4)
  ITP    751 Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation I (1)                 ITP 663 Introduction to Processing Skills (1)
  ITP    752 Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation II (1)                  This course provides information on the importance of rapid
  ITP    781 Practicum Seminar: Cultural Mediation (3)                  and efficient cognitive processing in English and ASL.
  LIN    741 Sociolinguistics of the U.S. Deaf                          Exercises in ASL and English are provided. They include:
             Community (3)                                              shadowing, decalage, dual tasking, memory development,
                                                                        and digit processing.
                         Semester V
  ITP    785 Internship (3-9)                                           ITP 664 Introduction to Consecutive Interpretation (1)
                                                                           This course is designed for interpreters who would like
                                                                        to develop consecutive interpretation skills. Consecutive

                                                                   88
                                                                                                                          Courses of Study


interpretation can be used as a professional tool or as a training          ITP 681 Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings,
exercise. Consecutive interpretation of the message begins after            Part II (1)
the source message has paused or stopped. Development of                      This is a continuation of the course, ITP 680 (Introduction to
consecutive interpretation skills enhances memory development,              Interpreting in Legal Settings, Part I). The course covers
both visual and auditory. The development of this skill enhances            preparation for legal assignments, text analysis of a commonly
self-confidence in interpreters, and it allows for the development           encountered legal text, qualifying and testifying as an expert,
of cognitive control of processes central to interpretation.                and continued professional development resources. All of the
Component skills are also addressed, such as abstraction, note              information is applicable for both deaf and hearing interpreters
taking, expansion, cloze, and prediction. This course is not                and for working in deaf/hearing interpreter teams.
included in the major.                                                         Prerequisites: ITP 680 (Introduction to Interpreting in Legal
   Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English and translation                Settings, Part I). Hearing interpreters must hold national certifi-
skills.                                                                     cations (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf inter-
                                                                            preters do not have to hold certification.
ITP 665 Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation of
ASL Monologues (1)                                                          ITP 691 Cognitive and Practical Aspects of Fingerspelled
   This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation               Word Recognition (1)
of ASL to English monologues. Emphasis is placed on                            This graduate-level course is designed for interpreters
comprehension of ASL prior to interpretation into English.                  who have experience interpreting from ASL to English and
Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring,              from English-based signing into English and who can usually
coping skills, simultaneity, and repair strategies.                         understand most of the message but frequently miss finger-
   Prerequisites: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which                spelled words on the first try. Experiences designed to improve
permit full comprehension of source text in either language.                fingerspelled word recognition on the first try will be provided.
                                                                            Fingerspelled words will be studied in context and in isolation.
ITP 667 Introduction to Simultaneous Interpretation of                      A televised lecture by Robert E. Johnson, Ph.D., ‘‘The Structure
English Monologues (1)                                                      of Fingerspelling,’’ will be incorporated into the course. This
   This is an introductory course dealing with interpretation               course also has a theoretical component in that the underlying
of English to ASL monologues. Emphasis is placed on                         cognitive processes associated with fingerspelled word
comprehension of English prior to interpretation into ASL.                  recognition will be explained and discussed. The theoretical
Course topics include effort in interpretation, restructuring,              aspects form the basis for the practical applications. This course
coping skills, simultaneity, and repair strategies.                         is not included in the major.
   Prerequisite: Fluency in ASL and English at levels which
permit full comprehension of source text in either language.                ITP 695 Special Topics (1-3)

ITP 668 Introduction to Deaf-Blind Interpretation (1)                       ITP 700 How to Teach Processing Skills for
  This is an introductory course designed for interpreters or               Interpretation (1)
future interpreters who have a good command of English and                     Introduction to the theoretical and practical basis for develop-
American Sign Language and would like to develop deaf-blind                 ing cognitive processing skills in practice and training. Methods
interpreting skills.                                                        of teaching processing skills are demonstrated. Issues related to
  Prerequisite: ITP 605 (The U.S. Deaf-Blind Community),                    grading and evaluation are discussed.
fluency in American Sign Language and English, and permission                   Prerequisites: Interpretation skills required, teaching skills
of instructor.                                                              preferred.

ITP 680 Introduction to Interpreting in Legal Settings,                     ITP 702 How to Teach Translation (1)
Part I (1)                                                                     Practical and theoretical applications of translation to
  This is an introductory course designed for interpreters                  the development of sign language interpreters are explored.
who are interested in or already working in the legal system.               Methods of creating a translation are demonstrated. Approaches
The course covers prerequisite skills and knowledge for legal               to evaluating a translation are included. Practical experience in
interpreters, roles and protocol for legal interpreters, positioning        translation is an integral part of the course.
of legal interpreters, roles of legal personnel, and ethics and the            Prerequisites: Experience in teaching some aspects of
court code of conduct. All of the information is applicable for             interpretation. Fluency in ASL and English at levels which
both deaf and hearing interpreters and for working in deaf/                 permit full comprehension of source texts in either language.
hearing interpreter teams.                                                  Also, students must have expressive language abilities which are
  Prerequisites: Hearing interpreters must hold national                    commensurate with their current level of receptive skill.
certifications (RID CSC, CI or CI/CT or NAD level V). Deaf
interpreters do not have to hold certification. The completion of
pre-reading packet is required.


                                                                       89
Courses of Study


ITP 703 Theory and Practice for Interpreter                               include rephrasing for meaning, restructuring for linguistic struc-
Educators (1)                                                             tures, and rephrasing complex utterances.
   This course is designed for professionals in the field of inter-           Prerequisite: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation
preter education who wish to upgrade their skills and                     program.
knowledge in relation to teaching interpretation. The course
includes a theoretical base for teaching, appropriate sequencing          ITP 724 Cognitive Processing Skills: English (2)
of skills in interpreter education programs, and an examination              This course provides an opportunity for students to develop
of student outcomes and how to evaluate them. Each participant            the cognitive skills that are preliminary steps for performing
will receive a set of instructional materials including videotapes        simultaneous interpretation. The cognitive and memory tasks
and an audiotape, all with scripts and suggestions for using them         presented in this course are designed to develop student’s ability
in teaching and testing. This course is not included in the major.        to segment information into appropriate units and to perform
                                                                          various cognitive tasks intralingually. Students will engage in
ITP 704 How to Teach Consecutive Interpreting (1)                         a variety of developmentally designed intralingual language
   This course introduces the theoretical and practical basis             exercises that introduce techniques of shadowing and decalage
for consecutive interpreting in practice and training. Teaching           within English. Other exercises include abstracting, prediction,
methods are demonstrated for teaching consecutive interpreta-             cloze, paraphrasing, and classification.
tion of monologues and dialogues. Issues related to grading and              Prerequisites: Completion of ITP 718 and ITP 719.
evaluation are discussed.                                                 Course Fee: $40
   Prerequisites: Interpretation skills required, teaching skills
preferred.
                                                                          ITP 725 Cognitive Processing Skills: American Sign
ITP 706 How to Teach Simultaneous Interpretation of                       Language (2)
Monologues (1)                                                               This course provides an opportunity for students to develop
   This course introduces the theoretical and practical basis for         the cognitive skills that are preliminary steps for performing
simultaneous interpreting in practice and training. Teaching              simultaneous interpretation. The cognitive and memory tasks
methods are demonstrated for teaching simultaneous interpreta-            presented in this course are designed to develop student’s ability
tion of monologues. Issues related to grading and evaluation are          to segment information into appropriate units and to perform
discussed.                                                                various cognitive tasks intralingually. Students will engage in
   Prerequisites: Interpretation skills required, teaching skills         a variety of developmentally designed intralingual language
preferred.                                                                exercises that introduce techniques of shadowing and decalage
                                                                          within ASL. Other exercises include abstracting, prediction,
ITP 714 Formal American Sign Language (3)                                 cloze, paraphrasing, and classification.
   An intensive advanced language course designed to increase                Prerequisites: Completion of ITP 718 and ITP 719.
student’s fluency in formal ASL. The course will involve one               Course Fee: $30
hour of lecture for the purpose of explaining and demonstrating
the tasks to be performed during the practice sessions and for            ITP 728 English Translation (2)
discussion of the conceptual and theoretical aspects of the tasks.          A course in which students translate small units of mono-logic
   Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Master of Arts in Interpre-         and dialogic discourse from ASL to English within extensively
tation program or permission of instructor.                               delayed time frames. Topics include: contrastive text analysis,
Course Fee: $40                                                           functional language equivalence, message restructuring, and
                                                                          judging appropriateness.
ITP 718 Building Translation Skills: English (2)                            Prerequisites: Completion of ITP 718 and ITP 719.
   A course of intralingual language exercises that introduces            Course Fee: $40
students to and provides practice in techniques of rephrasing
and restructuring utterances in forms that are most suitable for          ITP 729 American Sign Language Translation (2)
English as a target language. These exercises include rephrasing            A course in which students translate small units of monologic
for meaning, restructuring for linguistic structures, and                 and dialogic discourse from English to ASL within extensively
rephrasing complex utterances.                                            delayed time frames. Topics include: contrastive text analysis,
   Prerequisite: Acceptance into the M.A. in Interpretation               functional language equivalence, message restructuring, and
program.                                                                  judging appropriateness.
                                                                            Prerequisites: Completion of ITP 718 and ITP 719.
ITP 719 Building Translation Skills: American Sign                        Course Fee: $30
Language (2)
   A course of intralingual language exercises that introduces            ITP 732 Consecutive Interpretation (4)
students to and provides practice in techniques of rephrasing                A practice-oriented course in which students consecutively
and restructuring meaning in ASL. These exercises help students           interpret conversational discourse from ASL to English and
focus on meaning and on restructuring utterances in forms that            from English to ASL with delays of a few seconds after the
are most suitable for ASL as a target language. These exercises           source utterance is finished. Students are introduced to both
                                                                     90
                                                                                                                       Courses of Study


planned and unplanned conversational language samples such                ITP 747 ASL to English Simultaneous Interpretation II:
as telephone calls, social events, informal meetings, various             Monologues (2)
lengths, ranging from single utterances to discourse units of                This course is designed for students in the Master of
several minutes duration. In addition, students will spend two            Arts in Interpretation who have successfully completed all
hours a week observing certified interpreters. A total of 15 hours         required courses in the first year of the program and whohave
of observation are required, 30 suggested.                                passed the qualifying examination. It deals with simultaneous
   Prerequisites: ITP 728 and ITP 729.                                    interpretation from ASL to English in diverse settings and builds
Course Fee: $40                                                           on skills and knowledge presented in first-year courses in the
                                                                          program. Major topics include back-up interpreting, fed informa-
ITP 738 ASL to English Simultaneous Interpretation:                       tion, error recovery, relay interpreting, and aspects of medical,
Monologues (2)                                                            legal, and educational interpreting.
   A course in which students simultaneously interpret monologic             Prerequisites: ITP 738 and ITP 739.
talk from ASL to English with the target language production              Course Fee: $30
beginning before the conclusion of the source utterance and
continuing as the student listens to the continuing source                ITP 748 English to ASL Simultaneous Interpretation II:
utterance. Students are introduced to both planned and unplanned          Monologues (2)
texts, such as speeches, lectures, narratives, and media                     This course is designed for students in the Master of
productions.                                                              Arts in Interpretation who have successfully completed all
   Prerequisite: Completion of ITP 732.                                   required courses in the first year of the program and who have
                                                                          passed the qualifying examination. It deals with simultaneous
ITP 739 English to ASL Simultaneous Interpretation:                       interpretation from English to ASL in diverse settings and builds
Monologues (2)                                                            on skills and knowledge presented in first-year courses in the
   A course in which students simultaneously interpret monologic          program. Major topics include back-up interpreting, fed
talk from English to ASL with the target language production              information, error recovery, relay interpreting, and aspects of
beginning before the conclusion of the source utterance and con-          medical, legal, and educational interpreting.
tinuing as the student listens to the continuing source utterance.           Prerequisites: ITP 738 and ITP 739.
Students are introduced to both planned and unplanned texts,              Course Fee: $30
such as speeches, lectures, narratives, and media productions.
   Prerequisite: Completion of ITP 732.                                   ITP 751 Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation I (1)
                                                                             This advanced course focuses on simultaneous interpretation
ITP 740 Simultaneous Interpretation: Interactive (4)                      of monologues from English to ASL. It provides instruction and
   A course in which students interpret dialogues from ASL                practice in live settings and videotaped monologues up to 20
to English and from English to ASL with the target language               minutes in duration in order to build endurance and accuracy
production beginning before the conclusion of the source                  in interpretation. This course builds on skills and knowledge
utterance and continuing as the student listens to the continuing         presented in prerequisite courses in the interpretation program.
source utterance. Students are introduced to planned and                  Self-assessment of simultaneous interpreting skills will continue
unplanned dialogues such as telephone calls, social events,               to be developed. Topics will include: interpreting in a variety of
informal meetings, interviews, and non-technical conversations.           settings, including lectures, text preparation and task analysis,
   Prerequisite: Passing grade on the qualifying exam.                    back-up interpreting, and working with other interpreters.
Course Fee: $45                                                              Prerequisites: ITP 740, ITP 747, and ITP 748.

ITP 745 Interpreting English Signing: Dialogues                           ITP 752 Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation II (1)
and Monologues (4)                                                           This course is a sequel to ITP 751, Advanced Simultaneous
   A course in which students convert dialogues and monologues            Interpretation I, and focuses on simultaneous interpretation
from varieties of English signing to spoken English and                   of monologues from English to ASL. This advanced course
from spoken English to varieties of English signing with the              provides instruction and practice in live and videotaped settings
interpretation beginning before the conclusion of the original            of up to 30 minutes duration in order to build endurance and
utterance. Students are introduced to planned and unplanned               accuracy in interpretation. Monitoring and repair strategies will
dialogues such as telephone calls, social events, informal                be stressed. Self-assessment of interpreting skills will continue
meetings, interviews, and nontechnical conversations. In                  to be developed. Topics will include: interpreting in a variety of
addition, students are introduced to planned and unplanned                settings, including formal settings.
monologic events such as speeches, lectures, narratives, and                 Prerequisites: ITP 740, ITP 747, and ITP 748.
media productions.
   Prerequisite: Passing grade on the qualifying exam.                    ITP 775 Research Methods in Interpretation (3)
Course Fee: $75                                                              This course surveys both quantitative and qualitative research
                                                                          methods that have been successfully applied to the analysis
                                                                          of interpretation. The course emphasizes the development of
                                                                          research design and implementation skills through a variety of
                                                                     91
Courses of Study


activities including the critical analysis of research articles and        undertaken during the summer semester following completion of
the preparation ofa guided research project examining some                 all coursework and of the satisfactory completion of the written
aspects of interpretation. Students conduct a literature review,           and performance portions of the comprehensive exam.
gather data, perform analyses othe data, prepare a formal written             Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework, passing grade on
report, and present findings in ASL. Either replication studies or          comprehensive exams, and permission of department chair.
original work may be accepted and students will be required to
include abstracts, follow style guidelines, and prepare their final         ITP 795 Special Topics (1-3)
paper as they would a submission to a refereed journal.
   Prerequisites: LIN 705, ITP 714, ITP 738, and ITP 739.                  ITP 799 Independent Study (1-3)
Course Fee: $75                                                              This course provides an opportunity for students to design
                                                                           individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in
ITP 780 Practicum Seminar: The Interpreting                                regular classes.
Profession (3)                                                               Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
   A seminar in which interpreting students discuss factors that
will affect their professional lives. Topics in the first section
include: professional organizations, certification, contextual
factors, market analysis, time management, and business
management. The second section focuses on professional                                         Linguistics (LIN)
standards, including professional behavior, consumer attitudes
and language use, role and function of the interpreter, and ethical        Graduate Faculty:
codes. Upon successful completion of the mandatory qualifying                 Deborah Chen Pichler, Ph.D.; Paul G. Dudis, Ph.D.; Robert
exam given in the second semester, students will observe their             E. Johnson, Ph.D.; Scott K. Liddell, Ph.D. (Chair); Ceil Lucas,
mentors during the mentors’ interpreting assignments and meet              Ph.D. ; Susan Mather, Ph.D.; Christopher R. Miller, Ph.D.; Sarah
with the mentors for a discussion or feedback on the mentors’              Taub, Ph.D.
interpreting performances. The total number of required hours of
interpreting assignments observed and discussed to be accrued              About the Department:
as part of this course is 30.                                                 Gallaudet's Department of Linguistics offers the following
   Prerequisites: Passing grade on the qualifying exam,                    graduate degrees:
ITP 738, and ITP 739.                                                         1. M.A. in Linguistics
ITP 781 Practicum Seminar: Cultural Mediation (3)                             2. Ph.D. in Linguistics
   A comprehensive introduction to aspects of cultural mediation              The department is unique in that all students and faculty in the
as they relate to simultaneous interpretation. This course                 department share an abiding interest in the study of American
provides an overview of interpreting for consumers with                    Sign Language (ASL) and its use. The ongoing, innovative
specific communication needs and various cultural backgrounds.              research carried out by the linguistics faculty is contributing
Seminar topics include: interpreting for deaf-blind persons,               substantially to what is known about the structure and use of
foreign deaf persons, African Americans, and the elderly deaf              sign languages. ASL and other sign languages are not only the
population. Each of these poses particular linguistic adaptations          subject of faculty and student research, but ASL is also the
of which interpreters must be aware. Students also are required            language of communication in the classroom. Deaf graduate
to interpret a minimum of 30 hours. Fifteen of these hours                 students do not have to deal with the issue of finding competent
are supervised by a mentor, and 15 of the thirty hours are                 interpreters for classroom lectures, meetings with faculty
unsupervised. Students are encouraged to obtain up to 100 hours            members, and meetings with other students. Normal day-to-day
when possible. This course is a required course in the Master of           interaction with fellow graduate students happens easily in an
Arts in Interpretation (MAI) program.                                      environment where all students are skilled ASL signers.
   Prerequisites: Completion of ITP 740, ITP 747, ITP 748, and
ITP 780.                                                                   Graduate Special Students
                                                                              Non-degree graduate special students may take courses in
ITP 785 Internship (3-9)                                                   the linguistics program provided that they meet the course pre-
   The internship provides a valuable capstone experience                  requisites, have the necessary sign language skill, and have the
in an occupational setting related to the student’s specific                permission of the instructor. Completion of courses as a special
professional goals. The experience is designed to provide                  student does not guarantee later admission to a degree program.
students with the opportunity to synthesize practical and
academic experiences gained during the in-residence portion of             Master of Arts in Linguistics
the program. Students and instructors will agree upon a suitable              Students may seek an M.A. in linguistics either as their
site, supervision, and plan of activity before the semester begins.        terminal degree or as a step toward the Ph.D. It should be kept
Students must prepare a written account of their practicum                 in mind that to proceed from the M.A. to the Ph.D. program in
activities in a term paper that synthesizes the experience                 linguistics at Gallaudet, students must receive a "high pass" on
and keep a professional journal. The internship is ordinarily              their M.A. Comprehensive Examination.
                                                                      92
                                                                                                                        Courses of Study


    The M.A. program is appropriate for students seeking                    Qualifying Examinations
linguistic knowledge as a foundation for work in such allied                  All students must take qualifying examinations during the
professional fields as language teaching, interpreter education,             first year of coursework. Students who do not achieve a passing
language planning, bilingual education, and language                        score will be asked either to take remedial work and retake the
assessment. Graduates of this program are sought for positions              examination or withdraw from the program.
in interpreter training programs, faculty teaching posts at the
college level, or, given the appropriate educational background,            Comprehensive Examinations
as teachers of Deaf children.                                                  All students must pass a comprehensive examination designed
    Students pursuing the M.A. in linguistics at Gallaudet get a            to evaluate their grasp of the major principles and important
solid grounding in linguistic theory, method,and research with              content of the program of study. This examination is offered to
a special emphasis on sign language linguistics. The program                second-year students each spring semester.
includes core courses in linguistic theory (both generative
and cognitive), core courses in the structure of American Sign              Typical Program of Study (M.A.)
Language, courses in sociolinguistics, language and culture,
research methods, and two semesters of guided research under                                     Semester I - Fall
the supervision of a faculty member. In addition, students select             LIN 700 Proseminar (3)
three elective courses according to their interests. The M.A.                 LIN 701 Introduction to Phonological Theory (3)
program requires 47-51 credit hours of coursework. A full-time                LIN 707 The Structure of Language: English and ASL (4)
graduate student should complete the program in four semesters.               LIN 731 American Sign Language Phonology (3)
The program is designed to be completed during the fall and                   Sign Communication (2)
spring semesters, with no weekend or summer course offerings.
                                                                                               Semester II - Spring
Core Courses in Linguistics (M.A.)                                            LIN 702 Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3)
  LIN 700 Proseminar (3)                                                      LIN 721 Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (3)
  LIN 701 Introduction to Phonological Theory (3)                             LIN 732 American Sign Language Morphology (3)
 LIN 702 Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3)                                 LIN 750 Research Methods in Linguistics (3)
 LIN 707 The Structure of Language: English and ASL (4)                       Sign Communication (2)
 LIN 721 Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (3)
                                                                                                Semester III - Fall
Core Courses in Sign Language Linguistics (M.A.)                              LIN 733 ASL Syntax (3)
 LIN 731 American Sign Language Phonology (3)                                 LIN 771 Field Methods I (3)
 LIN 732 American Sign Language Morphology (3)                                Elective (3)
 LIN 733 American Sign Language Syntax (3)                                    Elective (3)
 LIN 741 Sociolinguistics of U.S. Deaf Community (3)                          Sign Communication (1)
 LIN 745 Languages and Cultures in Deaf Communities (3)
 LIN 750 Research Methods in Linguistics (3)                                                    Semester IV - Spring
 LIN 771 Field Methods I (3)                                                  LIN    741 Sociolinguistics of the U.S. Deaf
  LIN 772 Field Methods II (3)                                                             Community (3)
 Elective Courses in Linguistics (9)                                          LIN 745 Languages and Cultures in Deaf
 Sign Communication Courses                                                                Communities (3)
                                                                              LIN 772 Field Methods II (3)
Elective Courses in Linguistics                                               Elective (3)
  Students must complete at least 9 credit hours of elective
graduate courses in linguistics. Elective courses are chosen by
the student in consultation with the student’s advisor. Elective
                                                                            Ph.D. in Linguistics
                                                                               Gallaudet's Ph.D. program in linguistics, with a focus on
courses may be taken through the consortium and should focus
                                                                            sign language, opened its doors in the fall semester of 2002.
on aspects of linguistic theory or research related to the student’s
                                                                            Students may specialize in a range of theoretical and applied
professional goals.
                                                                            areas related to sign language, including but not limited
                                                                            to phonology, syntax, morphology, cognitive linguistics,
Sign Language Fluency                                                       sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language assessment,
  All applicants to the program must have sufficient skill and               first language acquisition, and second language acquisition.
experience in American Sign Language (ASL) to participate                   Successful students will receive an M.A. degree after two
fully in classroom discussions conducted in ASL. Applicants are             years of coursework, advance to candidacy to the Ph.D. after
requested to provide at least one letter of reference documenting           another three semesters of courses, and receive the Ph.D.
their signing skill and experience.                                         after completion of a dissertation. Required courses may be
                                                                            waived on a case-by-case basis for students with previous


                                                                       93
Courses of Study


work in linguistics. All courses taught by linguistics faculty are        papers will be the products of substantial data-based research
conducted in ASL.                                                         projects on topics of relevance to sign languages. The student
    The doctoral curriculum consists of a total of 76 credits of          will prepare a thorough review of the literature, collect and
coursework plus dissertation research. This means that those              analyze data, and report on the analysis. Successful completion
who have taken the 49 credits required by the M.A. curriculum             of these papers qualifies students to begin work on their disserta-
must complete another 27 credits of advanced linguistics cours-           tion proposal.
es. All students must complete the following advanced courses:
Advanced Topics in Phonology (LIN 801), Advanced Topics in                Dissertation
Syntax (LIN 802) or Cognitive Grammar (LIN 827), and Dis-                    Each student seeking a Ph.D. will be required to complete
sertation Proposal Development (LIN 890). An additional 24                a research-based dissertation in an area acceptable to his or
credits of elective courses must also be completed.                       her doctoral committee. The dissertation will be based on the
    Since the first two years of required coursework are the same          proposal accepted by the student's doctoral committee. Upon
for both the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, students are encouraged              completion of the dissertation, the student will defend it before
to enter the program at the beginning M.A. level. Students who            the doctoral committee. Most students should be ready for the
already have an M.A. in linguistics can apply directly for admis-         defense in the spring of the fifth year of study.
sion into the Ph.D. program, but will be required to take first
and second year courses that were not included in the previous            Core Courses in Linguistics (Ph.D. )
degree work. For those who have received an M.A. in language                LIN 701 Proseminar (3)
teaching from Gallaudet's American Sign Language and Deaf                   LIN 701 Introduction to Phonology and Morphology (3)
Studies Department, the entire second year of language teaching            LIN 702 Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3)
coursework will be applied toward the doctoral program, reduc-             LIN 707 The Structure of Language: English and ASL (4)
ing required coursework from five to three semesters. Students              LIN 721 Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (3)
who earned the M.A. from Gallaudet's linguistics program more               LIN 750 Research Methods (3)
than ten years before the date of application may be required to            LIN 801 Advanced Topics in Phonology (3)
retake the comprehensive examination and earn a score of "high              LIN 802 Advanced Topics in Syntax (3)
pass" prior to admission.                                                   LIN 827 Cognitive Grammar (3)

Elective Courses in Linguistics                                           Core Courses in Sign Language Linguistics (Ph.D.)
    Students must complete at least 27 credits of elective gradu-          LIN 731 American Sign Language Phonology (3)
ate courses in linguistics. Elective courses are chosen by the             LIN 732 American Sign Language Morphology (3)
student in consultation with the student’s advisor. Some courses           LIN 733 American Sign Language Syntax (3)
may be taken through the Consortium of Colleges and Univer-                LIN 741 Sociolinguistics of U.S. Deaf Community (3)
sities. Electives should focus on aspects of linguistic theory,            LIN 745 Languages and Cultures in Deaf Communities (3)
application, or research related to the student's professional or          LIN 771 Field Methods I (3)
academic goals.                                                            LIN 772 Field Methods II (3)

Qualifying Examination                                                    Core Courses in Statistics (Ph.D.)
   All students must take the qualifying examination in the                 EDF 801 Principles of Statistics I (3)
spring semester of the first year of coursework. Students must               EDF 802 Principles of Statistics II (3)
achieve a passing score in order to continue in the program. Part
time students may take the qualifying examination upon comple-            Typical Program of Study (Ph.D.)*
tion of the full sequence of courses ordinarily completed during
the first year of full time study.                                                                    Year I - Fall
                                                                            LIN    700    Proseminar (3)
Comprehensive Examination                                                   LIN    701    Introduction to Phonological Theory (3)
    All students must pass a comprehensive examination de-                  LIN    707    The Structure of Language: English and ASL (4)
signed to evaluate their grasp of the major principles and                  LIN    731    American Sign Language Phonology (3)
important content of the program of study. This examination
is administered in the spring semester of the second year of                                  Year I - Spring
coursework. Students enrolled in the terminal master's program              LIN 702 Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3)
must pass the comprehensive examination in order to receive the             LIN 721 Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (3)
M.A. degree. Those wishing to advance to Ph.D. candidacy must               LIN 732 American Sign Language Morphology (3)
achieve a "high pass."                                                      LIN 750 Research Methods in Linguistics (3)
                                                                          ______________
Qualifying Papers                                                         Note: Students who enter the Ph.D. program in linguistics with a Gal-
   During the second year of study, students seeking a Ph.D. will         laudet M.A. in Deaf Studies focusing on language teaching will be able
prepare the first of two qualifying papers. The second qualifying          to complete Ph.D. coursework in four semesters rather than six, since as
paper will be completed during the third year of study. These             many as 25 of their M.A. credits may be credited toward the Ph.D.

