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					                      Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


                                         Child Protection
                                       Policy Procedures

For the purpose of these Procedures:

All references to young people/person or child/children refers to anyone under 18 years of age.

Adults are 18 and over.

The term parent applies to the persons or persons with legal responsibility for a young person.

The term staff applies to all adult members and associates of the club including paid, non-paid
volunteers and parents.

The term club applies to all activity groups and sports clubs within Sports, Leisure and the Arts.

Common sense should be applied when considering the circumstances of older children.




                Name of Club…………………………………………………………


All Young People and Children have a right to be safe and enjoy their sport/activity, and as such this
document outlines the Child Protection Policy Procedures for Name of Club……………………………………...

These procedures should be read in conjunction with the Child Protection Policy. It is imperative that all
adults involved in any capacity with the Club read and fully understand the Child Protection Policy to ensure
that all Young People and Children at the Club are protected from harm and safe to enjoy sport. Adults at all
times in the vicinity of Young People and Children at the Club must be conscious and aware of these
procedures and abide by them fully.

It is important that all individuals working with Young People and Children behave in an appropriate manner,
operating within an accepted ethical framework. This will protect everyone within the activity set up.


The following document provides guidelines and procedures for the implementation of Name of
club…………………………………………………….. Child Protection Policy.




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          Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                 Child Protection Policy Procedures
                           Contents page

Section             Title

 1                  What are we protecting Children Against
                    1.1 Definitions
                    1.2 Children and Young People with Additional Support Needs
                    1.3 Bullying
                    1.4 Racism
                    1.5 Harassment

  2                 Codes of Conduct based on Principles and Procedures of Good
                    Practice
                    2.1 Principles
                    2.2 Procedures
                    2.3 Practice to be Avoided
                    2.4 Practice Never to be Sanctioned

  3                 Staff Recruitment

  4                 Transportation Procedures

  5                 Responding to Child Protection Concerns
                    5.1 Confidentiality
                    5.2 Defamation
                    5.3 Procedures for responding to a concern about a child
                    5.4 What to do if a child tells you about abuse (in general not regarding
                        any member of staff attached to the club)
                    5.5 Procedures for responding to concerns about the conduct of a
                        member of staff
                    5.6 False or malicious allegations
                    5.7 Historical Allegations of Abuse
                    5.8 Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003

  6                Safe in Care Guidelines
                    6.1 Why this is important
                    6.2 Adult to Child Ratios
                    6.3 Physical Contact
                    6.4 First Aid and Treatment of Injuries
                    6.5 Managing Challenging Behaviour
                    6.6 Trips Away from home (involving overnight stays)
                    6.7 Information and Communication Technology
                    6.8 Using the Internet to publish Information
                    6.9 Social Networking sites
                    6.10 Chat and Instant Messaging
                    6.11 Mobile Phones
                    6.12 Changing Facilities
                    6.13 Use of Alcohol and Illegal Substances


                    Declaration
                    Useful Contacts – Table for clubs to complete
                    Useful Contacts – East Lothian



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                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                   SECTION 1
                             WHAT ARE WE PROTECTING CHILDREN AGAINST?

1.1 Definitions
Child abuse is often difficult to recognise. It is not the responsibility of adults involved with the club to decide
whether or not a child has been abused. This is the role of trained professionals. We all however, have a duty
to act on any concerns about abuse.

In Scotland child abuse is defined as follows:

            ‘Children may be in need of protection where their basic needs are not being met, in a
         manner appropriate to their age and stage of development, and they will be at risk through
         avoidable acts of commission or omission on the part of their parent(s), sibling(s) or other
        relative(s), or a carer (i.e. the person while not a parent who has actual custody of the child).’

This definition includes placing children at risk through something a person has done to them or something a
person is failing to do for them. The definition can be broken down into 5 categories.

    1.    Emotional Abuse
    2.    Physical Injury
    3.    Physical Neglect
    4.    Sexual Abuse
    5.    Non-organic failure to thrive

These categories are not mutually exclusive, for example, a child experiencing physical abuse is undoubtedly
experiencing emotional abuse as well.

    1. EMOTIONAL ABUSE

        “failure to provide for a child’s basic emotional needs such as to have a severe effect on the
                                    behaviour and development of the child”

This could include making a child feel worthless or unloved, inadequate or not valued; inappropriate
expectations being imposed on children for their age or stage of development; the corruption or exploitation of
a child, or causing them frequently to feel frightened or in danger; persistent exposure to domestic abuse;
failing to provide a child with love, care and affection.

Examples of Emotional Abuse in Sport/Activity Setting

         Persistent failure to show any respect to a child e.g. continually ignoring a child.
         Constantly humiliating a child by telling them they are useless.
         Continually being aggressive towards a child making them feel frightened.
         Acting in a way which is detrimental to the child‟s self-esteem.


    2. PHYSICAL INJURY

                        “actual or attempted physical injury to a child, including the
        administration of toxic substances, where there is knowledge or reasonable suspicion, that
                            the injury was inflicted or knowingly not prevented”.

This could include deliberately hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning, scalding, drowning, suffocating
or otherwise harming a child. Physical injury may also occur where someone knowingly fails to take action to
protect a child from physical harm.



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                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Most children sustain accidental cuts and bruises throughout childhood. These are likely to occur in parts of
the body like elbows, shins and knees. An important indicator of physical abuse is where the bruises or
injuries are unexplained or the explanation does not fit the injury or the injury appears on parts of the body
where accidental injuries are unlikely e.g. on the cheeks or thighs. The age of the child must also be
considered. It is possible that some injuries may have occurred for other reasons e.g. skin disorders, rare
bone diseases.

Examples of Physical Abuse in Sport/Activity Setting

Bodily harm that may be caused by:

         over training or dangerous training of athletes.
         over playing an athlete.
         failure to do a risk assessment of physical limits or pre-existing medical conditions.
         administering, condoning or failure to intervene in drug use.


    3. PHYSICAL NEGLECT

  “This occurs where a child’s essential needs are not met and this is likely to cause impairment to
physical health and development. Such needs include food, clothing, cleanliness, shelter and warmth.
 A lack of appropriate care, including deprivation of access to health care, may result in persistent or
          severe exposure, through negligence, to circumstances which endanger the child”

As well as being the result of a deliberate act, neglect can also be caused through the omission or the failure
to act or protect e.g. the failure to obtain medical attention for a child.

Examples of Physical Neglect in Sport/Activity Setting

         exposing a child to extreme weather conditions e.g. heat and cold.
         failing to seek medical attention for injuries.
         exposing a child to risk of injury through the use of unsafe equipment.
         exposing a child to a hazardous environment without a proper risk assessment of the activity.
         failing to provide adequate nutrition and water.


    4. SEXUAL ABUSE

         “Any child may be deemed to have been sexually abused when any person(s), by design or
        neglect, exploits the child, directly or indirectly, in any activity intended to lead to the sexual
        arousal or other forms of gratification of that person or other person(s) including organised
            networks. This definition holds whether or not there has been genital contact and whether
                   or not the child is said to have initiated or consented to, the behaviour”.


This includes forcing or enticing a child to take part in sexual activities whether or not they are aware of or
consent to what is happening. Sexual abuse may involve physical contact, and non-contact acts such as
forcing children to look at or be involved in the production of pornographic material, to watch sexual activities
or encouraging them to behave in sexually inappropriate ways.

Some of the aforementioned activities can occur through the internet. Boys and girls are sexually abused by
males and females, including persons to whom they are and are not related and by other young people. This
includes people from all walks of life.

Some children may never be able to tell someone they have been sexually abused.



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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Changes in a child‟s behaviour may be a sign something has happened. In some cases there may be no
physical or behavioural signs to suggest that a child has been sexually abused.

Examples of Sexual Abuse in Sport/Activity setting

       exposure to sexually explicit inappropriate language or jokes.
       showing a child pornographic material or using a child to produce such material. inappropriate
        touching.
       sexual intercourse and/or sexual activity with a child under 16.


5. NON-ORGANIC FAILURE TO THRIVE

Failure to meet expected weight and growth norms or developmental milestones, which does not have a basis
in an hereditary or medical condition, as medically diagnosed. In its extreme form children can be at serious
risk from the effects of malnutrition, lack of nurturing and stimulation. This can lead to serious long term
effects such as greater susceptibility to serious childhood illnesses, reduction in potential stature and, with
young children in particular, the results may be life threatening over a relatively short period.

1.2 Children and Young People with a Learning or Physical Disability

Children and young people who have a learning or physical disability can be more vulnerable to abuse. This
is because:

       They are often dependent on a number of people for care and handling, some of which can be of an
        intimate nature.
       They may be unable to understand the inappropriateness of the actions or communicate to others
        that something is wrong.
       Signs of abuse can be misinterpreted as a symptom of the disability.
       Like other children they are fearful of the consequences of disclosing abuse.
       Attitudes and assumptions that children with disabilities are not abused.
       They may be unable to resist abuse due to physical impairment.
       Negative attitudes towards children with disabilities.
       Possible failures to recognise the impact of abuse on children with disabilities.

Particular care should be taken by all staff when with working with children affected by disability.

1.3 Bullying

Bullying may be seen as particularly hurtful behaviour, usually repeated over a period of time, where it is
difficult for those being bullied to defend themselves. It can take many forms including children being bullied
by adults, their peers and in some cases by members of their families. Bullying can be difficult to identify
because it often happens away from others and those who are bullied often do not tell anyone.

Bullying is a significant issue for children and has been the main reason for calls to ChildLine for the last eight
consecutive years.

Examples of Bullying in Sport

       Physical e.g. theft, hitting, kicking (in some cases, this might constitute an assault).
       Verbal (including teasing) e.g. racist or sectarian remarks, spreading rumours, threats or name-
        calling, ridicule or humiliation.
       Emotional e.g. isolating a child from the activities or social acceptance of the peer group.
       Harassment e.g. using abusive or insulting behaviour in a manner intended to cause alarm or
        distress.



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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

1.4     Racism

Children from British minority ethnic communities (and their parents) may have experienced harassment,
racial discrimination, and institutional racism. Although not formally recognized as a form of child abuse,
racism can be emotionally harmfully to children. Some racist acts also involve acts of physical violence
towards individuals or groups.

All organisations working with children, including those where British minority ethnic communities are
numerically small, should address institutional racism.

1.5      Harassment

An essential characteristic of harassment is that it is unwanted by the recipient. It is for individuals to
determine what behaviour is acceptable to him or her and what they regard as offensive.

Children may experience harassment or negative discrimination because of their race or ethnic origin, socio-
economic status, culture, age, disability, gender, sexuality or religious beliefs. This can have a detrimental
effect on a child.




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                  SECTION 2
        CODES OF CONDUCT BASED ON PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES OF GOOD PRACTICE

A Code of Conduct has a number of important functions. It:

       sets out what behaviour is acceptable and unacceptable
       defines standards of practice expected from those to whom it applies
       forms the basis for challenging and improving practice
       helps to protect staff by encouraging them to adhere to agreed standards of practice
       sets out for children and parents the standards of practice which they and the organisation should
        expect from those who work with children

If coaches, volunteers or officials at the Name of Club/Group……………………………………….. breach this
code of conduct, the individual may face disciplinary action.

Codes of Conduct are available for: INSERT DETAILS OF CODES ON CONDUCT ADOPTED BY
GROUP/CLUB :
   




All staff and participants must read and sign a Code of Conduct.

The Codes of Conduct adopted by Name of Club ………………………………………………….are based on
the below principles and procedures of good practice. Templates are provided on 39-41

2.1 Principles:

       Ensure that the sport or activity is fun, enjoyable and fair play is promoted
       Treat all Young People and Children equally, with respect, dignity and fairness
       Be an excellent role model - this includes not smoking or drinking alcohol in the company of Young
        People and Children
       Involve parents wherever possible
       Always put the welfare of each Young Person or child first, before winning or achieving goals
       Always work in an open environment. Avoid private or unobserved situations.
       Build balanced relationships based on mutual trust, which empower and include participants in the
        decision making process when possible
       Ensure the activity is appropriate for the age, maturity, experience and ability of participants
       Recognise the developmental needs and capacity of Young People and Children avoiding excessive
        training or competition and not pushing them against their will
       Give enthusiastic and constructive feedback, rather than negative criticism. Never ridicule or shout at
        a participant for making a mistake or losing.

2.2 Procedures:

    Ask each participant or parent to complete a registration form providing details on:

       name, address, date of birth
       experience of playing the sport
       any special needs or requirements
       any medicines being taken



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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

       existing injuries
       emergency contact details of a Parent or Carer including an additional number/contact if the parents
        can not be reached

    Template provided on page 42

       Ensure that there is regular communication with Parents, gaining written consent to act in loco
        parentis, if the need arises to give permission for the administration of emergency first aid and/or
        other medical treatment
       Ensure the information on the registration form is used to form a register which is always present at
        each session, in case of emergency.
       Ensure that if any form of manual/physical contact is required, it should be provided openly and only
        when necessary. Always follow the guidelines of your National or Scottish Governing Body.
       Keep up to date with the technical skills, qualifications and insurance in the sport/activity
       If groups have to be supervised in changing rooms or changing, always ensure parents or staff work
        in pairs
       Take responsibility for young people in your care until they have safely left the activity session
       Ensure parental permission is gained to take Young People and Children away from usual venue.

2.3 Practice to be avoided

The following practice will place Young People and Children and those working with them in a vulnerable
position and is deemed to be poor practice. If poor practice is identified through a complaint or referral, this
may result in an investigation and disciplinary action in terms of various relevant authorities (as listed at the
end of this procedure).

The following practice should be avoided:

       Having „favorites‟ – this could lead to resentment and jealousy by other children and could be
        misinterpreted by others.
       Spending excessive amounts of time alone with children away from others.
       Entering children‟s bedrooms on trips away from home, unless in an emergency situation or in the
        interest of health and safety. If it is necessary to enter rooms, alert the occupants by knocking and
        announcing your intention to enter. The door should remain open, if appropriate.

Where possible, avoid doing things of a personal nature for children that they can do for themselves

2.4 Practice never to be sanctioned

The following practices will never be sanctioned:

       Engaging in sexually provocative games, including horseplay.
       Engaging in rough or physical contact except as permitted within the rules of the game or
        competition.
       Forming intimate emotional, physical or sexual relationships with children.
       Allowing or engaging in touching a child in a sexually suggestive manner.
       Adults and other leaders sharing a room alone with a child for sleeping accommodation.
       Making sexually suggestive comments to a child, even in fun.
       Reducing a child to tears as a form of control.
       Allowing allegations made by a child to go unchallenged, unrecorded or not acted upon.
       Inviting or allowing children to stay with you at your home.
       Allowing children to swear or use sexualised language unchallenged




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


If any of the above, or the following incidents occur or are observed, you must report them to the Club Child
Protection Officer and make a written note using the Child Protection Significant Incident Report Form
(page 46) if possible, which is signed and dated and inform Parents wherever possible if:

       You accidentally hurt a Young Person
       A Young Person seems distressed in any manner
       A Young Person appears to be sexually aroused by your actions
       A Young Person misunderstands or misinterprets something you have done


Sports Teams - this section can be deleted if not applicable.

