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					Danish Environmental Protection Agency
Financial Resource Mobilisation
for Implementation of the
Strategic Plan for the Basel
Convention
Part II - Fact Sheets on Possible Funding
Sources for Waste Management

March 2004
Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       2



                               Danish Environmental Protection Agency
                               Financial Resource Mobilisation for
                               Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the
                               Basel Convention
                               Part II - Fact Sheets on Possible Funding Sources for
                               Waste Management

                               March 2004




Report no.      58231-2
Issue no.       02
Date of issue   March 2004


Prepared        AEJ, BIM, EB, HHU
Checked         APA
Approved        HHU




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Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets        3



                               Table of Contents
                               1           Fact sheets on Possible Funding Sources for
                                           Waste Management                                                            5
                               1.1         Introduction                                                                5
                               1.2         International Development Banks                                             7
                               1.2.1       Asian Development Bank (ADB)                                                7
                               1.2.2       Central American Bank for Economic Integration
                                           (CABEI)                                                                    10
                               1.2.3       Council of Europe Development Bank (CEB)                                   13
                               1.2.4       European Bank for Reconstruction and Development
                                           (EBRD)                                                                     15
                               1.2.5       European Investment Bank (EIB)                                             17
                               1.2.6       Inter-American Development Bank                                            20
                               1.2.7       International Bank for Reconstruction and
                                           Development (IBRD)                                                         23
                               1.2.8       Nordic Investment Bank                                                     26
                               1.3         International Development Funds                                            28
                               1.3.1       International Development Association                                      28
                               1.4         Multilateral Grant Donors (EU)                                             31
                               1.4.1       CARDS Programme                                                            31
                               1.4.2       European Development Fund (EDF)                                            33
                               1.4.3       Instrument for Structural Policies for Pre-accession
                                           (ISPA)                                                                     36
                               1.4.4       MEDA Programme                                                             38
                               1.4.5       TACIS                                                                      40
                               1.5         Multilateral Grant Donors (UN)                                             43
                               1.5.1       United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)                                43
                               1.5.2       United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)                                45
                               1.6         Multilateral Grant Donors (Other)                                          47
                               1.6.1       Global Environment Facility (GEF)                                          47
                               1.7         Bilateral Donor Agencies                                                   51
                               1.7.1       Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)                           51
                               1.7.2       Danish International Development Assistance
                                           (Danida)                                                                   54
                               1.7.3       Department for International Development (DFID)                            56
                               1.7.4       Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische
                                           Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH                                                  58
                               1.7.5       Direction Générale de la Coopération Internationale
                                           et du Développement (DGCID)                                                60
                               1.7.6       Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA)                             62
                               1.7.7       Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC)                            64
                               1.7.8       U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)                          67



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                               Table of Appendices
                               Appendix 1              List of International Financing Institutions




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                               1           Fact sheets on Possible Funding Sources
                                           for Waste Management

                               1.1         Introduction
                               In addition to the Guidance Note on Financial Resource Mobilisation for
                               Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention (Part I), fact
                               sheets for important international sources of funding have been prepared. The
                               fact sheets are intended to provide key information about the financing
                               institution or programme to a broad target group by providing an overview of:

                               •     The strategies and priorities of the funding sources with particular focus on
                                     regions/countries and waste-related issues;

                               •     The main types of financing offered (only sub-programmes or specific
                                     small windows of financing that are of relevance to waste management are
                                     mentioned);

                               •     Key information on access to funding as seen from the point of view of the
                                     recipient countries.

                               The fact sheets provide a snapshot of the situation as per September 2003,1
                               however, priorities and modalities of the financing institutions change over
                               time. It is therefore advisable always to check with the websites of the
                               financing institutions to get the latest information and to contact the institutions
                               directly to discuss concrete projects and funding possibilities at an early stage.

                               The fact sheets are presented with reference to the categories presented in Part I
                               of the Guidance Note, Chapter 3:

                               •     International development banks;
                               •     International development funds;
                               •     Multilateral grant donors; and


                               1
                                The information provided in the fact sheets was collected from the websites of the rele-
                               vant institutions. Following the Second Session of the OEWG in November 2003, Parties
                               and others were invited to provide comments and information on their bilateral assistance.
                               As per 22 March 2004 such information or comments have not yet been received.




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                               • Bilateral donor agencies.
                               As regards bilateral agencies, only a selected number of fact sheets have been
                               prepared.

                               For a quick overview, Annex 1 of this Part II contains a table covering all the
                               financing institutions (except bilateral) for which fact sheets have been
                               elaborated as well as some additional sources with a more limited role in
                               relation to financing of projects in the waste sector.

                               Furthermore, reference is made to the draft UNITAR/IOMC Guidance Note on
                               Financial Resources Mobilisation,2 which contains a number of fact sheets for
                               bilateral sources of funding.




                               2
                                UNITAR/IOMC: "Financial Resource Mobilisation for the Sound Management of
                               Chemicals", Working Draft, July 2001.


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                                  1.2         International Development Banks

1.2.1 Asian Development Bank (ADB)
1 Introduction
The Asian Development Bank is a lending institution for the developing countries in the Asian region. In
2002, ADB approved 89 loans and four equity investments valued at USD 5.7 billion. For technical
assistance (TA) operations, ADB approved 324 TAs valued at USD 178.7 million.

The Asian Development Fund (ADF) is ADB's "concessional" or "soft-loan" window and is funded by
ADB's donor member countries. At 31 December 2001, total contributed ADF resources amounted to
USD 18.18 billion. ADF has been replenished seven times and the current ADF period (ADF VIII) covers
the period 2001-2004.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The overall objective of ADB is poverty reduction, focusing on promotion of pro-poor, sustainable
economic growth, social development, and good governance. The Bank's Poverty Reduction Strategy
recognises that environmental sustainability is a prerequisite for pro-poor economic growth and efforts to
reduce poverty. Environmental sustainability is also one of three crosscutting themes of the Banks Long
Term Strategic Framework 2001-2015 (LTSF). The Bank has an environmental policy, documented in a
policy paper from 2002 (available on the website). The Environment Policy is grounded in ADB's Poverty
Reduction Strategy and LTSF. The Policy emphasises a number of priority areas of which the ones below
are the most relevant in relation to the waste sector:

• Environmental quality improvement, with a special focus on urban environment and health,
  encompassing support for environmental infrastructure, including waste management (solid, and
  hazardous waste) and support for industrial pollution projects.
• Capacity building within environmental management, focusing on environmental planning and policy,
  data and information management, regulatory systems and environmental governance.
• Playing a facilitating role in the context of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs), including
  treaties, conventions, and protocols, particularly to support its regional cooperative efforts. The Basel
  Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal, and
  the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are both mentioned among the
  MEAs, which are relevant for ADB support.

Of the total approved lending in 2002 (USD 5.6 billion), 4.5% or about USD 250 million was allocated for
environmental protection projects. In the planned allocations for 2003 environmental protection projects is
allocated 8% of total lending.

The ADB is a member of the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The policy, adopted by GEF in May
1999 on Expanded Opportunities for Regional Development Banks, allows ADB to blend its own resources
for sustainable development at the country level with GEF grant resources allocated to address global
environmental issues. The GEF is described in a separate fact sheet.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
The ADB provides support to its developing member countries, which are classified into three groups,
which determine their eligibility for ordinary Bank funding and funding from ADF, respectively. Group A
includes countries with very low per capita GNP and limited debt-repayment capacity and are fully eligible



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for ADF financing. Group B includes lower middle-income countries at intermediate levels of economic
development and with increasing capacity to service their debt and are eligible for limited amounts of ADF
funding in particular circumstances. Group C includes upper middle-income and high-income countries
with relatively high debt-repayment capacity, which are only eligible for Bank funding. Borrowers
comprise the following countries:

• Group A: Bhutan, Cambodia, Lao, Maldives, Nepal, Kyrgyz Republic, Mongolia, Tajikistan, Kiribati,
  Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Vanuatu
• Group B: Cook Islands, Marshall Islands, Tonga, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Viet Nam, Indonesia
• Group C: Afghanistan, China, Fiji Islands, Hong Kong China, India, Kazakhstan, Korea, Malaysia,
  Micronesia, Myanmar, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Taipei China, Thailand,
  Timor-Leste, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.
• In addition, East Timor and Azerbaijan are new borrowers and are eligible for ADF funding.

4 Organisations Supported
The four categories of eligible borrowers are (i) a member country of the Bank; (ii) an agency,
instrumentality, or political subdivision of a member country; (iii) an entity or enterprise operating in the
territory of a member country; and (iv) an international or regional agency or entity concerned with the
economic development of the region.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The ADB extends loans and equity investments to its developing member countries and provides technical
assistance for the planning and execution of development projects and programs and for advisory services.

Most ADB financing is designed to support specific projects, but ADB also provides other lending
modalities such as technical assistance loans; credit lines; program, sector, sector development program,
and private sector loans.
• Program loans are given by the Bank to assist in developing a sector (or subsector) as a whole and
   improving a sector's performance through appropriate policy and institutional improvements over the
   medium to long term.
• Sector lending is for project-related investments. The purpose of a sector loan is to assist in the
   development of a specific sector or subsector by financing a part of the investment in the sector.
• A sector development program (SDP) is a combination of an investment (project or sector) and a policy-
   based (program) loan as well as, where appropriate, attached technical assistance (TA). The SDP is not a
   separate lending modality, but represents a combination of policy and investment-based assistance.

Lending terms for ADB loans include a market-based interest rate, commitment fee and front-end fee. The
repayment term is based mainly on the economic life of the project. The financial condition of the
borrowing entity and the revenue-earning capacity of the project may also be taken into account. Subject to
these primary project considerations, the repayment period will depend on the debt-service capacity of the
borrowing country. The grace period will depend mainly on the time needed for the project to become
operational but may be modified to reflect country considerations.

ADF loans carry very low interest rates. For project loans (i.e., other than quick-disbursing program loans)
the terms are: 32-year repayment period including an 8-year grace period. For quick-disbursing program
loans the terms are: 24-year repayment period including an 8-year grace period. There is no commitment
fee associated with ADF-financed loans.




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6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
ADB actively promotes co-financing, defined as financing mobilised from sources other than the borrower
or project sponsors to augment its own assistance, with funds from commercial financial institutions,
official funding agencies and export credit agencies. For every dollar lent by ADB in 2002, an additional
50 cents was mobilised through co-financing operations.

There is no information regarding specific minimum requirements as to project size. The average project
size in 2002 was USD 64 million for all lending types.

7 Access to Assistance
ADB formulates operational strategies for individual countries, including economic and policy analyses,
and undertakes country performance reviews which provide a basis for policy dialogue with the
governments of developing member countries. ADB develops Country Strategy and Programs which
include identification of individual technical assistance and loan projects and programs. A project loan is
normally not taken up for processing unless it forms part of the Bank's country assistance plan (CAP) for
the DMC. The Bank assists its DMCs in the formulation and, if necessary, reformulation of projects so that
viable projects may eventually result.

The resident missions are responsible for country programming, project and technical assistance
processing, and portfolio management and project administration and should be addressed to discuss any
project ideas. There are resident missions in 16 countries and one regional resident mission (contact details
available on the website).

8 Other Information
None

9 Contact Details
Headquarters:
6 ADB Avenue, Mandaluyong City
0401 Metro Manila, Philippines
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 789
0980 Manila, Philippines
Tel: + 632 632 4444
Fax: + 632 636 2444

There are 24 other offices around the world. The contact details can be found on the website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.adb.org




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1.2.2 Central American Bank for Economic Integration (CABEI)
1 Introduction
The Central American Bank for Economic Integration (CABEI) is the development bank of the region. It
was established to promote the integration and balanced economic and social development of the Central
American countries. To that end, it supports public and private programs and projects that generate
productive employment and contribute to improving productivity and competitiveness, as well as raising
the human development indices of the region.

From its founding through March 1999, CABEI has approved 1,763 loans for a total of USD 5,238.4
million, 85% of which have been disbursed.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
Infrastructure and environmental sustainability are among the priority areas of attention:

Infrastructure: The construction, rehabilitation and modernization of the highway infrastructure and rural
roads, which connect production centers and markets. The elimination of obstacles to trade and competition
in the transport sector and the development of energy production.

Environmental Sustainability:
a) Participate in the CTO (Oxygen Transfer) market;
b) Collaborate in programs, which mitigate climate change and promote clean production processes; and
c) Contribute to energy conservation.

Under the heading of sustainable development, three areas of action are emphasised:

• Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises. It provides credit and technical assistance through banks, finance
companies or Non-government Organizations (NGOs).

• Environment. It finances environmental projects, channelling resources from a special fund devoted to
that purpose. It promotes projects involving water shed management and protection, energy conservation
and development of energy sources, climate change and bio-diversity, environmental education and
legislation and others related to Sustainable Development.