                                                                     94
                                                                                                                             Courses of Study



                    Year II - Fall                                             Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
  LIN 733 ASL Syntax (3)
  LIN 771 Field Methods I (3)                                                     Are additional application materials required?
  Elective (3)                                                                       Standardized Test         GRE
  Elective (3)                                                                       Scores
                                                                                     References                Three Letters
                      Year II - Spring                                               Reference Citing Sign     One of the 3 letters should
  LIN 741 Sociolinguistics of the U.S. Deaf                                          Language Skills           cite sign language skills
               Community (3)                                                     Resume                        No
  LIN 745 Languages and Cultures in Deaf                                         Writing Sample                No
               Communities (3)                                                   Videotape of Signing          No
  LIN 772 Field Methods II (3)                                                   and/or English
  Elective (3)
                                                                                  Are there additional application requirements?
                    Year III - Fall                                              On-Campus Interview           No
  LIN 802 Advanced Topics in Syntax (3) OR                                       Sign Language Evaluation      No
  LIN 827 Cognitive Grammar (3)                                                  English Evaluation            No
  Elective (3)                                                                       Culture and Language      Strongly recommended
  Elective (3)                                                                       Colloquium Required?
  Elective (3)
                                                                                  Are there additional background requirements?
                  Year III - Spring                                              Prior Master’s Degree         No
  LIN 801 Advanced Topics in Phonology (3)                                       Required Undergraduate        No
  Elective (3)                                                                   Major
  Elective (3)                                                                        Recommended              Language
  Elective (3)                                                                        Undergraduate Major      Math
                                                                                                               Science
                        Year IV - Fall                                           Prerequisite Coursework       No
  LIN    890 Dissertation Proposal Development (3)                               (Required)
               Year IV - Spring (and onward)                                     Standardized Testing          No
  LIN    900 Dissertation Research                                               Substitute for Prerequisite
                                                                                      Recommended Prior        Introduction to Linguistics
                                                                                      Coursework               Logic
Admission Requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D.                                                                  Foreign Language
                                                                                 Prior Professional            No
Programs in Linguistics                                                          Experience
                                                                                 Prior Certification            No
  Admission requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are the same.
                                                                                 Health Certification           No
                                                                                 Requirements
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                     Police or Other               No
University graduate program:                                                     Background Check

     Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence           Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
      of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited                  Last Date to Submit           February 15
      university. (Those applying during their final undergraduate year           Completed Application
      will be required to submit a final transcript after completion of           First Date for                No Set Date
      their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first                 Consideration of
      semester of graduate study.)                                               Application
      Official transcripts of all graduate study.                                 Summer Admission              No
      A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale)                  Possible?
      in all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occa                    Fall Admission Possible?      Yes
      sionally, applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be                      Winter Admission Possible?    No
      admitted conditionally upon the recommendation of the                      Part-time Study Possible?     Yes
      department.)                                                               Summers-Only Study            No
     An application fee of $50.                                                  Possible?
     A completed graduate school application form.                               Weekend and Evening           No
     Goals statement.                                                            Study Possible?
     TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
                                                                          95
Courses of Study



Courses Offered:                                                           tual mapping. The course concludes by examining subordination
                                                                           and specific types of ASL syntactic structures including relative
LIN 661 Brief Introduction to the Structure of                             clauses, conditional clauses, and related constructions.
American Sign Language (1)
  A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure               LIN 665 Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community (1)
and social uses of American Sign Language. The course will                    This course provides an overview of the major areas of
cover four major topics: 1) Phonology: The Study of the Raw                sociolinguistics and of current sociolinguistic thinking, with a
Materials of Signs, an examination of the structure of the                 focus on the Deaf community. It begins with an introduction to the
physical signals of ASL, the customary patterns for combining              field, followed by a look at bilingualism and language contact
them, and influences of signs on one another in connected                   phenomena, including lexical borrowing, code-switching,
discourse; 2) Morphology: Building and Storing Words,                      code-mixing, diglossa, pidgins, and creoles. Following this
the study of the basic meaningful units of ASL, including                  look at intralanguage phenomena, the focus turns to the internal
discussions of word creation, compounding, borrowing,                      and external constraints upon them. Discourse analysis is then
affixation, and numeral incorporation, and a discussion of the              examined, with a focus on language and social interaction and
use of space in ASL, including an examination of verbs with                the structure of conversations. Language attitudes are then
subject and object agreement and of spatial-locative verbs;                discussed, followed by a look at language policy and planning.
3) Syntax: Building Sentences and Longer Structures, an
examination of the word order of ASL sentences, non-manual                 LIN 695 Special Topics (1-3)
syntactic signals, and discourse structures; and 4) Sociolinguistic
Applications, a discussion of language variation and language              LIN 699 Independent Study (1-3)
contact in the Deaf community.                                               This course provides an opportunity for students to design
                                                                           individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in
LIN 662 Survey of American Sign Language                                   regular classes.
Phonology (1)                                                                Prerequisite: LIN 700 and Permission of the instructor.
   This course has four parts. Part one covers basic phonetic
notation and includes practice in the phonetic description of              LIN 700 Proseminar (3)
lexical signs of ASL. This will include an examination of hand                 In this course entering graduate students will be introduced
configurations, placements, orientations, nonmanual signals,                to the profession of linguistics: its history, subfields, and
and two-hand relationships. Part two deals with phonological               methodologies. Attention will also be given to the discipline's
processes, including movement epenthesis, hold deletion,                   major journals, conferences, and reference tools.
metathesis, assimilation, location neutralization, and weak
hand deletion. Part three examines phonotactic patterns within             LIN 701 Introduction to Phonological Theory (3)
the lexicon of ASL, focusing on permissable combinations of                  An introduction to the principles of linguistic study with con-
phonetic elements. Part four considers the nature of phonological          centrated focus on English phonology and phonological theory.
change and historical shifts in the structure of the lexicon.              Topics include: phonetics, phonemics, phonological processes,
                                                                           syllables and syllabification, distinctive features, phonological
LIN 663 Morphology of ASL Verbs (1)                                        rules, and an overview of current phonological theory.
    This course will focus on the use of space and the behavior
of verbs that use space in meaningful ways in American Sign                LIN 702 Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3)
Language. Major topics will include an examination of the                     A comprehensive introduction to the principles and study
signing space and the four functions of a locus, syntactic versus          of English syntax. Topics include: principles of syntactic
topographical space, mental representations of space, identity             argumentation; detailed examination of the major syntactic
shift, a detailed examination of indicating verbs, locative verbs,         structures of English; and the place of syntax in terms of the
classifier predicates (including discussions of imagery, verb               larger context of English grammar.
roots, categories of classifier handshapes, and types of represen-             Prerequisite: LIN 701.
tations), and aspectual inflections that operate by changing the
movement of verbs in space.                                                LIN 705 Introduction to Language and Communication (3)
                                                                              A comprehensive introduction to the science of language
LIN 664 Survey of American Sign Language Syntax (1)                        and communication. Topics include an introduction to levels
   This course begins by examining the various roles of non-               of language and language study, language variation, discourse
manual signals within ASL grammar and ASL discourse. This                  analysis, language in context, communication process models,
leads to the role of nonmanual signs in helping to determine               cross-cultural communication; language issues in social
the structure of ASL sentences. Next, the course examines the              stratification, and a brief introduction to the academic study of
order of constituents within ASL sentences, including topics and           translation and interpretation. In conjunction with the lectures,
topicalization, subject pronoun copy, deletion of subjects and             students will spend at least seven hours observing situations
objects, and the placement of tense markers. The next section of           where interpreting occurs.
the course focuses on the use of space in ASL discourse, verb                 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
classes based on how space is used, verb agreement, and concep-
                                                                      96
                                                                                                                        Courses of Study


LIN 707 The Structure of Language: English and                             LIN 745 Languages and Cultures in Deaf
American Sign Language (4)                                                 Communities (3)
   A comprehensive introduction to the linguistic structures of               This course explores the relationships between language and
English and American Sign Language. Topics include phonetics               culture from an anthropological and sociolinguistic point of
and phonemics; phonological processes; the identification,                  view. Students are introduced to participant observation and the
structure, and distribution of morphemes; principles of syntactic          ethnographic interview as research tools for understanding the
argumentation; detailed examination of the major syntactic                 interplay between language and culture in the Deaf community
structures of English and ASL; and the place of phonology,                 in which they participate.
morphology, and syntax in terms of the larger context of
grammar.                                                                   LIN 750 Research Methods in Linguistics (3)
                                                                              Guided fieldwork experience in ASL linguistics with
LIN 721 Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (3)                          emphasis on data gathering and analysis. Students select
   An introduction to the cognitivist approach to linguistics,             research topics within a specific domain of ASL established by
in which language and thought are taken to be grounded in basic            the instructor, conduct a literature review, gather data, perform
human experiences and to grow out of the nature of the physical            analyses of the data, and prepare a formal written report.
brain and body. Cognitive linguistics does not posit a separate               Prerequisite: LIN 732.
“language organ” in the brain, nor does it divide language into
autonomous syntactic, phonological, lexical, and semantic                  LIN 763 American Sign Language Structure for
modules; instead, it treats form and meaning as interrelated on all        Professionals in Deaf Education (3)
levels of structure. Topics include frame semantics, prototypes               A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure
and human categorization, metaphor, language and space,                    and social uses of American Sign Language. The course will
blended mental spaces, and cognitivist theories of syntax. The             cover four major topics: 1) Phonology, an examination of
course will include both foundational literature and applications          the structure of the physical signals of ASL, the customary
to sign linguistics.                                                       patterns for combining them, and the influence of signs on one
                                                                           another in connected discourse; 2) Morphology, the study of the
LIN 731 American Sign Language Phonology (3)                               basic meaningful units of ASL, including discussions of word
   A study of the phonological structure of signs in American              creation, compounding, borrowing, affixation, reduplication,
Sign Language. Part I presents a comparison of notation systems            temporal and distributional aspect, numeral incorporation, and a
for signs and provides extensive training in sign notation. Part           discussion of the use of space in ASL, including an examination
II deals with phonological contrast. Part III is concerned with            of verbs with subject and object agreement and of spatial-
the phonotactic properties of lexical signs. Part IV deals with            locative verbs; 3) Syntax, an examination of the word order of
phonological processes and historical change.                              ASL sentences, nonmanual syntactic signals, and discourse
    Prerequisite: LIN 701 or concurrent registration.                      structures; and 4) Sociolinguistic Applications, a discussion of
                                                                           language variation and language contact in the Deaf community
LIN 732 American Sign Language Morphology (3)                              and of language issues in deaf education in the United States.
   An in-depth examination of the internal morphological
structure of words. Examples are taken from a variety of                   LIN 771 Field Methods I (3)
languages of the world, but the primary focus is on ASL. Topics               This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence that pro-
include compounding, affixation and cliticization, reduplication,           vides students with experience in gathering and analyzing data
indexing, numeral incorporation, aspect marking, and verbs of              on sign languages other than ASL. The particular sign language
motion and location.                                                       selected varies from year to year depending on the availability
   Prerequisite: LIN 731.                                                  of native signers of foreign sign languages.
                                                                              Prerequisite: Completion of first-year linguistics courses.
LIN 733 American Sign Language Syntax (3)                                  Corequisite: LIN 733
   Elements of syntactic analysis with a major focus on ASL,
including hierarchical structure, parts of speech, word order,             LIN 772 Field Methods II (3)
topic constituents, the role of nonmanual signals, verb classes,              This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence that
complementation, relative clauses, and conditional clauses.                provides students with experience in gathering and analyzing
   Prerequisite: LIN 732.                                                  data on sign languages other than ASL. The particular sign
                                                                           language selected varies from year to year depending on the
LIN 741 Sociolinguistics of the U.S. Deaf Community (3)                    availability of native signers of foreign sign languages.
   An examination of the theories and principles of socio-                    Prerequisite: Completion of first-year linguistics courses.
linguistics with specific reference to sign language variation in           Corequisite: LIN 733
the context of the U.S. Deaf community. Topics include concepts
of sociolinguistics, sociolinguistic methodology, describing               LIN 781 Guided Research Project (3, 3)
language variation, social determinants of language variation,                An intensive research project conducted under the guidance
interactional determinants of language variation, language                 of a faculty member. The course is a continuing course, begun
attitudes, and language policy and planning.                               in the fall semester of the student’s last year of coursework
                                                                      97
Courses of Study


and continuing into the spring semester. The research, analysis,               LIN 824 Introduction to Mental Space Theory (3)
and writing require an amount of a student’s time equivalent                      A seminar focusing on mental space theory. Topics include
to a normal three-credit course in each of the two semesters.                  introductory concepts in cognitive grammar, mental space con-
Students are expected to develop an appropriate research plan,                 struction, cross-space mappings, metonymy, mental space blend-
to complete the human subjects review process, to analyze data,                ing, mental spaces as aspects of everyday cognition, and their
and to write a final paper of publishable quality.                              application to sign language classifiers and other constructions.
  Prerequisites: LIN 750 (or concurrent enrollment) and permission of             Prerequisite: LIN 721.
program coordinator.
                                                                               LIN 827 Cognitive Grammar (3)
LIN 795 Special Topics (3)                                                        Cognitive grammar is a non-generative approach to
                                                                               grammatical representation that integrates linguistic knowledge
LIN 799 Independent Study (1-3)                                                and more general aspects of cognition. This course provides an
  This course provides an opportunity for students to design                   introduction to the elements of cognitive grammar, including
individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in                semantic representation, linguistic symbols, and grammatical
regular classes.                                                               constructions.
  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                                     Prerequisites: LIN 702, LIN 733.

LIN 801 Advanced Topics in Phonology (3)                                       LIN 841 Discourse Analysis (3)
  An advanced seminar focusing on phonological theory.                            The focus of this course is a comparison among six dominant
Topics will vary depending upon current developments in                        approaches to the analysis of discourse: pragmatics, speech
phonological theory.                                                           act theory, ethnomethodology, interactional sociolinguistics,
   Prerequisite: LIN 701 and LIN 731.                                          ethnography of communication, and variation analysis, with a
                                                                               focus on sign language discourse.
LIN 802 Advanced Topics in Syntax (3)                                             Prerequisite: All required first and second year linguistics courses.
   An advanced seminar focusing on generative syntactic theory.
Topics will vary depending upon current developments in                        LIN 850 Historical Linguistics (3)
syntactic theory.                                                                This course focuses on language change. Topics include lan-
   Prerequisite: LIN 702 and LIN 733.                                          guage families, methods of reconstruction, phonological change,
                                                                               semantic change, grammaticalization, and related topics.
LIN 811 Language Acquisition by Children (3)                                      Prerequisite: LIN 701, LIN 702, LIN 707, LIN 721.
    This course critically reviews first language acquisition data
for both spoken and signed languages. The course includes a                    LIN 855 Language Typology (3)
critical evaluation of theoretical models attempting to account                   In this course we survey the range of variation among world
for how it is that children are able to acquire the languages                  languages, both spoken and signed. Topics include tense/aspect
they are exposed to. This course will provide a theoretical                    systems, modals, representations of spatial concepts, and word
foundation for those teaching children and students of cognitive               order, as well as a consideration of potential universals specific
development.                                                                   to sign languages.
   Prerequisites: Required master's level courses.                                Prerequisites: LIN 701, LIN 702, LIN 707.
LIN 812 Language Acquisition by Adults (3)                                     LIN 860 Language Variation (3)
   This course critically reviews the acquisition of language by                  An examination of analytical methods used in the study of
adults and the apparent disparity in language learning ability                 variation and change in language structure and use, with a focus
between children and adults. The course includes a critical                    on sign language variation. Practice in the exploratory analysis
evaluation of theoretical models of second language and second                 and interpretation of sociolinguistic and discourse data, and
language teaching methodologies. This course provides a                        introduction to quantitative tools, including the Varbrul program.
theoretical foundation for those teaching language to adults and                  Prerequisite: All required first and second year linguistics courses.
students of cognitive development.
   Prerequisite: All required first and second year linguistics courses.        LIN 890 Dissertation Proposal Development (3)
                                                                                  This graduate level seminar will be guided by a faculty
LIN 822 Brain and Language (3)                                                 member in order to assist students as they work through the pro-
    This seminar will review the literature on localization of lan-            cess of developing their dissertation proposal. It will also give
guage in the brain. The received model places linguistic ability               students the opportunity to learn from one another by describing
in the left hemisphere and spatial ability in the right hemisphere;            their progress as they develop their proposals.
this model will be critiqued in light of research on (highly                      Prerequisite: Completion of all required Ph.D. courses.
spatial) sign languages.
   Prerequisite: LIN 707.                                                      LIN 900 Dissertation Research (1-9)
                                                                                  Students may register for this course to conduct any aspect of
                                                                               their dissertation research.

                                                                          98
                                                                                                                             Courses of Study



          Physical Education (PED) and                                         Checklist of requirements specific to this program:

                Recreation (REC)                                                    Are additional application materials required?
                                                                                        Standardized Test Scores   GRE or MAT
                                                                                        References                 Three letters from educators,
Graduate Faculty:                                                                                                   employers or others who are
  Carol Cutler Riddick, Ph.D. (Coordinator); Gina Oliva, Ph.D.;                                                     able to evaluate applicant's
Anne Simonsen, Ph.D.                                                                                                ability to do graduate level work
                                                                                  Reference Citing
About the Department:                                                             Sign Language Skills              No
   In addition to its extensive undergraduate course offerings, the                     Resume                      Yes
Department of Physical Education and Recreation offers a Mas-                     Writing Sample                    No
ter of Science Degree in Leisure Services Administration.                               Videotape of Signing        Yes (Demonstrate signing skills
                                                                                        and/or English              by identifying and providing
Master of Science in Leisure                                                                                        details about your favorite
                                                                                                                    hobby)
Services Administration
    The M.S. in Leisure Services Administration is designed for                     Are there additional application requirements?
persons who aspire to administrative, supervisory, and leader-                         On-Campus Interview          Strongly encouraged
ship positions in the leisure services profession. The curriculum                      Sign Language Evaluation Yes (Must attain Intermediate
focuses on how to administer and supervise leisure services for                                                     or higher rating on the Sign
clientele who are deaf, hard of hearing, and/or hearing in either                                                   Communication Proficiency
inclusive or separate settings.                                                                                     Interview prior to the end of the
   This is an interdisciplinary program with coursework required                                                    first semester in the program)
in the Departments of Physical Education and Recreation,                                English Evaluation          Yes (Responses to questions
Administration and Supervision, and Educational Foundations                                                         in Graduate School's Applica
and Research. A student who graduates from the program will                                                         tion Booklet)
have earned an M.S. degree in Leisure Services Administration.                          Culture and Language        Strongly encouraged
Additionally, students admitted to this program are eligible to                         Colloquium Required?
pursue a graduate Certificate in Management (see Administration
and Supervision Course of Study offerings).                                         Are there additional background requirements?
   Faculty members affiliated with this program have varied                        Prior Master's Degree           No
practical experience backgrounds. The faculty is also nationally                  Required Undergraduate          No
and internationally recognized for their involvement in profes-                   Major
sional organizations as well as for their research and publica-                         Prerequisite              History and Philosophy
tions.                                                                                  Coursework                  of Parks and Recreation
                                                                                        (for non-recreation       Introduction to Therapeutic
                                                                                        undergraduates, deficiency   Recreation and Special
Admission Requirements for the M.S. Program in
                                                                                        coursework required)        Recreation
Leisure Services Administration                                                                                     Special Populations in
                                                                                                                     Therapeutic Recreation
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                                                        Leisure in Later Life
University graduate program:                                                                                        Leisure Education and
                                                                                                                     Facilitation Techniques
                                                                                  Standardized Testing              No
         Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
                                                                                  Substitute for Prerequisite
         evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
                                                                                         Recommended Prior          Yes (See prerequisite
         accredited university. (Those applying during their final
                                                                                         Coursework                 coursework above)
         undergraduate year will be required to submit a final trancript
         after completion of their bachelor's degree and before                          Prior Professional         Experience in leisure services
         enrolling in their first semester of graduate study.)                            Experience                 field and in interacting with
                                                                                                                    deaf or hard of hearing people
         Official transcripts of all graduate study.
                                                                                  Prior Certification                No
         A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in             Health Certification               No
         all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,            Requirements
         applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted                     Police or Other                   No
         conditionally upon the recommendation of the department.)                Background Check
         An application fee of $50.
         A completed graduate school application form.                           Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
         Goals statement.                                                        Last Date to Submit             No deadline, rolling
         TOEFL scores for all international applicants.                          Completed Application           admission
                                                                          99
Courses of Study


