Docstoc

Romeo and Juliet Worksheet

Document Sample
Romeo and Juliet Worksheet Powered By Docstoc
					Romeo and Juliet

         DAY 7
                 REVIEW

What did we learn in Act 1?
Act 1 Quiz
1.    In Prince Escalus’ speech, we are told that the Capulets and Montagues have had how
      many fights?
      a) two                    b) three                c) four
2.    The play takes place in what country?
      a) Great Britain          b) France               c) Italy
3.    Who attempts to calm down the feuding servants and keep the peace?
      a) Mercutio               b) Tybalt               c) Benvolio
4.    True or False: Romeo has been acting melancholy lately because he loves Juliet, but
      she is a Capulet and therefore forbidden to him.
5.    What advice does Benvolio give to Romeo about his troubles with love?
      a) send his love flowers b) look at other girls c) talk to his parents about it
6.    How old is Juliet?
      a) 12                     b) 13                   c) 14
7.    True or False: Juliet is completely against being paired with Paris.
8.    How does Romeo accidentally find out about the Capulet party?
      a) He reads the guest list for an illiterate servant.
      b) He finds an invitation on the street.
      c) He overhears Capulet speaking to a friend.
9.    Why is Tybalt so angry at the party?
      a) He wants to dance with Rosaline, but she doesn’t want to dance with him.
      b) He hates parties, but he was forced to go.
      c) He finds out that Romeo is there but can’t find him.
10.   True or False: As Romeo and Juliet are “falling in love” at the ball, they already know
      that their relationship will be forbidden because of who their parents are.
Act 2 Prologue
CHORUS
                                           In this passage, the
Now Romeo’s old feelings of desire         Chorus tells how, though
are dying, and a new desire is eager
to take their place. Romeo groaned for     they are forbidden to meet,
the beautiful Rosaline and said he         Romeo’s love for Rosaline
would die for her, but compared with       has died, and Juliet is now
tender Juliet, Rosaline doesn’t seem
beautiful now. Now someone loves           Romeo’s new love. Their
Romeo, and he’s in love again—both         love is stronger than any
of them falling for each others' good      other claim on their lives.
looks. But he has to make his
speeches of love to a woman who’s
supposed to be his enemy. And she’s
been hooked by someone she should
fear. Because he’s an enemy, Romeo
has no chance to see Juliet and say
the things a lover normally says. And
Juliet’s just as much in love as he, but
she has even less opportunity to meet
her lover. But love gives them power,
and time gives them the chance to
meet, sweetening the extreme danger
with intense pleasure.
 Act 2 Prologue
 Notice the contrasts    old desire   young
 that exist within the                affection
 prologue:
                         deathbed     heir
                         Rosaline     Juliet
                         foe          lover
                        limited       even more
 What do the contrasts access for    limited for
  add to the prologue?  Romeo         Juliet
 What is the purpose
  of having a prologue? extremities   extreme
                                      sweet
Act 2 Scene 1
I need two volunteers:
 One to read the part of
Benvolio; and another to
    read the part of
       Mercutio.
                           Mercutio and Benvolio
                           look for Romeo after the
                           dance. Mercutio makes
                           fun of Romeo’s affection
                           for Rosaline, not realizing
                           that Romeo is now in love
                           with Juliet.
 Act 2 Scene 1
 Central Concerns
1. Romeo, his heart aflame with love for Juliet, hides
   near the Capulet orchard. The unspoken
   suggestion is that he hopes once more to see
   Juliet.
2. Benvolio and Mercutio, who come looking for
   Romeo, make fun of his love. Dramatic irony is
   evident as Romeo, hidden nearby, can hear their
   conversation.
3. Mercutio with his sharp wit and humour, speaks
   of physical love – a counterpoint to the idealized
   love of Romeo and Juliet.
4. Romeo is so smitten with Juliet that he forsakes
   his friends’ company.
Act 2 Scene 1
 Themes
Act 2 Scene 1
 Themes
  Pick one theme
  and write a well
  constructed
  paragraph
  explaining the
  theme in relation
  to the play thus
  far.
Romeo and Juliet

