Docstoc

UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL

Document Sample
UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL Powered By Docstoc
					                      UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL

                      PHYSIOLOGY DEPARTMENT



                  SAFETY CODE OF PRACTICE




Updated August 2008
                         STATEMENT OF SAFETY POLICY.

The Physiology department is committed to provide, so far as reasonably
practicable, a safe and healthy working environment for its staff, students and
visitors, and will adopt as a minimum standard the legal requirements for health and
safety.


Safety will be considered as a priority when individuals, or research groups are
involved in the funding and development of research or teaching projects.


Laboratories will produce and display a code of practice that will identify general and
specific hazards in those areas. These codes of practice and the departmental
safety policy will be reviewed regularly.


A formal safety inspection will be carried out twice a year when health and safety
practices and arrangements will be monitored.


Accidents and incidents reported to the departmental safety co-ordinator or the
laboratory superintendent‟s office will be recorded, a copy of which will be sent to the
University safety advisors office. The reports will then be discussed at the next
meeting of the departmental safety committee.


The department will provide first aid materials at key points in the building, and
further supplies may be obtained from the laboratory superintendents‟ office.


Fire exits from the building will be clearly marked and appropriate extinguishers will
be provided.
A fire drill will take place sometime during the first term of each new academic year.
Regular weekly testing of the fire alarm system will take place.


A safety bulletin board will be provided where safety notices will be displayed and
notification of departmental safety committee meetings will be posted. This
information will also be available in each of the main laboratory areas.
A suggestion box will be provided in the departmental common room to enable
people to raise questions of safety anonymously if they so wish.
Senior technical staff meet to discuss new safety circulars as required, and pass on
relevant information.


The departmental safety committee will meet as and when required or requested but
no less than once a year.
The committee will be responsible for departmental policy statements,
implementation and development.
The safety committee will review safety policy and performance and will prepare an
action plan at the annual meeting to improve safety awareness and standards.
                    DEPARTMENTAL SAFETY COMMITTEE.




Professor. S. Dimaline. (Chair)
Professor. O.H. Petersen.
Dr. J. Coulson. (Radiation safety officer)
Dr. J. Barclay
Dr. O. Gerasimenko (Non ionising radiation safety)
Mrs H. Davies. (Dept safety Co-ordinator)
Mr S Bainbridge (Deputy Safety co-ordinator)
Mr D Franks (Fire Safety Co-ordinator)
Ms A Michael (Student representative)
Mr G Williams

This safety policy statement has been prepared and issued by the departmental
safety committee.
Safety Personnel.

Safety co-ordinator.         Mrs. H. Davies,
                             Room A07 Roberts suite
                             Ext. 44179

Deputy Safety co-ordinator .Mr. S Bainbridge,
                         Workshop, Nuffield building.
                         Ext.45336.

Biological safety officer.   Dr Jill Bubb
                             White block.
                             Ext.44770

Radiation safety officer.    Dr. J. Coulson,
                             Room 214 Nuffield Building.
                             Ext.45850

Laser safety officer.        Dr. O. Gerasimenko,
                             Room 1.09 Blue block
                             Ext.45322

Fire safety Co-ordinator     Mr D Franks
                             Room G.04a Yellow block
                             Ext 45329

Senior technical staff.

                             Mr. M. Houghton, Blue block,
                             ext.45355

(First Aider)                Mrs. H. Davies, Green block,
                             Ext.44179

(First Aider)                Mr. G. Williams, Red block,
                             Ext.45793

(First Aider)                Mr. W. Franks, Yellow block,
                             Ext.45329

                             Mr. I. Kirk, White block,
                             Ext.44770

(First Aider)                Mrs. C. Levene, Teaching laboratory,
                             Ext.45338

                             Mr. S. Bainbridge, Workshop,
                             Ext.45336
School and Departmental responsibility.

The head of the School of Biomedical Sciences is formally responsible to the senate
and council of the University for ensuring, so far as is reasonable and practical, that
the health and safety of staff, students and general public are not adversely affected
by the activities of the School.

Each individual working in the School has a legal obligation to take reasonable care
for the health and safety of him or herself and of other persons, who may be
affected by their acts or omissions.

Within research groups, the academic members of staff leading these groups are
responsible for the compliance of safety rules and regulations, and also the safe
working practices of staff and students working in that group.




Safety information.

Safety notices are posted on the safety bulletin board in the common room A.05.
Each main laboratory area has copies of safety circulars and memos. Each
laboratory will also have a safety code and copies of specific assessments which
must be consulted before you begin work in those areas.

Copies of all university and departmental safety codes are kept by Mrs H Davies
room A.07, Roberts Suite. These include:
COSHH regulations.
Guide lines for filling out risk assessments.
GMAG regulations.
Manual Handling policy.
Display Screen Equipment.
PUWER.
Code of practice on Allergy to Laboratory Animals
University safety policy for working with Radiation.

University codes of practice are also available online via the University website.



Work outside normal hours

Staff working outside normal working hours must fill in details in the record book
which may be found on the reception desk in the entrance foyer.
Experimental work outside normal working hours must be arranged with a group
head or supervisor.
If you are working alone in the department outside normal working hours (8.00am –
6.00pm) you must inform security on Ext 43252 when you arrive and again when
you leave the department.
Unattended experiments.

If you intend to carry on any experimental procedure or run any experimental
equipment which will remain active and working after you have left the building you
must complete a report form.
A copy of the form must be displayed next to the ongoing experiment and another
copy should be displayed close to the department entrance.
Forms are available from the laboratory superintendent‟s office, room A.07,Roberts
Suite.

Accident and incident reporting.

A report form should be completed for every personal injury or “near miss” caused
as a result of the work you are doing or by University property.
A copy of this report form will be sent to the University safety advisor.
The form can be obtained from Mrs Helen Davies the safety co-ordinator, room
A.07Roberts suite.




Standard First Aid Procedures


Eyes         Irrigate thoroughly with cold running water for at least 15 minutes. Hold
             eyelids open with fingers to ensure adequate flushing. Seek medical
             attention.

Skin         Flush affected area with copious amounts of water for at least 15
             minutes. Remove contaminated clothing and shoes and wash before
             reuse. Seek medical attention.

Mouth        Wash out mouth with water. Do not induce vomiting. Seek medical
             attention.

Inhalation   Remove subject from exposure. Rest and keep warm. Give artificial
             respiration if patient is not breathing. NEVER GIVE ANYTHING BY
             MOUTH TO AN UNCONSCIOUS PATIENT. Seek medical attention if
             exposure has been excessive.
Fire precautions and procedures.

All members of staff and students working in the department should know:
1) The location and how to operate fire fighting equipment in the department.
2) The location and operation of fire alarms in the building, and how to call the fire
   brigade.
3) The location of alternative escape routes for leaving the building in the event of a
   fire.


On discovering a fire.
a) Sound the alarm.
b) Telephone security (dial 2222); they will contact the fire brigade.
c) Use the nearest appropriate fire extinguisher to put out or contain the fire, but do
so without endangering yourself or others. If the fire is small and can be put out
easily with an extinguisher, take immediate action to extinguish it. Report to security
  control (43252) so that a check can then be made that the fire is out.


On hearing the alarm.

Persons not engaged in containing or fighting the fire must:
a) Make safe any experiment or equipment in use.
b) Evacuate the building as quickly as possible, closing doors.
c) Leave the building and go to assembly point. (DO NOT USE THE LIFT)


The assembly point for the Crown street block is the car park outside the main
entrance to the building. The assembly point for the Teaching Lab, Henry
Wellcome wing, Nuffield third floor corridor and Workshop is outside the main
entrance in the Ashton street car park.


d) Never assume that the alarm is a false alarm. Act quickly but calmly.
e) On no account must you re-enter the building until you are given clearance by a
   fire officer or the safety officer.


Every member of staff or student will be issued with a copy of the Departmental fire
regulations. They must be read and a receipt signed to confirm acceptance.
Waste disposal.