• Social Development. It channels resources for programs targeted at poverty reduction, education, health
care, integral rural development and housing, as well as providing financing for Municipalities.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

4 Organisations Supported
Governments, Autonomous centralized and/or decentralized Institutions, Private
Investors, Private Banks, State Banks, Financial Institutions, Micro, small and mid-
size enterprises (through Financial Intermediaries), Municipalities or Town Councils
(through Financial Intermediaries), Service providing municipal enterprises, Community or development
associations, Regional or Central American organizations, and Non Government Organizations.




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5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
CABEI provides the following main types of loans.

6 Financial Intermediation through Commercial Banks and other Financial Intermediaries
Both public and private banks and other intermediary institutions approved by the Bank‘s Credit Division
can participate in this mechanism to intermediate its resources. Acting as a second floor bank, CABEI
provides resources to the participating financial intermediaries, and they, in turn, finance private sector
projects.

7 Co-financing
When a financial intermediary is unable to provide total financing due to the project‘s size, limited
borrowing capacity or legal constraints, CABEI can provide direct financing for private sector projects.

8 Public Sector Financing
Under this mechanism CABEI channels resources to projects carried out by the Central American
governments or autonomous institutions. The credit applications must be backed by a sovereign guarantee
or the generic guarantee of the autonomous institution.

9 Other Mechanisms
CABEI is presently exploring the use of innovative financial mechanisms, in order to provide financial
solutions adapted to the particular needs of each project.

According to the operative and financial structure of CABEI, the resources are channeled through different
financial funds, including the following:

• The Ordinary Fund, which is used to take care of pre-investment requirements or investment in
industrial, agricultural or service projects, among others, especially in the private productive sector.

• The Central American Fund for Economic Integration, by means of which financing is provided to
the governments, regional organizations, municipalities, autonomous institutions, and mixed economy
businesses, to enable them to carry out transportation, telecommunications, energy, technical education,
management of natural resources, storage, and basic, social, and tourism infrastructure projects.

• The Financial Fund for Housing, by means of which resources are channeled to financial institutions
for urban development and construction of housing projects.

• The Special Fund for the Promotion of Central American Exports (FEPEX) and the Special Fund
for the Strengthening of Central American Exports (FOEXCA), by means of which CABEI acts as a
fiduciary to channel the resources from the European Union to strengthen the export capacity of the region.

• The Fund for Technical Cooperation, by means of which resources are channeled for the development
of studies and projects of great regional significance to support the Bank's credit activity.

• The Regional Fund for the Conversion of External Debt, by means of which the exchange of debt for
projects in areas that are priorities for social development, such as education, is facilitated.

• The Central American Fund for the Environment, by means of which resources are captured and
channelled for the protection of the environment and the rational use of the natural resources.



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10 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
For private sector loans: Up to 50% of the amount of the project is financed. A minimum of 25% can be
financed by the financial intermediary‘s own resources or with CABEI resources, and the remaining 25%
must be provided by the investor.
For public sector projects up to 90% of the total amount of the investment can be financed. In special cases,
such as Social Development programs this percentage can be increased.

The percentage to be financed will be determined by CABEI, taking into account the debt capacity of the
financial intermediary and the project with regard to the amount to be financed. The amount of CABEI
participation must be sufficient to ensure proper project execution with its own resources or those provided
by CABEI. Said financing will not exceed 75% of the total investment required for the project.

The portion of the credit that CABEI provides must be guaranteed by the intermediary itself and not by the
user. However the direct portion that CABEI provides must be guaranteed by the entity in charge of the
project. CABEI can share guarantees with the participating Financial Institutions.

11 Access to Assistance
To obtain intermediated credit, a client can:

• Go to a CABEI approved commercial bank in his/her country to request information about how to apply
for credit with CABEI funds.

• Alternately, the client can go to the Bank‘s offices in the given country to obtain information about
available CABEI resources and be provided with the names of approved commercial banks.

To obtain direct/co-financed credit a client should go to the CABEI Office in his/her country of origin to
obtain the eligibility requirements and the appropriate procedures for obtaining a loan. For public sector
financing: The application must be supported by a feasibility study carried out according to the guidelines
established by CABEI, which can be obtained at the Regional Offices located in Guatemala, El Salvador,
Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

12 Other Information
None.

13 Contact Details
The Regional Offices represent the Central American Bank of Economic Integration in each of the five
funding countries of the bank. They are located in Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa
Rica. They maintain direct and permanent contact with clients, promoting and defining operational
strategies for each country. Additionally, they analyze credit for financial intermediaries and administer the
credits in coordination with the Credit Division.

The contact details of each regional office is available on the website.

14 Information Sources
Website: http://www.bcie.org/cabei/




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1.2.3 Council of Europe Development Bank (CEB)
1 Introduction
The Bank provides loans to European countries for the financing of social projects, responds to emergency
situations and aims to improve living conditions and social cohesion in the less advantaged regions of
Europe. In 2002, projects amounting to Euro 1.6 billion were approved.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
Protection of the environment is not a key priority, but is mentioned among other fields of action and
constituted 13% (or Euro 208.5 million) of projects approved in 2002. Social infrastructures related to
protection of the environment, including treatment of solid waste, reduction and recycling of waste is
specifically mentioned hereunder.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Council of Europe Member States: Albania, Holy See, Poland, Belgium, Hungary, Portugal, Bulgaria,
Iceland, Romania, Croatia, Italy, San-Marino, Cyprus, Latvia, , Czech Republic, Liechtenstein, Slovenia,
Denmark, Lithuania, Spain, Estonia, Luxembourg, Sweden, Finland, Malta, Switzerland, France, Moldova,
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Germany, Netherlands, Turkey, Greece, and Norway.

4 Organisations Supported
Council of Europe member state governments and local authorities as well as other financing institutions
are eligible. No private person or enterprise is entitled to obtain a loan from the Bank. Applications for
loans should be submitted and approved by the relevant member state government.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The Bank provides:

• loans, paid over either directly to the borrowers responsible for implementation of the projects (states,
  local authorities), or to financial institutions in the case of projects grouping together several
  beneficiaries (SMPs).
• guarantees, within the framework of loan operations carried out by other financing sources.

Loans are provided with a market-based interest rate with up to 15 (exceptionally 20) years repayment
period and up to five years grace period. Loans are provided for two types of projects:

• individual projects characterised by a single borrower and a single project manager,

• sector-based multi-project programmes (SMPs), grouping together more than one project for
  operations in one or more of the Bank's fields of action.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
Financing is provided for up to 50% of the total investment.

7 Access to Assistance
The loan applications are presented by the member states. Hence, borrowers first have to obtain approval of
the project from the government of the country concerned.

The project is based on a presentation file (or feasibility report): this describes the project's socio-economic
impact as well as its technical aspects and gives details of the cost of the projected investment, the


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financing plan, the share of financing requested of the Bank, the procedures envisaged for monitoring the
project and the guarantees provided. The CEB's various departments can assist the applicant body in
preparing the file, and in particular with:
• formulating the social needs and the purpose of the project;
• describing the elements to be included in the request for financing;
• formally drafting the file to be presented.

8 Other Information
Projects must be in accordance with council of Europe conventions.

9 Contact Details
The CEB has one central office and there are no offices in the member states.

55, Avenue Kleber
F-75784 Paris Cedex 16
France
Tel: +33 (0)1 47 55 55 92
Fax: +33 (0)1 47 55 37 68

10 Information Sources
Website: www.coebank.org




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1.2.4 European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)
1 Introduction
The EBRD was established in 1991 to support central and eastern Europe and ex-soviet countries in the
transition towards a market-based economy. The purpose of the EBRD is to foster transition towards open
market-oriented economies and to promote private and entrepreneurial initiatives in the central and eastern
European countries. EBRD provides loans, equities and guarantees for large projects in 27 countries from
central Europe to central Asia.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The Bank's environmental policy (second revision approved in April 2003) recognises that sustainable
development is among the highest priorities of the EBRD's activities. The policy also states that the EBRD
will attach particular importance to promoting energy and resource efficiency, waste reduction,
redevelopment of ―brownfield‖ sites, renewable resources and resource recovery, recycling, and the use of
cleaner production in the projects it finances. Municipal and environmental infrastructure is among the
sectors prioritised.

The EBRD has invested some EUR 1.5 billion in municipal and environmental infrastructure in 57 projects
(as of December 31 2002). In 2002, the EBRD provided financing of more than EUR 558 million in
support of 13 projects to improve municipal infrastructure and energy efficiency.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic,
Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, FYR Macedonia, Moldova,
Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Tajikistan, , Turkmenistan,
Ukraine and Uzbekistan.

4 Organisations Supported
The EBRD works primarily with the private sector. It also works with publicly owned companies, to
support privatisation, restructuring state-owned firms and improvement of municipal services.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The EBRD provides loans, equity investment, and guarantees directly for large projects. Lending for large
investment projects is provided with market-based interest rate, repayment period up to 15 years and grace
period up to 3 years.

The EBRD also operates credit lines with financial intermediaries for smaller loan operations. To give
entrepreneurs and small firms greater access to finance, the EBRD supports financial intermediaries, such
as local commercial banks, micro-business banks, equity funds and leasing facilities. Investment criteria
are consistent with EBRD policy, but financial intermediaries make independent decisions about which
small and medium enterprises (SMEs) they fund.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
For large investment projects, the minimum lending amount is EUR 5 million. The EBRD finances up to
35% of the total project cost and higher if there is a state guarantee. The borrower is required to provide a
minimum of 15% of the total investment.




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7 Access to Assistance
A loan application must be submitted by the borrower to the head office or local offices. The Bank prepares
country strategies, which set the framework for the operations in each country. The strategy defines the
main areas prioritised and should be consulted in the process of preparing an application. The application
must be based on a business plan.

The Bank has a financing form on the website, which may be filled in with information about a prospective
project and submitted for further consideration. The EBRD can provide limited guidance and assistance to
project preparation.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
EBRD
One Exchange Square
London EC2A 2JN
United Kingdom
Switchboard tel: +44 20 7338 6000
Central fax: +44 20 7338 6100

The EBRD has local offices in a number of countries. Contact details are available on the website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.ebrd.com




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1.2.5 European Investment Bank (EIB)
1 Introduction
The EIB is the European Union's financing institution, providing loans to EU countries towards financing
capital projects according with the objectives of the EU. Outside the EU the EIB implements the financial
components of agreements concluded under EU's development aid and cooperation policies.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
According to the Corporate Operational Plan for 2002-2004, lending activity is geared to five operational
priorities, of which environmental protection and improving the quality of life is one. The Bank has set the
target of providing between a quarter and one third of individual loans within the European Union for
projects safeguarding and improving the environment, with a similar percentage to be applied in the EU
Accession Countries.

Where the environment is concerned, the EIB‘s objectives are to:
• Preserve, protect and improve the quality of the environment;
• Protect human health;
• Ensure the prudent and rational utilisation of natural resources;
• Promote measures at an international level to deal with regional or worldwide environmental problems.

In financing any investment, the EIB applies the core environmental management principles of
―prevention‖, ―precaution‖ and ―the polluter pays‖, as called for in EU policy. The EIB targets
environmental projects in four main fields, of which one is natural environment and nature protection,
including municipal and hazardous waste management and ―eco-efficiency‖ in industrial processes and
products (to conserve resources and minimise the generation of waste). Lending for projects that contribute
towards safeguarding the environment and improving the quality of life, both within and outside the
European Union, totalled some EUR 9 billion in 2001. Finance worth EUR 561.7 million in all was
provided for projects for solid and hazardous waste, with most activities in EU countries and accession
countries.

In the Accession Countries, lending for projects to protect the environment and improve the quality of life
came to EUR 484 million, representing about 20% of aggregate individual loans. In the Euro-
Mediterranean Partnership Countries, EUR 580 million devoted to financing the environment. Following a
resolution of the Stockholm European Council, the Bank is to finance environmental projects with a
European dimension in the St Petersburg and Kaliningrad regions (Russia) under a new EUR 100 million
financing facility coming under the "Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership".

The EIB participates in the METAP programme (see Appendix 1).

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
The EIB directs the bulk of its activity (85%) towards promoting the European economy. In addition, in the
context of the EU‘s development aid and cooperation policies, it operates in over 150 countries outside the
Union: in the countries seeking EU membership, the Balkans, the Mediterranean Partnership countries,
Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific as well as Asia and Latin America.

4 Organisations Supported
The EIB lends to:
• private or public companies



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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       18



• public authorities
• commercial banks
• international or national development finance institutions

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The EIB provides long term loans (4 to 20 years) of two types: Individual loans for large capital investment
projects and global loans for small and medium-sized operations. Global loans are loans to other financial
institutions (regional/national), which can subsequently lend for smaller operations.

The loans are provided with interest rates on market terms. The repayment period may be up to 12 years for
industrial projects, and 20 years for infrastructure projects, or more in exceptional cases. Grace periods for
capital repayment may be obtained for the construction phase of the project. Generally, neither processing,
commitment nor any other fees are charged.

