Docstoc

Jackson_Phase_2

Document Sample
Jackson_Phase_2 Powered By Docstoc
					   JACKSON COUNTY
    COMMISSION ON
CHILDREN AND FAMILIES




COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
    2001 - 2003
Contact Person:   Carin Niebuhr
                  1005 East Main St.
                  Medford, OR 97504
                  (541) 774-8200
                   December 28, 2001
                                        ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Commission on Children and Families wishes to thank the many people who have contributed their time
and ideas to the SB555 planning process in 2001. Broad citizen and civic participation have helped to make
Phase II of our Comprehensive Plan more truly reflective of the diversity in Jackson County. The Hispanic
Focus Group of West Medford Family Center was instrumental in obtaining information from the Hispanic
community. Special thanks to Rebecca Reid, Director of Southern Oregon Regional Services Institute and her
students from Southern Oregon University for updating the statistical charts.
         JACKSON COUNTY
COMMISSION ON CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
           1005 EAST MAIN STREET
             MEDFORD, OR 97504

                  (541) 774-8200
                (541) 774-7980 FAX



      BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS LIAISON:

      Jack Walker



      COMMISSION MEMBERS:

      Jim Adams, Chair             Julie Martinez
      Juli Di Chiro                Eileen Micke-Johnson
      Mary-Curtis Gramley          Judge Rebecca Orf
      Bob Grindstaff               Daniel Ramirez
      Carolyn Johnson              Ida Saito
      Muriel Johnson               Frances Summers
      Mickey Ketchum               Donald Todd
      Loretta Livaudais-Mapes      Lynn Webb
      Doug Mares



      COMMISSION STAFF:

      Carin Niebuhr, Director
      Sarah Heath, Project Services Coordinator
      Becky Longie, Administrative Assistant
      Stephanie Mendenhall, Administrative Assistant
                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS
VISION AND MISSION STATEMENT...........................................................................4

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..............................................................................................5

JACKSON COUNTY OVERVIEW .................................................................................7

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT .....................................................................................9

MINORITY OUTREACH ............................................................................................. 15

SENATE BILL 555 ....................................................................................................20

JACKSON COUNTY GOALS ...................................................................................... 21

GOALS AND HIGH-LEVEL OUTCOMES

         Goal 1: Strong, Nurturing Families .............................................................. 22
               1. Reduce Adult Substance Abuse........................................................ 23
               2. Reduce Domestic Violence................................................................ 32
               3. Reduce Poverty ................................................................................41

         Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children .............................................................. 50
               4. Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect *.................................................... 51
               5. Increase Prenatal Care .....................................................................68
               6. Increase Immunizations ...................................................................69
               7. Reduce Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use during Pregnancy .....71
               8. Increase Child Care Availability........................................................ 78
               9. Increase Readiness to Learn............................................................. 79

         Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth .................................................................86
               10, 11, & 12. Decrease Teen Alcohol, Tobacco and Drug Use * ............87
               13. Decrease Juvenile Arrests * ............................................................ 99
               14. Maintain Oregon Youth Authority (OYA) Bed Use * ....................... 100
               15. Decrease Juvenile Recidivism (re-arrest) * ................................... 101
               16. Reduce Teen Pregnancy................................................................ 110
               17. Decrease Youth Suicide ................................................................ 120
               18. Reduce High School Dropout ........................................................ 128

         Goal 4: Caring Communities ...................................................................... 136
               19. Increase Community Engagement ............................................... 137
               20. Increase Systems Integration *...................................................... 144

PRIORITIES AND STRATEGIES ............................................................................. 149

APPENDIXES .......................................................................................................... 163
     Appendix A: Bibliography ............................................................................. 164
     Appendix B: Definitions/Acronyms ............................................................... 170
     Appendix C: Community Involvement Backup Information ........................... 174
         * Jackson County Priority Outcomes
                                 JACKSON COUNTY
                         COMMISSION ON CHILDREN & FAMILIES




                                           VISION STATEMENT

All children live in safe, caring families and communities where: differences are
honored; acceptance and compassion are fostered; families are nurtured; and children
thrive and see themselves as loved and capable.


                                          MISSION STATEMENT

To promote wellness for all children and families as a community responsibility.


      PRINCIPLES:

        We believe . . . . .

           wellness is a condition in which the physical, emotional, social, spiritual, intellectual
            and cultural well-being of all children and families are nurtured and preserved.

           in fostering an atmosphere of community-wide participation and collaboration with
            shared decision-making and shared allocation of human, physical and financial
            resources.

           the service delivery system for all children and families shall be:
               Flexible                    Accessible
               Innovative and creative     Integrated
               Accountable                 Non-stigmatizing
               Efficient


      GOALS:

        1. Assess community strengths and needs.

        2. Develop, implement and oversee a county-wide comprehensive plan for all services
           to children and families.

        3. Support human services policy that encompasses the continuum of prevention,
           intervention, and treatment.

        4. Identify and facilitate opportunities for integration of all sectors of the community
            and service delivery systems.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                   Page 4
       JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON CHILDREN & FAMILIES
                   COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2001



                                         Executive Summary

Vision Statement: All children live in safe, caring families and communities where: differences are honored;
acceptance and compassion are fostered; families are nurtured; and children thrive and see themselves as loved
and capable. Over the past two years, Jackson County has been developing a comprehensive plan that will foster
and support this vision statement. The planning process has been intensive, inclusive, and highly focused. It has
included:
         Assessment and analysis of 20 higher level outcomes as they impact Jackson County.
         Involvement and direct collaboration with 15 community-planning groups.
         Inclusion and integration of 14 existing community plans impacting human services in Jackson County.
         Input from 10 focus groups selected for diversity, geographic, and/or specialized knowledge.
         Specialized outreach with Hispanic population through surveys, focus groups, and Hispanic community
            groups.
         Prioritization process in selection of outcomes involving service organizations, community groups, and
            focus groups.
         Ongoing analysis and specialized planning by four focused community work groups:
                     1.) Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee
                     2.) Early Childhood Partnership Team
                     3.) Jackson County Integration Planning Team
                     4.) Prevention Planning Council

Through this planning process, Jackson County has selected four priority outcomes to focus on over the following
three years. Each outcome includes community focus priorities and research based best strategies which will assist
our county in making significant positive changes to better support children and families in these areas. Priorities
and strategies were selected based on the twin criteria of community need and capacity to make positive changes.
Strategies will include resources included in SB 555 legislation (Commission on Children and Families, Juvenile
Crime Plan, and DHS prevention) as well as broader community resources.


                                  REDUCE CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT


Increase capacity of county-wide systems to provide comprehensive, integrated services to address multiple issues
of families at risk of child abuse and neglect.

        Strategy: Strengthen connections between the Community Safety Net system and the constellations of
        programs and schools that support its mission through (the Community Safety Net mission is to create
        seamless community resources/supports for at-risk families and children).
                       a. identifying the connections
                       b. engaging children and families
                       c. coordinating the case management, advocacy, and follow-up to ensure effectiveness

Increase community awareness, support, and prevention capacities to reduce child abuse and neglect.

        Strategy: Develop and provide professional training focused on child abuse and neglect problems related
        to mental health, drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence, and parents with developmental delays.
        Primary focus will be on prenatal to age five
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 5
                         REDUCE TEEN ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE


Increase prevention programs for school-age children.

        Strategy: Expand structured mentoring programs for all youth during and after school hours. Effective
        mentoring programs may provide: peer education mentoring; prevention activities during key transition
        times in students’ lives; curriculum-based mentoring programs; targeted intervention for at-risk youth;
        school and community mentoring partnerships.

Increase family involvement in prevention programming.

        Strategy: Provide opportunities for parent involvement in school, after-school, and community-based
        prevention activities. Identify and recruit at-risk families.

Promote community-based prevention programming.

        Strategy:   Change community norms around youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.

                                        JUVENILE CRIME PREVENTION


Service to high-risk pre-offenders ages 7-17.

        Strategy: Increase best practice case management service which bonds with identified youth and family,
        develops an individual plan around risk and protective factors, and works with youth and families to
        implement the plan.

        Strategy: Maintain and increase probation officer time to do risk assessment and provide case
        management services to identified high-risk first offenders and pre-offenders.

Service to high-risk first offenders

        Strategy: Maintain and increase service system to provide best practice community services identified
        through individual risk assessment to high-risk first offenders and pre-offenders.

                                       INCREASE SYSTEMS INTEGRATION


Clients feel that they are welcomed, heard, and that their needs are being met.

        Strategy: Increase development/implementation of inter-organizational front-line training.

        Strategy: Increase development of a culturally diverse human service workforce.

Increase positive outcomes in high-risk clients/families served by multiple agencies/organizations.

        Strategy: Maintain or increase family/client advocate resources that effectively engage and do outreach
        with high-risk families.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 6
JACKSON COUNTY OVERVIEW

The Rogue Valley

Medford, the county seat of Jackson County, is located in Southern Oregon, 273 miles from Portland and 27 miles
from the California border. It is the industrial, medical, and service center of Southern Oregon as well as Northern
California. Medford with a population of 63,154 is the largest city in
Jackson County and serves as a hub for business, commercial, and                   From 1990 to 2000 Jackson
professional services. Ashland is second with 19,522 residents and Central         County’s population grew by
Point is third with 12,493 residents. From 1990 to 2000, Jackson County’s          23.8%. Shady Cove was the
population grew by 23.8%. Shady Cove was the fastest growing city in               fastest growing city in Jackson
Jackson County, expanding by 70.8% in ten years. Also expanding rapidly            County expanding by 70.8% in
                                                                                   ten years.
in the past ten years were Central Point (66.4%), Eagle Point (59.5%), and
Talent (70.7%). In terms of numbers of people, Medford, Central Point,
Ashland, Talent, and Eagle Point experienced the greatest growth. According to a survey of the Oregon
Employment Department, the top three reasons cited for moving to the Rogue Valley were (1) to be with family, (2)
quality of life, and (3) retirement. In Southern Oregon, the percentage mentioning retirement was more than twice
that for the entire state. (26% to 12%).

Economy

Fifteen years ago, Jackson County went through a serious depression as the timber industry, which dominated the
local economy, was decimated as a result of economic and public land use changes. Since that time, the economy
has diversified and is no longer dependent on any single industry. The timber industry, agriculture, and tourism are
basic to the economy. Bear Creek Corporation is the largest manufacturing firm with 2,000 to 5,000 employees
during peak periods. Asante Health System is the largest non-manufacturing firm with 2,700 employees. Although
the economy has greatly improved it continues to lag behind the northern urban areas. Many of the new jobs are in
the service industry and do not pay the wages or benefits that were received in the timber industry. Housing is
expensive; using the housing cost/average wage ratio, Jackson County is one of the most expensive places to live in
the United States. It is also one of the most beautiful. Jackson County includes a diverse richness of recreational
and cultural activities and a community that is committed to maintaining and enjoying them.

Education

Nine school districts serve Jackson County: Ashland, Butte Falls, Central Point, Eagle Point, Medford 549C,
Phoenix-Talent, Pinehurst, Prospect, and Rogue River. Medford’s district 549C is the largest with close to 12,000
students. Six of these districts encompass rural communities. Families living in isolated communities such as
Butte Falls, Pinehurst, or Prospect lack public transportation, pharmacies and medical clinics, cultural and
recreational opportunities that are readily available in the Medford-Ashland urban area. This can be especially
challenging for families who work in the urban area and have school age children enrolled in the rural districts.
Southern Oregon University and Rogue Community College provide a wide variety of educational opportunities
that try to be responsive to the community needs.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 7
Population Trends

Since 1990, Jackson County’s population has increased by 23.8% with a current (2000) population of 181,269. By
comparison, Oregon has increased by 20.4% with a current population of 3.4 million. Over one fourth of the
Jackson County population (or 49,172) are children ages 0 - 17 years.


                                   Jackson County Population Growth Rates
                                                 1990- 2000
                            Age Group         1990        2000       % Change
                            All Ages                 146,389      181,269        23.8%
                            0-85                    144,310      177,483        23.0%
                            5                       9,758        10,888         11.6%
                            5-9                      10,520       12,222         16.2%
                            10-14                    10,520       13,096         24.5%
                            15-19                    9,779        12,966         32.6%
                            Total Children           40,577       49,172         21.2%

                     * United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 2001

Hispanic Population

Even though Hispanics account for only 6.7% of Jackson County’s population, they continue to be the fastest
growing segment of the population. Between 1990 and 2000, the total Hispanic population in Jackson County
increased 103.8% according to US Census Bureau census counts.

While 2000 census counts for Hispanics by age are not yet available, 1998 population by age estimates are
presented below. The number of Hispanic children (0 - 19 yrs) increased 81.6% between 1990 and 1998, compared
to an increase of 13.7% of all children.


                                  Jackson County Hispanic Population Growth Rates
                                                    1990- 1998
                              Census Estimates (may be undercounted due to migrant population)
                      Age Group              1990              1998           % Change
                      0-85                  5,949             10,702         79.9%
                      5                     866               1,478          70.6%
                      5-9                    707               1,291          82.6%
                      10-14                  618               1,161          87.8%
                      15-19                  565               1,075          90.3%




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                              Page 8
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

I.      PURPOSE:

In accordance with Senate Bill 555, Jackson County Commission on Children and Families has involved a diverse
cross section of the community in our comprehensive planning process. Community stakeholders have been
involved in all stages of our planning process and are considered essential partners in effective planning. The
following summary illustrates the methods used to engage and acquire the input of diverse partners and
populations.

II.     COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUPS

The Commission structure is illustrated in the preceding flow chart demonstrating the dynamic interaction between
established community groups who have agreed to assist in comprehensive planning for our high priority outcomes.
At least one Commission member also serves on each of the key community planning groups.

      Early Childhood Partnership Team (ECPT) was created in 1999 to focus on children ages 0-8 years and
      their families. A very collaborative membership includes 26 representatives of major early child service
      delivery systems and programs addressing the needs of young children and families. They have taken
      leadership for planning related to decreasing child abuse and neglect as a high priority outcome for Jackson
      County.

      Jackson County Prevention Council was created in 1998 to integrate primary prevention planning activities
      to reduce youth substance abuse, teen pregnancy, school dropout and juvenile delinquency in Jackson County.
      The Council allows for better coordination, support and advocacy for primary prevention planning.
      Membership on the Prevention Council includes 25 representatives from schools, law enforcement, non-profit
      agencies, community coalitions, after-school organizations, integration sites, health clinics, and local
      government agencies. The Prevention Council is responsible for feeding primary prevention information to
      various groups interested in such information including the Local Alcohol Drug Planning Committee
      (LADPC) and the Commission on Children and Families. The Prevention Council has taken leadership for
      planning related to decreasing youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, a high priority outcome in our
      county.

      Juvenile Justice Advisory Council (JJAC) was created in 1997 to focus on juvenile crime prevention,
      intervention, and treatment. Membership on JJAC includes 28 representatives from the Juvenile Court
      System, Oregon Youth Authority, law enforcement, Services to Children and Families, nonprofit agencies,
      Health and Human Services, schools, and concerned citizens. JJAC advises the Local Public Safety
      Coordinating Council (LPSCC) as well as the Commission on Children and Families. They have assumed
      leadership for planning related to decreasing juvenile arrests, recidivism rates, and the number of youth sent
      to state juvenile offender facilities.

      Jackson County Integration Team was created in 1991 as a countywide, policy-level integration planning
      team whose mission is to build, develop, and maintain effective service integration in our county. Two teams
      are informally known as ―Big Bang‖, an executive team focusing on policy and ―Little Bang‖, a site
      integration planning team. Jackson County currently has five integration sites: Rogue Family Center, Central
      Point Family Center, West Medford Family Center, Ashland Family Center, and Rogue River Family Center.
      There are approximately 44 member agencies on the Integration Team representing a broad array of services
      for children and families, e.g., schools, health, welfare, law enforcement, early childhood, senior and disabled,
      media, employment etc. The Integration Team has taken leadership for planning related to increasing systems
      integration as a high priority outcome for Jackson County.

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 9
III.     METHODS:

The Commission believes that broad community stakeholder participation is an essential component of successful
planning. A variety of methods have been used to ensure development of a plan that truly reflects the diversity of
our county. Six Commission members formed a Comprehensive Plan Coordinating Council to provide leadership
for this project. A Community Subcommittee of three members was also formed to plan for community input.
Dedicated Commission members have contributed at least 300 hours of volunteer time in this planning portion.

The following demonstrates how community information has been used in the Comprehensive Plan, what methods
were used to obtain community input, which members of the community were involved, and highlights of what we
learned. Copies of the instruments used to solicit partner input are included in the appendix.

A.     Selection of High-Level Priority Outcomes:

The Commission on Children and Families engaged a cross-section of the community in all phases of the planning
process including the selection of top high-level outcomes for Jackson County.

1.      Community Survey

         A community survey was used to help identify the top high-level outcomes for Jackson County. The
         survey was available in both English and Spanish. Commission members gave the ―High Level Outcomes‖
         survey to approximately 20 groups and 204 responses were received. The groups included:

         4C's Child Care Council                     Family Addiction Community Team (FACT)
         Child Care Task Force                       Children's Garden Child Care Center
         Family Child Care Providers                 Hispanic Interagency Committee
         Jackson County Library System               League of Women Voters
         Kiwanis Clubs                               Jacksonville Boosters Club
         Public Health Advisory Board                White City Improvement Association
         Soroptimist-Ashland/Medford                 Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
         Adult and Family Services (AFS)
         American Association of University Women (AAUW)
         Community Partnership Team: (Lunch Buddies, Big Brother/Sisters,Volunteer Drivers)

         Survey Results: The highest-ranking priority for our community (by a wide margin) was to Reduce Child
         Abuse and Neglect. Three additional priorities that are closely related to child abuse and neglect were
         ranked next highest. The remaining priorities were closely ranked together.

         1.   Child Abuse and Neglect                     6.   Reduce teenage pregnancy
         2.   Reduce adult substance abuse                7.   Increase system integration
         3.   Reduce domestic violence                    8.   Readiness to learn
         4.   Reduce poverty                              9.   Reducing juvenile crime
         5.   Decrease teenage drug use

B.     Data update, trend analysis, and SWOT discussion (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats):

Jackson County has provided updated data, trend analysis, and SWOT discussion for 20 high-level outcomes. We
contracted with Southern Oregon Services Institute (SORSI) at Southern Oregon University (SOU) to reformat and
update our data charts. Several SOU students were involved in the project. CCF staff completed the trend analysis
while several Commission members and CCF staff worked together to draft the SWOT discussions for the twelve
high-level outcomes (#’s 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, & 19) that were not identified as our county’s priority
focus for the next biennium but nevertheless are critical to planning efforts. In Phase I of planning, we incorporated


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 10
information from 21 existing community plans and 18 government and community groups. In Phase II of planning,
we selected key individuals and groups to review our updated discussions for accuracy and clarity.

In Phase II, members of the Early Childhood Partnership Team, Prevention Council, Juvenile Justice Committee,
and Integration Team reviewed and updated the trend analysis and SWOT discussions for our eight high-priority
outcomes relating to child abuse and neglect (#4), youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use (#’s 10,11,12),
juvenile crime (#’s 13,14,15), and systems integration (#20).

C.   Selection of Priorities and Strategies to Impact High-level Outcomes:

We have: 1) conducted both written and verbal surveys; 2) facilitated focus groups throughout the county with both
adults and youth; 3) solicited both individual and group input from key people having expertise in our high priority
outcomes; and 4) conducted specific outreach to include Hispanics who may not be fluent in English. Key surveys
were available in both English and Spanish. Our questions have been geared to help us discover, from the
community perspective, what they know about existing services, what they think is working and not working, what
would help make services better, and what is missing that would help to decrease child abuse and neglect, youth
alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, juvenile crime and increase the effectiveness of systems integration in Jackson
County.

We contracted with a professional facilitator, Ginger Casto, to assist us with planning and conducting four
geographic focus groups. She also facilitated a discussion with the West Medford Hispanic Focus Group to plan
the best methods for getting input from limited English proficient Hispanics throughout the county. In addition,
Ginger facilitated a focus group for the Prevention Council to obtain information specific to youth alcohol, tobacco,
and other drug use.

1.     Geographic Focus Groups

        Four focus groups were held at key locations inviting a cross-section of people within a specific
        geographic area to ensure county-wide community input. Several questions were asked in relation to child
        abuse and neglect, youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, and juvenile crime: 1) What strategies are
        working now? 2) What would help effective strategies work better? 3) What would you add to current
        strategies? Turnout was less than hoped for even though food was furnished. A total of 41 adults and
        youth attended the four groups. Information was given to the Early Childhood Partnership Team, the
        Prevention Council and Juvenile Justice Advisory Council to help them in choosing priorities and
        strategies.

                    SITE                                          COMMUNITY INPUT

        $    Rogue Family Center:                        Prospect/Butte Falls/Shady Cove/Eagle Point/White City
        $    Boys & Girls Club,Talent Teen Center:       Ashland/Phoenix/Talent
        $    Medford YMCA:                               Medford/West Medford/Jacksonville
        $    Patrick Elementary School:                  Sams Valley/Gold Hill/Central Point/Rogue River/Wimer

2.    Prevention Council Focus Groups

       After reviewing the information from the geographic focus groups, the Prevention Council held two focus
       groups at the West Medford Family Center to obtain information specific to adult and youth alcohol,
       tobacco, and other drug abuse.

         Adults and Youth Focus Group: A total of 30 people (21 youth and 9 adults) attended a focus group
          held at West Medford Family Center (pizza was provided). Participants included: men and women in



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 11
         On Track’s residential treatment - Mom’s and Dad’s programs; youth in On Track’s residential and out
          patient programs; youth not in treatment recruited through Kids Unlimited/VIBES (after-school recreation
          programs); and treatment professionals. CCF staff and members were also present. Participants were
          asked why they started using alcohol and drugs, what would have prevented them from starting, what they
          needed from family, peers, friends, schools, and the community to stop using, what has worked and not
          worked, what will prevent them from relapse, and how they planned to prevent their children from using.
          Information will be incorporated into choosing priorities and effective strategies to decrease youth alcohol,
          tobacco, and other drug use.

         Youth Focus Group: A smaller group of six youth (2 boys, 4 girls ages 15 to 16) not identified as having
          substance abuse problems were invited by Kids Unlimited to take part in a smaller focus group using the
          same questions (pizza was provided). All six youth had used alcohol, tobacco and/or other drugs in the
          past.

3.        Early Childhood Partnership Team - Provider Interviews and Client Surveys

          After reviewing the information from the geographic focus groups, the Early Childhood
          Partnership Team conducted provider interviews and client surveys to obtain information specific to child
          abuse and neglect.

             Provider Interviews: The Early Childhood Partnership Team Chair, also a Commission on Children
              and Families member, conducted interviews with 12 agency and program representatives. This
              information was incorporated into their SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) discussion
              and will also be considered in selection of priorities and effective strategies. Agencies interviewed
              included:

                             Asante Health Care System
                             Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)
                             Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC)
                             Domestic Violence Program
                             Early Head Start/Head Start
                             Jackson County Juvenile Court
                             Jackson County Health & Human Services, Community Safety Net
                             ―Little Bang‖ Integration Site planning group
                             On Track
                             Services to Children and Families (SCF)
                             Washington Elementary School
                             West Medford Family Center

              Client Surveys: Members of the Early Childhood Partnership Team conducted a survey of clients
               involved in either Services to Children and Families, Community Works, or Early Head Start. The
               intent was to gather information specific to child abuse and neglect from families who had some
               connection with protective services. Staff members from each of these programs administered the
               survey which consisted of questions relating to clients knowledge of community resources, which
               services were helpful to them or would have helped if received, and what they thought would help
               families with problems before they got involved with Services to Children and Families. A total of 49
               people were interviewed: Services to Children and Families - 19; Community Works - 20; Early Head
               Start -1. Results were shared with the Early Childhood Partnership Team and will be considered in
               formulating effective strategies.

