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CHEMICAL SAFETY GUIDELINES PROCEDURES

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CHEMICAL SAFETY GUIDELINES PROCEDURES Powered By Docstoc
					     Chemical Safety
Guidelines and Procedures
         (CSGP)




      First Published February 1992
         2nd Printing August 2000
          Revised February 2009
Table of Contents
PART 1……………………………………………………………………………….                                                             3
  INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………..                                                          3
     OSHA School Laboratory Standard……………………………………                                                3
     Role of CSGP………………………………………………………………..                                                       3
     CSGP Coverage……………………………………………………………                                                         3

PART 2……………………………………………………………………………….                                                             4
  PERSONNEL RESPONSIBLE FOR IMPLEMENTING CSGP…………….                                               4

PART 3……………………………………………………………………………….                                                             5
  CHEMICAL SAFETY GUIDELINES AND PROCEDURES (CSGP)………                                             5
     General Standard Operating Procedures……………………………                                             5
        General Rules…………………………………………………………..                                                     5
        Personal Protection…………………………………………………..                                                  5
        Protective Clothing and Equipment……………………………….                                            6
        Housekeeping………………………………………………………….                                                       6
        When Not to Proceed…………………………………………………                                                    6
        Spills and Accidents………………………………………………….                                                  7
        Waste Chemicals………………………………………………………                                                      7
     Procedure-Specific Safety Procedures………………………………                                             7
     Inventory…………………………………………………………………….                                                         7
     Control Measures and Equipment……………………………………..                                               8
        Ventilation……………………………………………………………….                                                      8
        Safety Cans............................................................................   8
        Flammable/Acid Storage Cabinets…………………………………                                              8
        Eyewashes and Safety Showers……………………………………                                                9
        Protective Apparel…………………………………………………….                                                   9
        Respirators……………………………………………………………...                                                     9

PART 4……………………………………………………………………………….                                                             10
  CRITERIA FOR CONTROL MEASURES…………………………………….                                                    10
     Exposure Guidelines………………………………………………………                                                     10
     Fire Guidelines……………………………………………………………..                                                     10
     Reactivity Guidelines……………………………………………………..                                                  11
     Corrosively and Contact Hazards………………………………………                                               11
     Safety Labels……………………………………………………………….                                                       12

PART 5……………………………………………………………………………….                                                             13
  EMPLOYEE INFORMATION, TRAINING & DOCUMENTATION...………                                            13
     Training Documentation………………………………………………….                                                   13

APPENDIX A………………………………………………………………………...                                                          14
APPENDIX B………………………………………………………………………...                                                          15




                                                                                                       2
PART 1.
INTRODUCTION
The Chemical Safety Guidelines and Procedures (CSGP) manual is the detailed Plan of
Compliance to The Federal Right-To-Know Laws for the Shawnee Mission School District,
Shawnee Mission, Kansas. Existing regulatory requirements are subject to change as
additional regulations are proposed. The CSGP are intended to provide our employees a
means to promote a safer work place environment. CSGP is not intended to take the place of
legal or other professional advice. OSHA expanded the Federal Hazard Communication
Standard to include educational laboratories. Employers are required to develop a program for
evaluating chemical hazards, providing required hazard communications, and training
employees. A detailed plan of compliance is required, which includes a list of known hazardous
chemicals in the work place referenced on appropriate material safety data sheets (MSDS),
methods of labeling chemicals, and methods of making the MSDS readily accessible to staff
while at work. Specific requirements include a written plan; assurance that hazardous
chemicals are properly labeled; maintaining and providing an MSDS for each hazardous
chemical in use; and training employees as to the requirements of the law, the specific program
that the school system has developed, the hazards of chemicals in the school, and methods that
the employee should use for self-protection, including “work practices, emergency procedures,
and personal protective equipment to be used.”


OSHA School Laboratory Standard
The law requires that laboratories establish a chemical awareness plan. This plan must include
standard operating procedures, criteria to determine appropriate control measures, protective
equipment, employee training and information, medical consultations and testing, and personnel
responsible for implementing the plan. In addition, there are extra requirements for carcinogens
and record keeping.


