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					    “CAREERING TOWARDS
THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY”
 Are business & Academia geared up to provide
   a future for high level researchers in Ireland?




                                    9am - 2pm
                          30th November 2005
                       The Helix, DCU, Dublin 9
 PROF. FERDINAND
VON PRONDZYNSKI
President of IUA, President of DCU




 Welcome to the Conference
                     MR MICHEÁL
                      MARTIN T.D
Minister for Enterprise, Trade & Employment




                      Opening Address
                      DAMIEN
                      CLANCY
Managing Director, Aughinish Alumina




 Strategic Development of R&D
           Links with Academia
Sustainable R&D Investment for
Sustainable Research Careers



      Damien Clancy MD
           Aughinish Alumina Ltd
Aughinish Alumina

                               Located 25 miles west of Limerick City on
                                the Shannon Estuary
                               Large Heavy Chemical Plant
                               Complex and highly integrated process
                               Completed expansion to 1.8Mtpa of Alumina
                                (Aluminium Oxide) in 2005
                               Operating in a commodity industry which is
                                very competitive, cost driven with little or no
                                product differentiation.




                Aughinish
Company Strategy

   Objective: To maintain margin
       In achieving this we must be productive and efficient


   3 Fold
     Manage Environmental and Energy Costs
     Increase production to reduce fixed costs and overheads
     Position R&D to protect the operation in the medium term
R&D History


                 Pre -1999
                      Directed and carried out by

       ?               ALCAN off-shore in
                       laboratories in Canada and
                       in the UK
                 Post -1999
                    R&D Vacuum
                    Decreased dependence on
                     ALCAN
                    Sourced new R&D
                     providers
                    Developed our R&D
                     Management Capability
R&D Strategy                                                     University of
                                                                  Limerick




To use a small number of world-
     class R&D institutions to
      provide Aughinish with
  innovative solutions in line with
     the company’s business
              strategy




                                             Australia
                                      • World Class Refineries
                                       •World Class Research
    Collaboration with University of Limerick
                                                                  Internationally recognised
                                                                  Alumina Process Research
                                                                  Centre

                                                      Capital Infrastructure
                                                      Investment
                                          Marie Curie Programme
                      Collaborative Agreement
                      €5.2 million over 4 years
                      Programme Focused
                      Knowledge Retention
             Low Key activity
              in a number of Areas
             Structures put in place
Little R&D
Control

1999          2002           2003          2004          2005            2006         2007
No of Researchers funded by Aughinish at UL

30

25

20

15

10

5

0
     1999   2000   2001   2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007
Aughinish’s R&D Providers

   UL                                          Australia
     Close by                                       Very knowledgeable on Alumina
     World Class Facilities                          Refinery Processes
     Academic Staff                                 Developed expertise over past 20
             Very experienced in our sub             years with Industry support
              processes                              Excellent Facilities
             Willingness and interest               History of Industry Collaboration
        Government and EU Funding                   Keen understanding of Industry
                                                      and its needs
                                                     Very forward thinking


               AAL encouraging the development of links between groups through
               Practical means. Increases and broadens the experience of
                 researchers
    Our Collaborative Model
    2003 signed a 4 year Collaborative Agreement with UL worth €5.2 million
    Moved towards Programme Based R&D
         Building R&D groups around a particular area of expertise, e.g.
              Crystallisation
              Computional Fluid Dynamics
         Committed Funding over a longer period
              Continuity
              Build up core expertise
              Retention of knowledge and skills
              Very suitable for training of new researchers
         Use the group to research on specific projects with a close link back into
          Industrial Organisation
              Access to laboratories
              Access to experience technical staff
              Industrial experience for researcher
         Encourage synergies between R&D groups
         Link UL to other R&D institutions world-wide that have applicable experience
         Bring the experts in the field to UL through an annual conference
              Generate Contacts
              New techniques
         Accelerate through Marie Curie Programme
Structure of Relationship

                             Steering Committee
                                    3 AAL
                                                                Bi Annual Updates
                              VP Research (UL)
                               Industry Liaison                 To CEO’s
                                 2 Academics




                             R&D Leader (AAL)



             Programme 1       Programme 2        Programme 3




      Collaborative Agreement
                    A High Level view of how the 2 organisations do business together
      Project Agreement (Very Important)
          Project needs to function on a Business Framework not an academic one.
          Needs of the Researcher also addressed
Return on Investment

   No short term gains
   Takes about 2 years for results to flow
   Very confident about the long term potential to generate a high rate
    of return
   Using Public funding programmes to reduce risk and parallel /
    accelerate research activities
    Collaborative R&D Funding – An Industry Perspective


   Very good support on the ground
        Industry Liaison at University level
        CHIU
   Very good facilities
        Access to large scale European Research Facilities to complement UL
         laboratories


   BUT
      A recognition by all that University – Industry Collaboration is a key
       means of economic development
      A more co-coordinated strategy through 1 government agency
             An array of government bodies involved often with different objectives
Our experience of Collaborative R&D
   A Partnership but unlike regular commercial relationships
             Develop synergies between technical disciplines
                   Academic structures often make this difficult
             Be conscious of the needs of the Researcher
                   Publication, publication, publication
                   Some freedom in the research is needed, you are employing a skilled scientist or
                    engineer not a technician.