The department generates large amounts of waste, some of which will require
special disposal methods. Waste bags are colour coded and it is essential that
everyone observes the local rules concerning what may or may not be put into these
bags.

The members of the cleaning staff will only empty general waste bins, and they
accept your assurance that these bins and bags do not contain any objects or
materials which may be hazardous to their health.

Waste other than general waste must be disposed of by laboratory staff as
described below.


Black bags.
Normal non-hazardous waste .e.g. Paper, office waste.


Yellow bags.
Waste for incineration EXCLUDING sharps which should be disposed of separately.

Bags must be sealed, labelled showing the name of the department, the users name
and the type of waste in the bag. The bag should then be put into the yellow metal
bin outside the rear entrance to the building and the bin should be locked. The waste
will be collected once a week.


Red, pink bags.
Radioactive contaminated material.

Bags must be sealed and put into the radioactive waste bin which will have been
allocated to your laboratory. When the bin is full a waste disposal form should be
filled in and taken to the laboratory superintendent‟s office. Arrangements will then
be made to collect the waste.
The waste bins are stored in the locked bunker at the rear of the Nuffield building.


Sharps.
Needles, Tips, blades etc.

Put into special CINBIN containers. When the cinbins are 3/4 full the lid should be
taped down to prevent it from opening and placed into the yellow metal waste bin
outside the rear entrance to the building for incineration.
Glass.
Metal bins are provided in all laboratories marked GLASS ONLY. The bins should
then be emptied into the general waste skips which are stored outside the rear of the
building. Protective gloves and goggles are available in the laboratory and should be
worn when removing glass bins to the general waste skips.


Chemical waste.
Check chemical data sheet and specific assessment for disposal method.
If it is not acceptable to wash the waste down the sink or if there is any doubt about
how to dispose of the material contact the senior technician in charge of your
laboratory area.


Waste paper.
Waste paper bins are provided.
These bins are for paper and general office waste only. Cardboard boxes should be
folded flat and placed outside the rear of the building for collection. Do not leave
empty boxes or boxes containing packing material for collection in the laboratory or
office where they may cause an obstruction.


Aqueous liquid radioactive waste.
Aqueous liquid waste may be disposed of down a designated sink.
The tap should be turned to give a gentle flow of water without splashing. The
aqueous waste can then be slowly poured into the flow of water, taking care to avoid
splashing which may contaminate the area surrounding the sink.
The water should be allowed to continue to flow after the waste has been poured
into the sink in order to flush the waste away.
Date, isotope, and activity should be recorded in the log sheet.


Aqueous biological waste.
Aqueous biological waste for disposal down the sink must be autoclaved before
disposal.
The cooled waste may then be discarded down the sink taking care to flush the
waste away with running water from the tap.
          General safety rules for the Physiology department.


In any laboratory there are hazards and areas of risk to the laboratory worker.
With some planning and forethought, the potential dangers can be minimised or
removed completely.

The following points are basic rules which should be observed in any laboratory. In
addition, laboratories or working methods may have specific risks attached to them,
and you should ask your supervisor to discuss these risks with you BEFORE you
undertake any new work.


                    STOP-THINK-IF IN DOUBT...ASK!


1. You should wear a suitable laboratory coat in the laboratory, not only to protect
   yourself from contamination by the materials you are working with, but also to
   protect others you come into contact with outside the laboratory.

2. Cuts, scratches, or abrasions on your hands or face should be covered before
   working in the laboratory even if you are working with non-hazardous, non-
   aggressive materials.

3. Eating, drinking, and the application of cosmetics in the laboratory is forbidden.

4. Use safe working practices at all times, and suitable protective equipment
   whenever necessary.

5. Read instructions and labels carefully and plan your experiment so that you may
   carry out your work safely.

6. Report any accidents, spillages, and potentially dangerous incidents to the
   technician or supervisor in charge of the laboratory.

7. Solutions and samples prepared during your experiment must be labelled to
   show details of these materials and any relevant hazard information.

8. At the end an experiment clean up your work area and dispose of any solutions
   and samples which are not needed. Any material which is to be stored for future
   use must be labelled correctly.

9. Before leaving the laboratory remove your lab coat and wash your hands.

10. Laboratory coats and gloves must not be worn in the staff common room,
    seminar room or meeting rooms.
                TEACHING LABORATORY CODE OF PRACTICE.


1.   A suitable laboratory coat must be worn at all times in the teaching laboratory.

2.   Eating, drinking and the application of makeup in the laboratory are forbidden.

3.   Long hair must be tied back at all times.

4.   Cuts and abrasions must be covered by a waterproof dressing. These may be
     obtained from the preparation room.

5.   Contaminated paper waste must be put into the yellow waste bag provided.

6.   Broken glass should be reported to the technician in charge of the laboratory.
     Sharps must be put into the CINBIN provided.

7.   Gloves are available from the preparation room and must be worn when the
      practical involves contact with blood or urine.

8.   All spillage‟s must be reported to the technician in charge of the laboratory. The
     area may need to be cleaned and disinfected.

9.   All accidents must be reported to the technician in charge of the laboratory. An
     accident report form must be completed.

10. Before you leave the laboratory, please wash your hands.




                               IF IN DOUBT .....ASK!
                          SAFETY CODE OF PRACTICE


                                 DR.M.CLAGUE.

                        5th FLOOR NUFFIELD BUILDING




Eating and drinking NOT allowed in laboratory areas.

Laboratory coats must be worn in rooms when engaged in experiments.

Laboratory coats must never be worn in room in offices or meeting rooms. They
should be put on the hanger by the door and not left on chairs or stools.

A specific protocol for working with any noxious substances must be worked out in
advance of any experiments, by the experimenter together with Mike Clague.

General safety matters arising can be discussed at weekly laboratory meetings.
          Department of Physiology Safety code of practice

                   for GREEN BLOCK LABORATORIES

                                supervised by

                          Professor G. J. Dockray




   This code of practice should be read, and implemented by all members of staff,
  students and visiting workers to Green Block. Workers using the microbiology,
tissue culture labs, handling human plasma, working with radiation or carrying
 out animal handling work should also be made aware of the relevant separate
                                  codes of practice.




                                                                 Revised August 2008
                   Green Block Safety Code Of Practice


GENERAL

  1. There is a safety information area located in room 1.22.
  2. A risk assessment should be carried out as per University guidelines
     BEFORE any work is carried out. a COSHH assessment should be carried
     out for any hazardous chemical BEFORE it is ordered or used. Copies of all
     assessments and hazard data sheets are kept in the safety information area
     in room 1.22.
  3. The department will issue individuals with a labcoat, these MUST be worn at
     all times.
  4. Laboratory coats will be collected for laundry each week and a new coat will
     be issued. Spare lab coats are available ,contact Marie Johnson
  5. The laboratory must be kept clean and tidy; spillages must be cleaned up
     immediately.
  6. The last person leaving the laboratory must ensure all windows and doors are
     closed and locked.
  7. Sinks for hand washing are readily available with soap and paper towels.
     They should not be used for any other purposes.
  8. The FIRST AID BOX is sited between doors 1.32 and 1.33. All accidents
     should be reported to Helen Davies your first aider.



CHEMICALS AND SOLVENTS

  1. Toxic chemicals must be kept locked in the poisons cupboard in room 1.29
  2. Risk assessments according to COSHH rules should be carried out before
     ordering or using the chemicals. Hazard data sheets for all chemicals should
     be kept.
  3. There is a card index system cataloguing all chemicals and solvents,
     including their location and main hazards. This is located in the safety
     information area in room 1.22.
  4. A list of chemicals used must be kept in lab books.
  5. Chemicals should always be stored in their original containers.
  6. Solvents should be kept in the appropriate solvent bins.
  7. Waste solvents should be poured into the appropriate canisters in rooms 1.33
     or 1.27. Halogenated or Non-Halogenated.
  8. Old and unwanted chemicals should be labelled with waste tags and Helen
     Davies informed. The department of Chemistry will then collect or advise on
     disposal.



