Docstoc

NO NOUNS_ NO VERBS_ NO SENTENCE_

Document Sample
NO NOUNS_ NO VERBS_ NO SENTENCE_ Powered By Docstoc
					  




        NO NOUNS, NO VERBS, NO SENTENCE!




1    
2  


  
Letter from the Editors
Dear  Readers,  
          You  are  about  to  enjoy  a  very  delectable  four  course  meal  that  will  
excite  and  tantalize  the  literary  taste  buds  of  your  brain.    This  is  a  collec-­
tion  of  the  savory,  creative  works  of  the  Incarnate  Word  Academy  student  
                                                                
          We  know  that  we  make  this  collaboration  look  simple  and  easy  to  

some  grunts  and  groans,  some  laughs,  but  not  very  many  tears.    There  
was  some  excruciating  pain  as  we  were  forced  to  reject  some,  but  deliri-­
ous  euphoria  as  we  added  others  to  the  pile.    There  were  moments  of  

absolute  relief  as  we  realized  we  had  everything  to  make  this  scrumptious  

the  tense  atmosphere  as  we  continuously  stared  at  computer  screens,  tedi-­

there  was  a  definite  collective  thought-­cry.    We  digress.  
         Oftentimes  during  a  large  project  like  this,  it  is  hard  to  view  the  
big  picture  when  each  group  is  focused  on  their  specific  component.    
However,  each  of  us  has  put  their  time  and  effort  into  this  project.    A  dash  
of  nouns  there,  a  pinch  of  verbs  here,  and  a  flaming  soufflé  of  sentences  
later,  we  were  able  to  prepare  dishes  of  succulent  poetry,  savory  fiction,  
fragrant  non-­fiction,  and  tantalizing  drama.    We  hope  you  enjoy.  
  
                                                          Bon  Appétit!  
                                                                   
                                                          2011  Creative  Writing  Class      




2    
  




                   Gratuity Included
          
          
          
        The  2010-­2011  IWA  Literary  Magazine  would  like  to  give  special  
        thanks  to  the  following  individuals:  
          
          
                  Ms.  Postel,  for  contributions  of  student  artwork           
                  Margaret  Alba,  for  her  help  with  Photoshop  
                  All  the  IWA  students  who  submitted  work  for  consideration,  
                  and  our  Maître  D,  Ms.  Cuneo.  
                    
          
          
          
        Cover  art  obtained  at:    
          
                                 Art  Access.  The  Art  Institute  of  Chicago.  2004.  
                  Web.  14  April  2011.    
          
          
          
          
           Interested  in  creative  writing  or  publishing?  Sign  up  to  take  Creative  
             Writing  for  one  or  both  semesters  starting  your  sophomore  year!    




3    
4  


MENU
APPETIZERS
A delectable array of poetry.

Haiku by Claire Tajonera                  6.00
                                          7.00
                                          8.00
                                         10.00
                                         12.00
                                         13.00
                                         14.00
                                         15.00
                                         16.00
Haiku by Katie Revia                     17.00
                                         18.00
                                         19.00
                                         22.00
Untitled by Elizabeth Bole

SOUPS AND SALADS
A refreshing collection of non-fiction

Untitled by Bri Faustino                 24.00
                                         26.00
                                         30.00
                                         33.00
                                         36.00


ENTREES
A hearty selection of fiction.

                                         38.00
                                         44.00
        -                                47.00
                                         49.00
                                         56.00
                                         57.00
                                         59.00
                                         61.00


4    
  


  
MENU

DESSERTS
A fantastical smorgasbord of dramatic pieces.

                                                62.00
                                                65.00
                                                68.00




BEVERAGE LIST                                         
A refreshing assortment of art work.                  
                                                      
                                                      
Untitled by Arielle Cottingham                   9.00
Untitled by Margaret Alba                       11.00
                                                15.00
                                                28.00
                                                29.00
                                                32.00
                                                35.00
                                                43.00
                                                44.00
                                                60.00
                                                64.00
                                                67.00
                                                71.00




5    
6  


POETRY
  
  
Derivative  of  Dreams  
Dearest  Calculus,  
                                 
Integrate  elsewhere!  
  

Biggest  Regret  
Take  me  back  in  time,  
                                             
                          
  

                              
Thoughts  racing  too  quick,  
You  put  milk  in  the  pantry.  
                                 
  

Missing  My  Grandpa  
Eager  to  leave,  I  
Lost  the  chance  to  say  I  love     
Never  said  goodbye.  
  

                  -­Claire  Tajonera  




6    
  

  
  
  
  
  
  
Butterfly  Kisses  
  
I  think  I  would  like  to  be  a  butterfly.  
I  would  like  to  flutter  in  the  sunshine,  
Alight  on  a  fragrant  flower,  
Be  blown  by  the  wind  this  way  and  that.  
  

I  think  I  would  like  to  be  a  buttefly.  
                                                 
Watch  their  expressions  as  I  float  by,  
See  the  joy  plain  on  their  faces.  
  

I  think  I  would  like  to  be  a  butterfly.  
Relying  only  on  the  world  around  me,  
Taking  only  what  I  need,  
Living  each  moment  fully.  
  

Yes,  I  think  I  would  like  to  be  a  butterfly.  

                             -­  Maire  Kelly  




7    
8  

  
  
  
  
                       
  
I  am  from  familiar  homes,  
From  scraped  knees  and  messy  hair.  
I  am  from  mud  pies  and  sticky  fingers.  
I  am  from  the  long  driveway,  sidewalk  chalk,    
          Overused  bicycles  and  hiding  places.  
I  am  from  dark  rooms  and  scary  stories.  
  
I  am  from  fist  fights  and  quick  resolutions.  
I  am  from  whining  and  getting  my  way.  
                                                        
I  am  from  Sunday  morning  breakfast,  
          Playing  airplane  with  Popo,  and  trips  to  the  shop.  
From  nickel  chips,  industrial  spaces,  familiar  
          Backstreets,  chemicals,  classic  cars,  forklifts,  and  desk  time.  
  
I  am  from  mom  and  dad.  
From  high  school  mistakes,  poor  judgments,  sneaking  out,  hard  times.  
From  why  are  we  going  and  why  is  he  here?  
I  am  from  secrets  and  pain,  
          Anger  and  regret.  
From  leaving  mom  and  sister  behind.  
I  am  from  escaping,  
          But  still  being  held  onto.  
I  am  from  my  first  stable  home,  being  shook  to  its  core.  
From  Destiny,  Popo  is  asleep  
          And  is  never  waking  up.  
  
I  am  from  locked  in  my  room,  writing  it  out.  
                                        
Stealing  razor  blades,  
  
  


8    
  

  
  
  
  
          Used  for  their  green  monster,  
And  awaking  my  own  red  one.  
From  friends  that  take  me  away.  
I  am  from  terrible  circumstances,  
          But  childlike  naivety.  
I  am  from  stories  you  hear  and  say  
                                                       
  
                            -­  Erika  De  La  Rosa  




Untitled    
Arielle  Cottingham  


9    
10  

  
Regret  
  
Did  I  ever  say  
that  I  could  always  talk  to  you  
that  I  could  whisper  you  painful  secrets  
and  you  listened  
  
Did  I  ever  say    
that  you  were  clever  
that  you  were  strong  
and  you  were  beautiful  
  
Did  I  ever  say  
that  you  were  always  there  
that  you  laughed  when  I  laughed  
and  held  me  when  I  cried  
  
Did  I  tell  you  
how  much  I  liked  it  
when  your  chest  heaved  with  laughter  
and  when  your  skin  brushed  mine  
  
Did  I  tell  you    
that  you  were  always  more  than  my  friend  
that  my  chest  ached  with  longing  
and  the  words  burned  in  my  throat  
  
But  one  summer    
One  dark  road  
One  swerving  car  
  
One  screech  of  tires  
One  spray  of  glass  
One  fading  cry  
  
One  accident  
And  I  never  got  to  say  
  

          -­  Julia  Voltz  


10    
  




         Untitled   Margaret  Alba  



11    
12  

  
  
  
Give  It  Time  
  
                                  
                                                                          
                                       
  
                                                                               
You  were  always  my  shield,  a  sense  of  protection.  
                                                                     
  
I  was  finally  ready  to  take  that  leap,  
Then  I  saw  you  flirting  with  her.  
  
                                                      
But  truthfully  time  will  never  help  me  get  over  this.  
  
                                        -­  Laura  Quirin    
  

  

  

  




12    
  

                                           
                                           
                                           
    Lamp    
  
                                              
                                              
                          Light  the  way,  oh  invention  
                          of  Edison.  You  bringeth  me  
                           LIGHT,  but  thou  clicks  off    
                         When  the  window  challenges  
                      You  to  a  room  filled  with  natural  
                        Sunlight.  Oh,  invention  of  Ed,  
                       I  wish  your  artificial  fire  would,  
                Like  a  friend,  be  with  me  through  darkness,  
               And  be  with  me  through  the  barren  blackness.  
               And  LIGHT  me  when  I  need  to  read  and  write.  
                 LIGHT  me  when  I  need  to  see  and  work.  
                                        LIGHT  
                                        When  
                                        I  need  
                                        HOPE.  
                                        LIGHT  
                                        When  
                                        I  need  
                                       SPIRIT.  
                                        LIGHT    
                                         When    
                                        I  need  
                                The  STRENGTH    
                      that  no  light  bulb  could  give  me.  
                                              
                                  -­  Abbie  Bacilla  




13    
14  

  
My  Ebony  
    
  
My  ebony  plays  acoustic  sounds  
                           
His  vibrations  are  heavy  
His  waves  come  with  thunder  
  
                                                      
Floetry  spinning  my  hips  in  a  roundabout  fashion  
My  ebony  wears  long  matted  curls  that  fall  over  his  face  
Hiding  his  ebony  eyes  
Below  he  wears  his  ebony  leather  
Strapped  tightly  across  his  waist  
  
                                                                         
In  blue  jeans  
Thighs  cut  sharp  
Arms  shaped  tight  
Stone  jaw  and  brown  lips  
They  kiss  tender  in  the  night  
  
My  ebony  never  loved  the  wrong  woman  
                            
My  ebony  shall  come  
With  the  rise  of  the  tides  
His  waves  will  come  hard  with  thunder  
My  ebony  do  come  soon  
Before  the  storm  takes  my  roots  up  
  
And  leave  my  trunk  asunder  
  
                                                                -­Bria  Temple  
  


14    
  




          Remember  When  
         Arielle  Cottingham  




15    
16  

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
My  Pantoum    
  
  
I  look  around  my  room  
Remembering  all  the  times,  
From  Barbies  to  boys,  
Oh,  how  time  flies!  
Remembering  all  the  times,  
I  gaze  out  the  window.  
Oh,  how  time  flies!  
No  longer  a  little  girl.  
I  gaze  out  the  window,  
From  Barbies  to  boys,  
No  longer  a  little  girl,  
I  look  around  my  room.  