Role of CSGP
This CSGP describes the Shawnee Mission School District’s chemical safety program, including
but not limited to personal protective equipment used, chemical inventory, control equipment
inventory and operations (such as vented hoods), employee training programs, medical
programs, material safety data sheets (MSDS), and safety inspections. The CSGP is designed
as a tool to coordinate safety procedures. Every employee in the school laboratory must
become familiar with this plan.


CSGP Coverage
All employees will cooperate in complying with the provisions of the CSGP. This plan applies to
all employees involved in school laboratories, art classes, and career and technical education
courses using toxic substances. The CSGP will be stored in the district document repository.




                                                                                               3
PART 2.
PERSONNEL RESPONSIBLE FOR IMPLEMENTING CSGP
Personnel                    Duties
Safety Council               Review CSGP biannually. Develop and update CGSP and appropriate polices
                             and practices
                             Develop and implement a labeling program
Associate Superintendent     Member of Safety Council
for Educational Services     Provide technical assistance in complying with CSGP and answer safety
                             questions for employees
                             Assist project directors to develop appropriate safety precautions for new
                             projects and procedures
                             Remain current on developing legal rules and regulations concerning chemicals
                             used in the district
                             Determine when an “Exposure Assessment” is appropriate
Dir. of Curriculum and       Member of Safety Council
Instruction                  Develop and maintain specialized area guidelines and procedures
                             Will submit such plan to the Safety Council for review and approval
Dir. of Career and Tech.     Member of Safety Council
Ed.
Dir. of Supply Services      Member of Safety Council
Dir. of Support Services     Member of Safety Council
Resource Specialists: Art,   Member of Safety Council
Career and Tech. Ed.,        Develop and maintain specialized area guidelines and procedures
Nurse, Science/Health        Submit such plan to the Safety Council for review and approval
Custodial Supervisor         Member of Safety Council
Building Administrators      Monitor procurement of new chemicals
                             Ensure that employees comply with CSGP
                             Ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment is available as needed
                             Monitor proper functioning of protective equipment such as fume hoods and
                             eyewash stations, and arrange for prompt repairs as needed
                             Perform regular chemical and housekeeping inspections
                             Determine when a complaint of possible over-exposure is “reasonable” and
                             should be referred for medical consultation
Division Coordinators        Monitor collection and disposal of chemical wastes
                             Ensure that employees comply with CSGP
                             Perform routine inspections of emergency equipment and eye wash stations
                             Gather and maintain manufacturer’s Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
                             Maintain and review chemical inventory to determine the chemicals are safe.
                             Review chemical requests for appropriate safe classroom use and quantity.
Teachers                     Ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment is available as needed
                             Monitor proper functioning of protective equipment such as fume hoods and
                             eyewash stations, and arrange for prompt repairs as needed
                             Train students on proper safety procedures.
                             Maintain proper storage, labeling and disposal of chemicals
                             Purchase chemicals carefully, buying only what is needed.
                             Never accept donations of chemicals.
Nurses                       Determine when a complaint of possible over-exposure is “reasonable” and
                             should be referred for medical consultation
Operations & Maintenance     Perform routine inspections of fire extinguishers
Warehouse Foreman            Gather and maintain manufacturer’s Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
Staff Responsibilities       Each person working with or around chemicals is responsible for remaining
                             aware of the hazards of those materials and handling those chemicals in a safe
                             manner. Each person is responsible for knowing how to handle a hazardous
                             chemical safely according to its types of hazards. If that person is unsure of a
                             hazard or safety procedure, refer to the Materials Data Safety Sheet (MSDS)
                             and ask the appropriate resource specialist or administrator for assistance.
                             Everyone shares the responsibility to ensure that all containers of chemicals are
                             properly labeled with the identity of the chemical and its hazards.
                                                                                                      4
PART 3.
CHEMICAL SAFETY GUIDELINES AND PROCEDURES
This section describes appropriate procedures and practices for chemical safety guidelines and
procedures.