For projects aiming to rectify environmental degradation in the Mediterranean Partner Countries, EIB's
loans can receive a 3% interest subsidy financed from the EU budget.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
The EIB acts as a complementary source of finance. Individual loans are provided for amounts over EUR
25 million and covering up to 50% of the investment costs. Global loans are provided for amounts above
20,000 EUR and below 25 million.

There is an active liaison between the Bank and DG Environment of the European Commission and the
EIB provides co-financing of environmental projects through various EU programmes, such as ISPA, the
European Regional Development Fund and the Cohesion Fund.

7 Access to Assistance
There is no standard procedure, official application form, questionnaire or required documentation for a
first presentation of a project to the Bank. Initial contacts to discuss a proposed project can be in any form,
by telephone, fax, e-mail or letter. For such first contacts, the project promoter should provide sufficient
information to allow verification of compliance of the investment with EIB‘s objectives and have a well-
developed business plan.

It is desirable for projects to be presented to the Bank at the earliest possible stage, especially in the case of
infrastructure schemes and projects mounted under public-private partnerships. In all cases, the EIB gives
promoters a rapid response based on its knowledge of each country‘s economic and financial context. At
this stage the Bank checks whether the project envisaged meets its fundamental criteria, notably regarding
eligibility, scale, sources of additional finance and economic sector.

8 Other Information
None.




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       19



9 Contact Details
Information and Communications Department
Secretariat General
100 boulevard Konrad Adenauer
L-2950 Luxembourg
Tel.: +352 43 79 31 22
Fax: +352 43 79 31 89

Specific contact information for country or region-specific desk managers is provided on the website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.eib.org




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       20




1.2.6 Inter-American Development Bank
1 Introduction
The Inter-American Development Bank provides financial assistance to help accelerate economic and
social development in Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition to the Bank, the IDB Group consists of
the Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) and the Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF). The IIC, an
autonomous affiliate of the Bank, was established to promote the economic development of the region by
financing small and medium-scale private enterprises. The MIF was created in 1992 to promote investment
reforms and to stimulate private-sector development. The Bank also has a Fund for Special Operations for
lending on concessional terms for projects in countries classified as economically less developed.

Over the course of 2002, the IADB committed USD 4.55 billion in 86 loan operations. Out of this, 24 loans
totalling USD 406 million was from the Fund for Special Operations. The Bank also financed 336 technical
cooperation projects totalling USD 65.4 million.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The IADB has committed to the Millennium Development Goals, agreed to by 189 nations in 2002 at the
United Nations Millennium Summit. The goals include ensuring environmental sustainability as one out of
7 main goals. The Bank approved an environmental strategy in July 2003. The strategy emphasises three
areas for Bank action, one of which is environment and social development. In this area, health and
environment, and, in particular, urban environment is highlighted. The Bank has a Sustainable
Development Department and a special section for urban environment and pollution control.

Environmental projects have accounted for 10 percent of total Bank lending in recent years, including
financings for environmental health, control of industrial pollution, protection of natural resources,
sustainable development, renewable energy, and institutional strengthening.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
All developing member countries in South America (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador,
Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela), Central America (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala,
Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama) and Latin America (Bahamas, Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guyana,
Haiti, Jamaica, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago) as well as Mexico.

4 Organisations Supported
The Bank may make loans or provide loan guarantees to any member country, any political subdivision
or government organisation unit thereof, any independent agency, semi-public enterprise, or private
enterprise in the territory of a member country, regional organisations composed of member countries, and
to the Caribbean Development Bank.

The political subdivisions of a country include states, provinces, and municipalities, and decentralised
government organisations such as State banks, development corporations, public utility companies,
universities, and the like, that are legally empowered to enter into loan contracts with the Bank. Any
company in which the government has a proprietary interest of more than 50% is considered to be a public
sector company. Private enterprises, in whatever their form of organisation, must have the legal capacity to
enter into loan contracts with the Bank. Among the private undertakings that may be eligible to become
borrowers from the Bank are corporations, other commercial companies, cooperatives, foundations, and the
like.




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The Bank provides technical assistance to its developing member countries, and sub-regional or regional
technical cooperation. The following institutions of the borrowing member countries of the Bank are
eligible to receive technical assistance:
• National governments and their political subdivisions.
• The rest of the public sector, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), and private entities with the legal
   authority to borrow funds and receive technical assistance.
• Regional and sub-regional organisations composed of member countries that are beneficiaries of Bank
   operations.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The Bank is authorised to assist in the financing of development projects in its regional developing
member countries by means of the following types of operations:
• Loans;
• Technical cooperation;
• Assistance in obtaining additional external financing to meet project needs;
• Guarantees extended by the IDB for loans from other sources.

Loans are provided with interest rates on market terms for the following types of operations:
• Loans for Specific Projects are designed to finance one or more specific projects or subprojects.
• Loans for Multiple Works Programs are designed to finance groups of similar works which are
  physically independent of each other.
• Global Credit Loans are granted to intermediary financial institutions (IFIs) or similar agencies in the
  borrowing countries to enable them to on-lend to end-borrowers.
• Sector Adjustment Loans provide flexible support for institutional and policy changes on the sector or
  sub-sector level.
• The Project Preparation Facility provides funding for supplementary activities necessary to prepare a
  project.
• Direct Lending to the Private Sector, without sovereign guarantees, in each instance with the
  concurrence of the government of the member country. At the outset, this financing would be targeted
  exclusively towards infrastructure and public utility projects providing services usually performed by
  the public sector.

The Bank finances technical cooperation activities to transfer technical know-how and expertise for the
purpose of supplementing and strengthening the technical capacity of entities in the developing member
countries. It may take one of the following forms:
• Technical cooperation with Non-Reimbursable Funding, which is a subsidy granted by the Bank to a
   developing member country to finance technical cooperation activities.
• Technical cooperation with Contingent-Recovery Resources, whereby the Bank finances technical
   cooperation activities where there exists a reasonable possibility of a loan, in which case, the borrower
   is obligated to reimburse the funding received from the Bank.
• Technical cooperation with Reimbursable Resources, which is a loan financed by the Bank to carry
   out technical cooperation activities.

The Bank can guarantee loans made by private financial sources to public and private sectors. The Bank
can provide guarantees with or without counter-guarantees of the borrowing country's government.
Guarantees to private sector lenders without government counter-guarantee of the borrowing country, in
whose territory the project is to be carried out, will not exceed 25% of the total cost of the project or $75
million, whichever is less. The guarantees could be used for any kind of investment project, although
the initial emphasis in guarantee operations will be on infrastructure projects.



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6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
The framework for the Bank's operations in each country is established in country papers (CP) whose
objectives are to establish the Bank's operational strategy for the country and define the programming
guidelines for the dialogue with the local authorities. The CP analyses the strategy and the development
and investment policies of each borrowing country; assesses its development needs and constraints and
defines the Bank's objectives, including its general and sectoral strategy for the country. The CP is the main
instrument used by the Bank to define the financial assistance and technical cooperation it will be
providing to its borrowing member countries. The document includes the Operations Annex which
identifies the projects to be considered by the Bank in the country during the following twelve months.

Project ideas should be referred to the relevant country office.

8 Other Information
None

9 Contact Details
1300 New York Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20577
United States of America
Tel: (1) 202-623-1000

The Bank has a number of country offices (contact details available at website).

10 Information Sources
Website: www.iadb.org




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets            23




1.2.7 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)
1 Introduction
The IBRD is one among several World Bank organisations. It is a lending institution providing low-interest
loans to higher-income developing countries - some of which can borrow from commercial sources, but
generally only at very high interest rates. In fiscal 2002 IBRD provided loans totalling USD 11.5 billion in
support of 96 projects in 40 countries.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The World Bank has committed to the Millennium Development Goals, agreed to by 189 nations in 2002 at
the United Nations Millennium Summit. The goals include ensuring environmental sustainability as one
out of 7 main goals.

In 2001, the World Bank endorsed an Environment Strategy to guide the Bank's actions in the environment
area, particularly over the next five years. The strategy sets out three overall objectives: 1) improving the
quality of life, 2) improving the quality of growth, and 3) protecting the quality of the regional and global
commons. Some overall sectoral priorities are also emphasised. These include, among others,
environmental health and urban environment. Under the latter, waste management, particularly industrial
and hospital waste, is mentioned.

The environment strategy includes regional strategies, where the priorities under each of the overall
objectives are indicated. The table below highlights the waste related priorities mentioned for each region.

 Region                                         Waste related priorities mentioned in the strategy
 East Asia and Pacific                          Pollution management (water/air), ODS and POPs
 Europe and Central Asia                        Health threats from toxic substances, ODS
 Latin America and the Caribbean                Health (solid and hazardous waste, toxic substances), clean production, ODS
 Middle East and North Africa                   Agricultural pollution/soil contamination. Urban pollution (waste management).
 South Asia                                     Health (solid waste), ODS
 Sub-Saharan Africa                             Health (disposal and management of hazardous waste), urban development.



There is no indicative budget for future activities within the environmental sector. However, since 1990,
WB lending to environmental projects has increased substantially (from almost zero to about USD 7 billion
in 2000). In 2002, projects approved by IBRD for urban development and natural resource management
constituted 12% of the total and a total lending amount of USD 1.4 billion.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Eligibility for IBRD loans is determined on the basis of the creditworthiness of the country and a maximum
per capita income. Exceptionally, other factors (such as size) may determine access to IBRD loans. As of
mid 2003, the countries eligible for IBRD loans are those with a per capita income of less than USD 5,185.
Information on countries eligible can be found on the website.




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       24



4 Organisations Supported
The IBRD may lend to (a) a member country; (b) a political subdivision of a member; and (c) any business,
industrial, and agricultural enterprise in the territories of a member. The IBRD generally prefers to lend
directly to the entity responsible for the implementation and operation of the project for which the loan is
made. In this way, the Bank is better able to monitor the project's implementation efficiently and suggest
corrective steps when there are shortcomings in project implementation. If the member in whose territories
the project is located is not itself the borrower, the member must guarantee the payment of the principal
and interest and other charges on the loan.

Regional Organisations as Borrowers. IBRD may finance a project to be carried out by an enterprise
owned jointly by two or more member countries or by public or private entities of such members. In this
type of lending, IBRD requires either joint and several guarantees or several guarantees from the members
in whose territories the project is located, as long as these guarantees together cover the total amount of the
principal and interest and other charges on the loan.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The IBRD offers two basic types of loans: investment loans for goods, works, and services, and adjustment
loans, which provide quick-disbursing financing to support policy and institutional reforms. Regarding
investment loans, the following types of loans are available:

• Adaptable Program Loans (APLs) are designed to provide funding for a long-term development
  program through a series of operations. Authority for approval is with the Executive Directors for the
  first loan of each program and the long-term program agreement.
• Emergency Recovery Loans are made to restore assets and productivity immediately after a major
  emergency (such as war, civil disturbance, or natural disaster) that seriously disrupts a member country's
  economy.
• Financial Intermediary Loans support the development of financial institutions and provide funds to be
  channelled through intermediaries for general credit or for the development of specific sectors or
  subsectors.
• Learning and Innovation Loans (LILs) are designed to support small, time-sensitive programs to build
  capacity, pilot promising initiatives, or to experiment with and develop locally-based models prior to
  large scale interventions. LILs are modest in size with each loan not exceeding $5 million. Approvals of
  LILs are at the management level rather than at the Executive Director level.
• Sector Investment and Maintenance Loans are designed to bring investments, policies and performance
  in specific sectors or subsectors in line with agreed economic priorities.
• Specific Investment Loans fund the creation of new productive assets or economic, social and
  institutional infrastructure or their rehabilitation to full capacity.
• Technical Assistance Loans are designed to strengthen capacity in entities concerned with policies,
  strategies, and institutional reforms in such areas as public enterprise reform and divestiture, civil
  service and judicial reform, government budgetary management and the formulation of economic
  policy.

The Bank essentially facilitates access to capital in larger volumes, on better terms, with longer maturities,
and in a more sustainable manner than the market provides. Countries that borrow from IBRD have more
time to repay than if they borrowed from a commercial bank—15 to 20 years with a three-to-five-year
grace period before repayment of principal begins.

A limited number of grants are available through the Bank, either funded directly or managed through
partnerships. The 2003 budget is USD 157 million, covering 48 grant programs. The World Bank also



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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       25



administers some 850 donor trust funds disbursing more than USD 1 billion a year. In the environmental
sector, the most important programme is the Global Environment Facility, which is described in a separate
fact sheet.

6 Project size and Co-financing Requirements
The IBRD does not operate with specific minimum or maximum requirements for project size or co-
financing.