          -­  Patricia  Sass  

  




16    
  

  
  
Winter  Ball  
  

Silky  dresses  and  
dress  slacks  worn  by  nervous  boys:  
that  is  Winter  Ball.  
            

            -­  Katie  Revia  

  

  

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
2/11/11  
  

Nitrate,  Acetate  
I  want  to  be  a  writer  
Why  take  Chemistry?  

          -­  Katie  Revia  




17    
18  


Red  
  

That  which  haunts  me  when  I  sleep  and  burns  my  eyes  when  I  wake.  
Forty  hours  a  week    it  is  mandatory  that  I  tote  it.  
                                                                   
                                                                                    
Proud  to  say  yes  it  is  all  girls!  
Proud  to  say  I  attend  Incarnate  Word  Academy.  
                                                                   

                 -­  Taylor  Gillespie  




18    
  


Flowers    
  
Wisdom  peers  through  the  creases  in  his  forehead  
And  experiences  rest  on  his  cheeks  
He  tells  the  young  lad:  
                                     
I  may  be  old,  but  I  was  young  once.  
                                            
  
The  lad,  with  his  smooth  brow  
And  his  fresh  cheeks  
Only  has  one  crease-­  between  his  eyes  
Releases  a  sigh  and  then  complies  
Maybe  talking  will  help  a  bit  
  
He  tells  a  story,  and  the  old  man  listens  
Smiling  from  amusement  here  and  there.  
                                                              
                                   
  
                                                 
                                              
He  said  she  was  pretty,  She  said  he  was  nice  
Things  seemed  to  be  going  well  
                                                      
  
                               
But  he  did  two  days  ago  
                                     
                                           
                                  
                                        
  
As  the  young  man  was  talking,  the  old  man  kept  smiling  
And  he  thought  back  to  spryer  times  
When  he  had  a  spring  in  his  step  
And  she  was  still  here  
Skipping  rocks  on  the  lake  every  summer  
19    
20  

                                              
When  she  left  for  one  whole  night  
                                                     
And  that  morning,  he  had  to  walk  to  work  
  
He  went  walking  that  night,  wandering  about  town  
                                            
Looking  tired  and  thoroughly  wet  
Standing  out  in  the  pouring  rain  on  the  porch  
  
The  light  turned  on  and  her  sister  opened  the  door  
Beholding  the  sad  sight  of  him  
                                                            
And  he  stood  there  in  front  of  the  door  
  
                                                             
Her  face  saying  all  she  was  thinking  
                                               
She  gave  them  both  a  look  
And  then  disappeared  to  the  kitchen  
  
He  held  out  a  bouquet  of  her  favorites-­  daisies  
And  glanced  at  her  with  a  sheepish  look  
And  though  she  tried  and  wanted  to  be  angry  
                                                                
And  ran  to  give  him  a  kiss  
  
He  was  drenched,  and  her  dress  got  wet  
But  right  then  neither  of  them  cared  
                                                         
Even  if  things  got  a  little  rough  
  
As  the  lad  continued,  searching  frantically  for  any  advice  
The  man  looked  up  to  the  sky  
After  feeling  he  had  gotten  that  smile  of  approval  
                                                  
  
  

20    
  


The  boy  was  hesitant  
                                      
                                               
But  if  you  like  her  enough  
And  it  seems  like  you  do  
                                   
  
The  boy  nodded  and  then  his  brow  became  smooth  
As  his  worry  was  eased  with  hope  
A  hope  that  maybe,  just  maybe  Gramps  was  right  
And  he  went  to  buy  her  flowers  of  every  hue  
  
As  he  watched  the  boy  scamper  off  
He  chuckled  to  himself  
Hoping  he  had  enough  money  to  cover  tax  
And  smiling  to  himself  he  took  a  sip  of  his  tea  
And  took  a  look  at  the  dried  daisies  in  the  vase  
  
Some  people  said  they  were  dead  
                                             
But  he  could  never  get  rid  of  the  things  
Because  no  matter  how  brown  
Or  frail  
Or  dry  
                                                               
                   
                 -­  Teresa  Stranahan  
  




21    
22  

                            
                    
                            
         
Untitled                    
  

                   
                    The  Awakening  by  Kate  Chopin;;  pg  37,  chapter  10  
  
What  is  my  unlimited?  
What  is  my  potential?  
Four  years  of  studying  and  preparing?  
Four  years  of  conquering  my  limits  so  that  I  may  be  unlimited  and  free?  
But  if  we  have  no  limits,  how  do  we  know  when  enough  it  enough  or  
where  the  line  is?  
  
If  we  have  no  limits,  
No  restraints,  
           No  boundaries,  
What  keeps  us  here  tethered  to  earth?  
For  to  be  unlimited,  
           To  have  no  restraints,  
                    To  have  no  boundaries,  
                             To  have  no  constraining  walls,  
Is  to  be  free.  
To  be  free  from  human  weaknesses.  
                                                 
  
But  if  we  have  no  weaknesses,  
           then  we  are  God  and  not  human.  
And  if  we  are  not  human,  
           then  we  are  free  of  human  strengths.  
Free  of  the  mind.  
           Free  of  the  body.  
                    Free  of  the  heart.  
                      
             


22    
  

                        
  
                        
  
                        
                        
  
                        
                              
But  this  is  not  possible,  for  we  are  human.  
                        
                        
Therefore,  we  do  have  a  mind.  
                        
We  do  have  a  body.  
                        
We  do  have  a  heart.  
                        
They  are  both  our  weaknesses  and  our  strengths.  
                        
They  teach  us  our  limits.  
                        
                        
When  enough  is  enough.  
                        
Where  the  line  is.  
                        
Freedom  lies  in  exploring  the  boundaries.  
                        
Unlimited  is  to  know  that  we  have  limits.  
                        
Our  only  true  weakness,  
                        
                        
                        
         Our  only  true  limit,  
                        
                                  
                         Is  to  believe  we  have  none.  
                           
                         -­  Elizabeth  Bole  




23    
24  

Non-Fiction
  

  
Untitled  
  
  
any  classes.    My  mom  says  that  those  things  are  the  sort  of  things  dads  do.    
I  guess  I  better  swing  by  the  bank  for  some  more  quarters;;  the  bus  only  
takes  exact  change.  
  
  
remember  a  time  when  the  two  were  together.    No  big  deal,  not  to  me  at  

cars,  and  none  of  my  dates  were  ever  scared  away  by  intimidation.    But  I  
never  really  saw  myself  as  missing  out  on  anything.  
  
         Father  daughter  masses  were  always  pretty  awkward  though.    I  sat  
by  myself  in  the  hard  pew  and  tried  to  find  the  resemblances  between  all  


roughly  a  two  and  a  half  hour  drive  three  if  you  are  going  the  speed  limit.    

girlfriend  whom  I  never  quite  clicked  with.    My  blood  sister  moved  in  
with  them  my  freshman  year  of  high  school,  leaving  me  behind.      
  
        Before  the  move,  my  dad  came  to  visit  every  other  weekend.    

leaning  more  towards  the  second  notion.    Now  there  is  no  real  reason  for  

call,  nothing  to  say.  
  
         I  try  to  be  the  best  at  everything.    I  am  an  extremely  competitive  
person.    This  is  something  my  dad  did  give  me  but  he  will  never  know  it.    
All  my  achievements,  awards,  all  my  medals,  and  miles  were  for  him.    


on  my  report  cards  are  a  must.      

24    
  


  
quiet.    I  am  the  one  who  takes  charge.  I  have  always  yearned  to  be  in  the  
spotlight,  in  need  of  attention,  acknowledgment,  recognition.    I  never  re-­
ceived  this  from  my  dad.    I  strive  to  be  the  girl  everyone  wants  to  be  
friends  with,  the  one  who  has  it  all  the  picture  perfect  life.  
  
        Beside  my  bed  is  a  picture  of  the  family  I  have  in  the  capital  city.    
All  with  coordinating  outfits,  perfect  smiles,  and  the  look  of  complete  self  
content  on  each  of  their  faces.  Deep  down  in  a  hidden  box  is  a  picture  
from  when  I  was  6:  tongue  sticking  out,  eyes  wide  open,  and  a  few  baby  

supporting  me.  
  
         I  have  learned  to  be  self  sufficient  and  that  the  only  person  you  
can  truly  count  on  is  yourself.    This  is  a  lesson  in  which  I  learned  early  on  
thanks  to  the  man  who  I  look  just  like.    The  man  who  has  given  me  the  
drive  to  fulfill  my  promise  in  my  life  despite  the  fact  that  none  of  his  have  
been  kept.  
                                      -­Bri  Faustino  




25    
26  

           
                           
           

vard  College,  we  would  like  to  congratulate  you  on  your  strong  high  


Forum,  Association  of  Black  Harvard  Women,  Harvard  African  Students  
                                                                  
                                                                           
         

would  like  to  congratulate  you  on  your  outstanding  achievements  and  en-­

Harvard  Latino  community  and  student  coordinators  for  the  Minority  Re-­
cruitment  Program,  we  would  like  to  reiterate  our  hope  that  you  will  con-­
                       
           This,  while  more  accurate,  is  downright  insulting.  
             