        Think long term
        Examine the Australian model of Co-operative Research Centres
             Longer term funding models pulling industry and research institutions together.
             3 year project based model is too short for researcher career development and quality
              of research may be suffering.
                      DR. MARY
                       MURPHY
Toxicology Manager, Remedi, NUI Galway




         Experience of International
                    Career Mobility
An Experience of International
and Intersectoral Career Mobility
Mary Murphy, PhD
                   REMEDI
                   National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
                   Tel:+353 91 495166 | Fax: +353 91 495547
                   Email: info@remedi.ie | Web: www.remedi.ie
Traditional Academic Scientist Career Format

• Independent isolated laboratory
• Leadership centers around individual PI
• Small university departments devoted to a single
  discipline
• Substantial teaching commitments
• Individual investigator grant support for research
• Early tenure
• Expects to remain for life
• Main reporting structure includes grant applications
  and peer-reviewed publications
Industry Scientist Career Format
• Team–based approach
• Role of individual scientist less important than
  the team
• Crosses multiple disciplines
• Heavy emphasis on strategic planning and
  project planning
• Short reporting cycle (1 month)
• Constant appraisal and reassessment
• Frequent changes in direction
• Subject to remote commercial pressures
The Academic Laboratory
• Under full control of PI
• Informal
• Written laboratory notebooks
• Frequent public disclosure at conferences, in theses
  and abstracts
• Poor appreciation of the value of IP
• Little attention to Standard Operating Protocols
• Little attention to monthly reports
• Hands-off approach by senior management
• No application of Good Laboratory Practice
• Often poor safety standards
 The Industrial Laboratory
• Matrix management, multiple reporting structures
• Highly organised
• Document control systems
• Strong emphasis on protection of IP
• Public disclosure only after patent filing
• All procedures defined by Standard Operating Protocols
• Multiple written reports (at least monthly)
• Full compliance with GLP necessary
• Strong emphasis on safety
University-Industry Partnership

•   Many scientists now move between industry and
    academia
•   University research must have industry relevance (SFI,
    IDA)
•   Traditional university department structure less relevant
•   Centre-like behaviour
•   Economic development depends on research having
    some industrial relevance
•   New metrics include patents filed, commercialization
    activities based on spin-off enterprise and technology
    licensing
•   Technology Transfer Office more relevant
International and Intersectoral
     Ireland                     US
   Undergraduate
    Postgraduate
   Diagnostic R/D
Postdoctoral Research
                          Academic Research
                           Biotech. Research
                        (Stem Cell Co. Start-Up)

 Academic Research
      CSET
Academic Research Experience
• Ireland
   – Small research groups
   – Little exposure to other research strands or
     collaborative research
   – Few post-doctoral researchers
   – Specific projects with limited development of
     skills
   – Few opportunities to develop presentation or
     report writing skills
   – Little input by clinicians
Academic Research Experience
• US
  – Clustered research
  – Groups with broad range of skills
  – High proportion of postdoctoral researchers
  – Greater emphasis on presentations
  – Strong involvement of clinicians
Industrial Research Experience
• Stem cell company start-up
   – Multi-tasking
   – Project-oriented with multidisciplinary group
      • Research
      • Quality assay development
      • Pre-clinical development
      • Regulatory submissions
   – Strong emphasis on IP but also publications
     and conference presentations
   – Grant-writing enabled and encouraged
Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI)

   • Located at NUI, Galway and UCHG
   • Funded under SFI campus-industry partnership
     Centres for Science Engineering and Technology
     (CSET) programme
   • Vision
      – To develop a new and realisable paradigm for
        medicine in the future utilising minimally invasive
        therapeutic approaches to promote organ and
        tissue repair and regeneration rather than
        replacement
      – Stem cell and gene therapy
Bone Marrow Stem Cells
                                                        Stem Cell




             Chondroblast   Myoblast      Stromal      Tenoblast   Preadipocyte   Neuralblast
Osteoblast
                             Fusion      Fibroblast




Osteocyte    Chondrocyte    Myocyte    Stromal Cells   Tenocyte     Adipocyte      Neuron
REMEDI Programmes in Stem Cell Biology
       • Adult stem cells
          – Bone marrow
          – Adult peripheral blood
          – Cardiac stem cells
          – Umbilical cord blood
          – Adipose Tissue
       • Stem Cell Proteomics and Phage Display
       • Stem Cell Genomics
       • Transcription factors
       • Regulation of Differentiation
       • Stem cells in disease
          – Osteoarthritis
          – Type 1 diabetes
Target Research Areas in Stem Cell and Gene Therapy