RADIATION

  1. Workers must register with the radiation protection office before starting work
     with radioactive compounds.
  2. Radioactive compounds must be ordered and received in accordance with the
     local guidelines.
  3. Radiation “badges” must be worn if issued along with laboratory coats and
     gloves.
  4. Radiation work should only be carried out in designated laboratories or areas
     and all work should take place on a spill tray.
  5. Any spillage of an isotope must be cleaned up immediately as per local rules.
  6. Work areas and personnel should be monitored after work has been carried
     out and readings recorded in the contamination logbook for that area.
  7. Solid waste should be disposed of in the appropriate bins (solid or scintillation
     vials) and the activity of the waste entered on the forms provided.
  8. Aqueous waste must be disposed of down designated sinks. The activity
     disposed must be entered on the waste form provided.
  9. In the event of a person becoming contaminated with radioactivity there is a
     safety shower in room 1.32



EQUIPMENT

  1. No one should use a piece of equipment unless trained to do so. User lists
     are displayed near large pieces of equipment, only people on this list are
     authorised to use the equipment until full training is given. Risk assessments
     for the use of larger pieces of equipment have been carried out.
  2. Any piece of equipment being used overnight should have a form with it
     clearly labelled with the users name, procedure and contact number. These
     forms are available from the safety information area in room 1.22.


FRIDGE/FREEZER

  1. All samples must be stored in appropriate containers clearly marked with:
     Owners name, Storage temperature, and Date.
  2. Radioactive isotopes and samples should only be stored, clearly marked in
     locked fridges/freezers in rooms 1.22/1.33
  3. Flammable solvents should only be stored in spark proof fridges/freezers.
  4. Biohazards stored must be clearly marked and only stored in labelled
     fridges/freezers in accordance with the Human Materials regulations.


BALANCES

  1. Always clean and switch off after use.
  2. Hazardous chemicals should be weighed out in the fume hood in room
     1.32.Filter masks are available in this room.
  3. After using the fine balance always enter details of the chemical used and its
     hazards.


CENTRIFUGES

  1. No one should use centrifuge unless trained to do so.
  2. Ensure all buckets are balanced and loaded into the centrifuge correctly.
  3. If there is a logbook, always fill it in at the end of each run.
  4. Human plasma must only be spun in the centrifuge in room 1.32 If there is a
     spillage disinfect the buckets with Trigene solution.
  5. Centrifuges should always be left clean and dry. Remove the buckets from
     the centrifuge at the end of each day.


AUTOMATIC PIPETTES

  1. Pipettes should always be stored upright.
  2. Used tips should be put into the nearest sharps bin. These bins are then
     sealed, labelled and taken to the large yellow bins outside the back door.
  3. Do not leave pipettes lying down with tips on. Anything in the tip may run
     back into the pipette.
  4. Never try to use a pipette for a volume smaller or greater than its volume limit.


ACCIDENTS

  1. All accidents must be reported to a first aider Helen Davies. and an accident
     form must be filled in after an accident.
  2. All cuts must be covered with waterproof plasters.
  3. Do not leave anything lying about that may cause a trip hazard.
  4. Wipe up ALL spills on floors and benches. Do not leave it for others to do.


                  Work within specialist areas in Green Block

  There are additional codes of practice for working within specific areas within
  green block. These include:
     1. Working in tissue culture labs 1.19b, 1.26, 1.35
     2. Working in Microbiology lab 1.28
     3. Working in RNA lab 1.36
     4. Working in Molecular biology lab 1.33
     5. Working with animals
     6. Handling human samples.
                      Safety Code of Practice for Blue Block

The Safety Code of Practice for Blue Block details specific hazards and reiterates the
general rules, should workers have turned to this section straight away.

Important: for first-time workers in the Blue Block area

No worker can commence laboratory work before the completion of the necessary
safety data forms listed below: -
 1. All work projects require that a risk assessment be carried out to assess the
    dangers relative to the project in question. Risk assessment forms can only be
    completed by the supervisor responsible for managing the worker/ project. A copy
    of the completed form must be stored safely by the worker/ applicant.

2. In addition to a project Risk Assessment form, many experimental procedures
   involve the use of chemicals and drugs which pose their own risks to worker safety.
   Chemicals need to be individually assessed using COSHH forms – also to be
   completed by the project supervisor.

More information on Risk and COSHH assessments can be obtained from Mark
Houghton (x45355).

3. On completion of the risk assessment form and during the course of relaying
   information, if the worker/ applicant gives information which suggests that they may
   suffer from allergic reaction to, for example, animal exposure (or any other
   allergen), then it is the duty of the supporting staff in Blue Block to inform the
   worker/ applicant that it may not be possible for them to commence work at all in
   the Blue Block area. A further appointment will be made for them to attend a
   medical examination at the Occupational Health Department to investigate further
   the nature of the allergen problem. Provided that the Occupational health Nurse is
   satisfied that the worker/ applicant will not be at risk, then the Head of Department
   of Physiology will be notified and then, formally, the worker will be allowed to
   commence laboratory work. This procedure must be followed before any laboratory
   work can take place.

General Procedures

The First Aid box for Blue Block is located on the wall between Room's 1.09 & 1.11.
Additional First Aid supplies can be obtained from Mrs Helen Davies (x44719).

The wearing of White laboratory coats is compulsory in all laboratories in Blue Block
(important exception: see the section on animal handling area in this chapter). White
coats are issued by the Department every Tuesday morning and the washing of coats is
also arranged by the Department (please do not remove coats from the Department for
washing at home). Further information regarding the distribution and weekly collection of
white coats can be obtained from Mrs Marie Johnson (Tel ext. 45335).

The consumption of food/drink is strictly forbidden in areas where experimental work is
being carried out. Eating and drinking should be confined to the Staff Common Room or
assigned office areas. Staff working in Blue block will be asked to sign a list
acknowledging that they have received a listing of laboratories and offices where eating/
drinking restrictions are applicable.

The Animal Handling Area

An area of room 1.03 in Blue Block has been assigned suitable for schedule 1
killing of mice/rats. There are a number of strict guidelines which must be
observed before any work can be commenced in this area.
Each worker is given a safety information package on arrival in the department. Staff
expected to work with animals and who suffer from allergen sensitivity, will be asked to
complete a questionnaire. This is a requirement by law. More information may be
obtained from the document 'Code of Practice for Allergy to Laboratory Animals',
available from Mr Mark Houghton in Blue Block.

Important: regardless of a workers involvement in schedule 1 handling procedure, all
users of Rm 1.03 prep room must be assessed (for allergen sensitivity and experimental
risk assessment) due to the proximity and potential exposure to airborne allergen. For
more information contact Mr Mark Houghton.

The correct techniques for animal handling will be taught during a teaching session
arranged for the worker by Mr Mark Houghton. The teaching session will be carried out by
Mr David Trafford from the Animal Unit.

All animal handling and related work must be carried out in the approved fume hood in
Room1.03. The fume hood must remain ON at all times (i.e. 24hrs).


Nitrile gloves and masks must be worn by those handling animals (These will be
provided).

Colour-coded Navy Blue laboratory coats are supplied to be worn exclusively in Room
1.03. This is to minimise the spread of allergens. Regardless of whether staff are handling
animals or undertaking general laboratory tasks in this room, you MUST wear a Navy Blue
laboratory coat. Before entering the room, you must leave your white laboratory coat on
the hangers provided outside the room. The Navy coats are collected for cleaning every
Friday at 2.00pm. Under no conditions must white coats be allowed to come into contact
with navy coats. Before leaving Room 1.03, and having completed your animal work,
hands should be washed thoroughly at the hand basin within Room 1.03 (not the main
prep room sink). All used blue coats must remain in Room 1.03.