     4.        Minority Outreach - Hispanic Community Forums and Surveys:
              The planning group felt it was important to gather input from the minority community relative to child
              abuse and neglect, youth substance abuse, and juvenile crime. Because the Hispanic community makes


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 12
            up the largest minority group in Jackson County, the Commission met with the Hispanic Focus group at
            West Medford Family Center as a starting place. Other minority representatives were invited to join in
            the discussion.

            Community Forum: Cydne Collins, Manager of the West Medford Family Center believes Hispanics
             need to be involved in the decision making process - “When they tell us what they need, the programs
             are so much more successful”. As a result, the Hispanic Focus
             Group at West Medford Family Center held a community-                “When they tell us what
             building forum June 21, 2001 attended by 18 families most of         they need, the programs
             whom are involved in the LISTO preschool education program.          are so much more
                                                                                  successful.”
             LISTO parents determined that driving classes with actual
             practice, childcare in their neighborhood (drop-in, 7 days a                  Cydne Collins, Manager
             week), and training for commercial cooking and sewing were               West Medford Family Center
             their highest priorities. Rogue Community College is helping
             them to plan a driving class. The parent group is continuing to meet monthly, receive driving
             instruction, and have now requested first aid classes.

            Groups and Individual Surveys: The Commission on Children and Families met several times with
             the Hispanic Focus Group during their regular June and July 2001 meetings. Twenty- two members of
             the West Medford Hispanic Focus Group met to discuss and plan how to obtain input from the
             Hispanic community on child abuse and neglect, youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use, and
             juvenile crime. The group included representation from On Track, Samaritan Counseling, V.A.
             Domiciliary, Adult and Family Services, Boys & Girls Club, Multi-Cultural Association, Rape Crisis,
             Oregon Child Development Coalition, Health Department, Commission on Children and Families,
             Education Service District, American Association of University Women, La Clinica del Valle,
             Mediation Works, Employment Department, and Family Addiction Community Team.

             The planning group decided to use a combination of individual surveys to be conducted at upcoming
             multi-cultural community events and agency sites as well as holding several focus groups in White
             City, Medford, and Phoenix where there are high concentrations of Hispanic families. We experienced
             varied success in our endeavors. We were successful with individual site surveys. A total of 62 surveys
             were returned from Hispanics at West Medford Family Center, La Clinica del Valle, Oregon Child
             Development Center, and Rogue Family Center sites. However no surveys were completed at five
             identified multi-cultural community events scheduled between July and September for a variety of
             reasons. Overall what did we learn? Cultural differences require innovative methods. The survey
             information will be taken back to the Hispanic Focus Group and Hispanic Interagency Committee for
             discussion and will also be incorporated into the Minority Outreach section of our Comprehensive
             Plan.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 13
                                      Jackson County Commission on Children & Families
                                       Partnerships for Comprehensive Planning (SB555)



                                                            Jackson County Board of
                                                                Commissioners



                                                               Jackson County
                                                            Commission on Children
                                                                and Families




                                                                   Early Childhood
                      Prevention                                     Partnership      Juvenile Justice
                       Council                                          Team          Advisory Council
                                                                                           (JJAC)
                                                                    0-8 Years

                         Service User                                   Service          Community
                            Input                                    Provider Input        Input



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                             Page 14
MINORITY OUTREACH

Introduction:

Even though Hispanics account for only 6.7% of Jackson County’s population they continue to be the fastest
growing segment of the population. Between 1990 and 2000, the total Hispanic population in Jackson County
increased 103.8% according to US Census Bureau census counts. While 2000 census counts for Hispanics by age
are not yet available, 1998 population by ages estimates show that the number of Hispanic children (0-19 yrs)
increased 81.6% between 1990 and 1998, compared to an increase of 13.7% of all children.

Milo Salgado from the Employment Department explains it well, ―Many Hispanic families originally came here
from California, Washington and Mexico because of the pear harvest. They stayed because they wanted a better
life.‖ Their presence brings a richness and diversity to the Rogue Valley.

Strengths:

Although there are still unmet needs, services have been steadily increasing in bilingual and bicultural capacities to
deal with the growing Hispanic population. Several groups in Jackson County are working hard to address school,
community, health, housing, business, and legal issues unique to Hispanics. Some of these include:

     Southern Oregon Head Start and the Education Service District (ESD) - Migrant Education Program
        collaborated to develop LISTO, a kindergarten readiness program serving Hispanic preschoolers and their
        parents in Phoenix, Medford, and White City. LISTO provides preschool classroom time promoting oral
        language, social interaction, and pre-literacy skills for preschool Spanish speaking children. The program
        also includes parent group activities, offering support, community referrals and preschool classroom
        activities for Spanish speaking families and school aged siblings of LISTO students. In collaboration with
        Rogue Community College, a bi-weekly English as a Second Language (ESL) family literacy class is now
        offered. 

       La Clinica del Valle provides medical and dental care for Hispanics including outreach services to those in
        migrant camps. La Clinica also collaborates with the Health and Human Services Department to offer a
        Healthy Start Program for Hispanic children ages 0 - 3 years. 

       The Oregon Child Development Coalition (OCDC) has responsibility for the Migrant Head Start and
        Migrant day care programs in Jackson County. OCDC also provides translation services for many
        community agencies. They collaborated with Job Council to provide training for Hispanic child care
        providers on the importance of filling out the Census 2000 as well as a workshop on recognizing and
        reporting child abuse.

       The Hispanic Interagency Committee provides a monthly opportunity for agencies and individuals to
        network and share expertise around Hispanic issues. Some of the community representatives include La
        Clinica, Oregon Child Development Coalition, the Carpenter Foundation, Rogue Community College,
        Center for Nonprofit Legal Services, Head Start, Commission on Children and Families and many more.
        At one meeting, an Anglo foster parent came because she recently adopted three Hispanic children and
        wanted to establish connections with the Hispanic community. The Department of Human Services was
        there to recruit Hispanics for Lunch Buddies. A pastor from a church in Talent was interested in becoming
        more cross-cultural and offered meeting space for ESL language and Spanish classes. A non-English-
        speaking parent was there to share his experience involving a legal issue.

       Many nonprofit and government boards need Hispanic representation but have had difficulty recruiting and
        retaining Hispanic members. In response to this need, the Rogue Valley Council of Governments (RVCG)
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                   Page 15
        is providing training for Hispanics who are interested in learning how to become Board members. RVCG
        also provide mentoring support for those who are newly appointed Board members. However, mobility,
        work and family commitments, and board meetings held during the day have presented obstacles to
        involvement. The City of Medford recently formed a Multicultural Committee for the Mayor. This
        committee has potential to expand the RVCG outreach to the Hispanic community to encourage their input
        and civic involvement. 

       West Medford Family Center – Hispanic Focus Group is a growing group of Hispanic professionals who
        meet twice a month to plan effective ways to serve Hispanics in West Medford as well as throughout the
        county. 

       Members of the Hispanic Interagency Committee identified many strengths of Hispanic families and their
        children including:

                o       Extended family supports and spending quality time with their children

                o        Resiliency. Families must be resilient to successfully adapt to a new country with different
                culture, language, laws, educational system etc.

                o       Strong faith, work ethic and growing educational motivation

                o      Youth involvement in positive activities such as dance and sports. Good examples are the
                VIBES Hispanic break dancers, Ballet Folklorica Latin Reflection dancers, and Bulldog Boxing
                Association.

Weaknesses:

       Lack of educational activities for Hispanic parents within walking distance of their community and with
        interpreters available. 

       Lack of fluent Hispanic representatives or paid staff to assist Spanish speaking people in local business and
        public/non-profit agencies. More welcome signs in Spanish and a Spanish voice at the other end of the
        telephone are needed. 

       Shortage of bilingual/bicultural service providers and resources, especially in the medical, mental health,
        substance abuse treatment, and adult/youth corrections fields. 

       Local physicians have asked for a Spanish 24 hr. help line for medical questions. Women interpreters are
        needed for women with medical questions.

       Lack of bicultural family advocate/outreach services for Hispanic families, particularly those with children
        in elementary school.

       With diminishing financial resources, it is difficult for teachers to meet the individual needs of youth,
        especially Hispanics. 

       Few Hispanics are involved in city and county planning processes. 




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 16
       The context of services and how business is conducted remains a foreign environment for Hispanics. It is
        hard for adults and youth in a new culture to buy a car, open a checking account, or obtaining a library
        card. This can be especially challenging coming from a different cultural understanding.

       Cultural differences make it more difficult for Hispanic females to participate in some activities, e.g.
        attending evening meetings, becoming a foreign exchange student.

Opportunities:

       West Medford Family Center – Hispanic Focus Group represents a growing base of Hispanic professionals
        who work with Hispanic families in our county. The Commission on Children and Families is working
        with this group and drawing in additional members to plan and facilitate several focus groups and surveys
        to gain input on our high priority outcomes: Child Abuse & Neglect; Youth Alcohol, Tobacco, & Drug
        Use; Juvenile Crime; and Systems Integration. Results will be incorporated into our final comprehensive
        plan strategies to ensure cultural competency. 

       Two new federal grants were awarded in September 2001 that will allow Healthy Start to serve more
        families in Jackson County and expand into Douglas and Josephine Counties under a new name – ―Family
        Foundations‖. The new federal money allows the Community Health Center to continue working with
        pregnant women in the White City area and provides money to expand prenatal care offered by Jackson
        County and La Clinica del Valle which serves the county’s Hispanic residents. In Jackson County, public
        health nurses will work primarily with pregnant Hispanic women and women in West Medford.

       Southern Oregon University sponsored Academia Latina 2001, a weeklong pilot program held at SOU
        campus to give Hispanic middle school students a first look at college life including a night in the dorms.
        Statewide, 13.3 percent of Hispanics drop out of high school. That rate is higher in Medford: 16.9 percent
        at South Medford High School and 13.6 percent at North Medford High School. The most frequently cited
        reason for leaving is to support the family. 

Threats:

       Children just learning English are often used as interpreters for their parents as in the case of a 15-year-old
        girl who helped her father to ―buy‖ a car. She did not understand the term ―lease‖. Using a family member
        as an interpreter can upset the balance of power and put the child in a difficult position. 

       Hispanic high school drop-out rates are high. When the student is dealing with educational challenges or
        social problems, parents are often working or don’t understand enough to be able to help their kids. If
        parents have no formal education they can’t help tutor their kids. Hispanic parents have a high work ethic
        versus an educational ethic ―so kids want to get out and go to work.‖

       Migrant farm workers lack adequate housing and are isolated from extended family supports. 

       Reluctance of Hispanics to become involved with traditional substance abuse treatment programs even
        when they employ bilingual/bicultural staff.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                       Page 17
Hispanic Community Involvement in Planning:

Hispanic Interagency Committee:
Although not formally adopted, the Hispanic Interagency Committee identified several key strategies.

         1.       Provide more opportunities for Hispanic adults and youth to become involved in planning and
                  developing culturally appropriate services.
                Expand Spanish language courses and bicultural training opportunities, especially for
                  administration, medical personnel, mental health professionals, and family outreach workers. 
         3.       Increase the number of bicultural staff in key positions, e.g., County Courthouse. Provide
                  mentoring for current bicultural/bilingual staff.
                Require applicants for funding to address specifically how they are serving the Hispanic
                  community, e.g., bilingual staff, interpreters, bilingual signs/materials, Spanish language and cross-
                  cultural training for staff.

West Medford Family Center - Hispanic Focus Group:
Cydne Collins, Manager of the West Medford Family Center believes Hispanics need to be involved in the decision
making process - “When they tell us what they need, the programs are so much more successful”. The Hispanic
Focus Group at West Medford Family Center held a community-building forum June 21, 2001attended by 18
families most of whom are involved in the LISTO program.

Parents agreed that driving classes with actual practice, childcare in their neighborhood (drop-in, 7 days a week),
and training for commercial cooking and sewing were the highest priorities for them. Rogue Community College is
helping them to plan a driving class. 

Commission on Children and Families:
The Commission on Children and Families met several times with the Hispanic Focus Group during their regular
June/July 2001 meetings. Members of the Focus Group developed a culturally appropriate survey that was
delivered in key locations countywide. Several minority outreach focus groups were also planned but have not been
carried out yet.

Sixty- two surveys were returned from La Clinica del Valle, Oregon Child Development Center, West Medford
Family Center, and Rogue Family Center. Results of the surveys showed that:

    1.        71% have heard of programs that help parents work with problems they may have with raising a
              family.
    2.        76% have not used these programs.
    3.        Reasons for not accessing programs were work, cost, transportation, lack of child care, appointment
              availability, language, and health insurance.
    4.        81-94% felt that medical and educational help were available in Spanish but special help for other
              problems was not available in Spanish.
    5.        Few responded to the question relating to knowledge of programs in their native country to keep
              youth off alcohol, tobacco, other drugs and juvenile crime.
    6.        82% had lived in Jackson County more than two years.
    7.        Most responders were female (86%) ages 18-29 (55%) or 30-39 (32%) and lived in either Medford
              (45%) or Phoenix-Talent (27%).

What are the survey implications for planning? We need to get the information out about resources and services
available. La Clinica del Valle, LISTO, schools, childcare systems, integration sites, churches, Hispanic radio, and
home visiting programs are some of the best ways to do it. Providing transportation, childcare, and offering
services to families after work hours will help reduce barriers. 




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 18
Summary of Major Findings – Cultural Competency

Each of the following goal sections include cultural competency findings specific to the 20 high level outcomes .
Major findings related to cultural competency in Jackson County are summarized here.

Ethnic:
$ Increase in the number of collaborative efforts and partnerships between agencies, schools, programs, and
    community groups, e.g., LISTO, Hispanic Interagency Council, West Medford Hispanic Focus Group, Multi-
    Cultural Association, and Medford Multi-Cultural Advisory Council.

$   As the multicultural/multilingual nature of Jackson County has increased, there has been a corresponding
    increase in the health and educational services available to Hispanic and other minority populations in the
    county.

$   Early childhood services targeted for Hispanic population are strong, diverse, culturally appropriate, and well
    supported by the Hispanic community.

$   Fear of deportation, lack of trust, and social isolation prevent many Hispanic families from accessing available
    services.

$   Growing Hispanic youth population have high school drop-out rates.

$   Under-representation of minorities in policy, planning, and program development efforts.

Gender:
$ Single parent households headed by women with children are most likely to be poor; parental risk factors are
    higher among low-income women.

$   Women in crisis (fleeing domestic violence) or coming out of the jails and in early recovery from alcohol/drug
    addiction often lack sufficient basic resources, especially safe housing.

Special Needs:
$ Jackson County has created an effective, collaborative system to work with special needs children ages 0-5
    years.

$   Lack of long-term educational and treatment resources for acting-out youth with learning disabilities and/or
    organic brain disorders.

$   There is a scarcity of respite care for families with special needs children 0-8 years or for extremely high-risk
    families.


Planning Groups for Hispanic Input:

       Hispanic Interagency Committee
       West Medford Family Center, Hispanic Focus Group
       Multi-Cultural Association
       Medford Multi-Cultural Advisory Council
       Southern Oregon University, Summer Youth Academy
       First Hispanic Youth Conference (9/18/00)
       Hispanic Clearinghouse at Southern Oregon University
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                   Page 19
                                            SENATE BILL 555



                                            Senate Bill 555 is a
                                            comprehensive investment
                                            policy for Oregon’s youth and
                                            families, consisting of five
                                            primary policy elements,
                                            including: comprehensive
                                            planning for children ages
                                            0-18 and their families;
                                            reducing juvenile crime;
                                            developing early childhood
                                            support systems; improving
                                            alcohol and drug prevention
                                            and treatment services; and,
                                            consistent program eval-
                                            uation and accountability.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 20
                            JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON
                                CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
                               2001 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN



                        GOAL 1                                                GOAL 2
               Strong, Nurturing, Families                           Healthy, Thriving Children

                 $    Adult Substance Abuse                              $     Child Abuse & Neglect

                 $    Domestic Violence                                  $     Prenatal Care

                 $    Poverty                                            $     Immunizations

                                                                         $     ATOD During
                                                                               Pregnancy

                                                                         $     Child Care

                                                                         $ Readiness to Learn



                      GOAL 3                                                   GOAL 4
               Healthy, Thriving Youth                                    Caring Communities

                $    Teen ATOD                                           $     Community Engagement

                $    Jvuenile Crime:                                     $     System Integration
                     Arrests/OYA Bed
                     Use/Recidivism
                                                                         $ Hispanic Outreach
                $    Teen Pregnancy

                $    Youth Suicide

                $    School Drop-Out




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                           Page 21
                                            JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON
                                                 CHILDREN & FAMILIES
                                               2001 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN




                                                   High-Level Outcomes


          GOAL 1:                                  $ Adult Substance Abuse
           Strong
         Nurturing                                 $ Domestic Violence
          Families

                                                   $ Poverty




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 22
                                       GOAL 1: STRONG, NURTURING FAMILIES

                               High-Level Outcome 1. Reduce Adult Substance Abuse
                                              County and State Data



                                                     Estimates of Adult Abuse and Dependency
                                                           Jackson County, 1997 & 1999

                        20%



                        15%
          % of Adults




                        10%



                        5%



                        0%
                               Alcohol & Illicit                                                      Methampheta
                                                   Alcohol   Any Illicit Drug   Marijuana   Cocaine                 Heroin   Hallucinogens
                                   Drugs                                                                 mines

                        1997       11.1%            9.9%          1.9%            1.7%       0.0%        0.3%       0.0%         0.1%
                        1999       13.6%            6.9%          9.6%            7.4%       2.5%        3.8%       0.5%         2.0%
              Source: Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, 2001




Trend Analysis:

       Jackson County has been labeled ―Crank County‖ and Medford has earned the nickname of ―Methford‖.

       Local information supports an ongoing problem with methamphetamines and alcohol and a growing
        problem with hallucinogens. However, some of the extremely sharp changes in the data in the above table
        (a 1,900% increase in hallucinogens and a 30% decrease in alcohol use over a two year period) are not
        supported by local information and are believed to be a result of sampling error due to small size of
        population sampled.

       According to the 1999 Oregon Household Treatment Needs Survey, 14.16% of adults in Jackson County
        abuse or depend on alcohol or other drugs compared to 15.28% of adults statewide. This translates to
        17,980 Jackson County adults in 1999 who abuse or are dependent on alcohol and/or illicit drugs using the
        American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) criteria.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                 Page 23
                                                     Clients Served through Alcohol and
                                                       Drug Abuse Programs, per 1000
                                                   Jackson County and Oregon, FY98-FY00
                                             30
              Clients Served per 1,000




                                             25


                                             20


                                             15


                                             10


                                              5


                                              0
                                                    FY98/99        FY99/00              FY00/01

                                         Jackson     24.9            25.0                 19.5
                                         Oregon      21.5            22.3                 17.6

           Source: Office of Alcohol and Drug
           Abuse Programs, 2001




       The rate of clients being served through treatment programs has decreased 22% in the last year from
        25/1,000 (FY99/00) to 19.5/1,000 (FY00/01). This is a slightly higher rate of decrease than the state rate
        of 21% during the same period.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 24
                                        JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SYSTEM
                                                  Goal 1: Strong, Nurturing Families
                                          High-Level Outcome 1. Reduce Adult Substance Abuse
                                           Adult Alcohol & Drug Abuse/Family Mental Health
                                                                 2000

           Agency                              Program                   Number Served   Number Served   Number Served    Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18     Families/Adults
Addictions Recovery Center       Intensive Outpatient                                                                 1                93
Addictions Recovery Center       Outpatient Treatment                                                                1               127
Addictions Recovery Center       Residential Treatment                                                              10               208
Genesis Recovery                 Residential Treatment                                                                               400
Genesis Recovery                 Outpatient Treatment                                                                                500
Jackson County Mental Health     Adult Outpatient                                                                                   3697
Jackson County Public Health     Vital Links                                       500                                               350
On Track, Inc.                   AFS Outstation                                    200              50                               300
On Track, Inc.                   DADS (residential A&D treatment                    14                                                    40
                                 for dads and therapeutic day care for
                                 children)
On Track, Inc.                   Healthy Babies (intervention with                                                                   150
                                 pregnant women)
On Track, Inc.                   HOME Program (residential A&D                     114                                               100
                                 treatment for moms and therapeutic
                                 day care for children)

On Track, Inc.                   Intensive Day Treatment                                                                                  64




  Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                  Page 25
           Agency                             Program                   Number Served       Number Served       Number Served        Number Served
                                                                          Ages 0-8            Ages 9-12           Ages 13-18         Families/Adults
On Track, Inc.                   Outpatient Adult                                                                                               2500
On Track, Inc.                   SCF Outstation                                      140                                                          140

On Track, Inc.                   Youth Counseling                                                          40                260                  100
                                 (School-based)


  Service Summary:

     Time constraints limited us to listing only agencies, which receive public funding. Services do not include private agencies/therapists who do
      not receive public dollars.
     State analysis in 1998 estimates that public funding provides some level (not necessarily the needed level) of A&D services to 80% of the
      Jackson County population eligible for and willing to participate in alcohol and drug treatment.
                  Early intervention, public awareness, and improved referral systems will increase the number of identified people eligible and
          willing to access treatment.




  Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                              Page 26
                GOAL 1: STRONG, NURTURING FAMILIES

             High-Level Outcome 1. Reduce Adult Substance Abuse


Introduction:

Adult alcohol and drug abuse are closely tied to increased incidents of child abuse and neglect,
domestic violence, teen pregnancy, school and work problems, homelessness, and criminal
behavior. This can have a devastating effect on the children in these families, setting the stage for
intergenerational substance abuse. Fetal alcohol syndrome, babies born drug addicted, premature
births, low birth weight infants, developmental delays, and behavioral disorders in children have
been linked to use of alcohol and drugs during pregnancy.

The economic costs of alcohol abuse in the United States are computed using the cost of illness
approach, which expresses the multidimensional impact of a health problem in dollars. The
estimated economic cost of alcohol abuse in the U.S. was $185 billon for 1998 (U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services, January 2001). More than 70% of these costs are attributed to
loss of economic productivity including alcohol-related illness, premature death, and crime.
These estimates do not include the costs of human suffering, not easily quantifiable in terms of
dollars.

Unfortunately the direction of adult alcohol and illicit drug abuse in Jackson County is heading
upwards! At the same time, the rate of clients being served through treatment is declining. With
cuts in state funded slots for treatment, Jackson County faces increased challenges to provide a
variety of treatment and rehabilitation services for alcohol and other drug users designed to meet
the therapeutic needs of diverse segments of our community. A look at some of the strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities, and threats may help to discover what will work in our county to
reduce adult substance abuse.

Strengths:

       The treatment provider community has remained stable in spite of financial challenges.
        One provider, Addictions Recovery Center, has added DUII services, and two providers,
        On Track and Community Works, have added enhanced outpatient treatment for high-
        risk youth.

       Jackson County is a model community for Service Integration. We have four sites (West
        Medford, White City, Central Point, Ashland) with a fifth site being initiated in Rogue
        River. Service integration enhances the amount of wraparound supports available to
        families in the DHS system.

       The County has started two dual diagnosis groups for severely impaired adult clients.
        Jefferson Behavioral Health (JBH) sponsored a training Summer 2000 that was well
        attended by both substance abuse and mental health professionals. The goal in Jackson
        County is to be sure there is ―No Wrong Door‖ for a person entering treatment. The two
        contracted alcohol and drug providers include licensed social workers or mental health
        staff that can work with identified dual diagnosis youth.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                  Page 27
      There is a strong collaborative spirit in Jackson County. These relationships enable
       agencies and groups to take quick advantage of funding opportunities and allow them to
       build on each other’s strengths. Leaders of the treatment organizations meet monthly to
       collaborate and learn from each other.

       ―Parallel Program‖ is providing a continuum of care including transitional housing for
        adult offenders to decrease risk of relapse and recidivism. The transitional housing has
        15 beds, is currently full with a waiting list; offenders average stay is three months.