       Ensure that if mixed teams are taken away, a male and female member of staff should always
        accompany them.
       Ensure that at tournaments or away/overnight fixtures, Adults do not enter young People or Children‟s
        rooms without following appropriate guidelines, or invite Young People and Children into their rooms
       Ensure parental permission is gained to take Young People and Children away to a
        tournament/event/activity away from usual venue




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                      Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                SECTION 3


                       RECRUITMENT OF COACHES, VOLUNTEERS & OFFICIALS


Name of Club ………………………………………………………………will take all reasonable steps to ensure
unsuitable people are prevented from working in either paid or unpaid employment with children. Further
there is a legal duty to ensure that individuals who are fully listed on the Disqualified from Working with
Children List (DWCL) are not engaged (either paid or unpaid) in any position within the club/group.

When appointing an adult to support or run a young person‟s team or group, that at a minimum, it is essential
for the person to undertake the following:

       An Enhanced Disclosure Scotland Check
       2 References – where possible at least 1 should be from an employer or voluntary organisation where
        the position required working with children. References from relatives will not be accepted. A
        template for a reference form can be found on page 44. If the person has no experience of
        working with children, specific training requirements will be agreed
       An interview or meeting with Name of Person/Club………………………………………………………..
       The individual should reapply for an Enhanced Disclosure Scotland Check every 3 years. This can be
        done individually or through the club.
       The individual is appropriately qualified – where applicable e.g. Current Level 1 coach, recognised
        childcare qualification
       Holds relevant current insurance where applicable.



    To complete an Induction which includes:

       Clarification, agreement and signing up to the Code of Conduct, The Child Protection Policy and the
        Policy Procedures.
       Assessment of training, individual aims, needs and aspirations
       Complete an agreed probation period on commencement of their role




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                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                   SECTION 4
                                      TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES

The Club will inform parents about the transport procedure regarding the dropping off and collecting of Young
People.

The procedure consists of the following principles:

        Staff will be responsible for Young People and Children when in the care of the club
        It is mainly the Parents responsibility to transport their child to or from the club. There may be
         circumstances where Staff may need to transport children e.g., to fixture/competitions and potentially
         to or from training. This would be in agreement between parents and the club. The adult would be
         subject to appropriate consent, selection and child protection procedures.
        The Club must receive permission from Parents for Young People and Children to participate in all
         competitions and away fixtures/events
        The Club will provide a timetable of activities at the beginning of a season and notify Parents in
         writing where practically possible of any changes to this timetable
        The Club will require contact numbers for Parents and any alternative numbers if they are not
         contactable on the numbers provided
        The Club will provide the Parents with a contact number which may be used if the Parents will be late
         in collecting their child/children

If a Parent is late the Club will:

        Attempt to contact the Parent (s)
        Contact the alternative contact name and number
        Wait with the Young Person at the club with at least one other adult
        Remind Parent (s) of the policy relating to late collection
        If a Parent (s) remain out of contact, Staff will report the situation to Social Services or the Police

Staff should avoid where possible:

        Taking the Child home or to any other location
        Asking the Child to wait in a vehicle or the Club with them alone
        Sending the Child home with another person without permission

    Where parents make arrangements for the transportation of children to and from the activity, out with the
    knowledge of the Name of club …………………………………………………………..it will be the
    responsibility of the parents to satisfy themselves about the appropriateness and safety of the
    arrangements.

Where it is necessary for a member of staff to transport children, the following good practice is required:

        Where practicable and planned, written parental consent will be requested if staff/volunteers are
         required to transport children.
        Always tell another member that you are transporting a child, give details of the route and the
         anticipated length of the journey.
        Take all reasonable safety measures e.g. children in the back seat, seatbelts worn, Booster seats
         provided if required (Under 12‟s or Under 135cm).
        Where possible, have another adult accompany you on the journey.
        Call ahead to inform the child‟s parents that you are giving them a lift and inform them when you
         expect to arrive.




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Where Name of club ……………………………………………………..makes arrangements for the
transportation of children the members of staff involved will undertake a risk assessment of the transportation
required.

The risk assessment must include:

       Ensuring all vehicles are correctly insured for the purpose
       Ensure the driver has a valid and appropriate license for the vehicle being used
       All reasonable safety measures are available i.e. fitted, working seatbelts, Booster seats where
        required (i.e. children under age of 12 or under 135 cm)
       An appropriate ratio of adults per child (see Safe in Care Guidelines page 30)
       Adequate breaks are scheduled for the driver if a long journey
       Children, wherever possible, should be in the back seat of the car
       Written parental consent will be requested if staff/volunteers are required to transport children

The risk assessment procedure will also apply to the use of minibuses and external transport e.g. A bus
taking a team to a fixture.

Child Protection Policy and Procedures are still applicable whilst Children are in transport arranged by the
club. The same reporting procedures apply e.g. completion of a Child Protection Significant Incident Form if
there are concerns.




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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                 SECTION 5
                            RESPONDING TO CHILD PROTECTION CONCERNS

Why it is important to respond to concerns

It takes considerable courage for a child or adult to disclose abuse. Disclosures need to be handled very
carefully and sensitively to avoid causing further distress to the child.

All concerns must be responded to in a way that ensures that a child receives appropriate help and support
and to ensure that appropriate action is taken against those who pose a risk to children and to protect not only
the child involved but all other children.

Robust procedures for responding to concerns will:

         Help to avoid those receiving information from engaging in judgments.
         Reassure those who report concerns that an appropriate course of action will ensue.
         Support those charged with managing concerns by providing them with a step-by-step process to
          follow.
         Safeguard the rights of those against whom complaints or allegations have been made

This section details how to respond to concerns about child abuse. A more in depth Disciplinary Procedure
can be found on page 51.
.
    It is not the job of anyone in group/club to decide whether or not a child has been abused. It is
                           however, everyone’s responsibility to report concerns

5.1       Confidentiality

The following is taken from Sharing Information About Children at Risk: A Guide to Good Practice (Scottish
Executive, 2003).

Information provided to organisations should remain confidential unless permission has been given to share
the information by the individual concerned or the safety of that person or another person may be at risk.

If there is a reasonable concern that a child may be at risk of significant harm, this will always override a
professional or organisational requirement to keep information confidential. It is good practice to inform
parents and children about the kind of situations which may lead to them having to share information with
other agencies.

5.2       Defamation

Concerned adults are sometimes reluctant to report concerns about abuse for fear that the person suspected
will sue them for defamation if the allegation turns out to be unfounded.

To be defamatory a statement must first of all be untrue. Even if subsequently shown to be untrue, the
statement will be protected by „qualified privilege‟ if it is made to the appropriate authority “in response to a
duty, whether legal, moral or social or in the protection of an interest” (Norrie K, Defamation and Related
Actions in Scots Law, 1995). Unjustified repetition of the allegations to other persons will not be protected by
privilege.

The qualification on privilege refers to statements made by malice. If a statement, even to the appropriate
authority, can be shown to be motivated by malice, then an action of defamation could be successful.

(Taken from Guidelines for Child Protection Prepared for the Independent Schools in
Scotland, Kathleen Marshall, Second Edition, January 1997)


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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


5.3 Procedures for Responding to Concerns about a Child

These procedures apply to all staff involved in NAME OF CLUB…………………………………………………

Concerns about the General Welfare of a Child (NOT involving concerns about child abuse)

NAME OF CLUB ………………………………………………………………is committed to working in
partnership with parents whenever there are concerns about a child. Parents have the primary responsibility
for the safety and well being of their children.

In most situations, not involving the possibility of the abuse of a child, concerns should be discussed with
parents. For example, if a child seems withdrawn, he/she may have experienced an upset in the family, such
as a parental separation, divorce or bereavement. Common sense is advised is these situations.

Any significant, untoward or unusual incidents which cause concern about the welfare of a child should be
recorded on the Child Protection Significant Incident Report Form page 46 and reported to the club Child
Protection Officer as soon as possible. Parents should also be informed of the circumstances as soon as
possible if appropriate.

Advice should be sought from the club Child Protection Officer if there is any uncertainty about the
appropriate course of action where there are concerns about the general welfare of a child.


5.4 What to do if a child tells you about abuse (in general, not regarding any member of staff attached
    to the club.


    No member of NAME OF CLUB ………………………………………………………….shall investigate
              allegations of abuse or decide whether or not a child has been abused.

Allegations of abuse must always be taken seriously. False allegations are very rare. If a child says or
indicates they are being abused or information is obtained which gives concern that a child is being abused,
the information must be responded to on the same day in line with the following procedure.

Respond:

        React calmly so as not to frighten the child.
        Listen to the child and take what they say seriously. Do not show disbelief.
        Reassure the child they are not to blame and were right to tell someone.
        Be aware of interpreting what a child says, especially if they have learning or physical disabilities
         which affect their ability to communicate or English is not their first language.
        Do not assume that the experience was bad or painful – it may have been neutral or even
         pleasurable.
        Avoid projecting your own reactions onto the child.
        Avoid asking any questions. If necessary only ask enough questions to gain basic
         information to establish the possibility that abuse may have occurred. Only use openended, non-
         leading questions e.g. Who? Where? When?
        Do not introduce personal information from either your own experiences or those of other children.

Avoid:

        Panicking.
        Showing shock or distaste.
        Probing for more information than is offered.



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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

       Speculating or making assumptions.
       Making negative comments about the person against whom the allegation has been made.
       Approaching the individual against whom the allegation has been made.
       Making promises or agreeing to keep secrets and giving a guarantee of confidentiality.

Where there is uncertainty about what to do with the information, the club Child Protection Officer can be
consulted for advice on the appropriate course of action.

If the Name of club Child Protection Officer ………………………………………………………….is unavailable
or an immediate response is required the police or Social services must be consulted for advice. They have a
statutory responsibility for the protection of children and they may already hold other concerning information
about the child. Record any advice given.

If you are concerned about the immediate safety of the child:

Take whatever action is required to ensure the child‟s immediate safety. Immediately inform the police and
seek their advice.

Record:

Make a written record of the information as soon as possible using the Child Protection Significant Incident
Report Form page 46 completing as much of the form as possible. The following information will help the
police and social workers decide what action to take next:

       Child‟s name, age and date of birth.
       Child‟s home address and telephone number.
       Any times, dates or other relevant information.
       Whether the person making the report is expressing their own concern or the concerns of another
        person.
       The child‟s account, if it can be given, of what has happened and how any injuries occurred using the
        child’s own words.
       The nature of the concern (include all of the information obtained during the initial account e.g. time,
        date, location).
       A description of any visible (when normally dressed) injuries or bruising, behavioural signs, indirect
        signs (do not physically examine the child).
       Details of any witnesses.
       Whether the child‟s parents have been informed.
       Details of anyone else who has been consulted and the information obtained from them.
       If it is not the child making the report, whether the child has been spoken to, if so what was said using
        the child’s own words.
       The child‟s views on the situation.

If completing the form electronically, do not save copies to the hard drive or floppy disk. Print a copy,
sign, date then delete immediately. Pass the record to Social Services or the police and to the club
Child Protection Officer.

Sharing Concerns with Parents

Where there are concerns that the parent(s) may be responsible for or have knowledge of the abuse, sharing
concerns with the parent(s) may place the child at further risk. In such cases advice must always firstly be
sought from the police or Childrens services as to who informs the parents.




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                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                          RESPONDING TO CONCERNS ABOUT CHILD ABUSE




 Disclosure by child to                                                   Information
staff member/volunteer                     Observation                   from another
                                                                       individual/agency




                                   Concern about child abuse




                                       Report to Club CPO                Take steps to
                                       or SGB/NGB CPO                    ensure child‟s
                                         Lead Officer for                 immediate
                                          action/advice                safety, if required




                                      Refer to Police and/or
  Follow advice from                       social work
 Police/social work as
  to who informs the                   Record advice given
        parents                         and action taken




                                           Decide how to
                                          support the child




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

5.5 Procedure for responding to concerns about the conduct of a member of staff

5.5.1 Concerns about the Conduct of a Member of Staff (paid and unpaid)

These procedures aim to ensure that all concerns about the conduct of a member of staff are dealt with in a
timely, appropriate and proportionate manner. No member of staff in receipt of information that causes
concern about the conduct of another member of staff towards children shall keep that information to himself
or herself, or attempt to deal with the matter on their own.

In the event of an investigation in to the conduct of a member of staff all actions will be informed by
the principles of natural justice:

       The staff member will be made aware of the nature of concern or complaint.
       Where the concern is about possible child abuse, advice will firstly be taken from the police as to
        what can be said to the employee.
       The Staff member will be given an opportunity to put forward their case.
       The Club will act in good faith, ensure the matter is dealt with impartially and as quickly as possible in
        the circumstances.

  In all cases where there are concerns about the conduct of a member of staff towards children, the
                        welfare of the child will be the paramount consideration.

         At any point in the management of concerns about the conduct of a member of staff,
                       advice may be sought from the police or Social services.
                                    Useful Contacts on page 38

5.5.2 Initial Reporting of Concerns

Any concerns for the welfare of a child arising from the conduct of a member of staff must be reported to the
club Child Protection Officer or person in charge of the club on the day the concern arises, as soon as
practically possible.

Where the concern is about the person in charge of the club on the day or the Child Protection Officer it must
be reported the SGB or NGB lead Child Protection Officer.

5.5.3   Recording

Concerns must be recorded using the Child Protection Significant Incident Report Form page 46 as soon
as possible. Reporting the concerns to the line manager/ Club Child Protection Officer should not be delayed
by gathering information to complete the form or until a written record has been made.

All subsequent actions taken and reasons for decisions shall be contemporaneously recorded on the Child
Protection Siginificant Incident Report Form page 46, signed and dated by the line manager/ Club Child
Protection Officer. Where Disciplinary Procedures are invoked, a written record will be made of all actions and
reasons for decision.

5.5.4 Establishing the Basic Facts –

Once the concerns have been reported, the Club Child Protection Officer will:

       Establish the basic facts
       Conduct an initial assessment of the facts in order to determine the appropriate course of action.
       Consult external agencies such as the police and Social services for advice at any time. This is
        important because they may hold other important information which, when considered alongside the
        current concerns builds a significant picture of concern.



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                           Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


The person who passes the concern onto the club CPO should check the concern has been dealt with in the
appropriate manner. If that person is not happy with the way the concern has been dealt with they can contact
the Police or Social Services for further advice.

5.5.5 Conducting the Initial Assessment –

The Club Child Protection Officer will conduct the initial assessment.

The purpose of the initial assessment is to clarify the nature and context of the concerns. It should determine
whether there is reasonable cause to suspect or believe that a child has been abused/ harmed or is at risk of
abuse or harm. Every situation is unique so guidance cannot be prescriptive.

           Where the established facts support a concern about possible abuse, the initial assessment will not
            form part of the disciplinary investigation.
           Subject to the nature and seriousness of the situation, if it is not clear at this stage whether a criminal
            offence may have been committed the member of staff may be approached as part of the information
            gathering process.
           Where the nature and seriousness of the information suggests that a criminal offence may have been
            committed, or that to assess the facts may jeopardise evidence, advice will be sought from the police
            before the member of staff is approached.
           An initial assessment of the basic facts may require the need to ask a child(ren) some basic, open-
            ended, non- leading questions solely with a view to clarifying the basic facts. It may also be
            necessary to ask similar basic questions of other children, or other appropriate individuals.
           Interviewing children about possible abuse and criminal offences is the sole remit of specially trained
            police officers and social workers. Questioning of children by those conducting an initial assessment
            should always be avoided as far as possible. If it is necessary to speak to the child in order to clarify
            the basic facts best practice suggests that consent from the parent be obtained.