7 Access to Assistance
IBRD assistance to countries takes place within the framework of the World Bank country assistance
strategy for the given country, which defines the level and composition of assistance to be provided.
Country assistance strategies usually cover a three-year period and are publicly available on the website,
pending the borrowing government‘s consent. Project ideas should be discussed with the local World Bank
representation for the given country for possible inclusion in the portfolio.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
The World Bank
1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433 U.S.A.
tel: (202) 473-1000
fax: (202) 477-6391

For contacting more than 100 local representations in member countries refer to website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.worldbank.org




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       26




1.2.8 Nordic Investment Bank
1 Introduction
The NIB is a multilateral financing institution owned by the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland,
Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). The NIB offers its clients loans and guarantees on market terms. The NIB
finances projects which are of mutual interest for the Nordic countries and for the borrower.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The environment, including waste management, is a priority sector. Specifically, it is part of the strategy of
the NIB to play an important role in the financing of environmental improvement investments in the Nordic
countries and in the Baltic Sea and Barents Sea regions. The environmental policy of the NIB may be
down-loaded from the website.

During the period 1998-2002, the Bank has granted environmental loans totalling EUR 3.6 billion. In 2002,
infrastructure for environmental protection, which includes waste management among other areas,
accounted for 12% of loans outstanding.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
NIB operates within the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) in all
emerging market countries, but priority is given to investments in the neighbouring areas to the Nordic
region. The NIB is authorised to provide special environmental investment loans to environmental projects
in these areas, i.e. Poland, the Kaliningrad area, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and North West Russia (St.
Petersburg, the Leningrad area, the Karelian Republic and the Barents region).

4 Organisations Supported
Public and private organisations.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The NIB provides medium to long term investment loans and guarantees. Loans are provided with market-
based interest rates, a repayment period up to 20 years. Environmental loans are generally given special
treatment, for example longer repayment periods, than other loans.

In the neighbouring regions to the Nordic countries, the NIB has actively supported the development of
national institutions to act as intermediaries for projects concerning the environment. This means that part
of the lending for environmental purposes, including waste management, is channelled through these local
institutions - often as smaller loans.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
Loans are provided for up to 50% of the total project cost.

7 Access to Assistance
The applicant should submit a loan application including project business plan and feasibility study. NIB
provides guidance and, in some cases, assistance to borrowers in project preparation. The application can
be submitted to the head office or the local offices (see below).

8 Other Information
None.



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9 Contact Details
Fabianinkatu 34
P.O. Box 249
FIN-00171 Helsinki
Finland
Tel: +358 9 18 001
Fax: +358 9 18 002 10

NIB has local offices in some countries. Details are available on the website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.nibank.org




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets         28




                                  1.3         International Development Funds

1.3.1 International Development Association
1 Introduction
The International Development Association, IDA, is the World Bank‘s concessional lending window. It
provides long-term loans at zero interest to the poorest of the developing countries. IDA credits and grants
make up about one-quarter of the World Bank‘s financial assistance. In fiscal 2002 IDA provided $8.1
billion in financing for 133 projects in 62 low-income countries.

IDA is financed by a partnership of donors, who come together every three years to decide on the amount
of new resources required to fund IDA‘s future lending program and to discuss lending policies and
priorities. The most recent replenishment of the IDA trust fund meant $23 billion to poor countries over the
three-year period which began on July 1, 2002.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The IDA lends, on average, about $6-7 billion a year for different types of development projects, especially
those that address peoples' basic needs, such as primary education, basic health services, and clean water
and sanitation. In 2002, projects approved by IDA for urban development and environmental & natural
resource management constituted a total lending amount of USD 0.83 billion, which was equal to 10% of
the total lending amount.

The World Bank, including the IDA, has committed to the Millennium Development Goals, agreed to by
189 nations in 2002 at the United Nations Millennium Summit. The goals include ensuring environmental
sustainability as one out of 7 main goals.

In 2001, the World Bank endorsed an Environment Strategy to guide the Bank's actions in the environment
area, particularly over the next five years. The strategy sets out three overall objectives: 1) improving the
quality of life, 2) improving the quality of growth, and 3) protecting the quality of the regional and global
commons. Some overall sectoral priorities are also emphasised. These include, among others,
environmental health and urban environment. Under the latter, waste management, particularly industrial
and hospital waste, is mentioned.

The environment strategy includes regional strategies, where the priorities under each of the overall
objectives are indicated. The table below highlights the waste related priorities mentioned for each region.

 Region                                   Waste related priorities mentioned in the strategy
 East Asia and Pacific                    Pollution management (water/air), ODS and POPs
 Europe and Central Asia                  Health threats from toxic substances, ODS
 Latin America and the Caribbean          Health (solid and hazardous waste, toxic substances), clean production, ODS
 Middle East and North Africa             Agricultural pollution/soil contamination. Urban pollution (waste management).
 South Asia                               Health (solid waste), ODS
 Sub-Saharan Africa                       Health (disposal and management of hazardous waste), urban development.




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       29



3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Three criteria are used to determine which countries are eligible to borrow IDA resources:
• Relative poverty, defined as per capita gross national income below an established threshold, currently
  USD 875.
• Lack of creditworthiness to borrow on market terms and therefore a need for concessional resources to
  finance the country's development program.
• Good policy performance, defined as the implementation of economic and social policies that promote
  growth and poverty reduction.

As per 2003, 81 countries are eligible to borrow from IDA. Some countries, such as India and Indonesia,
are eligible for IDA due to their low per capita incomes, but are also creditworthy for some IBRD
borrowing. These countries are known as "Blend" borrowers. Information on current eligible countries can
be found on the website.

Since most of IDA's resources are donated by member governments, the amount of funds available for
lending is virtually fixed once donations are pledged. IDA therefore must allocate resources among eligible
borrowing countries. Lending allocations are determined on a three-year rolling basis and are revised every
year when the World Bank assesses the quality of each borrower's policy performance resulting in a
performance rating of each borrower. The allocation of IDA's resources is determined primarily by each
borrower's rating, but per capita income is also a determinant, with the poorest of the eligible countries
receiving higher allocations for a given performance level. Finally, for borrowers that are eligible for both
IDA and IBRD funds ("Blend countries"), allocations must take into account those countries'
creditworthiness for and access to other sources of funds as well as their ability to use IDA resources
effectively to tackle poverty.

4 Organisations Supported
The IDA may lend to (a) member country; (b) the government of a territory included within IDA's
membership; (c) a political subdivision of any of the foregoing; (d) a public or private entity in the
territories of a member or members; or (e) a public international or regional organisation.

IDA normally makes credits to member countries only, whether the member itself or another entity is
responsible for project implementation.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The IDA provides interest-free loans (credits) typically with 20, 35 or 40 years to repay and a 10-year grace
period. There is no interest charge, but credits do carry a small service charge of 0.75 percent on disbursed
balances. While the bulk of IDA financing - over 70 percent in the financial year 2002 - is for investment
projects, IDA also provides adjustment credits (non-project).

The IDA also provides grants. In 2002, the donor countries decided that more of the money should be
provided as grants. Going forward, 18 to 21 percent of IDA resources will be used for grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
The IDA does not operate with specific minimum or maximum requirements for project size or co-
financing.




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7 Access to Assistance
Reference should be made to the World Bank country assistance strategy, which defines the level and
composition of assistance to be provided to the country in question based on needs and on portfolio
performance. Country assistance strategies usually cover a three-year period and are publicly available on
the website, pending the borrowing government‘s consent. Project proposals should be referred to the
relevant local World Bank representation.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
The World Bank
1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433 U.S.A.
tel: (202) 473-1000
fax: (202) 477-6391

For contacting more than 100 offices in member countries refer to website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.worldbank.org




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       31




                                  1.4         Multilateral Grant Donors (EU)

1.4.1 CARDS Programme
1 Introduction
The CARDS programme (Community Assistance for Reconstruction, development and Stabilisation) is an
EU programme to promote stability and peace in the Western Balkans through grant support to investment
and institution building. The programme underpins the Stabilisation and Association Process which is
intended to help the region to secure political and economic stabilisation while also developing closer
associations between the Western Balkans and the EU, opening a road towards eventual EU membership
once the conditions have been met. The budget allocation for the programme in 2000-2006 is EUR 4.65
billion.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The environment is listed among sectors supported. Within this sector, the focus is on harmonisation to EU
law, institution building and reduction of environmental health risks. In 2003, about 7% of assistance
focused on the environment sector.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro and the former Yugoslav Republic of
Macedonia.

4 Organisations Supported
Assistance can be provided to the State, entities under United Nations jurisdiction and administration,
federal, regional and local bodies, public and semi-public bodies, the social partners, organisations
providing support to businesses, cooperatives, mutual societies, associations, foundations and non-
governmental organisations.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is given in the form of grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
There is no specific requirement specified, but it is emphasised that co-financing should be sought
whenever possible.

7 Access to Assistance
The framework for CARDS assistance is provided in country strategic papers, indicative programmes and
annual action programmes.

The Country Strategy Paper provides the strategic framework in which EC assistance will be provided in
the period 2000-2006. It sets out EU co-operation objectives, policy response, and priority fields of co-
operation based on an assessment of the partner country‘s policy agenda and political and socio-economic
situation. The multi-annual indicative programme highlights programme objectives, expected results and
conditionality in the priority fields of co-operation for period 2002-2004. Annual action programmes sets
out the projects to be supported and the funding available, within the guidelines defined by the indicative
programme.




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Project ideas should be presented to the relevant EU delegation or to the agency in charge of programme
management (see below) for possible inclusion in the programme.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
DG External Relations is responsible for political direction and for multi-annual programming (Indicative
Programmes). European Union assistance in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia managed by the
European Union's Delegations in those countries. The European Agency for Reconstruction is responsible
for assistance in Serbia and Montenegro, and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The EuropeAid
Co-operation Office manages all regional programmes.

  EuropeAid Co-operation Office             Directorate General for External                European Agency for Reconstruction
  Rue de la Loi 41, Office 4/150            Relations                                       Egnatia 4, Thessaloniki 54626,
  1040 Brussels, Belgium                    Rue de la Loi, 200                              Greece
                                            1049 Brussels, Belgium                          Tel. +30 2310 505 100
                                                                                            Fax +30 2310 505 172



The contact details for the EU delegations can be found on the website of the Directorate General for
External Relations.

10 Information Sources
Websites:

EuropeAid Co-operation Office: http://europa.eu.int/comm/europeaid/projects/tacis

Directorate General for External Relations: http://europa.eu.int/comm/external_relations/ceeca/tacis/

European Agency for Reconstruction: http://www.ear.eu.int/




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1.4.2 European Development Fund (EDF)
1 Introduction
The European Development Fund is the principal financial instrument of the EU policy of development aid
to African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) States. The EDF is funded by the Member States, covered by its
own financial rules and managed by a specific committee. The Member States decide the EDF budget via
agreements that are subsequently ratified by the national parliament of each Member State. Each EDF is
concluded for a period of around five years. The ninth EDF (2000-2005), based on the Cotonou
Agreement, has been allocated EUR 13.5 billion over a period of five years. In addition, the unexpended
balances transferred from previous EDFs total EUR 9.9 billion.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The central objectives for EU-ACP cooperation are poverty reduction, sustainable development and
progressive integration of ACP countries into the world economy. The strategic framework for country
cooperation strategies sets out five objectives, of which the promotion of environmental sustainability is
one.

Under the EU's policy for integration of the environmental dimension in developing countries, a number of
issues eligible for aid and assistance are mentioned, including the following waste-related concerns:
• Global environmental issues (climate change, desertification, biological diversity, etc.);
• Transboundary issues (air, water and soil pollution);
• Urban environment problems (waste, noise and air pollution, water quality, etc.);
• Sustainable production and use of chemical products;
• Environmental problems related to industrial activities;
• Sustainable patterns of production and consumption.

The following types of project activities are supported:
• pilot projects in the field;
• schemes to build up the institutional and operational capacities of actors in the development process
  (governments, civil society, NGOs, etc.);
• drawing up of policies, plans, strategies and programmes for sustainable development;
• formulation of guidelines, operating manuals and instruments aimed at promoting sustainable
  development (databases on the Internet);
• support for the development and application of environment assessment tools;
• inventory, accounting and statistical work to improve the quality of environmental data;
• making local populations and key actors in the development process aware of sustainable development
  issues;
• promotion of trade in environment-friendly products;
• support for multilateral processes.

In 1999, only a small proportion of aid to ACP States was allocated to environmental projects -
approximately 2.5% or EUR 83 million. Out of the EUR 13.5 billion under the 9th EDF, EUR 10 billion in
the form of grants are allocated to support in accordance with national indicative programmes, EUR 1.3
billion to regional cooperation, and EUR 2.2 billion to private sector investment financing schemes.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
The 77 ACP States which participate in the Cotonou agreement as per August 2003 are as follows: South
Africa (not fully), Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Botswana, Cameroon, Congo
(Brazzaville), the Cook Islands, the Ivory Coast, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Fiji, Gabon, Ghana,


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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       34



Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Kenya, the Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Micronesia (Federated States of),
Namibia, Nauru, Nigeria, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, Senegal, the Seychelles, Surinam, Swaziland, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Zimbabwe.

The least-developed ACP states which, in certain cases, benefit from special treatment: Angola, Benin,
Burkina Faso, Burundi, Republic of Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, the Comoros,
Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, the Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau,
Equatorial Guinea, Haiti, Kiribati, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Madagascar, Mozambique,
Niger, Rwanda, Samoa, São Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, the Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sudan,
Tanzania, Tuvalu, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Zambia.