      Increased transitional and supportive housing which helps keep people clean and sober
        during and after treatment. In 2000, On Track, Inc. opened Stevens in Medford providing
        50 units of housing and case management for people in recovery from substance abuse,
        domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, or other special needs.

       Several countywide planning groups are working together to coordinate their efforts with
        a specific focus on substance abuse: CCF (Commission on Children and Families;
        LADPC (Local Alcohol and Drug Planning Committee); FACT (Family Addiction
        Community Team); and Jackson County Prevention Council.

       We have several strong early intervention programs in our county. Vital Links provides
        intervention/case management services for drug addicted pregnant and parenting mothers
        and their children. They created and manage The Safe Place, a resource center for
        recovering women and sponsor an annual Mothers Day Celebration. Vital Links has
        developed excellent resource materials, e.g. videos, to help educate our community.
        They provided leadership in getting the Healthy Babies Program started as well as a
        universal drug screening through the medical community in Jackson County.

       Universal Perinatal Drug Screening Project involves the medical community in early
        identification of drug using mothers who are referred to the Healthy Babies program, a
        collaborative effort between OnTrack, Inc., Jackson County Health Dept., and Services
        to Children and Families. Healthy Babies program offers women education and
        treatment on drug use issues during pregnancy.

       SODA continues to lead the community in organization and coordination of Drug Free
        Workplace programs. They initiated a group to help change community norms that allow
        youth to get started early in experimentation with drugs and alcohol

       We are also fortunate to have two model residential treatment programs for parents and
        their children. On Track runs the Home Program and Dad’s Program which allow
        parents and their young children to participate in recovery together. These are successful
        and innovative programs that draw in existing community resources to enrich their
        programs, e.g. volunteer Foster Grandparents provide support and role modeling in the
        Home Program demonstrating nurturing care for the babies.

       There is a strong network of recovering people in the Rogue Valley who provide outreach
        and hope - through a growing number of 12 Step Support Groups. Recovering people
        provide outreach into the jails and treatment centers, recreational opportunities such as
        camp-outs, hikes, and retreats. Many agencies, restaurants, and churches have allowed
        use of their space for minimal cost.

       Our county continues to come up with innovative outreach efforts. The Medford Police
        Department, West Medford Family Center and Medford School District have joined in

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001               Page 28
        partnership to place a uniformed School Resource Officer in the elementary schools to
        deal with absentee and truancy issues. Through their connections with community and
        families, they are able to link families with substance abuse problems to the appropriate
        resources.

       KARE (Kid’s Acting Responsibility Everywhere) includes family therapy and youth
        treatment enhancement which offers family therapy allowing identification and service
        delivery to parents of at-risk youth who may have alcohol and drug issues themselves.

       Teen residential program with family groups.

Weaknesses:

       Jackson County Detox program closed but the county continues to run a 48 hour sobering
        service. Local residential programs have agreed to provide detox when needed for clients
        entering residential treatment.

       Existing funding streams have restrictions that create obstacles for effective treatment of
        severely affected dual diagnosis clients. Another barrier is timely access to psychiatric
        services for mediation.

       Transportation especially for those living in rural areas is a barrier for people in recovery.
        People in early recovery usually have multiple problems requiring access to treatment,
        support groups, follow-up services, employment, probation/parole, and basic services.
        For those working evening and graveyard shifts, public transportation is often unavailable
        or difficult if transporting children to childcare.

       With the growing drug problem in Jackson County, there are relatively few Narcotics
        Anonymous groups compared to Alcoholics Anonymous.

       Lack of sufficient, safe, transitional housing for single recovering women being released
        from the Talent Correctional Facility. Many of the women in the Talent Correctional
        Facility are there because of methamphetamine abuse and have lost custody of their
        children, have no employment, poor health and face many challenges when they are
        released from jail.

       Lack of funding for youth residential alcohol and drug treatment.

Opportunities:

       Increased law enforcement efforts through JACNET, a multi-agency task force, is
        targeting the drug trafficking organizations responsible for the importation and
        distribution of the bulk of the illegal drugs seen in our community.

       Jackson County has begun a serious effort to deal more effectively with the dual
        diagnosis (alcohol/drug and mental health) population.

       The Legislature permanently funded a full time drug court coordinator position for
        Jackson County. Jackson County is using this position along with a technical assistance
        grant received from the National Office of Drug Court Programs to plan and implement a
        Family Drug Court system.


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                  Page 29
       The Talent Correctional Facility provides substance abuse rehabilitation to offenders who
        are incarcerated long term for alcohol and drug related offenses.

       Jackson County Courts, Juvenile/Adult Corrections, Commission on Children and
        Families, and On Track are putting together a collaborative application for a Byrne Grant
        that will focus on youthful offenders.

       On Track, Inc. will be opening another 50 unit housing development in 2002 that will
        provide safe housing and case management for families in recovery.

       Increasing number of community-based alcohol and drug outpatient services.

Threats:

       Methamphetamine is extremely addictive and can lead to permanent psychosis. Dual-
        diagnosis is becoming the norm often complicating successful recovery.

       Adult substance abuse leads to poor family management perpetuating the cycle of abuse.

       Lack of legislative action to increase the beer and wine sales tax to increase public
        support for treatment. In theory, taxation and other public policies that affect the price of
        alcoholic beverage prices can influence total alcohol consumption.

       The combination of inaccessible rural areas, a non-urban law enforcement system, and
        the I-5 transportation system has created a strong ―meth‖ presence in our community.

       Jackson County has a significant number of hard-core adult substance abusers and
        multigenerational drug abusers. It is difficult to reach and intervene with both the adults
        and the children in this subculture.

       Lack of crisis and respite nursery care for at-risk low income parents.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

      (Strength) A collaborative effort between the Medford School District, On Track, and
        ESD, Migrant Education, Project LISTO resulted in the establishment of parent support
        groups and a newsletter for Spanish speaking parents at both Jackson and Washington
        Elementary Schools in West Medford.

       (Weakness) The Hispanic community is reluctant to get involved with traditional
        treatment programs even when they employ bilingual/bicultural staff.

      (Weakness) Lack of bilingual/bicultural treatment programs and 12 Step Support groups;
        shortage of bilingual/bicultural accredited professionals to implement the existing
        programs.

       (Weakness) Women in crisis (fleeing domestic violence) or coming out of the jail and in
        early recovery from alcohol/drug addiction often lack safe transitional housing and basic
        resources.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                  Page 30
       (Opportunity) There is a growing awareness of the need to provide bilingual/bicultural
        services for Hispanics in the Rogue Valley. Collaborative community efforts have
        focused on providing resources and training to address bilingual issues, e.g., the Early
        Childhood Partnership Resource Guide and ―No Wrong Door‖ training for front line
        staff.

       (Opportunity) Three local nonprofit agencies (ARC, La Clinica, Samaritan Counseling)
        have received a grant to explore culturally accessible and relevant substance abuse
        services to the Hispanic population.

      (Opportunity) West Medford Family Center has developed a strong ―Hispanic Focus
        Group‖ who meet regularly to increase effective outreach to Hispanic families in need of
        basic resources. Several other Jackson County groups meet monthly to provide
        networking, education, and advocacy for minorities, e.g., the Hispanic Interagency
        Committee. The Multicultural Commission was recently formed by the City of Medford
        as an advisory body to the Council on issues of economic, social and cultural interest for
        Medford’s growing multicultural community.

      (Threat) Single parent households headed by women with children are most likely to be
        poor. Twenty two percent of Oregonians with a physical disability live in households
        with incomes below the federal poverty level. The poverty rate for Hispanics is twice
        that of Oregon’s white majority. Parental risk factors are disproportionately high among
        low-income women in general and put them increasingly at risk for substance abuse
        problems.

Summary:

The collaborative efforts and partnerships between agencies, schools, programs, and community
groups is a strength in our county and has increased our ability to intervene earlier and provide
more coordinated services. However, without increased funding, it continues to be a challenge to
find ways to fill identified gaps such as the need for transportation, mental health services,
educational opportunities, housing, basic needs, and family services. Increased public education
on the economic costs of alcohol and drug abuse may help to institute public and policy change at
the State and Federal levels resulting in additional funding.

Planning Groups:

   Jackson County Commission on Children and Families
    Jackson County Local Alcohol & Drug Planning Committee
    Jackson County Prevention Council
    Family Addiction Community Team (FACT)
    Southern Oregon Drug Awareness (SODA)
    Jackson County Early Childhood Partnership Team
    West Medford Family Center – Hispanic Focus Group
•    Hispanic Interagency Committee

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

   Jackson County Alcohol and Drug Treatment Plan – 2001/2003
   Juvenile Crime Prevention Plan

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001               Page 31
                                              GOAL 1: STRONG, NURTURING FAMILIES

                                           High-Level Outcome 2. Reduce Domestic Violence
                                                       County and State Data


                                                   Domestic Violence Arrests Per 1,000 Adults
                                                                  1995 - 2000
                                                         Jackson County and Oregon
                                            10
           Arrests per 1,000 >18 years




                                             8



                                             6


                                             4



                                             2


                                             0
                                                   1995         1996            1997            1998            1999       2000 Prelim.
                                         Jackson   3.8           3              3.2             3.7             3.0             4.3
                                         Oregon    4.3           4.4            4.5             4.4             4.6             5.1


         Source: Law Enforcement Data System, Report of Criminal Offenses and Arrests, 1995- 2001.




                                                              Domestic Disturbances Reporting
                                                                        1995-2000
                                                          1995     1996        1997      1998                          1999               2000

          Oregon
    # Incidents                                       21,414           29,965          19,801          19,768          17,068             19,119
    % Arrest                                           65%              63%             68%             68%             67%                69%
          Jackson
    # Incidents                                           705          590             717             976             658                1,012
    % Arrests                                             73%          72%             61%             57%             61%                58%
                                                                                                                 * 2000 data is preliminary.
Trend Analysis:

        The number of reported domestic violence incidents increased between 1999 and 2000,
         and increased particularly dramatically for Jackson County. The number of reported
         domestic disturbance incidents rose by 54% in Jackson County, from 658 in 1999 to


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                 Page 32
            1,012 in 2000. During the same period of time the number of arrests surged by 46% in
            Jackson County, from 401 in 1999 to 587 in 2000. Incidences of domestic disturbances
            grew statewide by 12% and arrests increased by 15% (1999-2000). Adjusting for
            population changes over the year at the county and state levels, the rate of arrests per
            1,000 adults increased in Jackson County by 43% and by 11% for the state.

           Although the arrest rates have increased dramatically in Jackson County between 1999
            and 2000, they have not kept pace with the increase in reported incidences (61% arrested
            in 1999 compared to 58% in 2000).

           The actual incidences of domestic violence may or may not have increased. All we
            really know is that the reported incidences have increased, which may be a good thing
            due to increased community awareness.



                                                                          Divorce Rates
                                                                            1980 - 2000
                                                              Jackson County, Oregon and United States

                                             10
                  Dissolutions of Marriage




                                              8
                    per 1,000 Marriages




                                              6


                                              4


                                              2


                                              0   1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
                                 Jackson          7.9   7.3   7.5   7.3   7.3   6.9   5.7   5.3   6.1   6.8   6.8   5.7   5.4   5.9   6.1   6     6.1   6     6     5.9

                                 Oregon           6.7   6.7   6.3   6.1   5.9   5.9   5.9   5.8   5.5   5.4   5.5   5.4   5.4   5.4   5.1   4.9   4.7   4.6   4.7   4.7

                                 United States    5.2   5.3    5    5     4.9   5     4.8   4.8   4.8   4.7   4.7   4.7   4.7   5.6   4.6   4.4   4.3   4.6   4.2   4.1




    * Source: Department of Human Services, Health Division, Oregon
    Vital Statistics Annual Report, years vary.




Trend Analysis

           Divorce rates in Jackson County exceed both state and national rates. There were 5.9
            dissolutions of marriage per 1,000 marriages in 1999 in Jackson County compared to 4.7
            dissolutions per 1,000 marriages in Oregon and 4.1 per 1,000 nationally. Since 1993,
            Jackson County divorce rates have been holding steady while state and national rates
            have been slightly decreasing.

           In 1999, a total of 560 divorces in Jackson County affected households with children. At
            least 1,061 children’s parents divorced or approximately 2.5% of children in Jackson
            County compared to 1.7% of children in Oregon.

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                                         Page 33
                                       JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                Goal 1: Strong, Nurturing Families
                                          High-Level Outcome 2. Reduce Domestic Violence
                                             Family Violence & Violence Against Women
                                                               1999

          Agency                              Program                   Number Served   Number Served   Number Served   Number Served
                                                                          Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18    Families/Adults
Community Works                 Dunn House/Outreach                                                                               1,190
Community Works                 Dunn House/Residential                            104              55              27              111
Community Works                 Rape Crisis                                                                                          59
Community Works                 Supervised Court Visitation                       140              37               9              186
On Track, Inc.                  DAAP (Domestic Abuse                                                                               220
                                Alternatives Program)
On Track, Inc.                  WAV (Women Against Violence)                                                                         60




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                    Page 34
                    GOAL 1: STRONG, NURTURING FAMILIES

                 High-Level Outcome 2. Reduce Domestic Violence

Introduction:

Domestic violence affects a significant number of families in our nation. Research indicates that 25%
(approximately 12 million) women in the Untied States will be abused sometime in their lives, becoming
the most common cause of nonfatal injury to American women (Preventing Intimate Partner Violence, p.6
in AFS Newsletter on Domestic Violence, Summer 2001). Violence ranges from emotional abuse, to life
threatening beating, to homicide. Domestic violence does not discriminate and occurs in families of all
income levels, races and forms. Violence is most common, however, among families who are
economically stressed, exposed to violence as children, and socially isolated. (Source: Pratt, Clara et. al.
Building Results: From Wellness to Positive Outcomes for Oregon’s Children, Youth and Families. 1997)

Recent research indicates that 10% of the adult population has grown up in homes in which women were
the victims of physically assaultive behavior (Vincent J. Felitti, The Adverse Childhood Experiences
[ACE] Study in Family Violence Prevention Fund, Health Alert, Summer 2001). Compared to children
who do not witness such violence, children who are exposed to violence are more likely to experience
developmental delays, have poor social skills, and be victims of child abuse and neglect. Children
exposed to domestic violence have more than twice the rate of psychiatric problems than other children.
Even more disturbing, a child being exposed to domestic violence is the major predictor for adults
engaging in domestic violence (Alicia Lieberman, PhD, Children: The Hidden Victims of Domestic
Violence, Health Alert, Summer 2001).

Elder abuse, committed by family and household members, is one form of domestic violence. The
Oregon Elder Abuse Reporting Act defines elder abuse as physical injury, neglect or abandonment of a
person 65 or older. This Act requires mandatory reporting of such abuse to the Oregon Senior and
Disabled Services Division. Both the absolute number and rate of reports have increased since 1989; in
1995 the overall elder abuse rate was 1,202 per 100,000. (Source: Harris, L., University of Oregon.
Valuing Families: The State of Oregon’s Families. 1999)

The following analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in Jackson County may help to
identify effective strategies we can use to reduce domestic violence in our county.

Strengths:

       Active law enforcement. Adjusting for population changes over the year at the county and state
        levels, the rate of arrests per 1,000 adults increased in Jackson County by 43% and by 11% for
        the state between 1999 and 2000.

       Jackson County Domestic Violence Council was formed in 1995 and has helped establish
        standards for treatment for batterers as well as a forum for discussion about domestic violence.

       Jackson County Courts are currently planning a multi-agency training in Spring 2002 for all the
        agencies/groups involved in juvenile matters, which will include some discussion of domestic
        violence and better ways for everyone to respond.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                        Page 35
       Jackson County’s Family Court coordinates cases so that one judge handles multiple cases for
        one offender/family, which may include a domestic violence case. However, there is only one
        family court coordinator, which limits the numbers the court is able to handle.

       All treatment programs for domestic violence offenders must meet Jackson County Batterer
        Intervention Standards developed and agreed upon by the Domestic Violence Council.

       Domestic violence offenders are also screened for substance abuse problems and referred to
        appropriate programs. On Track reports that approximately 75% of the offenders in their Men
        Against Violence (MAV) domestic violence treatment program have been identified with
        substance abuse problems. On Track also offers a Victim Support group. To meet the increasing
        demand for offender treatment, On Track has increased the number of staff from two to six and
        now offers two groups in White City, and six in Medford, including one in Spanish. On Track
        partners with the Corrections Department to have female Corrections Officers co-faciliate the
        groups.

       Rogue Valley Addictions Recovery Center, Genesis, and On Track, Inc. all routinely screen for
        domestic violence issues especially with female clients.

       Research based parenting groups for domestic violence offenders using facilitators who are cross-
        trained in domestic violence treatment protocols and strategies in order to provide continuity of
        care and consistency of programming.

       The Center for Legal Services provides legal services for Jackson County low-income clients
        with domestic violence problems, housing/income assistance, and immigration/ citizenship cases.
        Aggravated domestic violence problems may include: disputes in child custody, divorces with
        prevention or mitigation of physical or serious psychological abuse, and paternity cases to prevent
        deprivation of children in situation which involve serious family instability.

       Dunn House Shelter provides short-term shelter and assistance to women and children who are
        victims of domestic violence. Dunn House also provides public education presentations to local
        agencies, schools, churches etc.

       Children’s Advocacy Center works to improve parents’ ability to prevent re-abuse of their
        children, increase their knowledge about child abuse issues and parent’s communication and
        coping skills with their children.

       Heathy Start home visiting program provides an opportunity to screen for abuse, provide support
        and make appropriate referrals. However some research points out that home health nurse
        visitation programs are not as effective when there is domestic violence in the home (Excerpts
        from National Conference on Health Care and Domestic Violence Plenary Session in Health
        Alert, Summer 2001).

       Family Resource Centers/Integration sites offering neighborhood based, coordinated services and
        resources for at-risk families.

       Prevention Programs for at-risk youth. For example, Project DOVE targets middle school youth
        who are from domestic violence and/or substance abuse family situations and provides them with
        adult mentors, counseling, and outdoor recreation opportunities. A workshop training on Dating
        Violence was held for professionals working with youth.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                       Page 36
       Many other agencies in our county work hard to provide a safety net of services including crisis
        intervention, outreach, referral, counseling, basic resources, and advocacy. Oftentimes it is
        through outreach services that domestic violence situations are revealed and appropriate
        resource/referral can be made by trained front line staff. Some of these agencies include:
            o Community Works, Helpline
            o Access Senior Outreach & Food Share
            o Center for Legal Services
            o CERVS – Emergency Services
            o Community Health Center

Weaknesses:

       Lack of adequate funding for parenting programs. A high percentage of battered women are also
        mothers. When their children are having trouble at school, when their children are having
        tantrums in the supermarket, their self-esteem, their sense of competence and skill as a parent
        suffers. Effective parenting programs can help the women become mothers with a higher sense
        of competence. Parent educators can screen for domestic violence and provide resources and
        referrals.

       Lack of sufficient resources in all the areas domestic violence victims need: mental health
        counseling (many victims suffer from post-traumatic stress); drug and alcohol treatment (many
        victims, as well as batterers, are abusing drugs and alcohol – for victims this is often how they
        cope); housing; transportation (especially for those in rural areas of the county); child care; job
        training and jobs that pay a living wage.

       Lack of funding for prevention/intervention programs for at-risk youth. In fact, all youth could
        benefit from prevention education relating to dating violence etc.

Opportunities:

       Increase in the number of domestic violence arrests in Jackson County may eventually lead to a
        decline in the number of incidences.

       The Early Childhood Partnership Team (ECPT) has selected Child Abuse and Neglect as a
        priority outcome to focus on for the next two years. Because there is a strong correlation between
        domestic violence, adult substance abuse, and child abuse, the ECPT will be integrating these
        concerns as it plans strategies to reduce child abuse and neglect.

       Statewide efforts to build a trauma registry for monitoring and responding to violence against
        women in order to increase understanding of the dynamics of domestic violence. Domestic
        violence contact persons are also being established in each county health department, similar to
        the network instituted in AFS allowing for exchange of information, innovative practices and
        strategies, tools and other resources.

       Jackson County Courts are sponsoring a regional domestic violence training in September 2001
        for Judges, clerks, Family Court and other staff.

       AFS partners and DHS sister agencies continue efforts to impact domestic violence. It is hoped
        that the reorganized Department of Human Services service delivery model will provide a greater
        level of safety and protection to anyone who is in an abusive relationship.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                         Page 37
       Continued public education to increase community awareness, e.g., Dunn House presentations;
        AFS Newsletter on Domestic Violence.

       In April 2001, National Child Abuse Awareness Month, the State Division of Child Support
        Domestic Violence Committee collaborated with AFS and SCF to provide backpacks to children
        going into foster care. SCF reports that domestic violence is present in about one quarter of the
        families where child abuse results in the decision to recommend foster care (AFS Newsletter,
        Summer 2001). These kinds of efforts also bring opportunities for local merchants and the
        community to become educated about the risks for domestic violence and personally involved by
        helping to fund the backpacks.

       New screening protocols for domestic violence recently developed by AFS.

       Increased free resources available nationally. The Family Violence Prevention Fund
        (www.fvpf.org/health ) offers: 1) national guidelines on how to screen for domestic violence; 2)
        steps health care providers can take to improve their response to domestic violence; 3) free
        patient and provider educational materials; and 4) organizing ideas for the third annual ―Health
        Cares About Domestic Violence Day on October 10th, 2001.

       A $300,000 federal grant was awarded to Community Works in October 2001 to extend domestic
        violence aid in the Upper Rogue rural region where there have been no services available.

Threats:

       Rising rates of domestic violence in Jackson County. The number of domestic disturbance
        incidents rose by 54% in Jackson County, from 658 in 1999 to 1,012 in 2000. Incidences of
        domestic disturbances grew statewide by 12% during the same time period. These numbers
        reflect only the reported incidences. Research shows that two thirds (65%) of victims do not
        report domestic violence to the police (AFS Newsletter on Domestic Violence, Summer 2001).
        Domestic violence is painful to recognize and difficult to deal with. Social taboos, shame, fear,
        and denial work against reporting this information.

       Multiple risk factors in Jackson County. Jackson County has high rates of adult substance abuse,
        divorce, and poverty that can set the stage for domestic violence and child abuse and neglect.
        Children suffer as the hidden victims of domestic violence. Exposed to multiple risk factors they
        face increased chances of repeating the cycle.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

       (Strength) An increased number of the agencies providing domestic violence services have
        bilingual staff. For example, since Dunn House hired a bilingual Hispanic Outreach Coordinator
        there has been an increase in use of the shelter by Hispanic women and their children.

       (Strength) La Clinica del Valle’s Heathy Start home visiting program provides an opportunity to
        screen for abuse, provide support and make appropriate referrals.

       (Strength) On Track offers domestic violence treatment in Spanish and also has groups for
        women who have been affected by domestic violence in their homes. These groups cover
        victims’ issues as well as coping skills, communication skills, and parenting skills.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                        Page 38
         (Weakness) Because of cultural differences, it is more difficult to get Hispanics involved in
          domestic violence treatment.

         (Weakness) In order to meet the standards for batterers’ treatment, groups must be co-facilitated
          by a male and a female counselor. They are then able to serve as role models for appropriate
          behavior. On Track uses a female Corrections Officer for their English speaking groups but does
          not have a female facilitator for the Spanish speaking group.

         (Opportunity) Increase in Hispanic groups, e.g. Hispanic Interagency Committee, West Medford
          Family Center’s Hispanic Focus Group, who provide a forum for domestic violence education
          and resource/referral for the Hispanic community.

         (Opportunity) The DV Council has identified development of services to Hispanic women who
          are DV victims as a priority.