           • Cardiovascular diseases
           • Orthopaedic diseases
           • Pulmonary diseases
           • Neurological diseases
           • Basic stem cell biology
           • Gene vector development
REMEDI Partners
• Medtronic
   – Cardiovascular diseases
• Charles River BioLabs
   – Animal models of human disease
Regenerative Medicine Institute
     Gene                      Adult Stem Cell
    Therapy                       Therapy
    Basic Research                    Genomics

     Immunology                      Proteomics




           Toxicology/Preclinical Testing

                  GMP Manufacturing
                  Clinical Development



         Commercialization
Industry Partnerships and Knowledge Transfer at REMEDI

•   Full partner involvement in drawing up research programme plans
•   Clear reporting structures
•   Involvement of the industry partners in REMEDI management
    activities
•   Quarterly detailed progress reports
•   Regular visits of REMEDI Directors to partner headquarters and vice
    versa
•   Partner membership of the REMEDI IP Advisory Committee and full
    access to information on invention disclosures and patent filings
•   Review of all manuscripts, abstracts, posters etc. prior to submission
•   A close and bilateral working relationship between REMEDI project
    scientists and partner scientists
RESEARCHER Skills for Industry
• Skills that industry needs from researchers
  coming out of university
   – Broad skills base
   – Flexibility
   – Knowledge of GLP, GMP, Quality Issues
   – Understanding of Intellectual Property Issues
   – Knowledge of clinical trial design and regulatory issues
   – Good presentation skills to diverse audiences
   – Understanding of project-oriented management
   – Team-based
   – Deadline-oriented
Can Universities/Institutes meet this challenge?
• More practical courses
• Increase industrial placements
• Team-based projects
• Business modules in science degrees
   – IP
   – Project management techniques
   – Legal/regulatory affairs
• Modules on clinical research strategies
• Modules taught by industry leaders
• Post-graduate entrepreneurial courses
• Business writing courses
Universities/Institutes - Industry


• Greater interaction/trust
• Courses created after consultation
   – University/Industry/Clinicians
• Constant feedback
                BRENDAN
            O’CALLAGHAN
      Plant Manager, Tyco Healthcare




Sourcing Skilled Researchers for
     the Pharmaceutical Industry
                      DR. CONOR
                           LONG
     Project Director, expertiseireland.com




expertiseireland.com – A Gateway to
           Ireland’s Knowledge Base
Conor Long - Project Director
Celia Gallagher - Project Manager
   Expertiseireland.com is owned by IUA
   Funded by InterTradeIreland
Knowledge   Knowledge
   holder   user
  Knowledge      Knowledge
     holder      user
  Academics      Academics
Industrialists   Industrialists
 Consultants     Consultants
       Media     Media
  Knowledge      Knowledge
     holder      user
  Academics      Academics
Industrialists   Industrialists
 Consultants     Consultants
       Media     Media
   expertiseireland.com
       What is it?
       Operational concept
       Current status
       Future developments
What is expertiseireland.com?
   All island portal for expertise
   Large database of professional output
   Simple search tool
   Information on funding opportunities
    (SME)
   Technology transfer opportunities
   Growing database of commercial expertise
    Operational concept

   Simple data collection
   Minimal impact on data providers
   Up-to-date data
   Obvious benefits to all stakeholders
                  UU


Data flow               QUB




                       UCD
NUIG                   TCD
                       DCU
                       NUIM

 UL                    DIT
                       ITT


            UCC
     Current status

   All universities, North and South of the
    border, DIT and ITT contributing expert
    profiles
   Other ITs coming on stream
   Over 4,000 profiles updated daily (50,000
    citations, 30,000 conference presentations)
Future developments

   POP (project opportunities partnership)
    Search
   Direct access to source material
   Linkage to European expertise portal
Thanks


   CHIU
   InterTradeIreland
   Dr Celia Gallagher
    PANEL DISCUSSION

    Damien Clancy – Aughinish Alumina
Dr. Mary Murphy – Remedi, NUI Galway
Brendan O’Callaghan – Tyco Healthcare




         Chaired by: Dr Jim Ryan,
          Circa Consulting Group
    “CAREERING TOWARDS
THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY”
 Are business & Academia geared up to provide
   a future for high level researchers in Ireland?




