Docstoc

Biology

Document Sample
Biology Powered By Docstoc
					Biology                                                                   MAJOR, MINOR

PROFESSOR: Renee Godard
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Rebecca Beach, C. Morgan Wilson (chair)
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Ryan Huish
ADJUNCT LECTURER: Amy White
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN: Cheryl Taylor

The biology major seeks to develop in its students a sense of independent inquiry
into the processes of life. Core courses in the major provide all students with a
solid foundation in the biological sciences (from cells to ecosystems), while upper-
level courses and seminars as well as research opportunities give students the
chance for specific areas of interest in biology. As well as exploring biological
concepts, classes in the biology department promote the development of oral and
written communication skills as well as critical thinking. Graduating seniors will have
the skills to critique the primary biological literature, utilize biological instrumentation,
and design and carry out biological research in several disciplines. Hollins graduates
go on to graduate school, medical school, veterinary school, or other advanced

                                            79
training in allied health professions. Other graduates pursue a variety of careers in
the biological sciences, becoming research assistants, environmental consultants,
and teachers at both the elementary and secondary levels. Biology majors also
occupy various technical positions in private firms and governmental agencies.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BIOLOGY (B.A.):
    8 courses and associated laboratories, if applicable; two semesters of senior
    seminar and allied courses (54 – 70 credits)

    REQUIRED COURSES IN BIOLOGY:
    • Four core courses in biology and accompanying laboratories:
      BIOL 207: Ecology (6)
      BIOL 220: Human Physiology (6)
      BIOL 236: Molecular and Cell Biology (6)
      BIOL 241: Plant Biology (6)
    • Four elective courses in biology at or above the 200 level (including labs,
      if applicable). A student may substitute one semester of BIOL 390:
      Independent Study, BIOL 391: Independent Research in Biology, or
      BIOL 480: Senior Thesis for one of the elective courses. (A student may
      petition the department to include one course at the 100 level among the
      four elective courses, if the course is taken before the student decides to
      major in biology.)
    • BIOL 471, BIOL 472: Senior Seminar (2, 2) (Those seniors engaged in
      student teaching are exempt from BIOL 472.)

    REQUIRED ALLIED COURSES:
    • CHEM 101 and CHEM 102: General Chemistry (including laboratories)
      (4, 2) (4, 2) or CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry (including laboratory) (4, 2)
    • One course in mathematics or statistics (140 or above) or PSY 208: Analysis
      of Behavioral Data (4)

    RECOMMENDED ADDITIONAL COURSE WORK:
    For students interested in medical school, veterinary school, or graduate
    programs in health sciences or biology:
    • CHEM 221 and CHEM 222: Organic Chemistry (including laboratories)
      (4, 2) (4, 2)
    • PHYS 151 and PHYS 152: Physical Principles or PHYS 201 and PHYS 202:
      Analytical Physics (including laboratories) (4, 2) (4, 2)
    • STAT 140: Introduction to Statistics (4) or MATH 241: Calculus I (6)

    FOR STUDENTS INTERESTED IN TEACHING IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS:
    • CHEM 221 and CHEM 222: Organic Chemistry (including laboratories)
      (4, 2) (4, 2)
    • PHYS 151 and PHYS 152: Physical Principles (including laboratories)
      (4, 2), (4, 2)

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BIOLOGY (B.S.):
    8 courses and associated laboratories, if applicable; two semesters of senior
    seminar and allied courses (74– 86 credits)

    REQUIRED COURSES IN BIOLOGY:
    • Four core courses in biology and accompanying laboratories:
      BIOL 207: Ecology (6)
      BIOL 220: Human Physiology (6)
      BIOL 236: Molecular and Cell Biology (6)


                                         80
BIOLOGY continued
      BIOL 241: Plant Biology (6)
    • Three elective courses in biology (including labs, if applicable). At least two
      courses must be at the 300 level.
    • One semester of independent research:
      BIOL 391: Independent Research in Biology (4) or BIOL 480: Senior Thesis (4)
    • BIOL 471, BIOL 472: Senior Seminar (2, 2)