           While  the  ignorami  of  the  world  of  academia  apparently  cannot  
tell  the  difference  between  African  American  and  Afro-­Caribbean  
(Caribbean  Club  my  ass),  what  is  truly  offensive  about  both  of  these  
emails  is  the  thinly  veiled  comment  that  stage-­

                                                                                      
           
         Thank  you,  Harvard,  for  labeling  me.  Thank  you,  Harvard,  for  
sending  your  Minority  Recruitment  Program  after  me  instead  of  an  actual  
admissions  committee.  Thank  you,  Harvard,  for  sending  two  emails,  one  
for  each  minority  group  I  seem  to  belong  to,  since  the  two  apparently  

two  cultures  that  are  alike  as  puppies  and  mud-­completely  different,  yet  
easily  capable  of  mixing  into  one  muddy  puppy.  You  did  the  job  of  politi-­

as  racist  in  more  ways  than  one.  Of  course,  you  would  never  be  racist  

insulted  my  other  half  in  your  obvious  disregard  for  white  Americans,  in  
addition  to  students  who  are  truly  intelligent  regardless  of  ethnicity.  

26    
  




background  would  be  racist.  Yet  why  should  minorities  be  treated  differ-­

Why  should  whites  suffer  trying  to  pay  for  college  because  one  of  their  
                                                           as  my  father  did?  In  
fact,  had  my  father  married  his  high  school  sweetheart  (his  original  plan),  
                                                                                
           
         Furthermore,  this  political  correctness,  this  affirmative  action  
shtick,  only  degrades  minorities.  It  says  that  because  we  are  universally  
poor  and  have  not  been  able  to  move  up  in  socioeconomic  status  on  our  


because,  of  course,  we  could  never  get  in  on  our  own  merit.  Of  course  we  
cannot  prove  that  we  are  just  as  capable  of  succeeding  without  our  minor-­
ity  status.  
            


self-­congratulating,  unintentionally  racially-­profiled  emails,  your  Minor-­
ity  Recruitment  Program,  and  go  take  a  running  jump  into  Boston  Harbor.  

                 -­  Arielle  Cottingham    




27    
28  




         Frame     Abbie  Bacilla  


28    
  


           




              Untitled   Margaret  Alba  




29    
30  

  
The  Truth  Is  
  
        Every  teenager  at  some  point  always  believes  that  they  know  eve-­
rything.  
  
        The  truth  is,  when  your  parents  tell  you  that  you  are  wrong,  they  
speak  from  experience.  
  
  


                         
  
         As  I  was  staring  at  my  computer  screen,  filling  out  my  college  ap-­



she  said  this  looking  at  me  with  her  brown  eyes  that  I  inherited,  thoughts  

the  proper  term  but  she  is  so  much  more  than  that.  Sure  she  might  possi-­

                              -­willed  and  determined.  Housewife  simply  cannot  




but  in  the  end  I  ultimately  realize  that  she  was  right,  all  along.  
  
  

think,  apparently  we  even  run  the  same!  We  also  are  both  incredibly  stub-­
born,  something  he  inherited  from  his  mom  and  seemed  to  pass  along  to  
me.  This  is  probably  the  biggest  reason  why  we  seem  to  clash.  Despite  
our  arguments,  my  dad  is  an  incredible  man.  He  excelled  in  sports  as  a  
child  and  adolescent  and  his  passion  for  sports  has  stayed  with  him.  

ing,  heart  pounding,  competition  that  is  sports.  While  he  may  not  know,  

30    
  


when  it  comes  to  sports  his  opinion  matters  the  most  to  me.  As  soon  as  I  
step  off  the  soccer  field,  I  want  to  know  what  he  thought  of  the  game  and  
how  I  played,  and  no  one  else.  
  
          Dad  is  a  funny  quirky  kind  of  guy,  who  will  crack  a  joke  at  some  
of  the  most  awkward,  random,  and  inopportune  times.  He  says  some  of  
the  strangest  things.  For  example  one  early  morning  my  junior  year  of  
high  school,  dad  was  driving  me  to  school.  It  was  one  of  those  rainy,  
muggy  kinds  of  days  where  all  you  really  want  to  do  is  curl  up  with  a  
good  book  with  the  dog  lying  at  your  side.  Almost  to  school,  my  dad  said  



went  on  to  explain  that  since  ducks  love  water  and  it  was  a  rainy  day,  it  
was  obviously  a  good  day  to  be  a  duck.  While  at  the  time  it  may  have  
seemed  odd,  I  still  crack  a  smile  every  time  I  look  out  my  window  and  see  
it  drizzling,  thinking  of  how  the  ducks  must  surely  be  enjoying  the  
weather.  
  
          As  time  has  gone  on  I  have  learned  to  actually  listen  to  what  ad-­
vice  my  parents  have  given  to  me  rather  than  simply  letting  it  go  in  
through  one  ear  and  out  the  other.  Instead  of  thinking  that  I  know  it  all,  I  
go  to  them  for  advice.  I  always  keep  their  words  of  wisdom  with  me  and  
even  remember  the  strange  jokes,  to  make  me  smile.  
  
  
turns  out  my  parents  have  been  right  all  along.  
  

                                       -­Casey  Scott  

  

  




31    
32  




         Feet  in  Water   Kyrena  Dudley  


32    
  


A  Reflection  on  Food    
  

every  one  of  my  conversations,  on  the  receiving  end  of  every  one  of  my  
jokes,  would  argue  otherwise.  I  get  along  with  mostly  everyone.  Small  


                                           
                                                                                       -­
nine  percent  of  my  generation  on  nearly  every  subject.  
  
touch  on  art  or  culture  since  very  few  of  my  acquaintances  even  care  to  
mention  them  in  conversation.  But  what  separates  me  from  the  majority  
of  my  friends,  the  ladies  especially,  is  food.  
         To  be  specific,  the  adoration  of  food.  
  
more  than  ponder  on  the  foundation  of  what  is  rightly  labeled  an  obses-­
                                                          
  
them  divine  but  all  of  them  with  a  multitude  of  disciples.  Sex.  Money.  

circuit  of  our  lives.  Our  families.  Our  relationships.  Our  emotions.  Our  

magazines,  our  radio  stations,  and  our  city  blocks.  
  
fix  your  life  or  whatever  ails  you.  Food  for  recreation  and  consolation  and  
reconciliation.  All  of  it  celebrated  with  ceremony;;  meticulously  prepared  
by  strangers,  served  and  sold  at  small  fortunes  and  concocted  with  scru-­
pulous  devotion  to  the  faded  ink  of  family  recipes  in  kitchens  across  the  
country.  
  
dead  for  it  not  to  affect  you.  Since  I  am  neither,  I  must  painfully  admit  
that,  while  not  a  fanatic,  I  am  no  exception  to  the  pandemic.  
  


lite  consequences.  In  a  culture  that  both  exploits  and  degrades  food  and  
                                                               
33    
34  

          There  is  no  happy  medium.  Skip  a  meal  and  your  anorexic.  Eat  
too  much  and  you  run  the  risk  of  being  labeled  a  fatty.  But  not  everything  
is  black  and  white.  I  would  know     I  stand  right  smack  dab  in  this  big  
area  of  gray.  
  
ravished  or  determined  to  never  again  lift  the  fork  to  my  lips.  I  figure  

on  the  sedentary:  this  constant  yo-­yoing,  the  indecision,  my  denial  and  
then  my  reluctant  submission  to  human  need.  
          I  know.  I  make  it  sound  so  dramatic,  as  though  chow  were  an  abu-­
sive  boyfriend  or  a  dangerous  drug.  But  it  only  emphasizes  my  point.  

heard  girls  proclaim  their  love  for  food  like  zealots  praising  a  higher  
power.  The  same  girls  that,  upon  getting  invited  to  social  gatherings,  base  
their  attendance  on  the  possibility  of  good  eats  at  said  get-­togethers.  
  

of  emptiness  (trust  me  on  that  one)  and  will  only  fulfill  you  for  a  few  
hours,  depending  on  your  metabolism.  
  
Betty.  Sure,  that  name  is  fake  but  the  woman  is  real  and  serves  as  a  per-­

food.  
        Betty  is  a  hoarder,  compulsively  stingy,  planning  each  moment  of  

them  to  use,  stocking  her  house  full  of  Coke  and  generic  brand  junk  food  
in  case  of  natural  disasters  and  apocalyptic  occasions.  
          But  she  is  complex.  Behind  her  squirreling  is  fear.  Fear  of  not  get-­

room  for  cookies  and  left-­over  breakfast  tacos,  it  would  all  disappear  and  
                                                                         
        Just  another  epitome  of  food  as  fear.  

provoke  such  apprehension.  
                                                  
                                     -­  Elisa  Molina  



34    
  




         Rooster Margaret  Alba  
35    
36  

Inspiration  
           
           Cardboard  often  covered  holes  in  the  soles  of  his  shoes.  For  a  poor  
child  growing  up  in  the  government  subsidized  housing  projects  in  El  
Paso,  Antonio  remembers  the  days  when  his  parents  and  siblings  survived  
only  on  beans,  potatoes  and  tortillas.  
           Still,  not  immediately  knowing  how  far  below  the  poverty  line  he  
and  his  family  were,  little  Antonio  was  happy  and  played  without  a  care  
alongside  friends  and  family.  
           As  years  passed,  Antonio  grew  wiser  and  quickly  realized  the  
scale  of  poverty  he  and  his  family  lived  in     quickly  figuring  out  he  
needed  a  plan  to  end  it.  This  quest  soon  evolved  into  a  drive  to  succeed,  
become  successful  and,  most  importantly,  help  his  family  in  all  ways  pos-­
sible.  Little  Antonio  later  taught  me  perseverance,  confidence,  work  ethic,  
and  dedication.  He  grew  up  to  be  my  father,  Antonio  Delgado,  Jr.,  and  a  
successful  broadcast  news  photojournalist.  
           Growing  up  in  poverty  is  not  easy  for  anyone,  especially  a  young  
boy.  My  father  overcame  and  ignored  bad  influences  that  could  have  led  
his  life  astray.  
           His  strong  will  to  be  himself  and  not  follow  the  crowd  has  greatly  

dedication  to  his  family,  devotion  to  do  his  best,  and  never  giving  up  on  
his  dreams.  