  First Date for Consideration       No set date                               professional paper will have two foci from which to
  of Application                                                               choose. First, over several semesters, the M.S. candidate
  Summer Admission Possible?         No                                        can elect to read and synthesize information on a topic of
  Fall Admission Possible?           Yes                                       interest to him/her using either one of three themes—an
  Winter Admission Possible?         Yes                                       integrative literature review, a theoretical literature
  Part-time Study Possible?          Yes                                       review, or a methodological literature review. Or the
  Summers-Only Study                 No                                        M.S. candidate can elect to design, implement and
  Possible?                                                                    evaluate a service project related to leisure services
  Weekend and Evening                Yes                                       administration (such as designing, conducting, and
  Study Possible?                                                              evaluating a workshop on “Personnel Performance
                                                                               Appraisal in a Recreation Organization”). The service
Transfer Credit Hours                                                          project approach must have the written endorsement of
   Approval may be sought for having up to three graduate                      at least a public or private recreation organization.
credits at a grade of B or higher, transferred from other universi-            Regardless of the approach chosen, the professional
ties, counted toward the graduate degree. A minimum, however,                  paper must demonstrate a high level of critical thought
of 27 credits toward the M.S. in Leisure Services Administration               and serve as evidence of the ability to draw together an
MUST be in residence at Gallaudet.                                             area of knowledge.
                                                                                  Students choosing the thesis approach undertake an
Program of Study                                                               original and empirical study. The purpose of the thesis
   The M.S. in Leisure Services Administration requires the                    is to promote knowledge regarding leisure (e.g., leisure
completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours that can be pursued                 attributes and/or impact of leisure activity on the health
on either a part-time or full-time basis. Candidates for the M.S.              of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing) or the
in Leisure Services Administration must complete the follow-                   administration of leisure service delivery for deaf and
                                                                               other populations.
ing requirements, earning a minimum grade average of 3.0 or
                                                                                  The student selects his/her own professional paper or
higher:                                                                        thesis committee. Each committee is composed of three
                                                                               members, each of whom possesses an earned doctorate.
  1. Major Recreation Core (9 credit hours):                                   The student selects one member as the chair. A
     REC 705 Leisure Research Methods (3)                                      minimum of two members of the committee must be
     REC 710 Programming Leisure Services for Deaf                             from the Department of Physical Education and
                and Other Populations (3)                                      Recreation, and at least one member must be from
     REC 720 Administrative Issues in Recreation                               outside the department and/or University.
                Programs for Deaf and Other                                       The permission of the chair of the committee is
                Populations (3)                                                necessary to schedule and announce a professional
  2. Related Courses (9 credit hours):                                         paper or thesis defense. This defense will only be
     ADM 711 Basics of Management (3)                                          scheduled when the the committee chair has reviewed
     ADM 796 Executive Communication Skills (3)                                all chapters of the professional paper or thesis, and all
     ADM 837 Interpersonal & Group Behavior in                                 changes of a substantive and/or an editorial nature have
                Organizations (3)                                              been incorporated into the document to the satisfaction
  3. Core Course (3 credit hours):                                             of the committee chair. The committee must receive the
     EDF 740 Introduction to Statistical Analysis (3)                          completed document a full 14 calendar days prior to the
                                                                               defense date. If participation in the public commence-
   4. Internship REC 780 (3 credit hours). Students must                       ment event during May is expected by the student, the
      design and participate in an internship experience that                  defense must occur no later than one calendar month
      provides them with the opportunity to demonstrate and                    prior to Study Day. Unless otherwise agreed to by all
      synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired in the                      members of the committee, members of the committee
      courses taken to fulfill degree requirements for an M.S. in               are under no obligation to participate in more than one
      Leisure Services Administration. Students cannot                         defense per week. Consequently, early scheduling of a
      undertake an internship until: (a) all credit hours (except              defense is strongly encouraged. Permission to proceed
      professional paper or thesis credits) for the degree have                with a scheduled defense ultimately rests with the
      been successfully completed; and, (b) the graduate faculty               committee chair and the dean of the Graduate School.
      in the Department of Physical Education and Recreation                6. Other Requirements for the M.S. Program. In addition to
      have evaluated and determined the student's "readiness" to               the curricular requirements for the program, each
      enroll in the internship. A student is expected to complete a            student must comply with the following requirements:
      minimum of 200 contact hours in an approved agency                       a. Before embarking on an internship, a candidate must
      during the semester enrolled for the internship credits.                     attain a rating of "Intermediate Plus" on the SCPI.
   5. Professional paper (REC 790) or thesis (REC 791)                         b. In the event a student makes a C or lower in ADM
      (minimum of 6 credit hours). Students pursuing a                             796 (Executive Communication Skills), he/she will be
                                                                      100
                                                                                                                       Courses of Study


         required to develop a written remedial plan for                  relate to the recreation and park profession serving the deaf
         improving his/her written communication skills. This             community. In an attempt to assist students in understanding the
         plan must be presented no later than the end of the              increasing diversity of the population of the United States and
         first week of classes the following semester to the               the world, this course will address administrative concerns and
         instructor of ADM 796 for his/her approval. Students             issues related to diversity (in terms of gender, age, race, ethnic
         may not be permitted to enroll for any other degree-             group, sexual orientation, and ability).
         related courses until they have demonstrated
         acceptable improvement in their written English                  REC 780 Graduate Internship in Leisure Services
         skills (as assessed by the graduate faculty in the               Administration (3)
         Department of Physical Education and Recreation                     The graduate internship is the culminating experience in the
         and the instructor of ADM 796). When this occurs,                Master of Science degree in Leisure Services Administration.
         the student will be reinstated into the M.S. Program             The experience should enable the student to bring together
         and may resume her/his degree-related coursework.                all aspects of the graduate program so that he/she can apply
      c. Abiding by rules stated in Gallaudet University’s                theories, knowledge, and skills learned in the classroom.
         Graduate School Catalog, all requirements for the
         Master’s degree must be met within five years from                REC 790 Guided Professional Paper (1-4)
         the date of matriculation in the program of study.                  This course will be taken by students desiring either:
                                                                          intensive in-depth study and synthesis of a topic related to some
                                                                          aspect of leisure service delivery; or involvement in an approved
Courses Offered:                                                          service project for a leisure service organization. Credit hours
                                                                          must be distributed over at least three semesters.
REC 705 Leisure Research Methods (3)
   Introduction to the process of leisure research. Topics                REC 791 Thesis (1-4)
reviewed include: ethical and political considerations of research,          This course will be taken by students involved with
paradigm adoption, topic choice, and methodology (research                research associated with a thesis option in the leisure services
designs, sampling, instrumentation, data collection approaches)           administration program. Research will be conducted under
used in leisure research. The class also emphasizes mastering the         the direction of a graduate faculty member and will entail
reading and understanding of leisure research articles. During            developing, designing, and implementing the research project;
this course, students will select and begin to develop a topic for a      as well as writing and making oral presentations of findings.
thesis or professional paper.                                             Credit hours must be distributed over at least three semesters.
REC 710 Programming Leisure Services for Deaf and                         REC 795 Special Topics (1-3)
Other Populations (3)                                                        Prerequisites: Sponsorship by a graduate member of the
   Introduction to a comprehensive leisure program planning and           department's faculty and approval by the department's graduate
benefits-driven process. The emphasis is on recreation program             coordinator.
planning for persons who are deaf/hard of hearing/late-deafened.
In an attempt to assist students in understanding the increasing          REC 799 Independent Study (1-4)
diversity of the population of the United States and the world,              This course provides for individually directed study on a topic
this course will address program planning concerns and issues             of special interest and preparation. End products and number of
related to diversity (in terms of language choice, mainstream             credit hours must be mutually agreed to by student and teacher
orientation, gender, age, race, ethnic group, sexual orientation,         prior to registration.
and ability).                                                                Prerequisites: Sponsorship by a graduate member of the
                                                                          department's faculty and approval by the department's graduate
REC 720 Administrative Issues in Recreation                               coordinator.
Programs for Deaf and Other Populations (3)
  Introduction to the major administrative, supervision and
management issues confronting leisure service organizations.
Administrative principles and practices will be discussed as they




                                                                    101
Courses of Study



College of Liberal Arts, Sciences,                                                 American Sign Language (ASL)
and Technologies                                                                      and Deaf Studies (DST)

Karen L. Kimmel, Ph.D., Dean                                              Graduate Faculty:
Hall Memorial Building, Room S-242                                          Ben Bahan, Ph.D.; H-Dirksen L. Bauman, Ph.D. (Director of
                                                                          M.A. program); MJ Bienvenu, Ph.D. (Chair); Flavia Fleischer,
   The College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and Technologies                M.A.; E. Lynn Jacobowitz, Ph.D.; Arlene Kelly, Ph.D.; Mike
(CLAST) offers most of the general studies curriculum at                  Kemp, Ed.D. (Chair); Carolyn McCaskill, M.A.
Gallaudet. These courses provide for all students, regardless of
their fields of specialization, a strong foundation of knowledge
concerning their physical, social, and intellectual environment.          About the Department:
Courses are designed to cultivate inquiry and critical thinking,             The Department of American Sign Language and Deaf
enhance communication, broaden knowledge of human                         Studies offers an M.A. degree that provides an interdisciplinary
experience, and foster an appreciation and understanding of a             approach to the field of Deaf Studies. Students engage Deaf
diverse world community.                                                  Studies through a critical exchange with related fields, including
   CLAST offers majors in diverse disciplines of the humanities,          cultural studies, anthropology, history, literature, critical theory,
physical sciences, and social sciences. Students select a major           linguistics, philosophy, critical pedagogy, and visual media
from a wide variety of fields and often supplement their studies           production. Students complete the core curriculum in their first
by taking courses offered at other universities through the               year of coursework, then select a specific area of concentration
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan                 for their second year. These areas include Cultural Studies, Sign
Area. Upon completion of general studies and major course                 Language Teaching, and Deaf History. This degree will prepare
work, graduates of CLAST programs are prepared to enter the               students for employment and future study in signed languages
job market or to pursue professional and graduate studies at              instruction, humanities, social sciences, advocacy, and post-
Gallaudet or other universities.                                          secondary education.
   Through a variety of faculty research projects and grants,
CLAST has strengthened the educational experiences of                     Cultural Studies Concentration
students. Financially supported student research projects,                   Students in this concentration gain a critical understanding
student co-op work experience and internships, equipment                  of the position of the Deaf World within the context of human
and instructional materials for science and computer labs,                cultures by using a variety of theoretical approaches to the
scholarships and opportunities for collaboration with faculty and         concepts of identity, ideology, resistance, and culture. Graduates
students at other institutions are some examples.                         of the Cultural Studies concentration will be prepared to
   Academic departments and programs housed in CLAST                      teach Deaf Studies at the post-secondary level, enter fields
include Art; Biology; Chemistry and Physics; Communication                of advocacy, and pursue further research and education in
Studies; Deaf Studies; English; Family and Consumer Studies;              anthropology, cultural studies, sociolinguistics, disability studies,
Foreign Languages and Literatures; Government and History;                and critical theory.
Mathematics and Computer Science; Philosophy and Religion;
Psychology; Social Work; Sociology; Television, Photography,              Sign Language Teaching Concentration
and Digital Media; and Theatre Arts.                                          This concentration is designed to prepare students for a
   Summer, Evening, and Weekend Programs coordinates a                    career in teaching sign languages. Students will be introduced
wide spectrum of on-campus courses and educational activities,            to the key theoretical and methodological issues involved in
including undergraduate and graduate courses, sign language               sign language instruction, including curriculum development,
courses, and special programs year-round.                                 assessment, and incorporating Deaf culture into the language
   CLAST also houses the Center for Academic Programs and                 curriculum. In addition, students will undertake an internship in
Student Services which provides such student-centered support             which students will teach a sign language course on their own,
services as English Works! and the Office for Students with                under the supervision of a mentor. The Sign Language Teaching
Disabilities.                                                             concentration may count toward a full year's worth of course-
   The following CLAST departments offer degrees or                       work in Gallaudet's Ph.D. in Linguistics program.
certificates on the graduate level:
American Sign Language and Deaf Studies:                                  Deaf History Concentration
• M.A. in Deaf Studies                                                       This concentration provides courses in history research
Government and History                                                    methods and content, emphasizing how techniques of social and
• Graduate Certificate in Deaf History                                     cultural history can be applied to the histories of deaf people
Psychology                                                                and communities in the United States and Europe. Graduates of
• Psy.S. in School Psychology                                             the Deaf History concentration will be prepared to teach Deaf
• Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                            Studies at the post-secondary level, work in human service and
Social Work                                                               archival related fields, and pursue further research and education
• M.S.W. in Social Work                                                   in history, anthropology, historical linguistics, and disability
                                                                    102
                                                                                                                       Courses of Study


studies. For a list of faculty in the Deaf History concentration,             Standardized Testing             No
see Graduate Faculty list under Government and History depart-                Substitute for Prerequisite
ment listing in this section of this catalog.                                 Recommended Prior                Introduction to Deaf Culture
                                                                              Coursework                       Introduction to ASL Structure
                                                                              Prior Professional               No
Admission Requirements for the M.A. Program in Deaf                           Experience
Studies                                                                       Prior Certification               No
                                                                              Health Certification              No
Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet                  Requirements
University graduate program:                                                  Police or Other                  No
                                                                              Background Check
     Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence
     of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited univer-         Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
     sity. (Those applying during their final undergraduate year will          Last Date to Submit             February 15
     be required to submit a final transcript after completion of their        Completed Application
     bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first semester of         First Date for                  November 15
         graduate study.)                                                     Consideration of
     Official transcripts of all graduate study.                               Application
     A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in all         Summer Admission                No
     previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,                Possible?
     applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-              Fall Admission Possible?        Yes
     tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)                     Winter Admission                No
                                                                              Possible?
     An application fee of $50.
                                                                              Part-time Study Possible?       Yes
     A completed graduate school application form.
                                                                              Summers-Only Study              No
     Goals statement.
                                                                              Possible?
     TOEFL scores for all international applicants.                           Weekend and Evening Study       No
                                                                              Possible?
Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
                                                                            Program of Study
   Are additional application materials required?
      Standardized Test               GRE or MAT                            Core Curriculum
      Scores                                                                  All students admitted to the program must complete the
      References                      Three Letters                         following core courses with grades of B or higher.
  Reference Citing
  Sign Language Skills                No
  Special Essay                       No
                                                                                                 Semester I (Fall)
  Resume                              No                                      DST 701 Deaf Cultural Studies (3)
  Writing Sample                      No                                      DST 705 Sign and the Philosophy of Language (3)
  Videotape of Signing                Yes                                     LIN 707 Structure of Language: English and ASL (3)
                                                                                      (See course description under Linguistics and
     Are there additional application requirements?                                   Interpretation)
  On-Campus Interview                 No                                      ASL 709 ASL Media Production (3)
  Sign Language Evaluation            Yes                                                      Semester II (Spring)
  English Evaluation                  No                                      DST 710 Literary Traditions in the Deaf Community (3)
      Culture and                     By recommendation                       DST 712 Enforcing Normalcy: Deaf and Disability
      Language Colloquium             of department
                                                                                      Studies (3)
      Required?
                                                                              DST 714 Critical Pedagogy (3)
   Are there additional background requirements?                              HIS 731 History of the American Deaf Community (3)
  Prior Master’s Degree               No                                              (See course description under Government and
  Required Undergraduate              No                                              History)
  Major
  Recommended                                                               Cultural Studies Concentration
  Undergraduate Major                 No                                                          Semester III (Fall)
  Prerequisite Coursework             No                                      DST 733 Identity and Theory in Deaf Studies (3)
       (Required)                                                             DST 735 Deaf Visual Culture: Art, Theory and
                                                                                         Resistance (3)
                                                                      103
Courses of Study


   DST 780 Cultural Studies Research Project I (3)                      ASL 709 ASL Media Production (3)
   Elective (3)                                                            This core course introduces students to the tools and
   SWK 715 Disability Policy: Implications for Deaf and Hard            skills necessary to produce a variety of moving visual media.
              of Hearing Populations (3) (See course                    First, this course covers the basics of planning and capturing
              description under Social Work) (Or ADM 810 in             moving images; second, it explores possibilities of assembling
              Semester IV)                                              rhetorically motivated images; and third, it explores a number of
                       Semester IV (Spring)                             media that will enable students to design effective instructional
   DST 750 Seminar in Deaf Cultural Studies (3)                         materials and produce works that expand the field of ASL and
   DST 780 Cultural Studies Research Project II (3)                     Deaf Studies. Ultimately, this course intends to teach students to
   ADM 810 Public Policy and Persons with Disabilities (3)              "write" in new media, to gain insight into rhetorical strategies,
                                                                        and to inquire into the relations between the grammar of manual
Sign Language Teaching Concentration                                    and cinematic languages.
                        Semester III (Fall)
   ASL 741 Methods of Second Language Teaching (3)                      ASL 741 Methods of Second Language Teaching (3)
   ASL 743 Curriculum Development for Second Language                       This course focuses on principled approaches to developing
              Instruction (3)                                           and implementing classroom methods and strategies for
   LIN 812 Language Learning by Adults (3) (See course                  language teaching. It also investigates linguistic, psychological,
              description under Linguistics and Interpretation)         and attitudinal factors that influence student-teacher interaction
   Elective (3)                                                         in the classroom. The course examines in detail the most
                       Semester IV (Spring)                             important teaching methodologies that have evolved over
   ASL 760 Assessing Second Language Skills (3)                         the past thirty years. Following a thorough analysis of each
   ASL 762 Seminar in Sign Language Teaching (3)                        methodology, in terms of its theoretical justification and
   ASL 790 Sign Language Teaching Internship (3)                        supporting empirical research, students will endeavor to teach
                                                                        and learn some aspects of a second language through the
Deaf History Concentration                                              implementation of each of the methodologies.
                    Semester III (Summer)
  HIS 703 Topics in European Deaf History (3) (See course               ASL 743 Curriculum Development for Second
            description under Government and History)                   Language Instruction (3)
  HIS 732 Mass Media and the Deaf Community (3) (See                       This course examines the philosophical and historical
            course description under Government and                     foundations of curriculum. It also outlines curriculum decisions
            History)                                                    confronting educators, starting with the consideration of
                                                                        significant human needs and ending with the implementation of
               Semester IV (Fall or Spring or both)                     curriculum innovation in the classroom. The conceptual bases
   HIS 799 Independent Study (See course description under              for the principles and procedures are described to provide a
              Government and History)                                   clear, step-by-step guide for curriculum practitioners, whether
   Electives from Cultural Studies Concentration (Pick two              they are designing curricula for individual sign language classes
              from the following three courses)                         or for entire educational programs. Reading and analysis of ASL
   DST 733 Identity and Theory in Deaf Studies (3)                      curricula will also be featured in this course.
   DST 735 Deaf Visual Culture: Art, Theory, and
               Resistance (3)                                           ASL 760 Assessing Second Language Skills (3)
   DST 750 Seminar in Deaf Cultural Studies (3)                            This course examines factors involved in developing and
                                                                        administering an assessment of sign language students' linguistic
                      Semester IV (Summer)                              proficiency and socio-cultural competence. Topics include
   HIS 735     History of Disability in America (3) (See course         the role and function of assessment, assessment practicality,
               description under Government and History)                validity and reliability, current approaches to assessing language
   HIS 734     Deaf People in Hitler's Europe (3) (See course           learning, and an analysis of current tools for testing sign
               description under Government and History)                language skills and knowledge.

                                                                        ASL 762 Seminar in Sign Language Teaching (3)
Courses Offered:                                                            This course explores current issues related to pedagogy of
                                                                        sign language instruction. The first part of the seminar is devoted
ASL 695      Special Topics (1-3)                                       to incorporating culture into the language classroom. The second
                                                                        part is devoted to current research/studies on the language of
ASL 699 Independent Study (1-3)                                         instruction. Students are assigned to look into issues and bring
   This course provides an opportunity for students to design           their findings to class for class discussion. The third part is open
individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in         for discussion of current studies on second language teaching.
regular classes.
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
                                                                  104
                                                                                                                             Courses of Study


ASL 790 Sign Language Teaching Internship (3)                                  of Michel Foucault and emerging perspectives in Disability
   During internship, each student is asked to teach a sign                    Studies, this course inquires into the institutions that enforce
language class. Each student is required to meet with her/his                  normalcy through the disciplining of the body. In addition,
supervisor (faculty from the department) on a weekly basis to                  students explore the complex relationship between Deaf and
discuss upcoming classes for the week. The supervisor observes                 disability rights groups, as well as examine how Deaf and
the classes that students teach at least three times. At the end of            disabled persons resist the coercion to be "normal" through art,
the semester, the student hands in her/his course work, which                  film, literature, and personal narrative. This course is part of the
includes lesson plans, sample quizzes and tests, and self-analysis             core curriculum.
of her/his work.
                                                                               DST 714 Critical Pedagogy (3)
ASL 795     Special Topics (1-3)                                                  This core course focuses on the field of inquiry known as
                                                                               Critical Pedagogy, which examines the role education plays in
ASL 799 Independent Study (1-3)                                                shaping and transmitting the ideology of those in power. This
   This course provides an opportunity for students to design                  course also inquires into the use of education as a means of
individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in                resistance and emancipation. Particular attention will be given to
regular classes.                                                               the disparate conditions relating to the education of populations
   Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.                                     considered to be in the margins, i.e., class, race, ethnicity,
                                                                               gender, and disability. (Cross-listed as EDF714).
DST 701 Deaf Cultural Studies (3)
   This course explores the Deaf World through various                         DST 733 Identity and Theory in Deaf Studies (3)
theoretical lenses provided by the multidisciplinary field of                      This course explores the various issues and complexities
Cultural Studies. Students are asked to inquire into the varieties,            inherent in d/Deaf identity constructions. By drawing on
complexities, and commonalities of Deaf cultural experiences                   contemporary theoretical practices, including Marxism, post-
through rigorous questioning of fundamental issues pertaining                  colonialism, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism, queer
to cultural practices, ideology, power, identity, and heritage. The            theory, and phenomenology, students are encouraged to engage
course is a cornerstone in the Deaf Studies M.A. core curriculum               in a critical exchange between Deaf Studies and these theoretical
and provides the theory and content that subsequent courses                    approaches. This is a Cultural Studies concentration course.
build upon.
                                                                               DST 735 Deaf Visual Culture: Art, Theory and
DST 705 Sign and the Philosophy of Language (3)                                Resistance (3)
   This core course examines the role manual languages and                         This Cultural Studies concentration course investigates
deafness have played in the evolution of philosophical ideas                   the role of vision, visual practices, and visual art in the Deaf
concerning human identity, language, and the senses. Rather than               Community. By drawing on theoretical approaches in the
being marginal areas of concern, deafness and manual languages                 emerging field of Visual Culture, this course explores theories
have played an important role in the history of ideas and the                  of visual perception, the politics of representation by self and
philosophy of language. This course explores how hearing and                   Other, and the cultural practices of architecture, museums,
Deaf thinkers, artists, and writers have viewed manual languages               memorials, film, video, sign literature, and resistance art.
and deafness throughout history, with special emphasis on 17th                 Through discussions, projects, and presentations, students gain
century England, 18th and 19th century France, and 20th century                and articulate a critical understanding of the role of vision and
linguistic and literary theory. The course provides historical and             art in staking out a Deaf space within a phono-centric world.
intellectual background for understanding how deafness, manual
languages, and deaf education have been constructed and how                    DST 750 Seminar in Deaf Cultural Studies (3)
21st century views of education, language, and identity are in-                   This course provides the opportunity to explore a variety of
formed by the evolution of philosophical perspectives.                         topics of concern to Deaf Cultural Studies. Topics will be chosen
                                                                               for their contemporary relevance to the field. This course is
DST 710 Literary Traditions in the Deaf Community (3)                          required for Cultural Studies Concentration students.
    This core course is designed as a thorough exploration of
the literary traditions in the Deaf community. Attention is given              DST 780 Cultural Studies Research Project I and II (6)
to the unique face-to-face nature of signed literature and its                    A comprehensive Cultural Studies research project conducted
numerous traditional forms. Students become versed in the                      under the guidance of a faculty member. This two-semester
stylistics, poetics, and cultural contexts of signed literature in its         course is required for those in the Cultural Studies concentration
live as well as video-text formats.                                            of the M.A. degree in Deaf Studies. The project, research,
                                                                               analysis, and writing require an amount of time equivalent to
DST 712 Enforcing Normalcy: Deaf and                                           three credit hours in each of the two semesters. Students are
Disability Studies (3)                                                         expected to develop an appropriate project plan, complete a
   Students explore the historical construct of the categories                 human subjects review process (when applicable), conduct a
"normalcy," "disability," and "deafness." Building on the writings             study, analyze data, and submit a written summary of the project
                                                                               of publishable quality.
                                                                         105
Courses of Study



                      Biology (BIO)                                         Government (GOV) and History (HIS)