    REQUIRED ALLIED COURSES:
    • CHEM 101 and CHEM 102: General Chemistry (including laboratories)
      (4, 2) (4, 2) or CHEM 105: Principles of Chemistry (including laboratory)
      (4, 2)
    • Two additional chemistry courses (with labs), at or above the 200 level
      (8–12)
    • One course in mathematics, either MATH 152: Intuitive Calculus or
      MATH 241: Calculus I or STAT 140: Introduction to Statistics or STAT 251:
      Statistical Methods I or PSY 208: Analysis of Behavioral Data (4– 6)
    • PHYS 151/151L and PHYS 152/152L: Physical Principles I, II or
      PHYS 201/201L and PHYS 202/202L: Analytic Physics I, II (12)

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN BIOLOGY:
    6 courses and associated laboratories, if applicable (32–36 credits)
    • Three core courses in biology and accompanying laboratories chosen from
      the following:
      BIOL 207: Ecology (6)
      BIOL 220: Human Physiology (6)
      BIOL 236: Molecular and Cell Biology (6)
      BIOL 241: Plant Biology (6)
    • Three elective courses in biology at or above the 200 level (including
      laboratories, if applicable).

COURSES IN BIOLOGY:
BIOL 117: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (4)                                            Godard
    In this lecture/laboratory course students explore how organisms, communities,
    and ecosystems function under natural conditions, as well as how they function
    under human influence. We will cover a variety of current environmental
    concerns in both the classroom and laboratory, including the patterns of human
    population growth, the extinction crisis, global warming, acid rain, water
    pollution, solid waste management, sustainable agriculture, and renewable
    energy. Also listed as ES 117. Not intended for students majoring in biology.
    Open to first - year students. No prerequisite. Offered Term 2. (SCI)
BIOL 121: PLANTS AND PEOPLE - AN INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOBOTANY (4)
                                                                                Huish
    This interdisciplinary course draws from the natural and social sciences to
    investigate plant-human interactions. We’ll examine modern and historical uses
    of plants in a variety of cultures. Topics explored include plants as food,
    medicine, and in ritual and everyday life. The combined lecture/laboratory
    format allows students to experience the science of ethnobotany firsthand
    through experimentation and observation. Not intended for students majoring in
    biology. Also listed as INTL 121. Open to first-year students. No prerequisite.
    Offered both terms. (GLO, SCI)
BIOL 130: BIOLOGICAL SELF DEFENSE (4)                                       White
    This lecture/laboratory course explores how the human immune system
    protects us from disease and the microbial pathogens that try to breach our

                                        81
    defenses. The outcome of this constant interaction dictates the state of human
    health. Topics covered will include sexually transmitted diseases, biological
    agents, AIDS, malaria, and other diseases of public health interest. Laboratory
    experiments will investigate different facets of the immune system, the ubiquity
    of microorganisms and antibiotic sensitivity/resistance. Not intended for
    students majoring in biology. Open to first-year students. No prerequisite. Not
    offered in 2010–11. (SCI)

BIOL 132: HUMAN BIOLOGY - HOW DOES MY BODY WORK? (4)                          Wilson
    This lecture/laboratory course explores the basic principles and functions of
    the human body (such as digesting a meal, taking a breath, or fighting an
    infection) and puts them in the context of total body function. The aims of this
    course are to provide students with hands-on experience gathering physiological
    data, as well as with a basic knowledge of human health, which will provide
    them with a foundation from which they can ask informed questions of a
    physician about their own health and/or the health of their family members.
    Not intended for students majoring in biology. Open to first-year students.
    No prerequisite. Offered Term 1. (SCI)