Waste associated with animal use (contaminated paper, animal tissue etc) should be
disposed of in the yellow plastic bags provided and stored temporarily in the deep freeze
(Rm 1.04). For further details about disposal contact Mr Mark Houghton.
Disposal of waste paper should be in the bins clearly labelled as „Paper Only'. Likewise,
disposal of glass should be in the blue 'Glass Only' bins.

Procedure for ordering animals---See Mark Houghton


Solvent Storage in Blue Block

Organic Solvents used in Blue Block are predominately alcohols - Ethanol, Methanol.
Both are stored in the Solvent locker, Rm 1.08. A key can be obtained from Mark
Houghton. Naturally, it will be expected that all staff observe the common rule of not
storing inorganic acids (Hydrochloric acid, Nitric acid in the Blue Block area) in the same
confined area as alcohols.


Genetic Manipulation Work

The designated area for Genetic Manipulation is Room 1.08, which has been authorised
for Containment Level 2. All workers hoping to work in this area must first be instructed in
Genetic Manipulation laboratory techniques (contact Drs Oleg and Julia Gerasimenko).
Before commencing any work in this area, please consult Prof Alexei Tepikin or Dr Oleg
Gerasimenko.


Confocal Microscopy

Special microscope systems utilising Confocal technology are currently in daily use in
the following areas of Blue Block: -
Rm 1.16B (this room is situated inside Rm 1.04)
Rm 1.13
Rm 1.07

The nature of Confocal Microscopy requires the use of Laser beam technology which is
highly sensitive to vibration and potentially hazardous if exposed through accidental
mishandling. For this reason, only staff authorised by Prof Alexei Tepikin may be
allowed in these rooms.

In Prof Tepikins' absence, permission may be sort from Dr Oleg Gerasimenko (however
potential users have to receive some training from the departmental Laser Officer
(contact Mark Houghton for the latest information on staff appointed for this purpose).

During periods of Maintenance of the laser beam units, the immediate areas affected will
have restricted access and all staff working in the area will be notified.


Risk, COSSH Assessment forms and Chemical Safety Data Sheets

Copies of Risk Assessments, COSHH Assessment sheets and Safety Data Sheets for all
chemicals used in Blue Block area are kept in room 1.04, on the top shelf above the desk
of Mark Houghton. Documentation referring to all safety matters for the Blue Block area.

Centrifuges, Autoclaves

The Centrifuge room is located on the 1st floor next to the cold room. Workers must be
instructed how to use the centrifuge correctly by an authorised user. For Blue Block the
authorised user is Dr Julia Gerasimenko. On completion of training, the worker will be
included on a list of authorised Departmental centrifuge users.
The autoclave room is situated on the first floor and located within the Tissue Culture
Suite. Workers must be instructed how to use the autoclave correctly by an authorised
user. For Blue Block the user is Dr Julia Gerasimenko.
Accident and incident reporting

A report form should be completed for every personal injury caused as a result of the
work you are doing or by University property. A copy of this report form will be sent to
the University Safety Advisor. The form can be obtained from Mrs Helen Davies.

Safety Notices

Notices regarding current safety information can be found on the notice board on the left
hand wall after entering room 1.04.
SAFETY CODE OF PRACTICE FOR THE WHITE BLOCK


     NEUROTRANSMITTOR BIOLOGY GROUP
          (LABS A11, A12, A15, A16)
          WORKING WITH GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS.

1.a) Prior to commencement of any experimental work all staff should receive approval from the local
GM committee for the work they are proposing to undertake. This is a legal requirement and
mandatory. Adequate time should be allowed for approval to be given, bear in mind that fees may be
payable and approval needed from the HSE if working at levels higher than Class I. COSHH risk
assessment forms for work with biological agents (and carcinogens if relevant) should also be
completed. These forms should be regularly updated as the project evolves and further approval
sought where necessary.
 b) All staff must be trained and approved competent in good microbiological practices (see appendix)
by the Principal Investigator responsible for their work.

2. The areas in the laboratory suite where genetically modified organisms can be handled are:

Lab A15, Containment level 1: Live E.coli derivatives may be handled here, once the bacteria are
lysed and therefore dead small-scale cultures (<10mls) may be handled in A11 and A12. The
exception is work involving naked oncogenic DNA (this does not include sub-fragments of oncogenic
DNA which do not have the potential to transform/immortalise or allow escape from normal growth
control or induce anchorage-independent growth) this must always proceed in the designated areas.
All large-scale culture work and processing must be completed in A15.

Lab A16, Containment level 1: All genetic modification of cultured cells must take place here.

Work involving animals: Although there are no facilities within the Laboratory Suite itself for animal
work, Principal Investigators of projects involving genetic modification of animals should complete a
risk assessment form. Animals that satisfy the condition that they are as safe in the containment
facility (i.e. the animal house) as any recipient or parent non-manipulated animal may be maintained in
one of the University Animal Facilities subject to consultation with the staff responsible for these
facilities. Note that the requirements of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986, must be
observed.


If the work is to proceed at a higher containment level i.e. Higher than Containment Level 1,
individuals must consult the BSO and principal Investigator to identify suitable areas at the correct
containment level.

3. General rules when working with genetically modified organisms.
    (a)     The laboratory door of the containment facility must be closed when work is in progress.
    (b)     Laboratory coats (Howie style) or gowns must be worn in the laboratory and removed
            when leaving the laboratory suite.
    (c)     Eating, chewing, drinking, smoking, storage of food or applying of cosmetics must not
            take place in the laboratory.
    (d)     Mouth pipetting must not take place.
    (e)     Hands must be disinfected or washed immediately when contamination is suspected, after
            handling viable materials, and also before leaving the laboratory.
    The elbow-operated taps must be used when working at level ACGM 2.

    (f)      All procedures must be performed so as to minimise the production of aerosols.
             Biohazard containment caps must always be used where supplied when centrifuging
             biological/genetically modified material.
    (g)      In the event of spillage, all contaminated surfaces must be decontaminated with a 1:50
             dilution of Trigene. (working solution stable for 12 months).
    (h)      Bench tops and Class II hood must be cleaned before and after use.
    All equipment must be removed from the Class II hood.
    (i)     Used glassware and other materials should be immediately disinfected (1:50 dilution of
         Trigene) in the appropriate container. Pipettes must be totally immersed.
         Safety protocols for the Red Block

                  Laboratories supervised

 by Prof. R D Burgoyne and Prof. Alan Morgan


General Laboratory Guidelines

Laboratory Procedures for use of Isotopes in G39

Code of Practice for Genetic Manipulation Experiments

Animal Exposure
                                Red Block Laboratories

General Laboratory Guidelines

1.     Lab coats should be worn at all times while carrying out experimental work.

2.     Hands should be washed when experimental procedures are completed.

3.     No food or drinks should be consumed or stored in any laboratory areas in Red
       block.

4.     All work areas should be tidied after use and at the end of each day. Broken
       glassware, plastic pipettes or scalpel blades should be disposed of in
       appropriate designated containers; all used glass and plastic ware transferred
       for washing and benches cleaned.

6.     All containers with chemical solutions or solvents should be clearly labelled.

7.     In the event of spillages in specified work areas or in any general work area
       contaminated benches and equipment should be cleaned immediately. Any
       spillages on the floor should also be attended to.

8.     If chemicals are to be used or procedures undertaken for which a specific risk
       assessment has been prepared all aspects of the assessment should be
       adhered to. All workers of the group will be provided with copies of all risk
       assessments.

9.     In all cases where any potentially biohazardous reagents are used the following
       should be adhered to.

i)     Disposable gloves should be worn.
ii)    Stock solutions should be prepared in the fume cupboard in the preparation
       room (G31). Work with high concentrations of any volatile substances should
       be carried out in a fume cupboard.
iii)   Any contaminated materials should be disposed of in yellow bags for
       incineration. Contaminated glass and plastic ware should be soaked in 10%
       bleach and washed before re-use.

iv)    Any spillages should be dealt with immediately and these and any other
       accidents reported to Professor R D Burgoyne or Geoff Williams and the
       Laboratory Office (Len Lucas).
v)     Disposal of any chemicals or solvents must only be done after consultation with
       Geoff Williams about the correct procedures.