                    30 Minute Coffee Break
                          - Top Floor Foyer
          PROF. KEVIN
                RYAN
Principal Investigator, ISERC, UL




    Funding – The Oil in the
    Wheels of Collaboration
      University of Limerick
                  OLLSCOIL LUIMNIGH



       Business – Academia Linkages
                Examples of Success

                  Professor Kevin Ryan

“Careering Towards the Knowledge Society” – IUA/IBEC 30 November 2005
             Contents
• UL‟s History (very brief)
• Industry & Business Interaction
    • Examples of Success
•   The ISERC CSET
•   Career and Salary Issues
•   Structural Issues
•   Summary
    National Technological Park
• Established 1984 by
  • Shannon Development
  • University of Limerick
  • Local agencies
• Home to 90
  organisations
  • Multinationals, R&D
    entities, Irish tech.
    Companies, Campus
    Companies
  • Innovation centre
Industry & Business Interaction
 Cooperative education and
  graduate placement.
 Lifelong Learning/Executive
  education.

 Industrial Research Policy
 Spin-Offs and FDI
    Co-operative Education
• Some 2,000 placements per year
• Employer contribution of €19m p.a.
• Network: over 1,400 employer organisations.
• 35% placements are international
• 700 employers visit the campus annually
• First point of contact with the University –
  acquire and develop company intelligence.
Life-Long Learning and Executive
            Education
• AUA (Atlantic University Alliance) Industry Education
   – MSc In Technology Management by Distance Learning
   – First tri-University Degree in Ireland – UL, NUIG, UCC
   – Product innovation, technology transfer, R&D processes,
     organisation & process improvement, Leadership and
     Change Management
   – Indigenous & FDI Companies
   – Approx 40 Students per cohort – currently in 3rd Year
Life-Long Learning and Executive
            Education
 • ICBE – Irish Centre for Business Excellence
    • The ICBE acts as a central information resource from which
      organisations gain knowledge, advice and support
    • Learning is facilitated through direct contact between member
      companies and through the sharing of best practices and
      benchmarking


 • SNS – Supply Network Shannon
    • An Industry-led initiative aimed at Representing, Promoting,
      Developing and Connecting Together Sub-Supply companies in
      the Shannon Region
   Industrial Research Policy
• Focus on supporting development of a high
  tech indigenous sector.
  – Use of collaboration and mentor initiatives, TTI.
  – Research and IP licensing
• Anchor current and future FDI.
  – research and IP licensing
• Develop new high potential start-ups (HPSU).
  – Use campus company formations as preferred
    method of commercialisation, over licensing.
Spin-offs and FDI – Some Examples
 • Piercom (Software Re-engineering Tools & Services)
    –   Arose from EU Funded Project (REDO) ‟89-‟94
    –   Spun-off in ‟93 – 3 rounds of VC up to ‟99
    –   Peaked at 45 employees
    –   MBO and restructuring result in small, refocused company


 • QAD (FDI – Californian ERP Software Supplier)
    –   Attracted by Research (especially REDO & Piercom) in „97
    –   Established Software R&D for EMEA on Natl. Tech. Park
    –   Continuing research relationship with UL
    –   Partner in ISERC in „05
• Research spin-off from the Stokes Research
  Institute at University of Limerick.
• €1 million in venture capital funding (Kernel
  Capital) – September 05.
• New cancer diagnostic equipment, based on
  analysis of the human genome.
• Micro-fluidic Analysis System’ for cancer
  diagnosis.
• Based on work carried out in the Interaction
  Design Centre at the University of Limerick (pre-
  incorporation stage).
• Control digital parameters in multimedia
  applications with breath.
• DAM (Domestic Asthma Management) games
• Targeting youth market using mobile
  telecommunication.
 Aughinish Alumina Relationship
To Date:
• Aughinish initiated - mid 2001
• Needs driven from outset
• Project Based – clear goals and outputs.
• Benefited from PRTLI Investment – MSSI.
• Use of Standard Draft Agreements.
• Clear communications - Steering Committee.
• €5.2m investment - October 2003
      Irish Software Engineering
            Research Centre

• SFI funded CSET – €11.7m
• Involving researchers from
  –   University of Limerick
  –   Dublin City University
  –   Trinity College Dublin
  –   University College Dublin
                ISERC's Mission…
To advance the state-of-the-art in strategic
 software engineering for specific application
 domains

  ISERC will
    produce domain focused, world class research
    of industrial relevance
    that gives “Ireland Inc” the
     maximum competitive advantage

Involves researchers moving between universities and
  industry
          Industrial Partners