BIOL 140: HUMAN GENETICS (4)                                                     Beach
    In this combined lecture/laboratory course we explore the science behind such
    issues as human cloning, genetic testing, gene therapy, forensic DNA evidence,
    and genetically modified foods. Students gain an understanding of how the
    Human Genome Project may impact their lives and get a hands-on introduction
    to the laboratory analyses used in these studies. Not intended for students
    majoring in biology. Open to first-year students. No prerequisite. Not offered
    2010-11. (SCI)
BIOL 156: THE BIOLOGY OF WOMEN AND ITS SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS (4) Boatman
    Also listed and described as GWS 156. Open to first-year students. No
    prerequisite. Not offered in 2010–11. (SCI)
BIOL 197F: FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR - YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: MAKING GOOD
FOOD CHOICES FOR YOUR HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT (4)                            Beach
    Why do we make the food choices we make? Do we choose food mainly out of
    habit, or do we consider what is in it and how it was grown? How does the
    media and advertising influence our diet? In this course students learn to
    critically evaluate the foods they eat and the messages the food choices send
    to their bodies and the environment. We will examine where our foods come
    from, how food production and transportation impact the environment, why
    excessive use of pesticides has become problematic, and why trans fats and
    genetically modified foods (GMOs) may pose health risks. We will also
    investigate the energy footprints of processed foods and whole foods, and
    learn why some scholars advocate locally produced food and plant-based diets
    as the solution to the many environmental and health issues that surround
    food. Laboratory investigations will include testing for GMOs in foods, producing
    cultured and fermented foods, and analyzing our diets for nutritional content.
    Also listed as ES 197F. No prerequisite. Placement to be determined during the
    summer. Offered Term 1. (r , SCI)

BIOL 207: ECOLOGY (4)                                                        Godard
    As one of the core courses for the biology major, students explore the structure
    and function of the natural world. We examine the relationships between
    organisms and their physical and biological environment, global patterns of
    climate and biological life, patterns in population dynamics, as well as
    structure and change in communities of organisms. Also listed as ES 207.

                                         82
BIOLOGY continued
    Open to first-year students. No prerequisite. Offered Term 1. (SCI: must take
    lab to fulfill SCI)

BIOL 207L: LABORATORY FOR ECOLOGY (2)                                         Godard
    Students explore local aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems as well as gain
    hands-on experience carrying out ecological research in this field laboratory
    course. Students will also have several opportunities to carry out their own
    independent research. Also listed as ES 207L. Corequisite: BIOL 207. Offered
    Term 1. (SCI)

BIOL 220: HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (4)                                              Wilson
    As one of the four core courses for the biology major, students explore
    physiological mechanisms of the human body on the cellular, tissue, organ,
    organ system, and whole-organism levels, with emphasis on the way in which
    the human body responds to various external and internal stimuli to maintain
    homeostasis. Open to first-year students. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or CHEM
    105 or permission. Offered Term 2. (SCI: must take lab to fulfill SCI)

BIOL 220L: LABORATORY FOR HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (2)                                Wilson
    In this inquiry-based laboratory course, we explore many of the tools and
    techniques used in the study of physiological mechanisms. Students will
    employ hypothesis testing to explore these mechanisms and learn the
    essentials of scientific research and writing. Corequisite: BIOL 220. Offered
    Term 2. (SCI)

BIOL 236: MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY (4)                                        Beach
    The diversity and complexity of different cell types found in multicellular
    organisms is extensive, yet all eukaryotic cells have the same basic molecular
    components. One of the four core courses for the biology major, this course
    provides an overview of cell structure, biological macromolecules, cellular
    reproduction, and gene structure and function. Open to first-year students.
    Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or CHEM 105, BIOL 220, or permission. Offered
    Term 2. (SCI: must take lab to fulfill SCI)

BIOL 236L: LABORATORY FOR MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY (2)                       Beach
    This project-oriented laboratory provides students with the opportunity to
    analyze and characterize DNA and other cellular molecules. The course is
    designed to give students experience with an array of molecular biological
    techniques. In addition, students are exposed to elements of research and
    experimental design in a directed framework. Corequisite: BIOL 236. Offered
    Term 2. (SCI)

BIOL 241: PLANT BIOLOGY (4)                                                       Huish
    This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the nature of plants
    and the practice of plant science. We’ll cover the structure, function, and
    diversity of plants, including discussions of practical/applied plant biology
    (conservation, biotechnology, etc.). Students will be challenged to build an
    integrated understanding of plants, from an awareness of their biochemistry
    to their roles in an ecosystem, enabling future studies of plants and plant-
    mediated processes. Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 101 or CHEM 105.
    Offered Term 1.