Possible outcomes of initial assessment:

(i)         No further action (facts do not substantiate complaint).
(ii)        Situation is dealt with under procedures to manage poor practice; and/or,
(iii)       Disciplinary investigation (by the SGB).
(iv)        Child protection investigation (I.R.D jointly by police and social services).
(v)         Criminal investigation (by the police).

The results of a criminal investigation may well influence the disciplinary investigation, but not in all cases.

(vi)        Civil proceedings (by the child/family who alleged abuse).

Initial assessment supports concerns about poor practice and/or misconduct (but not possible child
abuse)

The Child Protection Officer will deal with the situation in line with Clubs Disciplinary Procedures.

Pending the outcome of any investigation conducted under Performance Management Procedures or
Disciplinary Procedures, precautionary suspension will be considered in all cases where there is significant
concern about the conduct of a member of staff towards children (see section 5.5.6) The welfare of children
will be the paramount concern in such circumstances.

Where the circumstances meet the referral criteria set out in the Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003
The club has a duty to make a referral to Scottish Ministers.




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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Initial assessment supports concerns about possible child abuse

Where the initial assessment of information gives reasonable cause to suspect or believe possible child
abuse the Club Child Protection will refer the concerns to the police and/or Social services as soon as
possible on the day the information is received.

The Club Child Protection Officer will make a written record of the name and designation of the social worker
or the police officer to whom the concerns were passed together with the time and date of the call, in case
any follow up is required.

The Club Child Protection Officer will confirm referrals to the police/Childrens services in writing within 24
hours. A copy of the Child Protection Significant Incident Form (page 46) should be provided to the police/
Social services on request.

Appropriate steps will be taken to ensure the safety of the child(ren) or who may be at risk. The parents of the
child(ren) involved will be informed as soon as possible following advice from the police/ Childrens services.

Advice will firstly be obtained from the police/Childrens services about informing the staff member involved
about the concerns. If the advice is to inform the staff member, they will be told that information has been
received which may suggest an allegation of abuse. As the matter will be sub judice no details will be given
unless advised by the police. All actions will ensure the best evidence is preserved for any criminal
proceedings while at the same time safeguarding the rights of the employee.

The Club will take all reasonable steps to support a member of staff or volunteer against whom an allegation
of abuse has been made.

5.5.6 Precautionary Suspension

Suspension is not a form of disciplinary action. The staff member involved may be suspended whilst an
investigation is carried out.

Suspension will be carried out by Name of person/group/panel responsible………………………………….
in accordance with the club Disciplinary Procedures. At the suspension interview the member of staff will be
informed of the reason for suspension (within the confines of sharing information) and given the opportunity to
make a statement should they wish to do so.

Notification of the suspension and the reasons will be conveyed in writing to the staff member in accordance
with club Disciplinary Procedures.

5.5.7 Disciplinary Investigation

Following advice from the police, cases that also involve a criminal investigation, will not preclude disciplinary
action being taken provided sufficient information is available to enable the Club Child Protection Officer to
make a decision and that to do so does not jeopardise the criminal investigation.

5.6       False or Malicious Allegations

In the exceptional circumstances that an investigation establishes an allegation is false, unfounded or
malicious:

         The staff member involved will receive an account of the circumstances and/or investigation and a
          letter confirming the conclusion of the matter. They may wish to seek legal advice.
         The Club Child Protection Officer will take all reasonable steps to support the individual in this
          situation.
         In these circumstances the management committee or club Child Protection Officer will review the
          child‟s participation in all activities.


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                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

         Data collected for the investigation will be destroyed in accordance with the requirements of the Data
          Protection Act 1998.

5.7       Historical Allegations of Abuse

Allegations of abuse may be made some time after the event e.g. an adult who was abused as a child by
someone who is still currently working with children. These procedures will be followed in the event of an
allegation of historical abuse.

5.8 Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003

The club or the NGB/SGB will refer to Scottish Ministers the cases of any member of staff who has (whether
or not in the course of their role within NAME OF CLUB……………………………………………) harmed a
child or placed a child at risk of harm AND as a result:

         The club has dismissed the staff member.

         The staff member would have been dismissed as a result of the incident had they not resigned,
          retired or been made redundant.

         The club had transferred the staff member to a position which is not a child care position.

         The staff member would have been dismissed or considered for dismissal where employment was
          not due to end at the expiry of a fixed term contract; or, The staff member would have been dismissed
          or considered for dismissal had the contract not expired.

The club will also refer the case of a staff member where information become available after the staff member
has:

         Been dismissed
         Resigned, retired or been made redundant,
         Been transferred to another position which is not a child care position; and,

The club form the opinion (on the basis of the information) that they would have dismissed or considered
dismissing the staff member on such grounds, had the information been available at the time of resignation/
redundancy/ retirement/ transfer.

Where the club receives information that a staff member who holds a child care position has been fully listed
on the Disqualified from Working with Children List, the staff member will be removed from the child care
position.




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                          Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                          RESPONDING TO CONCERNS ABOUT THE CONDUCT OF A
                                  MEMBER OF STAFF OR VOLUNTEER

                                      Concern about the conduct of a
                                            member of staff




                                      Report to line manager/or Club
                                                    CPO

                                                  Record



                                     Initial assessment to establish the            Consider precautionary
                                                  basic facts                         suspension where
                                                                                         appropriate


          Inappropriate
           Behaviour?                         Serious poor
                                          practice/misconduct?                      Possible child abuse?




                                       Situation will be managed                     Club CPO or line
   Line manager will take              according to Disciplinary                   manager will report
   appropriate action                          Procedures                              concerns to
                                                                                police/Childrens Services



                                      Possible Outcomes:                    Possible outcomes:
Possible outcomes:
                                             No case to answer                     Police investigation
                                             Disciplinary Hearing                  Criminal proceedings
      No case to answer
                                             Formal warning                        Civil proceedings
      Informal discussion
                                             Further training and                  Disciplinary Hearing
      Formal discussion
      Further training and
                                              support agreed                        Referral to Scottish
       support agreed                        Referral to Scottish                   Ministers where POCSA
                                              Ministers where                        criteria met
                                              POCSA criteria met




                                          Opportunity to appeal decision of the Disciplinary Hearing


                                                   21
                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                SECTION 6
                                        SAFE in CARE GUIDELINES

6.1 Why this is important

These guidelines have been introduced to provide practical guidance for those working directly with children
on practices to keep the child safe and to promote a safe operating environment for the member of staff.
These guidelines should be read as part of the Child Protection Policy and Procedures.

Breach of these guidelines may be dealt with under the club or Complaints Policy, Disciplinary Procedure
and/or Procedure for Responding to Concerns About a Child.

Sports, Leisure and the Arts organisations have a duty of care towards all children involved in activities.
Children under the age of 16 years should not be placed in positions of responsibility in relation to other
children. Young Leaders (16+) may be used but under close adult supervision. Common sense should be
used regarding changing arrangements etc.

These guidelines apply to all children and young people under the age of 18 years. Common sense should be
applied when considering the circumstances of older children and all children should have the opportunity to
express their views on matters which affect them, should they wish to do so.

As sport, leisure and arts activities take place in many different structures, locations, environments and
formats, it is impossible to provide specific guidance on many of the issues covered. The following guidelines
are therefore based on generally recognized good practice and common sense. Ultimately, most practical
situations will require a judgment to be made about what is practicable and reasonable in the circumstances.


6.2 Adult to child ratios

As a guide, the following ratios are recommended in the National Care Standards Early Education and
Childcare up to the age of 16 (Scottish Executive, 2005):

                                        Age 3 and over = 1 adult:8 children
                              If all children are aged over 8 = 1 adult:10 children

All activities should be planned to involve at least two adults, preferably one male and one female. As a
general guide, the following factors will also be taken in to consideration in deciding how many adults are
required to safely supervise children:

• The number of children involved in the activity.
• The age, maturity and experience of the children.
• Whether any of the group leaders or children has a learning or physical disability or special requirements.
• Whether any of the children have challenging behaviour.
• The particular hazards associated with the activity.
• The particular hazards associated with the environment.
• The level of qualification and experience of the leaders.
• The programme of activities.

There may be other considerations, which are specific to the sport, activity or environment.




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.3 Physical contact

All forms of physical contact should respect and be sensitive to the needs and wishes of the child and should
take place in a culture of dignity and respect for all children. Children should be encouraged to express their
views on physical contact.

In the first instance, coaching techniques should be delivered by demonstration (either by the coach or by
someone who can display the technique being taught).

Educational instruction should be clearly explained with a description of how it is proposed to handle or have
contact with the child before doing so. This should be accompanied by checking if the child is comfortable.
Manual support should be provided openly and must always be proportionate to the circumstances.

If it is necessary to help a child with personal tasks e.g. toileting or changing, the child and parents should be
encouraged to express a preference regarding the support and should be encouraged to speak out about
methods of support with which they are uncomfortable. Staff/volunteers should work with parents and children
to develop practiced routines for personal care so that parents and children know what to expect. Do not take
on the responsibility for tasks for which you are not appropriately trained e.g. manual assistance for a child
with a physical disability.

6.4 First aid and the treatment of injuries

All staff/ volunteers must ensure:

       All children and young people should complete a parental consent form (Template page 42).
       There is an accessible and well-resourced first aid kit at the venue.
       They are aware of any pre-existing medical conditions, medicines being taken by participants or
        existing injuries and treatment required.
       Only those with a current, recognised First Aid qualification treat injuries. In more serious cases
        assistance should be obtained from a medically qualified professional as soon as possible.
       An Accident and Incident Form is completed if a child sustains a significant injury along with the
        details of any treatment given. Common sense should be applied when determining which injuries are
        significant.
       Where possible, access to medical advice and/or assistance is available.
       A child‟s parents are informed of any injury and action taken as soon as possible.
       The circumstances in which any accidents occur are reviewed to avoid future repetitions.

6.5 Managing challenging behaviour
Staff/volunteers who deliver activities to children may, from time to time, be required to deal with a child‟s
challenging behaviour.

These guidelines aim to promote good practice and to encourage a proactive response to supporting children
to manage their own behaviour. They suggest some strategies and sanctions which can be used and also
identify unacceptable sanctions or interventions, which must never be used by staff. These guidelines are
based on the following principles:

       The welfare of the child is the paramount consideration.
       A risk assessment should be completed for all activities, which take in to consideration the needs of
        the all children involved in the activity.
       Children must never be subject to any form of treatment that is harmful, abusive, humiliating or
        degrading and should always be able to maintain their respect and dignity.
       No member of staff should attempt to respond to challenging behaviour by using techniques for which
        they have not been trained.




                                                        23
                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Adapted from CHILDREN 1ST’s Safe Care and Child Protection Standards, Policy and Procedures.

In dealing with children who display risk-taking or challenging behaviours, staff might consider the following
options:

       Time out- from the activity, group or individual work.
       Reparation- the act or process of making amends.
       Restitution- the act of giving something back.
       Behavioural reinforcement- rewards for good behaviour, consequences for negative behaviour.
       De-escalation of the situation- talking through with the child.
       Increased supervision by staff.
       Use of individual „contracts‟ or agreements for their future or continued participation.
       Sanctions or consequences e.g. missing an outing.

Adults shall never be permitted to use the any of the following as a means of managing a child‟s behaviour:

       Physical punishment or the threat of such.
       The withdrawal of communication with the child.
       Being deprived of food, water or access to changing facilities or toilets.
       Verbal intimidation, ridicule or humiliation.


Staff should review the needs of any child for whom sanctions are frequently necessary. This review should
involve the child and parents to ensure an informed decision is made about the child‟s future or continued
participation in the group or activity. Whilst it would always be against the wishes of everyone involved,
ultimately, if a child continues to present a high level of risk or danger to him or herself, or others, he or she
may have to be debarred from the activity/sport.

6.5.1 Planning activities

Good coaching practice requires planning sessions around the group as a whole but also involves taking into
consideration the needs of each individual within that group. As part of a risk assessment, coaches or leaders
should consider whether any members of the group have presented in the past or are likely to present any
difficulties in relation to either, the tasks involved, the other participants or the environment.

Where staff identify any potential risks, strategies to manage those risks should be agreed in advance of the
session, event or activity. The risk assessment should also identify the appropriate number of adults required
to safely manage and support the session including being able to adequately respond to any challenging
behaviour and to safeguard other members of the group and the staff involved.

All those delivering activities to children should receive training on these guidelines and should be supported
to address issues of challenging behaviour through regular supervision.

6.5.2 Agreeing acceptable and unacceptable behaviours

Staff, children and parents should be involved in developing an agreed statement of what constitutes
acceptable and unacceptable behaviour and the range of sanctions, which may be applied in response to
unacceptable behaviour. This can be done at the start of the season, in advance of a trip away from home or
as part of a welcome session at a residential camp.

Issues of behaviour and control should regularly be discussed with staff, parents and children in the context of
rights and responsibilities. When children are specifically asked, as a group, to draw up a „List of Acceptable
and Unacceptable Behaviours and Sanctions for Unacceptable Behaviour‟ that will govern their participation
in the group/team, they tend to arrive at a very sensible and working set of „rules‟. If and when such a list is
compiled, every member of the group can be asked to sign it, as can new members as they join.



                                                           24
                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.5.3 Physical interventions

The use of physical interventions should always be avoided unless it is absolutely necessary in order to
prevent a child injuring itself, injuring others or causing serious damage to property. All forms of physical
intervention shall form part of a broader approach to the management of challenging behaviour.

Physical contact to prevent something happening should always be the result of conscious decision-making
and not a reaction. Before physically intervening, the member of staff should ask himself or herself, „Is this the
only option in order to manage the situation and ensure safety?‟

The following must always be considered:

       Contact should be avoided with buttocks, genitals and breasts. Staff should never behave in a way
        which could be interpreted as sexual.
       Any form of physical intervention should achieve an outcome that is in the best interests of the child
        whose behaviour is of immediate concern.
       Staff should consider the circumstances, the risks associated with employing physical intervention
        compared with the risks of not employing physical intervention.
       The scale and nature of physical intervention must always be proportionate to the behaviour of the
        young person and the nature of harm/ damage they might cause.
       All forms of physical intervention should employ only a reasonable amount of force the minimum force
        needed to avert injury to a person or serious damage to property – applied for the shortest period of
        time.
       Staff should never employ physical interventions which are deemed to present an unreasonable risk
        to children or staff.
       Staff shall never use physical intervention as a form of punishment.

Any physical intervention used should be recorded as soon as possible after the incident by the staff involved
using the Child Protection Significant Incident Report Form (page 46) and passed to the Child Protection
Officer as soon as possible.

A timely debrief for staff, the child and parents should always take place following an incident where physical
intervention has been used. This should include ensuring that the physical and emotional well-being of those
involved has been addressed and ongoing support offered where necessary. Staff, children and parents
should be given an opportunity to talk about what happened in a calm and safe environment.

         There should also be a discussion with the child and parents about the child’s needs
                      and continued safe participation in the group or activity.