inspirational  journey  started  in  the  mid-­1970s  when  a  recruiter  for  a  local  
television  station  went  through  the  barrios  of  El  Paso  looking  for  anyone  
interested  in  entry-­level  positions.  

steps  out  of  poverty  and  beginning  a  new  pursuit     not  only  for  a  personal  
experience     but  a  career  that  would  one  day  help  his  younger  siblings  see  
they,  too,  had  options  and  opportunities  to  rise  out  of  poverty.  
         Head  held  high,  Antonio  worked  hard  every  day,  his  beating  heart,  
shining  with  dedication  and  persistence.  Little  did  he  know  that  one  day  
his  persistence  and  dedication  would  eventually  make  him  one  of  the  top  
Hispanic  photojournalists  in  the  country.  
         I  am  humbled  and  proud  to  know  how  hard  my  father  worked  to  
achieve  his  dreams.    The  reality,  that  he  used  his  experiences  to  influence  
other  individuals  just  like  himself  to  pursue  a  career  in  the  media,  has  

36    
  


given  me  the  drive  to  help  others  in  the  same  way.  One  of  my  goals  in  life  
is  to  help  individuals  experience  achievement  by  focusing  on  persistence.  
Believing  in  oneself  is  such  an  important  attribute  that  is  learned;;  and  in-­
dividuals  need  to  be  reminded  that  they  can  truly  accomplish  anything  if  
they  have  a  positive  attitude.  
          As  a  true  believer  of  dreams,  I  consistently  work  hard,  and  take  
one  step  at  a  time  to  make  my  dreams  of  attending  a  prestigious  university  
and  becoming  a  physician  a  reality.  

definitely  not  an  easy  one.    He  faced  times  when  even  his  own  family  did  

make  some  use  of  your  time  and  self.  You  cannot  make  it  in  the  media  


dream  come  true.  This  very  struggle,  the  disapproval  my  father  experi-­
enced  from  his  own  loved  ones,  is  an  asset  that  has  bolstered  his  charac-­
ter.    His  confidence  teaches  me  that  I  can  achieve  my  goals  if  I  put  in  my  
heart  and  effort  to  reach  all  my  aspirations.    I  am  gladdened  by  all  that  my  
father  has  done  not  just  for  me,  but  for  all  his  family.    He  blazed  a  trail  
and  showed  that  success  was  achievable  even  for  those  who  grew  up  less  
privileged  than  others.    His  ability  to  succeed  has  instilled  my  passionate  
drive  to  achieve  all  my  endeavors  by  working  diligently.  
           Antonio  sacrifices  time  from  his  busy  schedule  to  help  my  uncle  
who  is  very  ill  and  on  dialysis,  my  grandmother  who  has  breast  cancer  
and  anyone  else  who  needs  a  caring  hand.    His  love  for  family  and  others  
has  definitely  been  passed  down  to  my  brother  and  me.  I,  too,  will  one  
day  be  able  to  help  the  community  prosper  with  love  and  compassion  be-­
cause  of  the  qualities  I  have  learned  from  my  father.  I  thank  God  every-­
day  for  the  great  example  my  father  is  in  my  life  and  I  pray  I  will  con-­
tinue  growing  in  his  ways.  
                                        
             
             
                             -­Domenica  Delgado  
             



37    
38  


Fiction
  
Trouble  
  
                                                             
  


vehemently  into  that  dingy  mom-­and-­pop  diner,  my  full  weight  on  the  
shabby  door  having  caused  it  to  slam  raucously  into  a  nearby  worn  leather  


and  most  pronounced  of  breaths  and  shouted  groggily     ice  cold  rain  drip-­
ping  from  my  hair  to  the  stained  pale  tile  floor     that  I  needed  a  cup  of  
coffee  as  dark  and  black  as  my  surely  approaching  doom  and  as  bitter  as  
my  criminal  soul.  Pronto.  
           That  had  been  upwards  of  an  hour  ago,  thought  it  felt  like  a  year,  
at  least.  I  was  still  soaked  through  to  the  bone,  my  sweater  a  pool  of  blue  
muck  encasing  my  frigid  frame  and  my  dull  mass  of  tangled  brown  hair  
still  clinging  to  my  face.  As  my  cell  phone  rang  again  from  my  wet  jeans,  
I  disregarded  it  once  more     denying  the  omen  that  it  was     and  continued  
playing  connect-­the-­dots  with  the  raindrops  on  the  clear  glass  pane  to  my  
left  that  I  sat  sagging  against.  It  had  all  been  the  same  for  the  past  half  
hour;;  my  phone  would  ring  at  an  alarming  volume  and  I  would  again  real-­
ize  just  how  much  those  impromptu  watery  shapes  resembled  all  too  fa-­
miliar  plumes  of  flame     
Brad  Pitt.  But  perhaps  these  similarities  were  only  so  blatant  because  of  
                                       
           Driven  mad  by  the  incessant  recollection  of  that  not-­so-­ancient  
history,  I  had  squeezed  my  eyes  shut  and  groaned  pathetically.  Yep,  it  
looked  like  the  circus  and  hell  were  my  two  best  choices.  My  head  hit  the  
table  with  a  solid  thump.  
           Those  people  probably  thought  I  was  mental.  But  as  of  a  few  
hours  before  that  point  in  time,  a  lot  of  people  thought  I  was  mental.  
Okay,  so  I  had                                                  every  single  one  of  
them,  even  that  stupid,  atrocious  orange  beehive.    
  

38    
  


  
  
  
  
That  one  went  first,  actually.  I  had  been  far  too  tired  of  the  disgusting  
eyesore  to  let  it  clutter  my  presence  a  second  longer.  Now,  while  I  had  rid  
the  world  of  several  dozen  polyester  disasters,  no  one  else  seemed  too  
proud  of  me.  I  had  received  not  a  single  pat  on  the  back  in  congratulation.  
I,  however,  believed  that  I  deserved  a  Nobel  Prize  for  my  valiant  efforts  
of  world  purification.  
           I  needed  more  coffee.  
  
my  lower  jaw  gave  up  and  hung  there  lazily;;  so  the  fiery  Blair  had  finally  
lost  her  edge.  I  meditated  over  this  sad  truth  until  I  heard  a  bustling  of  
puffy  skirts  and  smelt  the  hairspray  that  cemented  the  dyed-­black  hair  of  
my  genial,  care-­free  waitress.  
  
her  honey-­ridden  southern  drawl  grating  against  my  nerves.  How  could  
she  be  so  happy  while  she  was  supplying  me     a  serial  wig-­burner     with  
my  last  meal?  Regardless,  I  grunted  in  the  affirmative,  flopping  my  right  
arm  on  the  crumb-­
gaze  from  the  table  that  wreaked  of  several  coats  of  led  paint  dating  back  
to  the  fifties  to  know  that  Jeannette  was  once  again  smothering  me  with  a  

ten  kicked  out  of  my  ridiculously  expensive  fine  arts  boarding  school     
halfway  across  the  country  from  my  parents  who  had  already  paid  two  
                                                              for  destroying  my  

sulting  in  me  driving  on  my  rickety  Vespa  to  this  middle-­of-­nowhere  
town,  Nevada,  sans  helmet  and  in  the  pouring  rain  just  to  end  up  running  
out  of  gas  and  money  in  front  of  this  crappy  little  diner  to  sit  and  realize  
that  I  had  achieved  nothing  but  to  leave  all  my  possessions  miles  behind  
me  on  a  school  campus  I  was  never  to  set  foot  on  again  under  penalty  of  
law,  ruin  my  future,  and  quite  possibly  bring  upon  my  own  death  via  an-­
ger-­crazed  parents  who  may  even  acquire  nondescript  rusty  metal  objects  
just  for  the  occasion.  
          To  this  day,  I  believe  that  Jeannette  must  have  been  psychic.  

39    
40  

  
          The  coffee  came.  I  stared  at  it,  my  chin  resting  on  the  table,  my  
arms  limply  splayed  at  my  sides.  Thunder  rolled,  causing  the  windows  to  
shudder  threateningly.  Just  then,  my  phone  rang  again  from  my  pocket.  I  
let  out  a  shudder  of  my  own.  I  was  doomed.  Jeannette  again  saw  my  obvi-­
ous  displeasure  and  patted  my  soggy  back  soothingly  before  asking  if  I  



was  wrong  and  she  could  direct  me  to  the  circus  that  she  had  fled  to.  But  
after  one  more  glance  at  her  genial  toothy  smile  and  a  perusal  of  the  other  
faces  in  the  restaurant     all  just  as  equally  innocent  and  unworried  as  hers  
     I  concluded  that  I  was  the  only  criminal  present.    
           I  forced  my  eyes  to  meet  her  bright  ones  again,  her  sympathy  ever
-­

madwoman)  and  shook  my  head,  venturing  to  clear  my  dry  matted  hair  
from  my  pale  face.  
         Jeannette  frowned  slightly,  putting  her  hands  on  her  hips  and  jut-­
ting  out  the  left  one.  As  kind  as  the  woman  was,  all  I  could  think  about  


her  thin  eyebrows  at  me  curiously  as  I  laughed  sardonically.  
  
           
             She  was  obviously  befuddled  by  my  reply,  and  her  mouth  opened  
and  closed  like  that  of  a  fish  for  several  seconds  while  her  mind  mean-­
dered  for  a  response.  None  such  came,  so  Jeannette  raised  her  stubby  
hands  in  mock  surrender  and  waddled  away  to  serve  an  older  man  across  
the  room.  I  sipped  my  coffee  and  slumped  back  in  my  chair,  blanching  a  
little;;  I  rarely  drank  coffee  before  that  day,  and  when  I  had,  it  had  been  
more  milk  and  sugar  than  the  actual  bitter  substance.  Sometimes,  I  wished  
                                                      for  while  my  doom  was  black  and  
ever  darkening,  my  coffee                                 
  

when  I  realized  that  I  would  eventually  have  to  face  their  wraths.  I  was  
surprised  to  hear  a  beep  sound  from  my  phone.    