10.    Packaging and boxes from deliveries should immediately be put in bins or
       placed on the floor next to bins for removal.

11.    Work with radioisotopes will only be carried out in room G39 by registered
       personnel after appropriate training and in accordance with local regulations
       and Red Block Laboratory practice for room G39.
12.   Work on genetic manipulation will only be carried out in room G38 by
      designated staff on appropriate projects after training in accordance with Red
      Block Laboratory Practice for room G38.

13.   Any proposed laboratory work outside of standard working hours (8.00am -
      6.30pm) should have the prior approval of Professor R D Burgoyne.

14.   A file on specific risk assessments, safety procedures and safe disposal
      techniques will be maintained by Geoff Williams and available in the Central
      Laboratory area of Red Block.

15.   Centrifuges should only be used after training in their correct use.

16.   A Guide to first aid will be posted in Red Block Central Laboratory.

17.   All new members of the laboratory will be given these guidelines and
      appropriate instructions in safety measures to be used.

18.   Members of other groups may only use equipment in Red Block Laboratories
      with the prior permission of Professor R D Burgoyne.



It is the responsibility of all members of the laboratory to safeguard themselves
and others by respecting the above procedures.
Laboratory Procedures for the use of Radioisotopes in G39
(Red Block)
1. Clearly labelled (including date of delivery) radioactive isotope stocks should be
   stored in a sealed container in the designated fridge or –20°C freezer in G39.

2. Disposable gloves (preferably two pairs) and a G39-designated lab coat (fully
   buttoned to the top) should be worn at all times in G39 when performing any
   experimental work involving radioisotopes.

3. All experimental work should be carried out over a plastic spill tray (with
   appropriate shielding if required) in G39. Scintillant should be stored and
   dispensed only in the fume cupboard in G39.

4. A full record of radioisotope stock should be kept and updated after every
   experiment. Individual stock sheets for each isotope can be found in the black
   ring binder in G39.

5. A record of any liquid waste disposed of via the designated radioactive disposal
   drain should be kept on the appropriate sheet in the black ring binder. During
   liquid waste disposal in sinks, a good water flow (avoid splashing) should be
   maintained to promote fast removal of the waste.

6. Experimental radioactive waste including pipette tips, culture dishes and stock
   bottles should be placed in the radioactive solid waste bin (yellow bin under
   bench in G39) and the amount of radioactivity recorded on the appropriate sheet
   in the black ring binder. If waste is highly radioactive (eg. 32P), it should be
   placed in the Perspex bin on the bench for decay prior to placing in the yellow
   bin. When the yellow bin is full it should be sealed with the supplied lid and
   placed in the radioactive bunker in the Physiology car park and the completed
   waste sheet given to Len Lucas. Len will issue a new bin.

7. Scintillant waste should be disposed of in the yellow scintillant waste bin under
   the bench in G39 and the amount of radioactivity recorded on the appropriate
   sheet in the black ring binder. When the bin is full, disposal of the bin should be
   carried out as described for the solid waste bin in (6).

8. Contamination checks (particularly for beta and gamma emitters) must be carried
   out before and after each radioactive experiment in G39 with a Geiger-counter
   for beta emitters, scintillation probe for gamma emitters and swab tests for low
   energy beta emitters. Monthly swab tests of all work areas should be carried out.
   All contamination readings must be entered on the appropriate sheet in the black
   ring binder. If required, contaminated plastic spill trays should be replaced and
   any other areas or equipment (particularly the barrels of pipettes) contaminated
   should be decontaminated to an acceptable level using Decon-90.

9. All benches should be cleaned after use and plastic and glassware tidied away.
      4. Laboratory Practice for experimental work at level 1 in Red Block Laboratories

 A copy of these instructions will be posted in GM rooms

4.1    Eating, chewing, drinking, smoking, storing of food, application of cosmetics
must not take place in any GM room. Mouth pipetting must not take place.

4.2      The door to GM rooms must be clearly marked with a Biohazard sign and an
indication of the containment level.

4.3       The laboratory door should be closed when work is in progress.

4.4     Laboratory coats should be worn in GM rooms and removed when leaving the room.
Lab coats should be buttoned all the way up.

4.5     Hands must be disinfected or washed immediately when contamination is
suspected, after handling viable materials, and also before leaving the laboratory.

4.6       All procedures must be performed so as to minimise the production of aerosols.

4.6       Disinfectants must be available for immediate use in the event of spillage.

4.8      Bench tops should be cleaned and disinfected after use (gloves should be worn)
and all work surfaces kept clean and tidy. Workers should monitor the state of the floors and
walls to check that they are not dusty. Used glassware etc. should be placed in the
appropriate disposal bins and not stored on work surfaces.

4.9      Disposable gloves should be worn at all times whilst handling potentially hazardous
material and these should be discarded in the bag for autoclavable waste.

4.10      Contaminated glassware should be autoclaved.

4.11     Glass and plastic pipettes should be placed tip down until fully immersed in
disinfectant and should remain immersed for at least 24 hours before removal and cleaning.
Alternatively solid waste such as plasticware can be placed in yellow bags and sent for
incineration.

4.12   Liquid waste should be inactivated by addition of the appropriate concentrations of
powdered Virkon, Trigen E or other approved disinfectant overnight before disposal in sinks.

4.13      Waste bags should not be allowed to become more than 3/4 full before disposal.

4.14    Hand wash sinks should be used for this purpose only and the taps on these sinks
operated using elbows or wrists.

4.15    Professor R D Burgoyne and Mrs Helen Davies should be informed of any accidents
or untoward incidents.
         Red Block Procedures relating to animal exposure

1.   All workers will be informed of the possible risks of
     development of animal allergy.

2.   No one with previous experience of animal allergy of any kind
     will handle animals or enter rooms used for animal work.


3.   Any evidence of allergic symptoms should be reported to
     Professor R D Burgoyne and Geoff Williams immediately.

4.   Animals will be killed in the Duncan Biomedical Sciences
     Unit.

5.   Workers handling animals will wear lab coats reserved for
     this purpose and gloves. Disposal ori-nasal masks will be
     available.
1.A        LABORATORY SAFETY POLICY FOR S. WRAY’S GROUP


      This laboratory will try to provide, so far as is reasonably
   practicable, a safe and healthy working environment. Thus all
 members of the laboratory must play their part in achieving this,
and I will be responsible for overall implementation. The personnel
of the laboratory and their duties will change from time to time, but
appendix 1 shows the current organisation. I will from time to time
 carry out “health and safety tours”. The laboratories “health and
safety consultative group” will for the foreseeable future involve all
 research personnel including technicians and post-graduate but
 not under-graduate students. Visitors may be co-opted if it is felt
  by the group to be helpful. This group will discuss, review and
  plan safety within the laboratory. The group secretary will take
 minutes of the meeting and help generate any necessary reports.
1.B                 LABORATORY GENERAL CODE OF PRACTICE

1.    All departmental and University safety policies and practices apply to all
people working in the laboratory, no matter how brief the period.

2.    Nobody can work in the laboratory without my knowledge or permission. If
you would like to use a piece of equipment in somebody else‟s laboratory, you must
consult the laboratory head first and be instructed in its safe use. Always be
thoughtful and courteous about the use of shared and other people‟s equipment.

3.    The laboratory‟s specific code of practice for working with human tissue,
animals and chemicals are available to all lab members and you should ensure you
have been given a copy of the appropriate codes

4.    Any comments or questions about the laboratory‟s safety practices can be
brought to my attention at any time. Some matters, e.g. accidents, bites must, in
any case be reported. In my absence you can consult or report matters to any other
member of the safety committee. There will be a group* safety meeting usually
every month to review practices and matters arising.