6.6 Trips away from home (involving overnight stays)


6.6.1   Designate a Child Protection Officer for the Trip

Those in charge of the group will be responsible for the safety and well being of children in their care. It is
recommended that one of the group leaders co-ordinates the arrangements for the safety and welfare of
children during the trip. The Child Protection Officer should ensure all practical arrangements have been
addressed and act as the main contact for dealing with any concerns about the safety and welfare of children
whilst away from home. A detailed itinerary will be prepared and copies provided to the designated contact for
Name of club …………………………………………………………… and parents.




                                                        25
                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.6.2   Risk Assessment

Potential area of risk should be identified at the planning stage through a risk assessment, which is legally
required, and which should be recorded in writing. Procedures should be put in place to manage the risks,
where appropriate. Risk assessment should be an on-going process throughout the trip as groups can often
find themselves in unexpected situations despite the best laid plans!

6.6.3   Travel Arrangements (See section 4 page 11 for further details)

Organisers must ensure there is adequate and relevant insurance cover (including travel and medical
insurance). If the trip involves travel abroad, organisers shall ensure they are aware of local procedures for
dealing with concerns about the welfare of children and are familiar with the details of the emergency
services in the location of the visit. Children should be informed of local custom regulations.

6.6.4   Adult to Child Ratios (See Section 6.1 page 22 for further details)

All trips away must be planned to involve at least two adults, preferably one male and one female where
possible. The guidelines on adult to child ratios will inform an assessment of the numbers of adults required to
safely supervise the group. Those involved should be recruited and selected in accordance with the
procedure for recruiting child care positions.

Group leaders should be familiar with and agree to abide by Name of club ………………………………Child
Protection Policy Procedures and Code of Conduct.

6.6.5   Accommodation

Organisers should find out as much as possible about the accommodation and the surroundings at the
planning stage. Where possible, an initial visit to the venue/accommodation should take place to help those
organising the trip identify all practical issues and allow time to address them in advance, in consultation with
children and parents where appropriate.

The following is a (non-exhaustive) list of some of the practical things that should be considered in advance
about the arrangements for accommodation:

       Location: central and remote locations both present different challenges.
       Sleeping arrangements. These will enable suitable sharing in terms of age and gender and
        appropriately located staff/volunteer bedrooms for both supervision and ease of access in case of
        emergency. Parents and children should be consulted in advance about arrangements for sharing
        where possible and appropriate.
       Appropriate procedures where others have access to the sleeping quarters.
       Special access or adaptive aids required by group leaders or children.
       Environmental factors.
       Personal safety issues.

6.6.6   Exchange Visits/ Hosting

Before departure, organisers should ensure there is a shared understanding of the standards expected during
home stays between them, host organisation/ families, parents and children themselves. These standards
should include arrangements for the supervision of children during the visit.

Host families should be appropriately Disclosure Scotland checked where possible or equivalent police
checks undertaken and references thoroughly checked. Organisers, parents and children should all be
provided with a copy of emergency contact numbers. Children should be aware of who they should talk to if
problems arise during the visit. Daily contact should be made with all children to ensure they are safe and
well.



                                                       26
                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.6.7   Residential at a Facility/Centre

Organisers should ensure the facility is appropriately licensed and has adequate and relevant insurance cover
in place. The facility should have a policy and procedures on the protection of children and Health and Safety.
Adequate security arrangements should be in place and facility staff should have been Disclosure Scotland
checked or equivalent. Facility staff involved in the training or instruction of children must be appropriately
qualified and trained.

Organisers should ensure there is adequate supervision of the group for the duration of the stay, particularly
when the facility is being shared with other groups.

6.6.8   Involving Parents

Where possible, a meeting should be held with parents before departure to share information about the trip,
answer their questions and make joint decisions about arrangements where appropriate. A Code of Conduct
shall be agreed with children and parents in advance of the trip along with sanctions for unacceptable
behaviour.
Parents must complete a full consent form and provide emergency contact details.

In the event of an emergency at home during the trip, parents should be encouraged to make contact with the
group leaders in the first instance so that arrangements can be put in to place to support the child on hearing
any distressing news.

6.6.9   During the Trip

Organisers must ensure arrangements are in place for the supervision and risk assessment of activities
during free time. Children shall not be allowed to wander alone in unfamiliar places. Group leaders should
have clear roles and responsibilities for the duration of the trip. They must not be over familiar with or
fraternise with children during the trip and remember that they are in a position of trust at all times. The use of
alcohol and/ or drugs or engaging in sexual relationships (between two young people) should not be
condoned during the trip, even if the legislation relating to any of these behaviours is more lenient than in
Scotland.

Group leaders should maintain an overview of the well being of all children during the trip. This can help to
identify issues at an early stage and resolve them as quickly as possible. Children can participate in this
process by, for example, taking turns to complete a daily diary about the trip. This can be a discreet way for
them to communicate things (both positive and negative) that they want you to know.

6.6.10 After the Trip

Where appropriate, a debrief will take place with all those involved in the trip, including children. This will
provide an opportunity to reflect on what went well, not so well and what could have been done differently.
Feedback will be used to inform future trips.


6.7 Information and Communication Technology

6.7.1   Use of Photographs, Film and Video

Name of Club…………………………………………………………… recognises that photographs of Young
People can pose direct or indirect risks to their subjects.

The aim of these guidelines is not to prevent bonafide persons from recording footage for performance
development reasons or the recording of achievements. They aim to ensure children are protected from the




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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

misuse of opportunities to take or manipulate film and video in a way that harms children or places them at
risk of harm.

Some sports/events/activities take place in areas where organisations have little or no control over the
environment such as open river or areas to which the public have general rights of access e.g. the open
countryside. In these circumstances, the adults attached to the club should take all reasonable steps to
promote safe use of photographing and filming and to respond to any concerns raised.


Name of Club ………………………………………………………..will ensure:

         Parents and children will be informed they may, from time to time, be photographed or filmed whilst
          participating in sport or activities. This could be for one of the following reasons: Video footage for
          performance development, Media coverage of an event or achievement, Promotional purposes e.g.
          website or publication.
         Where possible, materials promoting events will state photography and filming will take place.
         Information about what to do if concerned about photographing and filming will be available at all
          events.
         Registration of intention to photograph will be required on the day. This enables tracking of the
          equipment and operator should concerns arise in the future.
         Parents will be offered the opportunity to withhold their permission to photographing and filming. In
          the absence of any expressed objection, parental agreement will be assumed.
         Where appropriate, children will be asked their views. Where a child is able to provide an informed
          view, this will be taken into consideration by the event organizer
         Name of Club …………………………………………………………….will do everything reasonable in
          the individual circumstances to give effect to the wishes of parents and children. All actions are based
          on the best interests of the child.
         No unsupervised access or one-to-one sessions will be allowed unless this has been explicitly agreed
          with the child and parent.
         No photographing or filming will be permitted in changing areas.
         Images will not be shared with external agencies unless express permission is obtained from the child
          and parent.
         Anyone behaving in a way which could reasonably be construed as inappropriate in relation to filming
          or photographing should be reported to the person in charge on the day. They should be approached
          for an explanation. If a satisfactory explanation is not provided, the circumstances should be reported
          to the person in charge on the day or the Name of club ………………………………………..Child
          Protection Officer.
         Where appropriate concerns should also be reported to the police.

6.7.2     Storage of Photographs and Film

Name of club ……………………………………………………………………will ensure that all negatives, copies
of videos and digital photograph files are stored in a secure place. These will not be kept for any longer than
is necessary having regard to the purposes for which they were taken.

Name of person/CPO ………………………………………………………….will check with any external
photographers e.g. Newspaper photographers.

6.8       Using the Internet to publish information

6.8.1     Permission

         Written consent must be obtained from the child‟s parent before publishing any information about a
          child. If the material is changed from the time of consent, the parents must be informed and consent
          provided for the changes.



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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


       Special care must be taken in relation to vulnerable children e.g. child fleeing domestic violence or a
        child with a disability, and consideration given to whether publication would place the child at risk.

       Young athletes who have a public profile as a result of their achievements are entitled to the same
        protection as all other children. In these cases, common sense is required when implementing these
        guidelines. All decisions should reflect the best interests of the child.

6.8.2   Use of Images and Information on the Internet

       Information published on the websites must never include personal information that could identify a
        child e.g. home address, e-mail address, telephone number of a child. All contact must be directed to
        the club/CPO. Credit for achievements by a child should be restricted to first name e.g. Tracey was
        Player of the Year 2002.

       Children must never be portrayed in a demeaning, tasteless or a provocative manner. Children
        should never be portrayed in a state of partial undress, other than when depicting an action shot
        within the context of the sport. Attire such as tracksuits or t-shirts may be more appropriate.

       Information about specific events or meetings e.g. coaching sessions must not be distributed to any
        individuals other than to those directly concerned.

6.9 Social Networking sites

Risks associated with user interactive services include: cyber bullying, grooming and potential abuse by
online predators, identity theft and exposure to inappropriate content including self harm, racist, hate and
adult pornography.

Social network sites can be used for a variety of reasons within the club context

       Members of the club may have their own pages on services including Facebook, Bebo, Myspace,
        Flickr, Pizco, Hi5 and Twitter.
       Videos of club achievements on video sharing sites including YouTube.
       Creating a page on any of the above sites for Club usage. Information about events or training
        session can be displayed.

It is important for clubs to consider the use of Social Media and balance the benefits of the immediacy of
communication with the potential risks particularly to children.

Most young people use the Internet positively but sometimes behave in ways that may place themselves at
risk. Some risks do not necessarily arise from the technology itself but result from offline behaviours that are
extended online.

Potential Risks can include but are not limited to:

       Bullying by peers and people considered friends
       Posting personal information that can identify and locate the child offline
       Sexual grooming, luring and exploitation and abuse contact with strangers
       Exposure to inappropriate content
       Theft of personal information
       Involvement of making or distributing illegal or inappropriate content
       Encouragement of violent behavior, such as „happy slapping‟
       Glorifying activities such as drug taking or excessive drinking




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.9.1 Online Grooming and Sexual Exploitation of Young People

There is a concern that the capabilities of social networking sites may increase the potential for sexual
exploitation of young people. They can include exposure to harmful content. There have also been a number
of cases where adults have used social networking and interactive users services as a mean of grooming
young people for sexual abuse.

Online grooming techniques include:

       Gathering personal details
       Promising meeting with sports idols or celebrities
       Offering gifts including cheap event tickets, electronic games, music or software.
       Asking to meet young people offline
       Masquerading as minor or assuming a false identity to deceive a child
       Bullying and intimidating behavior
       Asking sexually themed questions or sending sexually themed images to a child.

6.9.2 Using Social Network Sites for Club Promotion or networking with members

       Understand the safety aspects including what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour on a
        social networking site.

Become familiar with the site itself before setting up a profile page for the club. This should include privacy
and safety tools, terms of service and how users contact the service should they have a concern or a
complaint.

When engaging with social networking companies it is important to ensure they adhere to relevant legislation
and good practice guidelines.

       Reporting online concerns about possible abuse

Organisational reporting procedures should include the reporting of potentially illegal/abusive content or
activity, including child sexual abusive images and online grooming. In addition to referral to Name of Club
Child Protection Officer,…………………………………………………………….. concerns arising online should
be reported to Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) or the Police immediately in line with
internal procedures. A Child Protection Significant Incident form (page 46) should be completed. Law
enforcement agencies and the service provider may need to take urgent steps to locate the child and/or
remove the content from the Internet.

Where a child or young person may be in immediate danger always dial 999 for police assistance.
       Management of the profile
Name of Person ………………………………………………………will have responsibility for: the setting up;
management; and moderation (overseeing/reviewing/responding to posted content) of the webpage/profile.
This includes the content you upload to appear, what you accept to be linked to your webpage/profile, and the
communication or Interaction with users. This person is most likely to have online contact with younger users,
interacting with the webpage/profile.
This person should be appropriately vetted (Enhanced Disclosure Scotland Check) and receive
recognised child protection training. Training should also address online issues, including what warning signs
to look out for.

If you are engaging a social media or moderation company to manage and moderate your webpage/profile it
is important that the designated child protection person within your organisation also has responsibility for the
management and moderation of the webpage/profile to ensure that any online safeguarding concerns are
handled in line with your existing child protection policies and procedures.


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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

       Choose an appropriate email address to register/set up a profile/account

This requires an email address – use the official sports organisation email address rather than a personal
email address (e.g. joebloggs@swimming association.co.uk rather than joebloggs@hotmail.com). This will
reduce the risk of the establishment of imposter or fake profiles, and is important in relation to any liability or
risk for an individual/employee required to set up the profile on behalf of the organisation. Similarly ensure
that only organisational rather than personal email addresses are made available on or through a profile.

6.9.3 Security and Privacy

Keep the log-in details to the account (including the password to the account and webpage/profile) secure
within your sport organisation. This will reduce the risk of the sports webpage/profile being hacked into.
Ideally, only a limited number of coaches should have the details.

Privacy and safety settings:

       Set the appropriate privacy level

Consider each of the privacy and safety settings available across all aspects of the services i.e. photos, blog
entries, image galleries and set the appropriate level of privacy taking into consideration your target
audience and who you wish to see the content. Failing to set appropriate privacy levels could result in
messages which are defamatory, libellous or obscene appearing on your profile before you have a chance to
remove it. This may result in significant personal distress, risk to the reputation of the individual, the sport
and/or the organisation, and require the intervention of the organisation, the service providers and possibly
the police.

       Accept ‘friends’ setting and minimum user age

You may wish to check a user profile before accepting them. Do not accept friend request from children
under the minimum age for the service (usually 13 years). Report underage users to the service provider and
to the young person‟s parents (perhaps via the organisation‟s designated person).

At no time should any adult within or associated with the club, accept ‘friend’ requests or ‘Adds’ from
young people from the club onto their own personal social networking site. All communication should
always be via the clubs site to foster an open and transparent environment.

       Accept comment’ setting

This allows a user to approve or pre moderate a comment from another user, usually a „friend‟ before it
appears on their webpage/profile. Ensure that all messages are checked before they appear on your sports
webpage/ profile to ensure that any inappropriate messages are blocked and if necessary reported to the
service provider. This may not be possible with all social networking services. You may wish to contact the
prospective service provider to establish if steps could be taken to adjust the privacy and safety settings for
your needs.

       Ensure that staff and volunteers, including coaches and athletes are aware of the need to
        protect their privacy online

Make sure that your staff and coaches (paid and volunteers), sports athletes, students and trainees, are
aware of the need to protect their own privacy online. They should understand the risks in posting and
sharing content which may damage their reputation before they link their webpage/profile to the sports
profile.




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.9.4 Address safety when adding content to your webpage/profile:

       Sports contact details

Add information about how to contact your sport organisation including a website address, if available. Also
include offline contact details for your club and any information on membership of a sports association. This
allows users to contact your organisation directly and verify your sports organisation offline.

       Promote your sports webpage/profile

Feature details of your organisation‟s social networking webpage/profile on your sports website. A
webpage/profile address on a social networking service is sometimes referred to as the URL. This helps
users to easily locate your organisation‟s presence online and reduce the risk of locating the wrong
webpage/profile including any fake profiles. Do not target children and young people who are likely to be
under the minimum requirement age for the social networking service in any promotion of the sports
webpage/profile

       Promote safe and responsible use

Consider promoting safe and responsible use of social networking to your sports audience online. This could
include uploading safety videos, messages or links onto the sports webpage/profile. If you do not yet have a
safe and responsible use policy or safety tips for your sport, there is a considerable amount of safety
material available.