         DAY 8
            REVIEW

Answers to Act 1 Quiz
Act 1 Quiz
1.    In Prince Escalus’ speech, we are told that the Capulets and Montagues have had how
      many fights?
      a) two                    b) three                c) four
2.    The play takes place in what country?
      a) Great Britain          b) France               c) Italy
3.    Who attempts to calm down the feuding servants and keep the peace?
      a) Mercutio               b) Tybalt               c) Benvolio
4.    True or False: Romeo has been acting melancholy lately because he loves Juliet, but
      she is a Capulet and therefore forbidden to him.
5.    What advice does Benvolio give to Romeo about his troubles with love?
      a) send his love flowers b) look at other girls c) talk to his parents about it
6.    How old is Juliet?
      a) 12                     b) 13                   c) 14
7.    True or False: Juliet is completely against being paired with Paris.
8.    How does Romeo accidentally find out about the Capulet party?
      a) He reads the guest list for an illiterate servant.
      b) He finds an invitation on the street.
      c) He overhears Capulet speaking to a friend.
9.    Why is Tybalt so angry at the party?
      a) He wants to dance with Rosaline, but she doesn’t want to dance with him.
      b) He hates parties, but he was forced to go.
      c) He finds out that Romeo is there but can’t find him.
10.   True or False: As Romeo and Juliet are “falling in love” at the ball, they already know
      that their relationship will be forbidden because of who their parents are.
              REVIEW

What did we learn about
the themes in this play?
    Act 2 Scene 2
Balcony Scene
After they leave the party, Romeo hides near the Capulet orchard
hoping to catch a glimpse of Juliet. Juliet suddenly appears at a
window above the spot where Romeo is standing. Romeo
compares her to the morning sun, far more beautiful than the
moon it banishes. He nearly speaks to her, but thinks better of it.
Juliet, musing to herself and unaware that Romeo is in her
garden, asks why Romeo must be Romeo—a Montague, and
therefore an enemy to her family. She says that if he would
refuse his Montague name, she would give herself to him; or if
he would simply swear that he loved her, she would refuse her
Capulet name. Romeo responds to her plea, surprising Juliet,
since she thought she was alone. She wonders how he found her
and he tells her that love led him to her. Juliet worries that
Romeo will be murdered if he is found in the garden, but Romeo
refuses to budge, claiming that Juliet’s love would make him
immune to his enemies. Juliet admits she feels as strongly about
Romeo as he professes he loves her, but she worries that
perhaps Romeo will prove inconstant or false, or will think Juliet
too easily won. Romeo begins to swear to her, but she stops
him, concerned that everything is happening too quickly. He
reassures her, and the two confess their love again. The Nurse
calls for Juliet, and Juliet goes inside for a moment. When she
reappears, she tells Romeo that she will send someone to him
the next day to see if his love is honorable and if he intends to
wed her. The Nurse calls again, and again Juliet withdraws. She
appears at the window once more to set a time when her
emissary should call on him: they settle on nine in the morning.
They exult in their love for another moment before saying good
night. Juliet goes back inside her chamber, and Romeo departs
in search of a monk to aid him in his cause.
     Act 2 Scene 2
 Figurative Language Alive:
  Balcony Scene Charades
1.    Break the students into groups of 3
      and give each group a line of
      figurative language from the balcony
      scene.
2.    Each group has three minutes to plan
      how they will represent the ideas as
      charades for the rest of the class.
3.    When the students are ready, have
      each small group act out its line, while
      the rest of the class guesses.
4.    When the audience has finished
      guessing (successfully or not), ask a
      member of the group to write the line
      on the board.
     Act 2 Scene 2
 Figurative Language Alive:
  Balcony Scene Charades
5.    Ask the students to identify the
      speaker of each line, Romeo or Juliet.
      Then see if the students can
      successfully sequence the lines
      written on the board in the order in
      which they appear in the scene.
 Act 2 Scene 2
 Reflection
1.   In the play, Juliet is not yet 14, and Romeo is
     approximately 16. Marriage at this age was not
     uncommon in Elizabethan England but do you feel that 14
     or 16 year olds can fully experience romantic love? Why
     or why not?
2.   Do you think that any teenager can be emotionally and
     mentally ready for marriage? Why or why not?
3.   Though the concept of arrange marriages is strange to us,
     it still occurs in some places in the world. Can you think of
     any advantages of arranged marriages?
4.   On a much smaller scale than arranged marriages, would
     you ever consider letting your parents choose a date for
     you? Why or why not?
Romeo and Juliet