4 Organisations Supported
The following entities are eligible for support:
• ACP states
• regional or inter-State bodies to which one or more ACP states belong and which are authorised by
  those states
• joint bodies set up by the ACP states and the EU to pursue certain specific objectives

Subject to agreement from the ACP State/States, the following bodies are also eligible:
• national or regional public or semi-public agencies, departments or local authorities of the ACP states
  and, in particular, their financial institutions and development banks
• companies, firms and other private organisations and private operators of ACP states
• enterprises of a EU Member State

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
The EDF consists of several instruments:
• Budgetary support
• Projects and programme grants
• Credit lines, guarantee schemes and equity participation for the private sector

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
At the request of the ACP States, EDF resources may be applied to co-financing. It is emphasised that
special consideration shall be given to the possibility of co-financing in cases where Community
participation will encourage the participation of other sources of finance and where such financing may
lead to an advantageous financial package for the ACP State concerned. Co-financing may be in the form
of joint or parallel financing.

7 Access to Assistance
The programming for grant assistance to individual countries (EUR 10 billion in the 9th EDF) consists of
the preparation of a national indicative programme for each country describing the focal sector(s) on which
support should be concentrated; the most appropriate measures and operations for attaining the objectives
and targets in the focal sector(s); and the resources reserved for projects and programmes outside the focal
sector(s). The programme is founded on a Country Support Strategy (CSS) based on the country‘s own
medium-term development objectives and strategies and an indication from the Community of the
indicative programmable financial allocation from which the country may benefit. The latter is based on a
combined assessment of needs and performance of the country in question. The programming for regional
assistance (EUR 1.3 billion in the 9th EDF) follows a similar procedure.




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Three EU entities of the EU Commission are involved: The Directorate General for External Relations and
the Directorate General for Development are responsible for the programming of external assistance. The
EuropeAid Co-operation Office, a department of the Commission, is responsible for project cycle
management of the individual activities to be undertaken under the programmes - from identification to
evaluation.

Both national and regional strategy papers and indicative programmes can be downloaded from the
websites of DG External Relations and DG Development. Project ideas should be discussed with the EC
delegation in the relevant country for inclusion in indicative programmes.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
    EuropeAid Co-operation Office           Directorate General for External            Directorate General for Development
    Directorate Africa, Caribbean           Relations                                   E-mail: development@cec.eu.int
    and Pacific                             Rue de la Loi, 200
    Rue de la Loi 41, Office 4/150          1049 Brussels                               Mailing address not available on web-
    1040 Brussels, Belgium                                                              site


The EC has delegations in a number of EC countries. The contact details can be found on the website of the
Directorate General for External Relations.

10 Information Sources
Websites:

EuropeAid Co-operation Office: http://europa.eu.int/comm/europeaid/index_en.htm

Directorate General for External Relations: http://europa.eu.int/comm/external_relations/

Directorate General for Development: http://europa.eu.int/comm/development/index_en.cfm




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       36




1.4.3 Instrument for Structural Policies for Pre-accession (ISPA)
1 Introduction
ISPA is one of the three EU financial instruments (with Phare and Sapard) to assist the candidate countries
(except Malta, Cyprus and Turkey) in the preparation for accession to the EU. Over the period from 2000
to 2006, a total of EUR 1.04 billion a year (at 1999 prices) will be made available for infrastructure projects
in the field of environment and transport.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
ISPA concentrates on assisting the candidate countries in the implementation of the ‗investment heavy‘ EU
directives, i.e. directives that are costly to implement. Within waste management, the following Directives
are mentioned in various ISPA documents:
• The Waste Framework Directive
• The Landfill Directive
• The Municipal Waste Incineration Directives
• The Hazardous Waste Incineration Directive
• The Packaging Waste Directive

Priority would be given to projects which:
• Comply with an investment-heavy directive: such as the draft landfill Directive, hazardous waste
   management Directives, incineration Directives;
• Have an important effect on human health: e.g. uncontrolled landfills leaching into water supplies or
   polluting emissions to air or uncontrolled hazardous waste disposals;
• elp prevent damage in environmental sensitive zones.

The following pre-requisites for ISPA eligibility are mentioned:
• Will operate in an adequate administrative and institutional framework;
• Fit into a waste management plan in the terms of the waste framework Directive;
• The polluter pays principle should be fully observed.

In 2000-02, approved environmental projects constituted 43.14% of all approved projects and represented a
total ISPA contribution of EUR 2.44 billion. Out of this group, 15.88% of the contributions were dedicated
to the waste sector amounting to a total of EUR 387 million.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia.

4 Organisations Supported
Assistance is provided to the national authorities in the accession countries. In each country, a central entity
is designated as the authority through which funds are channelled and has the overall responsibility for the
management of the funds. The implementing agencies supported are restricted to those operating within an
administrative legal framework. This means that they can be public bodies (national authorities, local
authorities) or public-private partnerships. There are special principles and requirements which must be
followed in case of support to public-private partnerships.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Financial assistance is provided in the form of grants for large investment projects.




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A small part of ISPA's budget may also be used to fund preparatory studies and technical assistance. A
clear link has to be shown between measures of these kinds and the projects funded by ISPA.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
For investment projects, a co-financing of minimum 25% is required and only projects with a cost above
EUR 5 million can be supported. The requirement to co-financing can be reduced to 15% in special cases.
The combined assistance from ISPA and other EU assistance must not exceed 90% of the total cost.

7 Access to Assistance
For each country a national ISPA strategy for each sector is prepared. The strategy provides the framework
for project identification and set out the criteria to be used to select and appraise proposed projects. The
strategies are based on the overall accession documents: Accession Partnerships and the national
programmes for the adoption of the aquis.

Each country has appointed a national ISPA co-ordinator. Via the co-ordinator, the countries can propose
projects, which are part of the sector strategy. Applications must be sent to the ISPA Directorate of DG
Regional Policy (see below). The application then needs approval from EU Commission and the ISPA
Management Committee. There is an ISPA Manual providing detailed information on policies and
procedures. It can be downloaded from the website of DG Regional Policy.

8 Other Information
ISPA represents an intermediate stage between EU's aid to third countries and the Cohesion Fund
providing financial support to EU member states and is due to change over time, resembling more closely
the Cohesion Fund as actual accession comes nearer. This move will entail an increasing decentralisation in
procedures for implementation.

9 Contact Details
The DG Enlargement is responsible for co-ordinating the accession negotiations between the EU and the
candidate countries. The DG Regional Policy is responsible for EU management of ISPA.

Directorate General for Regional Policy
Directorate F: ISPA and pre-accession measures
Rue de la Loi 200
B-1049 Brussels
Tel.: (+32)2-296 5068
Fax: (+32)2-296 1096

Contact information for EU delegations in candidate countries and the national ISPA co-ordinators can be
found on the DG Regional Policy website.

10 Information Sources
Website of DG Regional Policy: http://europa.eu.int/comm/regional_policy/




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       38




1.4.4 MEDA Programme
1 Introduction
The Euro-Mediterranean Partnership was launched at the 1995 Barcelona Conference between the
European Union and it‘s 12 Mediterranean Partners (called the Barcelona Process). The MEDA
programme is the principal financial instrument of the European Union for the implementation of the Euro-
Mediterranean Partnership. The Programme offers technical and financial support measures to accompany
the reform of economic and social structures in the Mediterranean partner countries.

The first phase of the MEDA programme was the period of 1995-1999 where the programme accounted for
EUR 3.4 billion. On November 2000 a new regulation establishing MEDA II for the period of 2000-2006
was adopted. The funding of the second phase amounts to EUR 5.35 billion.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
Sustainable rural development and environment is one among five sectors of co-operation. Within this area,
specific objectives for natural resource management are to support the governments of the MEDA
countries in managing their environmental and coastal resources, and to help them integrate current
resource management practices into their development policies.

At the level of regional cooperation, the Short and Medium-Term Priority Environmental Action
Programme (SMAP) is a framework programme of action for the protection of the Mediterranean
environment under the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership. The SMAP Partners have agreed on five priority
fields of action, including integrated waste management and hot spots (polluted areas and threatened
components of biodiversity). Within these two areas, priorities are:

• Preparation and implementation of national plans, data bases and pilot projects for the integrated
  management of (a) municipal waste, (b) industrial waste, and (c) hazardous waste
• Preparation of guidelines for more effective waste management
• Establishment of comparable statistical methodologies and national waste inventories
• Identification of waste disposal methods and sites presenting a risk for the environment and setting up
  infrastructures and taking measures to tackle these problems.
• Launching of initiatives to promote waste reduction, re-use and recycling
• Reinforcement of local management capacity and promotion of pilot initiatives to tackle systematically
  waste from tourism-related activities
• Preparation of national guidelines for the disposal of dredging spoils and used oils
• Establishment of emergency environmental plans for the integrated management of highly polluted
  Mediterranean urban areas
• Development and implementation of specific emergency programmes to reduce highly polluting
  emissions in industrial areas
• Setting up and implementation of management plans, pilot projects and demonstration actions to secure
  the future of the most valuable and threatened natural resources

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
The EU's 12 partners are: Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia (Maghreb); Egypt, Israel, Jordan, the Palestinian
Authority, Lebanon, Syria (Mashrek); Turkey, Cyprus and Malta; Libya currently has observer status at
certain meetings.




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4 Organisations Supported
The programme may apply to States, their local and regional authorities as well as actors of their civil
society.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants.

The MEDA programme includes a special instrument whereby EIB loans to the partner countries within the
environment can be given an interest rate subsidy (see also fact sheet on EIB).

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
There are no specific requirements, however, co-financing is encouraged.

7 Access to Assistance
The co-operation framework is described in indicative programmes and financing plans. The national
and regional indicative programmes define the main goals, guidelines and priority sectors of
Community support in the fields concerned based on the priorities determined with the Mediterranean
partners. The financing plans are drawn up at national and regional level and are based on the
indicative programmes. These plans contain a list of the projects for financing and are generally
adopted annually.
Project ideas should be discussed with the EC delegation in the relevant country for inclusion in the
relevant programmes.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
DG External Relations is responsible for political direction and for multi-annual programming (Indicative
Programmes), while EuropeAid Co-operation Office is responsible for managing the project cycle and
annual financing plans.

 EuropeAid Co-operation Office                                Directorate General for External Relations
 Directorate "Europe, Caucasus, Central Asia"                 Directorate "Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asian
 Rue de la Loi 41, Office 4/150                               Republics"
 1040 Brussels, Belgium                                       Rue de la Loi, 200
                                                              1049 Brussels



The EC has delegations in most partner countries. The contact details can be found on the website of the
Directorate General for External Relations.

10 Information Sources
Websites:

EuropeAid Co-operation Office: http://europa.eu.int/comm/europeaid/projects/

Directorate General for External Relations: http://europa.eu.int/comm/external_relatio



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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       40



1.4.5 TACIS
1 Introduction
Launched by the EC in 1991, the TACIS Programme provides grant-financed technical assistance to 13
countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and mainly aims at enhancing the transition process in these
countries. In the first eight years of its operating, TACIS committed a total of Euro 4,226 million of
funding to projects and environment and nuclear safety received 20% of the funds.

A Council Regulation (No 99/2000) was adopted in January 2000 providing a new framework for the
TACIS programme. TACIS has special sub-programmes for multi-country activities. These are comprised
by the TACIS Regional Cooperation Strategy Paper and Indicative Programme 2004 - 2006 which was
adopted by the European Commission on 11 April 2003.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The new regulation from 2000 states that TACIS is to provide assistance totalling EUR 3.138 billion until
the end of 2006 and to focus on 6 areas of co-operation, of which one is promotion of environmental
protection and management of natural resources. According to the new regulation, a maximum of three
areas of co-operation should be identified for each country. In addition, nuclear safety is mentioned as a
separate area of concern to be targeted where relevant.

The following sub-components are mentioned under promotion of environmental protection and
management of natural resources:
• development of sustainable environmental policies and practises
• promotion of harmonisation of environmental standards with European Union norms
• improvement of energy technologies in supply and end use
• promotion of sustainable use and management of natural resources, including energy saving, efficient
  energy usage and improvement of environmental infrastructure

For nuclear safety, the priorities are: Promotion of an effective safety culture, support to the establishment
of strategies for the management of spent fuel, decommissioning and waste management, contribution to
international initiatives.

The regulation specifies three areas for particular attention. One of these areas is "the need to reduce
environmental risks and pollution, including transboundary pollution". Further, environmental
infrastructure and networks is mentioned as one out of three priority sectors for TACIS investment
financing.

For Regional Cooperation, Sustainable management of natural resources has been selected as one out
of three priority themes for 2004-2006, focusing mainly on water, while also supporting biodiversity, forest
resources and climate change. Several of the programmes established may be relevant for waste related
funding:

The Municipal Investment Support Programme offers support in the traditional feasibility studies, where
closely linked with an investment. The programme is in operation in the Russian Federation only with a
budget of EUR 3 million.