       Sports events and competitions

Consider the integration of offline events with your sports presence online. Extra care should be taken when
advertising these events online and where information about users, including children and young people is
collected. In these circumstances you will need to follow the legal requirements concerning the collection of
personal information, as set out in the Data Protection Act 1998.

       Avoid taking personal details of children and young people

Do not ask users to divulge personal details including home and email addresses, schools, mobile numbers
that may help locate a child. It is best to provide the details of the event and signpost to where users can
obtain further information e.g. further information can be obtained from your local sports organisation or
club.

       Uploading Content – ‘think before you post’

Consider any messages, photos, videos or information – do they comply with existing policies within your
organisation? E.g. use of photographs of children. Is the content e.g. photographs and text appropriate to
the audience? Always seek young person/parental permission to use the photos of those featured before
adding to the sports webpage/ profile.

       Fake or imposter webpage/profiles

Beware of fake or imposter profiles of well known or celebrity sports people. It has been known for fake or
imposter profiles to be set up on social networking services. Sometimes this is intended to be fun, however
fake profiles can be set up with malicious intent to ridicule and harass an individual. It can also be used to
groom children by those seeking to gain a child‟s trust and attempt to set up a meeting offline. It is best to
first make contact offline with the sports person and check if they have an official webpage/profile.




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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

        Promote your sports webpage/profile

Once you have set up the sport webpage/profile and are in the process of adding content it may be useful to
contact the service provider. Some service providers „register‟ a range of charitable organisations. This can
ensure that a profile is not deleted as potentially fake or in breach of their own safety policies e.g. an „adult‟
profile with a number of children and young people linked as „friends‟ may raise concerns on the part of the
service provider about online grooming activity.


6.10 Chat and Instant Messaging

6.10.1 What is Chat?

As access to the internet has grown in recent years, online chat has also become a huge social phenomenon
both for adults and particularly amongst children and young people. Chat allows many people across the
world to communicate directly by exchanging text, almost as if they were holding a conversation in a room
with a group of people or on a one-to-one basis. As chat software develops, individuals are not only able to
send text messages to chat rooms but, in some instances, also have the ability to communicate through their
actual voices (voice chat) via headsets, or indeed, actually be seen by chat room members, through web
cams.

6.10.2 Child Safety Concerns

The negative side is the risk that areas of the internet where young people are likely to be found will be
targeted by adults or adolescents seeking sexual contact with children, or, more widely, that inappropriate
content or contacts will be made. Chat offers the predator anonymous contact at a safe distance allowing
contact to be made even while the child is using the internet in the secure surroundings of their own home,
even their own bedroom. This gives the opportunity for “grooming”, the development of a trusting relationship
by a paedophile with the intention of committing later abuse.

Specific concerns are that:

        the realtime nature of chat offers particular opportunities for direct and immediate contact, with the
         added facility to persuade a child to go off into a private conversation;
        user profiles and directories can allow a would-be abuser access to very useful personal information,
         as well as an opportunity to make initial contact;
        other users may make inappropriate material available by file transfer or live webcam images;
         pornographic website operators can also misuse chat systems by placing fake profiles containing
         links to their sites, and sending messages with such links to other users, and
        files or links accessed from messages in chat rooms may carry viruses, dialer programmes linked to
         high cost telephone services, or other harmful content. There have been a number of serious
         incidents where paedophiles have identified potential victims from among chat room participants and
         used a range of
        manipulative techniques to gain trust.

6.10.3   What is IM?

IM is a form of online technology allowing users to communicate in realtime with other users. At its simplest,
the technology provides an easy way of sending short written messages to a few friends online at the same
time but IM can offer a range of communication tools, including: text messaging, voice chat, webcams,
and file and picture exchange. IM is a complex technology and can be accessed over a number of different
platforms including: server-based systems, peer 2 peer, mobile phones and hand-held devices such as
personal digital assistants. There are many different IM products on the market, which are often freely
downloadable from internet companies‟ websites, or free sign-up CD ROMs offering internet access.




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

IM can be a very private form of communication between known friends where the user builds up a list of
contacts and is alerted when they are online. IM, however, can also be a public open environment where the
user is encouraged to find and make new contacts online.

When obtaining IM products companies require users to register and provide a certain amount of personal
information, for example, email address, personal websites, age, gender and location etc. This information
may be transferred automatically to a „member directory‟ or „public profile‟, which can be visible to other users
and is sometimes shared with chat systems.

6.10.4 Child Safety Concerns

Some concerns about IM stem, like telephone calls, from the private and un-moderated nature of the
communication. Children have been quick to use IM and it has become part of their everyday lives to keep in
contact with their friends at school or with friends they have made on-line.

Sexual predators, however, have recognised the power of IM to:

       operate in an environment of relative anonymity;
       make contact with children from member directories / profiles;
       move conversations from the public arena of chat rooms to a one-to-one private communication via
        IM;
       maintain contact with a child on their contact list, as they can always know when a child is online, and
       groom children with a view to isolating and manipulating them, developing emotional attachment and
        creating dependency in them, and meeting them in the real world.

IM can also be used to exchange files or images on a peer 2 peer basis. This can include inappropriate and
illegal content, which can be sent directly through file exchange or via SPAM. Trojan horses and viruses can
be sent and have been used to corrupt and/or take control of users‟ computers, gaining access to all their
files.
Children and young people have utilised the technology in positive and great ways but they too have realised
its potential to harass and bully other young people, especially given the integration with mobile phones.
Bullying can be continued online and beyond the playground when children are in the privacy of their own
homes.

IM can offer easy access to chat rooms and vice versa. Users can be just one click from the more private
world of IM to the very public world of chat, and it is possible that some children may not appreciate the
change in their environment.

In some chat systems, the child‟s username for IM will be carried over to become the child‟s username in
chatrooms, which then may make the user contactable via IM by someone who has seen them in a chat
room. Parents themselves may not realise the integrated nature of IM and need to know about the potential
risks of
chat rooms, and that access to chat rooms can be easy.

Good Practice Guidelines:

       Avoid accepting friends requests from junior members of the club or from people you do not know
       Keep all communication open and transparent e.g. letters/emails to parents
       Do not tell any child associated with the club your online name or „Add‟ details

Concerns

       Any concerns or enquiries about publications or the Internet should be reported to the club Child
        Protection Officer.




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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

6.11 Mobile Phones

Short Message Service (SMS) messaging is a quick and easy way to communicate with others and is a
popular and often preferred means of communication with children. Staff and volunteers must be aware that
intimidating, bullying or even abusive messages can be discreetly sent by text. Information sent in this way,
even where well-meaning, could be misinterpreted.

Further, the risks presented by developments in modern technology are becoming increasingly recognised.
Adults who seek to harm children have been known to use text messaging and internet chat rooms to “groom”
children. This area is now specifically addressed by the Protection of Children and Prevention of Sexual
Offences (Scotland) Act 2005.


6.11.1 Texting

Staff/volunteers must consider whether it is necessary and appropriate to hold the mobile phone numbers of
children. The general principle is that all communications with children should be open, transparent and
appropriate to the nature of the relationship.

In the first instance contact should always be made at the phone number the parent has provided on the
child‟s behalf. Good practice would include agreeing with children and parents what kind of information will be
communicated directly to children by text message. This information should only be “need to know”
information such as the last minute cancellation of a training session.

The following good practice is also required:

       the mobile phone numbers of children will be carefully stored (in accordance with data protection
        principles) and access will only be provided to those who need access for a legitimate reason.
       staff/volunteers must never engage in personal or sensitive communications with children via text
        message.
       all concerns about the inappropriate use of text messaging will be dealt with in line with Name of
        Club/Group ……………………………………………………………Complaints Policy, Disciplinary
        Procedure and/or Procedure for Responding to Concerns about Child Abuse.

6.11.2 Cameras/Videos

There have already been a number of cases where children have been placed at risk as a result of the ability
to discreetly record and transit images through mobile phones. The use of mobile phones in this way can be
very difficult to monitor.

The Use of Photographs, Film and Video (Section 6.71 page 27) should be observed in relation to the use of
mobile phones as cameras/videos. Particular care is required in areas where personal privacy is important
e.g. changing rooms, bathrooms and sleeping quarters. No photographs or video footage should ever be
permitted in such areas of personal privacy.

All concerns about the inappropriate use of mobile phones to record photographs or video footage will be
dealt with in line with Name of Club …………………………………………………Complaints Policy, Disciplinary
Procedure and/or Procedure for Responding to Concerns about Child Abuse.

This may include the concerns being reported to the police.


6.12 Changing Facilities

If a group is using changing facilities (whether home or away) the number of young people, type of group,
learning difficulties e.t.c. should be taken into account. Very young groups may need more supervision whilst


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                       Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

changing than older children. If more supervision is needed two members of Staff of the same gender as the
group should be used.

       Adults working with young teams should not change or shower at the same time using the same
        facility as young people.

       If possible, mixed gender teams should have access to separate male and female changing rooms. If
        not, separate changing times must be allocated.

       If Young Players (under 18) play for Adult Teams, they and their Parents must be informed of the
        Clubs changing arrangements and given the opportunity to discuss with the club.

       If Young People are uncomfortable changing or showering in public e.g. Changing villages in some
        Sports Centres, no pressure should be placed on them to do so.

       The Club will ensure that disabled participants and their Carers will be involved in deciding how, if
        applicable, they wish to be assisted to change and ensure they provide full consent to any support or
        assistance required.

       Debriefs following a match or training session between the coach and participants should not take
        place within the changing areas.



6.13 Use of Alcohol and Illegal Substances

Whilst actively working with Young People, all adults must adhere to the Code of Conduct. If an Adult is
reported to have breached the Code of Conduct, with regard to the use of alcohol, cigarettes or illegal
substances, he/she will be investigated under the Club/Group‟s complaints and discipline procedures.

Within the Club/Group setting or on away fixtures or tours, it is inappropriate and may be illegal for Adults to
allow Young People to consume alcohol, smoke (under the age of 16), or banned substances. If a report is
received with allegations of this taking place, the individuals will be seen to have breached the Code of
Conduct and will be investigated under the Club/Group‟s disciplinary procedures.




                                                Declaration

Name………………………………………..hereby adopts and accepts these Guidelines as current
operating guide regulating the action myself.


Date…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Signed………………………………………………………………………………………………….




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                        Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


Useful Contacts

Please complete the table with local details for quick referral:


1. The Club Child Protection Officer‟s contact details

2. Your sports National Governing Body Contacts (particularly the Child Welfare Case Officer at the NGB)

3. Local Police child protection teams. In an emergency contact via 999.

4. NSPCC Freephone 24 hour Helpline 0800 800 5000 (www.nspcc.org.uk )

5. Scottish Government Child Protection Line 0800 022 3222

     (http://www.infoscotland.com/childprotection)

6. Childline UK (www.childline.org.uk ) Tel: 0800 1111

7. Child Protection in Sport Service
                  st
   CHILDRENS 1
   Sussex House
   Glasgow
   G41 1DY

      Tel: 0141 418 5674
      www.childprotectioninsport.org.uk

8     www.helpforclubs.org.uk



                                                                              Other e.g.
                                                                            Emergency/Out
    Organisation      Contact Name           Contact         Contact          of Hours
                                             Address        Telephone          contact




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                         Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme



                               EAST LOTHIAN CONTACT DETAILS


Social Work:

Children‟s Services Social Work Team
Tel: 01875 824 090

Adult Social Work Services
Tel: 0845 603 1576

Emergency Social Work Services (ESWS)
Out of Hours Tel: 0800731 6969


Police:

Force Communication Centre (FCC)
Tel: 0131 311 3131 – Out of hours ask for the Duty Inspector

Family Protection Unit
Tel: 0131 654 5528


Health:

Paeditrician on call for Child Protection
NHS Lothian (contact from 9-5 pm Mon-Fri)
Out od Hours: 0131 536 0000 (ask for paediatrician on call)

Nurse consultant for Vulnerable Children
NHS Lothian
Tel: 0131 316 6634

Child Protection Advisor:
East Lothian CHP
Tel: 0131 316 6674
Mob: 07909 877672



Scottish Children’ Reported Administration
Tel: 01875 613 355




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                 Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


          CODE OF CONDUCT ADULT MEMBERS OF STAFF
                       Name of Club
      ……………………………………………………………………………………..

All adult members of staff (pain and voluntary) at the club must:
Always:
   Make sport/the activity fun, enjoyable and promote fair play
   Work in an open environment, avoiding private or unobserved situations
   Treat all participants equally with respect, dignity and fairness
   Put the welfare of each child first before winning or achieving performance goals
   Be an excellent role model including not smoking or drinking alcohol in the company of
    children
   Give enthusiastic and constructive feedback rather than negative criticism
   Build balanced relationships based on trust that empower and include children in the
    decision making process
   Recognise the developmental needs and capacity of children and avoid excessive
    training and competition, pushing them against their will or putting undue pressure on
    them
   Involve parents, guardians and carers wherever possible
Avoid:
  Having favourites – this could lead to resentment and jealousy by other children and
    could be misinterpreted by others.
  Spending excessive amounts of time alone with children away from others
  Entering children‟s bedrooms on trips away from home, unless in an emergency
    situation or in the interest of health and safety
  Doing things of a personal nature for a child they can do themselves
Never:
    Engage in sexual provocative games including horseplay
    Engage in rough, physical contact except as permitted within the rules of the game or
       competition
    From intimate emotional, physical or sexual relationships with children
    Allow or engage in touching a child in a sexually suggestive manner
    Allow unacceptable behaviour, swearing or sexualised language to go unchallenged
    Make sexually suggestive comments or gestures to a child, even in fun
    Reduce a child to tears as a form of control
    Allow allegations made by a child to go unchallenged, unrecorded or not acted upon
    Invite or allow children to stay with you at your home
    Share a room alone with a child for sleeping accommodation
I have fully read and understood the above Code of Conduct and will ensure that my conduct
and practice reflects the above points.
Signed:……………………………………………………………………………………………….
Name:…………………………………………………………………………………………………..
Date:…………………………………………………………………………………………………….




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme



                                         Code of Conduct

                                       Junior Participants

                                              (SPORT)



"It is the policy of Name of Club ……………………………………………..to ensure that all adult
members of staff and parents promote fair play at all times. Participants are encouraged to co-operate
with and respect those involved with the club at all times. The aim is for all to enjoy the sessions,
improve their skills and have FUN".


All junior members are asked to abide by the following rules at all times:

       Co-operate fully, respecting all requests and decisions made by the coaches, helpers, officials
        and administrators
       Be on time for sessions/matches/competitions
       Players must control their tempers and avoid behaviour which may inconvenience or upset
        others
       Treat opponents and team mates/other people in the club with respect at all times (on and off
        the field)
       Be considerate to others and work as a team
       Accept success and failure in a noble/ selfless way
       Do not purchase or consume alcohol, tobacco products, solvents, illegal drugs of any kind or
        purchase dangerous articles i.e. knives whilst representing the club or on the club premises
       Do not participate in any club activity whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Members
        shall not promote, give or sell any drugs to another member whilst participating on the club
        premises or participating in any club activity
       Take care of all property belonging to the club or any club member
       Do not leave sessions without permission of the person in charge
       Be responsible for caring for your own equipment, clothing and property
       No jewellery or unsuitable clothing or footwear should be worn during any practical sessions.
       Respect the rights, dignity and worth of all participants regardless of age, gender, ability,
        culture or religion.