General Standard Operating Procedures
The General Standard Operating Procedures are fundamental safety precautions which should
be familiar to all employees. These practices should be followed at all times.

       General Rules
       Awareness is the most fundamental rule of chemical safety. Everyone should remain
       constantly aware of the following:
        the chemical’s hazards.
        appropriate safeguards for using that chemical. Order only the quantity of chemicals
          that are needed for the school year/lab. Replace classroom lab investigations
          requiring hazardous materials with ones that do not.
        location and proper use of emergency equipment.
        how to properly store the chemical when not in use. (Remember: the chemical is
          actually used for only minutes in the average work day, the rest of the time it is being
          “stored” in the work place.) Out of date and overstocked chemicals should be
          disposed following district procedures.
        proper personal hygiene practices.
        that others will use that work area, therefore no one should leave unidentified
          chemicals in spills or in unlabeled containers.
        the proper uses, maintenance and limitations of personal protective equipment.
        the proper methods of transporting chemicals within the facility.
        appropriate procedures for emergencies.

       Personal Protection
       Personal safety is an important factor in chemical safety. To react with a person, a toxic
       chemical must contact that person. The four routes of entry (inhalation, ingestion,
       injection, and eye or skin contact) limit the chemical’s ability to contact. Some good
       personal hygiene practices include
        Wash promptly if skin contact is made with any chemicals regardless of corrosivity.
        Wear appropriate eye protection at all times.
        Avoid inhalation of chemicals; do not “sniff” test chemicals.
        Do not mouth pipette anything; use suction bulbs.
        Wash well after using chemicals; do not wash with solvents, use soap.
        Change clothing as soon as possible after leaving the work place (if no locker rooms
           are available) and launder work clothes often.
        Do not eat or smoke in chemical areas.
        Do not bring food, beverage or tobacco products into areas where chemicals are
           either used or stored. Food (especially bread), drink and (especially) tobacco absorb
           chemical vapors and gases from the air.




                                                                                                 5
Protective Clothing and Equipment
Most personal protective equipment is provided by the district to employees. It is the
responsibility of each employee to be certain that the appropriate equipment is
requested and is worn as necessary. Clothing should be worn to minimize exposed skin
surfaces available for direct contact through splashing. Employees should wear long
sleeve/long legged clothing and avoid short sleeved shirts, short trousers or skirts when
handling chemicals. See section on Protective Apparel.


Housekeeping
Common housekeeping practices contribute greatly towards chemical awareness and
safety. A clean work area is much safer than a cluttered or dirty one. Some appropriate
housekeeping measurers include:
     Keep all aisles, hallways, and stairs clear of all chemicals.
     Keep all work areas clear of clutter and obstructions.
     Regularly clean all working surfaces and floors. should be cleaned regularly.
     Never let anything block access to emergency equipment, showers, eyewashes
        and exits.
     Keep wastes should be kept in the proper containers and labeled properly.
     Consider any unlabeled containers are considered as wastes by the end of each
        work day.
 For the safety of the housekeeping staff, all employees should make sure to:
     Place all chemicals in proper storage areas by the end of each work day.
     Label all chemical containers with the identity of the chemical and concentration.
     Promptly clean up all spills and properly dispose of spilled chemicals.
     Separate and label broken glass.
     Organize chemicals first by COMPATIBILITY not alphabetically. Use suggested
        shelf storage patterns found in Flinn Scientific Reference Manual.
     Store chemicals alphabetically within compatible groups.

When Not to Proceed
Sometimes school employees should not proceed with what seems to be a routine task.
Under some conditions, the routine task might contain hazards not fully recognized by
the employee. Employees should recognize certain indicators to review the procedure,
including but not limited to:
     New procedure, process, or test, even if it is very similar to older practices.
     Change or substitution of any of the ingredient chemicals in a procedure.
     Substantial change in the amount of chemicals used; usually one should review
        safety practices if the volume of chemicals used increases by 20-25%.
     Failure of any of the equipment used in the process, especially safeguards such
        as fume hoods or clamp apparatus.
     Unexpected test results. When a test result is different than the predicted, a
        review of how the new result impacts safety practices must be made.
     If members of the school become ill, suspect exposure, the smell of chemicals, or
        otherwise suspect a failure of engineered safeguards.