•   Aimware                 •   Intel Ireland Ltd
•   Analog Devices (I)      •   Kugler Maag cie
•   Ashling Microsystems    •   Motorola Ireland
•   Beaumont Hospital       •   Piercom
•   Robert Bosch GmbH       •   QAD Ireland Ltd
•   IBM Ireland             •   Silicon & Software
•   Iona Technologies plc       Systems
                            •   eVolve Systems
      Career and Salary Issues
• Grade6 Admin– recent graduate – €33k – 45k
• University Lecturer (IoT higher!) – €47k- 76k
• Technician – recent grad – € 34k – 43k
• PostDoc – recent PhD – € 35k – 50k
• Research Fellow – PhD + Significant
  Achievement + Independent Researcher €58k
  – 73k
• Not to mention permanency, pension etc.
            Structural Issues
• Value attached to experience
  – Of industry by academia
  – Of academic by industry
• Limited long-term research until recently
• One example – Barry Macken
  – First Head of Electronics at NIHE Limerick ‟75
  – World-wide Head of Quality – Analog Devices ‟95
  – First Director of (Academic) Quality – UL „00
                  Summary
• At UL
  – Industrial Collaboration is well established
  – Experience has been overwhelmingly positive
  – Academia and Industry mutually benefit
• But obstacles remain to „careering‟ further…
  – Must have a well-paid research career structure
  – Need clear and flexible incentive systems
  – Must have broader scorecard for advancement
• „We‟ve only just begun..‟
                    BRENDAN
                     CREMEN
        Director of Engineering, Xilinx




Opportunities for Post Graduates
 in the Irish Electronics Industry
Post Graduate
Opportunities in
Irish Electronics
Brendan Cremen
Director of Engineering
Xilinx Ireland
November 2005
Semiconductor Market Size (End Market)
                                            by iSuppli (CAGR 2004 - 2009 = 8%)
                                                                                                          $336,508
       350,000
                               Revenue (Shipments)                                             $305,365              Industrial
                                 (In USD $Millions)                                 $277,654
       300,000
                                                                         $249,851                                    Automotive
                                                       $240,375
       250,000                         $226,976
                                                                                                                     Consumer

       200,000           $183,384

                                                                                                                     Wireless
                                                                                                                     Communications
       150,000
                                                                                                                     Wired
                                                                                                                     Communications
       100,000
                                                                                                                     Data Processing

         50,000
                                                                                                                     Total

               0

                       2003           2004          2005E 2006E 2007E 2008E 2009E

Source: iSuppli, Last Updated: Q3 2005, Next scheduled update: Q1 2006
         Consumers Currently Represent the Largest
           Segment of the Semiconductor Industry
  Semiconductor Consumption



      80%
      70%
      60%
      50%
      40%
      30%
      20%
      10%
        0%
               1965
                      1967
                             1969
                                    1971
                                           1973
                                                  1975
                                                         1977
                                                                1979
                                                                       1981
                                                                              1983
                                                                                     1985
                                                                                             1987
                                                                                                    1989
                                                                                                           1991
                                                                                                                  1993
                                                                                                                         1995
                                                                                                                                1997
                                                                                                                                       1999
                                                                                                                                              2001
                                                                                                                                                     2003
                                                                                                                                                            2005E
                                                           Consumer                     IT             Government

Source: SIA and Morgan Stanley Research
           Market Segments that offer
                  High Growth          Large Future Markets
                                       >$3Bn in 2009
                                                                               High Growth Markets
                                                                                   >10% 2004 to
                                   Semiconductor Content                            2009 CAGR
                                 Computing
                                 Desktop PCs                  Computing                      Computing
                                 Enterprise Servers                                          PDAs
                                                              Laptop PCs
                                 Hard Disk Drives                                            Wired
                                 DRAM Modules                 PC Servers                     Routers
                                 Wired                        Flat Panel Displays            SAN Switches
                                 LAN Switches                 Wired                          SAN HBAs
                                 Wireless                                                    xDSL DSLAM
                                                              Digital WAN
                                 Mobile Handsets                                             Optical WAN
                                 Digital Cordless Phones      Wireless                       Wireless
                                 Consumer                     Mobile Comm Infrastructure     Wireless Broadband
                                 Home Audio                   Other Mobile Communications    Wireless LAN
                                 Color TVs                                                   Auto
                                                              Consumer
                                 Digital Settop Boxes                                        Safety and Control
                                 Digital Still Cameras        MP3 Players                    Telematics
                                 Auto                         Digital TVs                    Body Electronics
                                 Entertainment                DVD Recorders                  Sensors
                                 Power Train
                                                              Video Game Controllers
                                 Industrial
                                 Medical Electronics          Flash Storage
                                 Manufacturing Automation     Consumer Appliances
                                 Semi Manufacturing
                                 Security Systems
                                 Military & Civil Aerospace




Source: iSuppli and Morgan Stanley Research
    US Industry Employment Growth
               2002-2012

             Bachelor’s Degree                    28.6%
        Computer SW, Electronic Eng, etc.