         (Threat) Because families of color disproportionately experience economic hardships, exposure
          to violence as children, and social isolation, violence may be more common among them.
          (Source: Pratt, Clara et. al. Building Results: From Wellness to Positive Outcomes for Oregon’s
          Children, Youth and Families. 1997)

Domestic Violence Council Goals for 2000

The Domestic Violence Council has created a collaborative outreach, treatment awareness, and safe
shelter system for victims of domestic violence. The Council’s top five goals for 2000 were:

Goal 1:           Get funding for the DV Council’s work. Establish DV Council sub-committee to develop
                  an on-going plan for grant writing, seeking funding sources as well as well as legislation
                  and lobbying.

Goal 2:           Develop services to Hispanic women who are DV victims

Goal 3:           Celebration: Organize an annual awards/recognition nighttime gala to celebrate what is
                  right

Goal 4:           Conduct safety and accountability audits. Write them into next grant.

Goal 5:           Each agency that is part of the DV Council works towards development of a written
                  policy within their agency of protocols regarding when an employee is either a DV victim
                  or perpetrator.

Summary:

Domestic violence is a significant and increasing problem in Jackson County. If we are to have an impact
on related high priority outcomes such as child abuse and neglect, adult substance abuse, and poverty,
then we must work to reduce domestic violence in our community. The Early Childhood Partnership
Team and Commission on Children and Families have prioritized child abuse and neglect as one of the
top issues to focus on in the next few years. It is suggested that representatives of the Jackson County
Domestic Violence Task Force work closely with the ECPT to incorporate effective domestic violence
prevention research and strategies in their plan of action.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                         Page 39
Planning Groups:

Jackson County Domestic Violence Council
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families
Child Abuse Task Force

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

Jackson County Domestic Violence Council Goals - 2000




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 40
                                     GOAL 1: STRONG, NURTURING FAMILIES

                                         High-Level Outcome 3. Reduce Poverty
                                                 County and State Data


                                                  Poverty Rates, 1990 - 1997
                                                 Jackson County and Oregon
                                       20%
            % persons with incomes




                                       15%
             federal poverty level
               below 100% of the




                                       10%




                                        5%




                                        0%
                                                                                         1990-1997
                                               1990    1993              1995    1997
                                                                                          Average
                                     Jackson   13.2%   14.4%             14.6%   13.8%    14.0%
                                     Oregon    12.4%   13.2%             12.5%   11.6%    12.4%

            Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Census of Population and
            Housing, and Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates. 2001




Trend Analysis

The poverty rate is defined as the percent of persons with incomes below 100% of the federal poverty
level. According to the 2001 Federal Poverty Guidelines a family of four earning $17,650 or less gross
income annually is considered to be at or below the poverty line.

   Jackson County has a significantly large number of working poor. Jackson County also has a larger
    than average number of families living in poverty.

   According to Census Bureau data, poverty rates in Jackson County have increased over time (1990-
    1995) and were estimated to be 13.8% (1997). The seven-year average rate of 14.0% for Jackson
    County is higher than Oregon’s average of 12.4%. The Southern Oregon region has the highest rate
    of childhood poverty in Oregon (Status of Oregon’s Children 1999 County Data Book).

   Jackson County has a lower than average number of families on welfare. In April 2000, the TANF-
    Basic (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) rate for Jackson County was 24.1/1,000 children
    compared to Oregon’s rate of 30.6/1,000 children.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                         Page 41
“A Portrait of Poverty in Oregon”, Oregon State University Extension Service, 2000

   WOMEN AND CHILDREN: Single females with children are most likely to be poor. Ninety two
    percent of the families on welfare in Oregon are single-parent households headed by women (1995
    Census). Thirty percent of the households headed by single women in Oregon live below the poverty
    level, almost twice the rate for households headed by single men (1998 Oregon Population Survey).

   AGE: Very young children ages 0 to 5 years, young adults ages 21 to 25, and senior citizens 76+ are
    most likely to live in poverty (1998 Oregon Population Survey).

   DISABILITY: Twenty two percent of Oregonians with a physical disability live in households with
    incomes below the federal poverty level (Oregon Progress Board’s 1998 Benchmark Report).

   MINORITIES: Of the 200,000 Hispanics estimated to be living in Oregon, about 27%, live in
    poverty. Their poverty rate is twice that of Oregon’s white majority (1998 Oregon Population
    Survey).

   Note: The Oregon Population Survey data does not have a large enough sample size to provide
    county level data while the U.S. Census Bureau data provides occasional county data through its
    series entitled ―Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates‖ (1993 data released January 1998; 1995
    data released February 1999, and 1997 data released December 2000). Poverty estimates are for the
    90% confidence interval for the lower bound of estimate of percent of people of all ages in poverty.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                       Page 42
                                       JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SYSTEM
                                               Goal 1: Strong, Nurturing Families
                                             High Level Outcome 3: Reduce Poverty
                                             Family Self–Sufficiency /Basic Resources
                                                               1999

          Agency                             Program                   Number Served    Number Served    Number Served    Number Served
                                                                         Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12        Ages 13-18     Families/Adults
ACCESS                         Community Food Pantries                                                                              3,500
ACCESS                         Emergency Assistance                               25               24               18                 32
ACCESS                         Federal Energy Assistance                         615              678              572              2,358
ACCESS                         Food Share                                       1,023            1,134             890             17,845
ACCESS                         Housing Stabilization                              16                7                7                 23
ACCESS                         State Energy Assistance                           135              100               63                198
ACCESS                         Tenant Based Assistance                            47               17               11                 36
ACCESS                         Weatherization                                     27               21               19                 78
Adult & Family Services        Employment Related Day Care                      1,605            1,178            1,602
Adult & Family Services        Food Stamps                                      2,050            1,392            3,255
Adult & Family Services        TANF/Cash Assistance                             1,037             633             1,475
ARC                            Transitional Living                                                                                         4
CERVS                          Family Self Sufficiency                          1,900            1,700            1,200             3,500
                               Food/Clothing/Other
Child Care Council             USDA Food Program for child care                 1,320             800
4-C                            providers
Department of Human            VRD-Volunteer Job Placement                                                                             83
Services/Community
Partnership




 Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                    Page 43
          Agency                             Program                   Number Served    Number Served      Number Served      Number Served
                                                                         Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12          Ages 13-18       Families/Adults
Habitat for Humanity           Low Income Home Ownership                           2                3                   1                    2
Housing Authority              Family Self-Sufficiency Program                                                                               50
Housing Authority              Subsidized Housing                                                                                         2,000
Living Opportunities           24-Hour Support Services                                                                                      29
Living Opportunities           Community Assistance                                                                                          45
Living Opportunities           Employment                                                                                                    65
NW Seasonal Workers            Self-Sufficiency                                                                                             200
On Track, Inc                  Case Management                                                                                               49
On Track, Inc.                 HIV Housing                                                                                                   17
On Track, Inc.                 Low Income Housing                                                                                            49
Oregon Child Development       USDA Food Program for Hispanic                                                                             1,400
Coalition                      child care providers
Red Cross                      Disaster Relief                                      9                 20                 14                 373
Salvation Army                 Transitional Shelter                                15                 14                                    228


 Basic Resource Summary:

    Basic Resource System serves people in crisis, people on subsidized income (welfare, social security), and working poor.
    The largest support systems for assisting families with Basic Resources are the food stamp program (approximately 12% of children receive
     food stamps) and the food pantry program.
    Most resource services track adults/families served and do not track numbers of children.




 Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                          Page 44
                                        JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SYSTEM
                                                Goal 1: Strong, Nurturing Families
                                              High Level Outcome 3: Reduce Poverty
                                                      Family Self-Sufficiency
                                               Adult Education & Adult Job Training
                                                               1999

           Agency                             Program                   Number Served   Number Served    Number Served      Number Served
                                                                          Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12        Ages 13-18       Families/Adults
Job Council                     Adult Training                                                                                          222
Job Council                     Dislocated Worker Training                                                                               591
Job Council                     Teen Parent Ed                                                                        154                 90
Job Council                     Youth Employment Training                                                             256
Rogue Community College         English as a Second Language                                                                             368
Rogue Community College         Vocational Education                                                                                   2,055
Southern Oregon Goodwill        Employment/Temporary                                                                                   1,588
                                Employment
Southern Oregon Goodwill        Welfare-to-Work                                                                                          593
Southern Oregon University      Adult Enrollment                                                                                       5,023
Vocational Rehabilitation       Job Skills                                                                                               485


  Service Summary:

     The bulk of county adult training services are provided by four training organizations.
     Rogue Community College became a Jackson County institution in 1996. Numbers served from Jackson County have increased steadily since
      then.




  Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                      Page 45
                         GOAL 1: STRONG, NURTURING FAMILIES
                           High-Level Outcome 3. Reduce Poverty

Introduction:

Poverty rates in Jackson County have increased over time (1990-1997) and are estimated to be nearly
14%, a higher rate than the State (12%). There are a large number of working poor and a larger than
average number of families living in poverty (under $17,650 for a family of four). The following analysis
attempts to pinpoint current strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that exist to help reduce
poverty in Jackson County.

Strengths:

   Jackson County has developed a highly sophisticated system of county, state, and private non-profit
    partnerships that maximize service effectiveness. The AFS and job training programs have developed
    an intensely integrated program over the last 10 years, which has strong positive outcomes in getting
    adults off welfare and into entry-level positions. Jackson County is one of the four DHS prototype
    integration counties and, over the last five years, has integrated human services and the AFS program
    to effectively serve the ―hardest to serve,‖ particularly those with alcohol and drug and child welfare
    problems. Focus groups of present integration clients indicate strong client satisfaction with
    integration services.

    Jackson County is highly collaborative. In most instances, service providers have successfully
     avoided or done away with duplicative or ineffective overlap services.

    The emergency service agencies have improved coordination and attempted to define a clear
     continuum of services. Integration sites and schools have increased outreach capacities to reach out
     to families in need of basic resources. In Spring, 2001, the Early Childhood Partnership Team
     developed the Jackson County Early Childhood Basic Needs Resource Guide, a comprehensive list
     of services for children ages 0 – 8 years. The Early Childhood Partnership Team worked with the
     Jackson County Integration Team to provide a ―No Wrong Door‖ training appropriate for
     receptionists, front line staff, case managers, screeners etc. to build effective ―customer‖ skills.
     Local nonprofit organizations are continuing to develop and strengthen capacity to deal with basic
     problems, not just the current crisis. Transitional and supportive housing services, while still
     woefully inadequate, have been slowly increasing.

    Community action organizations have formed in West Medford and White City, two of the high
     poverty communities in Jackson County. Both of these groups have made significant progress in
     developing home ownership programs, removing urban blight, and cleaning up their communities.
     Both groups are run by and serve citizens of their communities.

    Rogue Community College (RCC) has greatly increased its presence in Jackson County. RCC has
     been nationally recognized for its capacity to design and provide training based on community needs
     and in collaboration with community partners, particularly with the Job Council, Adult and Family
     Services (AFS), and the Jackson County Library in Medford.

    Habitat for Humanity has a successful program in Jackson County. There has also been progress
     made in housing stabilization for victims of domestic violence.

    Emergency food pantries, supplied by a common food bank, have been set up in most communities
     in Jackson County. The community continues to support food drives to supplement local food
     supplies for the food bank.


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                       Page 46
Weaknesses:

   Jackson County has a large number of working poor who are not on subsidized income programs.
    Many of our gaps in this area are due to a lack of sufficient resources for this population.

   Lack of sufficient affordable housing. There is a 2-year waiting list for subsidized
    housing. Jackson County has a low supply of rental housing, and costs are high compared to income
    level.

   Lack of sufficient transitional housing. Successful integration work has gotten many
    multi-problem families into treatment programs and out of domestic violence situations. These
    families need temporary transitional housing support to maintain their positive life changes.

   Lack of sufficient support services for working poor. Service providers are stretching
    eligibility guidelines as much as possible, but the present system continues to remove or never make
    supports available to working poor, removing incentives and opportunities for families to become
    truly self-sufficient.

   (12-18 year olds) Lack of emergency shelter services for homeless youth (present shelter service
    only for Juvenile Department and SCF youth).

   High number of temporary, seasonal, and part-time jobs which cannot adequately
    support a family and offer no health insurance.

   Lack of sufficient ―living wage‖ jobs.

   Cumbersome and changing rules and regulations make it difficult to be self-employed
    or run your own business.

   High cost of higher education.

   Community norm of not caring about what’s happening if it doesn’t directly involve me.

   High cost of moving in (deposits plus first and last month’s rent).

   Lack of public transportation in off hours.

   Lack of any public transportation in most rural areas of the county.

Opportunities:

    Families who are not involved in any system lack knowledge of available resources and/or
     do not know how to access them. In Spring, 2001, the Early Childhood Partnership Team tried to
     address this problem by developing Jackson County Early Childhood Basic Needs Resource Guide,
     a comprehensive list of services for children ages 0 – 8 years. The Early Childhood Partnership
     Team the joined with the Jackson County Integration Team to use the Guide in a ―No Wrong Door‖
     training appropriate for receptionists, front line staff, case managers, screeners etc. to build effective
     ―customer‖ referral skills.

    The City of Ashland is considering adoption of a ―living wage‖ ordinance that would impact
     all city employees and employees of businesses that contract with the city.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 47
    Threats:

         The wage gap between Jackson County and the state is getting wider. In 1999, average annual
          earnings for Jackson County were $25,668 compared to $30,867 for the state. Jackson County’s
          average annual earnings increased at a slower rate over the ten-year period than Oregon’s rate:
          41% for Jackson County compared to 52% for the state.

         Unemployment rate rising: During the last decade (1990-2000), the unemployment rate in Jackson
          County has averaged 7.2%. Jackson County’s unemployment rate for 2000 is 5.3% compared to
          Oregon’s rate of 4.9% and the United States rate of 4.0% (Preliminary estimates for 2000,
          Employment Department, April 2001).

         Affordable housing costs on the rise: Selling prices of homes in some areas of the county have
          risen 20% in the past 12 months increasing the lack of sufficient affordable housing.

    Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

        (Strengths) Jackson County is highly collaborative. All the strengths listed above will help to
         address issues of gender, race, language, or physical disability.

        (Weakness) There is an insufficient adequate housing supply for seasonal migrant workers. There is
         also a lack of sufficient supportive housing with long waiting lists for developmentally disabled
         adults and families. Women in crisis (fleeing domestic violence), or coming out of the jail and in
         early recovery from alcohol/drug addiction, lack sufficient basic resources, especially safe housing.

        (Opportunities) West Medford Family Center has developed a strong ―Hispanic Focus Group‖ who
         meet regularly to increase effective outreach to Hispanic families in need of basic resources. Several
         other Jackson County groups meet monthly to provide networking, education, and advocacy for
         minorities, e.g., the Hispanic Interagency Committee. The Multicultural Commission was recently
         formed by the City of Medford as an advisory commission to the City Council on issues of
         economic, social and cultural interest for Medford’s growing multicultural community.

        (Threats) Single parent households headed by women with children are most likely to be poor.
         Twenty two percent of Oregonians with a physical disability live in households with incomes below
         the federal poverty level. The poverty rate for Hispanics is twice that of Oregon’s white majority.

    Summary:

    Reducing poverty in Jackson County is a challenge! We have a highly collaborative service system and
    are one of the four DHS prototype integration counties. The integration sites and schools are becoming
    more sophisticated in outreach capacities to families in need of basic resources. Community coalitions
    have formed in high poverty areas of West Medford and White City to help address poverty issues. By
    addressing the other high-level outcomes identified in the Comprehensive Plan, e.g., youth and adult
    substance abuse, high school dropout, teen pregnancy, we will ultimately help to reduce poverty in
    Jackson County.




    Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                       Page 48
Planning Groups:

   Commission on Children and Families
   Adult and Family Services - Project Managers
   Early Childhood Partnership Team
   Jackson County Integration Team
   Hispanic Interagency Committee
   Community Services Consortium
   West Medford Community Coalition
   White City Improvement Association
   Rogue Valley Civic League

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

   Jackson County Integration Plan
   City of Medford Community Development Plan
   Unified Workforce Development Plan
   Community Action - ACCESS, Inc. Omni Plan
   Early Childhood Partnership Team Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 49
                                            JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION
                                              ON CHILDREN & FAMILIES
                                             2001 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN




                                                 High-Level Outcomes


                                                         $ Child Abuse &
                                                           Neglect
        GOAL 2:

        Healthy                                          $ Prenatal Care
        Thriving
        Children
                                                         $ Immunizations

                                                         $ ATOD Use
                                                           During Pregnancy

                                                         $ Child Care
                                                           Availability

                                                         $ Readiness to
                                                              Learn
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 50
                                                  GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN
                                                                     JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON
                      High-Level Outcome 4. Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect
                                     County and State Data

                                                 Child Abuse and Neglect Rate Per 1,000 Children
                                                                  1990 - 2000
                                                          Jackson County and Oregon
                                          20
              Abuse/Neglect Victims
              per 1,000 Children <18




                                          15




                                          10




                                           5




                                           0
                                                  1990     1991     1992   1993    1994    1995         1996        1997     1998   1999    2000
                                       Jackson    11.9     9.7      11.5   11.2    12.8        11.8     11.1        14.5     14.2   15.8    14.1
                                       Oregon      11       10       11     11      10         10           10       12       12    13.5    12.2




           * Source: State Office for Services to Children and Families, 2001.




                                                          Child Abuse/Neglect Victims 1990-2000
                                       1990         1991          1992     1993     1994         1995            1996      1997     1998     1999        2000

 Oregon                                  8,126      7,961         8,705    8,423 7,946 8,018 8,325                         9,742 10,147      11,241      10,186

 Jackson                                   442           372        443      445         523          491         459       605       627          671     616

Source: The Status of Children in Oregon’s Child Protection System - 2000

Trend Analysis

       Child abuse and neglect rates in Jackson County have been consistently higher than Oregon rates
        in the last decade. The number of child abuse/neglect victims in Jackson County increased 39.4%
        since 1990 while the number of victims in Oregon increased a lesser 25.4%. The 2000 Jackson
        County children abused/neglected rate was 14.1/1,000, which was also higher than the state rate
        of 12.2/1,000. There were 616 victims of child abuse/neglect in 2000, an 8.2% decrease from the
        previous year. Oregon also showed a sizable decrease of 9.4% in the number of victims.

       Infants: Infants continue to make up the largest single age group of victims. The large number
        of infant victims reflects several factors: the number of children who were found to be drug-


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                             Page 51
       affected at birth, the extreme vulnerability of this population, and the stresses that occur in
        families when children are born.

       Foster Care: The families of children placed in foster care face many issues. The top five
        family factors that put child at risk of being abused (and then removed and placed in foster care)
        are: drug abuse (72.3%); chronic neglect (55.4%); alcohol abuse (53.5%); teen parent at time of
        first birth (53.5%); and poverty/inadequate income (49.5%). (Source: SCF Cohort IV study of
        children in care between 1/95 through 6/97).

       Oregon’s definition of child abuse includes Threat of Harm, which many states do not include.
        This means that Services to Children and Families (SCF) get referrals and investigate situations
        where children have not yet been harmed, but are at high risk of abuse. This makes SCF reported
        numbers in Oregon larger than many states.

       National Data: While there has been a slight decrease in the incidence of child abuse and
        neglect in Jackson County in the past year, rates for the county have not shown the steady
        decrease that national statistics reveal (Child Maltreatment 1999: Reports from the States to the
        National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System NCANDS). Changes in Oregon’s definition of
        child abuse, as noted previously, may have contributed to the number of reported cases.
        Nevertheless, the number of child abuse/neglect victims in Jackson County and throughout
        Oregon remains at an alarmingly high level.

        Mirroring national data, child neglect remains one of the most common forms of maltreatment.
        National data indicates that 60 percent of all victims suffered neglect, while 20 percent suffered
        physical abuse and 11 percent were sexually abused. (NCANDS).

                           Correlations With Other High-Priority Outcomes

A thorough analysis and interpretation of child abuse and neglect data requires an examination of the
information regarding social and personal conditions that characterize families in which abuse and neglect
occur. Child abuse and neglect are correlated with substance abuse, domestic violence, and poverty.

       Adult Substance Abuse (Outcome #1): Most studies find that parental substance abuse is a
        contributing factor for between one third and two thirds of children involved with the child
        welfare system. It is estimated that 8.3 million children (National Household Survey of Drug
        Abuse, 1996) live with a parent who is alcoholic and 2.1 million children live with a parent
        whose primary problem is with illicit drugs.

       Domestic Violence (Outcome #2): Although domestic violence has just recently been added to
        the list of reasons why children enter foster care, the effects of violence on children is well
        researched. Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to be victims of abuse and
        neglect. Additionally, this exposure also has an adverse affect on cognitive, social, and emotional
        development (High-level Outcome 2; Reduce Domestic Violence).

       Poverty (Outcome #3): Poverty, a condition that is correlated with abuse, increased between
        1990 and 1995, with a slight decrease in 1997. Noteworthy is the fact that single females with
        children are most likely to be poor. Ninety-two percent of the Oregon families on welfare are
        single parent households headed by women (1995 Census).




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                              Page 52
                              COMMUNITY SAFETY NETS (CSN)



                               Jackson County Safety Net Referrals
                                           1999 – 2001
                                         (Unduplicated)
                                                           1999-2000              2000-2001

      # Families referred from SCF                           1,184 families         1,489
                                                             1,976 children
      # CSN Partner Referrals                                     436                447

      # Families receiving Targeted Case                           139               152
      Management (TCM)
      # Children from families receiving TCM                 Not Available           340



    Community Safety Nets serve children who are at high risk for abuse and neglect, but do not have a
    current open case with Services to Children and Families (SCF). Jackson County Safety Net receives
    their referrals directly from SCF. The Community Safety Net referrals from SCF are either on
    unfounded, unable to determine, or on families with two or more referrals. All referred families are
    screened and if deemed appropriate then receive an outreach letter offering services, referral to other
    partner agencies, and/or targeted case management. Targeted case management consists of two or
    more contacts (at least one of those contacts being face to face).

        Ages of Children: Jackson County Safety Net reports that in 1999-2000, fifty five percent of
        unfounded cases involve children 0-8 years; 23 percent involve children ages 9–12 years; and 22
        percent children 13-17 years.

        Identified Concerns: Of the Community Safety Net families receiving targeted case management
        (TCM) in 2000-2001, 37% of the referrals involved cases of threats of harm. Thirty-one percent
        (31%) of the TCM referrals identified neglect as the concern. Threats of harm and neglect are
        also the most commonly identified concerns in founded cases at the State level.