         DAY 9
              REVIEW

What did we learn about
   the balcony scene?
    Act 2 Scene 2
    Review
1.  But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? (Romeo)
2.  Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon (Romeo)
3.  My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words of thy tongue’s
    uttering, yet I know the sound (Juliet)
4. With love’s light wings did I o’erperch these walls (Romeo)
5. There lies more peril in thine eyes than twenty of their swords
    (Romeo)
6. I have night’s cloak to hide me from their eyes. (Romeo)
7. It is too rash…like the lightning which doth cease to be ere one
    can say it lightens (Juliet)
8. This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath, may prove a
    beauteous flower (Juliet)
9. My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep (Juliet)
10. Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books, but love
    from love toward school with heavy looks. (Romeo)
Act 2 Scene 3
    Friar Laurence
   It is very early the next morning, and the scene opens at the
    ―cell‖ of one Friar Laurence, a Catholic priest.
   The Friar is outside, picking plants which he can use in mixing
    various herbs and medicines.
   Friar Laurence says he must fill up his "osier cage," or his
    wicker basket. A long time ago, priests were supposed to be
    experts at plants and this sort of thing. All alone, the Friar
    begins to talk to himself (and, of course, to us).
   The Friar says that the plants can be "mickle," which means
    they can be very powerful.
   Friar Laurence picks one plant, and he mentions how it has
    both poison, and also medicine. If you smell it, it can make you
    well. If you taste it, it will kill. One hopes that the Friar can keep
    his prescriptions straight.
   His soliloquy compares the plants to men, by saying that men
    can be both good and evil; similar to the plants he is picking.
Act 2 Scene 3
Friar Laurence
The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
Check’ring the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels
From forth day's path and Titan's fiery wheels:
Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,
The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry,
I must up-fill this osier cage of ours
With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.
The earth that's nature's mother is her tomb;
What is her burying grave that is her womb,
And from her womb children of divers kind
We sucking on her natural bosom find,
Many for many virtues excellent,
None but for some and yet all different.
O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies
In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities:
For nought so vile that on the earth doth live
But to the earth some special good doth give,              In pairs, you are to read Friar
Nor aught so good but strain'd from that fair use
Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse:                Laurence’s speech.
Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied;
And vice sometimes by action dignified.                    With your partner, discuss the
Within the infant rind of this small flower                 language tricks that
Poison hath residence and medicine power:
For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;     Shakespeare uses in this
Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.
Two such opposed kings encamp them still
                                                            speech.
In man, as well as herbs -- grace, and rude will;
And where the worser is predominant,
                                                           Complete worksheet
Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.              provided.
    Act 2 Scene 3
Friar Laurence                     ―The earth that’s nature’s
    ―The gray-eyed morn            mother is her tomb;/What is her
     smiles on the frowning
     night.‖ ~personification       burying grave, that is her
    ―Check’ring the eastern        womb.‖ ~reversed thought
     clouds with streaks of        ―And from her womb children of
     light.‖ ~imagery and           divers kind/We sucking on her
     metaphor
                                    natural bosom find.‖ ~reversed
    ―And flecked darkness
     like a drunkard reels.‖        sentence construction
    ~ simile
    ―From forth day’s path
     and Titan’s fiery wheels.‖
     ~allusion
    ―I must up-fill this osier
     cage of ours.‖ ~reversed
     word
Act 2 Scene 3
A Last Look at ―The Gray-Eyed Morn‖
 What does Friar Laurence explain about the
   nature of these herbs?
 How does this nature lesson apply to life in
   general?
 How does this nature lesson apply to the
   relationship between Romeo and Juliet?
 How does the use of these language tricks
   enhance this speech for you?
Romeo and Juliet