               Doctoral Degree                    29.9%
      Computer & Information Scientists




Source; US Dept of Labor, Bureau of Labor Stats
Necessary success factors

•   Knowledge
•   Seed and venture capital & business angels
•   Hosting infrastructure
•   Entrepreneurial environment
•   Constructive risk approach
•   Training/education infrastructure and programs
•   Inbound Marketing
•   Attractive reward systems
•   Theme driven clusters of companies
  Close the Loop & Fuel the Engine
                                              • Only the right
                                                combination of
             Knowledge                          ALL elements
                             Infrastructure
Training /
Education
              creation
                                                can foster a
                   Venture                      successful
                   capital                      regional
                                                development,
Entrepreneurship         Market knowledge       based upon
                                                an
                                                increasingly
                                                knowledge
                                                based society
    Research Pipeline
             Research Programme




               Industry Transfer Projects




                   Industry product development


          Latency ≠Throughput
Hence: long term relationships necessary
      Belgium Observation
• Phase 1: Competence
  – Define goals
  – Build critical mass
  – Establish presence
• Phase 2: Credibility
  – Recognition externally
  – Collaboration with other globally recognised leaders
• Phase 3: Create Wealth
  – Spins-offs
  – Leverage for SME & MNC
Requirement for Industry


   • Quality of personnel

   • Quality of research
      Belgium Observation
• Phase 1: Competence
  – Define goals
  – Build critical mass
  – Establish presence
• Phase 2: Credibility
  – Recognition externally
  – Collaboration with other globally recognised leaders
• Phase 3: Create Wealth
  – Spins-offs
  – Leverage for SME & MNC
               Competition

                      Ireland   Singapore
Population             4.0m       4.2m
GDP                   $154b       $91b
GPD Growth Rate        5.6%       8.4%
Education 3rd level     50%        39%
Computers per 100        42         62
            Semiconductor
• 29 IC Design Companies
  • Infineon, Oki, Broadcom, Marvell, etc.
• 17 Assembly & Test Companies
  • AMD, Linear Tech, Micron, ISE Labs,
• 14 Wafer Fabs
  • Includes latest US $3.6B UMC-Infineon 300mm
• Subcon Services
  • burn-in, failure analysis labs, etc.
• Others
  • Dupont Photomasks to invest US $50-70M over the next
    5 years
  “In the past scientists saw the pursuit of money as
intellectually uninteresting. To do research for industry
    was only for those who couldn‟t get a university
                      appointment”
Post Graduate
Opportunities in
Irish Electronics
Brendan Cremen
Director of Engineering
Xilinx Ireland
November 2005
Semiconductor Market Size (End Market)
                                            by iSuppli (CAGR 2004 - 2009 = 8%)
                                                                                                          $336,508
       350,000
                               Revenue (Shipments)                                             $305,365              Industrial
                                 (In USD $Millions)                                 $277,654
       300,000
                                                                         $249,851                                    Automotive
                                                       $240,375
       250,000                         $226,976
                                                                                                                     Consumer

       200,000           $183,384

                                                                                                                     Wireless
                                                                                                                     Communications
       150,000
                                                                                                                     Wired
                                                                                                                     Communications
       100,000
                                                                                                                     Data Processing

         50,000
                                                                                                                     Total

               0

                       2003           2004          2005E 2006E 2007E 2008E 2009E

Source: iSuppli, Last Updated: Q3 2005, Next scheduled update: Q1 2006
         Consumers Currently Represent the Largest
           Segment of the Semiconductor Industry
  Semiconductor Consumption



      80%
      70%
      60%
      50%
      40%
      30%
      20%
      10%
        0%
               1965
                      1967
                             1969
                                    1971
                                           1973
                                                  1975
                                                         1977
                                                                1979
                                                                       1981
                                                                              1983
                                                                                     1985
                                                                                             1987
                                                                                                    1989
                                                                                                           1991
                                                                                                                  1993
                                                                                                                         1995
                                                                                                                                1997
                                                                                                                                       1999
                                                                                                                                              2001
                                                                                                                                                     2003
                                                                                                                                                            2005E
                                                           Consumer                     IT             Government

Source: SIA and Morgan Stanley Research
           Market Segments that offer
                  High Growth          Large Future Markets
                                       >$3Bn in 2009
                                                                               High Growth Markets
                                                                                   >10% 2004 to
                                   Semiconductor Content                            2009 CAGR
                                 Computing
                                 Desktop PCs                  Computing                      Computing
                                 Enterprise Servers                                          PDAs
                                                              Laptop PCs
                                 Hard Disk Drives                                            Wired
                                 DRAM Modules                 PC Servers                     Routers
                                 Wired                        Flat Panel Displays            SAN Switches
                                 LAN Switches                 Wired                          SAN HBAs
                                 Wireless                                                    xDSL DSLAM
                                                              Digital WAN
                                 Mobile Handsets                                             Optical WAN
                                 Digital Cordless Phones      Wireless                       Wireless
                                 Consumer                     Mobile Comm Infrastructure     Wireless Broadband
                                 Home Audio                   Other Mobile Communications    Wireless LAN
                                 Color TVs                                                   Auto
                                                              Consumer
                                 Digital Settop Boxes                                        Safety and Control
                                 Digital Still Cameras        MP3 Players                    Telematics
                                 Auto                         Digital TVs                    Body Electronics
                                 Entertainment                DVD Recorders                  Sensors
                                 Power Train
                                                              Video Game Controllers
                                 Industrial
                                 Medical Electronics          Flash Storage
                                 Manufacturing Automation     Consumer Appliances
                                 Semi Manufacturing
                                 Security Systems
                                 Military & Civil Aerospace