40    
  

  

first,  worried  when  I  realized  that  I  would  eventually  have  to  face  their  
wraths.  But  then  I  smirked;;  the  circus  travelled.  My  parents  would  proba-­
bly  never  find  me.  Holding  on  to  this  thought,  I  dug  my  phone  out  of  the  
right  pocket  of  my  almost-­dry  jeans,  fishing  through  various  gum  wrap-­
pers,  my  lucky  nickel     Fred     and  my  Vespa  keys  to  do  so.  Putting  the  
device  to  my  ear,  I  listened  to  the  message  warily.  
  
this  instant,  young  lady.  Your  mother  and  I  did  not  raise  you  to  set  peo-­
                          
          My  mother  chimed  in  from  the  background:  
             actual  hair.  Wigs                                        wigs   
  
                                                   my  father  yelled,  not  necessarily  
to  my  mother  or  anyone,  really.  He  always  yelled.  It  was  a  hobby  of  his.  
He  especially  loved  to  do  so  when  he  had  no  clue  what  he  was  yelling  
about.  It  was  one  of  those  instances.  
                  my  mother  replied  calmly.  Needless  to  say,  I  preferred  my  
                                        
          Somehow,  though,  my  parents  had  missed  the  memo  that  my  ex  


those  two,  setting  something  on  fire  was,  well,  setting  something  on  fire.  
It  was  a  bad  thing  to  do,  regardless  of  the  fact  that  that  horrible  witch  had  
it  coming  to  her.  I  digress.  
  
                                                                                            
The  line  went  dead.  I  had  always  had  a  knack  for  rendering  my  father  
speechless.  
                                                                                      
which  is  what  I  had  wanted  to  do  originally,  mind  you     
the  wig  burning.  I  had  been  caught  red-­handed,  literally.  The  dorm  moni-­
tor  had  smelled  smoke  and  let  herself  in  while  I  had  been  watching  the  
last  polyester  pile  go  up  in  smoke  in  the  bathroom  sink;;  yes,  the  red  
tresses  of  the  Little  Mermaid  had  been  the  last  to  go  in  my  fake-­hair  in-­
cinerating  fiesta.  And  man,  had  it  felt  good.  Unfortunately,  I  had  been  too  


41    
42  

  
caught  up  in  exacting  my  revenge  to  realize  how  much  smoke  had  perme-­
ated  the  air  of  the  room,  if  not  the  whole  hall.  But  that  witch  I  had  been  
forced  to  room  with,  she  had  stolen  my  money,  my  food,  my  shirt,  my  
scarf,  two  of  my  headbands,  my  eyeliner,  my  shower  loofah,  and  finally,  

course,  defended  my  case  to  the  dorm  monitor:  I  had  practically  done  my  
roommate  a  favor  by  ridding  her  wardrobe  of  those  epitomes  of  a  rain-­

and  my  parents.  
  
There  was  no  way  I  should  be  punished  for  giving  that  ex  roommate  a  
taste  of  her  own  medicine.  Heck,  I  even  did  the  world  a  favor  simultane-­
ously!  I  set  my  phone  down  decisively  and  waved  my  hands  to  gain  

                                                                   
         The  poor  woman  looked  terribly  confused  by  the  demand  and  my  

back  of  the  diner  by  the  kitchen  and  returned  a  few  minutes  later,  still  
looking  puzzled  at  my  so  suddenly  changed  demeanor     a  flame  reignited.  
She  set  the  heavy  volume  down  in  front  of  me,  nonetheless.  That  book  
held  my  future,  unlike  that  dumb  school  full  of  dimwitted  losers  who  con-­
sider  reading  a  few  lines  dryly  to  be  drama.  A  shaft  of  light  broke  through  
the  dispersing  storm  clouds  and  shone  straight  onto  the  book,  causing  the  
yellow  cover  to  glow  ethereally.  I  grinned  in  anticipation,  sitting  up  ram-­
rod  straight  and  flipping  through  the  first  few  sections  of  the  phonebook  
in  front  of  me.  
  


power.  I  had  a  spark  again.  
                                                      doctor  

                
  
                            -­  Mary  Kate  Sloan  
  
  

42    
  

  
  
  
  
  




              Oranges     Rebecca  De  Leon  

43    
44  

  




         Pink   Natalie  Lerma  




44    
  


Count  Your  Blessings  
  
           Worst  day  ever!  Failing  math  is  one  thing,  but  getting  your  favor-­
ite  pair  jeans  ripped,  having  your  shoes  fall  apart,  tripping  over  yourself  
in  gym,  and  humiliating  yourself  in  front  of  your  crush  is  the  worst  com-­
bination  to  have  on  a  Friday.  A  FRIDAY!  Of  all  days,  this  stuff  could  


for  it.  My  mom  told  me  I  had  to  walk  home  today  too.  Thanks  a  lot  mom!    
                     So  here  I  am  on  this  cold  and  wet  day,  running  around,  water  
getting  to  my  feet  through  my  shoes,  hair  sticking  to  my  head,  just  trying  


bus  stop  I  can  stand  under  for  a  while  and  get  a  breather.      
                -­do-­do-­do-­do-­do          Who  was  that?  That  was  such  a  
                                                      Do-­do-­do-­do-­do-­do

jump  in  her  walk,  and  everything  around  her  seemed  bright.  She  acts  as  if  



for  a  moment.  She  smiles  and  walks  up  to  me,  still  standing  in  the  rain  
though.    


                                                                           MY  personal  




ripped,  my  shoes  are  falling  apart,  I  humiliated  myself  in  front  of  my  
crush,  tripped  over  myself  in  gym  and  got  laughed  at,  I  have  an  F  in  math,  
                                                       

                                                                                              




45    
46  


mean  big  
over  shadowed  by  the  big  picture,  you  want  to  look  at  something  over  all  

to  be  a  bright  side.  I  would  love  to  see  her  try  and  show  me  that!  
                                                                                        




versation  continues  like  that,  her  contradicting  my  horrible  day  into  the  
smallest  of  positive  things  I  never  really  thought  of.    




moment  was  something  I  will  never  forget.  She  grew  angel  wings,  and  
vanished.  And  after  that  the  rain  had  stopped  and  the  sun  broke  through  
the  clouds.    

                                                                          -­do-­do-­do-­do-­
           
                                      -­Elizabeth  Hesse  

  

  

  




46    
  


Make-­up  Counter    
  
There  she  stood,  smiling  for  all  the  world  as  if  she  had  something  to  smile  
about.  Her  eyes,  nicotine  saturated  like  the  rest  of  her,  reservedly  but  lov-­
ingly  beckoning  us  over.  Dejectedly  hopeful  dollar  bills  and  my  eyes  
pinned  to  her  rough  black  foundation  encrusted  jacket.  
                       I  think  to  myself.  A  baby  out  of  high  school?  A  broken  
home?  Dreams  waylaid?  
                       She  could  be  happy,  whole.  She  could  have  a  family,  a  
life,  a  home.  
Her  manner  tells  me  differently.  

she  can  anchor  herself  on  to,  our  words  and  smiles  appreciated,  but  just  
getting  in  the  way;;  too  late.  
The  conversation  perhaps  inevitably  turns  to  childhood,  the  naturally  to  
Barbies.  
  
               My  sister  
  

laugh  and  a  shake  of  that  tobacco-­rusty  head.  
I  see  another  story  in  those  eyes  worn  smooth  by  life.  
Might  I  end  up  like  her?  Did  she  have  the  opportunities  like  I  do?  Maybe,  
maybe  not.  Does  it  even  matter  in  the  end?  

ing  and  bursting  and  begging  to  flow  flow  flow.  
You  live  your  life  and  you  end  up  working  at  a  make-­up  counter  in  a  de-­
partment  store  in  a  mall  in  a  sprawling  town,  where  no  one  knows  anyone  
and  everyone  knows  everyone  and  the  light,  the  peppy  instore  music,  the  
people  are  all  too  much,  and  never  enough,  an  d  for  what?  To  go  home  
tired  to  an  empty  apartment,  maybe  a  house  with  a  sadly  ruffled  cat  and  
some  potted  pants  too  tired  to  flourish,  too  indecisive  to  die.  Cheap  appli-­
ances,  furniture,  Covered  in  plastic,  smothered.  
                            