The TACIS Cross-border Cooperation Programme supports actions on the borders between the Russian
Federation, Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova with their central European neighbours and the European
Union. The TACIS Small Project Facility is part of this Programme: it promotes integration at local level




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       41



(local trade, economic cooperation, environment, tourism and agriculture), by means of grants up to a
maximum value of EUR 200,000.

The TACIS Bistro facility is designed to respond quickly to requests for support for small scale projects
within the country programmes in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia and Kazakhstan. As a rule, projects
last no more than nine months and are funded up to EUR 100, 000.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
The following countries are eligible for TACIS support: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia,
Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Moldova, Mongolia, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.

Russia and Ukraine are the main beneficiaries, receiving 50% and 20% of the funds, respectively, in the
period 1990-99.

4 Organisations Supported
TACIS co-operation takes place at the government level, however, private organisations can also benefit
from the support. Direct funding of equity and stakes in individual companies is excluded.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants for technical assistance and for investment financing.
According to the new regulation, max.20% of the annual budget can be allocated to investment financing.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
The new regulation focuses on maximisation of impact through a limited number of projects of sufficient
scale (according to the TACIS website: projects of at least EUR 2 million in Russia and Ukraine and EUR
1 million in the other partner countries). Co-financing is encouraged - but there is no specific requirement.

7 Access to Assistance
The framework for TACIS assistance is provided in the Partnership and Co-operation Agreements (PCAs),
National Country Programmes and regional programmes.

The PCAs are legal frameworks setting out the political, economic and trade relationships between the
European Union and the partner countries. Each PCA is a ten-year bilateral treaty signed and ratified by the
EU and the individual state, formalising the EU‘s relationship with the country concerned. Within this, the
TACIS programme acts as the instrument of cooperation to reach the joint political goals.

The national country programmes include indicative programmes, valid 3-4 years, which identify
priorities and areas of co-operation as well as annual or biannual action programmes setting out the projects
to be supported and the funding available, within the guidelines defined by the indicative programme.

Project ideas should be discussed with the EC delegation in the relevant country for inclusion in action
programmes.

The regional programmes are based on indicative and action programmes as well. However, several of
them can offer funds for smaller projects on a flexible basis. Details on access to these programmes can be
found on the website. The Bistro facilities are managed by the European Commission's Delegations in
Moscow, Kiev, Tbilisi and Almaty (Bishkek).




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8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
Since January 2001 DG External Relations has been responsible for political direction and for multi-annual
programming (Indicative Programmes), while EuropeAid Co-operation Office is responsible for managing
the project cycle and Annual Programmes.

 EuropeAid Co-operation Office                                  Directorate General for External Relations
 Directorate "Europe, Caucasus, Central Asia"                   Directorate "Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asian
 Rue de la Loi 41, Office 4/150                                 Republics"
 1040 Brussels, Belgium                                         Rue de la Loi, 200
                                                                1049 Brussels


The EC has delegations in a number of EC countries. The contact details can be found on the website of the
Directorate General for External Relations.

10 Information Sources
Websites:

EuropeAid Co-operation Office: http://europa.eu.int/comm/europeaid/projects/tacis

Directorate General for External Relations: http://europa.eu.int/comm/external_relations/ceeca/tacis/




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       43




                                  1.5         Multilateral Grant Donors (UN)

1.5.1 United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
1 Introduction
The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) provides grant funding for economic and social
development. Funds come from the voluntary contributions of Member States of the United Nations and
affiliated agencies, who have committed themselves to providing approximately USD 1 billion yearly to
UNDP's regular resources. Other funding arrangements, including cost-sharing, provide approximately
USD 1 billion in additional resources each year.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The UNDP has committed to the Millennium Development Goals, agreed in 2002 at the United Nations
Millennium Summit. The goals include ensuring environmental sustainability as one out of 7 main goals.
The UNDP offers grant funding for technical assistance in six areas of practice, including energy and
environment. The major areas of support include national strategic, policy and regulatory frameworks for
environmentally sustainable development; national and local-level capacity development to support
participatory approaches to environmental management; and helping countries to meet their commitments
under the global environmental conventions on biodiversity, climate change and desertification. For 2002,
estimated total programme expenditures within the energy and environment sector were USD 298 and
constituted 16.11% of total expenditure.

The UNDP is the implementing agency in relation to a number of trust funds and facilities. In relation to
environment and the waste sector, the following are the most important:

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is described in a separate fact sheet.

The Public-Private Partnerships for the Urban Environment Facility (PPPUE) is a multi-partner and
multi-donor facility. The PPPUE focuses on the overarching goal of developing tripartite partnerships
(government, business, civil society) to improve the access of the urban poor to basic urban services,
including solid waste management. Under the facility, innovative partnership grants support projects
activities in one or more of the following areas:
• Establishing adequate policy, legal and institutional frameworks for public private partnership
   development at the local level, e.g. review of legislation, support to policy development.
• Building local capacity for public private partnerships, e.g. training on PPP, local strategy development,
   tools and manuals.
• Designing and implementing innovative partnership arrangements. Specific activities may cover
   advisory inputs into project identification, evaluation and financing; local legal frameworks, contractual
   arrangements and business plan development.

The Thematic Trust Fund on Environment is a UNDP trust fund focusing on three priority service lines:
Integrating environmental management concerns into national development frameworks, strengthening
local environmental governance, and addressing global and regional environmental problems. Resources
under the TTF will focus on low-income countries, the Least Developed Countries and the Africa region,
while a small proportion of the resources will be used to fund global and regional initiatives. The funding
target for the Environment TTF is USD 60 million over a period of three years (2001-2003).




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3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
The UNDP works with developing and transition countries globally and has offices in 166 countries.

4 Organisations Supported
UNDP projects may be executed in the following ways:
(a) National execution. This refers to management by a governmental entity and is the norm;
(b) Execution by a United Nations agency or multilateral development bank;
(c) Execution by an NGO; or
(d) Direct execution. This refers to cases where management is by UNDP itself; it is permitted only in
   exceptional circumstances.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
There is no official maximum size of project. The UNDP encourages cost-sharing contributions but there is
not a specific requirement.

7 Access to Assistance
UNDP assistance is programmed through a country cooperation framework (CCF). This is developed
within the framework of the dialogue between the UN system and the national authorities in the countries.
This dialogue results in a common country assessment (CCA), and a United Nations Development
Assistance Framework (UNDAF), which is a strategic framework for the country-level activities of the
entire United Nations system. The UNDP's CCF sets out the key results, the strategies through which the
results will be achieved, and how they will be assessed. Once a CCF is approved, UNDP resources are
assigned, and individual programmes and projects are formulated. Project proposals should be referred to
the relevant country office for possible inclusion in the programme of support.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
United Nations Development Programme
Bureau for Development Policy (BDP)
304 East 45th Street
New York, NY 10017
USA
Tel.: +1 (212) 906-5020
Fax: +1 (212) 906-6754

Information on the contact details for the country offices in 166 countries can be found on the website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.undp.org




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1.5.2 United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
1 Introduction
UNEP is the focal point for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst,
advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global
environment. The aim of the mandate is that UNEP would keep the world environment situation under
review and ensure that emerging environmental issues of international significance receive consideration
by Governments. UNEP also hosts several environmental convention secretariats including the Basel
Convention on the Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and the Stockholm Convention on
Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). The Division of Environmental Policy Implementation (DEPI)
functions as a focal point for UNEP in coordination of technical assistance support for various policy
implementation initiatives in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
Five sectors are prioritised: Water, clean and renewable energy, health and the environment, sustainable
agriculture, and biodiversity. In relation to health and environment, chemicals and hazardous waste is a
special focus area. Projects supported include technical assistance and capacity building for:
• Environmental policy development and use of regulatory, economic and other incentives and
   instruments to ensure compliance with national objectives in the context of global trends and
   multilateral environmental agreements.
• Ensuring compliance with and enforcement of established national, regional and international
   environmental policy instruments, particularly legally-binding instruments. Particular emphasis is
   placed on illegal trade in violation of international environmental instruments.
• Environmental law, development of legal instruments and implementation of international
   environmental conventions.

Assistance is provided in the form of organisation of activities in environmental awareness raising,
education, training, institution building, compiling training manuals, organising education workshops and
providing legal advisory services.

The Environment Fund is the main mechanism for financing core UNEP activities. This funding base,
which is not tied to specific programmes and projects, remains UNEP‘s top priority. In addition to the
Environment Fund, the total UNEP operational budget includes additional resources from UNEP trust
funds and trust fund support, counterpart (earmarked) contributions and the UN Regular Budget. The total
2000–2001 UNEP biennial budget exceeded $200 million. The Environment Fund budget for 2002–2003
biennium is USD119.9 million.

UNEP is an implementing agency for the Global Environment Facility. This facility is described in a
separate fact sheet.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Projects implemented are often of an international or regional character and involving developing or
transition countries.

4 Organisations Supported
UNEP stakeholders are often representative groups such as scientists, government-designated experts, focal
points or other United Nations agencies. NGOs and other major groups (such as scientific and professional




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associations, service clubs, community-based organisations, consumer unions and environmental citizen's
organisations) are key stakeholders.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Funding is in the form of grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
The UNEP plans the allocation of resources each biennium. This involves developing or revisiting the
Medium Term Plan (duration 4 years), based on which policy directives are applied, priorities set and
estimates made of resource allocation. Proposals should be addressed to the UNEP headquarters for
possible inclusion in the programme.

UNEP programmes are increasingly implemented through the six regional offices of DRC located in
Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, North America and West Asia.
Contact information on website under Division of Regional Co-operation.

8 Other Information
None

9 Contact Details
United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Avenue, Gigiri
PO Box 30552,
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: (254-2) 621234
Fax: (254-2) 624489/90

10 Information Sources
Website: www.unep.org




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                                  1.6         Multilateral Grant Donors (Other)

1.6.1 Global Environment Facility (GEF)
1 Introduction
The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is an international financial organisation that operates in
collaboration and partnership with the three implementing agencies UNDP, UNEP and the World Bank for
the purpose of achieving global environmental benefits. The GEF is administratively supported by, but
functionally independent of, the World Bank.

The GEF provides grant and concessional funding for projects and programmes within six areas:
biodiversity, climate change, international waters, ozone depletion, land degradation, and persistent organic
pollutants (POPs). The GEF is also the designated financial mechanism for international agreements on
biodiversity, climate change, and POPs. From 1991 through 2003, the GEF has provided USD 4.5 billion in
grants (and generated USD 14.5 billion in co-financing from other partners) to more than 1,300 projects in
140 countries. In 2002, 32 donor countries pledged USD 3 billion to fund operations between 2002 and
2006.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The GEF finances projects that reflect national/regional priorities and have the support of the country or
countries involved in six focal areas: Biodiversity, climate change, international waters, ozone depleting
substances, land degradation, and persistent organic pollutants. The table below indicates the level of
funding (allocations) in 2003.

 Area                             POP       ODS       Int. Waters     Climate Change       Biodiversity    Multiple
 Allocation (USD million)             45         2              92                  191             172              108


To guide operations, the GEF has developed operational programmes for a number of specific areas. The
waste related programmes are the Contaminant-Based Operational Programme under International Waters,
and the Operational Programme on Persistent Organic Pollutants (draft).

In the Contaminant-Based Operational Programme, four components characterise the range of projects of
the programme. One includes a set of limited demonstration projects for addressing land-based activities
while others include projects related to contaminants released from ships, persistent toxic substances such
as POPs, and targeted regional or global projects useful in setting priorities for possible GEF interventions,
meeting the technical needs of projects in this focal area, or distilling lessons learned from experience.

The GEF is committing $250 million from 2003 to 2006 to help developing countries tackle persistent
organic pollutants. The POP operational program is expected to focus on:

(a) Development and strengthening of capacity, aimed at enabling the recipient country to fulfil its
obligations under the convention. These country specific enabling activities are eligible for full
funding of agreed costs. These may include action plans, inventories, institutional/regulatory
strengthening, etc.

(b) On the ground interventions, aimed at implementing specific phase-out and remediation measures at
national and/or regional level, and including components of targeted capacity building. Full projects and
medium-sized projects eligible for funding will be focused on the following: Develop and/or strengthen the


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capacity of developing countries and countries with economies in transition, promote the access to, and
transfer of, clean and environmentally sound alternative technologies/products/practices, facilitate the
environmentally sound disposal of stockpiles of obsolete POPs, and facilitate the identification of sites
affected by POPs.

The GEF supports activities to phase out ozone-depleting substances. This is done in partnership with the
institutions of the Montreal Protocol under the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer.
The GEF funds projects that enable the Russian Federation and countries in Eastern Europe and Central
Asia to phase out their production and use of ozone depleting substances (ODS). Similar phaseout activities
in developing countries (Article 5 countries) are funded through the financial mechanism of the Montreal
Protocol.

There are no dedicated funds available from the GEF specifically for Basel Convention projects.