Signed:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Name: …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Date: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………




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                           Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                                       Code of Conduct for

                                               Junior Members/participants

                                                       (ART AND LEISURE)


"It is the policy of Insert club name…………………………………………………….to ensure that all
adult members of staff , participants and parents promote a fair atmosphere at all times. Participants
are encouraged to co-operate with and respect those involved with the club/group at all times. The
aim is for all to enjoy the sessions, improve their skills and have FUN".


All junior members are asked to abide by the following rules at all times:

          Co-operate fully, respecting all requests and decisions made by the coaches, tutors, judges
           and helpers.
          Be on time for sessions and competitions
          Members must control their tempers and avoid behaviour which may inconvenience or upset
           others
          Treat other people in the club with respect at all times (in and out of the class)
          Be considerate to others and work as a team
          Accept success and failure.
          Do not purchase or consume alcohol, tobacco products, solvents, illegal drugs of any kind or
           purchase dangerous articles i.e. knives whilst representing the club or on the club premises
          Do not participate in any club activity whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Members
           shall not promote, give or sell any drugs to another member whilst participating on the club
           premises or participating in any club activity
          Take care of all property belonging to the club or any club member
          Do not leave sessions without permission of the person in charge
          Be responsible for caring for your own equipment, clothing and property
          No jewellery or unsuitable clothing or footwear should be worn during any practical sessions.
          Respect the rights, dignity and worth of all participants regardless of age, gender, ability,
           culture or religion.
     

Signed: ................................................................... Date: .......................................................

Name: …………………………………………………………………………………




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                  Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                           Parental Consent/Membership Form

Please complete the following, sign and return to: ……………………………..……before
your child starts their first session.

Name of Child …………………………………………. Date of Birth ………………………...…………..

Parent/ Guardian ………………………………………………………………………………....……………

Address: …………………………………                          Tel (day):………………………………………………
………………………………………….…                              Tel (evening):…………………………………………
……...……………………………………                             Mobile:…………………………………………………
Postcode:……………………………….                          Parent/Guardian e-mail:……………………………..

Will your child be collected/ given permission to walk home from the sessions:


Collected                                                Walk Home

If collected by whom:   …………………………………………………………………………….

Medical Information:

Family Doctor:………………………………………. Doctor’s Tel No:.………………………......………

Does your child suffer from any medical conditions inc ADHD/allergies that the club/ coach should be
aware of (including any current medication):
……….…………………….…………………………………………………………………………..……………

…...……………………………………………………………..……………………………..…………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Please provide details of medication that must be administered: ………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………..……………………………..……………………………..……………………

Please provide emergency contact details: (If different from above)

Name: ……………………………………………………………… Telephone no: ……………..………….

Relationship to child: ………………………………………………………………………………..........…….




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                    Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


Membership Fees:
Member:                Fee:         Please tick:
Senior                 £x
Students               £x
Under 18‟s             £x
Non-Playing            £x

Total                  £



CONSENT (please read carefully)

   a) I agree to my son/ daughter taking part in the activities of the club.
   b) I confirm to the best of my knowledge that my son/ daughter does
      not suffer from any medical condition other than those listed
      above.
   c) I understand that the Club or Organisers accept no responsibility for loss, damage or injury
      caused by or during attendance on any of the club/group organised activities except where
      such loss, damage or injury can be shown to result directly from the negligence of the Club or
      the Organisers.


Signed ………………………………….....................… (Parent/ Guardian) Date:
……………………………


      Would you be able to help at the club/group?:


Yes                        No


      If yes please indicate availability and a club member will be in touch:…………………………………………




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                        REFERENCE FORM
Name of Club ……………………………………………………………..is committed to ensuring that all
staff and volunteers who are recruited in to child care positions (as defined in Schedule 2 of the
Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003) are
suitable for the position.

In accordance with Name of Club …………………………………………Child Protection Policy and
Procedures, references will be obtained and thoroughly checked for all staff and volunteers seeking
appointment to a child care position.

DETAILS OF REFEREE
Name: ___________________________________________________________
Position held: ______________________________________________________
Organisation: ______________________________________________________
Address:


Post Code:

Telephone: _______________________________________________________

Relationship to
Applicant:
________________________________________________________________

Name of applicant ……………………………..has expressed an interest in a position in Vacancy
Details:




and has given your name as a referee. The position is a childcare position (as defined in the
Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003).

As an organisation committed to the welfare and protection of children we are anxious to know -is any
reason at all to be concerned about this applicant being in contact with children?

YES/NO Delete as appropriate.

If you have answered yes we will contact you in confidence.

All the information on this form will be treated confidentially and in accordance with relevant legislation
and guidance. Information will only be shared with the person conducting the assessment of the
applicant‟s suitability for the position and the immediate supervisor should
they be offered a position.

We would appreciate you being extremely candid in your evaluation of this person.
How long have you known this person:
_____________________________________________________________________________

In what capacity: ______________________________________________________________




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                    Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


What qualities does this person have that would make them suitable to work with children?
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________

Please rate this person on the following (please tick one)

Attendance - Unsatisfactory/Satisfactory/ Good/ Excellent
Responsibility
Maturity
Self Motivation
Can motivate others
Ability to work as a team
Willingness to follow instructions
Commitment
Communication skills
Trustworthiness
Reliability

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION
Please use this space to provide any other information about the applicant which you
consider is relevant to the position applied for (continue on a separate sheet if necessary).




TO BE COMPLETED BY REFEREE
I declare that all the information contained in this form is accurate and truthful to the best of
my knowledge.

Signature: ______________________________________ Date: ___________________

Print Name:
_____________________________________

Please return this form in an envelope marked PRIVATE and CONFIDENTIAL to:
[insert name of Child Protection Officer…………………………………………………………………….
[insert address of organisation]




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                       Child Protection
                               Significant Incident Report Form

This form must be completed as soon as possible after receiving information that causes concern
about the welfare or protection of a child. The form must be passed to ………………… as soon as
possible after completion; do not delay by attempting to obtain information to complete all sections.

Complete Part A of this form if the concerns relate to the general welfare of a child.
Complete Parts A and B if the concerns relate to possible child abuse.

    1. CHILD’S DETAILS

Child‟s Name: __________________________________________________

Date of Birth: ___________________________________________________

Address: ______________________________________________________

Telephone Contact: _____________________________________________

Child‟s Preferred Language: ______________________________________

Is an Interpreter Required?      YES / NO (delete as appropriate)

Is the child affected by disability? YES / NO (delete as appropriate)

If yes, give details:
______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

    2. DETAILS OF PERSON RECORDING CONCERNS

Name: ________________________________________________________

Position/Role: __________________________________________________

Address: ______________________________________________________

Telephone Contact: ______________________________________________


3. DETAILS OF INCIDENT GIVING RISE TO CONCERNS
(Record details including date, time, location, nature of concerns)




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

4. DETAILS OF ANY WITNESSES
(Record names, addresses and telephone contacts)




5. DETAILS OF INJURIES
(Record all injuries sustained, location of injury and action taken)




PART B where there are concerns about possible child abuse


6. DETAILS OF PERSON ABOUT WHOM THERE IS A CONCERN

Name: ________________________________________________________

Relationship to Child: ____________________________________________

Address: ______________________________________________________

Telephone Contact: ______________________________________________

7. DETAILS OF CONCERNS
(Continue on a separate sheet if necessary)




8. DETAILS OF ANY ACTION TAKEN




9. DETAILS OF AGENCIES CONTACTED
(Record date, time, name of person contacted and advice received)




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                 Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


10. Have the child’s parents been informed? YES / NO (delete as appropriate)
If yes, record details:




11. Child’s views on situation (if expressed. Continue on separate sheet if required)




Signed: _____________________________ Date: ____________________



Print Name: ___________________________________________________


Position:______________________________________________________


Concern passed to: _____________________________________________




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                               CHILD PROTECTION OFFICER
                                   ROLE DESCRIPTION

                                         NAME OF CLUB

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

                                     Main Purpose of Role

• To act as a point of contact in all issues relating to the welfare of young people and children and to
ensure all appropriate documentation and forms are in place and completed in accordance with the
Name of NGB ………………………………………….Child Protection policy/Club Child Protection
Policy and Procedures(delete as appropriate)

                                           Duties Involved

       Be supported by (Insert name of Facilty Manager, ELC contact, NGB/SGB contact)
       Ensure the club/group has a Child Protection Policy and Policy Procedures
       Ensure Codes of Conduct are well publicized and followed
       Implement and promote the Club Child Protection Policy and Procedures.
       Act as the main contact within the Club for the protection of children.
       Encourage good practice and support of procedures to protect children.
       Keep abreast of developments and understand the latest information on data protection,
        confidentiality and other legal issues that impact on the protection of children.
       Ensure all adults at the club in contact with children or young people possess an Enhanced
        Disclosure check.
       Maintain confidential records of reported cases, action taken, liaise with the statutory
        agencies and ensure they have access to all necessary information.
       Report cases, concerns and action taken to statutory agencies.
       Attend training on the protection of children and organise appropriate training for other
        members.
       Be aware of contacts within local statutory agencies including the police and social work
        services.
       Monitor and review the Child Protection Policy and Procedures for their club.
       Maintain strict confidentiality even if a complaint, concern or allegation has been made
        against a friend/personal contact/family member.

Liaison with:

       All committee members, all coaches, referees, tutors, volunteers taking responsibility for
        young people and parents of juniors.

       NGB/SGB Name…………………………………… Lead Child Protection Officer – contact
        details ……………………………………………………………………………………………………

       Local Social Services and Area Child Protection Committee contacts.

       Facility Managers, ELC contact




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


Responsible to:

• The title of the person at the club whom the Child Protection Officer is responsible to

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Meetings to attend:

• List of meetings that CPO is required to attend :

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Estimated time commitment:

• Average amount of time CPO is expected to commit to the club in this position.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Term of role:

• Annual appointment, although continuity in the role is desirable.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Recommended training:

• NGB or East Lothian Council approved Child Protection Course.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

      Guidelines on Disciplinary Issues relating to a Child
                     Protection Concern

                                             Introduction

This resource provides guidelines for managing a disciplinary procedure with an emphasis on cases
of misconduct by a volunteer/staff member involving children and young people.

It outlines good practice but it is not intended as an exhaustive guide to all disciplinary matters.

In the cases that a Sport‟s Governing Body (SGB)/club has existing disciplinary procedures and
practices in place these should be followed.

When managing any concern regarding the conduct of a volunteer/staff member involving children
and young people, it is first important to refer to the SGB/club‟s Procedure for Responding to
Concerns.

Please note that the police or social work services can be contacted for advice with regard to any
concern involving the alleged mistreatment of a child. If the nature of the concern suggests a criminal
offence has occurred, or that a child may hae been abused, the police or social work services must be
contacted for advice. If a child is at immediate risk of harm, dial 999.

It is difficult to predict our reaction to receiving such a concern or complaint. Inevitably it will be
influenced by the nature and seriousness of the concern. However, common reactions can include
shock, disbelief or worry.

This resource has been developed to provide supplementary guidance on managing a disciplinary
procedure that relates to the misconduct of a volunteer/staff member and involves children and young
people.

Not all concerns which are raised will result in a disciplinary process. To determine whether instigating
the SGB/Club‟s disciplinary procedure is appropriate, an initial assessment of the basic fact is
required.
                                         Initial Assessment

The purpose of the initial assessment is to clarify the nature and context of the concern. It should
determine whether there is reasonable cause to suspect or believe that a child has been abused or
harmed, or is at risk of abuse or harm.

It will involve asking some basic questions of appropriate individuals with the sole purpose of
clarifying the basic facts.

If the nature of the concern suggests that a criminal offence has occurred, or that a child may have
been abused, then advice must be sought from the police before speaking to child witnesses or to the
volunteer/staff member at the centre of the allegation.

The possible outcomes of the initial assessment are:

    1. No further action (facts do not substantiate complaint)
    2. Situation is dealt with under procedures to manage poor practice; and/or
    3. Disciplinary investigation (by governing body/club)




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

    4. Child protection investigation (jointly by the police or social work services)
    5. Criminal investigation (by the police)

Following the initial assessment, a period of precautionary suspension may be helpful or necessary
while a concern is being further investigated.

                                   Precautionary Suspension
Managing the precautionary suspension of a volunteer/staff member should be made by the
appropriate person/s in line with the SGB/Club‟s disciplinary procedure. If a separate suspension
procedure exists this should be referred to.

The following are good practice guidelines and should be considered in conjunction with the above
procedures.

Precautionary suspension may be considered in the following circumstances:

       If the police or social work services advise suspension
       If the volunteer/staff member‟s attendance or involvement in the club could compromise the
        investigation.
       If the allegation made against the volunteer/staff member was ultimately to be proved, then
        there would be significant concern about the conduct of that volunteer/staff member towards
        children or other adults.

Suspension is not a form of disciplinary action and does not involve pre-judgement. It should only be
considered in the above circumstances.

In all cases of suspension the welfare of children will be the paramount concern.

Managing a precautionary suspension
Duration – the duration of the suspension will vary depending on the circumstances. Typically it
should not exceed the time taken to conduct a satisfactory investigation.

Communication – At the outset the volunteer/staff member should be invited to a suspension
interview. The volunteer/staff member will be informed of the reason for the suspension (within the
confines of sharing information) and the duration of the suspension. The details of the suspension
should also be confirmed in writing.

Extensions – An extension to the suspension period may be appropriate; if for example a disciplinary
hearing uncovers further facts for investigation or it is advised by the police or social work services.
The period of suspension should be kept under review and the volunteer/staff member informed in
writing of extensions.

Pay – In the case of a paid member of staff any period of suspension should be with full pay as to
freeze pay may be interpreted as a disciplinary penalty.

Status – At the conclusion of the investigation the volunteer/staff member should be invited to a
disciplinary hearing. Consideration should be given to the suspension status of the volunteer/staff
member at this time. It may be extended pending further investigation or terminated following the
conclusion of the disciplinary hearing. The volunteer/staff member should receive confirmation in
writing when the suspension is terminated.

It is important to recognise that the suspension of a volunteer/staff member may generate disruption
within the SGB/club and consideration should be given to how to minimise this.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                             Managing a disciplinary procedure

Where the initial assessment of a reported concern identifies misconduct, but not child abuse, by a
volunteer/staff member, the SGB/club‟s internal disciplinary procedure should be followed.

If the nature of the concern suggests that a criminal offence has occurred or that a child may have
been abused then advice must be sought from the police before instigating the SGB/club disciplinary
procedure.

A disciplinary procedure should be based on principles of natural justice, which promote fair
treatment:

       The volunteer/staff member will be made aware of the nature of concern or complaint.
       The volunteer/staff member will be given an opportunity to put forward their case.
       The club/group will act in good faith, ensure the matter is dealt with impartially and as quickly
        as possible in the circumstances.
       The club will offer the volunteer/staff member the opportunity to appeal a disciplinary decision.

Roles in managing a disciplinary procedure

Typically there are three key roles in the management of a disciplinary procedure:
    1. Investigating Officer
    2. Disciplinary Manager/Panel
    3. Appeal Manager/Panel

The Investigating Officer will conduct the disciplinary investigation to establish the facts surrounding
the alleged misconduct.