        DAY 10
              REVIEW

What did we learn about
    the Friar’s speech?
Language Tricks REVIEW
 Figurative
  Language
 Personification
 Metaphor
 Simile
 Allusion
 Reverse Word
 Reverse Thought
 Reverse Sentence
  Structure
Act 2 Scene 4 and 5
    More Language Tricks
   The recognition, identification, and analysis of
    language tricks takes a great deal of focus and
    practice. Therefore, we will spend another day on
    these activities. 
   The class will be divided into 5 groups. Each
    group will be assigned one of the following
    passages:                          Rhyme
       2.4.1-37                       Hyperbole
       2.4.38-103                     Puns
       2.4.164-219 Look for           Simile
       2.5.1-55                       Metaphor
       2.5.56-83                      Personification
                                       Etc.
Act 2 Scene 4 and 5
    More Language Tricks
   2.4.1-37: Mercutio tells Benvolio that Tybalt
    has sent a challenge to Romeo.
   2.4.38-103: Benvolio, Mercutio, and Romeo
    trade witticisms.
   2.4.164-219: Romeo asks Juliet’s nurse to tell
    Juliet to meet him at Friar Laurence’s cell
    today so they can be married.
   2.5.1-55: Juliet is eager for her nurse to come
    home and tell about her meeting with Romeo,
    but the nurse takes her time in reporting.
   2.5.56-83: After much dodging, the nurse tells
    Juliet she is to marry Romeo today.
Act 2 Scene 4 and 5
  More Language Tricks
 Your group is to study the assigned
  passage and complete the following
  activities:
  1. Prepare a summary of your group’s lines.
  2. Identify three examples of language tricks
     used in your group’s lines.
  3. Discuss how these specific tricks enhance the
     passage for your group.
  4. Identify what your group thinks is the most
     important line, and explain why it is important.
Act 2 Scene 4 and 5
                Each group will be
                 responsible for ―teaching‖
                 their assigned passage to
                 the class.
Romeo and Juliet

        DAY 11
             REVIEW
What did we learn about
         Shakespeare’s
       language tricks?
 Act 2 Scene 4 Review
    Central Concerns
1.   The violence of the feud and danger it poses to Romeo
     and Juliet are evident in Tybalt’s challenge to Romeo.
2.   Benvolio and Mercutio show their loyalty to Romeo.
3.   Mercutio reveals his dislike for Tybalt, whom he sees as a
     man only interested in appearance and show.
4.   The comic banter between Romeo and Mercutio shows
     that Romeo is in better spirits.
5.   Mercutio jests in sexual word-play as he banters with the
     nurse.
6.   The Nurse, acting as Juliet’s envoy, in entrusted with the
     secret of the afternoon wedding and Romeo’s plan to go
     to Juliet’s bedroom that night. She acts as a loyal and
     trusted servant carrying out Juliet’s wishes.
 Act 2 Scene 5 Review
 Central Concerns
1. Juliet shows her anxiety over the news from
   Romeo in her opening soliloquy.
2. The Nurse annoys Juliet by delaying her news
   and complaining of aches and pains. The pains
   and slowness associated with her age are
   contrasted with the anxious passion of Juliet’s
   youth.
3. Juliet finally extracts the news of her impending
   wedding from the Nurse, who remains true to
   character by making a vulgar comment about
   Juliet’s wedding night.
Act 2 Scene 6
I need three volunteers:
  One to read the part of
 Romeo; one to read the
part of Juliet; and another
  to read the part of Friar
         Laurence.
                              Romeo and Juliet meet
                              and are married at Friar
                              Laurence’s cell. It is now
                              Monday afternoon. A
                              little over 24 hours since
                              the play began.
 Act 2 Review
―There stays a
 husband to make
 you a wife.‖
   We will now watch
   Act 2 of the Zeffirelli
   movie (1968) version
   of Romeo and Juliet.

The full Zeffirelli version is on YouTube.
     Act 1 and 2 Review
Directions: Test your knowledge of the play thus far by determining which character
spoke the following lines. All letters will be used at least once. Write the letter of the
correct character in the space provided.

a)    Romeo                             d) the Nurse                        g) Mercutio
b)    Juliet                            e) Benvolio                         h) Tybalt
c)    Friar Laurence                    f) Prince Escalus                   i) Lady Capulet

_____ 1. “If ever you disturb our streets again your lives shall pay the forfeit of the
     peace.”
_____ 2. “I hate the word as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.”
_____ 3. “So please you step aside; I’ll know his grievance or be much denied.”
_____ 4. “I’ll look to like, if looking liking move, but no more deep will I endart mine eye
     than your consent gives strength to make it fly.”
_____ 5. “O then I see Queen Mab hath been with you.”
_____ 6. “Speak briefly, can you like of Paris’s love?”
_____ 7. “The hie you hence to Friar Laurence’s cell; there stays a husband to make you a
     wife.”
_____ 8. “I should have been more strange, I must confess, but that thou overheard’st,
     ere I was ware, my true love passion.”
_____ 9. “Young men’s love then lies not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes!”
_____ 10. “Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight. For I ne’er saw true beauty till
     this night.”

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:477
posted:7/22/2011
language:English
pages:38
Description: Romeo and Juliet Worksheet document sample