47    
48  

these  people  rushing  past  me  carrying  their  own  stories  and  worries,  


wishes  to  stumble  blindly  out  into  the  harsh  commercial  lighting  and  
hopefully  into  her  realm;;  any  of  their  realms.  That  would  be  soft  and  cli-­
ché.  

ing  dry  spots,  and  all  the  time  I  know  her  mind  is  elsewhere.  Maybe  on  
her  birthday  tomorrow.  Her  birthday,  will  it  be  spent  with  friends?  How  
old  is  that  wrinkling,  twinkling  tawny  face?  Perhaps  it  will  be  spent  at  a  
bar,  drinking  to  trash  memories?  
                                            
The  best  I  can  come  up  with  to  lighten  my  mind.  Needless  to  say,  it  is  
hardly  effective,  as  I  can  think  only  of  those  potted  plants,  soil  dry;;  fil-­
tered,  dusty  sunlight  their  only  connection  to  the  world.  
She  flicks  the  make-­
wonderful,  sweetie!  Let  me  go  get  tho-­
                                  -­up  smeared  plastic  mirror,  slowly  wiping  it  on  
her  jacket  with  a  hopeful  glance  at  herself  in  its  cloudy  surface.  
She  thinks  no  one  notices.  

make-­               

                                                                         
                
  
                                                       -­Sofia  Leggio  




48    
  


Think  in  Days;;  Think  in  Moments  
       
quickly  escalating  into  a  high-­pitched  blare.  I  figure  the  annoying  vehicle  
will  quickly  pass  before  Ms.  Reynolds  hands  me  a  test.  That  would  be  the  
worst  distraction  to  have  during  a  life-­altering  math  exam.  Immediately,  I  
filter  out  the  annoying  sound  with  thoughts  of  the  future.  My  plans  for  the  
fast  approaching  weekend  come  to  mind.  A  few  of  my  friends  invited  me  
                                                                                                        
          No,  I  need  to  focus  on  acing  this  test.  I  studied  all  night,  but  I  still  


night.  Or  maybe  it  was  my  dog.  She  barked  for  hours  because  of  a  thun-­
                                                                  
         Wait,  how  can  I  be  so  heartless?  Someone  could  be  dying  in  that  

my  hands  to  say  a  quick  prayer.  As  I  begin,  I  hear  tires  screech  to  a  halt  
somewhere  outside,  the  sound  of  a  siren  now  causing  my  eardrum  to  vi-­
brate.    
           In  moments,  the  entire  class  crowds  in  front  of  the  window.  I  de-­


way  toward  my  desk  at  a  swift,  even  pace.  I  look  up,  hoping  the  teacher  

as  I  meet  her  gaze.  A  deep  furrow  is  etched  into  her  brow,  worry  clouds  
her  eyes,  and  her  mouth  is  parted  slightly  as  she  chooses  her  words  care-­
fully.    
                                                              

Classroom  doors  pass  me  one  by  one,  row  upon  row  of  lockers  zoom  by.  I  

where  I  am  taking  my  consciousness.  I  find  myself  breathing  heavily  at  
the  entrance  to  the  school,  mind  racing  with  the  worst  possible  scenarios.  
With  enough  power  to  move  a  car,  I  push  open  the  doors  and  rush  over  to  
the  scene.      



49    
50  

         Are  his  stitches  infected?  Is  the  pain  too  much  to  handle?  Is  his  
body  rejecting  the  transplant?    
         The  mob  of  teenagers  part  for  me  without  hesitation.  However,  
when  I  reach  the  red  and  white  vehicle,  the  paramedics  have  already  
loaded  the  stretcher  on.  Before  they  close  the  doors,  I  catch  a  glimpse  of  

identity.  I  launch  myself  at  the  ambulance,  pleading  to  them  to  let  me  
come.  They  push  me  away  without  as  much  as  a  word.  In  seconds,  the  
tires  come  to  life  and  are  no  more  than  a  blur  in  the  distance.    
         The  teachers  start  yelling  at  the  sea  of  students  to  head  back  to  
class.  As  the  group  disperses,  I  remain  glued  to  cement,  staring  at  an  
empty  gray  street.    
                                          +~+~+  
  

dream.  He  is  the  only  person  that  could  make  me  this  anxious.  Today  his  

cloud  of  chemical  fumes  and  the  faint  scent  of  lavender  laundry  detergent.  
The  lavender  reminds  me  of  his  mom,  a  pleasant  business  woman  who  
works  around  the  clock.  I  quietly  walk  towards  his  bed,  being  cautious  
not  to  disturb  the  peaceful  aura  around  him.    
          I  realize  he  is  asleep,  the  face  of  a  young  boy  revealed.  Creases  of  


falls  at  even  intervals.  Quickly,  I  calm  down.    I  take  a  moment  to  burn  the  
image  into  my  memory,  as  odd  as  that  sounds.  He  is  a  bit  pale  and  gaunt,  
but  there  is  color  in  his  cheeks.  His  auburn  hair  is  a  bit  ruffled.  His  lips  
are  set  in  a  small  innocent  smile,  as  if  he  was  laughing  at  one  of  his  own  
                                                                                     
           His  long,  rather  enviable,  eye  lashes  flutter  as  he  abruptly  opens  
his  eyes.  He  greets  me  with  a  look  of  surprise  and  sits  up.    
                                                               

                            
        His  smooth  laugh  rolls  around  the  room  in  languid  waves.  The  
infectious  sound  makes  me  giggle  quietly,  but  I  quickly  hide  my  face  be-­
hind  my  hand.    


50    
  


says  with  an  eyebrow  raised.    
                                                 

eight  years!  Nevertheless,  you  refuse  to  show  me  a  genuine  smile.  Humor  
                      

                                               
           He  lets  out  a  noisy  sigh  and  falls  back  onto  the  bed.    

ing  his  head.    
                                                                                        

             

just  fainted  from  exhaustion  a  few  days  ago.  I  told  you  to  stay  home  
longer  after  your  surgery.  You  could  have  at  least  taken  it  easy  at  school.  

throw  him  a  quick  glare.    

tells  me  about  the  pain.  He  was  diagnosed  with  bone  cancer  two  years  
ago.  That,  on  top  of  needing  a  few  bone  marrow  transplants,  has  been  
hard  on  his  body.  He  never  says  a  word  about  it  though  so  I  never  bring  it  
up.    

winks.  
         I  lightly  hit  him  with  a  pillow  lying  on  the  side  of  the  bed.  He  
grabs  his  pillow  and  quickly  returns  the  blow  with  more  force.  The  attack  
signals  all  out  war  and  we  find  ourselves  ducking  around  the  room  to  
avoid  assaults.  His  relaxed  laugh  echoes  around  me  once  more  when  he  
sees  how  determined  I  am  to  win.  I  avoid  his  left  arm,  knowing  it  would  


way  with  a  murderous  look.  
        We  drop  our  pillows,  straightening  up  under  her  stern  gaze.  The  
nurse  places  a  finger  to  her  lips,  her  face  suddenly  brightening  up.  She  



51    
52  

winks  and  heads  off.  I  realize  it  is  one  of  the  nurses  Zack  has  gotten  to  
know  from  his  frequent  check-­ins.  His  positive  attitude  and  persistence  
have  always  made  it  easy  for  him  to  bond  with  anyone.    
                        We  head  back  to  our  regular  positions,  he  in  his  bed,  me  faithfully  
by  his  side.  For  the  rest  of  the  day,  we  reminisce  on  old  memories.  He  
brings  up  how  I  always  made  him  the  damsel  in  distress  so  I  could  be  the  
dragon  when  we  were  younger.  He  never  seemed  to  mind.    
                        For  the  most  part,  I  allow  him  to  talk  without  interruption.  I  feel  
relaxed  by  his  voice.  I  let  his  thorough  descriptions  of  our  past  sink  in  as  I  
listen  attentively.    
                                                                                                      +~+~+     

Gradually,  his  health  has  recovered,  bringing  more  color  to  his  pale  com-­
plexion.  I  hand  him  a  list  of  school  events  and  assignments  for  the  day.  
He  always  manages  to  stay  on  top  of  demands.      

my  teachers  are  out  to  get  me,  my  parents  took  away  my  phone,  my  back  

dals,  and  today  I  fell  asleep  in  history,  earning  myself  a  detention  from  
the  teacher.  This  is  only  a  glimpse  into  my  troubles  for  the  week  to  be  
honest.    
         I  decide  to  tell  Zack  about  my  week,  emphasizing  each  offense  
against  me  with  frustration.  With  every  passing  minute,  he  becomes  

the  time.  I  unexpectedly  snap.  

                                                                    

is  dark,  eyes  glazing  over  with  ice.  The  room  loses  all  signs  of  warmth  
and  comfort.    

defensively.    
                                         
        I  freeze  in  place.  The  Zack  I  know  has  vanished  in  the  blink  of  an  
eye.  Usually  he  agrees  with  me  or  sympathizes.    
                                             

pain.  What  gives  you  the  right  to  criticize  every  aspect  of  life  and  all  its  

52    
  


                                                           
           His  face  has  hardened  into  unadulterated  anger.  His  green  eyes  
that  regularly  shine  with  a  resolute  twinkle  appear  black  in  the  poor  light-­
ing.  I  remain  silent,  trying  to  form  a  glare  as  deadly  as  his.  Does  he  think  
he  understands  the  real  world  or  something?  The  man  is  bed  ridden  half  

through  problems  effortlessly.  I  let  these  thoughts  spin  around  my  mind,  
unsure  where  to  begin.    

                                                                  

                                    


spend  part  of  your  high  school  years  trapped  in  a  dingy  hospital  room.  

                          -­   


ments,  chores,  school  drama,  bullying-­   

want.  You  live  and  plan  your  time  by  weeks  and  days,  never  thinking  

happened  to  the  witty  adventurous  girl  I  used  to  know.  Since  we  entered  
                                          
                                    

                                                   
                                   
          Before  he  can  lecture  me  further,  I  storm  out.    
                                              +~+~+  
            I  sit  on  a  cold  plastic  chair  in  the  waiting  room.  A  fluorescent  
light  in  the  far  right  corner  flickers  rapidly  every  few  minutes.  A  TV  is  on  
towards  my  left,  spouting  out  reports  about  natural  disasters  on  low  vol-­
ume.  My  face  is  hidden  by  hands,  holding  back  tears,  concealing  emo-­



53    
54  

tions  that  make  me  even  more  pathetic.  A  clock  ticks  softly  somewhere  in  
the  room,  counting  down  the  minutes.    
  
         The  aquamarine  gown  I  chose  for  prom  now  sits  limply  on  my  


down  and  his  recent  bone  marrow  transplant  has  caused  some  complica-­


could  get  here  from  their  meeting  over  four  hours  away.  How  could  I  say  
no?  