Ann Powell, Ph.D., Chair                                               Graduate Faculty:
Hall Memorial Building, Room E-300                                       Barry H. Bergen, Ph.D.; Susan Burch, Ph.D.; Donna F. Ryan,
                                                                       Ph.D. (Director of Graduate Certificate Program in Deaf His-
                                                                       tory); John S. Schuchman, Ph.D.; John V. Van Cleve, Ph.D.
Courses Offered:
                                                                       About the Department:
BIO 711 Human Genetics (3)                                               The Department of Government and History houses two dis-
   An in-depth examination of the mechanisms involved in pro-          ciplines and two undergraduate majors: government and history.
ducing genetic variation in humans and medical/clinical aspects        On the graduate level, it began offering a Graduate Certificate
of genetic variation and disease. Topics include human cytoge-         Program in Deaf History in the summer of 2000.
netics and chromosomal disorders, nontraditional inheritance,
genetic counseling, and the ethical, legal, and social impact of
genetics technology. Hereditary variations in deaf people are also     Graduate Certificate Program in
discussed.                                                             Deaf History
                                                                         The Graduate Certificate Program in Deaf History is a
                                                                       graduate education program in the new field of deaf history. It
                     English (ENG)                                     provides graduate level courses in historical research methods
                                                                       and content, emphasizing how techniques of social and cultural
David Pancost, Ph.D., Chair                                            history can be applied to the history of deaf people and com-
Hall Memorial Building, Room W-212                                     munities in the United States and Europe. Professionals who
                                                                       learn about the history of deaf people will bring new insights
                                                                       and scholarship to their teaching, sign language interpreting,
Courses Offered:                                                       research, writing, counseling, and social work.
ENG 670 Comparative Poetics: ASL and English (3)
   A course in comparative poetics using poems in ASL and              Admission Requirements for the Graduate Certificate
English. ASL poems on videotape are analyzed for their poetic          Program in Deaf History
devices and elements. ASL poetry and English poetry are com-
pared. Guest lecturers demonstrate related forms of expression,        Checklist of requirements for application specific to this
such as “signlore,” signing for the stage, and nonverbal commu-        graduate certificate program:
nication.
   Prerequisites: Ability to understand ASL, though not necessar-             Transcripts (official or unofficial) of all undergraduate study,
ily to produce it; English 204 or its equivalent.                             including evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from
                                                                              an accredited university.
ENG 721, 722, 761 The Literary Experience I, II, III (3)                      A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
 Studies in the nature of literature through examples.                        all previous undergraduate study. (Occasionally, applicants with
                                                                              a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted conditionally upon the
ENG 771 Rhetoric (3)                                                          recommendation of the department.)
   The art of using language with effect; emphasis on the                     An application fee of $50 (not required of Gallaudet employees).
principles with some attention to their use in teaching                       A completed graduate certificate application form.
composition. Models of great writing in such forms as the essay
are studied extensively.
                                                                            Are additional application materials required?
                                                                           Standardized Test Scores        No
ENG 788 Seminar in English (4)
                                                                           References                      No
   Opportunity to select a topic for individual study and research
                                                                           Reference Citing Sign           No
and, in weekly meetings, to discuss common prob-lems and share             Language Skills
results. Tutorial sessions in addition to the weekly meetings.             Special Essay                   No
                                                                           Resume                          No
ENG 799 Independent Study (1-3)                                            Writing Sample                  No
 Prerequisite: An independent study form.                                  Videotape of Signing            No
                                                                           and/or English

                                                                            Are there additional application requirements?
                                                                           On-Campus Interview             No
                                                                           Sign Language Evaluation        No

                                                                     106
                                                                                                                    Courses of Study


  English Evaluation            No                                    Courses Offered:
  Culture and Language
  Colloquium Required?          No                                    HIS 731 History of the American Deaf Community (3)
                                                                        This course introduces students to the history of the American
   Are there additional background requirements?                      Deaf community. While recent studies in social history have
  Prior Master’s Degree         No                                    challenged our notions of race, class, and gender, historians
  Required Undergraduate                                              have not yet fully addressed a fundamental underlying concept
  Major                         No                                    of normality. A close study of Deaf history offers one approach
  Recommended                                                         to this issue, and students in this course confront some of the
  Undergraduate Major           No                                    specific issues facing this minority group. Particular attention is
  Prerequisite Coursework                                             paid to the ways in which deafness has been interpreted within
  (Required)                    No                                    the mainstream community, as well as how Deaf people have
  Standardized Testing                                                expressed and preserved their cultural identity. By studying
  Substitute for Prerequisite   No                                    the changes in this group and its relation to hearing society, this
      Recommended Prior         Sign Language (or experience          course also raises broader issues of cultural identity in the U.S.
      Coursework                using sign language)
  Prior Professional                                                  HIS 732 History of Mass Media and the Deaf
  Experience                    No                                    Community (3)
  Prior Certification            No                                      This course is an historical survey of the mass media (print,
  Health Certification                                                 film, and television) as sources and interpreters of deafness
  Requirements                  No
                                                                      and Deaf people within the context of U.S. social and cultural
  Police or Other                                                     history. This class also will examine historical changes in the
  Background Check              No
                                                                      products of mass media within the deaf community and offer
                                                                      ways of critiquing media sources.
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling
  Last Date to Submit                                                 HIS 733 Topics in European Deaf History (3)
  Completed Application         April 18
                                                                        This course covers a variety of important topics in the his-
  First Date for                                                      tory of the Deaf in Europe from the Eighteenth Century to the
  Consideration of              No Set Date
                                                                      present, addressing significant events, movements, issues, and
  Application
                                                                      perspectives on deafness in Great Britain, France, Germany,
  Summer Admission              Yes
                                                                      Russia, and Italy. Topics may vary each time the course is
  Possible?
                                                                      taught, based on emerging scholarship and its availability in
  Fall Admission Possible?      No
                                                                      English translation. Specific topics may include the medieval
  Winter Admission Possible?    No
                                                                      origins of modern cultural assumptions; changing attitudes and
  Part-time Study Possible?     Yes
                                                                      ideas about sign language in the Enlightenment; Abbé de l'Epée
  Summers-Only Study
  Possible?                     Yes
                                                                      and other early educators of the Deaf; the Congress of Milan; the
  Weekend and Evening
                                                                      Braidwoods; Eugenics and Deafness; the evolution of education
  Study Possible?               No
                                                                      for the Deaf in Europe; Deaf People in Hitler's Europe; Modern
                                                                      Deaf Liberation Movements, etc.
Program Curriculum                                                    HIS 734 Deaf People in Hitler's Europe (3)
   The fifteen credits required to complete the program will             This course covers a series of important topics in the history
allow students to develop skills and awareness regarding the          of Deaf people in Europe under Hitler's control, examining the
present state of knowledge and research in Deaf history.              fate of deaf people in Germany and deaf Jews all over occupied
                                                                      Europe. Examples are drawn from Germany, Hungary, Poland,
Required Courses for Certificate                                       and Czechoslovakia.
  History of the American Deaf Community (3)
  One U.S. history course from the following electives (3)            HIS 735 The History of Disability in the United
  One European history course from the following electives(3)         States (3)
  Two additional electives (6)                                           This course addresses the meaning of disability in America in
                                                                      the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This is a cultural study
Electives                                                             of disability, and confronts the social construction of disability,
  History of Mass Media and the Deaf Community (3)                    its representation and changing meaning in society. By chal-
  Deaf People in Hitler's Europe (3)                                  lenging common social assumptions, and expanding social his-
  Topics in European Deaf History (3)                                 torical studies of marginalized groups, this course also refocuses
  History of Disability in the U.S. (3)                               the study of such major themes in history as nativism, the role of
  Special Topics in Deaf History (3)                                  media, community histories, eugenics, gender roles, the idea of
  Independent Study (3)                                               progress, and the perception of normalcy.
                                                                107
Courses of Study


HIS 795 Special Topics in Deaf History (3)                                  planning. The faculty is committed to developing competent
                                                                            school psychologists who serve diverse students, including
HIS 799 Independent Study (3)                                               specialization in the area of deafness. The program has a solid
  This course provides an opportunity for students to design                core of academic and applied courses supplemented by
individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in             extensive practica and a one-year internship.
regular classes.                                                               The core curriculum consists of credit hour requirements in
  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                               the following eight core competency areas:

                                                                            1. Knowledge of human development (e.g., cognitive, intel-
                                                                            lectual, adaptive, emotional, social, behavioral, language, and
                                                                            perceptual-motor areas), academic mastery, educational curricu-
                                                                            lum, and learning environments.
                   Psychology (PSY)                                         2. Knowledge of varied models and methods of service
                                                                            delivery, including assessment, consultation, intervention,
Graduate Faculty:                                                           outcome evaluation, and family systems models, incorporating
  Lynne Blennerhassett, Ed.D. (Director of School Psychol-                  information technology and empirically based professional
ogy); Patrick J. Brice, Ph.D. (Director of Clinical Psychology);            service.
Carolyn Corbett, Ph.D.; Virginia Gutman, Ph.D. (Chair) ; Irene              3. Knowledge of school psychology history and professional
Leigh, Ph.D.; Asiah Mason, Ph.D.; Bryan Miller, Ph.D.; Donna                issues, administrative and supervisory procedures related to
Morere, Ph.D.; Tania Thomas-Presswood, Ph.D.; Mary Weiner,                  school psychology and school systems, family systems, and le-
Ph.D.                                                                       gal and ethical standards guiding service delivery at individual,
                                                                            group, family, school, and system levels.
About the Department:                                                       4. Assessment, evaluation, and interpretation of human develop-
   Psychology is a scientific field concerned primarily with                  ment and learning domains (e.g., cognitive, intellectual, adap-
human behavior and related sensory, motor, cognitive, and                   tive, emotional, social, behavioral, language, perceptual-motor,
physiological processes. The Department of Psychology at Gal-               and academic mastery) within a collaborative, data-based frame,
laudet University has existed for more than 40 years, originally            respecting diversity of student strengths, needs, learning styles,
teaching aspects of this field to undergraduate students. In 1978,           and cultures.
a graduate program in school psychology was established to                  5. Use of behavioral and observational strategies in individual
train psychologists interested in working in educational settings           diagnosis linked to developing effective instruction and en-
with deaf and hard of hearing stu-dents (as well as with hearing            hancement of individual growth and development.
students). In 1990, a doctoral program in clinical psychology               6. Use of systematic therapeutic approaches (e.g., behavior
began to train graduate students in clinical and research skills            management, FBA, consultation, counseling, conferencing) to
applicable to hearing and deaf populations, but with a focus on             address identified needs at the individual, group, family, and
deaf and hard of hearing individuals.                                       system levels.
   The department offers graduate degrees in school psychology              7. Function as the resource specialist in the school attuned to,
and clinical psychology. The clinical psychology program offers             and skilled in, achieving mental health goals, prevention ser-
a doctoral degree (Ph.D.), which includes a master’s degree                 vices, home-school collaboration, crisis intervention, and crisis
(M.A.), while the school psychology program offers a specialist             intervention teamwork.
degree (Psy.S.) in school psychology, which includes a master’s             8. Design, implement, and evaluate in-service, staff develop-
degree (M.A.) in developmental psychology.                                  ment, parent education, and system level programs.
   In 2003-2004 35 students were enrolled as undergraduate
psychology majors, 19 as school psychology graduate students,                  The additional program objective of training students with an
and 32 as clinical psychology doctoral students. The depart-                expertise in deafness is framed within the following five special
ment currently has 16 full-time faculty plus several adjunct and            competency areas.
part-time faculty members. Faculty are active in graduate and
undergraduate teaching, research, and various professional and              1. Communication and meeting the communication needs of all
service activities. Students and faculty often engage in collabora-         individuals whom one serves, which includes the development
tive research efforts with other academic departments and with              of American Sign Language (ASL) skill, as well as the ability
the Gallaudet Research Institute.                                           to assess one's communication skills and adapt communication
                                                                            modalities to meet the specific needs of each child (ASL, manu-
                                                                            ally coded English, oral/aural approaches, etc.).
Specialist Program in School Psychology                                     2. Knowledge of deafness issues, including research, technolog-
   The Department of Psychology offers a specialist degree pro-             ical innovations, deaf culture, diversity within the Deaf commu-
gram in school psychology (Psy.S.) with specialization in deaf-             nity, and resources for families and the professional.
ness. The program provides a comprehensive plan of studies that             3. Psychoeducational considerations for children who are Deaf
integrates basic psychology, practitioner skills, and educational           or hard of hearing, including modifications needed in use of

                                                                      108
                                                                                                                          Courses of Study


standardized test instruments, interpretation of results,                 Admission Requirements for the M.A. and Psy.S.
socialization issues, family issues, and the impact of additional         Program in School Psychology
disabilities.
4. Specialized psychological assessment and observational                 Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
strategies for students who are Deaf or hard of hearing across            University graduate program:
diverse cultural, economic, linguistic, and personal-developmen-
tal domains.
                                                                               Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including evidence
5. Knowledge of educational intervention techniques and
                                                                                of having received a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
curriculum adaptations for students who are Deaf or hard of
                                                                                university. (Those applying during their final undergraduate
hearing.
                                                                                year will be required to submit a final transcript after completion
                                                                                of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling in their first
   Supervised practicum and internship experiences are
                                                                                semester of graduate study.)
available at school and educational programs for deaf, hard of
                                                                                Official transcripts of all graduate study.
hearing, and hearing children in the metropolitan Washington
area and across the United States. A background check is                        A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
frequently a requirement of practicum and internship sites                      all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
and will be the financial responsibility of the student before                   applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
placement is made.                                                              tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
    The graduate program in school psychology requires the                     An application fee of $50.
completion of 72 graduate hours as well as practicum and                       A completed graduate school application form.
internship experiences. The program generally takes three years:               Goals statement.
two years of course study (including practicum experiences)                    TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
and a one-year internship. The first year of the program includes
a 30-credit sequence of courses in psychology and related                 Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
areas, demonstration of sign communication competency, and
successful completion of comprehensive examinations in three                  Are additional application materials required?
areas (language, cognition, and behavior disorders). Successful                 Standardized Test            GRE
completion of these requirements results in a master of arts                    Scores
degree in developmental psychology. The master's degree is                      References                   Three Letters
usually awarded at the end of the first year of study.                       Reference Citing Sign            No
    The second year includes an additional 30-credit sequence of            Language Skills
courses emphasizing school psychological services, successful               Resume                           No
completion of a comprehensive examination in the area of                    Writing Sample                   No
psychoeducational assessment, and an extensive practicum                    Videotape of Signing             No
experience. The third program year is a full-time school                    and/or English
psychology internship placement (12 credits), which may be
served in a school or school/clinical setting anywhere in the
United States. Upon successful completion of the internship year             Are there additional application requirements?
the specialist degree in school psychology is awarded.                      On-Campus Interview              No
   The school psychology program is fully accredited by                     Sign Language Evaluation         No
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education                 English Evaluation               No
(NCATE) and approved by the National Association of School                      Culture and Language         Sometimes
Psychologists (NASP); therefore, graduates of the Gallaudet                 Colloquium Required?
program may receive certification as school psychologists in
the many states that recognize NCATE/NASP certification                       Are there additional background requirements?
of training programs. The completion of the specified school                 Prior Master’s Degree            No
psychology program satisfies the requirements for school                         Required Undergraduate       Psychology Major or Minor
psychology certification in the District of Columbia Public                      Major                        or Related Field
Schools.                                                                    Recommended                      No
                                                                            Undergraduate Major
                                                                                Prerequisite                 Statistics
                                                                                Coursework                   Child Development
                                                                                (Required)                   Abnormal Psychology
                                                                            Standardized Testing             No
                                                                            Substitute for Prerequisite
                                                                            Recommended Prior                No
                                                                            Coursework


                                                                    109
Courses of Study



   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                       Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology
       Last Date to Submit      February 1                               The Department of Psychology offers a doctorate (Ph.D.) in
  Completed Application                                               clinical psychology, with specialization in working with deaf
  First Date for                No Set Date                           and hard of hearing populations. The program has a life-span
  Consideration of                                                    development philosophy and offers courses and opportunities
  Application                                                         for supervised practice with deaf children, adults, and older
  Summer Admission              No                                    people, with both early- and late-onset hearing loss. Students
  Possible?                                                           also develop general clinical skills through work with hearing
  Fall Admission Possible?      Yes                                   populations.
  Winter Admission Possible?    No                                       The clinical program trains psychologists in both clinical and
  Part-time Study Possible?     Yes                                   research skills. It prepares them to contribute to the field both by
  Summers-Only Study            No                                    providing clinical services to deaf and hard of hearing individu-
  Possible?                                                           als and by expanding the knowledge base in areas of psychology
  Weekend and Evening           No                                    important for working effectively with these populations. The
  Study Possible?                                                     doctoral program typically requires a minimum of five years for
                                                                      completion, one year of which is a full-time clinical internship.
Core Courses                                                          Students may apply to be awarded an M.A. in Psychology after
   Courses that must be taken at Gallaudet in the school              completion of their predissertation research project and the com-
psychology program:                                                   prehensive examination. This is usually awarded after the third
                                                                      year of study and is not a terminal degree.
  PSY 701 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in                     Students complete approximately 100 hours of academic
            School Psychology (3)                                     credit, including the following areas: biological bases of
  PSY 743 Assessment I (3)                                            behavior, social bases of behavior, cognitive and affective
  PSY 746 Assessment II (3)                                           bases of behavior, human development, research and analytic
  PSY 765 Assessment III (3)                                          methods, ethics, psychological assessment, and psychological
  PSY 770-771 Practicum in School Psychology I, II (6)                interventions. The program includes supervised practicum expe-
  PSY 772 Consultation Externship (1)                                 riences and a research-based dissertation.
  PSY 790, 791, 792, 793 Internship (12)                                 Students must attain prescribed levels of sign language
                                                                      competency to enter their first practicum and to be permitted to
Required Courses                                                      apply for internship.
  PSY 732 Child Psychopathology and Behavior                             The Clinical Psychology Program is accredited by the Ameri-
           Disorders (3)                                              can Psychological Association.
  PSY 748 Psychoeducational Assessment and
           Programming with Exceptional Children (3)                  Admission Requirements for the Ph.D. Program in
  PSY 754 Biological Psychology: Brain and Behavior (3)               Clinical Psychology
  PSY 760 Behavioral and Therapeutic Interventions with
          Children (3)                                                Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet
  PSY 766 School Psychology and Prevention Services (3)               University graduate program:
  PSY 767 Psychological Consultation: Theory and
           Practice (3)
                                                                            Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
                                                                            evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
Additional Requirements                                                     accredited university. (Those applying during their final
   Students must pass a comprehensive examination in each of                undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript
these areas: language development, cognitive development, behav-            after completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling
ior disorders, psychoeducational assessment.                                in their first semester of graduate study.)
   Students must take at least one course in each of these areas:            Official transcripts of all graduate study.
educational methods or curriculum, multicultural education,
                                                                             A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
audiology, statistics, and psychology and deafness.
                                                                             all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
   Students must demonstrate sign language proficiency by pass-
                                                                             applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
ing six graduate-level credit hours of coursework in the area of
                                                                             tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
sign communication (or waiver).
                                                                            An application fee of $50.
                                                                            A completed graduate school application form.
                                                                            Goals statement.
                                                                            TOEFL scores for all international applicants.




                                                                110
                                                                                                                    Courses of Study


Checklist of requirements specific to this program:                         Summers-Only Study            No
                                                                           Possible?
   Are additional application materials required?                          Weekend and Evening           No
      Standardized Test         GRE (Required)                             Study Possible?
      Scores                    GRE Writing Assessment
                                (Recommended)                             Typical Program of Study
      References                Three Letters
  Reference Citing Sign         No                                                                  First Year
  Language Skills                                                                               Semester I - Fall
      Special Essay             Narrative Statements                       PSY 711 Principles of Statistics (3)
      Resume                    Required                                   PSY 712 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
      Writing Sample            Paper                                      PSY 733 Child Development (3)
  Videotape of Signing          No                                         PSY 749 Intellectual Assessment: Measurement
  and/or English                                                                       Principles and Applications (3)
                                                                           PSY 781 Clinical Psychology Ethics and Practice I (2)
   Are there additional application requirements?                          ASL class as needed (3)
     On-Campus Interview        Recommended (by invitation)
                                                                                               Semester II - Spring
     Months of Interviews       February/March
                                                                           PSY   703   Research Seminar (1)
     Sign Language Evaluation   During interview: SCPI
                                                                           PSY   713   Psychological Statistics II (3)
  English Evaluation            No
                                                                           PSY   782   Clinical Psychology Ethics and Practice II (2)
     Culture and Language                                                  PSY   834   Adult Psychopathology (3)
     Colloquium Required?       Sometimes
                                                                           PSY   865   Personality Assessment: Projective
                                                                                       Techniques (3)
   Are there additional background requirements?
     Prior Master’s Degree      Psychology M.A. Preferred                                           Summer
     Required Undergraduate     Psychology Major or                        PSY 866     Personality Assessment: Objective
     Major                      Minor or Equivalent                                    Techniques (2)
  Recommended                   Psychology                                 PSY 704     Research Seminar (1)
  Undergraduate Major
     Prerequisite               Statistics                                                        Second Year
     Coursework                 Developmental Psychology                                          Fall Semester
     (Required)                 Abnormal Psychology                        PSY   785   Introductory Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)
                                Experimental Psychology                    PSY   783   Foundations of Psychotherapy
  Standardized Testing                                                     PSY   800   Individual Research (1-12)
  Substitute for Prerequisite   No                                         PSY   833   Adult Development and Personality (3)
       Recommended Prior        18 or more hours of Undergraduate          PSY   836   Methods of Adult Psychotherapy (3)
       Coursework               Psychology Courses                         PSY   840   Neuroanatomical and Neurophysiological
       Prior Professional                                                              Foundations of Neuropsychology (3)
       Experience               Preferred
  Prior Certification            No                                                               Spring Semester
  Health Certification                                                      PSY 723 Psychology and Deafness (3)
  Requirements                  No                                         PSY 784 Foundations of Psychotherapy Lab (1)
       Police or Other                                                     PSY 786 Introductory Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)
       Background Check         Required Prior to Practicum                PSY 800 Individual Research (1-12)
                                                                           One of the following three PSY courses:
       Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                           PSY 751 Psychology of Perception (3)
  Last Date to Submit           February 1                                    PSY 752 Cognitive Psychology (3)
  Completed Application                                                       PSY 815 Psycholinguistics (3)
  First Date for                February 1                                 One elective 800-level PSY course on psychological
  Consideration of                                                            intervention (There are numerous options) (3)
  Application
  Summer Admission              No                                                                  Summer
  Possible?                                                                Complete Predissertation Project
  Fall Admission Possible?      Yes                                        PSY 800 Individual Research (1-12)
  Winter Admission Possible?    No                                         PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
  Part-time Study Possible?     No                                         PSY 985 Advanced Clinical Psychology Practicum (1-6)

                                                                    111
Courses of Study


                          Third Year                                                       Fifth Year
                        Fall Semester                                                 Fall-Spring-Summer
 One elective 800-level PSY course on psychological               Complete and defend dissertation
    intervention (There are numerous options) (3)                 Complete clinical internship
 One of the following two PSY courses:                            Degree awarded in August
    PSY 809 Social Psychology and Human Diversity (3)
    PSY 820 History and Systems (3)
 PSY 885 Intermediate Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)
                                                                Courses Offered:
 PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
                                                                PSY 701 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School
                                                                Psychology (3)
                         Spring Semester
                                                                   Provides familiarization with legal and ethical issues and
 One of the following two PSY courses:
                                                                the role and function of the psychologist in the school setting.
    PSY 840 Neuroanatomical and Neurophysiological
                                                                Class and field experiences are designed to acquaint the
                 Foundations of Neuropsychology (3)
                                                                student with the various roles, responsibilities, and operations
    PSY 854 Psychopharmacology (3)
                                                                of multidisciplinary teams from a multicultural perspective.
 One of the following three PSY courses:
                                                                Available school and community resources for deaf and hard of
    PSY 751 Psychology of Perception (3)
                                                                hearing people are explored.
    PSY 752 Cognitive Psychology (3)
                                                                   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
    PSY 815 Psycholinguistics (3)
 One elective 800-level PSY course on psychological
                                                                PSY 703, 704 Research Seminar (1, 1)
    intervention (There are numerous options) (3)
                                                                   This seminar introduces students to ongoing faculty, staff,
 PSY 886 Intermediate Clinical Psychology Practicum (3)
                                                                and student research projects. The seminar also includes direct
 PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
                                                                experience as a research assistant in a faculty or staff member’s
 Complete first draft of dissertation proposal
                                                                research program. Ethical issues in research with human
                                                                subjects receive particular emphasis.
                        Summer
                                                                   Corequisites: PSY 711 for 703; 712 for 704, or equivalent.
 Comprehensive Examinations
 PSY 800 Individual Research (1-12)
                                                                PSY 711 Principles of Statistics (3)
 PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
                                                                   Discussion of the theory and applications of inferential
 PSY 985 Advanced Clinical Psychology Practicum (1-6)
                                                                statistics, including sampling, estimation, confidence intervals,
                                                                inferences, effect sizes, and hypothesis testing, as well as
                         Fourth Year
                                                                descriptive statistics, validity, and reliability. Specific statistical
                        Fall Semester
                                                                techniques such as t tests, Chi Square, one way and factorial
 One elective 800-level PSY course on psychological
                                                                analyses of variance, correlations, simple and multiple
    intervention (There are numerous options) (3)
                                                                regression, as well as an introduction to trend analysis will be
 One of the following two PSY courses:
                                                                presented. Lab experiences in using SPSS or similar computer
    PSY 809 Social Psychology and Human Diversity (3)
                                                                programs for analyzing data will be provided. Evaluations of
    PSY 820 History and Systems (3)
                                                                statistical methods used in published research will be discussed.
 PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
 PSY 985 Advanced Clinical Psychology Practicum (1-6)
                                                                PSY 712 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
 Complete dissertation research proposal
                                                                   Covers principles of research design in psychology from two-
 Complete qualifying examination
                                                                group comparisons to complex multiple treatment designs. Also
 Apply for internship
                                                                includes writing research reports and articles, questionnaire and
                                                                survey research, case studies and other single-subject designs,
                        Spring Semester
                                                                correlational studies, naturalistic observation, and ethical
 One of the following two PSY courses:
                                                                considerations in research.
    PSY 840 Neuroanatomical and Neurophysiological
                                                                   Prerequisite: PSY 711.
                 Foundations of Neuropsychology (3)
    PSY 854 Psychopharmacology (3)
                                                                PSY 713 Psychological Statistics II (3)
 One elective 800-level PSY course on psychological
                                                                   Covers inferential statistics including simple and complex
    intervention (There are numerous options) (3)
                                                                analysis of variance, multiple comparisons between means, and
 PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
                                                                analysis of covariance. Chi-square and other nonparametric
 PSY 986 Advanced Clinical Psychology Practicum (1-6)
                                                                statistics and partial and multiple regression are included.
                                                                Experience with computer programs for these statistical
                          Summer
                                                                analyses will be provided.
 PSY 900    Dissertation Research (1-12)
                                                                   Prerequisite: PSY 711.