3 Eligible Countries and Regions
A developing country or a country with economy in transition is eligible for receiving funding if it has
ratified the relevant treaty (biodiversity, climate change, Montreal Protocol, or POPs – but does not apply
to international waters projects) and if it is eligible to borrow from the World Bank (IBRD and/or IDA) or
receive technical assistance grants from UNDP.

4 Organisations Supported
The Implementing Agencies may make arrangements for GEF project preparation and execution by
multilateral development banks, specialised agencies and programs of the United Nations, other
international organisations, bilateral development agencies, national institutions non-governmental
organisations, private sector entities and academic institutions.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is generally provided in the form of grants but other forms may be used (concessional lending,
revolving fund, etc.).

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
Four main categories of GEF grant financing are available:
1. Full-Sized Project funding
2. Medium-Sized Project funding (GEF grants up to USD 1 million)
3. Expedited Enabling Activity grants
4. Project Preparation Grants.

There are three categories of project preparation grants:
• PDF Block A (up to $25,000);
• PDF Block B (up to $350,000 - up to USD 700,000 for multi-country projects); and
• Block C (up to $1 million).

The GEF emphasises its catalytic role and seeks to leverage additional financing from other sources. All
GEF projects are expected to be co-financed, however, there is no specific requirement for co-financing
which is based on a case-by-case determination of eligible ("incremental") costs.




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7 Access to Assistance
All three implementing organisations can serve as an entry to proposing projects for GEF assistance. In
general, the local office of the relevant organisation should be contacted and they will advise on the
eligibility of the proposal and on the options for the different types of grants. The contact details for the
local offices can be found on the websites of the respective implementing agencies. A number of guidance
documents on the GEF project cycle and for the application procedures for various types of grants are
available on the websites as well.

It is worth to consider the division of responsibilities between the three organisations. The UNDP plays the
primary role in ensuring the development and management of capacity building programs and technical
assistance projects. The UNEP plays the primary role in catalysing the development of scientific and
technical analysis and in advancing environmental management in GEF-financed activities. The World
Bank will play the primary role in ensuring the development and management of investment projects. In
addition, four Regional Development Banks (African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank,
European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and Inter-American Development Bank) and three
UN Specialised Agencies (FAO, UNIDO and IFAD) are also accountable for the execution of GEF
projects, and may therefore also serve as an entry point to seek GEF assistance.

8 Other Information
GEF may fund the "incremental" or additional costs associated with transforming a project with national
benefits into one with global environmental benefits. Thus, GEF grants may cover the difference or
"increment" between a less costly, more polluting option and a costlier, more environmentally friendly
option. The process of determining incremental costs can be complicated, but simplified guidelines for
calculating incremental costs are being developed by the GEF Secretariat and the GEF agencies named
above may provide assistance in this matter..

9 Contact Details
GEF Secretariat:
1818 H Street, NW, MSN G 6-602
Washington, DC 20433 USA
Telephone: (202) 473-0508
Fax: (202) 522-3240/3245
Email: GEF@TheGEF.org

10 Implementing agencies:
 Global Environment Facility Coordina-        The United Nations Development            UNEP Division of Global Environ-
 tion Team                                    Programme (UNDP) -                        ment Facility Coordination
 Environment Department                       Global Environment Facility (GEF)         P.O. Box 30552
 The World Bank                               Unit (UNDP-GEF)                           Nairobi, Kenya
 1818 H Street, NW                            304 East 45th Street                      Tel: [254 2] 624165
 Washington, DC 20433                         9th Floor                                 Fax: [254 2]
 USA                                          New York, NY 10017                        624041/623696/623162
 Tel: +1 202 473 1816                         Tel: +1-212-906-5044
 Fax: +1 202 522 3256                         Fax: +1-212-906-6998




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11 Information Sources
Websites:

 GEF                 www.gefweb.org
 GEF World           http://lnweb18.worldbank.org/ESSD/envext.nsf/45ByDocName/WorldBank-
 Bank                GlobalEnvironmentFacility
 GEF UNDP            http://www.undp.org/gef/
 GEF UNEP            http://www.unep.org/gef/content/index.htm




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                                  1.7 Bilateral Donor Agencies

1.7.1 Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
1 Introduction
The Canadian International Development Agency is responsible for Canada's Official Development
Assistance (ODA) program based on the Government's foreign policy. The mandate of Canada's ODA is
defined as:

"The purpose of Canada's ODA is to support sustainable development in developing countries, in order to
reduce poverty and to contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world."

In the financial year 2001-02, CIDA disbursed about CAD 1.26 billion in bilateral assistance.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
Support to the environment to help developing countries to protect their environment and to contribute to
addressing global and regional environmental issues is one among six overall priorities for the operations
of CIDA.

In the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2003-2004, the key target under environmental sustainability is to
work towards achieving the targets of the MDGs on Environmental Sustainability in collaboration with the
international development community, i.e.:
• Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes and
• reverse the loss of environmental resources;
• halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water;
• achieve, by 2020, significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers129.

The priorities for the next three years towards achieving environmental sustainability are:

• build partners' capacities to address global, regional and national environmental issues such as
  desertification, biodiversity, and climate change;
• support and promote environmental and broader socio-economic policy dialogue and programming that
  directly address environmental issues.

According to CIDA's Statistical Report on Official Development Assistance for the Fiscal Year 2001-2002,
4.49% of disbursements were allocated to general environmental protection.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
CIDA supports projects in more than 150 countries around the world in the following regions: South and
Central America, Africa and the Middle East, Central and Eastern Europe and Asia. A list of eligible
countries is available on the website.

4 Organisations Supported
CIDA supports government institutions and NGOs (Canadian and foreign) as well as the private sector.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants.




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6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
Bilateral development assistance is planned and delivered within the general policy context provided by
Canada's ODA Policy Framework and CIDA's Development Policy Base and within the general
operational context provided by CIDA's Regulatory Environment and the three key Agency Program
Management Frameworks described in Part I, - Draft Guidance Note, Chapter 3. There are now two
principal programming mechanisms within the bilateral program branches as described below.

A. The Bilateral Directed Mechanism
The traditional country programming approach is referred to as the "Bilateral Directed Mechanism" and is
the chief mechanism for delivering the assistance programmes. The programming takes a point of departure
in bringing Recipient Country/Region development needs, CIDA program objectives and Canadian
capabilities together through the preparation, negotiation and approval of a Country/Regional Programming
Framework. The cycle continues through the project identification process which leads to further activities
as a potential project is analysed, its feasibility assessed, a design prepared, approval sought, agreements
reached, etc.

B. The Bilateral Responsive Mechanism
The unsolicited proposal mechanism was established in 1996 and is referred to as the "Bilateral Responsive
Mechanism". Under this mechanism, unsolicited proposals can be submitted to Bilateral country and
regional program units by either the Canadian for-profit (private) sector, the Canadian not-for-profit sector
or by a consortium involving both. All projects must have an identified "Recipient Country Partner." The
Recipient Country Partner can not be a development assistance project entity (e.g. a local entity which has
been substantially created and primarily funded through CIDA development assistance funds) or a part or
subsidiary of a Canadian company, university, etc.

Proposals are required to meet the following five basic criteria:
• Development impact of the project must prevail;
• There must be conformity with the CIDA Country/Regional Programming Framework (C/RPF) where
   one exists;
• No profit may be associated with the contribution agreement;
• A general ceiling of $5.0 million per contribution will apply; and,
• Cost-sharing and leveraging will be taken into account in the approval process

A guide to the bilateral responsive mechanism is available on the website of CIDA.

8 Other Information
None.




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9 Contact Details
Canadian International Development Agency
200 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
K1A 0G4
Tel: (819) 997-5006
Toll free: 1-800-230-6349
Fax: (819) 953-6088

10 Information Sources
Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/




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1.7.2 Danish International Development Assistance (Danida)
1 Introduction
The Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA) is responsible for administration of the
Danish bilateral assistance. .In 2002 the Danish assistance to developing countries amounted to DKK 12.86
billion (including assistance to multilateral grant donors). In 2003, the budget is DKK 12.83 billion.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The environment is one among three major cross-cutting issues in Danish development policy. In 2003, it
is planned that DKK 1.7 billion will be allocated to environmental projects or projects with related
environmental aspects.

DANIDA has a special facility for environmental support called MIFRESTA. Under MIFRESTA, support
is provided for selected countries (see below) and for global environmental programmes, especially
programmes for support to implementation of international environmental agreements.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
According to Danish development policy, the Denmark's bilateral development cooperation will be
concentrated on fifteen programme countries. These are: Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Egypt,
Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam, and Zambia.

Under the MIFRESTA facility, support is targeted at Botswana, Cambodia, Malaysia, Mozambique,
Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand and Vietnam.

In addition, limited funds will be available for non-co-operation countries.

4 Organisations Supported
No information provided on type of organisation supported.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is given in the form of grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
DANIDA elaborates country strategies for all co-operation countries providing the priorities and strategies
for DANIDA support to the countries. Strategies are elaborated based on nationally defined policy
frameworks for poverty strategies, which form key entry points for Danish development assistance. The
country strategies are available on the website.

8 Other Information
None.




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9 Contact Details
Udenrigsministeriet
Asiatisk Plads 2
DK-1448 København K
Denmark

Tel.: +45/ 33 92 00 00
Fax: +45/ 32 54 05 33

10 Information Sources
Website: www.um.dk




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1.7.3 Department for International Development (DFID)
1 Introduction
The Department for International Development is a United Kingdom Government department responsible
for the bilateral assistance of the United Kingdom. The overall policy direction is provided by the
government of the day through DFID's Secretary of State. DFID's mandate is given in the International
Development act (2002), gives the Secretary of State the specific remit of promoting development and
reducing poverty.

The budget of DFID in the financial year 2002/03 was over EUR 3 billion and it is projected to increase to
over EUR 4 million in 2005/06. Approximately half of the budget is used to contribute to various
multilateral agencies (including the EU) and the other half for bilateral assistance.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The overall framework of DFID developmental policy is set out in the 1997 White Paper 'Eliminating
World Poverty: A challenge for the 21st Century', and expanded upon by the 2000 White Paper
'Eliminating World Poverty: Making Globalisation Work for the Poor'. The commitment to the Millennium
Development Goals is confirmed in these white papers, which includes a key policy commitment to .
tackling global environmental problems. In this area, the specific commitments are to:

• Work to reduce the contribution made by developed countries to global environmental degradation.
• Work with developing countries to ensure that their poverty reduction strategies reflect the need to
manage environmental resources sustainability, and strengthen their capacity to participate in international
negotiations.

DFID has a department dealing with infrastructure and urban development. The Urbanisation section of
this department has a knowledge and research programme with three themes: (i.) Increase the access of low
income households and the poor to adequate, safe and secure shelter, (ii.) Improve the access of low
income households and the poor to improved urban services, and (iii.) Enhance the effectiveness of city
and municipal planning and management.

DFID provides specialist advice on all aspects of environmental engineering through the department. This
advice covers a broad range of issues encompassing water resources management, waste management,
pollution control cleaner technology and production, and the environmental assessment, management and
monitoring of infrastructure and urban development programmes.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
DFID‘s assistance is concentrated in the poorest countries of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, but also
contributes to poverty reduction and sustainable development in middle-income countries, including those
in Latin America and Eastern Europe.

4 Organisations Supported
Assistance is provided to Government bodies, NGOs and, through some specific programmes, to the
private sector.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants.




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6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
Since 1997 the Department for International Development (DFID) has published Country Strategy Papers
to set out the aims for contributing to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in
various countries. The Country Strategy Papers are prepared for all countries in which development
assistance programmes exist, and are normally produced every three years. DFID has recently designed the
second-generation Country Assistance Plans. In the majority of the countries in which DFID works there
are nationally owned and administered plans to reduce poverty. The Country Assistance Plans set out in
detail how DFID will work as part of the international development effort to support these strategies. The
plans will incorporate analysis of each country‘s potential for political, social, and economic change.

The new generation of Country Assistance Plans will be gradually rolled out from mid – 2002. Draft Plans
will be made available on the DFID website and interested parties will be invited to offer their comments.
An indicative timetable of forthcoming Plans will shortly be made available through this page.

In addition to the assistance supplied through the country programming process, DFID has a number of
funds and facilities providing funding for various purposes, some of these are called Challenge Funds.
These are a relatively new way of providing support to initiatives in or for developing countries. They work
by supporting enterprises and projects that contribute to the development process. For Challenge Funds, it
is up to the bidder to come up with a concept for evaluation by an independent panel. Detailed proposals
are then invited from a short-list, with cost-sharing grants awarded to those initiatives that best meet the
Fund's objectives. A list of the funds and the particular terms and conditions is available at the website.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
DFID has headquarters in London and East Kilbride, offices in many developing countries, and staff based
in British embassies and high commissions around the world (contact details available at website).