              *(This is the “health and safety consultative group”)

5.    Under-graduates may not work on laboratory equipment unsupervised outside
of normal working hours (9.00-6.00). Other laboratory workers can work outside
these times to perform routine experiments, computing and so forth. It is not
advisable to change or move gas cylinders if you are on your own. You should sign
the departmental “out of hours working” book which is kept in the entrance. You
may wish to let security know when you arrive and leave. See also departmental
information on burglar alarm.

6.    All communal areas must be kept safe and tidy. You have a duty to leave
these areas safe so that somebody else can come and use them and not be
endangered. Any spills e.g. on benches, balances, set ups, must be dealt with in
the appropriate manner. It is not acceptable, for example, to leave the balance and
area around it, dirty. There will be a 10-30 minute tidying session for all lab
members every week following the lab meeting. A rota for specific tasks e.g.
balances, bench coats is in operation and must be complied with.

7.     Do not leave solutions in glassware you wish to have cleaned. Never leave
unmarked containers around which contain substances that could be harmful to
others e.g. acids or alkalis. Clearly mark containers containing such solutions. Hot
plates which are not in use, but hot, should have the “hot” notice placed by them.

8.    Always have the safety of others and yourself in mind.

9.    Keep as tidy working conditions as you can around your own area. In
darkened labs it is obviously important that nothing is left on the floor, sticking out
and so forth. These labs should not be used as thoroughfares.

10.   All chemicals must be returned to their correct place of storage
11.   All sharps and broken glass must be disposed of in the appropriate manner.
The sharps bins are not for rubbish. The Blue glass bin is only to be used for
placing broken glass in.

12.    It is your responsibility to read the information coming with chemicals you are
using. You should note also the safety instructions and code of practice for the
laboratory.

13.     Do not let electrical cables trail. If you are concerned about a piece of
electrical equipment, see Bill Franks or the departmental electrical technician, Steve
Bainbridge.

14.   Use the trolleys provided for transporting cylinders. These should always be
secured when in use. There are data sheets available on the safe handling,
transporting and storage of gas cylinders. Never over-tighten regulator valves.
Never raise sparks when fitting or opening oxygen cylinders.

15.    All accidents are to be reported to the departmental safety officer and also
written in the “accident report” book in MrsHelen Davies‟ office.




1.    Appendix 1


RESPONSIBILITIES FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY


                                      University
                                           ↓
                                        School
                                  (Safety Committee)
                                           ↓
                                         Group
                                        S. Wray
                                           ↓

     ↓                      ↓                          ↓                       ↓
 General             Chemicals and                 Human                    Animals
  Policy           specific assessment             Tissue                  and tissue
     |                      |                          |                       |
Susan Wray            Bill Franks                 Bill Franks              Dr R Floyd
Bill Franks           Karen Nobel                Ted Burdyga              Bill Franks
                                  ANIMAL TISSUES*

    1. The University’s code of practice on laboratory
  animals shall be given to each member of the laboratory
   involved in using animals, and they should familiarize
                     themselves with it.
2.       All killing and gross dissection of animals will normally be carried out in the
appropriate rooms in the University animal house. Only in exceptional cases will
animals be brought to the lab e.g. for in vivo experiments. When animals need to be
brought to the lab then they should be transported and kept in cages which are fitted
with filters (if available) otherwise covered e.g. in plastic sacs, to prevent the spread
of hair and allergens. The transporting cage should either be quickly returned to the
animal house or stored in a cupboard – this will help prevent the spread of allergens.
Stored cages must be returned on the next working day, at the latest.

3.    Separate lab coats should be worn when dealing with animals (e.g.
transporting and handling) from those worn for experimental procedures. The
“animal” lab coats should be hung in the animal room when not being used. You
must not enter other areas wearing them.

4.     Work with animals can only be carried out in the designated laboratory area.
Access to the room shall be limited to authorised persons. Animals should be
handled only in the designated area.
5.     Animal carcasses and tissues should be placed in yellow disposal bags
before removal of incineration. When necessary these can be placed in the marked
area in the fridge, in the designated laboratory area, for later removal. This should
not however be used as a long-term storage facility. Animal tissue may be stored in
the fridge for 24 hours if suitably labelled (date, initials). Weekly wiping and
disinfecting of the fridge/freezer must be carried out. Yellow bags will be removed
weekly (currently Tuesday p.m./Wednesday a.m.) by Mr. Franks.

6.      Hands must be washed immediately after handling animals or animal waste.
Work areas must be kept clean and regularly disinfected. Play your part in keeping
the fridge clean and removing all yellow bags and pots.

7.   Eating, chewing, drinking, smoking, storing of foods and application of
cosmetics must not take place in the animal room.

8.     Any accidents e.g. bites, must be reported. Keep your tetanus inoculation up-
to-date.

9.     Any new member or working visitor to the laboratory must gain instruction
from animal house staff (Mr. Dave Trafford) on the anaesthetizing and killing of
laboratory animals, and must never undertake these procedures alone and un-
supervised until such time as they are judged competent by him and another
laboratory member. Mr. Trafford holds frequent training session for new group
members. If there are any concerns Professor S. Wray must be appraised. Animals
must be handled gently
(* Containment level 1 assumed)

10.    The risk of developing allergies to animals may be reduced by wearing
appropriate protective clothing e.g. goggles and facemask. Further information can
be obtained in the University‟s Code of Practice for laboratory animal allergy and
from the University Safety Officer.


2.B       WORKING AND SAFETY PRACTISES FOR ANAESTHETISED

                                    ANIMALS

  1. This work may be carried out only by Home-Office
 personal licence holders, who have (or who work for the
    holder of) the appropriate project licence, and all
necessary conditions and rules must be strictly adhered to.
2.    The University‟s code of practice on laboratory animals and allergies should
be read and familiarized.

3.    The laboratories general safety precautions for working with animals and
animal tissue must be read and adhered to.



                                    S. WRAY
3.               SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FOR HANDLING OF HUMAN

UTERINE AND URETERIC SAMPLES*


      1.      Transport, storage and use of samples should be
            carried out in glass and plastic ware specifically
                  designated for human sample work.

2.         Separate dissecting kit for use with human samples should be used.

3.   Any preparation of samples should be carried out in designated areas, clearly
marked with biohazard warning tape.

4.     Vinyl gloves and laboratory coats (side or back fastening) must be worn in the
laboratory and removed when leaving the laboratory site.

5.     Hands must be washed only in designated sink, which are those fitted with
taps of a type which can be operated without being touched by hand.

6.     Effective disinfectant must be available and used to disinfect bench surfaces,
dissecting equipment and glassware after use.

7.     Samples for disposal should be placed in the clear incineration bag, which is
kept in the fridge, before removal for incineration. These should only be put on the
designated shelf in the fridge. Mr. Franks will remove samples on a regular basis in
accordance with the human materials regulations.

8.     Eating, drinking, smoking, storing of food and applying of cosmetics must not
take place in the laboratory.

9.     Persons involved with handling of human samples must be familiar with the
booklet “Categorisation of pathogens according to hazard and categories of
containment” issued by the Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens. This is
available in Mrs Davies‟ office

10.        Hepatitis B vaccination is strongly encouraged.



                                         S. WRAY




(*Containment level 2 assumed)
         4. USE OF CHEMICALS – SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AND CODE

                                  OF PRACTICE


1.    The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations require

that assessments are made of every use of a substance hazardous to health.




2.    In many cases in this laboratory this can be done by standard precautions.

These can be determined by all graduates. For example should you use a fume

cupboard, or can open use be made of them? If you are in any doubt, consult me or

a member of the departmental safety committee




3.    Where standard precautions do not apply a specific assessment is required.

This should be done initially by the group member using the chemical but then be

brought to me for authorization. If you require help, consult me or a member of the

departmental safety committee. Mr. Franks has compiled our specific assessments,

which are date numbered for chemicals. These are kept in a labelled file. Mr.

Franks also has data sheets, filed in alphabetical order, on all the other chemicals

we hold, which are governed by standard precautions. You should be familiar with

where these two files are kept. You may not remove them or items from them.