                                                          112
                                                                                                                           Courses of Study


PSY 723 Psychology and Deafness (3)                                          for evaluating and selecting tests, methods, and theoretical
   This course considers the effects of prelingual and post-                 approaches to assessment are also presented.
lingual deafness or hearing loss on psychological development
and adaptation. Topics covered include cognitive and linguistic              PSY 746 Assessment II: Intellectual Assessment (3)
development, personality, psychopathology, interpersonal                        An intensive course in theory, methods, and clinical skills
behavior, possible compensatory processes in other sensory                   in appraisal of individual intelligence, including test selection,
systems, and vocational/avocational interest.                                administration, and scoring; analysis and interpretation of test
                                                                             results; preparation of reports; and legal and ethical standards in
PSY 724 Psychology and Disability (3)                                        assessment. Separate sections are offered for school psychology
   This course provides a comprehensive foundation of                        and clinical psychology majors. The school psychology section
theory, research, and practice relating to general and special               emphasizes assessment of the child in educational settings.
psychological aspects of physical, mental, and emotional                     The clinical psychology section emphasizes assessment of the
disabilities in American society. Includes medical, psychological,           individual child and adult in a variety of clinical settings.
psychiatric, and employment-related as well as entitlement                      Prerequisites: School psychology majors: PSY 743, 770.
program-related definitions of disability and their ramifications;             Clinical psychology majors: PSY 709, 711, permission of the
the impact of disabilities upon psychological growth and coping              instructor.
in individuals and families, societal attitudes toward disabilities,
and prevention and treatment strategies and issues.                          PSY 748 Psychoeducational Assessment and Programming
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                               for Exceptional Children (3)
                                                                                An overview of formal and informal assessment procedures
PSY 732 Child Psychopathology and Behavior                                   used in identifying exceptional children, including cognitive,
Disorders (3)                                                                social-emotional, and perceptual-motor functioning as well
  A study of child behavior disorders and other psycho-                      as achievement measures. Assessment procedures used
pathologies of childhood, including types of disorders, etiology,            in developing and evaluating intervention strategies and
and intervention and prevention strategies. Psychological,                   Individualized Education Plans will be discussed, using an
developmental, biological, cultural, and educational factors are             interdisciplinary model and a multicultural and/or bilingual
included.                                                                    perspective. The collection and use of data for the purpose of
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                               evaluating program effectiveness will also be included.
                                                                                Pre- or Corequisites: PSY 743 and 746 or permission of
PSY 733 Child Development (3)                                                the instructor.
   Knowledge bases in child and adolescent development,
including biological, cognitive, social, affective, and moral                PSY 749 Intellectual Assessment: Measurement Principles
development. Methodological and theoretical issues and                       and Applications (4)
controversies in the study of human development are discussed.                  An intensive course in theory, methods, and clinical
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                               skills in the appraisal of individual intelligence, including
                                                                             a critical analysis of individual tests, criteria for evaluating
PSY 736 Psychological Development I: Learning and                            and selecting tests, values, limitations of tests, test selection,
Cognitive Development (3)                                                    administration and scoring, analysis and interpretation of test
   A survey of current psychological research on cognitive                   results, preparation of reports, and legal and ethical standards in
processes and development, including perceptual learning,                    assessment.
concept learning, problem solving, and memory.
  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.                                PSY 750 Language Intervention with Special
                                                                             Populations (3)
PSY 739 Psychological Development II: Language                                  A seminar in which students critically evaluate research
Development and Assessment (3)                                               articles related to language development and intervention
   A survey of research and theory on language structure,                    of special education populations such as mentally retarded,
processing, and development including evaluation of instruments              blind/low vision, autistic/emotionally disturbed, deaf or hard of
for assessing language development.                                          hearing, and learning disabled children. This course is generally
   Prerequisite: General psychology or permission of the instruc-            taken by students enrolled in PSY 771 and concurrently serving
tor.                                                                         special education referral children.
                                                                                Prerequisite: PSY 739 or permission of the instructor.
PSY 743 Assessment I: History and Theory of
Assessment (3)                                                               PSY 751 Psychology of Perception (3)
   An introduction to multiple methods of assessing behavior,                   Theories and research findings in human and animal percep-
abilities, and achievement. Includes the history of assessment               tion with emphasis on the visual system. Course topics include:
practices and theory, a discussion of the statistical properties of          neuroanatomy and physiology of the visual system, psychophys-
assessment instruments, including reliability, validity, standard            ics, color vision, space perception, form perception, information
error of measurement, and normal distributions. Criteria                     processing, and the psychopathology of perception.
                                                                       113
Courses of Study


PSY 754 Biological Psychology: Brain and Behavior (3)                       PSY 770 Practicum in School Psychology I (3)
   Addresses brain-behavior relationships with an emphasis                    Under close supervision students gain experience in
upon school-age children. Anatomy of the brain as well as                   multidimensional assessment of individuals in various settings.
neurodevelopmental and acquired neurophysiological disorders                Emphasis is on developing skills in administering, interpreting,
that affect children will be discussed. Students will be introduced         and reporting the results of various measurements of intellectual
to neuropsychological tests and test batteries used in the                  and educational functioning.
evaluation of this age group.                                                 Pre- or Corequisites: PSY 746 and permission of instructor.
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
                                                                            PSY 771 Practicum in School Psychology II (3)
PSY 757 Family Assessment, Interviewing, and                                   Under the close supervision of a certified or licensed
Interventions (2)                                                           psychologist, students work in a school or clinic setting
  Methods of interviewing, assessing, and introducing change into           providing psychological and educational assessments,
family systems. Theories and methods of family therapy.                     preparing reports, counseling with clients, and developing and
   Prerequisite: PSY 733.                                                   implementing intervention programs. In addition, students
                                                                            attend a weekly seminar emphasizing major issues in the
PSY 760 Behavioral and Therapeutic Interventions                            professional practice of school psychology.
with Children (3)                                                              Pre- or Corequisites: PSY 701, 743, 746, 748, and permis-
   The course focuses on the theoretical and applied use of                 sion of the instructor.
interventions used with children exhibiting behavioral and/or
emotional difficulties. Emphasis is placed on the use of Applied             PSY 772 Psychological Consultation: Externship (1)
Behavioral Analysis, functional analysis, behavior modification                 A supervised practicum in which the student is responsible
techniques, and psychotherapeutic interventions used with                   for designing, implementing, and evaluating a psychological
individuals, small groups, and families.                                    consultation experience in a school or educational program.
   Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
                                                                            PSY 781-782 Clinical Psychology Ethics
PSY 765 Assessment III: Social, Emotional, and Behavioral                   and Practice I and II (2,2)
Assessment (3)                                                                 This course sequence introduces clinical psychology doctoral
   Training with techniques and instruments used in social,                 students to professional practice in clinical psychology. The
emotional, and behavioral assessment. Projective and descriptive            two-semester sequence covers ethical and professional expecta-
techniques are discussed in addition to the use of adaptive                 tions and guidelines, legal obligations of psychologists, and an
behavior instruments. The use of assessment data for educational            overview of clinical practice, such as clinical observation and
and vocational planning and decision-making is emphasized                   interviewing. The first semester focuses primarily on adults,
from a multicultural perspective.                                           the second on work with children and families. Cross-cultural
   Pre- or Corequisites: PSY 711, 743, and 746 or permission of             issues in clinical practice are included in both semesters.
instructor.                                                                    Prerequisite: Enrollment in clinical psychology doctoral
                                                                            program or permission of the instructor.
PSY 766 School Psychology and Prevention Services (3)
   This course includes discussion of the conceptual basis and              PSY 783 Foundations of Psychotherapy (2)
techniques used in delivering mental health services to non-                    This course is an introduction to the practice of psycho-
identified populations in schools. Types of interventions studied            therapy, and the spring lab provides an opportunity to work with
include the use of group techniques, social skill development               a deaf client in psychotherapy. This course is a complement
procedures, enrichment programs, teaching of parenting skills,              to Methods of Psychotherapy, which provides an overview of
development of vocational or school transitional services, and              theories and approaches. For most students, Foundations of
methods for delivering in-service training to professional staff            Psychotherapy and Methods of Therapy are taken at the same
members. Emphasis will be given to the role of the psychologist             time. The focus is on building skills for planning, initiating,
on crisis intervention teams.                                               conducting, and evaluating therapeutic interventions with
                                                                            clients. Class participation and application of skills in practice
PSY 767 Psychological Consultation: Theory and                              sessions are essential components of this course. Foundations of
Practice (3)                                                                Psychotherapy is a 2-part course. The didactic portion (2 credits)
   Survey of major theoretical models of psychological                      is taken in the fall semester, while the case experience (1 credit)
consultation with professional peers, parents, administrators, and          is taken in the spring semester.
organizations as they are applied to school settings, mental health             Prerequisite: A graduate level course in methods of psycho-
settings, medical settings, natural communities, and workplaces.            therapy or its equivalent.
Methods for achieving individual or system-wide change are
reviewed through literature, class discussion, simulation, and              PSY 784 Foundations of Psychotherapy Lab (1)
role-playing activities.                                                       This course is a 1-credit hour lab course that follows Founda-
   Prerequisite: Second-year graduate status or permission of the           tions of Psychotherapy. It is designed to provide graduate
instructor.
                                                                      114
                                                                                                                            Courses of Study


students in clinical psychology with psychotherapy experience,                 PSY 799 Independent Study (1-3)
particularly with deaf and hard of hearing individuals.                          Independent study provides the opportunity for more
Through Gallaudet University's Mental Health Center, students                  concentrated study of particular topics than can be provided in
will conduct, under direct supervision, a minimum of six                       regular classes. End product and the number of credit hours to be
psychotherapy sessions with a client that is appropriate for them.             given must be mutually agreed to by student and teacher prior to
This may include live observation and/or videotaping of the                    registration.
therapy, supervision sessions, and maintaining documentation.                     Prerequisite: Second-year status.
   Prerequisites: PSY 783 and a methods of psychotherapy
course.                                                                        PSY 800 Individual Research (1-12 )
                                                                                  This course provides credit for individual student research
PSY 785-786 Introductory Clinical Psychology                                   projects at the pre-dissertation stage, conducted under approved
Practicum (3,3)                                                                faculty supervision.
   Focuses on intellectual and personality assessment, diagnosis,                 Prerequisites: PSY 703, 704, 711, and 712 or permission of
and treatment planning. Placement covers a minimum of two                      the instructor.
semesters or the equivalent.
                                                                               PSY 809 Social Psychology and Human Diversity (3)
PSY 790 Internship: Individual Case Study (3)                                     This course provides an introduction to theoretical and re-
   Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised                 search foundations in social psychology, particularly as related
experience in identification and description of school-related                  to clinical/personality psychology and to the study of cultural
problems, formulation of diagnostic plans, selection and use of                minorities and the diversities of human experience.
appropriate evaluation tools, referral to appropriate specialists,
integration of findings, and recommendation of appropriate                      PSY 815 Psycholinguistics (3)
action and follow-up.                                                             This course provides an overview of theoretical perspectives
  Prerequisites: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.         and research issues in psycholinguistics. Topics include
                                                                               theoretical perspectives, language development and acquisition,
PSY 791 Internship: Teacher Consultation and                                   neurolinguistics, language comprehension and produc-
Counseling (3)                                                                 tion, and the relationships between language and cognition,
   Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised                 social relationships, self-concept, and power. Cross-linguistic
experience in conferences with teachers to interpret results of                comparisons are made between signed and spoken languages.
child diagnostic study; conferences with parents to interpret plan                Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or
of action for child or youth; short term and group counseling                  permission of the instructor.
with students.
  Prerequisite: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.          PSY 820 History and Systems (2)
                                                                                  Review of theoretical approaches in the historical
PSY 792 Internship: System Consultation and                                    development of psychology as a discipline, including the
In-Service (3)                                                                 emergence of clinical and experimental psychology from roots
   Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised                 in philosophy and physiology. The principal systems and schools
experience at an advanced level in conferences with teachers,                  of thought in the history of psychology are surveyed, including
parents, administrators, and other specialists in the school                   psychophysics, structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism,
and community concerning planning, referrals, and in-school                    Gestalt theory, psychoanalysis, and cognitive theories, to reveal
interventions and experience in developing and implementing                    their impact on contemporary psychology.
in-service programs for teachers, administrators, and staff.                      Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or
  Prerequisites: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.         permission of the instructor.

PSY 793 Internship: Advanced Case Conference (3)                               PSY 825 Health Psychology (3)
   Field experience in an approved setting provides supervised                    This course provides an introduction to the interaction of
experience at an advanced level in conferences with teachers,                  psychological and biological factors in health and illness, and
parents, administrators, and other specialists to interpret                    the effects of psychological interventions on high- and low-risk
the results of child diagnostic study; active participation in                 lifestyles and medical outcomes. Students become familiar with
multidisciplinary staffings; and design and development of                      theories of psychobiological interactions, biological systems
interventions for the remediation of student learning and                      believed to be affected by this interaction, and assessment and
behavior problems in the classroom.                                            intervention techniques used to alter health outcomes of these
  Prerequisites: Advanced program status and permission of instructor.         interactions. Specific diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and
                                                                               asthma are addressed, as are treatment compliance and the role
PSY 795 Special Topics (1-3)                                                   of the psychologist in the medical setting.
                                                                                   Prerequisite: PSY 754.



                                                                         115
Courses of Study


PSY 826 Child Clinical Psychology Treatment                                the administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected
Methods (3)                                                                neuropsychological screening tests, with emphasis on their use
  A survey of treatment methods with children and adolescents,             with deaf and hard of hearing populations.
the child in the context of the family, and issues in working with            Prerequisite: PSY 840.
and understanding educational and other settings.
   Prerequisites: PSY 733.                                                 PSY 851 Group Psychotherapy (3)
   Pre- or Corequisite: PSY 732.                                             An introduction to the theory and practice of group
                                                                           counseling and psychotherapy, with application to group work
PSY 833 Adult Development and Personality (3)                              with deaf individuals. There are didactic and experiential
  This course introduces students to theories of adult develop-            components in the course that give students opportunities to
ment, including diverse paths in adulthood. Methods of con-                develop an understanding of group development, dynamics, and
ceptualizing and studying development during adult life will be            counseling theories; group leadership styles; group counseling
examined, as will aspects of intellectual, social, and personality         methods and skills; and other group approaches.
development. The impact of lifestyle, occupation, and family                 Prerequisites: PSY 836.
factors will also be considered.
                                                                           PSY 854 Psychopharmacology (3)
PSY 834 Adult Psychopathology (3)                                             This course provides an introduction to the uses, neuro-
   This course provides an understanding of normal and                     physiological mode of action, and physiological and
psychopathological variants of adult functioning and                       behavioral effects of various categories of psychoactive
development. Diagnostic criteria, psychodynamic issues,                    medications, including antipsychotic, anxiolytic, and
and applications of DSM-IV will be discussed. Treatment impli-             antidepressant medications. Basic psychopharmacological
cations of various diagnostic categories will be included.                 research and the psychomimetic effects of drugs used for the
   Prerequisite: Clinical psychology student or permission of the          treatment of medical disorders will be discussed.
instructor.                                                                   Prerequisite: PSY 840.

PSY 835 Late Adulthood and Aging (3)                                       PSY 860 Cognitive-Behavior Therapies (3)
  This course provides the student with basic information about               This course provides an in-depth examination of the
the physical, social, and psychological effects of aging, the              theories, principles, and applications of cognitive-behavior
developmental issues that arise during older adulthood, and the            therapy. Historical issues, behavioral models, and specific types
approaches to coping with these changes and adjustment to the              of cognitive-behavioral therapy, including Rational Emotive,
death of loved ones and the individual’s own confrontation with            Cognitive Therapy, and the Case Formulation Model, are
mortality.                                                                 explored. Research trends including application to the problems
                                                                           of eating disorders, anxiety, depression, poor social skills, and
PSY 836 Methods of Adult Psychotherapy (3)                                 marital dysfunction are also addressed.
  An overview of methods and theories of psychotherapy                        Prerequisites: PSY 712, PSY 781, PSY 834, or by
used with adults. Covers professional and ethical guidelines as            permission of the instructor.
applied to the conduct of psychotherapy.
  Prerequisites: PSY 781 and 834, or permission of instructor.             PSY 862 Multicultural and Urban Issues in Clinical
                                                                           Practice (3)
PSY 840 Neuroanatomical and Neurophysiological                                The Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area is very culturally
Foundations of Neuropsychology (3)                                         diverse. This course will focus on the special issues that are
   This course provides a foundation in functional neuro-                  raised when offering mental health services to persons of color
anatomy, neurophysiology, and the presentation and effects                 who reside in this large urban area. During the course, students
of brain injuries, illnesses, and syndromes. It also includes              will have the opportunity to examine the following content
material on peripheral sensory and perceptual functions. When              areas: the psychology of racism and oppression, theoretical
you complete this course, you should have a basic knowledge                issues and research findings on psychotherapy with minority
of brain structure and function/dysfunction and the interaction            populations, the impact of therapist characteristics on the
of mind and body. An emphasis is placed on application of the              therapeutic process and relevant issues for traditional and
information to clinical populations and the ability to critically          emerging minority groups. Each class period will also include a
evaluate neurophysiological and neuro-psychological research.              small module on an "urban issue" of concern to area reidents.
                                                                              Prerequisites: PSY 781, 834 or permission of instructor.
PSY 843 Neuropsychological Foundations and
Assessment (3)                                                             PSY 865 Personality Assessment: Projective
  This course provides an introduction to the foundations of               Techniques (3)
neuropsychology, including an introduction to functional                     During this course, students learn the basic principles of the
neuroanatomy, neuropsychological research, and the                         Exner Comprehensive System of Rorschach Interpretation.
presentation and effects of brain injuries, illnesses, and                 Students learn how to administer the Rorschach, practice
syndromes. Students learn to apply this knowledge through                  scoring using the Exner System, and interpret the test results.
                                                                     116
                                                                                                                         Courses of Study


Other projective techniques such as the Thematic Apperception                intervention. Placement in clinical settings for a minimum of
Test are also covered. Students practice report-writing skills.              two semesters or the equivalent.
Information learned about personality testing is integrated with                Prerequisites: PSY 749, 781, 834, and SCPI rating of "inter-
information previously covered during Assessment II:                         mediate plus" or better.
Intellectual Assessment.
   Prerequisites: PSY 781, 709, 746.                                         PSY 900 Dissertation Research (1-12)
                                                                               Students may register for dissertation research while
PSY 866 Personality Assessment: Objective                                    conducting any phase of their dissertation research project.
Techniques (2)                                                                 Prerequisite: Must have completed predissertation research
   This course addresses the uses and limitations of the MMPI-2              project.
and other frequently used objective measures used to assess per-
sonality factors and possible psychopathology in clients. Special            PSY 985-986 Advanced Clinical Psychology
attention is given to possible adaptations and need for caution in           Practicum (1-6, 1-6)
interpretations when such measures are used with deaf and hard                 Allows students to develop advanced clinical skills in
of hearing clients and clients whose cultural history/affiliation is          specialized assessment and/or treatment. One- or two-semester
outside the mainstream. Students are expected to develop skills              placements.
in the integration of data derived from objective measures with                 Prerequisites: PSY 885, 886
other assessment results into a coherent and useful report.
   Prerequisites: PSY 834 and PSY 746.                                       PSY 999 Clinical Psychology Internship (1-6)
                                                                               Registration indicates that the student is undertaking a
PSY 870 Clinical Hypnosis and Brief Psychotherapy (3)                        psychology internship approved by the clinical psychology
   This course is an elective intervention course in the clini-              program at the predoctoral or doctoral level.
cal psychology program. It introduces students to the work                     Prerequisites: Open only to students who have completed
of Milton Erickson and others who have pioneered the use of                  comprehensive examinations, advanced to candidacy for the
hypnosis in clinical settings. While this course does not lead to            Ph.D. degree, have an SCPI rating of "Advanced" or equivalent,
certification in the field of hypnosis, it will lay the foundation for         and are in an internship approved by the clinical psychology
anyone later wishing to pursue certification through professional             program faculty.
groups such as the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis
(ASCH). The course is highly experiential, including work on
trance inductions, development of metaphors, and application
of trance principles and hypnosis to specific kinds of issues in
psychotherapy and healing in general, as well as application of
                                                                                              Social Work (SWK)
hypnosis work with deaf people. In addition to the experiential
component, the course will provide students the opportunity to               Graduate Faculty:
review research into hypnosis and hypnotic phenomena.                          Carol Cohen, Ph.D.; Elizabeth Creamer, M.S.W.; Teresa
                                                                             Crowe, Ph.D.; Janet L. Pray, Ph.D. ; Martha Sheridan, Ph.D.
PSY 880 Clinical Supervision (3)                                             (M.S.W. Program Director); Marquessa Brown, D.S.W. (Depart-
   Clinical supervision provides an introduction to theory,                  ment Chair)
methods, and ethical issues in the supervision of clinical
services. The course emphasizes the supervision of                           Professional Staff:
psychotherapy and related interventions. Supervision of other                  M. Teresa Arcari, M.S.W. (Field Placement Director)
clinical services, such as assessment and crisis intervention,                 Marcia Schweitzer, M.S.S.
are also included. Both individual and group supervision are
considered. Classes include lecture, discussion of readings, and             About the Department:
case material.                                                                  The Department of Social Work offers the master’s in social
   Prerequisites: Enrollment in a graduate program in a mental               work (M.S.W.) degree and the baccalaureate degree with a major
health field, such as Clinical Psychology, Counseling, Social                 in social work. The M.S.W. program admitted its first class in
Work, or School Psychology. PSY 836 (Methods of Adult                        1989.
Psychotherapy) or equivalent. Completion of at least 2 semesters                The M.S.W. program prepares deaf, hard of hearing, and
of supervised experience in a mental health setting.                         hearing students to assume leadership positions in the provision
                                                                             of social work services for deaf and hard of hearing people
PSY 885, 886 Intermediate Clinical Psychology                                throughout the United States and internationally. Graduates are
Practicum (3,3)                                                              employed in child welfare agencies, schools and universities,
   Concentrates on further development in assessment and                     mental health settings, family service agencies, correctional
diagnosis, accompanied by development of skills in the psycho-               facilities, and programs for people with developmental
therapeutic relationship and various methods of psychological                disabilities, among many others. Graduates are providing clinical
                                                                             services and are engaged in advocacy, administration, program