The occurrence of any of these conditions should result in work stop and immediate
investigation by the division coordinator, or building administrator/supervisor. The
results of the investigation should be reported immediately to the building
administrator/supervisor who must decide whether to continue investigation, institute any
additional corrective actions beyond those of the employee, or allow work to continue.

                                                                                            6
       Spills and Accidents
       Spills of toxic substances or accidents involving any hazardous chemical should be
       resolved immediately, according to the district guidelines. The overall steps of handling
       an accident are briefly:
        Notify the supervisor and appropriate emergency responders immediately. Have
           someone check container label and get Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), if
           available.
        If spilled chemical is flammable, extinguish all nearby sources of ignition.
        If a person has been splashed with a chemical, wash them with plenty of water for at
           least 15 minutes, remove all contaminated clothing, and GET MEDICAL
           ATTENTION.
        If a person has been overexposed by inhalation, get victim to fresh air, apply artificial
           respiration if necessary, and GET MEDICAL ATTENTION.
        In other cases of overexposure, GET MEDICAL ATTENTION and follow the
           instructions of the medical professional.
        After securing proper medical attention for a chemical exposure victim, neutralize or
           absorb the spilled chemical with the proper spill clean up material and dispose of it in
           accordance with hazardous wastes procedures. (Check respective MSDS.)
        Respond appropriately in case of emergency
        DO NOT force any liquids into the mouth of an unconscious person.
        DO NOT handle emergencies alone, especially without notifying someone that the
           accident has occurred.
        DO NOT apply medical aid procedures without some training in that area (except to
           wash with WATER for 15 minutes and get victim to fresh air). If staff member is not
           trained in fundamental first aid, get MEDICAL direction before inducing vomiting,
           giving antidotes or applying a “neutralizer” to the skin or eyes of the victim. Everyone
           should be aware of how to give CPR.
        DO NOT linger at the accident scene if you are not one of the emergency
           responders.

       Waste Chemicals
       Chemical wastes are regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency under the
       Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and its amendments. A generator of
       hazardous wastes is now defined and regulated if the entire facility produces more than
       25 KG of hazardous wastes per month. The district is classed as a “small quantity
       generator,” i.e., less than 25 KG per month.

       All employees should be advised by their supervisor on how to handle wastes from their
       work. Check MSDS for proper disposal. For hazardous chemicals refer to chemical
       disposal procedures in Appendix A & B.


Procedure-Specific Safety Procedures
Written specialized area guidelines and procedures normally have a brief description of specific
safety practices for that particular procedure. Employees should read and review those
practices before commencing a procedure. Employees can find those written references by
asking their supervisors.

Inventory
An inventory of all chemicals should be maintained, with quantity, concentration and location.

                                                                                                   7
Control Measures and Equipment
Chemical safety is accomplished by awareness of the chemical hazards and by keeping the
chemical under control through a variety of engineered safeguards. School laboratory
personnel should be familiar with the proper use of those safeguards. School laboratory
supervisors should be able to detect the malfunction of those safeguards. All engineered
controls must be properly maintained, inspected on a regular basis, and never overloaded
beyond their design limits.