    Community responsiveness and strong partnerships with Jackson County SCF are factors
    explaining the large numbers of referrals and the increase in number of referrals documented in
    Community Safety Net data.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                       Page 53
                   Child Welfare Partnership/Portland State University
                                     February 2001
Portland State University

Jackson County vs Oregon statistics from the Southern Regional Report for children entering foster care between
1995-mid 1997, Child Welfare Partnership/Portland State University, February 2001.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                              Page 54
                                REASON FOR REMOVAL BY PERCENTAGE
                                       Jackson County vs Oregon
                                            1995 – Mid 1997

          Reason                                      Jackson County     Oregon

          Parental Absence                            22.5               20.6

          Neglect                                     18.6               21.8

          Parental Treatment Needs                    17.6               8.5

          Child=s Treatment Needs                     12.7               11.2

          Physical Abuse                              9.8                8.9

          Threat of Harm                              7.8                15.1

          Sexual Abuse                                5.9                4.8
          Domestic Violence                           2.0                2.8

          Child=s Behavior                            2.0                4.6

          Mental Abuse                                1.0                1.0

                           FAMILY FACTORS BY PERCENTAGE OF REMOVAL
                                      Jackson County vs Oregon
                                           1995 - Mid 1997

          Family Factors                              Jackson County     Oregon

          Poor Parenting Skills                       75.2               59.5

          Drug Abuse                                  72.3               58.9

          Chronic Neglect                             55.4               59.0

          Criminal Involvement                        54.5               50.7

          Mental Illness                              45.5               26.2
          Unemployment                                38.6               40.0

          History of Being Abusive to Children        21.8               18.7

          Angry/Aggressive/Emotionally Unstable       20.8               22.9

          Parent Incarcerated                         17.8               11.3




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001      Page 55
                            CHILD’S AGE AT REMOVAL BY PERCENTAGE
                                      Jackson County vs Oregon
                                           1995 - Mid 1997
          Child’s Age                           Jackson County Oregon

          Ages 00-05                                    48.0               44.3

          Ages 06-12                                    45.1               41.1

          Ages 13-17                                    6.9                14.6



                         CHILD PROBLEMS BY PERCENTAGE OF REMOVAL
                                    Jackson County vs Oregon
                                         1995 - Mid 1997

           Child=s Problems                             Jackson County    Oregon

                                                DSM IV Mental
           Victim of Sexual Abuse                       25.5              32.6

           Victim of Multiple Incidents of Physical     21.6              27.6
           Abuse

           Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity              18.6              18.2
           Disorder

           Developmental/Learning Disorders             14.7              14.9

           Adjustment Disorder                          13.7              9.4

                                                ICD-9 Physical

           Drug Exposed Infant                          10.8              5.0

           Sensory Impaired Sight                       4.9               1.4

           Drug Affected Infant                         2.9               2.7

           Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Affect                2.9               3.6

           Asthma                                       2.9               5.5

                                                      Behavioral
           Exposure to Domestic Violence                38.2              44.2

           Angry/Aggressive Behavior                    22.5              26.1

           Out of Control/Acting Out Behavior           19.6              20.2

           No Identified Problems                       14.6              12.7

           Severely Emotionally Disturbed (SED)         9.8               5.5




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001       Page 56
                        FAMILY BARRIERS TO REUNIFICATION BY PERCENTAGE
                                      Jackson County vs Oregon
                                           1995 - Mid 1997


           Family Barriers                        Jackson County          Oregon

           Drug Involvement                       46.1                    40.1

           Chronic Neglect                        20.6                    18.6

           Parent Incarcerated                    20.6                    14.9

           Mental Condition                       18.6                    8.9

           Alcohol Abuse Issues                   16.7                    17.8

           Overwhelming Child Care                14.7                    8.7

           Physically Abusive Parent              11.8                    13.1


             FAMILY SERVICES OFFERED PRIOR TO UNIFICATION BY PERCENTAGE
                                 Jackson County vs Oregon
                                      1995 – Mid 1997

           Family Services                        Jackson County          Oregon

           Visitation                             74.5                    70.1

           Drug/Alcohol Outpatient Treatment      50.0                    34.7

           Parent Training                        45.1                    47.2

           Drug/Alcohol Inpatient Treatment       35.3                    22.3

           AA/NA Support                          35.3                    17.5


                 CHILD SERVICES OFFERED DURING REMOVAL BY PERCENTAGE
                                  Jackson County vs Oregon
                                       1995 - Mid 1997

           Child Services                         Jackson County          Oregon

           No Services Provided                   26.0                    25.2

           Individual Counseling                  23.0                    29.1

           Psychiatric/Psychological Exam         13.0                    19.1

           Intensive Family Service/High Impact   12.0                    8.7
           Counseling

           Individual Education Plan              11.0                    13.7




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001       Page 57
                               Child Abuse and Neglect Information
                                           Key Points
                                       As Reported in Cohort Study 4


The following information was noted in the reports of the Cohort Study of children entering longer-term
foster care. Information appearing in Cohort Study 4 pertains to Jackson County and covers the period of
time from 1995-97. The study was conducted by the Child Welfare Partnership at Portland State
University.


The most common reasons for children entering foster care in Jackson County include:
    parental absence
    neglect
    parental treatment needs
    treatment needs of the child

The ages of children entering foster care are categorized in three groups—0-5 years, 6-13 years, and
14-17 years. Compared to previous the Cohort study, more children between the ages of 6-13 and fewer
adolescents between the ages of 14-17 are entering foster care in Jackson County.


The most common problems associated with children entering foster care in Jackson County include:
    exposure to domestic violence
    victim of multiple incidents of physical abuse
    victim of sexual abuse, angry/aggressive behavior
    out of control/acting out
    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity disorder.

Nearly 15% of the children entering foster care in Jackson County exhibit developmental/learning
disorders as well as an adjustment disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.


The most common problems associated with caretakers of children entering foster care in Jackson
County are:
    poor parenting skills (75%)
    drugs abuse (72%)
    more than 60% are single parents

The most common barriers preventing a child’s return home include:
    drug involvement
    chronic neglect, parental incarceration
    mental condition
    alcohol abuse
    overwhelming child care

Over 90% of the children entering foster care in Jackson County are classified as levels 1-3 (severe to
moderate). One-third of cases sampled in Jackson County are considered severe.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                        Page 58
            Differences Between Cohort Study 3 (1992-95) and Cohort Study 4 (1995-97)
                      Child Welfare Partnership at Portland State University


    CONDITIONS                                          1992-95                1995-97

    Family Factors
     Mental illness                                     23.8%                  45.5%
     Teen at first birth                                34.5%                  53.5%
     Poverty/inadequate income                          29.8%                  49.5%
     Domestic violence                                  29.8%                  46.5%
     Drug abuse                                         52.4%                  72.3%
     Alcohol abuse                                      54.8%                  53.5%
     Chronic neglect                                    67.3%                  55.4%

    Child Problems
     Exposure to domestic violence                      14.6%                  38.2%
     Victim of multiple incidents of physical abuse     10.7%                  21.6%

    Services offered to Families
     D/A inpatient treatment                            21.8%                  35.3%
     AA/NA Support                                      19.4%                  35.3%
     D/A Outpatient Treatment                           28.2%                  50.0%
     Family decision meeting                            15.3%                  37.3%
     Parent training                                    49.4%                  45.1%

    Services Offered to Children
     Shelter evaluation                                 No data                9.0
     Individual counseling                              24.7%                  23.0%
     IFS/High Impact counseling                         no data                12.0%
     Family counseling                                  no data                9.0%

    Barriers to Returning Children Home
     Drug involvement                                   41.2%                  46.1%
     Alcohol abuse issues                               20.6%                  16.7%
     Parent incarcerated                                7.6%                   20.6%




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001             Page 59
                                       JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                 Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children
                                        High-Level Outcome 4: Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect
                                                            Child Abuse
                                                               2000
                                                                    Number           Number           Number                         Bi-Lingual
                                                                                                                  Number Served
                                                                    Served            Served          Served                          Services
          Agency                            Program                                                               Families/Adults
                                                                    Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18
                                                                                                                                              Yes
JCHHS/Community Works          Safety Net                                      174           76              90                152

                                                                          1,605            3,789
Community Works                Personal Safety
                                                                      (ages 0-6)     (ages 7-12)

Community Works                Supervised Visitation                            54               8           11                 98            Yes

Community Works                Together for Children                           165                                              82
                                                                                                                                       Bi-Lingual
Jackson County Child Abuse
                               Children’s Advocacy Center                      318          151             193                662      literature
Task Force
                                                                                                                                        available
Jackson County Mental
Health/SFC/DHS                 Parenting Lab                                                                                    90
Community Partnership
Juvenile Department/CASA       CASA                                            214           20              11                121

SCF                            Adoption Services                                43           12               2                 43

SCF                            Assessment                                      156           27              15                187

SCF                            Foster Care                                     126          103              32                256

                               Home Visitation/Case
SCF                                                                            520          274              34                768
                               Management

Child Abuse Service Summary:
 Intense services for child abuse and neglect intervention are primarily targeted to families with children ages 0-8.
 Children ages 8-18 who are victims of abuse, or who were previous victims of abuse, tend to receive less intervention and most often become

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                           Page 60
    populations in another outcome area (sexual behavior, juvenile delinquency).

                                       JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SUMMARY
                                                  Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children
                                         High-Level Outcome 4: Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect
                                                           Parenting Skills
                                                                2000

                                                                      Number          Number           Number           Number Served          Bi-Lingual
          Agency                            Program                   Served           Served          Served           Families/Adults         Services
                                                                      Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18
Community Works                 Bi-Lingual Parent Education                                                                             34               Yes

Community Works                 Family Advocate                                96                                                       13

                                Parent Education for Case
Community Works                                                                                                                        535
                                Management
                                Parent Education/General
Community Works                                                                                                                      1,115
                                Community

Community Works                 Parent Education/Level 7                                                        177                    177

Southern Oregon Head Start      Early Head Start                               48                                                       35

OnTrack                         New Ways Parenting Program                     30               20               10                     20               Yes

SODA                            Preparing for Drug-Free Years                                  204                                     204



Service Summary:

   Although services are often delivered only to parents (adults), they are listed here in both categories to clarify the target age groups for programs.
   Several comprehensive early childhood programs include parent education as a part of their ongoing comprehensive services. Services listed on
    this page have a primary focus of parent education.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                      Page 61
                                       JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                 Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children
                                        High-Level Outcome 4: Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect
                                                            Respite Care
                                                               2000

                                                                    Number          Number           Number
                                                                                                                    Number Served            Bi-Lingual
                                                                    Served           Served          Served
          Agency                           Program                                                                  Families/Adults           Services
                                                                    Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18
ARC/Jackson County             ARC Respite Care                                 9            40              25                    68

                               Summer Day Camp/Respite
Easter Seals of Oregon                                                         16            10              10                    29
                               Program
Lifespan Respite of Jackson
                               Respite Care                                    11               5             3                    19
County


Service Summary:

    $   Respite care service for children in Jackson County is limited to ARC (developmental disability), Easter Seals (physical handicap)
        populations, Lifespan Respite (families in crisis).
    $   ARC and Easter Seals programs are small and both lack stable funding bases. Lifespan Respite has very limited funding; however, it serves
        families in crisis very well.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                   Page 62
                 GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

           High-Level Outcome 4. Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect

                                  The Vision for Children
                    (as adopted by the Early Childhood Partnership Team)

    “All children live in safe, caring families and communities where: differences
    are honored, acceptance and compassion are fostered, and development is
    nurtured.”


Introduction:

The following summaries of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats emerged from an
analysis of data pertaining to children and families in Jackson County and a review of the service
delivery system which functions in response to the needs and conditions of children and families
throughout the county. Given the demographics and the conditions that are associated with child
abuse and neglect, this section reflects perspectives that may appear in other outcomes but are
directly related to child abuse and neglect. Specifically, conditions of poverty, single parenting,
domestic violence, and substance abuse, are proven correlations to child abuse and neglect. Thus
the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats sections will include some comments that
pertain to both child abuse and neglect and the other related conditions.

Strengths:

        A collaborative spirit which manifests itself in systematized ways, e.g., service integration
         sites in West Medford, White City, Ashland, Central Point, and Rogue River and in less
         formalized partnerships and connections among county, state, and private non-profit
         agencies and programs.

        Policies and practices embraced by professionals and lay persons that support the
         integration of services in a family-centered approach.

        A variety of educational, social, and medical resources and services available to children
         and families, and a strong, experienced workforce committed to delivering quality services.

        A community health center (La Clinica del Valle) for Latinos offering bilingual staff who
         provide medical and dental services to children and families in a culturally sensitive
         environment.

        Residential treatment programs for parents (mothers and fathers who are recovering from
         addiction) and their children, offering a variety of services that support effective parenting
         and help reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect.

        A short-term shelter and assistance program for women and children who are victims of
         domestic violence.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                    Page 63
       An effective county-wide Safety Net program that screens SCF-referred families and
        collaborates with a host of agencies and programs to provide family support services.

       Comprehensive early childhood programs (Early Head Start, Head Start, Asante Child
        Development Center) that collaborate with social service and health agencies in developing
        and delivering comprehensive services to children and families with diverse needs.

       Improved court child welfare system, which has substantially decreased dependency court
        time-lines and increased efficiency.

       Family Court focusing on multi-risk families and proposed family drug court help increase
        accountability and integration.

       Effective early interventions, family-centered programs that provide direct services to
        children with physical, emotional, and cognitive problems and delays.

       Home visiting programs that screen for abuse, provide support and make appropriate
        referrals.

       Child protective services (SCF) that encourage family participation in planning and
        decision-making.

       A regional Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) that provides coordinated services
        including medical, legal, and mental health service for victims of abuse and neglect.

       Elementary schools in at-risk areas that are reaching out to children and families by
        establishing family resource centers which offer medical, mental health, and other support
        services.

Weaknesses:

       Absence of a system-wide communication and data-gathering framework that honors needs
        for confidentiality and comprehensiveness, yet allows for the sharing of information across
        agencies and programs.

       Lack of bilingual staff in some social, health, educational, and medical agencies and
        programs.

       Inadequate number of qualified foster parents to meet the need for placement of children
        who have been abused and/or neglected.

       Insufficient mental health services for children and parents who do not have Medicaid
        benefits.

       Lack of crisis relief or respite care nursery that could work intensively and
        comprehensively with at-risk families.

       Insufficient access to low-income dental and health care for both children and adults.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                    Page 64
       Inadequate supply of volunteers for child abuse and neglect advocacy and support. Lack of
        staff to train those volunteers who are available.

       Lack of capacity in agencies, prohibiting them from offering extensive prevention services
        including county-wide education initiatives.

       Lack of a community-wide, concerted effort to create awareness of abuse and neglect and
        encourage individuals to become involved in a solution to the problem.

       Insufficient resources for parents with developmental disabilities to ensure that their
        children have a safe environment.

       Need for additional intensive intervention services for mentally ill children and parents.

       Lack of transportation, especially for families in rural areas, to access childcare, health and
        other childhood and family support services.

Opportunities:

       Community-wide efforts to create greater awareness of the existence and effects of child
        abuse and neglect and promote involvement on the part of all citizens to decrease the
        number of children who experience maltreatment.

       Collaboration among public and private agencies to seek grant funding for the provision of
        more culturally and linguistically appropriate services to Hispanic and other minority
        populations.

       Initiatives to increase the number of volunteers who can participate in a variety of
        programs that contribute to the well-being of children and the encouragement of effective
        parenting.

       An interest on the part of the medical community to strengthen existing screening for child
        abuse and neglect.

       Increase in community foundation funding resources with interest in children and families.

       A concern among professionals over the unavailability of a respite/relief nursery that
        provides comprehensive services to abused and neglected children and their families and
        an interest in seeking ways to support the development of this type of service.

       At risk families have increased access to alcohol and drug services through the
        neighborhood based integration centers.

       The development of more family service centers in elementary schools, particularly
        schools in lower social-economic neighborhoods. Family service centers may offer social
        service, medical, mental health, and other support services for children and their families.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                      Page 65
       Expansion of efforts to increase the pool of foster parents so that the needs of the child and
        the skills of foster parents can be matched; development of community based foster care
        service (Annie Casey Grant).

Threats:

       A major issue in Jackson County is the high use of drugs (especially methamphetamine)
        and alcohol which has a negative effect on families. Services to Children and Families
        estimates that 80% of families in their system have problems related to substance abuse.

       Reductions in funding leading to insufficient resources for social services.

       Lack of community-wide awareness of problems and issues related to child abuse and
        neglect.

       Discouraged or disengaged parents who are unmotivated to change or improve their
        parenting skills or their family functional level.

       A reduction in the number of child development specialists/counselors in elementary
        schools.

       Lack of sensitivity and awareness to language and cultural differences.

       Poverty and possible fluctuations in the economy.

       Competing problems of a critical nature, making it difficult to respond to all of the needs in
        the community.

       Isolation of families and loss of natural community systems and attitudes that impede the
        building of community.

       Raising of federal guidelines for poverty has potential of reducing services for eligibility
        and scope of services for health care under the Oregon Health Plan.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

       (Strength) As the multicultural/multilingual nature of Jackson County has increased, there
        has been a corresponding increase in the health and educational services available to
        Hispanic and other minority populations in the county.

            o   La Clinica del Valle is serving Spanish-speaking children and adults with a full
                array of health and dental services. La Clinica also provides assistance to families
                in their efforts to become members of the Oregon Health Plan. This medical
                facility promotes closer connections among Hispanic families and intervention and
                prevention services that help reduce child maltreatment.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                   Page 66
            o   A two-year, renewable, EVEN START grant was awarded this year to Jackson
                County Education Service District – Migrant Education and Head Start. The
                funding will allow them to expand LISTO pre-school program for Hispanic
                children and their families. It will also enable them to teach Spanish literacy to
                Hispanic families receiving AFS and TANF benefits.

            o   Through the Jackson County Education Service District - Migrant education
                Program, Early Head Start, and Head Start, pre-school and school-age children can
                participate in language and literacy programs. These programs utilize a family-
                centered approach that facilitates development and use of effective parenting
                strategies.

            o   A Federal grant through the Education Service District and Southern Oregon
                University provides a ―Career Ladder‖ program that pays prospective bilingual
                teachers to get their degrees.

       (Strength) West Medford Family Center, an integrated service center, has bilingual staff to
        serve Limited English Proficient (LEP) families and is developing a variety of activities to
        engage Latinos in community activities.

       (Weakness) Although services for minority populations are increasing, there continues to
        be a shortage of bilingual staff in many social service agencies and in schools.
        Additionally, the lack of cultural sensitivity and awareness that exists in the county acts to
        impede full inclusion of all individuals in programs, activities and generally into the
        community. This shortage of bilingual staff affects the ability of agencies to attract and
        serve Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals.

       (Weakness) Attitudes toward substance abusing parents, gay and lesbian parents, and
        single parents impede the development and use of some services.

       (Weakness) As one source of diversity socio-economic status has an impact on the overall
        well-being of families. Long-term poverty affects family patterns, child rearing practices,
        and access to basic resources, all of which are related to child abuse and neglect.

       (Weakness) Gender inequity affects educational, social, and family processes. The
        treatment of women and related problems of domestic violence are diversity issues that
        affect the well-being and care of children.

       (Opportunity) A Community Safety Net position was piloted last year at West Medford
        Family Center specifically to serve Hispanic families and will be funded again this year.

Summary:

There are a variety of services in Jackson County that are designed to reduce child abuse and
neglect. Agency and programmatic structures reflect relatively high levels of collaboration and
integration in the delivery of these services. Further analysis and careful consideration of the
strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats will aid in the planning of additional services and
the utilization of available resources.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                   Page 67
Planning Groups:

   Commission on Children and Families
   Early Childhood Partnership Team
   Jackson County Child Fatality Review Team
   Jackson County Multidisciplinary Team (MDT)

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

   Early Childhood Partnership Team Plan
   Jackson County Safety Net Plan
   Jackson County Integration Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 68
                                                          GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

                                                       High-Level Outcome 5. Improve Prenatal Care
                                                                  County and State Data

                                                           Percent of Infants whose Mothers Received
                                                                   1st Trimester Prenatal Care
                                                                            1990 - 2000
                                                                  Jackson County and Oregon
                                             100%
             % Births of Mothers Receiving
              1st Trimester Prenatal Care




                                              80%



                                              60%


                                              40%



                                              20%


                                               0%
                                                                                                                                          2000
                                                        1990    1991    1992    1993    1994    1995    1996    1997    1998    1999
                                                                                                                                        (Prelim.)
                                             Jackson    70.9%   70.9%   73.9%   76.7%   72.6%   70.7%   74.3%   76.0%   75.3%   79.9%   77.9%
                                             Oregon     75.7%   76.7%   78.7%   79.3%   79.0%   78.5%   79.7%   81.0%   80.2%   80.9%   81.3%


              * Source: Department of Human Resources, Health Division, 2001.




Trend Analysis

   First trimester prenatal care: The data reflect the percentage of babies whose mothers received early prenatal
    care beginning in the first trimester. A higher percentage of women received adequate prenatal care in
    Jackson County during 2000 (79.9 %) compared to 1990 (70.9 %), representing a 12.6 % increase. Jackson
    County’s 2000 rate is below Oregon’s 2000 rate (81.3%) for first trimester care.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                        Page 69
                         GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

                         High-Level Outcome 6. Increase Immunizations
                                    County and State Data


                                            JACKSON COUNTY
                                     IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM DATA
                                    Immunization Rates (%) for 19-24 Months
                                                 1998 - 1999

                                                    JACKSON COUNTY                             STATE

                                                     1998             1999              1998             1999
        % of Clients Served in
        Community Health Department*                 14%              16%               18%              16%
        Immunization Rates (%) for
         19-24 months                                67%              64%               66%               N/A
      Source: Department of Human Services, Oregon Health Division – Immunization Tracking And Recall System (ITARS)
     * CHD = County Health Department

Trend Analysis:

       By the time children reach their 19-month birthday they should have received the 4:3:1 series of basic
        immunization: four doses for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis(DTP), three doses for polio (OPV)5 and
        one dose for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). Although children should receive the 4:3:1 series by
        their 19-month birthday, completing the series may take as long as three years. In the 1999 Oregon
        Immunization Survey of Two-Year-Olds study, ―two-year-olds‖ are children 19-35 months of age (that is,
        children who are not yet three years old).

       1999 Oregon Immunization Survey of Two-Year-Olds: This survey studied the immunization rates for
        2,452 Oregon children 19-35 months who received all or part of the series of basic immunizations in
        1994, 1995 and 1996. The goal of the survey was to identify risk factors for the under-immunized
        children living in Oregon, to determine the immunization rates among different ethnic populations, and to
        identify barriers to immunization as perceived by parents. Results of the study showed that less than
        81.0% of the children in the survey were fully immunized with 5-7 immunizations and less than 1.4% of
        children ages 19-35 months old were unimmunized. Children born in Region 4 (Lane, Coos, Curry,
        Douglas, Josephine, Jackson, and Klamath Counties) had the highest rate of being unimmunized (3.0%).
        Reasons for not immunizing their children included: religious beliefs; immunizations do more harm than
        good; just have not thought about it or gotten around to it; and none of the above.

       Jackson County has a higher rate of religious exemptions (3%) than the rest of the state (2.7%).
        However, the Ashland School District has an alarming 11% religious exemption rate. State health
        officials are concerned that Ashland may have lost the ―herd effect‖ associated with immunization rates
        and may experience an outbreak of measles or pertussis.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                           Page 70




                                     OREGON / UNITED STATES
                                    National Immunization Survey Data
                                  Immunization Rates (%) for 19-35 Months
                                               1995 - 1999


                                     1995          1996            1997            1998            1999

             OREGON                  74%           72%             73%             76%             73%

       UNITED STATES                 76%           78%             78%             81%             80%
      Sources: Department of Human Services, Oregon Health Division
      Center for Disease Control, National Immunization Survey



Trend Analysis:

       Jackson County rates are not available for children 19-35 months thus we cannot directly compare our
        county with the State and National rates. However this is the last year the Health Division will be using
        the Immunization Tracking And Recall System (ITARS); they will be changing to a system allowing
        comparison with CDC data. We should have immunization rates for Jackson County children 19-35
        months ―soon‖ according to the Health Department.

       Oregon lags behind the Nation on immunization rates. In 1999, Oregon reports 73% of children 19-35
        months were adequately immunized compared to the U.S. rate of 80%.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 71
                                              GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

                              High-Level Outcome 7.
           Reduce Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use During Pregnancy
                              County and State Data

                                                            Percent of Infants Whose Mothers
                                                              Used Alcohol While Pregnant
                                                                        1990 - 1999
                                                              Jackson County and Oregon
                                            8%

                                            7%
            % Births where Mothers used
               Alco hol while Pregnant




                                            6%

                                            5%

                                            4%

                                            3%

                                            2%

                                            1%

                                            0%
                                                    1990   1991   1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999

                                          Jackson   2.0%   2.0%   2.0%   2.0%   1.0%   2.0%   3.0%   2.0%   1.7%   2.1%
                                          Oregon    5.0%   5.0%   4.0%   3.0%   3.0%   3.0%   2.0%   2.0%   1.6%   1.8%


                   So urce: Department o f Human Reso urces, Health Divisio n, 2001.