The Disciplinary Manager/Panel will conduct a disciplinary hearing, make a decision on disciplinary
action, and communicate the decision to the volunteer/staff member at the centre of the allegation.

The appeal manager/panel will review the grounds for appeal by the volunteer/staff member and
make a determination on the appropriateness of the initial disciplinary action.

Post holders should:

       Be selected taking account of impartiality (that is, have no bias and be unconnected to the
        incidents (s) in question.
       Be educated and trained in dealing with such matters, and be familiar with standard
        procedures.
       Understand the importance of dealing with confidentiality, rumour and intimidation.
       Have consideration and respect for all parties including witnesses.
       Make efforts to put people at ease and deal firmly but sensitively with a potentially stressful
        experience.

To promote impartiality at each stage of the process the Investigating Officer should not be involved in
the Disciplinary or Appeal hearing unless to deliver evidence. The Manager/Panel Members involved
in the Disciplinary Hearing should not be involved in the Appeal Hearing.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Conducting a Disciplinary Investigation

The following are recommendations for conducting a disciplinary investigation:

Step 1 – Planning the Investigation

       Establish the precise details of the allegation (seek clarification from complainant)
       List the parts of the code of conduct that have been breached.
       List what further information/evidence is needed to establish the facts.
       Define the resources and timelines for conducting the investigation.

Step 2 – Establishing the Facts

       Identify who needs to be interviewed and the information required
       Plan the order of interviews. Interviewing the volunteer/staff member at the centre of the
        allegation first may save a lot of time if, for example, he/she admits to the allegation.
       Ensure notice is provided to the interviewee and that it is at a convenient time and in a private
        location.
       It may be helpful to prepare questions or points to cover during the interview.
       State clearly the purpose of the interview and what the information will be used for.
       Open-ended questions; for example, who, what, where, how and why encourage people to
        talk and expand on the subject.
       Close-ended questions; for example, Do you… will only be answered by „yes‟ or „no‟ and
        should be used sparingly. They can be useful for confirming facts.
       Record the key points of the interview and ask the interviewee to confirm that it reflects the
        content of the conversation.

Step 3 – Assessing the Facts

       Review all the evidence to confirm whether there are any gaps in it.
       Assess the investigation findings and determine whether a disciplinary hearing is appropriate.
       Certainty is preferable but it is sufficient to form an opinion on the balance of probabilities.

Managing a Disciplinary Hearing

Where the investigation findings provide sufficient evidence to instigate a disciplinary hearing the
SGB/club‟s disciplinary procedure must be followed. The following are good practice guidelines on
managing a Disciplinary Hearing and conducting a Disciplinary Hearing:

Invitation to Disciplinary Hearing

This should be in the form of a letter to the volunteer/staff member at the centre of the allegation and
include:

       Confirmation of the date, time and venue of the proposed hearing
       Confirmation that there is a requirement to attend
       Reasonable detail of the allegations which will be presented
       A copy of any documentary evidence that may be used at the hearing
       Confirmation that the alleged misconduct may, if proven, require a disciplinary penalty to be
        imposed. If dismissal is an option this should be clearly stated in the letter.
       Clarification that no judgement will be made in advance of the disciplinary hearing
       Confirmation that there will be the opportunity to answer allegations.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

       Clarification on the right to be accompanied by a colleague or trade union representative.

Conducting the Disciplinary Hearing

The following practices are recommended when conducting a Disciplinary Hearing:

       The allegations and evidence will be put clearly to the volunteer/staff member.
       The volunteer/staff member will be asked to comment on the evidence and the allegations.
       If matters come to light at the disciplinary hearing that warrant further investigation,
        consideration will be given to adjourning the hearing while those matters are investigated. The
        results of any further investigation will be reported to the volunteer/staff member who will be
        given an opportunity to comment.
       Once the issues have been put to the volunteer/staff member and discussed, the respective
        positions on both sides will be summarised at the end of the hearing.
       The volunteer/staff member is told that all they have said will be considered and that they will
        be written to with the Manager/Panel‟s decision.
       The Manager/Panel will retire to consider a decision before contacting the volunteer/staff
        member.

The Disciplinary Manager/Panel should avoid the following behaviours during the course of the
Disciplinary Hearing:

       Using humour
       Being apologetic or debating the evidence
       Defending, arguing, justifying
       Allowing the meeting to go on too long
       Making promises that cannot be kept.



                                     Special Considerations

   Speaking to children during the investigative process or as part of a disciplinary
                                       hearing

In establishing the facts of any concern or complaint, it may be necessary to speak to a child or
children who were involved in the alleged incident.

In some circumstances, it would not be appropriate for the person conducting the investigation to
speak to a child involved in the incident. In particular, if the nature of the concern suggests that a
criminal offence has occurred or that a child may have been abused, then it is the job of specially
trained and competent police officers and social workers to interview the child.

If there is any doubt as to whether it is appropriate to speak to a child, advice should firstly always be
sought from the police or social work services.

In cases where the nature of the complaint or concern is such that the police or social work services
are not involved, careful consideration should still be given before approaching young people for
information as part of the initial investigation process or as part of a disciplinary hearing.

To minimise distress or anxiety for the child, it is a good idea to give some thought as to how to
approach them. Some things to consider are:




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                    Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

       The age, gender and background of the child i.e. will they require an interpreter?
       Whether the child has any learning or physical disability which may affect their ability to
        communicate with others.
       The child‟s emotional state.
       Timing and location of interview, bearing in mind the child‟s daily routines.
       What you will do if the child becomes upset.
       Obtaining consent from the parents/carer.
       Any other information which may be relevant.

The Disciplinary Panel/Investigating Officer should decide whether it is absolutely necessary for the
child to be involved in a Disciplinary Hearing. If the child is to be involved, consideration should be
given to the following:

       Allowing the child to be accompanied by a relative or other responsible adult (preferably
        someone who is not involved in the case)
       The environment or room layout – how intimidating it could appear to a child.
       The number of people present – try to ensure only those who need to be there are present
        while the child gives evidence.
       The age of the child.
       The nature of the evidence the child may be giving.
       The nature of the relationship between the child and the subject of the hearing.
       The tone and style of questioning; that is, clear and non-threatening, with sufficient
        opportunity for the child to consider the questions and answer them.

These considerations should be balanced against the need to ensure that the volunteer/staff member
has a fair hearing.

                              Deciding on the Disciplinary Penalty

Where the Disciplinary Manager/Panel believes that a case of misconduct is proven a decision must
be reached on the appropriate disciplinary penalty.

A decision on the disciplinary penalty should be applied in accordance with the SGB/club‟s
disciplinary procedure.

The following should be considered when deciding on the penalty:

       The nature and seriousness of the misconduct.
       Previous disciplinary record.
       The likelihood of repeating the misconduct.
       Previous service/contribution to the club.

The penalty should be appropriate to the severity of the misconduct.

Once the penalty has been agreed the volunteer/staff member should be written to with confirmation
of the penalty and the brief reasons.

If a warning is given, the length of time for which this will be live should be stated in the letter and
should be in accordance with the SGB/club‟s disciplinary procedure.

Any letter of dismissal should make clear the reason why the volunteer/staff member is being
dismissed and the date when the termination will take effect.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                        The Appeal Process
In line with the principles of natural justice a volunteer/staff member should have the right to appeal a
disciplinary penalty decision. SGB/Club‟s should refer to their disciplinary procedure for clarification
on the right to appeal.
Letters communicating a disciplinary penalty should state that the volunteer/staff member has a right
to appeal against the disciplinary penalty and should include details of the person to write to and the
timescales involved.
A member of the SGB/club who is in a more senior position than the person making the penalty
decision should conduct an appeal.
The person/s hearing the appeal should not be involved in the procedure leading up to the penalty
decision.
The Appeal Hearing should be arranged with advance notice of date, time and venue and should be
confirmed in writing to the volunteer/staff member.
Prior to the Appeal Hearing, the volunteer/staff member should be asked to confirm any grounds on
which they are appealing and why they believe the penalty decision was incorrectly made.
Once any issues have been discussed at the Appeal Hearing, the matter should be adjourned and the
volunteer/staff member told that a decision will be made and confirmed in writing.
The decision of the Appeal Manager/Panel should be confirmed in writing to the volunteer/staff
member. In accordance with the club‟s disciplinary procedure the letter should confirm whether there
is any further right of appeal

            Referrals to the Disqualified from Working with Children List
The Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003 stipulates that an SGB/Club must refer to Scottish
Ministers the cases of any volunteer/staff member who (whether or not in the course of their role
within the SGB/Club) harmed a child or placed a child at risk of harm.

AND as a result:

    1. The SGB/Club has dismissed the volunteer/staff member
    2. The volunteer/staff member would have been dismissed as a result of the incident had they
       not resigned, retired or been made redundant.
    3. The SGB/Club has transferred the staff member to a position in the SGB/Club which does not
       involve contact with children.
    4. The staff member would have been dismissed or considered for dismissal had the contract
       not expired.
    5. The SGB/Club will also refer the case of a volunteer/staff member where information
       becomes available after the volunteer/staff member has:
            Been dismissed by the SGB/club
            Resigned, retired or been made redundant
            Been transferred to another position in the SGB/club which does not involve contact
                with children, and the SGB/club forms the opinion (on the basis of the information)
                that they would have been dismissed or considered dismissing the volunteer/staff
                member on such grounds, had the information been available at the time of
                resignation/redundancy/retirement/transfer.

Where the SGB/Club receives information that a volunteer/staff member in a child care position has
been fully listed on the Disqualified from Working with Children List, the volunteer/staff member will be
removed from that position.




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                 Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme




                                    Glossary of terms

Disciplinary Action – Formal action against a volunteer/staff member e.g. issuing a first
written warning for misconduct or dismissing someone for gross misconduct.

Disciplinary Procedure – A procedure for organisations to follow to deal with cases of
misconduct or unsatisfactory performance. It helps organisations to deal with disciplinary
cases fairly and consistently.

Gross Misconduct – Acts which are so serious as to justify possible dismissal, such as theft
or fraud, physical violence or bullying, access of offensive or obscene material, serious
insubordination, serious incapability brought on by alcohol or illegal drugs, a serious breach
of health and safety rules, a serious breach of confidence, child abuse.

Disciplinary Penalty – Punishment imposed on a volunteer/staff member as a result
unsatisfactory performance or misconduct. Sanctions may include dismissal, or actions short
of dismissal such as loss of pay or demotion.

Natural Justice – The basic fundamental principles of fair treatment. These principles
include the duty to give someone a fair hearing, the duty to ensure that someone impartial
decides the matter, and the duty to allow an appeal against a decision.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                               Sample Disciplinary Procedure

Please note that this is a sample procedure only. Advice should initially be sought from your
Governing Body. There may be an existing disciplinary procedure in place for your sport or art. This
sample procedure may also be adapted.

The [organisation’s name] ……………………………….aim is to encourage high standards of
individual behaviour in all aspects of the sport. This procedure sets out the action which will be taken
when the code of conduct is breached by a volunteer or a staff member. This procedure should be
read in conjunction with the procedure for Responding to Concerns About the Conduct of a Volunteer
or Staff Member.

    1. Principles

            a) This procedure is designed to establish the facts quickly and to deal with disciplinary
               issues consistently.
            b) No disciplinary action will be taken until a matter has been fully investigated.
            c) The volunteer/staff member involved may be suspended from their role while an
               investigation is carried out. Suspension is not a form of disciplinary action. A decision
               to suspend will be made by [role title/person’s name]………………………..
               Notification of the suspension and the reasons will be conveyed in writing to the
               volunteer/staff member.
            d) At every stage of the formal disciplinary procedure the volunteer/staff member will
               have the opportunity to state his/her case at a Disciplinary Hearing. If so wished
               he/she will have the opportunity to be represented or accompanied at the hearings by
               a third party; for example, a friend or colleague or a trade union representative (where
               applicable).
            e) The volunteer/staff member has the right to appeal against any disciplinary action.
            f) The disciplinary procedure may be implemented at Stage 1, 2 or 3 if the
               volunteer/staff member‟s alleged misconduct warrants such action.

    2. The Procedure

Initial Stage (does not form part of formal disciplinary procedure)

Where a volunteer/staff member fails to meet the required standard of behaviour and the shortfall is of
a minor nature, the [role title] …………………………………….may decide to speak to the
volunteer/staff member on an informal basis to avoid the need for formal disciplinary action. The [role
title]………………………….. will also advise the volunteer/staff member of the need to achieve and
maintain the standards required. The [role title]………………………….. may inform the volunteer/staff
member that failure to achieve the required standards will result in a formal Disciplinary Hearing,
which may result in disciplinary action.

Facts of the conversation should be noted and confirmed in writing to the volunteer/staff member so
there is clarity about what has to be achieved.

Formal Disciplinary Procedure
       Stage 1 – First Warning

If conduct is unsatisfactory, the volunteer/staff member will be given a written warning. Such warnings
will be recorded. The warning will expire after [insert time period……………………] of satisfactory
conduct. A final written warning may be considered if there is no sustained satisfactory improvement
or change.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


       Stage 2 – Final written warning

If the offence is serious, or there is no improvement in standards, or if a further offence of a similar
kind occurs, a final written warning will be given. The written warning will expire after [Insert time
period………………………………………]. Action at Stage 3 will be taken if there is no sustained
satisfactory improvement or change.

       Stage 3 – Dismissal or Action Short of Dismissal

If the conduct has failed to improve, the volunteer/staff member may suffer demotion, disciplinary
transfer or dismissal.

Gross misconduct

If, after investigation, it is confirmed that a volunteer/staff member has committed an offence of the
following nature (the list is not exhaustive), the normal consequence will be dismissal without notice or
payment in lieu of notice: theft, damage to property, fraud, incapacity for work due to being under the
influence of alcohol or illegal drugs, physical violence, bullying, abuse of a child or gross
insubordination.

Following advice from the police, cases that also involve a criminal investigation will not preclude
disciplinary action being taken. This is provided sufficient information is available to enable
[organisations name………………………………] to make a decision and that to do so does not
jeopardize the criminal investigation. Any decision to dismiss will be taken by the [organisation’s
name]……………………………………… only after full investigation.

    3. Appeals
A volunteer/staff member who wishes to appeal against any disciplinary decision must do so to [role
title/appeal panel…………………………………] within seven working days of the disciplinary decision
being made known to them.

The volunteer/staff member should provide a written statement of the appeal, indicating the grounds
for the appeal, together with accompanying documents, as they feel appropriate.

The appeal will also be heard by [role title/appeal panel…………………………………]and a decision
on the case made as impartially as possible.

The [role title/appeal committee] ……………………………will notify the volunteer/staff member of the
decision in writing as expeditiously as possible. The decision of [role title/appeal
committee…………………………………………….. is final and there is no right to appeal.

    4. Referral

If a volunteer/staff member has harmed a child or put a child at risk of harm, [organisation’s
name………………………………..] has a legal duty to refer that person to Scottish Ministers where
the referral criteria have been met.




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                              Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


                            Managing common reactions in disciplinary hearings

           A Disciplinary Hearing involves having a difficult conversation, and this can generate a mixture of
           feelings for both the person leading the hearing and the volunteer/staff member at the centre of it.

           For the person leading the hearing, these concerns often centre around managing the response from
           the volunteer/staff member and the impact it will have on your relationship with them or their peer
           group.