       Ventilation
       School laboratory ventilation should be normally not less than 20 linear feet per minute
       air flow through each room. This gives the workers comfortable breathing air. But 20
       feet per minute translates to less than one quarter mile per hour; the flow should not be
       considered sufficient to prevent accumulation of chemical vapors. Work done with
       chemicals with low TLVs or high vapor pressures should be done in a fume hood. Fume
       hoods should provide 60-100 cubic feet per minute of air flow. When using a fume hood
       the worker should be aware that:
        The fume hood is a safety back-up device to the condensers, traps, or other devices
            to trap and collect the flammable or toxic vapors.
        Fume hood shields should be lowered at all times except when adjusting the
            apparatus inside.
        The apparatus inside the hood should be kept towards the rear of the hood to
            prevent vapors from escaping.
        The design of the hood is usually for substances of specific characteristics (e.g.,
            venting at the top or bottom sides is for chemicals of low and high vapor density,
            respectively).
        Hoods are NOT storage areas.
        The vent ducts and fans must be kept clean and clear of obstructions.
        The hood must remain “on” at all times when a chemical is open inside the hood,
            regardless whether any work is being done in the hood.
        Personnel should be aware of steps to take in case of power failure or other causes
            of hood failure.

       Safety Cans
       Flammable liquids should be kept in cans specifically designed for them. The cans
       should be used according to manufacturer instructions and common safety practices,
       including:
        The can must be kept closed except when adding or removing liquid.
        As with all chemicals, bulk chemicals in safety cans must be stored in flammable
           storage areas and not in school laboratory work areas or hallways.
        All flammables must be protected against sources of ignition.

       Flammable/Acid Storage Cabinets
       Cabinets designed for the safe storage of flammable and acidic chemicals can only do
       so if used and maintained properly. Always read the manufacturer’s information and
       follow some prudent safety practices such as:
        Store only compatible materials inside the cabinet. Nitric acid should be stored
            alone, not with other acids.
        Store chemicals of similar vapor density together when using mechanical ventilation
            (e.g., heavier than air vapors are vented through the bottom vent and lighter than air
            vapors through the top vent).
        Do not store paper or cardboard inside cabinets with the chemicals.
        Do not overload the cabinet. The doors must close securely.

                                                                                                     8
Eyewashes and Safety Showers
Whenever using chemicals make certain you know the availability of an emergency
supply of water. All laboratories must be reviewed and equipped with eyewashes,
and/or safety showers or hoses, if needed. As with any safety equipment, these can
only be useful if they can be used, therefore:
 Keep all passageways to the eyewash and shower clear of any obstacle (even a
    temporarily parked chemical cart).
 Eyewashes should be checked routinely to ensure water flows through them.
 Showers or hoses should be checked routinely to be assured that access is not
    restricted and the start chain or valve is within reach.
 The flow through the safety showers should be tested periodically to ensure a flow of
    25 gallons per minute.

Protective Apparel
Protective clothing was briefly discussed earlier. Some additional information about the
use of protective clothing includes:
 Gloves – must be of a material compatible with the chemicals used. Gloves should
   be inflated (by whipping it in air, not by mouth inflation) to check its integrity before
   each use.
 Safety Glasses – should only be used when working with solid materials, such as
   glass blowing. Glasses should not be used with liquid chemicals.
 Goggles – form the liquid proof seal around the eyes necessary when working with
   liquid chemicals.
 Goggles with Face Shield – are recommended for use when working with
   hazardous chemicals, corrosives, and hot chemicals. The goggles protect the eyes
   in case splash is from side or beneath shield.
 Science Laboratory Coat – long sleeved coats offer the wearer minimal skin
   protection against minor splashes, allowing the chemical something to react with
   before the skin and offering victim time to remove the coat and shower.
 Science Laboratory Apron – rubberized aprons offer time to react to splash.

Respirators
OSHA requires all employers to primarily prevent atmospheric contamination. If they
cannot keep the vapor concentrations below regulated levels, then the employer will
implement a written respirator program (see 29 CFR 1910.134). The written respirator
program will discuss such issues as respirator selection criteria, inspection, and
maintenance. All personnel using respirators must be trained in their proper use and
care.




                                                                                               9
PART 4.
CRITERIA FOR CONTROL MEASURES
This section examines criteria and guidelines which can or will be used to determine the use of
engineered controls and personal protective equipment.

Exposure Guidelines
Most materials used have some guidelines for exposure as stated on the Material Data Safety
Sheet (MSDS), such as Threshold Limit Values (TLV) or Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL).
When such values exist, they will be used to assist the Associate Superintendent of Educational
Services in determining proper safety precautions, including control measurers and safety
apparel.