Trend Analysis:

       Use of alcohol during pregnancy: According to Oregon Health Division birth records, the percentage
        of infants whose mothers used alcohol during pregnancy in Jackson County has remained at a fairly
        constant 2% since 1990, except for declines in 1994 and 1998 (1.0% and 1.6%, respectively) and an
        increase to 3.0% in 1996. The 1999 rate in Jackson County slightly exceeds the state rate. Data is
        taken from birth certificates and self reported.

       The 2.1% rate for 1999 reported by Oregon Health Department is not supported by local data, which is
        gathered through universal drug screening and referrals to Jackson County Maternal Child Health
        Program. Out of 2,100 births, 402 (25%) reported exposure to alcohol and illegal drugs.

Jackson County Healthy Babies Program: (Source: On Track) The Healthy Babies Program is a collaborative
effort between On Track and Jackson County Maternal Child Health Program. Women who have enrolled
in the Healthy Babies Program and self-reported their use of alcohol or other drugs shows that: 60% used
alcohol; 48% used marijuana; 24% used methamphetamine; 2% abused prescription drugs; and 1% used
heroin



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                              Page 71
                                          JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                     Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children
                                                           High-Level Outcome 7.
                                        Reduce Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use During Pregnancy
                                                        Child Related Physical Health
                                                                    1999

              Agency                               Program                 Number Served    Number Served    Number Served     Number Served
                                                                             Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12        Ages 13-18      Families/Adults
  Adult & Family Services           AFS Medical Programs                            1,644            1,112             2,330               N/A
  American Heart Association        Heart Power Kits/School Education                                                                     1,000
  Asante Child Development          Feeding Clinic                                    40               10
  Services
  Asante Child Development          Health Therapy                                    20               50
  Services
  Children’s Dental Clinic          Free Dental Care                                  76              196                99
  Community Health Center           Primary Health Care                             1,146             436               490               4,397
  Department of Human               DHS Transportation for Health                    648              336               576                 468
  Services/Community                Visits
  Partnership
  La Clinica del Valle              Child Wellness                                   135
  NW Seasonal Workers               Northwest Seasonal Workers Health                                                                       100
                                    Care
  On Track                          On Track HIV Outreach                                                                                   984


  Public Health                     Babies First                                    1,200                                          3,450 visits,
                                                                                                                                 approximately
                                                                                                                                 1,200 families
  Public Health                     Cacoon (children with congenital                                                                       225
                                    disabilities)



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                              Page 72
              Agency                              Program                  Number Served    Number Served    Number Served      Number Served
                                                                             Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12        Ages 13-18       Families/Adults
  Public Health                     Immunizations                                   2,000            1,200             1,000              5,000

  Public Health                     Maternal Visits                                                                                          450
  Public Health                     Prenatal Care Access                                                                                     540
  Public Health                     Vital Links                                                                                  650 women with
                                                                                                                                   A&D histories
  Red Cross                         Health Services                                  325               453               422              4,695
  Health Services

Health Resource Summary:
 Service list does not include private providers or primary hospital services.
 Funding for physical health care from public or non-profit providers comes from a variety of funding sources including, but not dominated by, the
   Oregon Health Plan.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                Page 73
                                          JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                     Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children
                                                           High-Level Outcome 7.
                                        Reduce Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use During Pregnancy
                                                  Mental Health/Developmental Disabilities
                                                                    1999

              Agency                              Program                  Number Served    Number Served      Number Served       Number Served
                                                                             Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12          Ages 13-18        Families/Adults
  Asante Child Development          High Risk Evaluation                            1,000
  Services
  Jackson County                    Adult Case Management                                                                                       412
  Developmental Disabilities
  Jackson County                    Child Case Management                              45                 45                  74
  Developmental Disabilities
  Jackson County                    Adult Outpatient                                                                                           3,697
  Mental Health
  Jackson County                    Child Outpatient                                  483                454                 741                713
  Mental Health
  SOCSTC                            Day Treatment                                                         26                                     26
  SOCSTC                            Foster Care                                         3                  4                   8                   6
  SOCSTC                            Outpatient Counseling Program                      52                 36                  23                 84
  SOCSTC                            School Based Counseling                            55                126                  61                 80
  SOCSTC                            Sex Abuse Treatment                                96                 55                  45                168


Service Summary:
 Jackson County Mental Health primarily serves children who are covered by the Oregon Health Plan.
 The majority of children served by SOCSTC are also funded through the Oregon Health Plan.
 Service list does not include private mental health providers. We know how many are served by public dollars; we do not know total served.
 Developmental Disability Services limited to those who meet state eligibility standards.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                    Page 74
                        GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN
                High-Level Outcome 5.            Improve Prenatal Care
                High-Level Outcome 6.            Increase Immunizations
                High-Level Outcome 7.            Reduce Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use During
                                                 Pregnancy


Introduction:

The health status of children is significantly impacted by the health of the mother during her pregnancy. Risks to
the infant are reduced when prenatal care begins in the first trimester. Although a higher percentage of pregnant
women are getting prenatal care sooner, Jackson County’s 79.9% still lags slightly behind the State’s 81.3%.
Jackson County’s self-reported use of alcohol or drugs during pregnancy also remains slightly higher than the State
rate. In early childhood, children can be protected from many childhood illnesses when they receive a full
compliment of immunizations. The following analysis attempts to pinpoint current strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities, and threats that exist to help improve the health of children in Jackson County.

Strengths:

       (Prenatal care) The Oregon Mothers Care Project (formerly First Steps) provides access to prenatal care
        for 300 pregnant, low-income women. Services are provided through the County’s four Integration
        Centers. 100% of the County’s OB providers participate in this collaborative effort.

       (Prenatal care) The Community Health center in White City has funding for a Perinatal Care Access
        Program. In 2000-2001, 315 free pregnancy tests were performed and 93 women received prenatal care.
        96% of this care was begun during the first trimester.

       (Prenatal/Immunization) Jackson County has had a Healthy Start, home visitation program for first birth
        families, since 1995. Services are offered out of the County’s four Integration Centers and in collaboration
        with La Clinica del Valle. In 1999-2000. Ninety-eight percent of first birth families were screened. Two
        hundred and ninety-seven families (72 Hispanic) received on-going home visits to encourage well baby
        checks, immunization, and positive parenting.

       (Immunization) Jackson County has an Immunization Council made up of public and private health
        providers who meet to improve the immunization rate of young children.

       (Substance use) In 2000-2001, the Jackson County Maternal Child Health Program provided 8 home visits
        each to 94 women, who used alcohol and/or drugs during their pregnancy. 85% of these women were
        enrolled during the first trimester. 50% enrolled in treatment programs.

       (Substance use) The Healthy babies Program is a collaborative outreach to pregnant women to prevent
        drug and alcohol use during pregnancy. The Program has worked with the local medical establishment to
        promote universal drug screening for pregnant women and outreach and treatment services to support
        women in being drug-free during pregnancy. This is seen as a model program by the State.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 75
Weaknesses:

       (Prenatal/Immunization) The complexity and low reimbursement rates of the Oregon Health Plan have
        limited prenatal and early childhood care.

       (Prenatal/Immunization) The majority of HMO’s have left Jackson County because of low reimbursement
        rates. Many Oregon Health Plan (OHP) patients have difficulty finding physicians who will take their OHP
        open cards.

       (Immunization) Low-income children have difficulty accessing pediatric care because of the problems
        with the Oregon Health Plan and Medicaid.

       (Immunization) Private Physicians and Public Health share responsibilities for immunizations. The shared
        system has not developed aggressive outreach or tracking. Our county’s low rate may be a data collection
        problem. There is low participation on ALERT, the State system of data collection thus our data is not
        accurate.

       (Immunization) The approved immunization schedule for children is overwhelming; too many shots and
        the timing and scheduling are difficult to keep straight. Partially because of the housing issues described in
        Outcome 3, there is a high rate of transiency in many areas of Jackson County. Children who continually
        move generally lack consistent health care and record keeping.

Opportunities:

       (Prenatal) Oregon Mother Care Project has received a grant from the March of Dimes to produce a series
        of PSAs to encourage mothers to seek early prenatal care. The areas three hospitals have matched these
        funds to purchase airtime. The campaign will run from mid-July through October 2001.

       (Prenatal/Immunizations) Healthy start will begin offering services from a new Integration Site in Rogue
        River.

        (Substance abuse) The new state budget includes increases in funding for alcohol and drug related
        problems under OHP services for families with young children.

Threats:

       (Immunization) Jackson County has a higher rate of religious exemptions (3%) than the rest of the state
        (2.7%). However, the Ashland School District has an alarming 11% religious exemption rate. State health
        officials are concerned that Ashland may have lost the ―herd effect‖ associated with immunization rates and
        may experience an outbreak of measles or pertussis.

       (Substance use) Federal legislation and or a future ruling by the Supreme Court could adversely impact the
        Healthy Babies program by prohibiting universal drug screening of pregnant women.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

       (Strength) La Clinica del Valle, originally a migrant clinic, now functions as a community health center for
        area Latinos. Their staff is both bilingual and bicultural. Hispanic family advocates are recruited and
        trained to make home visits for Healthy Start. La Clinica trains Hispanic birth coaches called Doulas who
        are invited to enter the birthing unit at Ashland Community Hospital to assist Hispanic mothers in labor.

       (Strength) Some employees who provide perinatal health services at the five Integration Sites and Jackson
        County Public Health are bilingual, and education materials are prepared in Spanish.


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                   Page 76
       (Weakness) Many of the areas Latino community members are not legal citizens and hesitate to seek
        medical care because of fear of deportation. Many do not have health insurance and are afraid of the costs
        of prenatal care and immunization fees.

       (Opportunity) A four year Healthy Start grant was recently awarded to Jackson County and will be focused
        on Hispanic families in West Medford, identified as a high needs area for prenatal care and immunization
        fees.

       (Opportunity) The West Medford Family Center has developed a strong ―Hispanic Focus Group‖ to
        increase outreach to Hispanic Families. Along with the Hispanic Interagency Committee and the
        Multicultural Commission, these groups provide opportunities to educate pregnant and parenting Hispanic
        moms about health services available in the county.

       (Threat) Funding for La Clinica del Valle is always uncertain. As eligibility criteria for the Oregon Health
        Plan changes, La Clinica finds itself having to provide a greater percentage of charity care.

Summary:

Jackson County has been a model for the State in its development of Integration Centers as sites from which to
offer holistic health services to low-income families. Area healthcare providers have developed innovative
programs such as the Healthy Babies Program to increase access to early prenatal care and identify women using
drugs during their pregnancy.

Planning Groups:

       Commission on Children and Families
       Public Health Advisory Board
       Jackson County Perinatal Task Force
       Early Childhood Partnership Team

Existing Plans Integrated Into Findings:

       Jackson County Public Health Strategic Plan
       Jackson County Early Childhood Partnership Team Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 77
                                                     GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

                                                 High-Level Outcome 8. Increase Child Care Availability
                                                                County and State Data


                                                                              Child Care Availability
                                                                      Jackson County and Oregon, 1990-2000
                                                       30
               per 100 Children under 13 years
                  Childcare Slots Available




                                                       20




                                                       10




                                                                     N/A

                                                        0
                                                                                                                                     2000
                                                              1990   1991   1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999
                                                                                                                                    Prelim.
                                                    Jackson    20            15     19            23     24     18     23     29      22
                                                    Oregon     14            15     15     16     16     19     20     21     21      20

               * Source: Employment Department, Childcare Division,
               2001. Preliminary estimates.


* Note: From 1995 forward, the estimate of identified providers is supplied to the Child Care Division by Child Care
Resources & Referral agency. No data is reported for counties without a CCD funded Child Care Resources & Referral
agency. Prior to 1995, the number of identified providers was obtained using a combination of CCR&R and CCD regulatory
data method, which resulted in an inflated number of providers.


Trend Analysis:

       Child Care Slots: In Jackson County, an estimated 22% of children under age 13 are in paid child care
        arrangements. According to the Status of Oregon’s Children 1999 County Data Book, children are in paid
        child care settings for an average of 31.3 hours per week. The number of child care slots in Jackson County
        increased between 1990 and 1999, from 22 to 29 slots available per 100 children under 13 years. The rate
        declined slightly in 2000 to 22 slots per 100 children under 13 years. In 2000, there were 22/100 child care
        slots in Jackson County, higher than the state rate of 20/100 child care slots.

       Because of changes in the Child Care Division legal requirements and USDA food program regulations the
        Child Care Resource Network (CCRN) and Oregon Child Development Coalition (OCDC) predicted a drop
        in the number of child care slots.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                  Page 78
                        GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

                      High-Level Outcome 9. Improve Readiness to Learn
                                   County and State Data



                                                     Children Entering Kindergarten
                                                            "Ready-to-Learn"
                                                Jackson County and Oregon, 1997 and 1999

                                          100%
                          "Ready-to-Learn"
                          Percent En tering




                                              80%
                            Kinderg arten




                                              60%

                                              40%

                                              20%

                                              0%
                                                        1997-98                1999-00
                                      Jackson            59%                    72%
                                      Oregon             58%                    67%

                         Source: Oregon Department of Education




Trend Analysis:

       Jackson County improves! The 2000 Oregon Kindergarten Readiness Survey indicates that 72% of
        Jackson County children entering Kindergarten met all six developmental dimensions of readiness. In
        1997, only 59% met all six dimensions. This is higher than the State rates of 67% (2000) and 58% (1997).

       The status of Oregon’s current Kindergarten children and their developmental readiness for school was
        measured for the first time by a teacher survey distributed in fall 1997. The Oregon Department of
        Education plans to conduct the survey every two years. Six developmental dimensions were used to gauge
        young children’s readiness for school: physical well-being; language usage; approaches to learning;
        cognition/general knowledge; motor development; and social and emotional development.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                              Page 79
                           Developmental Readiness by Dimension Area


                                              Jackson County
                              Developmental Readiness of Kindergarten Children
                                                1997 - 2000
                                 Percentage Demonstrating Readiness Areas

                      Readiness Area              Meets Readiness Area         Meets Readiness Area
                                                         1997                         2000

              Physical Well Being                          87.9%                      93.4%

              Language Usage                               86.4%                      92.6%

              Approach to Learning                         85.9%                      94.0%

              Cognition/General Knowledge                  81.5%                      88.4%

              Motor Development                            88.4%                      88.8%

              Social/Emotional Development                 82.0%                      84.4%
              Total Percent Meeting
              All Dimensions of Readiness                 59.0%                       71.8%


Trend Analysis:

       All dimensions showed an increase between 1997 and 2000. In Fall 2000, the 1997 Oregon Kindergarten
        Readiness Survey was revised to include data related to language and literacy development, Head Start, and
        Early Childhood Special Education. This information will provide a baseline for future study.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 80
                                            JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                     Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children
                                             High-Level Outcome 8: Increase Child Care Availability
                                               High-Level Outcome 9: Improve Readiness to Learn
                                                         Childhood Care and Education
                                                                     1999
               Agency                              Program                     Number Served   Number Served   Number Served   Number Served
                                                                                 Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18    Families/Adults
    ACCESS                           Kid Start Program                                    19                                                  4
    Asante Child Development         Early Intervention Special Education                650
    Services
    Ashland YMCA                     Child Development Center                            150                                                125
    Child Care Council               USDA Food Program for child care                  1,320             800
    4-C                              providers
    Job Council                      Child Care Resource Network                       1,904             173              18              1,378
    La Clinica del Valle             Non-Intensive Early Childhood                        98
    On Track, Inc.                   HOME Day Care                                       115
    On Track, Inc.                   DAD’s Day Care                                       30
    Oregon Child Development         Hispanic Outreach                                                                                       47
    Coalition
    Oregon Child Development         Migrant Child Care                                  105
    Coalition
    Oregon Child Development         Migrant Head Start                                   45
    Coalition
    Oregon Child Development         USDA Food program for Hispanic                                                                       1,400
    Coalition                        child care providers
    Public Health/La Clinica del     Healthy Start                                       300                                                300
    Valle
    Southern Oregon Head Start       Early Head Start                                     49                                        38 families/
                                                                                                                                      58 adults
    Southern Oregon Head Start       Head Start                                          552                             536                832




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                 Page 81
                         GOAL 2: HEALTHY, THRIVING CHILDREN

                High-level Outcome 8.            Increase Child Care Availability
                High-level Outcome 9.            Improve Readiness to Learn


Introduction:

An estimated 22% of children under age 13 are in paid child care arrangements for an average of 31.3 hours per
week in Jackson County. In 2000, there was an expected drop in the number of child care slots available in Jackson
County from 29/100 (1999) to 22/100 (2000). This is most likely due to new Child Care Division legal
requirements and USDA food program regulations. Even with this drop in child care slots, Jackson County rates
are higher than the State rates of 21/100 (1999) and 20/100 (2000).

An increasing number of children in Jackson County are entering Kindergarten ―ready to learn‖. Seventy-two
percent (72%) of Jackson County children entering Kindergarten in 2000 met all six developmental dimensions of
readiness compared to 59% in 1997. This compares favorably with the State rates of 58% (1997) and 67% (2000).
The following analysis points out current strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats that exist to help improve
early childhood care and education in Jackson County.

Strengths:

    Jackson County has a long-standing early childhood collaboration network which includes
     the following ongoing planning/collaboration service groups:
             Child Care Task Force - Child care providers, CCRN, USDA, AFS, CCF, OCDC, trainers
             Early Intervention Council - Child Development Center (EIC major provider), Head Start, Public
             Health, parents, public school liaisons, CCF
             Healthy Start - Public Health, La Clinica del Valle
             Universal Drug Screening - Public Health, OnTrack (A&D provider), community hospitals
             Jackson County Association for the Education of Young Children (JCAEYC) - Providers, teachers,
             trainers

    Jackson County has pulled together the existing networks and added key community resource people
     to start the Early Childhood Partnership Team, which creates a comprehensive Early Childhood System in
     Jackson County. This group has worked together to create: 1) Jackson County Early Childhood System of
     Services and Supports For Children and Their Families, March 2000; 2) Jackson County Early Childhood
     Basic Needs Resource Guide 2001; and 3) a specific work group to look at ways to increase readiness to learn.

    The training partners in the Child Care Task Force have developed a training continuum, which
     provides quality early childhood provider training from pre-orientation through CDA to a BA in early
     childhood. It is very responsive to provider needs and has created a particularly large amount of affordable,
     accessible training for the beginning stages of the continuum.

    Jackson County has a rich and diverse service system for young families. County services include
     Early Head Start, Healthy Start, Migrant Head Start, migrant day care, and a large federal health clinic
     focusing on Hispanic and migrant families.

    Jackson County has a large number of services, which provide home visiting for families with young
     children. The service integration system has helped us avoid service duplication. Most families receive home
     visits from only one service system. The exceptions are purposeful, based on the complex needs of some
     families. (SCF clients will be visited by both SCF and the community home visiting agency involved with the
     family.) Agencies doing home visiting are beginning to provide shared common training and even,
     sometimes, shared supervision.

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 82
   Many elementary schools in at-risk areas of the county have created, or are interested in creating, an early
    childhood component which assists families in raising ready to learn children. Many Head Start and Early
    Intervention classrooms are on elementary school sites. Some schools sponsor family advocates who work
    with families of children 0-6.

   The Child Care Task Force has worked well with providers to maintain and increase child care slots.
    Statistically, Jackson County has a high number of slots relative to the rest of the state.

   Jackson County annual Early Childhood conferences including the Spring conference
    sponsored by the Early Intervention Council and the fall conference sponsored by JCAEYC.

Weaknesses:

    (Ages 0-8) There is lack of universal screening and scarcity of outreach and home visiting services
     for high-need later-birth families. SCF families needing long-term intervention have nowhere to turn when
     they are ready to ―graduate‖ from SCF-mandated programs.

    Lack of service alternatives to home visiting for working families who are not available for the
     traditional model programs. This factor is particularly important since the advent of welfare reform. Early
     employment of young mothers causes increased stress and, too often, there is no service system available to
     them.

    Lack of capacity for infant-toddler daycare and for non-traditional hours day care. Many low-
     income families are hired in the retail and service systems and, consequently, work non-traditional hours.

    Lack of sufficient outreach/family advocate services for high-risk families, particularly with children ages 5-8.

    Increasing numbers of families with young children where all household adults are working, often with
     full-time jobs. They cannot access many services because they are not available, and if the service was
     available to them in off-hours, they could spend only limited hours engaged with the service.

    Families with young children are often not engaged with any service system and thus, are unaware
     of what is available to them in the community. When a family in this situation has a problem, it often takes
     them a long time to figure out where to go for help. Some families probably never make it that far.

    Low-income families, because they are often necessarily highly transient, sometimes become lost
     between various service systems. Family plans get made but follow-through disappears with the family’s
     transience.

    Parent involvement, which is strongly developed in many preschool programs, is often lost in the
     transition to public school. Parents don’t feel as wanted, needed, or welcomed in many public school settings,
     so they disengage from the education experience.

    (Ages 0-8) Publicly funded mental health services are targeted to a diagnostic system which is not
     particularly applicable or appropriate for children ages 0-8. Because of this, few publicly funded mental
     health services are available, in spite of research evidence, which ties early socialization (bonding, attachment
     disorders) to early childhood experience.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                   Page 83
Opportunities:

    Lack of common confidentiality protocols limits effective information sharing between agencies.
     The Early Childhood Partnership Team is providing a forum for Head Start and Medford School District to
     work together on developing a model for effective information sharing as well as improving parent
     involvement in the transition to public school.

    Commitment to work on transition services between public schools and early childhood providers.

Threats:

    Family transience and child care provider turnover (estimated to be from 20-40% annually) threaten
     continuity of child care/adult bonding and early education.

    Child care provider pay is very low. This poses a long term threat to quality of child care. It is very
     challenging for highly educated providers to stay in the profession.

    Transportation is a severe barrier in rural areas to child care, health services, and other early childhood
      supports.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

    (Strength) Jackson County has created an effective collaborative system to work with special needs
     children ages 0-5.

    (Strength) Early childhood services targeted for the Hispanic population are strong, diverse, and
     culturally appropriate. Services are well supported by the Hispanic community and are probably the
     model Hispanic Service System in this community. The majority of the services have been here for a long
     time.

    (Strength) The Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) in Jackson County has developed a model
      program, CARE, to provide in-home mentoring for child care providers to assist them in meeting high quality
      standards. They also provide safety and educational supplies. At the request of the Hispanic community,
      CARE recently expanded their capacity to provide bilingual services for Hispanic child care providers.

    (Strength) Project LISTO is a collaboration between Jackson Education Service District, Migrant
     Education Program and Southern Oregon Head Start, which provides a supportive pre-school environment in
     Spanish for three, four, and five year old Hispanic children and their families. The curriculum is parent
     driven, utilizing songs, stories, games, and cultural traditions garnered from their experiences. Parents also
     attend a weekly support group meeting during class time that covers parent skills, community involvement,
     health education, and literacy activities with their children.

    (Weakness) There is no crisis relief nursery. Respite care service for children in Jackson County is
     limited to ARC (developmental disability) and Easter Seals (physical handicap) populations. Programs are
     small and both lack stable funding bases.

$   (Weakness) There is a scarcity of respite care for families with special needs children 0-8 years or
    extremely high-risk families.

    (Opportunity) Early childhood programs have collaborated so program overlap, when it occurs, is
     generally planned for, based on the special needs of that child. (A severely physically handicapped child will
     be enrolled in the Early Intervention program and be receiving home visits from the Cacoon nurse.)


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                       Page 84
    (Threat) Fear of deportation, lack of trust, and social isolation prevent many Hispanic families from
     accessing available services.