BIOL 241L: LABORATORY FOR PLANT BIOLOGY (2)                                         Huish
    Laboratory sessions provide a hands-on introduction to plant biology in
    laboratory and field settings. Investigations of plant structure, diversity, ecology,
    and physiology will introduce students to experimental design, data collection,

                                          83
    and subsequent written and oral presentations of results. At least one weekend
    field trip will be required. Corequisite: BIOL 241. Offered Term 1. (o)

BIOL 260: HUMAN ANATOMY (4)                                          Godard, Wilson
    In this course, students have the opportunity to investigate the structure of the
    human body through independent exploration of texts and computer-based
    models of human anatomy. Students will be evaluated for their understanding
    of each anatomical system through written tests, lab practicals, and oral
    exams. This self-directed course is only for students who need human anatomy
    as a prerequisite for professional schools. Prerequisite/corequisite: BIOL 220
    and BIOL 220L. Permission of instructor is required. Offered Term 2.

BIOL 290: INDEPENDENT STUDY (2 or 4)                                   Department
    Tutorials based on standard primary and secondary sources or may contain an
    experiential component. These studies, below the advanced level, must be
    planned and approved in consultation with a member of the department prior
    to registration. Maximum of 8 credits permissible. Offered any term.

BIOL 310: EVOLUTION AND THE HUMAN CONDITION (4)                                Godard
    In this seminar students explore basic evolutionary concepts, such as natural
    selection, sexual selection, and population genetics and relate them to issues
    in human health and disease, the extinction crisis, and other impacts
    associated with human activity in the world. Our investigations will include an
    exploration of a variety of issues from the costs and benefits of aging, to the
    host-pathogen arms race, to the long-term viability of conservation programs for
    endangered species. Prerequisite: one of the four biology core courses (BIOL
    207, BIOL 220, BIOL 236, or BIOL 241) or permission. Not offered 2010-11.
    (o, r )

BIOL 312: MICROBIOLOGY (4)                                                    White
    The term microorganism brings to mind the thought of disease and infection,
    yet plants and animals cannot exist without the many microbes in our world.
    This course provides a survey of microorganisms, focusing largely on the
    bacterial organisms and viruses that have the greatest impact on our existence.
    Prerequisites: BIOL 220 and BIOL 236; CHEM 102 or CHEM 105. Not offered
    2010-11.

BIOL 312L: LABORATORY FOR MICROBIOLOGY (2)                                      White
    This lab concentrates on techniques for culturing, handling, and identifying
    microorganisms. Students also carry out independent laboratory projects
    during the final weeks of the semester. Corequisite: BIOL 312. Not offered
    2010-11.

BIOL 313: INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4)                                            Wilson
    Invertebrates, members of the animal kingdom lacking a backbone, comprise
    95 percent of the animals on Earth today. In this course students explore the
    anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and taxonomy of this incredibly diverse
    group of animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 220. Not offered 2010-11.

BIOL 313L: LABORATORY FOR INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (2)                           Wilson
    This laboratory provides students the opportunity to explore the anatomy of
    invertebrate organisms, the environments in which they live, and the techniques
    used to classify them. Exercises are conducted in both the laboratory and the
    field. Corequisite: BIOL 313. Not offered 2010-11.