Please also read the “safety data sheet” which is attached as appending 4.i.




4.    When laboratory members start an experimental protocol they should list in

the back of their lab notebooks, all chemicals to be used.         You should then

determine whether standard precautions apply or if a specific assessment is
required. It is suggested that you keep your own additional copy, of any specific

assessments that relates to your work, in your lab notebook.




5.        Use of carcinogens, teratogens or embryotoxins always requires a specific

assessment. Once I have approved this or drawn this up, it has to be approved by

the departmental safety officer. No work using substances in this category can be

started until this approval is given.




6.        Details and amplification of the above can be found in the University‟s “control

of substances hazardous to health – carrying out assessments” leaflet in Mr. Lucas‟

office.




7.        Do not transfer chemicals to unlabelled containers. If you do transfer

chemicals to another container always label it with any hazardous warning

information.       If you provide others with chemicals, always provide the

information on hazards. If you obtain chemicals from others always ask about

hazard information; if necessary contact the supplier.




8.        Mouth pipetting is not permitted.




9.        Eating, chewing, drinking, smoking and application of cosmetics are not

permitted in laboratories.
10.   At the end of the laboratory session, wash your hands.




11.   If necessary wear eye protection, or a full-face visor. For substances, which

are harmful in contact with the skin, use the appropriate gloves.




12.   Tops should be quickly replaced on all volatile chemicals. When not working

in a fume cupboard try and keep apparatus enclosed e.g. keep a top on the

anaesthetizing jar. Take care not to inhale or breathe the atmosphere very close to

the point of release of a substance. Less than 500ml at a time should be kept on the

open bench if at all possible when using flammable liquids




13.   See the separate sheet appendix II for incident advice.




14.   Chemicals and waste should be disposed of in the appropriate manner.

Contact the departmental safety officer if you are unsure.




                                                                          S. WRAY
4.     Appendix i




                                   SAFETY DATA SHEETS




1.     These are kept in a file clearly marked, near to the main chemical shelves.

The Sigma Data Sheets give all the code numbers.




2.     For the safe handling of the chemicals the code numbers and their definitions

are in the front of this folder.




3.     The list is in alphabetical order and includes all the chemicals currently in use.

It will be periodically updated, but if you think that something is missing or that more

information is required about the chemicals or compounds you are working with,

then you should make your views known to either me or Mr. Franks.




4.     In the data sheets are B.O.C. notes on the safe handling, transporting and

storage of their gas cylinders. Do not over tighten a regulator valve on a cylinder

and do not use anything that may raise a spark when fitting or opening a regulator

on an oxygen cylinder.
5.    There is a list of the products supplied to us from Molecular Probes,

Calbiochem, Radio Spares etc – if you feel that any of this information is incorrect or

out-dated could you raise this matter with me or Mr. Franks.




6.    Individual company web sites often have the latest Safety Data Sheets for

products we are using or may use in future planned experiments. These web sites

are “book-noted” on „Smithers‟.
4.    Appendix ii

                     EMERGENCIES AND ACCIDENTS




 Telephone 2222 for fire, police, ambulance, bomb threats and emergencies.

Safety Advisor: 43242, 43243, and 43244. Security 43252, 43249. When fire

alarm sounds you must evacuate the building. Mr Franks to check personnel

                                have complied




Users of substances hazardous to health should know what they would do in

                    the event of a foreseeable contingency.




Spillage




In the event of a spillage outside a fume cupboard or local exhaust enclosure:

          If the substance is flammable, eliminate sources of ignition.
          Instruct others to keep at a safe distance.
          Open windows where appropriate.
          For spillage of volatile materials, evacuate the room and shut the
           door unless the substance has been determined as safe to use in
           the open.
          Unless the spillage is one which may be left to clear by evaporation
           and ventilation, it should be cleared up by at least two people
           wearing appropriate masks absorbing it onto sand or proprietary
           absorbent which is transferred into a container which is put into a
           well ventilated space for ultimate disposal.
Toxic Gas Leakage

       If compressed gas is leaking and cannot be shut off, feed the gas if

possible into a fume cupboard or other ventilation discharge directly to the

outside. Where practicable transport a leaking cylinder to the open air and

clear the surrounding area. If this is not practicable, evacuate the room, if

possible opening windows before leaving.          Subsequent removal of the

cylinder to a better ventilation place should only be carried out by at least two

people wearing appropriate masks.




Reporting

       Report accidents and incidents on a University Accident/Incident

Report form. Wherever there is reason to believe that someone has had a

higher than acceptable level of exposure to a substance it should be reported

to the Safety Advisor and to Occupational Health. Anyone who thinks their

health might have been affected by exposure to substances at work (including

e.g. dermatitis or asthma) should contact Occupational Health.
         School of Biomedical Sciences

               Division of Physiology

 Safety protocols for the 4th Floor, Nuffield
                 Building

                  Laboratories supervised

    by Drs Doherty, Mora, Plagge, Royle and Wilm


General Laboratory Guidelines

Laboratory Procedures for use of Radioisotopes in 4.12 and 4.13

Code of Practice for Genetic Manipulation Experiments

Animal Exposure

Specific Risk Assessments
                                                              May 2007
Laboratories on the 4th Floor, Nuffield Building

General Laboratory Guidelines

1.   Howie style Lab coats should be worn at all times while
     carrying out experimental work.

2.   Hands should be washed when experimental procedures are
     completed.

3.   No food or drinks should be consumed or stored in any
     laboratory areas.

4.   Eating and drinking are allowed in 4.01, 4.02, 4.07, 4.08,
     4.09, 4.10, 4.16A. Food or drink may be transported through a
     laboratory but the food or drink must be sealed, e.g. mugs of
     coffee without a lid must not be carried through. Under no
     circumstances will washing up of crockery and glassware
     used for eating and drinking be carried out in laboratory
     areas. Food preparation and washing up facilities can be
     found on the third floor adjacent to the common room.

5.   No mouth pipetting must be carried out.

6.   All work areas should be tidied after use and at the end of
     each day. Broken glassware, plastic pipettes or scalpel
     blades should be disposed of in appropriate designated
     containers, all used glass and plastic ware disinfected and
     transferred for washing and benches cleaned.

7.   All containers with chemical solutions or solvents should be
     clearly labelled.

8.   In the event of spillages in specified work areas or in any
     general work area contaminated benches and equipment
     should be cleaned immediately. Cleaning procedures for
     specific chemicals should be outlined in the COSHH forms. It
     is your responsibility to know how a chemical should be
     cleared up should spillage occur. Any spillages on the floor
     should also be attended to. Mop up excess liquid and notify
     others if the floor is wet.
9.     If chemicals are to be used or procedures undertaken for
       which a specific risk assessment has been prepared all
       aspects of the assessment should be adhered to. All workers
       of the group will be provided with copies of all risk
       assessments.

10.    In all cases where any potentially biohazardous reagents or
       dangerous chemicals are used the following should be
       adhered to.

i)     Appropriate single use gloves should be worn.

ii)    Stock solutions should be prepared in a fume cupboard.
       Work with high concentrations of any volatile substances
       should also be carried out in a fume cupboard.

iii)   Any biologically contaminated materials should be disposed of
       in yellow clinical waste bags for incineration. Contaminated
       glass and plastic ware should be soaked in 10% bleach or
       Virkon/Trigene for at least 15-30 minutes and washed before
       re-use. Waste from GM experiments (e.g. agar plates) should
       be collected in an autoclavable bag, placed in a biowaste bin
       and sealed using autoclave tape for autoclaving. The bin
       prevents any leaks and allows for easy transport to the
       autoclave.

iv)    Any spillages should be dealt with immediately and these and
       any other accidents reported to a group leader and the
       Laboratory Office (Len Lucas).

v)     Disposal of any chemicals or solvents must only be done after
       consultation about the correct procedures.

vi)    There is currently no liquid nitrogen store on the 4th floor.
       Small amounts of liquid nitrogen may be brought in using an
       appropriate dewar with a lid. Refer to the University of
       Liverpool code of practice on physical hazards before
       commencing work with liquid nitrogen.

vii)   Before work can begin in a microbiological safety cabinet
       (Rooms 4.11 and 4.12), fume hood (Rooms 4.13 and 4.24) or
       laminar flow cabinet (4.12), users MUST receive training on
      appropriate use from a group leader. Be aware of the level of
      protection that each safety cabinet provides.