Yet,  his  presence  has  lingered  and  his  speech  has  become  a  chant  in  my  
mind.  Our  argument  has  been  rewinding  in  my  head  ever  since.  I  admit  

is  the  only  person  that  can  cheer  me  up  anymore.  If  something  happens  to  

           
         The  nurse  who  had  interrupted  the  pillow  battle  a  few  weeks  ago  
taps  me  on  the  shoulder.  Worry  lines  are  evident  on  her  face.    
                                                                          
         I  nod  curtly  and  follow  her  to  the  room,  where  she  leaves  me  to  
sort  out  matters  on  my  own.  I  slowly  open  the  door.  He  is  sitting  on  his  
bed,  back  faced  towards  me,  eyes  transfixed  on  the  world  outside  his  win-­
dow.  I  walk  over  to  him  and  try  to  see  what  has  grabbed  his  attention.  Is  it  
the  bright  yellow  and  green  lights  on  the  buildings?  Is  it  the  tide  of  people  
headed  in  every  direction?  

etly.    
          I  look  up,  and  sure  enough,  a  few  silver  stars  manage  to  twinkle  
over  the  skyscrapers  that  cover  most  of  the  sky.  I  thought  it  was  impossi-­
ble  to  see  stars  in  the  city,  especially  here  where  the  lights  are  brightest.  

since  I  believed  otherwise.  Reminds  me  of  how  I  choose  to  complain  in-­
stead  of  overcome  obstacles.  Maybe  the  latter  is  how  you  find  the  stars,  as  
cheesy  as  it  sounds.    
          Unexpectedly,  I  feel  something  soft  press  against  my  cheek  for  a  
moment.  I  turn  towards  Zack  as  he  pulls  his  face  away  from  mine,  a  gen-­

54    
  


tle  smile  gracing  his  expression.    

                                                                                         

                                                                          

                                                                                                 
                                                           -­  Wait,  did  you  just  kiss  
                              
                                                           
          We  just  stare  at  each  other  for  a  while,  waiting  for  the  other  to  de-­
cide  what  the  gesture  meant.  He  suddenly  bursts  out  laughing,  the  sound  
of  his  voice  encircling  me.  I  begin  to  laugh  with  him,  feeling  lighter  and  
at  ease.  
                                                -­Meghan  Nguyen  




55    
56  

My  Accusation  
  
        I  look  up  from  the  ground.  My  mother  stands  there  in  front  of  me,  
arms  crossed,  foot  tapping,  eyes  narrowing,  and  lips  pursing.  She  stood  


at  me  in  disbelief.  I  continued  to  try  to  look  as  unaware  of  the  situation  as  
possible.  My  heartbeat  picked  up  a  rapid  pace,  my  palms  began  to  over-­
heat,  and  my  lungs  were  unable  to  consume  air.  I  was  filled  with  a  sudden  
strike  of  guilt.  About  to  give  in,  the  pot  on  the  stove  started  to  overflow  
with  foaming  white  bubbles.  As  she  turned  around  to  turn  it  off  I  let  my  
guilt  out  without  words,  just  air  and  let  in  a  gasp  of  air  that  would  hope-­
fully  get  me  through  this  case  and  out  of  this  court  house.  Before  she  
turned  around  I  flicked  a  few  crumbs  off  the  tips  of  my  fingers.  My  

through  the  door  and  into  the  bathroom  staring  at  my  reflection,  where  a  
smirk  was  slapped  across  my  face.  I  did  it,  I  was  guilty.  It  was  I  who  stole  
a  cookie  from  the  cookie  jar.  
                                               -Ashlie  Contreras




56    
  

Senioritis  




tivation  is  unfamiliar  to  me  now.  I  find  myself  asking  questions  like  

the  teacher  is  talking  about  something  new  on  their  agenda  to  finish  me  


through  my  stack  of  piling  essays  and  projects.  Sure,  it  might  seem  lazy,  

after  Christmas  break  (short  as  it  is),  I  returned  to  school  with  hand  writ-­
ing  that  had  deteriorated  to  kindergarten  chicken  scratch.  The  reason  was  

part  being  my  hands  felt  too  lazy  to  grip  the  pencil.  That  being  said,  I  also  
find  studying  boring.  I  like  notes.  Notes  are  fun,  simple  and  to  the  point.  I  
appreciate  when  teachers  make  power  points  because  it  is  easier  for  me  to  
understand  and  that  without  the  PowerPoint,  I  could  probably  careless  
about  the  subject.  However,  I  like  it  even  more  when  teachers  give  me  
test  and  quizzes  with  the  actual  content  placed  on  the  PowerPoint  ,  rather  
                                            
         My  laziness  has  spilt  over  into  anything  I  have  ever  found  as  fun.  

far  back,  my  mind  has  the  capacity  of  a  kindergartener:  only  capable  of  
coloring  and  eating  cheerios  until  nap  time.  To  give  myself  some  credit,  I  
am  actually  in  Art  class  so  I  kind  of  should  be  interested,  plus  I  have  an  
easel  and  all  sorts  of  art  stuff  in  my  room.  I  am  constantly  searching  for  

amount  of  my  time  listening  to  music,  which  becomes  old  after  a  week.  I  
consider  myself  now  the  all-­
stream.  I  swear  if  a  mainstream  95.7  listener  got  a  hold  of  my  iPod  and  
aired  it,  I  would  probably  die  of  a  heart  break.  Most  mainstream  listeners  
cannot  truly  appreciate  the  music  I  listen  to,  however,  I  give  some  inter-­
ested  people  the  benefit  of  the  doubt  because  I  for  one  listen  to  almost  
everything  and  I  can  somehow  find  my  true  love  for  the  genre  I  listen  to.    


57    
58  

  
With  my  senioritis  I  am  cursed  with  strayed  thoughts  and  temporary  
symptoms  of  ADD.  I  have  no  clue  what  people  are  saying  1/3  of  the  time,  
and  I  feel  kind  of  bad,  so  I  just  nod  my  head  in  agreement.  No  one  has  

so  I  assume  they  either  have  no  clue  about  what  they  are  talking  about,  
they  could  care  less  about  my  response,  or  have  the  same  story  as  the  last  
person.  I  also  find  myself  lost  in  space  half  the  time.  Just  the  other  day  I  
was  in  Spanish  class,  board  out  of  mind  and  completely  detached  from  the  
discussion,  so  I  decided  to  take  out  a  note  card  and  draw  a  taco.  The  taco  
drawing  then  led  me  to  draw  a  picture  of  an  angry  chief  with  a  spatula.  
After  looking  at  my  accomplishment  that  had  consumed  10  minutes  of  my  

(because  those  are  my  favorite)  and  priced  each  taco  to  my  liking.  Most  

about  how  delicious  their  tacos  were,  but  for  about  15  minutes,  I  did.  I  
even  constructed  a  plan  that  was  seemingly  flawless  at  the  time,  but  after  
much  contemplation,  I  decided  that  it  needed  a  lot  of  revisions.  My  plan  
included  bringing  my  boyfriend  a  breakfast  taco,  allowing  his  friends  to  

this  is  soooo  weird  but  it  gets  worst.  I  would  then  pull  out  an  entire  dozen  
tacos,  and  offering  them  for  $3.  My  mind  was  so  flattered  by  my  

ing  breakfast  biscuits,  duhhhh.    
  
                                  
                                     -­Natalie  Lerma  




58    
  


Run  
  



destroyed  by  a  single  hunk  of  explosive  metal  dropped  from  our  planes  
thousands  of  feet  above.  Homes  and  schools  and  places  of  worship  for  

completely  demolished  by  hands  just  like  mine;;  hands  that  were  here  to  


never  forget  the  face  of  the  child  staring  back  at  me.  A  young  boy,  no  
more  than  five  or  six,  staring  up  at  me  from  under  a  piece  of  concrete  that  
covered  half  of  his  small  body.  I  remember  thinking  he  looked  a  lot  like  
my  own  son  and  I  remember  the  nausea  that  crashed  over  me  in  the  few  


prison.  But  here,  this  child  meant  nothing.  
As  I  ran  away,  the  reasons  why  I  served  started  to  blur  in  my  mind,  like  
they  were  being  erased.  Before  I  stopped  running,  all  of  them  were  gone  
completely.  

                                              -­Rachel  Sloan  




59    
60  




         Structure   Anonymous  



60    
  


Grand  Decisions    
  
It  all  came  down  to  this.  
This  would  be  the  most  important  decision  I  ever  made.  He  would  ask  me  
the  question.  He  would  look  me  right  in  the  eye  and  just  ask  it.  As  if  it  


                                                                  -­word  answer;;  I  

man  across  from  me.  His  eyebrows  draw  together  slightly  in  the  middle  
and  I  can  imagine  myself  making  the  same  face  back  at  him.  
                     

swered  the  question,  then  these  hands  would  have  something  extra;;  some-­
                                      
Slowly,  the  decision  starts  to  form  in  my  mind.  The  voices  of  the  people  


                                                                                    
Taking  in  a  shaky  breath,  I  finally  answer.  
              
A  person  behind  me  cheers  as  I  finally  carry  my  groceries  out  the  door  
and  it  lets  me  know  I  made  the  right  decision.    

                                             -­Rachel  Sloan  




61    
62  

Dramatic Writing
  
Excerpt  from  The  Unforgettable  Tale  of  Summer  Camp  
Scene  Five  
Scene  opens  on  a  camp  room  where  Scarlett  and  Lily  are  sitting  on  chairs  
while  about  fifteen  little  girls  are  sitting  on  the  floor.  Little  girls  are  all  
chatting.  
LITTLE  GIRLS:  (In  a  teasing  manner  and  in  unison)  Lily  likes  Luke!!!  
Scarlett  rolls  her  eyes  to  the  side  and  lets  out  a  huge  sigh  as  Lily  blushes  
and  changes  the  topic.  
LILY:  Okay  listen  up  girls!  (Room  goes  quiet)  Tomorrow  is  our  trip  to  

day  so  you  should  all  have  the  money.  
Little  girls  start  piling  money  on  side  table  while  Lily  checks  off  who  paid  
on  list.  
SCARLETT:  (To  Lily)  I  can  take  the  money  to  the  office  on  our  way  
outside.  
LILY:  
you  check  off  the  names.  (Hands  over  the  list)  
SCARLETT:  Gladly.    
LILY:                                                                  
The  girls  start  to  line  up  at  the  door  as  Lily  leads  them  offstage.  
Scarlett  erases  the  marks  that  Lily  made  on  the  checklist.    