Source: iSuppli and Morgan Stanley Research
    US Industry Employment Growth
               2002-2012

             Bachelor’s Degree                    28.6%
        Computer SW, Electronic Eng, etc.


               Doctoral Degree                    29.9%
      Computer & Information Scientists




Source; US Dept of Labor, Bureau of Labor Stats
Necessary success factors

•   Knowledge
•   Seed and venture capital & business angels
•   Hosting infrastructure
•   Entrepreneurial environment
•   Constructive risk approach
•   Training/education infrastructure and programs
•   Inbound Marketing
•   Attractive reward systems
•   Theme driven clusters of companies
  Close the Loop & Fuel the Engine
                                              • Only the right
                                                combination of
             Knowledge                          ALL elements
                             Infrastructure
Training /
Education
              creation
                                                can foster a
                   Venture                      successful
                   capital                      regional
                                                development,
Entrepreneurship         Market knowledge       based upon
                                                an
                                                increasingly
                                                knowledge
                                                based society
    Research Pipeline
             Research Programme




               Industry Transfer Projects




                   Industry product development


          Latency ≠Throughput
Hence: long term relationships necessary
      Belgium Observation
• Phase 1: Competence
  – Define goals
  – Build critical mass
  – Establish presence
• Phase 2: Credibility
  – Recognition externally
  – Collaboration with other globally recognised leaders
• Phase 3: Create Wealth
  – Spins-offs
  – Leverage for SME & MNC
Requirement for Industry


   • Quality of personnel

   • Quality of research
      Belgium Observation
• Phase 1: Competence
  – Define goals
  – Build critical mass
  – Establish presence
• Phase 2: Credibility
  – Recognition externally
  – Collaboration with other globally recognised leaders
• Phase 3: Create Wealth
  – Spins-offs
  – Leverage for SME & MNC
               Competition

                      Ireland   Singapore
Population             4.0m       4.2m
GDP                   $154b       $91b
GPD Growth Rate        5.6%       8.4%
Education 3rd level     50%        39%
Computers per 100        42         62
            Semiconductor
• 29 IC Design Companies
  • Infineon, Oki, Broadcom, Marvell, etc.
• 17 Assembly & Test Companies
  • AMD, Linear Tech, Micron, ISE Labs,
• 14 Wafer Fabs
  • Includes latest US $3.6B UMC-Infineon 300mm
• Subcon Services
  • burn-in, failure analysis labs, etc.
• Others
  • Dupont Photomasks to invest US $50-70M over the next
    5 years
  “In the past scientists saw the pursuit of money as
intellectually uninteresting. To do research for industry
    was only for those who couldn‟t get a university
                      appointment”
                   DR. COLM
                    HARMON
       Director, Geary Institute, UCD




Industry/Academia Relationships
  – A Social Science Perspective
         UCD Geary Institute




Industry-Academia
Relationships
A View from the Social Sciences


Professor Colm Harmon
Director, UCD Geary Institute
  KEY MESSAGES

 Question: Is the intersection between academic
  excellence and excellence in design (and evaluation)
  of economic and social policy is not as developed as
  it should be?
 Potential 'timebomb„
       The norm is increasingly doctoral level training in key areas of
        private and public sector employment in the US and Europe
       Valuing these researchers and embedding them into the Irish
        (and European) knowledge economy is essential.
 Industry can play a role in dealing with the
  challenges.




                                                                           112
 August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
ACADEMIA & PUBLIC POLICY – A VIEW

 Perception?
       Interaction between policy and academia is not as well developed in Ireland
 If true, not solely responsibility of academic
  community
       Neither the supply or demand for research input into policy design processes
        is adequate.
       This removes a key voice from the policy debate but more importantly
        means that the taxpayer may not be getting the value added from their
        investments made in ventures such as PRTLI.
 We need to
       Improve the ‘supply’ side
       Engage with major groups to change the ‘demand’ for academic research




                                                                                       113
 August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
OTHER VIEWS….!

“There was a time, when those who had an interest in
  policy making, would be given the same warning, as
  people who like sausages – don't look too closely at how
  they are made.” An Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern TD, February
  2005.