Summary:

The highly collaborative system in Jackson County is certainly one of our greatest strengths for achieving the high
priority outcomes of child care availability and readiness to learn. With Governor Kitzhaber’s Oregon Children’s
Plan, we have increased opportunities to make progress. Some of the specific strategies for the future were
identified in Phase I of this plan and include:

    1. Maintain the present service system
    2. Work toward a universal screening system, which effectively identifies children in need of service.
    3. Build a stronger early childhood service system for working with families, with innovative strategies to
       reach parents who are holding full-time jobs.
    4. Build service support for high-risk later-birth families.
    5. The Jackson County Child Care Task Force set priorities for the next two years at their August 2001
       meeting. These priorities are to increase quality child care, especially for infants, toddlers, and children
       with special needs.

Planning Groups:

   Early Childhood Partnership Team
    Early Intervention Council
    Commission on Children and Families
    Child Care Task Force

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

   Jackson County Early Childhood Comprehensive Plan
   Early Intervention Service Plan
   Strategies from Southern Oregon Head Start Comprehensive Plan
   Child Care Task Force Strategic Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                   Page 85
                                          JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON
                                               CHILDREN & FAMILIES
                                             2001 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN




                                                         High-Level Outcomes


                                                   $ Teen Alcohol, Tobacco & Other
                                                     Drug Use
          GOAL 3:
                                                   $ Juvenile Arrests
           Healthy
           Thriving
            Youth                                  $ Oregon Youth Authority Bed
                                                     Use

                                                   $ Juvenile Recidivism
                                                     (re-arrest)

                                                   $ Teen Pregnancy

                                                   $ Youth Suicide

                                                   $ High School Dropout

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 86
                                                 GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

                           High-level Outcomes 10, 11, and 12.
               Decrease Teen Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use (ATOD)
                                 County and State Data


                                                         Jackson County Public School Drug Use Survey

The Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs (OADAP) has conducted statewide surveys of 8th and 11th graders
every other year since 1986. Surveys were conducted in five regions. Region 4 includes Coos, Curry, Douglas,
Jackson, Josephine, and Klamath counties. The 1994 survey included 6th graders for the first time. Local data for
Jackson County was gathered for the first time in 1996. The following data allows comparison of baseline data
(1996) for Jackson County compared to 1998, 2000, and the State.


                                                     6th Grade: Substance Use in Past 30 Days
                                                    Alcohol, Marijuana, and Tobacco 1996 - 2000

                                                  50%
                   Substances in Past 30 Days
                     Percent Students Using




                                                  40%


                                                  30%
                                                             Alcohol              Marijuana               Tobacco
                                                  20%


                                                  10%


                                                   0%
                                                           1996 1998 2000        1996 1998 2000         1996 1998 2000

                                                Jackson 12.6 13.6 5.2%           4.4% 6.1% 1.6%         7.6% 11.0 5.1%
                                                Oregon    8.9% 8.2% 7.7%         2.1% 1.7% 1.0%         5.9% 6.0% 3.6%
             Source: Department of Human Resources, Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs,
             Public School Drug Use Surveys, 1996 - 2000.



Trend Analysis:

       Alcohol: A striking decline in alcohol use was reported for Jackson County 6th graders who reported a
        58.7% decrease in use between 1996 and 2000. The 2000 rate of alcohol use for Jackson County 6th
        graders (5.2%) is lower than the state rate (7.7%) and reverses a trend of increasing use between 1996 and
        1998.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                             Page 87
       Tobacco: Although Jackson County 6th grade use of tobacco decreased between 1998 (11.0%) and 2000
        (5.1%), they were still above the state rates respectively (6.9% vs. 3.6%). Smokeless tobacco use (2.0%)
        reported in the last 30 days in 2000 by Jackson County 6th graders is also higher than the state rate (1.5%).

       Marijuana: While there was a significant 73.7% decrease in Jackson County 6th grade use of marijuana
        between 1998 and 2000, they were still above the state rate (1.0%) for 2000.

       Inhalants: Jackson County 6th grade use of inhalants (5.8%) is significantly higher than 8th (2.0%) and 11th
        (0.9%) graders in Jackson County as well as the state (5.2%).

       While Jackson County 8th and 11th graders, and 6th graders statewide, prefer alcohol over ―other drugs,‖ our
        local 6th graders seem to prefer inhalants slightly more often (5.6%) compared to alcohol (5.2%) and
        cigarettes (5.1%)



                                                       8th Grade: Substance Use in Past 30 Days
                                                      Alcohol, Marijuana, and Tobacco 1996 - 2000
                                              50%
                                                        Alcohol           Marijuana          Tobacco
               Substances in Past 30 Days
                 Percent Students Using




                                              40%


                                              30%


                                              20%


                                              10%


                                               0%
                                                      1996 1998 2000    1996 1998 2000     1996 1998 2000
                                            Jackson   32%   39%   22%   15%   17%     6%   24%   30%    12%
                                            Oregon    30%   26%   26%   15%   12%     8%   22%   20%    13%

        Source: Department of Human Resources, Office of Drug Abuse Programs,
        Public School Drug Use Surveys, 1996 - 2000.




    Trend Analysis:

$       Alcohol: A significant decline in alcohol use was reported for Jackson County 8th graders, who reported a
        31.2% decrease in use between 1996 and 2000. The 2000 rate of alcohol use for Jackson County 8th
        graders (22%) is lower than the state rate (26%) for the first time since 1996. However, compared to other
        drug use, alcohol seems to be the ―drug of choice‖ for 8th graders in Jackson County and statewide.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                   Page 88
       Tobacco: Jackson County 8th grade use of tobacco decreased between 1998 (30%) and 2000 (12%) and is
        slightly lower than the state rate for 2000 (13%). Smokeless tobacco use (4.9%) reported in the last 30 days
        in 2000 by Jackson County 8th graders is slightly higher than the state rate (4.4%).

       Marijuana: There was a significant 65.8% decrease in Jackson County 8th grade use of marijuana between
        1998 and 2000. The Jackson County 8th grade rate of marijuana use (5.7%) is lower than the state rate for
        2000 (8.2%).

       Other Drugs: Jackson County 8th graders report a higher rate of use for selected ―other drugs‖ than
        Jackson County 11th graders in 2000. Specifically they have higher rates of use for: LSD/psychedelics
        (1.00% - 0.00%); cocaine/crack (1.00% - 0.00%); inhalants (2.00% - .90%); heroin (.24% - 0.00%); and
        tranquilizers/quaaludes/barbiturates (1.00% - 0.00%).


                                               11th Grade: Substance Use in Past 30 Days
                                               Alcohol, Marijuana, and Tobacco 1996 - 2000

                                       50%
                                                 Alcohol       Marijuana                  Tobacco


                                       40%
        Substances in Past 30 Days
         Percent Students Using




                                       30%



                                       20%



                                       10%



                                        0%
                                              1996 1998 2000   1996 1998 2000            1996 1998 2000

                                     Jackson 43% 45% 37%       20% 26% 14%               27% 35% 22%
                                     Oregon   43% 43% 44%      22% 21% 18%               28% 32% 25%

     Source: Department of Human Resources, Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs,
     Public School Drug Use Surveys, 1996 - 2000.




Trend Analysis:

       Alcohol: There was a 13.9% decrease between 1996 and 2000 for Jackson County 11th grade alcohol use.
        The 2000 rate of alcohol use for Jackson County 11th graders (37%) is lower than the state rate (44%) and




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 89
        reverses a trend of increasing use between 1996 and 1998. Compared to other drug use, alcohol appears to
        be the ―drug‖ of choice for 11th graders in Jackson County and statewide.

        Tobacco: Jackson County 11th grade use of tobacco decreased between 1998 (35%) and 2000 (22%) and
        is slightly lower than the state rate for 2000 (25%). Smokeless tobacco use (9.6%) reported in the last 30
        days in 2000 by Jackson County 11th graders is slightly lower than the state rate (10.6%).

       Marijuana: There was a significant 49.6% decrease in Jackson County 11th grade use of marijuana between
        1998 and 2000. The Jackson County 11th grade rate of marijuana use (14%) is lower than the state rate for
        2000 (18%).

       Other Drugs: Jackson County 11th grade use of other illicit drugs is very low compared to their
        counterparts in 6th and 8th grades in Jackson County and the state. They reported no use of LSD/other
        psychedelics, cocaine/crack, heroin, or tranquilizers/quaaludes/barbiturates and low rates of use for
        inhalants (.9%).


                          Juvenile Offense Substance Abuse Related Data

                                             Jackson County
                              Juvenile Offense Substance Abuse Related Data
                                                1996 – 1999

                               # Offenses in 1996           # Offenses in 1999               Change
           Alcohol                    586                          387                    33.9% decrease
           Tobacco                    950                          617                    35% decrease
            Drugs                     284                          248                    12.5% decrease
    Source: Juvenile Department Annual Report, 1999

Trend Analysis

       The number of juvenile alcohol, tobacco, and drug offenses decreased significantly from 1996 to 1999.
        Recidivism trends for alcohol, tobacco and other drug offenses also decreased almost 27% in 1999. These
        downward trends lend support to the decline in student reported rates of use in 2000.

Overall:

       Although 6th, 8th, and 11th grade reported use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana has declined significantly
        in the last year, substance abuse among public school students continues to be a major concern in Jackson
        County as it is in Oregon and across the nation.

       According to the National Annual Household Survey, there is a trend of decreased use of illicit drugs
        among youths age 12-17 (from 11.4% in 1997 to 9.0% in 1999).

       The decrease in local reported use follows a general downward trend found throughout the state and the
        nation and is supported by the downward trend in local juvenile arrest rates for substance abuse related
        offenses.

       Overall, youth (6th, 8th and 11th combined) are reporting fewer risk factors and more protective factors. All
        youth between 1998 and 2000, reported less risk/higher protection factors in 53 areas, while reporting
        increased risk/lowered protection in 29 areas. Most of the improvement comes from surveyed 8th graders,
        who showed improvement in nearly all areas (25 out of 27), while 11th and 6th graders reported little
        improvement (14 out of 27).

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 90
       Early initiation of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs increases the risk of violent, criminal and risky behaviors
        as well as poor school performance. For example 6th graders are 24 times more likely to engage in criminal
        behavior compared to 11th graders (9 times more likely) and 8th graders (20 times more likely). On the
        other hand, protective factors increase the chances a youth will not use ATOD. A 6th grader who has
        participated in prevention programs is 99% less likely to use ATOD compared to 11th graders (62% less
        likely) and 8th graders (74% less likely).

       According to NPC Research who prepared The Public School Drug Use Survey (2000), it is possible that
        the differences in reported prevalence between 1998 and 2000 could be due to the significant differences in
        sample size between these two years (2000 - 633 students; 1998 – 1,955).

       The Oregon Healthy Teens Survey combines and replaces the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and
        the Student Use Survey and will provide one single statewide assessment of adolescent health status. The
        survey will be conducted annually over the next three years and includes 6th, 8th, and 11th graders.

       Three major school districts (Medford, Phoenix/Talent, and Central Point) have committed to surveying a
        large sampling of students over the next three years (2001-2002-2003) which will provide more accurate
        information.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 91
                                    JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SUMMARY
                                                  Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                        High-Level Outcomes 10, 11, & 2: Decrease Teen Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use
                                                         Youth Prevention
                                                               1999

            Agency                              Program                  Number Served Number Served             Number Served        Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8         Ages 9-12              Ages 13-18         Families/Adults
 Housing Authority                Public Housing Drug Elimination                   Ages 6-12         50                      15                   90
                                  Program
 OnTrack, Inc.                    Prevention                                            15                 150                  20                      40
 Phoenix-Talent Schools           Lifers Club                                                                                   63
 Sheriff’s Department             DARE                                                                   2,400                                     150
 Kids Unlimited (2000-01)         After School Prevention Education                                        170                  90                      40
 SODA                             After School Prevention/Education                    152                 200
 SODA                             Kids Don’t Come With an Owner’s                                                                                  204
                                  Manual
 SODA                             Prevention/Education                                                     400                 100
 SODA/Schools                     Reach Clubs                                                                                   50
 SODA                             SODA Teens                                                                                   122


Service Summary:

    The majority of prevention services focused on substance abuse target children and parents in the upper elementary grade levels. The majority of
      these projects have been functioning for several years.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                     Page 92
                                    JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                  Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                        High-Level Outcomes 10, 11, & 2: Decrease Teen Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use
                                                         Youth Treatment
                                                               1999

            Agency                             Program                   Number Served       Number Served        Number Served      Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8            Ages 9-12            Ages 13-18       Families/Adults
 Kolpia Counseling                Youth Counseling                                                                           120
                                                                                                                     (Ages 13-17)
 OnTrack, Inc.                    Outpatient Youth Services                                                10                300                  100
 OnTrack, Inc.                    Teen Residential                                                                             48                   40
 OnTrack, Inc.                    Youth Enhanced Treatment                                                                     80                   80
 OnTrack, Inc.                    Youth Counseling (School based)                                          40                 260                 100

Service Summary: Time constraints limited us to listing only agencies that receive public funding. Services do not include private agencies/therapists
who do not receive public dollars.

       Publicly funded adolescent treatment is provided by OnTrack, Inc.
       Most youth receiving treatment are high school age.
       Enhanced treatment is focused on juvenile offenders or pre-offenders needing substance abuse treatment.
       Treatment is provided both at school sites and in treatment facilities




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                    Page 93
                           GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

      High-level Outcomes 10, 11, & 12. Decrease Teen Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use


Introduction:

The Public School Drug Use Survey shows a striking decline in rates of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use for
Jackson County 6th, 8th, and 11th graders in 2000 and reverses a trend of increasing use between 1996 and 1998.
With a few exceptions these rates are lower than the state for the first time in several years. However due to
significant differences in sample size between 1996 and 1998, results should be interpreted cautiously. Substance
abuse among students continues to be a major concern in Jackson County especially for the younger students.

With the aim of strengthening the prevention system in Jackson County, school, agencies, and community
organizations are joining together to address adolescent risk behavior. This makes sense, as teen pregnancy,
juvenile crime, alcohol, tobacco, and drug use, as well as school dropout all share common risk factors. Activities
designed to reduce risk and increase protective factors for substance abuse for example, will also have an impact on
the other youth risk behaviors. The following analysis attempts to pinpoint current strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities, and threats that exist to help reduce risk and increase assets and protective factors for youth in
Jackson County.

Strengths:

   The Family Addiction Community Team (FACT) was established as the initial Jackson County-wide
    integration project. It is focused on community-wide coordination to lessen the impact of drug and alcohol
    abuse in our county.

   Southern Oregon Drug Awareness (SODA) is celebrating its 21st year as a community, grassroots group
    dedicated to preventing substance abuse.

   Strong community service integration efforts are focused on identifying parents and adults with
    substance abuse problems and doing targeted outreach to get them and keep them in treatment groups.
    Currently there are four well established sites in Jackson County including Rogue Family Center in White City,
    West Medford Family Center, Central Point Family Center, and Ashland Family Center. A new site is being
    started in Rogue River.

   Collaborative programs for drug addicted teen parents providing education, resources, case management, and
    separate residential treatment programs for both teen moms and dads and their children (Healthy Start, On
    Track, Inc., Jackson County Health Department, SCF).

   Universal drug screening initiative for pregnant women in which the medical and treatment communities focus
    on the earliest possible prenatal outreach (1999- to present).

   Ongoing collaboration between law enforcement, the courts, human service providers, the early childhood
    community, and health providers to maximize outreach and intervention in drug/alcohol affected families.
    Collaborative programs include the Safety Net, Direct Service Network Teams, KARE, Family Court, School
    Resource Officers.

   Youth alcohol and drug treatment is offered on-site in each of the eight secondary schools in Jackson County
    offering a variety of educational/treatment type groups.

   The Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors survey was administered to 2,375 eighth
    and tenth graders in seven school districts in the Fall of 1999. The survey measured strengths and assets

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 94

    present in the lives of kids – according to them. Results indicated that Jackson County exceeds national
    averages with 47% of our County’s youth having more than 20 assets. Compared to the national sample, more
    Jackson County youth reported higher levels of commitment to learning including achievement motivation,
    school engagement, homework, bonding to school, and reading for pleasure. Students also reported higher
    levels of support including family support, positive family communication, other adult relationships, caring
    school climate and parent involvement in school.

   Increasing number of after school recreation and tutorial/mentoring programs in at-risk communities. The
    Grove in Ashland, Boys & Girls Clubs in Phoenix, Talent, and Central Point, Kids Unlimited in Medford and
    Rogue River. Eagle Point High School just received a large three year 21st Century Learning grant to expand
    after-school opportunities.

   Focused community effort in tobacco abatement. Increasing numbers of smoke-free restaurants, and one
    smoke-free community.

   Number of diverse free/low-cost recreation opportunities, including concerts in the parks, summer movies, city
    recreation programs, community skate parks, numerous urban and rural parks and health fairs.

   Increased efforts to target families, e.g. Mediation Works started an adult/adolescent mediation service for
    families.

   Growing effort to include family components in existing prevention efforts.

Weaknesses:

   There is a lack of money to fund prevention programs.

   Lack of programs and resources for selected and indicated populations of children. Jackson County has an
    alarming number of young substance abusers (6th grade use records). It is probable that many young children
    gain access to alcohol and other drugs through their homes. Targeting children from families with substance
    abuse problems is one effective way of attacking this problem. The selected and indicated populations would
    be those most at-risk for early substance abuse.

   Not enough transitional and drug-free housing for families in recovery from substance abuse.

   (Ages 8-12) Lack of service resources for families with elementary-aged children to provide outreach and case
    management necessary for dealing with chronic substance abuse problems.

   (Ages 8-12) Lack of skills training and counseling resources for the selective population of elementary-aged
    children with substance abusing parents.

   (Ages 8-12) Lack of sufficient pro-social recreation/child care programs for latchkey children, particularly
    those in high-risk geographic areas.

   The community norm relating to youth experimentation with alcohol and drugs puts our youth at risk. The
    perceived adult norm regarding youth using alcohol and drugs is that youth experimentation is an expected rite
    of passage, one which the adults experienced and one which they expect their kids to experience. Many adults
    may not acknowledge or comprehend the increased risk issues for today’s youth population.

   Jackson County has a significant number of hard-core adult substance abusers. It is difficult to reach and
    intervene with both the adults and the children in this subculture.


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 95


   ( Ages 8-12, 13-17) Increased pressure on schools to attain academic success has reduced or eliminated many
    school social support programs.

   (Ages 13-17) The community has not found an effective way to deal with minors in possession of alcohol or
    tobacco.

   There is a lack of leverage for families not in the ―system‖.

   (Ages 13-17) There are inconsistent policies and policy enforcement in both the law enforcement and
    education communities. Enforcement practices vary even between schools in the same school district.

Opportunities:

   Comprehensive county planning with a concentrated focus on reducing youth ATOD.

   Jackson County Prevention Council opportunity to pool resources and efforts to find more funding.

   School/Business partnerships.

   SODA Community Norms and Community Readiness Survey activities.

   Possible increase in Tobacco funding for Jackson County.

   ―No Wrong Door‖ planning, a collaborative interagency effort to provide front line staff training in
     more effective screening and referral to appropriate community resources.

   State-wide mentoring coordination.

   Increased ability to work with the media.

   DHS re-organization.

   Tougher drug use policies for Ashland and Phoenix/Talent School Districts.

   ACE (Operation Alcohol Coalition Enforcement), formed in May, 2001 represents a partnership
    comprised of officials from Oregon Liquor Control Commission, U. S. Forest Service and Siskiyou and
    Jackson County Sheriff’s Departments. The group focuses on underage drinking, illegal parties, campground
    safety, and other alcohol-related problems.

   On Track, Inc. anticipates opening Orchard Homes (Medford) another 50 unit housing development in 2003
    that will provide safe housing and case management for families in recovery.

Threats:

   Legislation action (or lack of).




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 96
   Grants are becoming increasingly competitive, particularly at the federal level.

   Recent reduction in CCF funding (nearly 30%) for programs serving children ages 9-17 in Jackson County.

   Substance abusing parents.

   (Universal) Medford is often referred to as ―Methford.‖ The combination of inaccessible rural areas, a non-
    urban law enforcement system,, and the I-5 transportation system have created a strong methamphetamine
    presence in our community.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

   (Strength/Opportunity) Increased resources for Spanish speaking parents, e.g. LISTO, Hispanic Interagency
    Committee, West Medford Family Center’s Hispanic Focus Group, Medford Multi-Cultural Advisory Council,
    Multi-Cultural Association.

   (Strength/Opportunity) Kids Unlimited: Over half of the kids served in summer camp in West Medford are
    minority status; 30% of the summer camp staff are bilingual and/or Hispanic; there is strong Hispanic parent
    involvement.

   (Strength/Opportunity) Boys & Girls Club in Talent has gained the trust of Hispanic youth and their families
    and are providing positive after-school activities.

   (Weakness) Lack of sufficient bilingual and bicultural resources to deal with Hispanic families with serious
    substance abuse problems.

   (Weakness) The Hispanic community is reluctant to get involved with traditional treatment programs even
    when they employ bilingual/bicultural staff.

   (Opportunity) Southern Oregon University, Summer Youth Programs initiated their first annual Hispanic
    Youth Academy, a one-week residential program at SOU (2001). They also offer a summer cultural camp for
    Native American youth and a camp for gifted youth.

   (Opportunity) New research relating to Hispanic programming.

   (Opportunity) National Guard offers no-cost, bi-lingual parent education relating to ATOD prevention.

Summary:

We are making progress in reducing youth alcohol, tobacco, and drug use in Jackson County. With a few
exceptions (6th grade tobacco and marijuana use), our rates are now lower than the state rates. However, the 2001
legislative session resulted in a substantial loss of funding for programs serving children 9-17 years. Increased
competition for grants could threaten the collaborative spirit of community prevention and early intervention
efforts. On the other hand, it could also serve as an opportunity to band together and find more creative and
effective ways to pool our resources for effective prevention programming.

Planning Groups:

   Jackson County Commission on Children and Families
   Local Alcohol and Drug Planning Committee
   Prevention Planning Council
   FACT (Family Addiction Community Team)
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 97
   SODA (Southern Oregon Drug Awareness) Board
   West Medford Family Center, Hispanic Focus Group
   Southern Oregon University Youth Programs

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

   Jackson County Alcohol and Drug Implementation Plan
   Jackson County Tobacco Plan
   FACT Strategic Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 98
                                                 GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

                                            High-level Outcome 13. Decrease Juvenile Arrests
                                                         County and State Data


                                                                        Juvenile Arrests
                                                              Jackson County and Oregon, 1990-1999
                                            100.0



                                             80.0
              per 1,000 Under 18 Years
                  Juvenile Arrests




                                             60.0



                                             40.0



                                             20.0



                                               0.0
                                                       1990   1991   1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999
                                            Jac kson   62.1   64.3   72.2   85.5   70.9    73    94.4   95.9   88.1   76.1
                                            Oregon     46.5   48.8   52.1   53.8   57.3   58.6    62    58.6   53.9   45.0

                  * Source: Law Enforcement Data System,
                  Preliminary Data, 2001.




Trend Analysis (1990-1999)

Juvenile Crime Rates: Historically, Jackson County has ranked in the top ten Oregon Counties for juvenile crime
rates. Jackson County has a high 1999 juvenile offense rate (76.1/1,000) compared to the State (45.0/1,000).
However, the volume of juvenile crime in Jackson County decreased 17% in 1999 (5,378) compared to 1996
(6,551). Alcohol, tobacco, and drug offenses decreased 32% in 1999 (1,237 compared to 1996 (1,820). All
offenses in 1999 compared to 1998 either decreased or remained constant except for notable increases in:

                                        Assault in the Fourth Degree (34% increase)
                                        Disorderly Conduct (35% increase)
                                        Harassment (12% increase)




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                 Page 99
                            GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

       High-level Outcome 14. Maintain Oregon Youth Authority (OYA) Bed Use
                               County and State Data


Jackson County

The current (7/23/01) allocation for Jackson County is 36 beds. This is based on a population of 44,204
(ages 0-17) and 260 serious crime arrests (8/2001). According to OYA tracking, Jackson County has
been substantially in compliance over time. Jackson County has exceeded their allocation by one or two
beds in 33 weeks (11%) out of approximately 294 weeks from July 1995 to February 2001.