that  is  seen  on  the  table.  
She  walks  offstage  with  a  devious  smile.  
Scene  Six  
Enter  Lily  to  camp  office.  In  the  office  Scarlett  and  the  Behrs  look  angry.  
LILY:  You  called  me?  
MR.  BEHR:  Yes,  we  have  an  extremely  serious  matter  to  discuss  with  
you.    
MRS.  BEHR:  After  camp  today,  we  asked  Scarlett  if  she  had  the  money  
for  the  trip  tomorrow  and  she  informed  us  that  you  had  it.    
LILY:  Well,  this  must  be  a  mistake  because  Scarlett  was  taking  it  to  the  
             
MRS.  BEHR:  Well,  we  thought  maybe  you  had  left  it  in  the  room  until     
    we  saw  the  list.  (Holds  up  list)  

62    
  


LILY:                                                            
MRS.  BEHR:  
to  do  this.  We  allowed  you  to  work  here  last  minute.  We  gave  you  a  great  
opportunity.    
MR.  BEHR:  Do  you  know  that  we  have  very  angry  parents  who  want  to  
know  where  their  money  for  the  circus  has  gone?  
MRS.  BEHR:  When  we  asked  Scarlett  (Looks  over  at  Scarlett),  she  was  

saw  the  money  in  the  purse.    
LILY:  (Looks  confused)                                         
MR.  BEHR:  Regardless  of  what  you  did  or  did  not  do,  we  are  going  to  
have  to  let  you  go.  This  was  a  very  irresponsible  move  on  your  part.  
LILY:                 
MRS.  BEHR:  We  are  very  sorry.    
Lily  exits  devastated  as  she  spots  Scarlett  in  the  corner  smiling  at  her.    
Scene  Seven  
Scarlett  is  seen  talking  to  Luke  about  incident  as  Lily  enters  on  other  side  
of  stage.  She  is  not  seen  by  the  former  two.  
SCARLETT:  
                                                   
LUKE:  You  know  what  Scarlett;;  we  were  over  a  long  time  ago!  You  
need  to  get  over  yourself!  
Scarlett  lets  off  a  huge  sigh  and  walks  offstage.    
Lily  enters  near  Luke.  
LUKE:                                                             
LILY:  Why  did  Scarlett  just  call  me  a  gold  digger?  
LUKE:  
today?  
LILY:  
believe  you!  
She  starts  to  run  offstage.  
LUKE:                                                     
LILY:  
me  again!  
LUKE:                              
He  does  not  finish  sentence  as  Lily  has  now  run  completely  offstage.    
                                       -­Kendall  Lyman  

63    
64  

  




64    
  

Never  Fully  Recovered  
  
Scene  One:  The  Beginning  
(Blackout,  Curtains  closed  entire  scene,  Audience  hears  someone  running  mur-­
muring.  Or.  Curtain  is  opened,  revealing  the  stage  is  hidden  behind  a  thin,  white  
curtain.  All  furniture  is  onstage  behind  the  curtain,  with  lights  in  different  places  
on  upstage  right,  center  and  left.  All  the  audience  sees  is  the  shadows  of  every-­
thing  in  the  room)    
  
WOMAN:  No.  No.  Oh  God.  Please  No.  (Frantically  trying  to  get  her  key  into  
the  lock  and  open  the  door,  keys  jingling  are  heard)  Come  on!  Come  on!  Open  
up  stupid  door!                               Come  on!  Open  up  damn  it!  Oh  God!  
                                                  (Hear  the  door  open  and  slam  shut  fol-­
lowed  by  the  sound  of  a  bolt  locking  in  place,  followed  by  as  sigh  of  relief,  
breathless)                                                             (Sudden  banging  on  
the  door  is  heard  three  times,  slowly  and  rhythmically,  door  knob  is  heard  jig-­
gling,  Silence,  Door  is  heard  clicking  to  unlock,  Long  silence,  Door  bursts  open,  
woman  screams,  things  are  heard  falling  down,  some  glass  breaks,  Curtain  
moves  a  bit)                                                  (Gasps,  Hear  woman  fall  to  
the  ground,  dead.  Silence)  
  
(Blackout)    
  
Scene  Two:  the  Funeral:  At  the  Graveyard  
(All  main  characters  are  standing  in  a  semi-­circle  around  the  grave,  mourning  
the  loss  of  their  friend)  
  
HOLLY
were  celebrating  her  latest  groundbreaking  story.  
EDEN:  I  know.  (Sob.)  She  was  always  the  center  of  attention  at  parties  
TANZI:  And  the  way  she  died  was  just  horrible.  How  is  anyone  capable  of  
something  like  that?  
SKYLER:  Why  would  anyone  want  to  kill  her?  She  was  a  good  person.  
ZACK:  Even  the  good  must  sometimes  die  young.  But  no  one  deserves  to  die  
the  way  she  did.  
FRANK:  Well  apparently  somebody  thought  she  should.  
DOMINICK:  And  by  the  look  of  the  stab  wound,  they  were  determined  to  make  
sure  she  was  dead.  
ZACK:  
dead  before  she  hit  the  floor.  
(Eden  and  Tanzi  start  crying  uncontrollably)  

65    
66  

SKYLER:  And  poor  Chris,  losing  his  aunt  so  suddenly  like  that.  She  was  your  
                                            
  
                                                        
  
DOMINICK:  I  hope  that  the  killer  is  quickly  found  
ZACK:  The  police  are  working  as  hard  as  they  can.  For  now  all  we  can  do  is  
wait.  
FRANK                                                
ZACK:                                             
FRANK                                                                   
EDEN:  then  what  do  you  suppose  we  do?  
FRANK
of  spending  every  moment  waiting  for  and  hoping  for  the  cops  the  find  some-­
thing.  (Moves  closer  to  grave)  you  will  be  greatly  missed  Amy.(Leaves.  Tanzi,  
Holly  and  Skyler  move  closer  to  grave)    
TANZI:  Even  though  you  are  not  here  with  us  any  more  Amy,  your  memory  
will  live  on  forever.  (Tanzi,  Holly  and  Skyler  leave.  Eden  goes  closer  to  grave)  
EDEN:  (sniff)  Parties  will  never  be  the  same.  (Eden  and  Dominick  leave)  
ZACK:                                                       
CHRIS:  Just  give  me  a  few  more  minutes.  
ZACK:  Ok  (pause,  hesitantly)                                      
  
(Leaves)(Chris  steps  toward  grave,  reaches  behind  headstone  revealing  a  bou-­

rest  of  bouquet  in  front  of  the  grave;;  kneels  on  one  knee,  next  to  headstone,  fin-­
gering  the  rose;;  collapses  over  headstone/gravestone  crying)  
  
(Blackout)  
                                    -­Mary  Faith  Langemeier    




66    
  




                     Three  Views  of  IWA   Elleanor  Jackson  
                                            
                                            
         (Original  photographs  manipulated  in  Photoshop  by  editors)  




67    
68  

Senioritis  
  
(RYLEIGH A  senior  in  high  school.  A  workaholic  when  it  comes  
   to  grades;;  an  overachiever  and  somewhat  of  a  perfectionist.  
   On  edge  due  to  lack  of  sleep  stemming  from  too  many  nights  
   spent  doing  homework  instead  of  getting  much-­needed  rest.  
   Wants  nothing  more  than  to  relax  and  to  be  left  alone,  particu-­
   larly  on  the  subject  of  school.  
  
AVA
   is,  but  notices  Ryleigh  seems  to  have  been  slacking  off  lately.  
   In  typical  motherly  fashion,  she  resolves  to  speak  to  her  
   daughter  on  the  subject  and  hopes  to  get  her  back  on  track.  
  
         (RYLEIGH  is  lying  on  her  bed,  wearing  large  earphones.  
         She  is  obviously  exhausted,  with  dark  circles  under  her  
         eyes.  Her  mother,  AVA,  enters)  
           
AVA:  Ryleigh!  What  are  you  doing?  (RYLEIGH  
         hearing  through  the  headphones.  AVA  resorts  to  shouting)  Ry-­
         leigh!  
  
RYLEIGH:  (removes  headphones)  What?  
  
AVA:                                                             
  
RYLEIGH:  Yeah.  (replaces  headphones)  
  
AVA:  (pulls  earphones  off
                                                  
  
RYLEIGH:  
         Mom.  
  
AVA:  Stop  being  a  senior  and  get  to  work  on  your  paper.  
  
RYLEIGH:                                             
  

68    
  


  
RYLEIGH:  Like  what?  
  
AVA:  
is  come  home,  eat,  and  lie  on  your  bed  listening  to  your  music  until  you  
go  to  sleep.  You  used  to  be  so  driven,  honey,  and  now  I  never  see  you  do-­
ing  any  homework  after  school.  I  thought  you  loved  writing.  I  think  you  
have  senioritis.  
  
RYLEIGH:  




an  AP  exam,  and  I  have  no  idea  how  many  other  ones  for  class  alone!  I  



a  day  off  from  schoolwork  this  year  since  class  started  back  in  August.  
Yes,  that  includes  Thanksgiving,  Christmas,  Easter  and  spring  break.  
Hell,  those  are  when  everyone  gets  the  heaviest  homework  loads!  When  

breaks  as  they  are  a  couple  extra  days  to  finish  ungodly  amounts  of  home-­
work  with  maybe  a  cumulative  hour  of  family  time  sandwiched  between  
analysis  of  a  postmodern  nightmare  of  a  novel  and  a  paper  on  whether  or  
not  I  think  resistance  to  peer  pressure  is  indicative  of  leadership.    We  
                                            Catch-­22  
been  reading  other  books  that  were  complicated  enough  without  the  post-­
modern  plot  structure  to  confuse  us  even  more,  because,  as  I  mentioned  
before,  WE  ARE  ALL  EXHAUSTED  AS  IT  IS.  We  want  teachers  to  lay  



you  were  saying  a  minute  ago  that  I  used  to  be  so  driven.  



69    
70  

  



                                               
(  end  scene)  
  
                   -­Arielle  Cottingham  
  
  
  




70    
  

  




         Piece  of  Cake   Abbie  Bacilla  
71    

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:16
posted:7/22/2011
language:English
pages:71