                                                                       117
Courses of Study


and policy development, community development, consultation,               field practicum (approximately 1012 hours of field practicum)
research, and publication.                                                 and 50 course credits.
   The Department of Social Work has nine faculty and one pro-                Students in the M.S.W. program may apply to participate in
fessional staff who are highly qualified and experienced in their           a school social work specialization which is accredited by the
fields. Department members are engaged in research, are active in           National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.
community service projects, and present regularly in professional          Students take courses specifically related to school social work,
conferences, workshops, and colloquia.                                     including school social work policy and school social work
   Social work faculty are engaged in joint training projects with         practice. Internship experiences during both years take place in
the Department of Human Services of Washington, D.C., and                  school settings or in other education-related agencies. A student
in program development efforts on behalf of deaf and hard of               may take an approved elective course in order to enhance
hearing people throughout the metropolitan Washington area. In             preparation to work with deaf and hard of hearing children in
addition, the department sponsors guest lectures and colloquia             schools. Participants in this program may apply to take part in a
by professional social work practitioners from the Washington,             U.S. Department of Education grant, which provides half tuition
D.C., metropolitan area as well as from other areas of the                 waivers and stipends during all four semesters. Students selected
country.                                                                   for the grant opportunity must commit to work in a school
   The master’s program is accredited by the Council on Social             setting after graduation.
Work Education. The baccalaureate program in social work has
been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education since              Admission Requirements for the M.S.W. Program in
1976 and was reaccredited in 1994.                                         Social Work
                                                                           Checklist of requirements for application to every Gallaudet Uni-
Master of Social Work Program                                              versity graduate program:
   The master of social work program at Gallaudet University
prepares students for advanced social work practice with deaf
and hard of hearing populations. Graduates possess the knowl-                    Official transcripts of all undergraduate study, including
edge and skills to enter the profession as practitioners in various              evidence of having received a bachelor’s degree from an
settings, such as schools, health care agencies, family and child                accredited university. (Those applying during their final
                                                                                 undergraduate year will be required to submit a final transcript
welfare agencies, mental health settings, disability organiza-
                                                                                 after completion of their bachelor’s degree and before enrolling
tions, corrections agencies, organizations that provide services
                                                                                 in their first semester of graduate study.)
to senior citizens, etc. Graduates possess knowledge and skills
in areas of direct generalist practice with individuals, families,                Official transcripts of all graduate study.
groups, organizations, and communities. Graduates may practice                    A minimum 3.0 grade point average (on a four-point scale) in
in areas such as policy, research, program development, and                       all previous undergraduate and graduate study. (Occasionally,
agency and community work.                                                        applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 may be admitted condi-
   The M.S.W. program consists of 62 credit hours of study.                       tionally upon the recommendation of the department.)
The foundation curriculum consists of courses in eight core                      An application fee of $50.
curriculum areas: human behavior and the social environment,                     A completed graduate school application form.
social welfare policy and services, social work practice, research,              Goals statement.
field education, values and ethics, diversity, and populations at                 TOEFL scores for all international applicants.
risk, including social and economic justice. Foundation students
attend a concurrent field practicum with courses, entering the              Checklist of requirements specific to this program:
field of practice for two eight-hour days a week at an internship              Are additional application materials required?
site. Students complete the first year of study with approximately                Standardized Test             GRE or MAT
500 hours of field practicum experience in addition to course and                 Scores
lab credit.                                                                      References                    Three Letters
   The advanced curriculum concentration courses consist of                  Reference Citing Sign             No
advanced content in all of the curriculum areas. Graduates                   Language Skills
expand and deepen knowledge and skills acquired during the                       Special Essay                 Narrative
foundation year and develop special knowledge and skills needed              Resume                            No
for practice with deaf and hard of hearing populations. Students                 Writing Sample                Recommended
in the advanced year have a full semester of courses in the fall             Videotape of Signing              No
semester and a full block placement in the spring semester with
                                                                             and/or English
two online courses. During the spring semester, students are
placed in settings that require advanced social work practice
skills. Students work at their internship sites for four eight-hour              Are there additional application requirements?
days, totaling thirty-two hours per week or 512 hours for the                    On-Campus                     Recommended
semester in addition to two online courses. At the completion                    Interview
of the second year of study, students graduate with 12 credits of                Month of Interviews           February - March

                                                                     118
                                                                                                                          Courses of Study


  Sign Language Evaluation       No                                      have received a grade of B or better in their undergraduate
  English Evaluation             No                                      courses and are recommended for advanced standing by their
      Culture and Language       Strongly Recommended                    undergraduate program. Waiver of field practicum credits
      Colloquium Required?                                               requires the recommendation of the field practicum director.
                                                                         Admission with advanced standing is decided on an individual
   Are there additional background requirements?                         basis and is designed to prevent duplication of material learned
  Prior Master’s Degree          No                                      in the applicant’s undergraduate social work program. Students
  Required Undergraduate         No                                      are encouraged to take electives up to the 62 credit limit.
  Major
  Recommended                    No                                      Curriculum
  Undergraduate Major                                                       The M.S.W. program consists of 62 credit hours distributed
      Prerequisite               30 Hours Liberal Arts or                among: a) required foundation courses; b) concentration course
      Coursework                 Humanities                              areas in deaf and hard of hearing populations; and c) elective
      (Required)                 Coursework in Human Biology             credits. The full-time program is designed to be completed in
  Standardized Testing           No                                      two years. The elective credits can be taken in any graduate
  Substitute for                                                         department at Gallaudet or through the consortium. Students
  Prerequisite                                                           specializing in school social work are expected to choose
  Recommended Prior              No                                      electives, with the approval of their advisors, that relate to
  Coursework                                                             the specialization. ASL courses do not satisfy the elective
  Prior Professional             No                                      requirement. All students are required to take A&S 707 (3
  Experience                                                             credits).
  Prior Certification             No
  Health Certification            No                                      Part-time Options
  Requirements                                                              Students may wish to enroll on a less than full-time basis.
  Police or Other                No                                      Three- and four-year part-time options are available on a three-
  Background Check                                                       and four-year schedule. The program must be completed within
                                                                         four years. The course plans are designed to preserve sequential
   Application Deadlines and Program Scheduling                          learning.
  Last Date to Submit            February 15
  Completed Application
  First Date for                 No Set Date
                                                                         Field Instruction
  Consideration of
                                                                             The field practicum component of social work education
  Application                                                            is a central feature of social work training because it provides the
  Summer Admission               No
                                                                         opportunity for the student to apply and integrate knowledge
  Possible?                                                              and skills learned in the classroom with professional practice
  Fall Admission Possible?       Yes                                     opportunities in human service agencies.
  Winter Admission Possible?     Only with advanced                          The first year of field practicum offers students opportunities
                                 standing                                for learning experiences, including responsibility for work-
  Part-time Study Possible?      Yes                                     ing with individual clients and their families; development and
  Summers-Only Study             No                                      leadership of a client group; and an organizational, administra-
  Possible?                                                              tive, and community intervention. In the second year, the field
  Weekend and Evening            No                                      practicum provides students with opportunities in an agency
  Study Possible?                                                        providing services to deaf and hard of hearing clients or in an
                                                                         organization developing those services. The director of field
Conditional Admission                                                    instruction selects agencies able to provide students with rich
   Occasionally, a student who is unable to satisfy a particular         learning opportunities and supervision by a qualified M.S.W.
admission requirement otherwise gives evidence of ability to             social worker. The field instructor fills a dual role as practitioner
succeed in a graduate social work program. The student may               and educator and will be chosen on the basis of social work
be awarded admission conditionally. The student then has until           practice competence, supervisory experience, and commitment
the end of the first semester to remove those conditions. If the          to student learning. The student’s interests, career goals, and
student does not remove those conditions, he or she will not be          learning needs are considered in the selection of internship sites.
able to continue in the program.                                            Students specializing in school social work will have
                                                                         internship sites in school or education-related agencies or
                                                                         organizations. Agencies that have provided social work
Advanced Standing
                                                                         internships include:
   Students who have graduated with bachelor’s degrees
in social work from Council on Social Work accredited programs           Arlington County Department of Social Services
may be eligible for advanced standing through the waiver of first         Baltimore City Public Schools
semester courses. Up to 15 credits may be waived if students             Bread for the City

                                                                   119
Courses of Study


Child Development Center—Gallaudet University                                   SWK 715 Disability Policy: Implications for Deaf and
Deaf-REACH, Inc.                                                                             Hard of Hearing Populations (3)
D.C. Department of Human Services
                                                                                SWK 751 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
D.C. Rape Crisis Center
D.C. Superior Court
                                                                                             Populations: Micro Interventions (3)
Fairfax County Public Schools                                                   SWK 752 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board                                                Populations: Macro Interventions (3)
Family Service Foundation—Institute on Deafness                                 Elective (3)*
Heartland of Hyattsville Health Care                                                                                       Total: 15 credits
Hospice of Washington
J.B. Johnson Nursing Home
                                                                                               Semester IV - Spring
Jewish Social Service Agency
Kendall Demonstration Elementary School                                         SWK 780 Advanced Practice Seminar (3)
Maryland Association of the Deaf                                                SWK 781 Field Practicum with Deaf and Hard of
Maryland Governor’s Office for Individuals with Disabilities                             Hearing Populations (6)
Maryland School for the Deaf                                                    SWK 791 Research Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Mental Health Center - Gallaudet University                                                   Populations [online] (3)
Model Secondary School for the Deaf                                                                                       Total: 12 credits
Mt. Vernon Mental Health Center
                                                                                                                   Grand Total: 62 credits
National Association of Social Workers - National Office
National Association of Social Workers, Metro Washington Chapter
National Institutes of Health                                                  Typical Two-YearProgram of Study with School Social
Northwest Family Center
Parent-Infant Program
                                                                               Work Specialization
Prince George’s County Department of Social Services
Rachel’s Table                                                                                      (Foundation Year)
Rockville Senior High School                                                                         Semester I - Fall
Senior Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Senior Citizens                      SWK 705     Human Behavior in the Social
St. Elizabeths Hospital                                                                     Environment I (3)
Washington Assessment and Therapy Services                                      SWK   711   Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)
Washington Hospital Center
                                                                                SWK   741   Social Work Practice I (includes lab) (5)
Whitman-Walker Clinic
                                                                                SWK   755   Research Methods I (3)
                                                                                SWK   771   Foundation Field Practicum I (3)
Typical Two-YearProgram of Study                                                                                           Total: 17 credits
                                                                                                    Semester II - Spring
                         (Foundation Year)                                      SWK 706     Human Behavior in the Social
                          Semester I - Fall                                                 Environment II (3)
  SWK 705        Human Behavior in the Social                                   SWK   742   Social Work Practice II (3)
                 Environment I (3)                                              SWK   756   Data Analysis (3)
  SWK     711    Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)                         SWK   761   School Social Work Policy (3)
  SWK     741    Social Work Practice I (includes lab) (5)                      SWK   772   Foundation Field Practicum II (includes
  SWK     755    Research Methods I (3)                                                     lab) (3)
  SWK     771    Foundation Field Practicum I (3)                               HSL 707     Audiology (3)*
                                                     Total: 17 credits                                                     Total: 18 credits
                        Semester II - Spring
  SWK 706 Human Behavior in the Social                                                        (Advanced Concentration Year)
               Environment II (3)                                                                    Semester III - Fall
  SWK 742 Social Work Practice II (3)                                           SWK 713 Issues in Human Behavior and the Social
  SWK 756 Data Analysis (3)                                                                  Environment: Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  SWK 772 Foundation Field Practicum II (includes                                            Populations (3)
               lab) (3)                                                         SWK 751 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  HSL 707 Audiology (3)*                                                                     Populations: Micro Interventions (3)
  Elective (3)*                                                                 SWK 752 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
                                                     Total: 18 credits                       Populations: Macro Interventions (3)
                                                                                SWK 760 School Social Work Practice (3)
            (Advanced Concentration Year)                                       Elective (3)*
                   Semester III - Fall                                                                                     Total: 15 credits
  SWK 713 Issues in Human Behavior and the Social                                            Semester IV - Spring
          Environment: Deaf and Hard of Hearing                                 SWK 780 Advanced Practice Seminar [online] (3)
          Populations (3)                                                       SWK 781 Block Field Practicum in Schools: Deaf and
_______________                                                                         Hard of Hearing Populations (6)
*May be taken during the summer or any semester of the program.
                                                                         120
                                                                                                                           Courses of Study


  SWK 791 Research Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing                        Typical Three-YearProgram of Study with School Social
          Populations [online] (3)                                            Work Specialization
                                                   Total: 12 credits
                                           Grand Total: 62 credits
                                                                                             (First Year: Foundations)
                                                                                                 Semester I - Fall
Typical Three-YearProgram of Study                                              SWK 705 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I (3)
              (First Year: Foundations)                                         SWK 711 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)
                  Semester I - Fall                                             SWK 755 Research Methods I (3)
  SWK 705 Human Behavior in the Social                                                                                     Total: 9 credits
          Environment I (3)                                                                         Semester II - Spring
  SWK 711 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)                                SWK    706   Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (3)
  SWK 755 Research Methods I (3)                                                SWK    756   Data Analysis (3)
                                                    Total: 9 credits            SWK    761   School Social Work Policy (3)
                      Semester II - Spring                                      HSL    707   Audiology (3)*
  SWK 706 Human Behavior in the Social                                                                                     Total: 12 credits
               Environment II (3)
  HSL 707 Audiology (3)*
                                                                                       (Second Year: Foundations, continued)
  Elective (3)*
                                                                                                Semester III - Fall
                                                    Total: 9 credits
                                                                                SWK 741 Social Work Practice I (includes lab) (5)
             (Second Year: Foundations, continued)
                                                                                SWK 771 Foundation Field Practicum I (3)
                      Semester III - Fall
                                                                                SWK 760 School Social Work Practice (3)
  SWK 741 Social Work Practice I (includes lab) (5)
                                                                                                                           Total: 11 credits
  SWK 771 Foundation Field Practicum I (3)
  Elective (3)*                                                                                Semester IV - Spring
                                                    Total: 11 credits           SWK 742 Social Work Practice II (3)
                 Semester IV - Spring                                           SWK 772 Foundation Field Practicum II (includes lab) (3)
  SWK 742 Social Work Practice II (3)                                           Elective (3)*
  SWK 756 Data Analysis (3)                                                                                                Total: 9 credits
  SWK 772 Foundation Field Practicum II (includes lab) (3)
                                                    Total: 9 credits                   (Third Year: Advanced Concentration)
                                                                                                 Semester V - Fall
             (Third Year: Advanced Concentration)                               SWK 713 Issues in Human Behavior and the Social
                       Semester V - Fall                                                 Environment: Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  SWK     713 Issues in Human Behavior and the Social                                    Populations (3)
               Environment: Deaf and Hard of Hearing                            SWK 751 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
               Populations (3)                                                           Populations: Micro Interventions (3)
  SWK     715 Disability Policy: Implications for Deaf and                      SWK 752 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
               Hard of Hearing Populations (3)                                           Populations: Macro Interventions (3)
  SWK     751 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing                                                                       Total: 9 credits
               Populations: Micro Interventions (3)                                            Semester VI - Spring
  SWK     752 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing                            SWK 780 Advanced Practice Seminar [online] (3)
               Populations: Macro Interventions (3)                             SWK 781 Block Field Practicum in Schools: Deaf and
                                                    Total: 12 credits                    Hard of Hearing Populations (6)
               Semester VI - Spring                                             SWK 791 Research Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  SWK 780 Advanced Practice Seminar (3)                                             Populations [online] (3)
  SWK 781 Block Field Practicum with Deaf and Hard of                                                                      Total: 12 credits
          Hearing Populations (6)                                                                                    Grand Total: 62 credits
  SWK 791 Research Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing
               Populations [online] (3)                                       Courses Offered:
                                                   Total: 12 credits
                                            Grand Total: 62 credits           SWK 702 Play Therapy (3)
_________________
                                                                                 This course prepares school social counselors and school so-
*May be taken during summer or any semester of the program.
                                                                              cial workers to provide effective psychotherapeutic interventions
                                                                              to deaf and hard of hearing children in school settings through
                                                                              play therapy. Various techniques in play therapy, sand tray
                                                                              therapy, art therapy, and psychodrama will be presented, taking
                                                                              into consideration the child's developmental age and need.
                                                                                 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
                                                                        121
Courses of Study


SWK 705 Human Behavior in the Social                                      of hearing populations. The course looks at the complex inter-
Environment I (3)                                                         play of psychosocial, system, and ecological forces in the life
   This foundation course affirms the central focus of social work         cycle development of individuals who experience deafness. The
practice as the person or human group in interaction with the             course explores forces of oppression and political and economic
social environment. It looks at transactions between people and           influences that impact the behavior, adaptation, and functioning
their environments as complementary parts of a system in con-             of deaf and hard of hearing people.
tinuous interaction. Concepts of biopsycho-social development                Prerequisite: SWK 706.
across the life span are presented. The changing functions of the
family in response to developmental transitions are considered.           SWK 715 Disability Policy: Implications for Deaf
                                                                          and Hard of Hearing Populations (3)
SWK 706 Human Behavior in the Social                                         This course presents specialized content about social
Environment II (3)                                                        welfare policies affecting deaf and hard of hearing people and
   This course examines the behaviors, functions, and structure           people with disabilities. These policies are discussed within
of groups, communities, and organizations known as macro                  the framework of analysis and evaluation to determine future
systems. Students are introduced to theories that explain inter-          directions for policy. The impact of the service delivery,
actions within and between each of these larger systems. The              funding, and organizational systems on the implementation of
course also addresses issues related to equitable distribution of         policy is considered. The course looks at policies for people
goods and services that may be encountered by macro systems.              who are deaf-blind, developmentally disabled, and chronically
   Prerequisite: SWK 705.                                                 mentally ill.
                                                                             Prerequisite: SWK 711.
SWK 707 Introduction to Gerontology (3)
   This course examines the biological, social, and psychological         SWK 717 Cultural Competence (3)
aspects of aging, with special attention to the interrelationship            This course examines theories of cultural and ethnic identity,
between theoretical and practice-oriented knowledge. The                  literature related to the cultures of women, deaf and hard of
course is organized around basic theories and processes of aging          hearing people, gay and lesbian people, ethnic minorities of
and considers developmental issues facing individuals as they             color, and people with disabilities. Because of the complexity of
move through maturity and old age. Cross-cultural issues that             culturally competent social work practice, students are required
shed light on the American experience are examined. Cultural/             to examine personal prejudices, stereotypes, and belief systems
historical, class, gender, ethnic, and minority relationships             that negatively affect the provision of services to diverse
to aging are considered. Selected policy issues related to                populations. Readings on oppression, identity, and minority
developmental changes and needs are introduced where possible,            cultures are supplemented with presentations by experts from the
as are earlier developmental processes that continue into                 community and dialogue with them. The course uses classroom
advanced age.                                                             exercises, written assignments, and objective measurements to
                                                                          increase self-awareness in the context of the student’s personal
SWK 709 Psychodynamic Theories (3)                                        identity and attitudes about difference based on ethnicity,
  This elective course adds depth to the micro practice                   gender, sexual orientation, and disability.
component of the MSW social work curriculum. It focuses on
practice with individuals who have mental health problems.                SWK 741 Social Work Practice I (5)
Students who specialize in clinical social work, counseling, or              This is the first foundation course in the sequence of social
mental health can gain knowledge in assessment and intervention           work practice courses. It focuses on the knowledge, values,
using ego psychology and object relations theory.                         and skills required to intervene with individual, family, and
                                                                          group systems. This course focuses on social work relationships
SWK 711 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)                            as integral components for change. Students gain knowledge
   This course introduces the student to the range and structure          and skill in the use of self in social work practice. There is a
of social welfare policies and services in the United States,             companion lab with this course.
with some material from other countries for international
comparisons. The course looks at how these policies reflect                SWK 742 Social Work Practice II (3)
societal values in responding to human needs, populations at                 This is the second foundation course in the sequence of social
risk, and social problems. Historical perspectives on current             work practice courses. It focuses on the knowledge, values, and
policy choices and issues are discussed. The course discusses             skills required for effective intervention with larger systems
the professional role of social work in evaluating and developing         of organizations and communities. It builds upon knowledge
social welfare policy and identifies opportunities and skills              of interventions with individuals and groups to develop
needed in the process of planned policy change.                           foundation skills such as advocating for clients within complex
                                                                          systems, building coalitions, negotiating with diverse groups,
SWK 713 Issues in Human Behavior and the Social                           assessing community needs, program evalution, development,
Environment: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Populations (2)                     management, proposal writing, understanding budgets, and
   This concentration course, taken in the second year, focuses           supervision.
on human behavior and the social environment of deaf and hard                Prerequisite: SWK 741.
                                                                    122
                                                                                                                         Courses of Study


SWK 743 Social Work Practice with Older Persons                            SWK 755 Research Methods I (3)
and Their Families (3)                                                        This course is the first of a required two-course sequence
   The focus of this course is on assessment and intervention              designed to introduce the process of research, beginning with
with older people and their families. A primary, secondary,                topic choice and covering methodologicalapproaches such
and tertiary intervention model is presented with emphasis on              as surveys and single case design, data collection, ethics and
maintaining independence, using community-based services,                  politics of research, and unique problems of research in social
and preventing institutionalization. The interdisciplinary aspects         work settings. During this course, students select and develop a
of gerontological social work, working with teams, and educat-             topic for their second year special project.
ing as well as learning from other professionals are addressed.
Special attention is given to social work with older people with           SWK 756 Data Analysis (3)
hearing loss; Alzheimer’s and other organic disorders; alcohol                The second semester in the foundation research sequence
abuse; medication problems; bereavement, death, and dying;                 focuses on statistical and qualitative tools that provide the
neglect; abuse and victimization; and social work practice with            student and professional social worker with the means for
racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities.                                     evaluating practice and programs. Descriptive statistics,
   Prerequisite: SWK 707.                                                  inferential statistics, and qualitative techniques of analysis are
                                                                           the focus of this course. The student is introduced to computer
SWK 749 Social Policy and Community Planning with                          technology and its use for data analysis, using software
Aging Persons (3)                                                          packages such as the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences
   This course is part of the required sequence for the aging              for the personal computer (SPSS/PC+), and “The Ethnographer”
and hearing loss concentration. Its focus is on social policy and          software for analysis of qualitative data.
community planning issues related to needs and services for aging             Prerequisite: SWK 755.
people. Questions facing all aging individuals are framed within
two contexts: the cultural context of the aging deaf, and the              SWK 760 School Social Work Practice (3)
special situation of deaf and hard of hearing elderly people. The             This course exposes students to the specialized knowledge,
course’s perspective is to examine how national policy and service         skills, and values needed for effective social work practice with
networks promote or interfere with successful aging and ways               deaf and hard of hearing children and their families within the
in which social work can contribute to improving relevant social           complex ecosystem of their educational settings and broader
policies and programs.                                                     communities. Focus is on 1) assessment, intervention, and
   Prerequisites: SWK 707, 743.                                            prevention in the school setting; 2) collaboration and referral
                                                                           to outside agencies; 3) detection and reporting of child abuse
SWK 751 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing                             and neglect; 4) interprofessional collaboration between social
Populations: Micro Interventions (3)                                       workers and educators to meet the complex needs of at-risk
   This is the first practice course in the concentration, focusing         students. Traditional social work practice (family and group
on the knowledge, values, and skills required for social work in-          counseling, parent education, crisis intervention, and advocacy)
terventions with individuals, families, and group systems where            and emerging models of service delivery (play therapy
there is a deaf or hard of hearing member. Specific skills related          modalities and prevention activities such as psychoeducational
to communication issues, such as use of professional interpret-            approaches in conflict resolution, substance abuse prevention,
ers and the repertoire of visual and expressive techniques, are            etc.) in schools will be covered. School social work roles and
explored.                                                                  functions ranging from formalized data collection procedures
   Prerequisite: SWK 742.                                                  and assessment through contributing to and monitoring the
                                                                           ISP process to purely clinical interventions are covered. This
SWK 752 Practice with Deaf and Hard of Hearing                             class builds on school social work policy, human behavior,
Populations: Macro Interventions (3)                                       and research courses. Societal, cultural, institutional, diversity,
   This is the second concentration practice course with a                 and familial values will be explored in relation to practice and
focus on specialized knowledge and skills needed to work                   student success.
with organizations and communities of which deaf and hard                     Prerequisites: SWK 705, SWK 706, SWK 741, SWK 742.
of hearing people are a part. Building on the foundation-year
principles of intervention with organizations and communities,             SWK 761 School Social Work Policy (3)
this course focuses on the processes of empowerment of deaf and               This course builds a base of knowledge, skills, and values
hard of hearing populations, interventions that increase access to         among graduate social work students which will prepare them
political and social processes in communities and organizations.           for work with deaf and hard of hearing children, adolescents,
Topics include grassroots organizing, planning, administration,            and their families, within the context of the educational setting.
social action, and program evaluation skills.                              Students will develop an understanding of laws and policies
   Prerequisite: SWK 751.                                                  which impact upon the ecosystem of the child which relate
                                                                           to school social work and mental health policies, educational
                                                                           placement and access, poverty, violence, child abuse, and
                                                                           maltreatment, substance abuse, domestic violence, healthcare,