11.   Packaging and boxes from deliveries should immediately be
      put in waste paper bins or placed on the floor next to bins for
      removal. Large pieces of cardboard can be temporarily placed
      in the foyer area for collection by Michael Leahy.

12.   Work with radioisotopes will only be carried out rooms
      designated for radioactive work by registered personnel after
      appropriate training and in accordance with local regulations
      and 4th Floor practice.

13.   Work on genetic manipulation will only be carried out by
      designated staff on appropriate projects after training in
      accordance with 4th Floor Practice.

14.   Any proposed laboratory work outside of standard working
      hours (8.00am - 6.30pm) should have the prior approval of a
      group leader – and be recorded in the out of hours book.

15.   A file on specific risk assessments, safety procedures and
      safe disposal techniques will be maintained and made
      available in the in 4.07.

16.   Centrifuges should only be used after training in their correct
      use.

17.   A Guide to first aid will be posted in 4.07.

18.   All new members of the laboratories will be given these
      guidelines and appropriate instructions in safety measures to
      be used.

19.   Members of other groups may only use equipment in 4th Floor
      laboratories with the prior permission of the appropriate group
      leader.

It is the responsibility of all members of the laboratory to
safeguard themselves and others by respecting the above
procedures.
Laboratory Procedures for the use of Radioisotopes in 4.12
and 4.13, 4th Floor, Nuffield Building.
10. Clearly labelled (including date of delivery) radioactive isotope stocks
    should be stored in a sealed container in the designated fridge or –20°C
    freezer in 4.13.

11. Rubber disposable gloves (preferably two pairs) and a 4.12/4.13-
    designated lab coat (fully buttoned to the top) should be worn at all times
    in 4.12 and 4.13 when performing any experimental work involving
    radioisotopes.

12. All experimental work should be carried out over a plastic spill tray (with
    appropriate shielding if required) in 4.13. Scintillant should be stored and
    dispensed only in the fume cupboard in 4.13.

13. A full record of radioisotope stock should be kept and updated after every
    experiment. Keep records of all radioisotope usage and disposal in the
    appropriate sheet. Individual stock sheets for each isotope can be found in
    4.13.

14. A record of any liquid waste disposed of via the designated radioactive
    disposal drain should be kept on the appropriate sheet in the radioactivity
    folder. During liquid waste disposal in sinks, a good water flow (avoid
    splashing) should be maintained to promote fast removal of the waste.

15. Experimental radioactive waste including pipette tips, culture dishes and
    stock bottles should be placed in the radioactive solid waste bin (yellow
    bin in 4.13) and the amount of radioactivity recorded on the appropriate
    sheet in the black ring binder. If waste is highly radioactive (eg. 32P), it
    should be placed in the Perspex bin on the bench for decay prior to
    placing in the yellow bin. When the yellow bin is full it should be sealed
    with the supplied lid and placed in the radioactive bunker in the Physiology
    car park and the completed waste sheet given to Len Lucas. Len will
    issue a new bin.

16. Scintillant waste should be disposed of in the yellow scintillant waste bin
    under the bench in 4.13 and the amount of radioactivity recorded on the
    appropriate sheet in the black ring binder. When the bin is full, disposal of
    the bin should be carried out as described for the solid waste bin in (6).

17. Contamination checks (particularly for beta and gamma emitters) must be
    carried out before and after each radioactive experiment in 4.13 and 4.12
    with a Geiger-counter for beta emitters, scintillation probe for gamma
    emitters and swab tests for low energy beta emitters. Monthly swab tests
    of all work areas should be carried out. All contamination readings must
    be entered on the appropriate sheet in the radioactivity folder. If required,
    contaminated plastic spill trays should be replaced and any other areas or
    equipment (particularly the barrels of pipettes) contaminated should be
    decontaminated to an acceptable level using Decon-90.
18. All benches should be cleaned after use and plastic and glassware tidied
    away.
  4.   Laboratory Practice for experimental work in Laboratories on the 4th
                         Floor, Nuffield Building

 A copy of these instructions will be posted in microbiological containment labs

4.1    Eating, chewing, drinking, smoking, storing of food, application of
cosmetics must not take place in any GM room. Mouth pipetting must not take
place.

4.2     The door to GM rooms must be clearly marked with a Biohazard sign
and an indication of the containment level.

4.3    The laboratory door should be closed when work is in progress.

4.4   Howie style Laboratory coats should be worn in GM rooms and
removed when leaving the room. Lab coats should be buttoned all the way up.

4.5     Hands must be disinfected or washed immediately when contamination
is suspected, after handling viable materials, and also before leaving the
laboratory.

4.6     All procedures must be performed so as to minimise the production of
aerosols.

4.6      Disinfectants must be available for immediate use in the event of
spillage.

4.8     Benchtops should be cleaned and disinfected after use (gloves should
be worn) and all work surfaces kept clean and tidy. Workers should monitor the
state of the floors and walls to check that they are not dusty. Used glassware
etc. should be placed in the appropriate disposal bins and not stored on work
surfaces.

4.9    Disposable gloves should be worn at all times whilst handling potentially
hazardous material and these should be discarded in the bag for autoclavable
waste.

4.10   Contaminated glassware should be autoclaved.

4.11     Glass pipettes should be placed tip down until fully immersed in
disinfectant and should remain immersed for >24 h before removal and
cleaning. Alternatively solid waste such as plasticware can be placed in yellow
bags and sent for incineration.
4.12    Liquid waste should be inactivated by addition of the appropriate
concentrations of Virkon, Trigen E or other approved disinfectant overnight
before disposal in sinks.

4.13   Waste bags should not be allowed to become more than 3/4 full before
disposal.

4.14    Hand wash sinks should be used for this purpose only and the taps on
these sinks operated using elbows or wrists.

4.15    Len Lucas and either Dr Doherty, Mora, Plagge, Royle or Wilm should
be informed of any accidents or untoward incidents. They can advise if an
accident/incident form needs to be completed.
        4th Floor Procedures relating to animal exposure


   All workers should be registered with Occupational Health and a
    health questionnaire completed before any work starts.
   All workers will be informed of the possible risks of development
    of animal allergy.

   No one with previous experience of animal allergy of any kind will
    handle animals or enter rooms used for animal work, unless
    absolutely required and appropriate countermeasures to
    effectively suppress allergic reactions have been taken.

   Any evidence of allergic symptoms should be reported to either
    Dr Doherty, Mora, Plagge, Royle, Wilm immediately.

   Animals will be killed whenever possible in the Duncan
    Biomedical Sciences Unit. Where this is unavoidable, animals
    will be brought to room 4.23, killed and tissues removed. Animals
    will be killed through a recognised Schedule 1 procedure by a
    person holding a Home Office personal licence or by a competent
    person, who has been properly trained in Schedule 1 procedures.
    A copy of Schedule 1 humane killing procedures will be available
    in room 4.23. If tissues are to be processed for primary cell
    culture, they will be rinsed in appropriate buffer (e.g. PBS) first (to
    minimise risk of exposure to allergens), before they are taken into
    room 4.12 for further processing in the flow cabinet.

   Workers handling animals will wear lab coats reserved for this
    purpose and gloves and individually face-fitted RPE according to
    the Code of Practice for Allergy regulations. Disposal FFP2 ori-
    nasal masks will be available.

   Carcasses and tissues will be collected in plastic bags and temporarily
    stored in the -20°C freezer in room 4.23 until they are centrally disposed
    off.

				
DOCUMENT INFO