                                        84
BIOLOGY continued
BIOL 314: GENETICS (4)                                                         Beach
    This course covers aspects of inheritance, including classical Mendelian and
    modern molecular genetics. Population genetics and variation will also be
    explored. Prerequisite: Two of the four biology core courses (BIOL 207, BIOL
    220, BIOL 236, or BIOL 241 and CHEM 101 or CHEM 105). Not offered
    2010-11.
BIOL 314L: LABORATORY FOR GENETICS (2)                                        Beach
   In this laboratory students gain practical experience in the techniques of both
   classical geneticists and molecular biologists. Laboratory investigations include
   breeding experiments with plants and fruit flies, as well as molecular genetic
   experiments using recombinant DNA methodology. Corequisite: BIOL 314. Not
   offered 2010-11.

BIOL 315: COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (4)                                 Wilson
    Why are there no flying elephants? In this course we will compare the design
    and structure of vertebrate animals in relationship to the environments in
    which they evolve. We will emphasize the functional morphology of anatomical
    systems and major adaptive changes in the evolution of vertebrate structure.
    Prerequisite: BIOL 220. Not offered 2010-11.
BIOL 315L: LABORATORY FOR COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (2) Wilson
    This laboratory involves detailed dissections and comparisons of organ systems
    in the lamprey, shark, and cat. Corequisite: BIOL 315. Not offered 2010-11.

BIOL 317: BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)                                       Bowers
    Also listed and described as PSY 317. Prerequisites: PSY 141 (or permission)
    and BIOL 220. Not offered 2010-11. (SCI)

BIOL 322: DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (4)                                           Beach
    Development from the fertilized egg to a complete adult organism requires a
    precisely coordinated series of events involving molecular, cellular, and
    organismal mechanisms. This course provides an integrative survey of animal
    development, with a focus on those unifying mechanisms that are common to
    all developing embryos. Prerequisite: BIOL 236 or BIOL 314. Offered Term 1.
BIOL 322L: LABORATORY FOR DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (2)                           Beach
    This laboratory is designed to give the student hands-on experience in
    experimental embryology. The first part of the course is devoted to techniques
    for handling, culturing, and manipulating invertebrate and vertebrate embryos.
    Students then apply these techniques in self-designed independent projects
    during the remaining half of the semester. Corequisite: BIOL 322. Offered Term
    1.
BIOL 323: ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (4)                                                  Godard
    Analyses of animal behavior incorporating ethological, ecological, and
    evolutionary perspectives. This interdisciplinary course covers the development,
    underlying mechanisms, adaptive value, and evolution of behavior. Also listed
    as PSY 323. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 or BIOL 220. Offered Term 2.

BIOL 323L: LABORATORY FOR ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (2)                               Godard
    Observational and experimental techniques in field and laboratory settings.
    The lab culminates in independent research projects. Also listed as PSY 323L.
    Corequisite: BIOL 323. Offered Term 2.




                                        85
BIOL 332: IMMUNOLOGY (4)                                                      White
    This course provides an overview of the cell and molecular biology of the
    mammalian immune response, focusing on antibody structure and function,
    cells and tissues of the immune system, and the genetic basis for antibody
    diversity. Advances in studies of immune deficiencies, autoimmune diseases,
    the allergic response, transplant rejection, and cancer are also covered.
    Prerequisites: BIOL 220 and BIOL 236 and CHEM 101 or CHEM 105. Offered
    Term 2.

BIOL 332L: LABORATORY FOR IMMUNOLOGY (2)                                    White
    This laboratory provides students with hands-on experience in experimental
    techniques used in immunology research. Laboratory methods focus on cellular,
    molecular, and biochemical aspects of immunology. Corequisite: BIOL 332.
    Offered Term 2.

BIOL 351: BIOCHEMISTRY (4)                                           Boatman
    Also listed and described as CHEM 351. Prerequisites: CHEM 222 and CHEM
    222L or equivalent. Offered Term 1.

BIOL 351L: LABORATORY FOR BIOCHEMISTRY (2)                                Boatman
    Also listed and described as CHEM 351L. Corequisite: BIOL 351. Offered Term 1.

BIOL 352: ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY (4)                                       Boatman
    Also listed and described as CHEM 352. Prerequisite: BIOL 351. Offered Term 2.

BIOL 352L: LABORATORY FOR ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY (2)                       Boatman
    Also listed and described as CHEM 352L. Corequisite: BIOL 352. Not offered
    2010-11.