When, as listed on the MSDS the TLV or PEL, values exist and are low, the user of the
chemical must use it in an operating fume hood or if a fume hood is not available, a respirator
will be used. When the TLV or PEL values are not available for that substance on the MSDS,
the Lethal Dosage information (LD50) will be assessed. If that is low, then the chemical must
also be used in a fume hood if possible, or a respirator must be used.


Fire Guidelines
In general, a flammable chemical is determined by its flash point, the lowest temperature at
which an ignition source can cause the chemical to ignite momentarily. Although the lowest
temperature at which the chemical will catch fire with an ignition source is called the “fire point,”
it is rarely more than one or two degrees greater than the “flash point.” Therefore, the flash
point will be used as the reference of “fire hazard.” OSHA and NFPA have guidelines on when
a chemical is considered flammable. Those guidelines are herein adopted for use in the school
laboratory.

“Flammable” is generally used to refer to chemicals with a flash point below 100 degrees
Fahrenheit (F). Chemicals with flash points between 100 and 200 degrees F are termed
“Combustible.” Combustible chemicals have caused buildings to burn down; therefore, any
chemical with a flash point below 200 degrees F will be considered a “fire hazard” and will be
stored in a flammable solvent storage area or a flammable storage cabinet. More detailed
discussions on fire hazards can be found in OSHA’s regulations (29 Code of Federal
Regulations 1910) and your local fire codes.




                                                                                                    10
Reactivity Guidelines
While NFPA has developed some guidelines on what constitutes a reactive chemical, their
emphasis is centered on a fire emergency. Other guidelines on which chemicals are reactive
can be found in regulations from the Department of Transportation (49 CFR) and the
Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR).

At the district, a reactive chemical is one which is:
     Ranked by NFPA as 3 or 4 for reactivity.
     Determined by the US DOT as either:
     An oxidizer
     An organic peroxide
     An explosive (Classes A, B, or C)
     Fits the US EPA definition of reactive in 40 CFR 261
     Fits the OSHA definitions of unstable or polymerizable
     Is found to be reactive with ordinary substances

Once a chemical has been determined to be reactive, all proper safety precautions will be used
including extra segregation in storage and prohibition on mixing with other chemicals without
appropriate personal protection and precautions.


Corrosively and Contact Hazards
A corrosive chemical is defined by OSHA, DOT, and EPA. So the district will consider a
chemical corrosive if it fits the definition of corrosive found in regulations by:
     OSHA (29 CFR)
     DOT (40 CFR)
     EPA (40 CFR)
     Or it has a very low or high pH
A skin or eye contact hazard chemical is one where the chemical’s route of entry for its toxic
effects is through the skin or eyes. Chemicals which are contact hazards will be determined by
examining the MDSD or medical and industrial awareness literature.




                                                                                             11
Safety Labels
All chemicals, including solutions, should be labeled with name and concentration.

Alternatively to procedures in Part 4, the district can use the available information on the labels
and MSDS of products purchased that rank the four hazard groups of Health, Fire, Reactivity,
and Contact from 0 (for least hazard) to 4 (for greatest hazard). Color codes are also given to
suggest appropriate segregation and storage precautions.

Appropriate control measures are as follows:
    Health Hazards – have health ranking of 3 or 4. Note that since the color code is for
      storage, a health hazard might not have a BLUE label because it might also be
      flammable, reactive, or a contact hazard. These materials will have restricted access
      and use. The user of these chemicals will use appropriate controls such as closed glove
      boxes, fume hoods, gloves, respiratory protection, etc.

      Fire Hazards – have a flammability ranking of 3 or 4 if they are flammable, but are
       considered fire hazards if their ranking is 2 or more. Because chemicals which are fire
       hazards have special storage requirements, any chemical ranking 2 or more gets a RED
       label regardless of other hazards. If those other hazards are severe (3) or extreme (4),
       then the label is striped to warn the user to read it before use and for segregated
       storage. Flammable and combustible chemicals, with ranking of 2 or greater, must be
       used in vented areas, fume hoods and must be protected from sources of ignition.