           It is important to acknowledge these feelings and to use any available support. This might involve
           speaking with someone who you know has led a disciplinary process before or seeking guidance from
           your governing body.

           As part of the preparation for managing a disciplinary procedure it can be helpful to consider the
           volunteer/staff member at the centre and their possible reactions.
           Below is a model that describes the stages an individual is likely to go through when faced with a
           change in their lives.

           It can be applied when considering the stages a volunteer/staff member may go through when an
           allegation has been made against them. Though just a model it can be a useful prompt to consider
           where a volunteer/staff member might be in the change process. This can help you consider the types
           of reactions you may be faced with during the course of the disciplinary hearing.




                  Shock

                                                                            Moving On
                                Denial
Response/Mora




                                                                         Acceptance
                                         Fear


                                                Anger
 le




                                                              Understanding

                                                        Depression




                                                            Time




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Here are some of the more typical reactions and some suggestions on how to manage them:

Person who argues

      Always expect some disagreement
      Listen carefully and paraphrase to demonstrate you understand their point of view
      Reiterate the why and the what of the decisions that have been made
      Don‟t make false promises
      If you don‟t know the answer say that you don‟t and that you will go and investigate
      Remember that this person is probably in the denial stage of the change curve.

Person who loses their temper

      Stay calm, listen and hear the person out
      Acknowledge their emotion and try to understand what is making them angry
      Calmly restate your points and involve him/her in reaching a shred understanding
      Focus on those things that are in the person‟s control
      Any use of shouting or personal insults should lead you to end the discussion.



Non-responder

      Use the silence. Give the person plenty of time to formulate a response
      Listen
      Ask open questions to encourage them to talk
      Ask what they are feeling/thinking
      Check their understanding of what has been said.

Person who cries

      Allow some time for the emotion
      Make sure you have tissues
      Offer them time to visit the bathroom
      Demonstrate empathy
      Focus on the immediate next steps.

Persecuted Person

      Focus on the objectivity and transparency of the process
      Avoid offering your personal opinions
      Avoid engaging in discussion on performance of other colleagues.




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                  Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme


                                    Sample Letters


Notice of Disciplinary Hearing

Please note that this letter is a sample only. It may need to be adapted to reflect your
Disciplinary Procedure and to address the individual circumstances of the disciplinary case:


                                                                    Date:


Dear ________________________

I am writing to tell you that you are required to attend a Disciplinary Hearing on ____ at ____
am/pm which to be held in ____.

At this meeting the question of disciplinary action against you, in accordance with
[organisation’s name] Disciplinary Procedure, will be considered with regard to:

Description of incident e.g. “An Incident took place on ______ between yourself and ______,
when it was alleged that you……”

Please find enclosed the following available evidence e.g. written witness statements where
available, emails

You will have the opportunity at the hearing to respond to the incident described and to the
enclosed evidence.

You are entitled, if you wish, to be accompanied by a colleague or trade union
representative.

Yours sincerely


Signed _____
[Role Title]




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                  Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme




Notice of written warning or final written warning


Please note that this letter is a sample only. It may need to be adapted to reflect your
Disciplinary Procedure and to address the individual circumstances of the disciplinary case.


                                                                    Date:


Dear _________________________

You attended a Disciplinary Hearing on____________ I am writing to confirm the decision
taken that you be given a [written warning/final warning] under the [first/second] stage of the
[organisation’s name] Disciplinary Procedure.

This warning will be recorded but will be disregarded for disciplinary purposes after a period
of [insert time period], provided your conduct improves.

   a)   The nature of the unsatisfactory conduct was:
   b)   The conduct or performance improvement expected is:
   c)   The timescale within which the improvement is required is:
   d)   The likely consequence of further misconduct or insufficient improvement is:

You have the right to appeal against this decision. Please submit your appeal in writing to
______ within [x working] days or receiving this disciplinary decision.

Yours sincerely



Signed _________
[Role title]




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                  Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme




Notice of dismissal or action short of dismissal

Please note that this letter is a sample only. It may need to be adapted to reflect your
Disciplinary Procedure and to address the individual circumstances of the disciplinary case.


                                                                  Date ________


Dear_________

You attended a Disciplinary Hearing on _______ I am writing to confirm the decision taken
that you be [dismissed/demoted/transferred] under the final stage of [organisation’s name]
Disciplinary Procedure.

The reasons for your [dismissal/demotion/transfer] are:

This will take effect from [insert date].

You have the right to appeal against this decision. Please submit your appeal in writing to
[role title] within [x working] days of receiving this disciplinary decision.

Yours sincerely




Signed ________
[role title]




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                  Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme




Notice of appeal hearing against disciplinary action

Please note that this letter is a sample letter only. It may need to be adapted to reflect your
Disciplinary Procedure or to address the individual circumstances of the disciplinary case.


                                                             Date_______


Dear ______

You have appealed against the [written warning/final warning] confirmed to you in writing on
______.

Your appeal will be heard by _______ in ______on______ at ______.

You are entitled to be accompanied by a colleague or trade union representative.

The decision of the Appeal Hearing is final and there is no further right of review.

Yours sincerely



Signed ________
[Role title]




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                  Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme




Notice of Result of Appeal Hearing against Disciplinary Action


Please note that this letter is a sample only. It may need to be adapted to reflect your
Disciplinary Procedure and to address the individual circumstances of the disciplinary case.


                                                              Date ________


Dear________

You appealed against the decision of the Disciplinary Hearing that you be [dismissed/subject
to disciplinary action].

The appeal hearing was held on _______.

I am now writing to confirm the decision taken by [name of manage who conducted the
hearing], namely that the decision to ______ [stands/is revoked].

Specify if no further disciplinary action is being taken or what the new disciplinary action is.

You have now exercised your right of appeal under the [organisation’s name] Disciplinary
Procedure and this decision is final.

Yours sincerely


Signed _________
[Role Title]




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                     Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

        REVIEWING THE MANAGEMENT OF A CHILD PROTECTION CONCERN

PLANNING A REVIEW

Taking the time to think about some preliminary matters will help to ensure that the review is as
effective as possible. The template at the end may help you to plan your review.

    1. Why?

Be clear from the outset about the remit and aim(s) of the review, or why you are reviewing. This will
make it easier to decide who should be involved, how to go about it and what information you need to
gather.

There may be more than one reason for reviewing a case or cases for example:

         To examine the role of all staff in responding to concerns identified about a child or coach.
         To establish whether the organisation‟s procedures were followed and how effective they
          were in protecting the child.
         To establish how well all the organisations involved in the case worked together.
         To establish whether there are lessons to be learned, what those lessons are and to make
          recommendations for future action.

Setting out a remit for the review will keep the reviewer focused and also provide clarity to others
about the process or intended outcomes.

    2. Who?

The child protection lead officer should help the organisation determine who should conduct the
review.

         This may be part of the SGB lead child protection officer‟s role
         An ex-officio member of the management team.
         In some cases it may be appropriate for an independent person to conduct the review; for
          example, where individuals from the organisation have been closely involved or there are
          concerns around the conduct of individuals or the processes they have applied.

Having someone independent carry out the review can be beneficial, particularly where the case has
had significant impact on the individuals involved and/or the sport. This „Independent person‟ should
have the necessary skills, knowledge and understanding of child protection, from either within or
outwith the sport; for example, a lead officer from another SGB or an existing volunteer who works
professionally in child protection.

        Where someone independent is involved, it is important to ensure there is agreement about
                                           confidentiality.

Other points to consider are:

         Who else, if anyone, at SGB/awarding body level should be involved in the review?
         Will other organisations involved in the case be invited to contribute? This may include police,
          social work or governing body.
         Will the child or family be involved? If so, how? If the child and family are involved, it is
          important to keep them informed of the progress of the review and to share findings with
          them.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

    3. When?
Here are some examples of WHEN a review may be appropriate:

       At the conclusion of any case dealt with through the SGB‟s child protection procedures for
        Responding to Concerns about a Child or Responding to Concerns about the Conduct of a
        Staff Member or Volunteer.
       At the conclusion of legal proceedings.
       At the conclusion of disciplinary proceedings including an appeal.
       As part of an annual review of all child protection cases which arose during the year.

Clearly a full review of a case subject to criminal investigation by the police, a child protection
investigation by police and social work, or legal proceedings will only be possible at the conclusion of
the investigation or legal proceedings. However a review should be held as soon as possible to
ensure that any lessons learned are acted upon timeously.
    4. How?

       Firstly, agree a timescale for carrying out the review.
       Secondly, ensure that police and/or social workers have completed any investigations and
        that there are no outstanding legal proceedings.
The review process will be informed by the reasons for reviewing, which will probably reflect the
complexity of the incident.

The main source of information is likely to be the Child Protection Significant Incident recording forms.
These forms may provide all the information required. In cases where these forms have not been
completed or the quality of the information is poor, it may be necessary to speak to the people
involved to get more details.

It‟s important to consider and acknowledge how people might be feeling about the incident itself and
the possible impact of a review. People may feel their actions are being called into question or
scrutinised, which could leave them feeling anxious or threatened. Where the reviewer intends to
speak to those involved, they should plan how they will introduce the review, explain the purpose of it
and how they will deal with any reactions or questions from those involved; for example:

“I’ve been asked by the Governing Body to review how the sport dealt with the concerns about X. This
review will consider how procedures were followed and whether appropriate action was taken to
protect those involved. This will give you an opportunity to tell me about your experience and make
any suggestions for improving things in the future”
    5. Recording and reporting the findings.
The reviewer should make a record of the review and its findings. This doesn‟t necessarily need to be
a lengthy report, although a full report may be appropriate in certain circumstances.

Generally, any record of a review should contain the following information:

       The source of the concern
       The nature of the concern.
       A chronology of events, individuals and organisations involved.
       Action taken.
       An analysis of the key issues or matters linked to the aims of the review.
       Any other relevant points or observations.
       Lessons to be learned and changes to be made.
       Recommendations.




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                                   CONDUCTING A REVIEW
Step 1           Establish the facts of the case, a chronology of events and the roles of
                 individuals and organisations involved.


Setting out the actual sequence of events will help the reviewer to understand what happened, when,
and who was involved: for example:

23 April 2008    Child disclosed physical abuse to coach
23 April 2008    Coach reported concern to club CPO
24 April 2008    Club CPO reported incident to SGB CPO
24 April 2008    SGB CPO sought advice from PC Smith; London Road Police Station, referral then
                 made to the Family Protection Unit.


Step 2           Identify any issues or key questions relating to the aims of the review

Having established the sequence of events the reviewer should then be able to answer the questions
contained in the specific remit of the review.

If the reviewer considers that a child may still be at risk despite action taken during the case or as a
result of the club or SGB’s failure to take appropriate action, they should be prepared to act. Any
urgent issues should be addressed immediately without waiting for the conclusion of the review.

Step 3           Identify any other relevant points or observations

The reviewer may identify issues, which are worth exploring further. These may include:

                 PROCEDURES                                              PEOPLE

        Were the relevant procedures followed?             Were the right people involved?
        If not, is there a reasonable explanation          Were the views of the child/family
         for this?                                           obtained?
        Were the timescales appropriate?                   Were those involved aware of the
        Do the current procedures provide                   procedures?
         adequate information about what to do in           Had the people involve been trained on
         such a situation?                                   the procedures?
        If appropriate, was a referral made to             Where appropriate, were external
         Scottish Ministers as required by the               organisations involved; for example, the
         Protection of Children (Scotland) Act               police of governing body?
         2003?

                   OUTCOMES                                            RECORDING

        Was the outcome appropriate to the                 Were records kept?
         case?                                              Is the quality of the information recorded
        If not, why not?                                    satisfactory?
        Is there a need to take further action in          Can the forms be improved?
         this case; for example, referring the case
         to the police/social work?


Step 4           Identify any lessons to be learned and what changes need to be made




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                   Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

Step 5           Make recommendations
Recommendations may include things like changes to procedures, forms and/or provision of training.
It may be helpful for the reviewer to prioritise the recommendations as appropriate, for example,
essential, desirable or helpful.
POST REVIEW
Responding to the Findings and Recommendations
Having invested the time and effort in conducting a review the governing body should carefully
consider how to respond to the findings and any recommendations. It also must consider how to
advise/support any club on whose behalf it has conducted the review. Decisions on how to react to
the recommendations should be taken by the appropriate board/management/executive committee.

Where recommendations are to be followed, the management should identify the priorities, what
action is required, who will take action and timescales for completion. This information must be clearly
communicated to those involved. Management should follow up to check that action has in fact been
taken.
If it is decided not to follow the recommendations, this decision and the reasons should be clearly
recorded in management minutes.
Applying the Learning in Practice
Lessons learned and/or changes made to procedures or practice must be communicated to those
who need to know so they can be put into practice. This can be achieved in number of ways:
           - a briefing note
           - training session
           - group email
           - article in an SGB/club publication or website

The best method will often be determined by the significance or nature of the information to be
passed on. Like all other policies and procedures, these changes in practice should be subject to
regular monitoring and review to ensure compliance.
Sharing the Findings and Recommendations Internally and Externally
There are benefits to sharing the outcomes of a review with others:
             -   It demonstrates that the club is committed to continuous improvement
             -   Other individuals and organisations may benefit from lessons learned from the clubs’
                 experience.
             -   It can contribute to the wider understanding of child protection in sport and the arts
                 and the ways in which practice and guidance can be enhanced.
Remember that many of the details of the case will be confidential, so any information shared must be
presented in a way that protects the anonymity and privacy of those involved.
Internally
Identify those within the governing body and club who should get feedback on the outcomes of the
review. This will include the board/management/executive committee, the individuals involved in the
case, and where appropriate, other club members.
Externally
The club should also consider whether there are other organisations or partners who would benefit
from the review and recommendations. This may include other SGBs, governing bodies,
sportscotland, the Child Protection in Sport Service etc. Depending on the circumstances of the case,
there may be media interest in the outcome of the review. The governing body should have a strategy
in place to deal with any enquiries from the media.




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              Sport, Leisure and the Arts Accreditation Scheme

                        REVIEW PLANNING TEMPLATE
           Name of the reviewer:

           Case reference:                 If this record is going to be shared with others, the
                                           details of the case should be anonymised using a
                                           unique reference number or identifier.


   Outstanding investigations and          If relevant to this case, have the following been
           proceedings:                    concluded:

                                               1. Police and social work child protection
                                                  investigation? Y/N
                                               2. A criminal investigation by the police?
                                                  Y/N
                                               3. Any related legal proceedings? Y/N

                                           If the answer is no to any of these questions,
                                           the review cannot proceed.


           Remit of review:                List here in bullet point form the reasons for the
                                           review:
                                                
                                                
                                                


      Timescales for completion:           This should be the dates when the review will
                                           begin and end with the reported findings.

  How will the review be conducted?        List here the methods to be used to conduct the
                                           review; for example:
                                                 A review of all paper records
                                                 Telephone/face-to-face interviews with
                                                    relevant individuals
                                                 Contact with other organisations involved
                                                    as necessary

Are there any special considerations or    For example, this case was reported in the press,
         features in this case?            the child involved has a learning disability.

      How will the findings and
   recommendations be reported?

Who will the outcomes of the review be     List here all internal and external parties with
             shared with?                  whom information will be shared.


     Is a media strategy required?




                                          72

				
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