DFID, 1 Palace Street, London SW1E 5HE
DFID, Abercrombie House, Eaglesham Road, East Kilbride, Glasgow G75 8EA
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7023 0000
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7023 0019

10 Information Sources
Website: www.dfid.gov.uk




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1.7.4 Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH
1 Introduction
The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH is a government-owned
corporation for international cooperation of Germany. In more than 130 developing or transition countries,
GTZ is supporting c. 2,700 development projects and programmes, chiefly under commissions from the
German Federal Government. GTZ was founded in 1975 as a corporation under private law. The German
Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) is its main financing organisation.
GTZ also undertakes commissions for other government departments, for governments of other countries,
for international clients such as the European Commission, the United Nations or the World Bank, as well
as for private-sector corporations. GTZ operates on a public-benefit basis. Any surpluses are exclusively
re-channelled into its own development cooperation projects.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The GTZ works with hazardous waste management, municipal waste management, and waste management
policy.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Latin America and the Caribbean: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican
Republic Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay,
Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela

Africa: Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic,
Chad, Côte d‘Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya,
Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Republic
of Congo, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda,
Zambia, and Zimbabwe

Near and Middle East and the Maghreb: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman,
Palestinian Territories, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.

Mediterranean Region, Europe, Central Asian Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan,
Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan,
Kosovo, Kyrgyz Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation,
Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan,

4 Organisations Supported
In the waste sector, GTZ's partners are municipal administrations, local and regional associations, and
national, federal or regional authorities and ministries with full or partial responsibility for waste
management. GTZ project partners in the industrial waste management sector are public institutions,
industrial associations and chambers, and the industries themselves.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
In the field of international cooperation, GTZ provides technical assistance, i.e. transfer and mobilisation of
knowledge and skills with the aim to improve capacity of partner organisations.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.



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7 Access to Assistance
The GTZ does not allocate resources - it carries out projects financed by various donors, especially the
German Federal Ministry for Economic Co-operation and Development (BMZ) who is by far the largest
source of revenue for GTZ. However, there is a dialogue between GTZ and BMZ at the Federal level as
well as between GTZ local offices in partner countries and BMZ. It is therefore advisable to contact GTZ
local offices to discuss project ideas.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH
Dag-Hammarskjöld-Weg 1-5
65760 Eschborn
Germany
Telephone +49 (0)6196 79-0
Telefax +49 (0)6196 79-1115

The contact details for the 63 field offices can be found on the website.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.gtz.de




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1.7.5 Direction Générale de la Coopération Internationale et du Développement (DGCID)
1 Introduction
The DGCID is under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of France and is responsible for the grant-based
bilateral assistance for co-operation and development. The DGCID provides project assistance and
technical assistance, which is provided in a number of sectors. In addition, support is provided for
universities and scientific co-operation, audiovisual communication, cultural co-operation and promotion
of the French language as well as support for NGOs.

The DGCID is separate from the Agence Francaise de Développement (AFD), which is the institution
responsible for the bilateral lending facilities of France, which are available to public and private
organisations. The AFD offers loans on both concessional and market terms as well as assistance for
project preparation.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
The total budget of DGCID in 2002 was EUR 1.43 billion. Out of this total, approximately 30% was
allocated for development project support and technical assistance. Support for sustainable development
and management of natural resources is one among a number of key priorities for the technical assistance
operations of DGCID.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Sub-Saharan Africa is prioritised and received 46% of DGCID funds in 2002. Other regions supported
include: The Maghreb (12%), Central and Eastern Europe (11%), South and Southeast Asia (7%), South
America (7%), Near and Middle East (6%), Northern and Western Europe (5%), Far East and Oceania
(4%) and North America (2%).

4 Organisations Supported
Governments and NGOs.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
The DGCID is overall responsible for the country programming setting out the priorities for French
bilateral assistance at the country level. This is co-ordinated with other French ministries as well as
recipient countries. The three-year country strategies are available in French on the website of the DGCID.
French bilateral lending assistance provided through AFD is also directed by the country programmes.

8 Other Information
None.




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9 Contact Details
244, boulevard Saint-Germain
75303 Paris 07SP
France
Tel: (33) 01 43 17 90 00

Or:

20, rue Monsieur ou 57, boulevard des Invalides
75700 Paris 07SP
France
Tel: (33) 01 53 69 30 00

10 Information Sources
Website: www.diplomatie.gouv.fr




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1.7.6     Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA)

1 Introduction
JICA is responsible for the technical cooperation aspect of Japan‘s ODA programs that is aimed at building
capacity of developing countries and sharing knowledge that can serve the socioeconomic development of
the developing countries. JICA carries out a variety of programs to support the nation building of
developing countries through such technical cooperation.

The total official development assistance of Japan amounted to USD 9,283 million in 2002.Out of this,
about half was provided in the form of bilateral grants.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
JICA has been cooperating in many countries regarding waste management related sectors through
following ways,

(1) sending experts who are able to make necessary advice to establish the appropriate waste management
system in developing countries
(2) making a master plan to improve the waste management system of developing countries
(3) conducting training courses in various fields such as urban solid waste management and comprehensive
waste management technique.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Assistance is provided to a number of countries (155 in 2003) in Asia,the Middle East , the Americas
Oceania , and Europe. Countries eligible for grant aid are those that qualify for financing from IDA (see
separate fact sheet).

4 Organizations Supported
No information on type of organization supported.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Technical co-operation is provided in the form of bilateral grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
JICA operates under the policies defined by the Japanese Government and according to a country-specific
and issue-specific approach, which involves the formulation of plans for specific countries and issues and
transcending project types and sectors.

8 Other Information
None.




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9 Contact Details
Japan International Cooperation Agency
6-13F, Shinjuku Maynds Tower 1-1
Yoyogi 2-tyoume, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-8558
Japan
Tel: 03-5352-5311/5312/5313/5314

JICA has overseas offices in a number of countries. Their contact details can be found on the web-site.

10 Information Sources
Website: http://www.jica.go.jp/




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1.7.7         Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC)

1 Introduction
JBIC is in charge of implementing Japanese ODA loans. The basic characteristic of these operations is to
provide concessionary long-term, low-interest funds needed for the self-help efforts of developing
countries, including infrastructure development and economic stabilization.

Japan also provides assistance in the form of the grant aid and the technical cooperation. Japan
International Co-operation Agency (JICA) is in change of implementing technical cooperation.

The total official development assistance of Japan amounted to USD 9.283 billion in 2002. Out of this,
about 25% was provided in the form of ODA loans.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
As the economy grows, air and water pollution, and the waste disposal problem created by industrial
activity or urban living as well as increasing population in urban areas are deteriorating the urban
environment in developing countries. In light of this context, JBIC aims at improving the urban
environment. Specific priorities include pollution control facilities, including air pollutions control systems,
waste water treatment systems, waste disposal systems, and environment-friendly production technology
that facilitates recycling and has the least impact on the environment.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Assistance in FY2002 was characterized by an intense focus on Asia, the priority region, and seven priority
areas in line with the Medium-Term Strategy. By region, 95.7% of the total commitments were made for
Asia. A further break-down of the region shows that the share of Southwest Asia increased from 15.4% in
the previous year to 30.1%.

4 Organizations Supported
ODA loan operations support the public sector of developing countries, including central government,
municipal government, and other governmental institutions. NGO, Private Firms and other civil society can
be supported in order to enhance aid effectiveness.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
There are various kinds of bilateral loans (ODA Loan) as follows;

        (1)     Project Loans: Project Loans, which are predominant among ODA loans, finance projects
                such as roads, power plants, irrigation, water supply and sewerage facilities. The loans are used
                for the procurement of facilities, equipment and services, or for conducting civil works and
                other related works.
        (2)     Engineering Services (E/S) Loans: This type of loans is for engineering services, which are
                necessary at survey and planning stages of the projects. The services include reviews of
                feasibility studies, surveys on detailed data on project sites, detailed designs and preparation of
                bidding documents. Completion of feasibility studies or their equivalent are prerequisite for
                this type of loans.
        (3)     Financial Intermediary Loans (Two-Step Loans): Financial intermediary loans are
                implemented through the financial institutions of the recipient country based on the policy-
                oriented financial system of that country. These loans provide funds necessary for the



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              implementation of designated policies, such as the promotion of small-and medium-scale
              enterprises in manufacturing, agriculture, and other specified industries and the construction of
              facilities to improve the living standards of the poor. These loans are known as "two-step
              loans" because there are two or more steps before the end-beneficiaries receive the funds.
              Under this type of loan, funds can be provided to a large number of end-beneficiaries in the
              private sector. Since these loans are implemented through local financial institutions, they also
              serve to strengthen the operational capabilities of these institutions and to develop the financial
              sector of the recipient countries.
     (4)      Structural Adjustment Loans (SAL): This type of loans assists recipient countries to improve
              economic policies and to implement structural adjustment for overall economies. Prior to loan
              commitments, JBIC examines structural adjustment programs of recipient countries and sets
              conditionalities for achieving targets of the programs. In most cases, the loans are disbursed in
              parts (tranches) as conditionalities are fulfilled. The funds are usually used for the settlement of
              payments for imported equipment and materials and associated services. If needed, the funds
              may be also used for consulting services required for implementation of structural adjustment
              programs. Structural adjustment loans are often co-financed with multilateral institutions.
              While structural adjustment loans are used for economic policy improvement and reforms of
              overall economies, sector adjustment loans focus on improving the policies and institutional
              reforms of specific sectors in recipient countries.
     (5)      Commodity Loans: This type of loans aims for both supports for balance of payments and
              economic stability of recipient countries. These loans are often used to import commodities
              such as industrial machinery and raw materials, fertilizer and pesticide, agricultural and other
              kinds of machinery, which are agreed upon beforehand between the Japanese and recipient
              governments. Also, local currency (counterpart) funds, paid by importers to governments to
              obtain foreign currencies provided under the loans, are used for economic and social
              development.
     (6)      Sector Program Loans (SPL): This type of loans is used to support development policies in
              prioritized sectors of developing countries. Local currency (counterpart) funds are utilized for
              public investments for sector-specific improvements. Project-type

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
-No restriction on the project size. It depends on the type of loans indicated in the above mentioned.
-No co-financing requirements. JBIC has a track record for co-financing with World Bank, ADB, IDB and
so on.

7 Access to Assistance
ODA loans are available upon request from a recipient country.

8 Other Information
None.

9 Contact Details
Japan Bank for International Cooperation
4-1, Ohtemachi 1-Chome
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8144, Japan
Tel: 03-5218-3101




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  Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets       66



10 Information Sources
Website: http://www.jbic.go.jp/




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets   67




1.7.8 U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
1 Introduction
The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is the principal agency for providing foreign
assistance from the United States to developing and transitional countries. The source of funding is the U.S.
Federal budget.

2 Support to Waste Related Sectors
Environment is one of many areas of operation. Under environment, support is given to pollution
prevention and cleaner production, which co-ordinated with assistance to the health sector. Under the
strategy for "Making Cities Work", USAID also provides support to urban programs aiming to increase
investment in basic urban infrastructure, housing and services, generate increased economic opportunity in
cities, promote safe, healthy urban environments, and help city governments more effectively respond to
the needs of the urban poor (see http://www.makingcitieswork.org/).

In the financial year 2001, the USAID committed approximately USD 1 billion for urban projects, out of
which about 10% went to environmental projects.

3 Co-operation Countries and Regions
Countries in four regions of the world: Africa, Asia & the Near East, Europe & Eurasia, Latin America &
the Caribbean.

4 Organisations Supported
No information provided on type of organisations supported.

5 Type of Financial Assistance Provided
Assistance is provided in the form of grants.

6 Project Size and Co-financing Requirements
No requirements specified.

7 Access to Assistance
Every three years USAID publishes a strategic plan that identifies strategic development goals and outlines
their linkages with U.S. national security interests, with the last being in 2000. USAID and the State
Department are producing a joint strategic plan for FY 2004 to 2009. Each fiscal year the Agency submits
its budget justification to the Congress for appropriation. The Congressional Budget Justification (CBJ)
reflects the Administration's program and budget request for bilateral foreign economic assistance
appropriations on a country-by-country level. Project ideas should conform with the priorities in the
strategic plan and CBJ. It is suggested to contact the local office of USAID to discuss project ideas at an
early stage.

8 Other Information
None.




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   Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets   68



9 Contact Details
Ronald Reagan Building,
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20523.
United States
Tel: +1 202-712-0000.

Addresses of field offices in various countries and a complete telephone directory are available on the web
site.

10 Information Sources
Website: www.usaid.gov




   C:\Docstoc\Working\pdf\16fe34c9-3f0e-4fe3-866e-d8c59c511acc.doc                                                    .
National Re-
sources/
Funds

● User charges
● Company
self-            Financial Resource Mobilisation for Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the Basel Convention - Fact Sheets   69
  financing
● Public budg-
ets
● Environ-
mental funds                                           Appendix 1                  List of International Financing
● Commercial                                                                       Institutions
banks




                 C:\Docstoc\Working\pdf\16fe34c9-3f0e-4fe3-866e-d8c59c511acc.doc                                                    .

				
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