                                                                     123
Courses of Study


social justice, and accessibility. Skills in assessing policy needs,         spring semester, students are placed in settings that require ad-
evaluating policy and policy implications for deaf and hard of               vanced social work practice skills. Students work at their intern-
hearing children, their families, and the educational system will            ship sites for four eight-hour days, totaling thirty-two hours per
be developed. Students will also develop skills to effect change             week or 512 hours for the semester. This is in addition to two
in policies and programs which impede the deaf child's success               online courses. The field practicum is in an agency or school
in school. This course is grounded in professional social work               carefully selected to promote learning in the concentration focus
values and ethics and examines their implications for policy.                of deaf and hard of hearing populations. An experienced M.S.W.
   Prerequisites: SWK 705, SWK 711                                           field instructor supervises the student in the practicum. The goal
                                                                             of the practicum is for students to deepen their knowledge and
SWK 771 Foundation Field Practicum I (3)                                     skills in social work practice, particularly with deaf and hard
   Foundation Field Practicum is a 16-hour-per-week supervised               of hearing populations. The practicum serves as a vehicle for
experience in a social service agency. Under the guidance                    students to integrate knowledge, skills, ethical and professional
of experienced M.S.W. field instructors, students do initial                  values, culturally competent practice approaches, and ongoing
and ongoing assessments, plan and implement interventions                    assessment of the effectiveness of each social work intervention.
designed to bring about personal growth, empower clients and
client systems, and promote social change. The practicum work                SWK 791 Research Practicum I: Deaf and Hard of
includes work with deaf and hard of hearing individuals, hearing             Hearing Populations (3)
and deaf family members, related organizations, and the broader                 This course builds on principles of research taught in the first
community.                                                                   year; the student applies them to an area of interest within the
   Corequisite: SWK 741.                                                     concentration focus of deaf and hard of hearing populations.
                                                                             Review of the literature on Deaf culture, problem definition,
SWK 772 Foundation Field Practicum II (3)                                    research questions/hypotheses, conceptual framework, variable
    This course follows successful completion of SWK 771.                    specification, and development of the instrument are parts of
Students return to their agencies approximately two weeks prior              the scientific approach to be used to generate knowledge and
to the start of classes for 16 hours a week for 17 weeks. Under-             information. The final assignment for the course is the student’s
standing of generalist social work theory and the development of             completed application tothe Institutional Review Board in
intervention skills are expanded during this semester. Students              preparation for data collection and analysis during the second
refine and deepen the goals of their learning contract, as well as            semester.
the skills of assessment and intervention with clients and client               Prerequisite: SWK 756.
systems, including the organization and the community.
    Prerequisite: SWK 771.                                                   SWK 792 Research Practicum II: Deaf and Hard of
    Corequisite: SWK 742.                                                    Hearing Populations (3)
                                                                                This course is the second semester of the advanced research
SWK 780 Advanced Practice Seminar (3)                                        sequence. Students continue their research project (thesis),
   This course is designed to enhance students’ abilities to                 collecting their data, and analyzing findings using computer
integrate micro, mezzo, and macro levels of social work practice             technology where appropriate for quantitative and qualita-
with deaf and hard of hearing populations. Seminar participants              tive analysis. Special issues of analysis and interpretation for
present their own work from field practicum and participate in                research related to deaf and hard of hearing populations are
discussion of the work of peers. Seminar participants and the                considered.
instructor also identify and examine controversial issues and                   Prerequisite: SWK 791.
other issues of concern to the profession in general and to social
work practice with deaf and hard of hearing populations in                   SWK 795      Special Topics (1-3)
particular.
   Corequisite: Final semester of field practicum, SWK 782.                   SWK 799 Independent Study (1-3)
                                                                               This course provides an opportunity for students to design
SWK 781 & SWK 782 Field Practicum with Deaf and Hard                         individual programs that cover particular topics not covered in
of Hearing Populations I & II (6)                                            regular classes.
   Students in the advanced year have a full block placement in                Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
the spring semester while taking two online courses. During the




                                                                       124
                                                                                       The University Community




                           The University Community
                                                   Patron
                                               George W. Bush
                                                  President

                                          Board of Trustees


    Glenn B. Anderson, Chair, Arkansas                           The Honorable John McCain, Arizona


        Cynthia W. Ashby, Georgia                               Nanette Fabray MacDougall,** California


Celia May L. Baldwin, Vice Chair, California                      Alexander E. Patterson,* Connecticut


      Brenda Jo Brueggemann, Ohio                                        Frank Ross, Maryland


          Vinton G. Cerf, Virginia                                    Robert G. Sanderson,* Utah


       Susan J. Dickinson, Colorado                              Benjamin J. Soukup, Jr., South Dakota


    Bill Graham, Secretary,Washington                             Christopher D. Sullivan, New Jersey


        Pamela Holmes, Wisconsin                                       Charles V. Williams, Ohio


      Angela Jorge-Quiñones, Florida                            The Honorable Lynn Woolsey, California


       L. Richard Kinney, Wisconsin                                     Frank H. Wu, Michigan


   The Honorable Ray LaHood, Illinois                                          * Emeritus
                                                                              ** Honorary
        Ken H. Levinson, California




                                                    125
The University Community


                                          University Administration
I. King Jordan, President; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A.,         David de Lorenzo, University Librarian; B.A., Wabash
Ph.D., University of Tennessee                                       College; M.S., Simmons College; J.D., Southern New
                                                                     England School of Law
Jane K. Fernandes, Provost; B.A., Trinity College; M.A.,
Ph.D., University of Iowa                                            Deborah E. DeStefano, Executive Director, Enrollment
                                                                     Services; B.A., M.A., Gallaudet University
Paul Kelly, Vice President, Administration and Finance;
B.S., University of Massachusetts; M.B.A., Babson College;           Katherine A. Jankowski, Dean, Laurent Clerc National
J.D., George Washington University                                   Deaf Education Center; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.Ed.,
                                                                     University of Arizona; Ph.D., University of Maryland
Lindsay Dunn, Special Assistant to the President, Advocacy;
B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A., New York University                Karen Kimmel, Dean, College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and
                                                                     Technologies; B.A., M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D.,
Patricia M. Kunkle, Executive Assistant to the President/            State University of New York, Buffalo
Board Liaison; B.S., Elizabethtown College; M.S.W.,
Gallaudet University                                                 Cynthia M. King, Executive Director, Academic Technology;
                                                                     B.A., University of Delaware; M.Ed., McDaniel College
Catherine Sweet-Windham, Executive Director,                         (formerly known as Western Maryland College); Ph.D.,
Institutional Advancement; B.S., University of North                 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Carolina; M.A., Gallaudet University
                                                                     Carl A. Pramuk, Dean, Student Affairs; B.A., Gallaudet
Fred Weiner, Special Assistant to the President, Planning;           University; M.Ed., American University
B.S., Gallaudet University
                                                                     John Van Cleve, Executive Director, ITS/Press/Marketing;
Thomas E. Allen, Dean, Graduate School and Professional              B.A., Western State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Programs; B.A., Kenyon College; Ph.D., University of                 California, Irvine
Minnesota

David F. Armstrong, Director, Budget; B.A., Ph.D.,
University of Pennsylvania

                                  Administration and Faculty Emeriti
Yerker J. Andersson, Professor Emeritus; B.A., Gallaudet             David S. Martin, Dean/Professor Emeritus; B.A., Yale
University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University;             University; Ed.M., C.A.S., Harvard University; Ph.D., Boston
Ph.D., University of Maryland                                        College

Kurt Beermann, Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., Ph.D.,                Eugene McVicker, Professor Emeritus; B.A., Gettysburg
New York University                                                  College; M.Div., Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get-
                                                                     tysburg; M.A., Columbia University; M.Ph., Ph.D., George
Harry Bornstein, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Rutgers Univer-           Washington University
sity; M.A., Fordham University; Ph.D. American University
                                                                     Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, Professor Emerita; B.A.,
Gilbert Eastman, Professor Emeritus; B.A., Gallaudet                 Denison University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D.,
University; M.F.A., The Catholic University of America               University of California at Berkeley

J. Philip Goldberg, Professor Emeritus; B.A., M.A., Ph.D.,           Richard W. Meisegeier, Professor Emeritus; B.A., St. Olaf
University of Maryland                                               College; M.A., Gallaudet University; Ph.D., University of
                                                                     Maryland
Harvey Goodstein, Professor Emeritus; B.A., Gallaudet
University; M.S., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D.,         Deborah Meranski, Professor Emerita; B.A., Gallaudet
American University                                                  University; M.A., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D.,
                                                                     New York University
Virginia Heidinger, Professor Emerita; A.B., B.S.,
University of Illinois; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia            Ronald E. Nomeland, Professor Emeritus; B.S., Gallaudet
University                                                           University; M.Ed., University of Maryland; M.A., California
                                                                     State University, Northridge; Ph.D., Syracuse University
Doin Hicks, Professor Emeritus; B.A., Arkansas College;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Arkansas                                  James M. Pickett, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Oberlin
                                                                     College; E.T.M. 2/C, U.S. Navy Electronics School; Ph.D.,
Willard J. Madsen, Professor Emeritus; B.A., Gallaudet               Brown University
College; M.Ed. Louisiana State University




                                                               126
                                                                                                        The University Community


H. Neil Reynolds, Professor Emeritus; B.S., Tufts Univer-             Ronald E. Sutcliffe, Dean Emeritus; B.S., Gallaudet
sity; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University                                 University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland

John S. Schuchman, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Butler                   Louis F. Townsley, Professor Emeritus; B.A., M.A.,
University; M.A., Indiana University; J.D., Georgetown                University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Maryland
University Law School; Ph.D., Indiana University
                                                                      Rosemary D. Weller, Professor Emerita; B.A., St. Mary’s
Ausma Smits, Professor Emerita; B.A., Gallaudet                       College; M.A., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D.,
University; M.A., Georgetown University                               University of Maryland

Anne Spragins-Harmuth, Professor Emerita; B.A., Agnes                 Anne D. Womeldorf, Professor Emerita; B.A., King
Scott College; M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina              College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina

Shirley P. Stein, Professor Emerita; B.A., Hunter College;            Herbert Woofter, Professor Emeritus; B.S., Northwestern
M.A., Columbia University                                             University; M.A., Ohio State University


                                                 University Faculty

         College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and                       del Salvador; M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Rutgers
                     Technologies                                     University
                                                                      Barry Bergen, Associate Professor of Government and
Catherine F. Andersen, Professor of Communication                     History; B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., Ph.D.,
Studies; B.S., Ohio University; M.S., Hofstra University;             University of Pennsylvania
Ph.D., Indiana University
                                                                      Julia Bertak, Associate Professor of Family and Child
Donalda Ammons, Professor of Foreign Languages,                       Studies; B.S., M.S., Indiana State University; Ph.D.,
Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.S.,          University of Maryland
McDaniel College (formerly known as Western Maryland
College); Ed.D., Nova University                                      MJ Bienvenu, Assistant Professor of American Sign
                                                                      Language and Deaf Studies; B.A., M.A., Gallaudet
Susan Anthony-Tolbert, Professor of Psychology; A.B.,                 University; Ph.D., The Graduate School, The Union Institute
Marywood College; M.A., Ph.D., Temple University
                                                                      Melani Bleck, Assistant Professor of English; B.A.,
Kathleen Arnos, Professor of Biology; B.A., McDaniel                  University of Colorado, Boulder; M.Sc., Ph.D., University of
College (formerly known as Western Maryland College);                 Edinburgh, Scotland
Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia
                                                                      Lynne Blennerhassett, Professor of Psychology; A.A.,
Ben Bahan, Professor of American Sign Language and Deaf               Housatonic Community College; B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.,
Studies; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.Ed., Ph.D., Boston             University of Cincinnati
University
                                                                      Marcia Beth Bordman, Professor of English; B.A.,
Sharon Barnartt, Professor of Sociology; B.A., Brandeis               University of Missouri; M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D.,
University; M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University         University of Maryland
of Chicago
                                                                      Jill Bradbury, Assistant Professor of English; B.A., Univer-
H-Dirksen L. Bauman, Professor of American Sign                       sity of California, Irvine; M.A., Ph.D., Brown University
Language and Deaf Studies; B.A., Colorado College; M.A.,
University of Northern Colorado; Ph.D., State University of           Derek C. Braun, Associate Professor of Biology; B.A.,
New York at Binghamton                                                Gallaudet University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland

Ann Beasley, Assistant Professor of English; B.A.,                    Lois Bragg, Professor of English; B.A., Pennsylvania State
Huntingdon College; M.Ed., McDaniel College (formerly                 University; M.A., St. Bonaventure University; Ph.D., State
known as Western Maryland College)                                    University of New York at Buffalo

Edward Evans Beasley, Professor of Mathematics and                    Patrick J. Brice, Professor of Psychology; B.A., M.A.,
Computer Science; B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.S., Ph.D.,              Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago
University of Maryland
                                                                      Marquessa Brown, Professor of Social Work; B.A., West
Beth Sonnenstrahl Benedict, Assistant Professor of                    Virginia State College Institute; M.S.W., Howard University;
Communication Studies; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A.,              D.S.W., The Catholic University of America
New York University; Ph.D., Gallaudet University
                                                                      Susan Burch, Associate Professor of Government and
Cristina Berdichevsky, Associate Professor of Foreign                 History; B.A., Colorado College; M.A., Ph.D.; Georgetown
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Universidad               University


                                                                127
The University Community


John F. Canney, Associate Professor of English; B.A., M.A.,           Flavia Frazier, Instructor of American Sign Language and
University of San Francisco                                           Deaf Studies; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A., California
                                                                      State University at Northridge
Scott M. Carollo, Assistant Professor of Art; B.A., Gallaudet
University; M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design                Sumi Funayama, Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.A.,
                                                                      University of Hawaii at Manoa, M.S. M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale
John B. Christiansen, Professor of Sociology; B.S., Carroll           University
College; M.A.T., Antioch College; M.A., University of
Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of California, Riverside                 Dennis Galvan, Professor of Psychology; A.B., University
                                                                      of California, Davis; M.A., Ph.D., University of California,
Carol Cohen, Associate Professor of Social Work; B.S.,                Berkeley
Cornell University; M.A., M.S.W., University of Wisconsin;
D.S.W., Smith College                                                 Marguerite Glass, Associate Professor of Art; B.A.,
                                                                      Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A. Ph.D., University of
Willy Conley, Associate Professor of Theatre Arts; B.S.,              Maryland
Rochester Institute of Technology; M.A., Boston University;
R.B.P., University of Texas, Galveston; M.F.A., Towson                Brian Greenwald, Assistant Professor of Government and
University                                                            History; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A., The George
                                                                      Washington University
Carolyn Corbett, Associate Professor of Psychology; A.B.,
Brown University; M.S., San Francisco State University;               Johnston Grindstaff, Associate Professor of Art; B.A., M.S.,
M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University                            Gallaudet University; M.F.A., George Washington University

Terry H. Coye, Associate Professor of English; B.A., State            Virginia Gutman, Professor of Psychology; A.B., Stetson
University of New York at Binghamton; M.A., Gallaudet                 University; Ph.D., Duke University
University
                                                                      Barbara Hardaway, Professor of English; B.A., American
Elizabeth Creamer, Assistant Professor of Social Work;                International College; M.A., Emerson College; Ph.D.,
B.A., M.S.W., Gallaudet University                                    Howard University

Teresa V. Crowe, Associate Professor of Social Work;                  Judith E. Harkins, Professor of Communication Studies;
B.S.W., University of Maryland; M.S.W., Gallaudet                     BA., M.Ed., McDaniel College (formerly known as Western
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland                             Maryland College); M.A., California State University at
                                                                      Northridge; Ph.D., Gallaudet University
Jane Dillehay, Professor of Biology; B.S., Allegheny
College; Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University                            Kristen Harmon, Associate Professor of English; B.A.,
                                                                      Culver-Stockton College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Tracie Duncan, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts; B.A.,             Missouri -Columbia
Knox College; M.F.A., George Washington University
                                                                      Robert Harrison, Associate Professor of Communication
Cynthia Edwards, Assistant Professor of English; B.S.,                Studies; B.S., Northwestern University; M.A.C.T., University
State University of New York, at Geneseo; M.A., Ed.S.,                of Tennessee; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Gallaudet University
                                                                      Rachel M. Hartig, Professor of Foreign Languages,
Howard L. Egan, Professor of Mathematics and Computer                 Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A.,
Science; B.A., M.A., Washington University; M.S., Johns               Rutgers University; Ph.D., The Catholic University of
Hopkins University; Ph.D., Washington University                      America

Angela V. Farrand, Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts;               James Edward Haynes, Associate Professor of Philosophy
B.A. Gallaudet University; M.F.A., Arizona State University           and Religion; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A., Ph.D.,
                                                                      University of Maryland
James J. Fernandes, Professor of Communication Studies;
B.A., Allegheny College; M.A., Ph.D., University of                   Christopher Heuer, Assistant Professor of English; B.A.,
Michigan                                                              M.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Patricia C. Foley, Instructor of Government and                       Jane D. Hurst, Professor of Philosophy and Religion; B.A.,
History; B.G.S., University System of New Hampshire;                  Smith College; M.A., Ph.D., Temple University
M.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Massachusetts                                                         George E. Ivey, Professor of Mathematics and Computer
                                                                      Science; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D.,
Stephen Fox, Professor of English; B.A., Duke University;             University of Florida
M.A., Ph.D., Emory University
                                                                      E. Lynn Jacobowitz, Associate Professor of American Sign
Carole N. Frankel, Associate Professor of Foreign                     Language and Deaf Studies; B.A., Gallaudet University;
Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., M.A., University          M.Ed., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Gallaudet University
of Pennsylvania
                                                                      Paul Johnston, Professor of Art; B.F.A., Rochester Institute
Paige Franklin, Assistant Professor of English, B.A., M.A.,           of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Gallaudet University; M.A.T.E.S.O.L.; American University
                                                                128
                                                                                                        The University Community


I. King Jordan, Professor of Psychology; B.A., Gallaudet              Jack Mika, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Tennessee                      Computer Science; B.S., Bucknell University; M.S.,
                                                                      Vanderbilt University
Arlene Blumenthal Kelly, Associate Professor of American
Sign Language and Deaf Studies; B.A., M.A., Gallaudet                 Bryan Miller, Associate Professor of Psychology; B.A.
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland                             Stetson University; M.S., Bucknell University; Ph.D., Temple
                                                                      University
Mike Kemp, Professor of American Sign Language and
Deaf Studies; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.Ed., McDaniel             John Douglas Miller, Professor of English; B.A., M.A.,
College (formerly known as Western Maryland College);                 Sacramento State College; Ph.D., University of California,
Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University            Davis

Karen Kimmel, Associate Professor of English; B.A., M.A.,             Margery Miller, Professor of Psychology; B.A., Elmira
West Virginia University; Ph.D., State University of New              College; M.A., New York University; M.S., State University
York, Buffalo                                                         of New York, Albany; M.A., Towson State University; Ph.D.,
                                                                      Georgetown University
Joseph G. Kinner, Associate Professor of Government and
History; B.A., M.A., San Fernando Valley State College;               William L. Millios, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles                          Computer Science; B.S., Gallaudet University; M.S., George
                                                                      Washington University
Deborah A. Krichbaum, Associate Professor of Family and
Child Studies; B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D.,            Constantina T. Mitchell, Professor of Foreign Languages,
University of Maryland                                                Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., George Washington
                                                                      University; Licence ès lettres, Sorbonne; M.A., Middlebury
Fat C. Lam, Professor of Mathematics and Computer                     College; Ph.D., McGill University
Science; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A., George
Washington University; Ph.D., University of Montana                   Janice D. M. Mitchell, Professor of Foreign Languages,
                                                                              Literatures, and Cultures; A.B., Lycoming College;
Camilla Lange, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and                 M.S., Georgetown University; Ed.D., University of Southern
Computer Science; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A.,                   California
McDaniel College (formerly known as Western Maryland
College)                                                              Michael L. Moore, Professor of Chemistry and Physics;
                                                                      B.A., Gallaudet University; M.S., Southern Methodist
Irene Leigh, Professor of Psychology; B.S., Northwestern              University; Ph.D., North Texas State University
University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University
                                                                      Donna Morere, Associate Professor of Psychology; B.S.,
Ellen Loughran, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages,             M.S., University of South Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., University
Literatures, and Cultures; A.B., Chestnut Hill College; M.A.,         of Alabama, Birmingham
Ph.D., University of Virginia
                                                                      Ava Morrow, Assistant Professor of Biology, B.S., Morgan
Herbert Mapes, Associate Professor of Mathematics and                 State University; M.S., Ph.D., Howard University
Computer Science; B.A., M.A.T., Gallaudet University
                                                                      William Moses, Professor of Art; B.A., St. Vincent College;
Harry Markowicz, Associate Professor of English; B.A.,                M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University
University of Washington; M.A., Simon Fraser University
                                                                      Margaret E. Mullens, Professor of Foreign Languages,
Frances Marquez, Instructor of Government and History;                Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Michigan State University;
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Claremont          M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of Maryland
Graduate University
                                                                      Jennifer Nelson, Professor of English; B.A., George
Asiah Mason, Associate Professor of Psychology; B.A.,                 Washington University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
M.A., Ph.D., Western Michigan University                              California, Berkeley
Eileen Matthews, Assistant Professor of English; B.A.,                James Nickerson, Professor of Mathematics and Computer
M.A., Howard University                                               Science; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.S., University of
                                                                      Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Maryland
Deborah Maxwell-McCaw, Associate Professor of
Psychology; B.A., College of St. Benedict; M.A., Gallaudet            Jane Nickerson, Professor of English; B.A., MacMurray
University; Ph.D., George Washington University                       College; M.A., Gallaudet University; Ph.D., University of
                                                                      Maryland
Carolyn McCaskill Henry, Assistant Professor of American
Sign Language and Deaf Studies; B.A., M.A., Gallaudet                 Jane Norman, Professor of Communication Studies; B.A.,
University                                                            Gallaudet University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D.,
                                                                      Howard University
Raymond Merritt, Instructor of Biology; B.A., Gallaudet
University; M.S., George Washington University                        Mohammad Ahmad Diab Obiedat, Associate Professor of
                                                                      Mathematics and Computer Science; B.S., M.S., Yarmouk
                                                                      University - Jordan; Ph.D., Middle East Technical University

                                                                129
The University Community

Diane O’Connor, Professor of English; B.A., LeMoyne                  Martha Sheridan, Associate Professor of Social Work;
College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University                            B.A., Gallaudet University; M.S.W., University of Maryland;
                                                                     Ph.D., Ohio State University
Russell C. Olson, Associate Professor of Government and
History; B.A., M.A., Georgetown University                           Jean Shickel, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and
                                                                     Computer Science; B.A., M.A., Gallaudet University
Carielyn Palmer, Assistant Professor of English; B.S.,
University of Wisconsin, at Milwaukee; M.A., Ph.D.,                  Shirley E. Shultz Myers, Professor of English; B.A.,
Gallaudet University                                                 University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University

David W. Pancost, Professor of English; A.B., Wabash                 David Snyder, Professor of Chemistry and Physics; B.S.,
College; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University                                Boston College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University

David Penna, Associate Professor of Government and                   Caroline Solomon, Assistant Professor of Biology; B.A.
History; B.A., M.A., Duquesne University; Ph.D., J.D.,               Harvard University; M.S. University of Washington
University of Denver
                                                                     Charlene Sorenson, Professor of Chemistry and Physics;
Cynthia Peters, Professor of English; B.A., M.A.,                    B.S., St. Andrews Presbyterian College; Ph.D., University of
Gallaudet University; M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D.,           Tennessee, Knoxville
George Washington University
                                                                     Barbara Stock, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and
Pilar Piñar, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages,               Religion; B.S. State University of New York at Geneseo;
Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., University of Granada               Ph.D., Syracuse University
(Spain); M.A., University of Montana; M.A., Ph.D.,
University of Arizona                                                Tonya Stremlau, Professor of English; B.A., Oral Roberts
                                                                     University; M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Louisiana
Ann Powell, Professor of Biology; B.S., Virginia State               State University
College; M.S., Ph.D., Howard University
                                                                     Ian Sutherland, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages,
Janet L. Pray, Professor of Social Work; B.A., Montclair             Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Johns Hopkins University;
State College; M.S.W., Smith College; Ph.D., The Graduate            Ph.D., Duke University
School, The Union Institute
                                                                     Zoltan Szekely, Associate Professor of Mathematics and
Leslie Rach, Associate Professor of English; B.A.,                   Computer Science; B.S., Jozsef University - Hungary; M.S.,
University of Florida; M.A., Gallaudet University; Ph.D.,            Ph.D., University of South Carolina
University of Maryland
                                                                     Judith Termini, Associate Professor of Communication
Lillie S. Ransom, Associate Professor of Communication               Studies; B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., George
Studies; B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., Gallaudet University;          Washington University
Ph.D., University of Maryland
                                                                     Tania Thomas-Presswood, Associate Professor of
Margaret Reichard, Associate Professor of Art; B.A.,                 Psychology; B.A., Long Island University; M.A., Ph.D.,
University of Delaware; M.A., University of Michigan;                Hofstra University
M.F.A., University of the Arts, Philadelphia
                                                                     Linda Thompson, Assistant Professor of Foreign
Buck Rogers, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages,               Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Oswego State
Literatures, and Cultures; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A.,         University; M.A., Middlebury College
George Mason University
                                                                     Benson Tong, Assistant Professor of Government and
Donna F. Ryan, Professor of Government and History; B.A.,            History; B.A., Science University of Malaysia; M.A., Ph.D.,
Wheaton College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University                  The University of Toledo

Tracey Salaway, Associate Professor of Art; B.F.A., M.F.A.,          Walter E. Trafton, Jr., Professor of Chemistry and Physics;
Rochester Institute of Technology                                    B.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois

James A. Schiller, Instructor of Social Work; B.A.,                  Tsui-hsia Irene Tseng, Associate Professor of Mathematics
University of Southern California; M.S.W., Adelphi                   and Computer Science; B.A., Chen Kung University; M.A.,
University                                                           M.S., Ohio University

Pia Seagrave, Professor of English; B.A., M.A., Eastern              John V. Van Cleve, Professor of Government and History;
Michigan University; Ph.D., Michigan State University                B.A., Western State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
                                                                     California, Irvine
Paul Setzer, Professor of Art; B.A., Gallaudet University;
M.F.A., George Washington University                                 Mairin Veith, Instructor of Government and History; B.A.,
                                                                     Gallaudet University; M.A., University of Limerick
Vicki Jo Shank, Professor of Mathematics and Computer
Science; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.Ed., McDaniel                 Margaret Vitullo, Associate Professor of Sociology; B.S.,
College (formerly known as Western Maryland College);                Rice University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan
Ph.D., George Mason University
                                                               130
                                                                                                       The University Community


Florence Vold, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and                Thomas F. Baldridge, Associate Professor of Business; A.B.,
Computer Science; B.A., Gallaudet University; M.A.,                  Harvard University; M.B.A., J.D., University of California,
California State University, Northridge                              Berkeley; M.F.A., University of Southern California

Mark Weinberg, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages,             Scott J. Bally, Associate Professor of Hearing, Speech, and
Literatures, and Cultures; C.E.L.G., Universite de                   Language Sciences; B.S., Truman State University; M.S.,
Montpellier; B.A., Queens College; M. Phil., Yale University         Colorado State University; M.S.W. Gallaudet University;
                                                                     Ph.D., The Union Institute
Tammy Weiner, Associate Professor of Psychology; B.A.
Lenoir-Rhyne College; M.A., CAGS/Ed.S., Gallaudet                    Roger Beach, Professor of Counseling; B.A., University
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland                            of Northern Colorado; M.S., University of Arizona; Ed.D.,
                                                                     University of Maryland
Stephen Weiner, Associate Professor of Communication
Studies; B.A., M.A., Gallaudet University; Ed.D., American           Jean S. Berube, Assistant Professor of Physical Education
University                                                           and Recreation; B.S., M.S., University of Maryland

Barbara White, Professor of Social Work; B.A., Gallaudet             Barbara A. Bodner-Johnson, Professor of Education; B.A.,
University; M.S.W., University of Maryland; D.S.W., The              Creighton University; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D.,
Catholic University of America                                       Syracuse University

Bruce A. White, Professor of English; B.A., Tufts                    Andrew Brinks, Assistant Professor of Physical Education
University; M.Ed., M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., University           and Recreation; B.S., Gallaudet University; M.A., McDaniel
of Maryland                                                          College (formerly known as Western Maryland College)

Robert Williams, Professor of Psychology; B.A.; New                  Bernard Brown, Assistant Professor of Business; B.S.,
Mexico State University; Ph.D.; University of Tennessee              Gallaudet University; M.B.A., Western New England College

Kathleen Wood, Associate Professor of English; B.S.,                 Sarah Burton-Doleac, Assistant Professor of Physical
Ball State University; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D.,              Education and Recreation; B.A., Gallaudet University;
Georgetown University                                                M.Ed., McDaniel College (formerly known as Western
                                                                     Maryland College)
Robert P. Zambrano, Professor of English; B.S., M.S.,
Georgetown University; D.A., The Catholic University of              Howard Busby, Professor of Counseling; B.S., Southern
America                                                              Illinois University; M.S., University of Kansas; M.A.,
                                                                     California State University; Ph.D., University of Arizona

                                                                     Robbie Carmichael, Assistant Professor of Physical
  Graduate School and Professional Programs                          Education and Recreation; B.S., M.A., Gallaudet University

                                                                     Stephen Chaikind, Professor of Business; B.B.A., Baruch
Robert Ackley, Professor of Hearing, Speech, and Language            College; M.A., City College of New York; Ph.D., City
Sciences; B.S., Cornell College; M.Ed., McDaniel College             University of New York Graduate School and University
(formerly known as Western Maryland College); Ph.D.,                 Center
University of Colorado
                                                                     Deborah Chen Pichler, Assistant Professor of Linguistics;
Isaac Agboola, Professor of Business; B.S., M.B.A.,                  B.A., B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University
Gallaudet University; Ph.D., University of Maryland                  of Connecticut
Thomas E. Allen, Professor of Educational Foundations and            Emilia Chukwuma, CPA, Associate Professor of Business;
Research; A.B., Kenyon College; Ph.D., University of                 B.A., Gallaudet University; M.S., University of Baltimore
Minnesota
David F. Armstrong, Associate Professor of Business; B.A.,           M. Diane Clark, Professor of Educational Foundations and
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania                                    Research; B.A., Shippensburg State College; M.A., Marshall
                                                                     University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina
Cynthia Bailes, Professor of Education; B.A., Gallaudet
University; M.A.T., Augustana College; Ph.D., University of          Steven Collins, Assistant Professor of Interpretation; B.A.,
Maryland                                                             M.A., Gallaudet University; Ph.D., The Union Institute and
                                                                     University
Matthew Bakke, Assistant Professor of Hearing, Speech,
and Language Sciences; B.S., Cathedral College; M.A.,                Cynthia Compton, Associate Professor of Hearing,
Teachers College Columbia University; M.S., Brooklyn                 Speech, and Language Sciences; B.A., Douglass College,
College; Ph.D., City University of New York                          Rutgers University; M.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., City
                                                                     University of New York
Kathryn Baldridge, Associate Professor of Physical
Education and Recreation; B.S., Indiana University; M.A.,            Valerie Dively, Associate Professor of Interpretation; B.A.,
California State University, Northridge                              M.A., Gallaudet University; Ph.D. Union Institute




                                                               131
The University Community

E. Ronald Dreher, Professor of Physical Education and                 Michael A. Karchmer, Professor of Educational
Recreation; B.A., Western State College; M.S., Arizona State          Foundations and Research; B.A., Rice University; M.A.,
University; Ph.D., University of Utah                                 Ph.D., Emory University
Francis Duffy, Professor of Administration and Supervision;           Paul Kelly, CPA, Professor of Business; B.S., University
B.S., Mansfield University; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of                of Massachusetts; M.B.A., Babson College; J.D., George
Pittsburgh; M.A.S., The Johns Hopkins University                      Washington University
Paul Dudis, Assistant Professor of Linguistics; Hunter                Cynthia King, Professor of Educational Foundations and
College, City University of New York; M.A., Gallaudet                 Research; B.A., University of Delaware; M.Ed., McDaniel
University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley                 College (formerly known as Western Maryland College);
                                                                      Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Carol Erting, Professor of Education; B.S., M.A.,
Northwestern University; Ph.D., American University                   Thomas N. Kluwin, Professor of Educational Foundations
                                                                      and Research; B.A., Marquette University; M.A., University
Peter J. Fitzgibbons, Research Scientist, Hearing, Speech,            of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Stanford University
and Language Sciences; B.S., Tufts University; M.S.,
University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Northwestern University           Carol J. LaSasso, Professor of Hearing, Speech, and
                                                                      Language Sciences; B.S., University of Colorado; M.A.,
Laurene E. Gallimore, Associate Professor of Education;               University of Denver; Ph.D., University of Maryland
B.S., University of Nebraska; M.Ed., McDaniel College
(formerly known as Western Maryland College); Ph.D.,                  Jeffrey Lewis, Professor of Counseling; B.A., Gallaudet
University of Arizona                                                 University; Ph.D., New York University
Barbara Gerner de Garcia, Associate Professor of                      Scott K. Liddell, Professor of Linguistics; B.S., Weber State
Educational Foundations and Research; B.A., Carnegie-                 College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
Mellon University; Ed.M., Ed.D., Boston University
                                                                      Linda Lytle, Assistant Professor of Counseling; B.A.,
Ann E. Graziadei, Professor of Physical Education and                 Gallaudet University; M.A., Ph.D., The Catholic University
Recreation; B.S.E., State University of New York, at                  of America
Cortland; M.S., Indiana University; Ed.S., University of
Georgia; Ph.D., University of Maryland                                Richard Lytle, Professor of Education; B.A., University
                                                                      of California at San Diego; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of
Simon Guteng, Associate Professor of Education; B.A.,                 Maryland
M.A., Gallaudet University; Ph.D., University of Arizona
                                                                      Ceil Lucas, Professor of Linguistics; B.A., Whitman
Jan Hafer, Professor of Education; B.A., Shepherd                     College; M.A., University of Texas at Austin; M.S., Ph.D.,
College; M.Ed., McDaniel College (formerly known as                   Georgetown University
Western Maryland College); Ed.D., University of Maryland
                                                                      James Mahshie, Professor of Hearing, Speech, and
Wendy D. Hanks, Associate Professor of Hearing, Speech,               Language Sciences; B.S., LeMoyne College; M.S., Ph.D.,
and Language Sciences; B.S., M.C.D., Brigham Young                    Syracuse University
University; Ph.D., Wichita State University
                                                                      Fred Mangrubang, Associate Professor of Education;
Diane Hottendorf, Professor of Physical Education and                 A.A.S, Rochester Institute of Technology; B.S., M.A., East
Recreation; B.A., California State University; M.S., Ph.D.,           Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Maryland
University of Southern California
                                                                      Anita Marie Marchitelli, Professor of Physical Education
Patricia L. Hulsebosch, Professor of Education; B.A., M.A.,           and Recreation; B.S., M.A., University of Maryland; Ed.S.,
University of South Florida; Ph.D., University of Illinois at         Gallaudet University
Chicago
                                                                      William J. A. Marshall, Professor of Administration and
Jay Innes, Professor of Education; B.A., M.Ed., University            Supervision; A.B., Stonehill College; M.S., Gallaudet
of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Gallaudet University                         University; Ed.D., University of Illinois
Patricia Johanson, Professor of Business; B.A., M.A.,                 Susan Mather, Professor of Linguistics ; B.A., M.A.,
Brigham Young University; Ph.D., George Washington                    Gallaudet University; Ph.D., Georgetown University
University
                                                                      William P. McCrone, Professor of Counseling; B.A.,
Judith L. Johnson, Professor of Education; B.S., Gallaudet            Canisius College; M.A., The Catholic University of America;
University; M.A., Eastern Michigan University; Ph.D.,                 Ed.D., University of Arizona; J.D., Georgetown University
Gallaudet University                                                  School of Law
Robert E. Johnson, Professor of Linguistics; B.A., Stanford           Sandra McLennon, Assistant Professor of Physical
University; Ph.D., Washington State University                        Education and Recreation; B.S., Gallaudet University;
                                                                      M.Ed., McDaniel College (formerly known as Western
Thomas Jones, Professor of Education; B.A., University of             Maryland College); M.Ed., Temple University
South Florida; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers;
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
                                                                132
                                                                                                       The University Community


Donna Mertens, Professor of Educational Foundations                  Risa Shaw, Instructor of Interpretation; A.A., Gallaudet
and Research; B.A., Thomas Moore College; M.S., Ph.D.,               University; B.I.S., George Mason University; M.S.,
University of Kentucky                                               McDaniel College (formerly known as Western Maryland
                                                                     College)
Melanie Metzger, Professor of Interpretation; B.S.,
University of Maryland, University College; M.A., Gallaudet          Anne Simonsen, Professor of Physical Education and
University; Ph.D., Georgetown University                             Recreation; B.A., University of Iowa; M.A., George
                                                                     Washington University; Ph.D., University of Maryland
Christopher Miller, Assistant Professor of Linguistics ;
B.A., M.A., University of Ottowa; Ph.D., Université du               William P. Sloboda, CDP, CPA, Associate Professor of
Québec à Montréal                                                    Business; B.S., Gallaudet University; M.B.A., George
                                                                     Washington University
Robert T. Mobley, Professor of Education; B.A.,
Southeastern College; M.A., Rider College; Ph.D., Gallaudet          Gregory Snyder, Assistant Professor of Hearing, Speech,
University                                                           and Language Sciences; B.A., Wheaton College; M.S., East
                                                                     Carolina University
Donald F. Moores, Professor of Education; B.A., Amherst
College; M.S., Gallaudet University; M.A., California State          Sarah Taub, Associate Professor of Linguistics; B.A.,
University, Northridge; Ph.D., University of Illinois                Williams College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California,
                                                                     Berkeley
Diane Morton, Professor of Counseling; B.S., M.S.,
California State University; Ph.D., Center for Psychological         Helen Thumann, Assistant Professor of Education; B.S.,
Studies                                                              University of Texas at Austin; M.A., Gallaudet University

Mary June Moseley, Professor of Hearing, Speech, and                 Lillian Marie Tompkins, Associate Professor of Education;
Language Sciences; B.S., Phillips University; M.A., Ph.D.,           B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Gallaudet University
Kent State University
                                                                     Qi Wang, Assistant Professor of Business; B.A., Yunnan
Martin Noretsky, Professor of Educational Foundations                University; M.B.A., Pennsylvania State University
and Research; B.A., University of Miami; M.A., Gallaudet
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland                            Maria T. Waters, Associate Professor of Physical Education
                                                                     and Recreation; B.S., James Madison University; M.A.,
Gina A. Oliva, Professor of Physical Education and                   University of Maryland
Recreation; B.A., Washington College; M.A., Gallaudet
University; Ph.D., University of Maryland                            Marshall E. Wick, Professor of Business; B.A., Gallaudet
                                                                     University; M.B.A., University of Toronto; J.D., George
Charles J. Pearce, Professor of Business; B.A., M.A.,                Washington University
D.B.A., George Washington University
                                                                     Edward Wilk, CPA, Associate Professor of Business; B.S.,
Barbara N. Pomeroy, Associate Professor of Physical                  M.B.A., Gallaudet University
Education and Recreation; B.S., West Chester State College;
M.S., Pennsylvania State University                                  Amy Wilson, Assistant Professor of Educational
                                                                     Foundations and Research; B.A., Illinois State University;
Khadijat Rashid, Assistant Professor of Business; B.S.,              Ed.M., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Gallaudet University
Gallaudet University; M.B.A., University of Maryland
                                                                     Cheryl Wu, Assistant Professor of Counseling; B.A., Brown
Carol Cutler Riddick, Professor of Physical Education and            University; M.A., Gallaudet University; Psy.D., California
Recreation; B.A., M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D.,             School of Professional Psychology
Pennsylvania State University
                                                                     Kathleen Zaccagnini, Associate Professor of Physical
Cynthia Roy, Associate Professor of Interpretation;                  Education and Recreation; B.A., Immaculata College; M.A.,
B.S., Southwest Texas State University; M.A., Gallaudet              University of North Carolina; M.A.T., University of North
University; Ph.D., Georgetown University                             Carolina

Marilyn A. Sass-Lehrer, Professor of Education; B.A.,                Frank R. Zieziula, Professor of Counseling; B.A., St.
Queens College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D.,                    John Fisher College; M.S., State University of New York at
University of Maryland                                               Albany; Ph.D., New York University




                                                               133
                                            Gallaudet University Organizational Chart
                                 Special Assistant for Planning
                                    (Congressional Relations,                                                                                                 Executive Assistant/
                                                                                                        Board of Trustees
                                     Institutional Information                                                                                                  Board Liaison
                                Management, Institutional Research)


                                      Executive Director for
                                   Institutional Advancement
                                                                                                                                                                Special Assistant
                                       (Development, Public                                                 President
                                                                                                                                                                 for Advocacy
                                Relations, Media Relations, Alumni
                                            Relations)


                               Vice President, Administration
                                   and Finance Treasurer                                                                                                                           Provost
                                (Facilities and Transportation)                                                                                 Executive Director,                                      Executive Director,
                                                                                                                                               Academic Technology                                       Enrollment Services



            Director, Equal                    Director, Audit
                                                                                                                                                                                                             Director,
             Opportunity                      and Management                Director, Budget                                                   University Librarian
                                                                                                                                                                                                          Honor's Program
              Programs                        Advisory Services




                                                                                                                                                Dean, Graduate School
Executive Director,           Executive Director,          Executive Director, ITS,   Executive Director,          Dean, College of Lib-        and Professional           Dean, Student Affairs     Dean, Laurent Clerc
Business and Support          Finance                      Press/Marketing            Services                     eral Arts, Sciences, and     Programs                                             National Deaf Education
Services                                                                                                           Technologies                                            • Athletics               Center
                              • Cashier's Office           • Gallaudet Press           • Human Resources                                         • Gallaudet Research       • Campus Activities
• Auxiliary Enterprises:      • Financial Operations      • Sign Language Studies     • Insurance                  • Academic Departments         Institute sponsored      • Campus Life             • Kendall School
  Post Office, Bookstore,      • Student Accounts          • Reprographic Services     • Interpreting                (including summer and         Programs                 • Campus Ministries       • Model Secondary
  Kellogg Conference                                      • Information Technology    • Public Safety               enrichment programs)        • Technical and            • Community Service       School
  Hotel, Food Services                                      Services                  • Risk Management                                           Information Support      • Health / Wellness       • NORE
• Health Service                                                                                                   • Associate Dean-            • Faculty Development        Programs                • Information Systems
                                                                                                                   Center for Academic          • IRB                      • Judicial Affairs        • National Mission
                                                                                                                   Programs and Student         • Professional Programs    • Mental Health Center      Planning
                                                                                                                   Services (Academic                                      • Multicultural Student   •Training and
                                                                                                                   Advising,                    • Associate Dean -           Programs                  Professional Develoment
                                                                                                                   Career Center, ELI, First      Graduate Education and   • Orientation Programs
                                                                                                                   Year Experience,               Extended Learning
                                                                                                                   Developmental                  (Graduate School, PST
                                                                                                                   Programs, International        Courses, Online Cours-
                                                                                                                   Programs, Tutorial and         es, CASLL, Leadership
                                                                                                                   Instructional Programs)        Institute)
                                                                     Graduate Academic Calendar*
                                                                              2004 - 2005
                      Culture and Language Colloquium (CLC)                                                                        Spring Semester 2005
August 2-18           Culture and Language Colloquium On-Line                                     January 17             Martin Luther King holiday (no classes)
August 8              Arrival Day for intensive ASL students                                      January 17             All dorms open at 10 a.m. for returning students
August 9-18           Intensive ASL for graduate students                                         January 18             New Student Orientation begins at 9 a.m.
August 18             Arrival Day for on-campus CLC students                                      January 18             Classes begin
August 19-25          Culture and Language Colloquium On Campus                                   January 18             Business registration (payment of tuition, room, and board)
                                                                                                  January 18-
                   Orientation for New Graduate Students (GSO)                                       January 28          Add/drop
August 25            Arrival Day                                                                  January 21             Last day to register
August 26-27         Orientation programs                                                         January 28             Last day to add/drop courses
August 27            Business registration for new students                                       February 14            Last day to withdraw with WD grade. (Forms must be signed
                                                                                                                           and returned to the Registrar’s Office by 4:30 p.m.)
                                   Fall Semester 2004                                             February 28            Last day to change to audit
August 29              All dorms open at 10 a.m. for returning students                           March 10-11            Course registration for 2005 summer school for currently
August 30              Classes begin                                                                                       enrolled students
August 30              Business registration (payment of tuition, room, and board)                March 14-18            Spring Break
Aug. 30-Sept. 10       Add/Drop                                                                   March 15               Last day to submit defensible dissertation to Graduate School
September 3            Last day to register                                                                                office
September 6            Labor Day holiday (no classes)                                             April 5                Last day to defend dissertation (for May graduations)
September 10           Last day to add/drop courses                                               April 11               Course registration for fall 2005 semester for currently
September 28           Last day to withdraw with WD grades. (Forms must be signed                                          enrolled students
                         and returned to the Registrar’s Office by 4:30 p.m.)                      May 2                  Classes end
September 28           Last day to change to audit                                                May 2                  Last day to withdraw with WP/WF grades. (Forms must be
October 19             Enrichment Day (no classes)                                                                         signed and returned to the Registrar’s Office by 4:30 p.m.)
November 8             Course registration for spring 2005 semester for currently                 May 2                  Last day to change incomplete grades from previous semester
                         enrolled students                                                        May 3                  Study Day
November 24-26         Thanksgiving holiday                                                       May 4                  Final examination period begins
December 10            Graduation application deadline for Dec. and May graduation                May 7                  Final examination period ends
December 10            Classes end                                                                May 8                  All dorms close at noon
December 10            Last day to withdraw with WP/WF grade. (Forms must be                      May 9                  All grades due from faculty no later than 4 p.m.
                         signed and returned to Registrar’s Office by 4:30 p.m.)                   May 12                 Graduate Awards and Hooding Ceremony
December 10            Last day to change Incomplete grades from previous semester                May 13                 Commencement exercises
December 10            Last day for Consortium registration for Spring 2005 semester
December 13            Study Day                                                                                                  Summer Sessions 2005**
December 14            Final examination period begins
December 17            Final examination period ends                                              May 16-August 5        Graduate summer school 1st session
December 18            All dorms close at noon
December 18            Winter Break begins                                                        ** NOTE: There are three sessions of summer school, but graduate programs may schedule
December 20            All grades due from faculty no later than 4 p.m.                           courses of varying duration any time within this period. Consult program directors for details
                                                                                                  on particular courses. Also, instructors may use their discretion in scheduling make-up classes
* This calendar is subject to change due to circumstances beyond the University’s control or as   for days lost to Memorial Day Holiday in May and July 4th Holiday in July.
deemed necessary by the University in order to fulfill its educational objectives.
                                                                                            Index
Academic Appeals ...................................................................20              Gallaudet Child Development Center ......................................33
Academic Calendar ................................................................135               Gallaudet Credo .........................................................................4
Academic Honesty Policy ........................................................21                  Gallaudet Interpreting Service .................................................10
Academic Probation and Dismissal .........................................16                        Gallaudet Map........................................................................136
Academic Technology................................................................9                Gallaudet Mission ......................................................................3
Accreditation ..............................................................................3       Gallaudet Vision Statement........................................................3
Administration and Faculty Emeriti.......................................126                        Global Internship Program.........................................................7
Admission ................................................................................11        Grading System........................................................................17
Archives .....................................................................................9     Graduate Academic Calendar ................................................135
Athletics/Intramurals ................................................................34            Graduate School and Professional Programs ...........................36
Board of Trustees ...................................................................125            Graduate School and Professional Programs
Campus Life .............................................................................32            Faculty ...............................................................................131
Campus Location .......................................................................1            Graduate Student Association ..................................................34
Campus Map ..........................................................................136            Graduate Student Orientation ....................................................6
Campus Ministries ...................................................................34             Hearing and Speech Center ......................................................33
Career Center .............................................................................8        History of Gallaudet...................................................................2
Center for American Sign Language Literacy ...........................6                             Immunization Requirements ....................................................11
College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and Technologies.............102                                 International Students
College of Liberal Arts, Sciences, and Technologies                                                    Admission ...........................................................................12
   Faculty ...............................................................................127          Financial Aid .......................................................................30
Commencement .......................................................................16                 International Internship Program ..........................................7
Confidentiality of Student Records ..........................................22                      Mental Health Center ...............................................................33
Consortium of Universities ........................................................9                Multicultural Student Programs ...............................................34
Courses of Study                                                                                    Notetaking Services ...................................................................7
   Administration and Supervision..........................................37                       Office for Students With Disabilities .........................................7
   American Sign Language and Deaf Studies .....................102                                 Requirements for Degrees........................................................18
   Biology ..............................................................................106        Residence Halls........................................................................32
   Counseling ..........................................................................46          Room and Board ......................................................................23
   Education ............................................................................53         Sexual Harassment Policy........................................................21
   Educational Foundations and Research ..............................71                            Sign Communication at Gallaudet .............................................4
   English ..............................................................................106        Student Academic Center ...........................................................9
   Government and History ...................................................106                    Student Classification.................................................................5
   Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences ...........................75                             Student Health Services ...........................................................33
   Interpretation .......................................................................86         Student Publications.................................................................35
   Linguistics ...........................................................................92        Student Right-to-Know Act .....................................................21
   Physical Education and Recreation .....................................99                        Transcripts and Diplomas ........................................................20
   Psychology ........................................................................108           Transportation Services............................................................33
   Social Work .......................................................................117           Tuition and Fee Schedule .........................................................24
Culture and Language Colloquium ............................................6                       Tutorial Center ...........................................................................8
English Works! ...........................................................................8         University Administration......................................................126
Fees                                                                                                University Faculty..................................................................127
   Enrollment Fees ..................................................................23             University Library......................................................................9
   Room and Board .................................................................23               Vehicle Registration .................................................................33
   Living Expenses ..................................................................25             Visiting Gallaudet ......................................................................1
   Additional Fees ...................................................................25            Withdrawals and Refunds ........................................................26
Financial Aid ............................................................................26
   Types of Financial Aid ........................................................28
   Processing of Financial Aid ................................................30




                                                                                                  137

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:56
posted:7/23/2011
language:English
pages:139