BIOL 357: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (4)                                              Huish
    This seminar examines the impact of current environmental problems (global
    warming, introduced species, degradation of water resources, land use
    practices, etc.) on the life-sustaining properties of natural ecosystems, as well
    as current theories and practices in conservation biology. We not only try to
    understand the nature, cause, and implications of various environmental
    issues, but we also explore possible solutions to the problems. Each student
    has the opportunity to explore a particular environmental problem of interest
    (from local to global) and present her research. Also listed as ES 357.
    Prerequisites: BIOL/ES 207 and 207L or BIOL/ES 117 and permission. Offered
    Term 2.

BIOL 357L: LABORATORY FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (2)                              Huish
    Laboratory activities will cultivate an understanding of real-world, hands-on
    conservation biology through fieldtrips, active discussions, and training on the
    use of professional tools used by conservation biologists, such as GIS
    (Geographic Information Systems), which significantly aid in the decision-
    making process for the management and preservation of biodiversity.
    Corequisite: BIOL 357. Offered Term 2.

BIOL 361: PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY (4)                                           Wilson
    Living organisms must overcome the challenges imposed by their natural
    surroundings to survive. This course explores the physiological mechanisms
    that animals (both vertebrate and invertebrate) employ to flourish in a variety of
    environments, both aquatic and terrestrial. Using a comparative approach in
    the context of evolution, students explore topics such as osmoregulation and


                                         86
BIOLOGY continued
    excretion, metabolism, respiration and circulation, thermoregulation, and the
    neuroendocrine control of physiology and behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 or
    BIOL 220. Offered Term 1.

BIOL 361L: PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY LAB (2)                                      Wilson
    This laboratory provides students with hands -on experience documenting and
    experimentally manipulating the physiological mechanisms employed by
    organisms in response to a variety of environmental conditions. Following
    introductory laboratory experiences, students design and carry out their own
    experiments to test questions involving a variety of physiological processes.
    Corequisite: BIOL 361. Offered Term 1.

BIOL 390: INDEPENDENT STUDY (2 or 4)                                 Department
    Independent study conducted at the advanced level. Application must be made
    with faculty prior to registration. Offered any term.

BIOL 391: INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY (4)                               Department
    This course is intended for students conducting independent scientific research.
    At the beginning of the semester in which the student enrolls in this course, a
    proposal for the research project will be developed in consultation with the
    faculty supervisor. The project must involve laboratory and/or field research
    with significant data collection and analysis. The student will be expected to
    produce a formal scientific report at the conclusion of the project, which should
    include a review of the scientific literature relevant to the study. Prerequisites:
    two of the four biology core courses (BIOL 207, BIOL 220, BIOL 236, or BIOL
    241). Offered any term.

BIOL 399: INTERNSHIP (4)                                                Department
    Application must be made with faculty prior to registration. May be proposed
    any term.

BIOL 471, 472: SENIOR SEMINAR (2, 2)                                    Beach, Wilson
    All majors are required to take this course during both terms of their senior
    year. During the first term, each student will prepare a portfolio summarizing
    her academic experiences. Additionally, during the first term students will
    explore and develop presentations about the primary literature. In the second
    term, students will choose from a number of major topics of importance and
    controversy and develop group presentations and lead discussions exploring
    these topics. Offered both terms.

BIOL 480: SENIOR THESIS (4, 4)                                          Department
    Students are expected to carry out a yearlong research project (includes Short
    Term). The research project will be summarized in a paper of publication quality.
    If a student’s status and thesis meet the requirements for honors, then BIOL
    480 will be converted to BIOL 490. Application must be made with faculty prior
    to registration.

BIOL 490: SENIOR HONORS THESIS (4, 4)                                   Department
    Students should not register for BIOL 490. Research is initially conducted as
    BIOL 480: Senior Thesis. Honors status will be determined in the spring.




                                         87

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:48
posted:7/21/2011
language:English
pages:9