      Reactive Hazards – have a reactivity ranking of 3 or 4. If it is not also a fire hazard, the
       label is colored YELLOW to indicate that segregated storage is necessary. Read the
       label and MSDS before use to determine what the material reacts with. Do not mix this
       chemical with other chemicals except under supervision, with splash and explosion
       shielding. Note the “expiration date” on the label and both use and dispose of the
       remainder of the chemical before that date.

      Contact Hazards – have a contact ranking of 3 or 4. Read the label to determine if the
       chemical is corrosive or toxic with skin or eye contact as the route of entry. The label
       might be WHITE or STRIPED depending on other hazards and whether it is acidic or
       caustic. Personnel using chemicals which are contact hazards will cover exposed areas
       of the skin, will wear proper eye and face protection. Safety showers and eyewashes
       should be available before using any contact hazard.

      ORANGE or GREEN Labeled Chemicals – have no hazard ranking greater than 2 and
       flammability ranking is less than 2. These are slight hazards and standard awareness
       and safety practices will be used to prevent unnecessary exposure.




                                                                                                  12
PART 5.
EMPLOYEE INFORMATION, TRAINING & DOCUMENTATION
This section incorporates the minimal informational requirements of the OSHA Standard with suggestions
for making an employee informational and training program effective.

Informational Requirements
OSHA has required that employees be informed of:
      The existence, location and availability of this document (CSGP).
      The criteria to select, use, and the limits of personal protective equipment.
      Exposure limits including TLV and PEL.
      The emergency procedures and the location of emergency equipment.
      The location of available reference materials including the Material Safety Data Sheets.
Information does not need to be a formal training session in a classroom setting. Information can be from
informal group or individual discussions with one’s supervisor, posted notices, or handout booklets.
OSHA has not shown interest in how the employees learn this information, but if asked by an OSHA
inspector, the employees must be able to answer those issues accurately.

Training Documentation
Formal employee training will be documented on attendance sheets kept with the master copy of the
CSGP housed at the Central Office of the building.




                                                                                                       13
Appendix A
                    Shawnee Mission School District
                    Procedure for Chemical Disposal
Emergency Chemical Disposal Process
If there is a hazardous chemical that needs to be removed immediately, call the
Warehouse Supervisor 993-8405, followed by the content area resource specialist: Art,
993-8619; Career and Tech. Ed, 993-8792; Nurse: 993-6297; Science/Health 993-8667.

For chemicals not requiring emergency action:
1. Complete a four-part requisition stating the need for chemical pick-up.

2. Complete the Chemical Disposal Inventory form describing the chemicals for
disposal.

3. Send copies of both forms to the warehouse supervisor and content area resource
specialist at Indian Creek.

4. The chemical inventory list will be sent from the warehouse to Johnson County EPA
to provide the required disposal processes. The list with EPA information will be sent
back to the school to proceed with the packing process.

5. Send a request to the warehouse for the estimated number of 5 gallon buckets and
vermiculite needed for packing.

6. The warehouse will bring the requested 5 gallon buckets and vermiculite to pack the
chemicals for disposal. Only compatible chemicals should be packed in each bucket.
Teachers follow the Jo. Co. EPA packing instructions for compatible chemicals. Each
bucket should be labeled with the chemicals it contains. Use the inventory form to list
the chemicals being sent.

7. Leave the chemicals in a safe location on your shelf until further information is
provided. Except for urgent needs, chemical disposal will be scheduled when 5
schools have requested a pick up. You will be notified of the pick-up date.




                                                                                          14
Appendix B
                      Chemical Disposal Inventory
School ________________________________________________________________

Contact Person_________________________________________________________

Date _________________________________________________________________

              Waste Description
      Common names and/or chemical names   Size of container   Volume or mass of waste




                                                                                  15

				
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