“Social science should be at the heart of policymaking.
  We need a revolution in relations between government
  and the social research community – we need social
  scientists to help determine what works and why, and
  what types of policy initiatives are likely to be the most
  effective.” UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)
  seminar in February 2002.


                                                           114
  August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
KEY CHALLENGES
 “Technology transfer” understood as a concept to
  drive ongoing economic development.
        We must capture the same concept for the social sciences
        Replace ‘patents’ with ‘policy’ in key arguments.


 Recent NESF/Geary Institute Conference in UCD -
  pressure points

        Policy needs often inconsistent with academic processes
         (feasibility, short time lines etc)
        Pressure on researchers to obtain the ‘desired’ result
        Academic researchers often weak at communicating findings in
         ways meaningful to policymakers.




                                                                        115
August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
                                           UCD GEARY INSTITUTE


                                                                                Education
Corporate                                                                       & Labour
                             Law &              Innovation &       Health        Market
                             Society                R&D




                   Research Community – Senior and Junior


Research Infrastructure                                           Graduate Training
      Data Archive                                                       - PhD
    IT ‘Informatics’                                           - Masters in Public Policy?


                                                                                             116
August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
TARGET AUDIENCES

                                                  Senior government officials

                 Members of
                 Oireachtas                                                       Cabinet




State agencies
                                                 KEY AUDIENCES                         ‘Commentariat’




                                                                                Industry Leaders
    Political advisory
       structures

                                                          Key media

                                                                                                        117
   August 2005      Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
FEEDING THIS FORWARD – LABOUR
MARKET

 Graduate Training
         Innovative ways that parallel natural sciences
 Why?
         Create a cadre of social science professionals
         Multi-skilled, adaptable and innovative researchers who can
          approach problems from multiple perspectives
         Better trained in methods than ever before
         Equipped to map their training to application
         Equipped to ‘translate’ their ideas for media, non-specialists
 Implications for policy development are immense
         More analytical sophistication and better ‘joined-up’ thinking
         More imagination and more empathy for wider views.


                                                                           118
 August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
THE CHANGING SCENE

 Major human capital investments
        Postdoctoral researchers
        Visiting scholars
        Visiting Doctoral Researchers
 Research Programmes as ‘Labs’
        Frontier methods of economic, social and legal investigation
        Disciplines interact and challenge each other through joint projects, seminars
         and conferences
        Promote interaction with society through engagement with business, the
         professions, government and the wider community founded on the credibility of
         the peer reviewed research process
 Central role in training
        Early Stage Training (EST) model
        Post Masters formal training period
        Apprentice model for the research period




                                                                                          119
 August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
 An example:
 Successful ageing




                                           120
August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
     National Context -
    Ireland has Europe‟s youngest but most rapidly ageing population
    Economic reality
    Unique opportunity
    Differences in social „connections‟ between urban and rural areas
     although isolation a problem throughout
         41% of those living alone in the population are over 65,
         20% are over 80, 25% of over 65’s live alone
 Little evidence of planning for this reality?
         86% of over 65’s owner occupiers, 4% rent, 7% ‘social housing’
         Policy is directed at care in the community - about 13000 in permanent
          residential care (less than 3%)




                                                                                   121
    August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
 Research to Address the Issues

  Research
               SHARE-IRELAND
               Peer reviewed research investment (IRCHSS, EU)
               Multidisciplinary team
  Policy:
                 Government is accessible
                 Health service reforms are on agenda
                 Pension process under reform (PRSAs)
                 Housing policy – and housing equity
  Practice:
               Multiple agencies
               Role for proposal to act as a hub to this community
                in terms of information, advocacy and delivery.


                                                                      122
August 2005       Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
A ROLE FOR INDUSTRY?

 Impact of the social science research agenda
  requires investment.
 However the role of industry in funding this work is
  not as developed as with other fields of research
 Concerns:
       Industry needs (profit!) inconsistent with independence.
       Areas of research in the social sciences are ‘sensitive’
       Can you separate ‘research’ from ‘sponsorship’?
 Can we get around these issues?
 YES! Dynamics of Drinking Behaviour
       Diageo Ireland
       Multidisciplinary team
       Investment from Diageo as seed capital for broader work.



                                                                   123
 August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
Key Blocks for Industry Partnerships




                                           124
August 2005   Communicating ‘Policy Lab’
  PANEL DISCUSSION

      Prof. Kevin Ryan – ISERC, UL
            Brendan Cremen - Xilinx
Colm Harmon – Geary Institute, UCD




Chaired by: Dr Conor O’Carroll,
 Head of Research Office, IUA
   BRENDAN
    BUTLER
      Director, IBEC




Closing Comments
    “CAREERING TOWARDS
THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY”
 Are business & Academia geared up to provide
   a future for high level researchers in Ireland?




                   Lunch – Top Floor Foyer

				
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