Southern Area Region

The Southern Area Region consists of Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson, and Josephine Counties who agree
to share their bed allocations when needed. The total bed allocation for the Southern Region is currently
84 beds.

Background

The total number of beds allocated to the state is based on the April 2001 OYA Close Custody Population Forecast
as modified by OYA’s Legislatively Adopted Budget. Individual county allocations are made as agreed to with the
Oregon Juvenile Departments Director’s Association. It is the intent of OYA that these allocations will remain in
effect through December 2001. The allocations will be reviewed when the Office of Economic Analysis publishes
the October 2001 population forecast.

The total number of beds available for the Discretionary Bed Allocation (DBA) was determined by starting with the
number of beds funded in OYA’s 2001-03 budget. The forecasted need for the Measure 11/11 Reduced/Waived and
Public Safety Reserve* populations was subtracted from this to arrive at the remaining beds available for the
discretionary populations. The new state DBA of 580 is about 10 percent less than the current 650 due to a
decrease in the forecasted number of beds and to reductions from that forecast due to the following two factors: the
April bed forecast was significantly lower than the previous forecast and the legislature under funded this new
forecast by 30 beds. Individual county allocations may have changed by more or less than 10 percent due to
updated population and arrest data and the use of a two-year rolling average of this data.

* Public Safety Reserve beds are reserved for all youth who have committed: Murder 1; Attempted Murder; Aggravated
Murder; Manslaughter 1; Rape 1; Sodomy 1; Sexual Penetration with a Foreign Object 1; Assault 1; Robbery 1; Arson 1; and
Kidnapping 1.



Source: Oregon Youth Authority, Program Office
        530 Center St. NE, Suite 200
        Salem, OR 97301.
        Judy Satrum (503) 373-7387




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                     Page 100
                           GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

             High-level Outcome 15. Decrease Juvenile Recidivism (re-arrest)
                                 County and State Data


Definition: Recidivism is defined as a new criminal offense committed within 12 months after the initial offense.
Criminal offenses do not include violations such as possessions of tobacco, curfew, runaway or possession of
alcohol.



                                     JACKSON COUNTY - OREGON
                                            Juvenile Recidivism
                        (Offenders with One or More New Offenses within 12 Months)
                                                1995 - 1998

        Year        Jackson County             Oregon             Jackson County                Oregon
                           #                      #               % of all offenders        % of all offenders
         1995             648                   8,508                   36.0%                    38.1%
         1996              744                  8,946                   36.7%                    37.2%
         1997              774                  8,928                   38.5%                    38.4%
         1998              682                  8,221                   36.0%                    36.9%
     * Juvenile Recidivism, Oregon Statewide Report on Juvenile Recidivism 1995-1998, Oregon (2001).



Trend Analysis:

       In Jackson County, the number of youth (682) who committed new offenses within 12 months decreased
        11.8% in 1998 compared to 1997 (774). This is a higher decrease than reported statewide during the same
        period (7.9%).

       The percentage of youth who re-offended during 1998 (36.0%) is lower compared to 1997 (38.5%). The
        1998 re-offense rates for Jackson County (36.0%) are slightly lower than reported statewide (36.9%).

       64.0 % of offenders in Jackson County did not commit a new crime in 1998 compared to 60.0% in 1997.

       13.4% of offenders in Jackson County committed three or more new crimes in 1998 compared to 16.1% in
        1997.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                     Page 101
       Jackson County Recidivism Averages for 1995-1998:

       62.7% of offenders in Jackson County did not commit a new crime.

       14.2% of offenders committed 72.6% of new crimes.

       Offense Rate = 1.12 for all offenders.

       Offense Rate = 5.69 for offenders with three or more new crimes.

1999 Report on Programs and Statistics, Jackson County, Oregon (Juvenile Department, 2000).

       Alcohol, tobacco and other drug offenses decreased almost 27% in 1999.

       The number of chronic offenders and the percent of new crimes they committed decreased in 1998.

       Based on 1998-1999 data, 4.4% of all girl offenders become chronic offenders (five or more offenses)
        compared to the 9.5% of boy offenders who do.

       77% of girl offenders did not commit another offense within one year compared to 60% of boy offenders.

Jackson County Girls Referred for Juvenile Offenses - 1999

       82% of all girls 12 and under were first offenders (compared to 65% of all boys 12 and under).

       Increasing number of girls referred for behavioral crimes (e.g., drug offenses in or near
        schools, weapons, harassment, menacing, resisting arrest).




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                              Page 102
                       THREATS OF VIOLENCE IN LOCAL SCHOOLS
                              (Source: Jackson County Juvenile Department - 8/16/00)


The Safe Schools Compact was implemented in 1998 and is a set of protocols that describes how schools, police,
Juvenile Department and Mental Health intervene in instances of weapons or threatened violence in the schools.

During the 1999-2000 school year, 119 incidents of threatened violence in county schools were reported to police,
under the Safe Schools Compact, representing a 28% increase over the previous 1998-99 school year with 93
incidents.

Local authorities credit most of the increase to heightened awareness of school safety, issues by schools and police,
decreased tolerance for problem behaviors in school, a multi-disciplinary approach to screening children and youth
for the likelihood of continuing threat of violence, and graduated interventions consistent with the risk and needs of
the youth.

                                             SUMMARY of 1999-2000:

                                119 incidents of threatened violence
                                27 crimes charged
                                72 comprehensive risk assessments conducted by Mental Health
                                20 youth placed on court ordered probation
                                7 bomb threats that resulted in arrests
                                2 arrests for possession of firearms in schools
                                3 repeated incidents of threatened violence
                                33% of the incidents were elementary school students
                                37% of the incidents were middle school students
                                30% of the incidents were high school students




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 103
                                           JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                        Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                                      High-Level Outcome 13 & 15: Decrease Juvenile Arrests and Re-Arrests
                                                  Juvenile Crime Prevention for Non-Offenders
                                                                     1999

                Agency                             Program                     Number Served   Number Served     Number Served    Number Served
                                                                                 Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12         Ages 13-18     Families/Adults
     Boys & Girls Club                Gold Hill Summer Program                            15               15                 2
     Boys & Girls Club                Talent Boys & Girls Club                           225              185              210
     Boys & Girls Club                Talent Summer Program                               55               53               25
     Boys & Girls Club                White City Boys & Girls Club                       175              150               75
     Boys & Girls Club                White City Summer Program                           30               25
     Community Works                  JCP (KARE) Case Management                           2                 7              14                 22
                                                                                                   (Ages 9-12)
     Jackson County Mental            KARE Mental Health                                                                    13
     Health
     On Track, Inc.                   JCP (KARE) Case Management                          15               60               20                 95
     On Track, Inc.                   KARE Parenting                                                                                           13


Service Summary:

   Programs funded primarily to prevent delinquency serve approximately 1,000 elementary school-aged children and 350 middle school children, when
    corrected for estimated overlap.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                  Page 104
                                                     JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SUMMARY
                                                                   Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                                                     High-Level Outcome 15: Reduce Juvenile Recidivism (re-arrest)
                                                                     Basic Services to Offenders
                                                                                1999

                   Agency                             Program                  Number Served   Number Served   Number Served     Number Served
                                                                                 Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18      Families/Adults
       Jackson County Juvenile            Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment                                  3                24                27
       Services
       Jackson County Juvenile            Juvenile Services – Total Served               153             211             2,354             2,718
       Services
       Jackson County Juvenile            Victim-Offender Program                                          8              115               123
       Services
       Jackson County Mental Health/      KARE Mental Health                                                               13
       SOCSTC
       OnTrack, Inc.                      KARE Parenting                                                                                     13

      Service Summary:
         Juvenile Services serves approximately 2,354 youth each year.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                               Page 105
                           GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

        High-level Outcome 13.           Decrease Juvenile Arrests
        High-level Outcome 14.           Maintain Oregon Youth Authority (OYA) Bed Use
        High-level Outcome 15.           Reduce Juvenile Recidivism (re-arrest)


Introduction:

Jackson County has one of the highest incidents of juvenile crime in the state of Oregon. The statistic is impacted
by many factors, including a strong law enforcement focus on youth, a well-staffed and active Medford police
force, and the lack of a comprehensive, countywide diversion program.

There have been many community service changes in the past few years, which should positively impact
delinquency prevention. The initiation of the Juvenile Crime Prevention Program has strengthened the juvenile
probationary and community prevention programs for targeted high-risk children ages 8-17. Both the Medford
Police Department and the juvenile probation staff have expanded coordination and on-site service with schools in
a variety of community-based school justice projects. Most integration sites include a Community Justice
component and the court system has developed a family court and a family drug court program.

The following analysis attempts to identify current strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, which impact
the amount and severity of juvenile crime in Jackson County.

Strengths:

   Jackson County has a collaborative history of coordinated services between the Juvenile Department, the
    Commission on Children and Families, schools, public agencies, and non-profits. The leaders in this
    collaboration worked together to create the Jackson County Juvenile Crime Prevention System and the Direct
    Service Network Teams.

   Ongoing communication and coordination between law enforcement agencies, the Juvenile Department, and
    the schools ensure protective responses to enforcement, gang, and youth violence issues.

   Increasing focus on family and community in juvenile offender and prevention activities as demonstrated by
    family therapy/parent training, community review board, and integrated family staffing activities.

   Community Justice, Jackson County Mental Health, and local school systems have worked together to create a
    proactive response system to youth violence. There were 119 incidents of threatened violence by youth in
    schools in 1999/2000. Of those incidents, 27 resulted in criminal charges and 72 resulted in comprehensive
    risk assessments conducted by Jackson County Mental Health.

   The merging of adult probation and juvenile probation, resulting in earlier intervention and co-location at
    integration sites.

   The Juvenile Crime Prevention system, initiated in 2000, combines an extensive community collaborative
    network of public and non-profit providers who will be working with over 200 high-risk non-offenders with an
    array of case management, mental health, intensive parent training, and substance abuse treatment depending
    on the individual needs of the youth and his/her family.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 106
   Community Justice has been an active partner in the integration efforts with the school systems and the
    integration sites bring programs to rural areas such as parenting, mental health, and targeted case management.

   Recreation programs in high-risk areas which reach high-risk youth have increased.

   The community recently approved a county bond to fund a new juvenile detention facility. The facility is
    projected to be open in 2004 and will include a shelter, secure detention with treatment pods, and offices for
    community probation officers.

   Effective community treatment programs for offenders, including youth sex offender treatment, victim offender
    treatment, mental health, and substance abuse treatment have been developed.

   Involvement of judges in various community agencies and committees such as the Juvenile Justice Advisory
    Committee, Commission on Children and Families, Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, and family court
    has resulted in increased accountability and service coordination.

Weaknesses:

   There is a lack of resources for children ages 4-7 with antisocial behavior, coming from at-risk families. There
    are a number of research-proven school and family interventions but few resources to fund the services.

   School and Juvenile staff indicate the need for a court school, a structured but flexible educational facility
    where youth not in detention, but under the authority of Community Justice, could be placed when the school is
    not able to maintain them in the traditional school environment. Placement would be temporary, with the goal
    of maintaining school credits and returning the youth to the regular school program as soon as possible.

   There is a need for stable and effective aftercare services for county and OYA youth returning from residential
    or institutional placement.

   The closing of the Talent Youth Diagnostic Shelter means Jackson County has no short-term shelter capacity
    for delinquent or dependent youth.

   There is a lack of sex offender treatment beds and a limited number of adolescent foster beds, resulting in youth
    remaining longer than necessary in costly institutional placements.

   The large size of probation caseloads results in fewer community-based individualized services.

   There is a lack of programs that work with youth under age 12 who are transitioning from dependency
    (victimization) to delinquency and vice versa.

Opportunities:

   Voter analysis in last bond election indicates strong community support for youth prevention and treatment
    programs, and lack of support for ―lock them up‖ approaches.

   Designing and creating the new juvenile facility in a way that supports community involvement and ownership.

   Lack of territorialism by OYA, juvenile corrections, and adult corrections, which allows them to cooperate and
    work together.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 107
   Policy-makers favor helping youth.

   Family court and proposed family drug court to increase accountability and integration.

   Information Technologies Group willing to help programs with analysis.

   The presence of a strong volunteer base.

Threats:

   Reduced resources resulting in loss of programs.

   Increasingly complex dysfunctional families whose children are exposed to chronic domestic violence and
    adult drug use.

   Increasing numbers of dual diagnosis youth and adults, challenging the treatment, evaluation, and corrections
    systems.

   Transient families/youth resulting in youth lacking continuity in educational and treatment programs.

   Ongoing problem with adult use of amphetamines and alcohol and a growing problem with hallucinogens.
    Adult use increases risk factors for youth.

   Community/family norms which do not support non-offender behavior.

   Pre-delinquent youth and their families are not required to accept or be engaged in services. Some of the
    highest-risk family systems refuse all services until the youth has broken a law and the court requires
    intervention.

   Youth who have been suspended or expelled from school are seriously at-risk; they usually drop out, become
    even more susceptible to antisocial activities, and have few prosocial ways of using their time.

   Youth coming from the child welfare system, who show antisocial behavior and require residential or foster
    care, are a population that crosses systems and for which no one wants to take responsibility. It is unclear what
    the responsibility is of the child welfare system for children/youth who were basically raised in that system and
    are now adolescents.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

   (Strength) Jackson County has several projects directed to at-risk Hispanic youth.

   (Strength) Public and nonprofit agencies have increased bilingual, bicultural capacity over the last two years.

   (Strength) Jackson County has an ongoing mental health group targeted for at-risk female offenders.

   (Weakness) There is a lack of appropriate resources for acting-out youth with learning disabilities and/or
    organic brain disorders. We lack long-term educational and treatment resources for these youth.

   (Weakness) There is a lack of appropriate resources for developmentally delayed boys exhibiting antisocial
    behavior. The standard sex offender and criminal thinking programs are not appropriate for retarded youth.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 108
   (Weakness) It is difficult to engage the Hispanic community (adult and youth) in existing alcohol and drug
    treatment programs.

    (Opportunity) A number of Hispanic collaborations and interagency groups have emerged, which are
    interested in improving services and outcomes for Hispanic youth.

   (Threat) The growing Hispanic youth population has a high school dropout rate which increases relative to the
    rate of poverty and family dysfunction.

   (Threat) The relatively small number of females eligible for state-supported shelter makes it increasingly
    difficult to create and maintain a female youth shelter system.

   (Threat) Because there are fewer girls in the juvenile justice system, it is difficult to develop the array of
    opportunities available to boys. OYA and the county have done a fair to good job of adapting services to girls,
    but the relatively low numbers limit the range of services.

   (Threat) It is more difficult to pick out pre-delinquent girls from the risk factors. Many girls with high-risk
    factors have non-adaptive, reactive behavior that is not delinquent. Girls from troubled and at-risk families
    need screening, which combine status and victim profiles with offender profiles and have appropriate resources
    for each profile. It is tragic to see girls in trouble denied services until they commit a crime.

Summary:

The development of the Juvenile Crime Prevention Plan has increased collaborative justice, human service, and
community planning to address the needs of offender and pre-offender youth. The emerging challenge will be to
continue to change and improve services and systems to most effectively impact positive change.

Planning Groups:

   Commission on Children and Families
   Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee
   Local Public Safety Coordinating Committee

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

   High-Risk Juvenile Crime Prevention Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 109
                                                   GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

                                                 High-level Outcome 16. Reduce Teen Pregnancy
                                                             County and State Data


                                                                           Teen Pregnancy Rate
                                                                  Jackson County and Oregon, 1990 - 2000

                                                    25
                 per 1,000 females 10-17 years




                                                    20
                      Teen Pregnancies




                                                    15



                                                    10



                                                     5



                                                     0
                                                                                                                                   2000
                                                           1990   1991   1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999
                                                                                                                                 (Prelim.)
                                                 Jackson   20.9    19    16.5   18.8   15.7   15.9   17.3   14.4   13.7   11.5    11.2
                                                 Oregon    19.7   19.3   17.9   18.2   18.9   19.2   18.8    18    17.2   15.9    13.9

                                       Source: Oregon Health Division, 2001.




Trend Analysis

   By definition pregnancy rates include births plus abortions. The teen pregnancy rate/1,000 females (ages 10-17
    years) in Jackson County have decreased significantly over time. The rate for 1990 in Jackson County was
    20.9/1,000 compared to a 2000 rate of 11.2/1,000. This represents a 46% decline over ten years. The Oregon
    State rate for 2000 was 13.9/1,000 and represents a 29% decline over nine years. The State Benchmark goal
    for year 2000 is 15 pregnancies per 1,000.

   The overall the U.S. teenage pregnancy rate also declined 17% between 1990 and 1996, from 117
    pregnancies/1,000 women (ages 15-19) to 97/1,000. Decreases in the pregnancy rate among sexually
    experienced teenagers accounted for most of the drop in the overall teenage pregnancy rate in the early-to-mid
    1990’s. ―While 20% of this decline is because of decreased sexual activity, 80% is due to more effective
    contraceptive practice‖ (The Alan Guttmacher Institute, Facts in Brief: Teen Sex and Pregnancy, 1999).

   Jackson County teens are making better decisions! The above trend data shows that community-based,
    comprehensive approaches to teen pregnancy prevention appear to be making a difference in Jackson County.
    A number of approaches were used by the Reduce Adolescent Pregnancy Project (RAPP), Planned Parenthood,
    Prevention Planning Council, Health Department, and school based programs centered around the Governor’s
    Teen Pregnancy Prevention Action Agenda.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                 Page 110
                          OREGON YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY


                                            OREGON
                              YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY (YRBS)
                                             1991-1999
                                          (Grades 9 - 12)
                                      Percent Responding YES
                               Year                       1991 1993 1995                1997    1999

                   Response from percentage of the total population taking the survey:

        Ever had sexual intercourse?                               47      46      40      35      36

        Had first sexual intercourse prior to age 13?               8      10       6       5       4

        Ever been or ever gotten someone pregnant?                  5          6    4       4       4
                Response from percentage of population reporting they have ever had sex:

                                                                  27      20      25      28      27
        Used alcohol or drugs before last sexual intercourse?

        Used birth control pills/shot as main birth control;       22      22      22      19      23
        last intercourse, past 3 months?




   Oregon Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) – High School: TheYRBS is a public school-based survey of
    9th through 12th grade students in Oregon. The survey has been conducted every two years since 1991 and is
    useful in tracking trends and changes in the health risk behaviors of youth. Several questions relate to sexual
    behavior and attitudes. The percentage of high school youth having sex has declined 23.4% but the use of
    alcohol and/or drugs before sex has increased 7.4% in the last eight years (1991 - 1999).

   Oregon Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) – Middle School: TheYRBS was administered to 7th and 8th
    grade middle school students statewide for the first time in 1997 after the STARS program (abstinence based
    peer education) was initiated. The number of 7th graders reporting they have had sex at least once declined
    from 14% in 1997 to 11.2% in 1999. The number of 8th graders reporting they have had sex at least once also
    declined from 20% in 1997 to 16.9% in 1999.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 111
                           TEEN PARENT PROGRAMS IN JACKSON COUNTY

                                             Teen Parent Program
                                              By School District
                                       Enrollments for 1993/94 to 2000/01
                           1994/95    1995/96      1996/97     1997/98     1998/99     1999/00     2000/01
      North Medford           69         94          73          88            120        93          77
      South Medford           95         108         101         114           136       108         130
      Crossroads                                                                                      36
      Eagle Point                                                                                     14
      Totals                 164         202         174         202           256       201         257



   County-wide enrollments in the teen parent programs have increased. Eagle Point School District started a
    program Fall 2000 and Crossroads started a formal program with child care on site for the teen parents enrolled
    in the alternative program. The programs enable teen parents to complete their education and learn parenting
    skills. School staff are seeing younger moms who are homeless with more challenges. There are more 10th and
    11th graders enrolling in the teen parent programs than 12th graders. The majority are first time moms.

   Rogue Valley Community Development Corporation (RVCDC) is a philanthropic group made up of realtors
    committed to finding affordable housing for the community. They have developed a partnership with South
    Medford High School (SMHS) that allows at risk youth to learn construction skills while renovating houses for
    RVCDC. Working in partnership with Medford Teen Parent Advisory Board, RVCDC purchased property in
    West Medford and renovated a home for teen parents. Negotiations have just been completed with the Catholic
    Community to manage the teen parent home.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 112
                              Key Issue: Births to Young and Single Mothers

   In both Jackson County and Oregon, virtually half of the births to young women ages 15-24 are to unwed
    mothers. Jackson County and Oregon rates for 1999 are 48.8% and 50.7% respectively (Oregon Vital
    Statistics County Data, Department of Human Resources, Center for Disease Prevention and Epidemiology,
    Center for Health Statistics).

   Non-marital Birth Rates for Teenagers: Nationally, teenage mothers are much less likely to be married now
    than a generation ago (Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report). The percent of births to
    unmarried mothers ages 15-17 nearly doubled between 1970 (43%) and 1996 (84%). Among older teens ages
    18-19, the percent more than tripled between 1970 (22%) and 1996 (71%). Oregon’s rates follow the national
    trend. The nonmarital birth rate doubled for Oregon teens aged 10-17 between the years of 1975 (5.2) and
    1995 (10.6) and tripled for teens aged 18 and 19 between the years of 1975 (17.0) and 1995 (55.3). Children
    of teen parents are at greater risk for school failure, juvenile delinquency, and becoming teen parents
    themselves (Higginson, 1998; Maynard, 1996 in Kissler & Fore, 2000).

   The increase in non-marital births may be explained in terms of an earlier onset of sexual activity and the
    postponement of marriage. Approximately half of older unmarried women having a subsequent child were
    also teen parents (Foster & Hoffman, 1996 in Kissler & Fore, 2000). Increased stress and poverty are also
    related to non-marital births.

   In 1997, almost half of all children living with only their mother lived in poverty (Juvenile Offenders and
    Victims: 1999 National Report). The critical factor for children of unmarried mothers is the lack of parental
    attention and involvement in their lives, which is often associated with the stress of single parenting. It is
    more difficult for one parent, juggling the demands of multiple roles, to do as much as two parents can do.

   Linkages have been established with teen parenting, low birth weight for children of teen parents, repeat
    pregnancies and multiple fathers, increased stress on families, loss of community, children in poverty,
    possible difficulty in finding accessible, quality child care, school failure, alcohol and drug abuse,
    delinquency and violence, child abuse and neglect, early sexual abuse, suicide, sexual precocity, and divorce
    rates.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 113
                                                         KEY ISSUE: SECOND BIRTHS TO TEEN MOTHERS



                                                          Second Births to Teen Mothers (10-19 Years)
                                                            Jackson County and Oregon, 1989-2000

                                                  70                                                                                            1000
                10-19 Years, Jackson County




                                                                                                                                                       Second Births to Teen Mothers
               Second Births toTeen Mothers




                                                  60
                                                                                                                                                950




                                                                                                                                                           10-19 Years, Oregon
                                                  50

                                                                                                                                                900
                                                  40

                                                  30
                                                                                                                                                850

                                                  20
                                                                                                                                                800
                                                  10

                                                   0                                                                                            750
                                                                                                                                       2000
                                                         1989   1990   1991   1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999
                                                                                                                                      Prelim.
                                              Jac kson    44     48     62     48     37     50     51     41     53     58     46      36
                                              Oregon     919    888    961    929    880    831    872    920    883    926    929     884



               * Source: Oregon Health Division, Center for Health Statistics,
               Unpublished data. 2001.




Trend Analysis

   Second births to teen mothers is a significant issue. The number of births to Jackson County teens ages 10-19
    years who were already parents increased 41% between 1996 and 1998, but preliminary 2000 data shows a
    38% decline in the number from the 1998 high. According to research, 25% of teenage mothers have a second
    child within two years of their first child (The Alan Guttmacher Institute, Facts in Brief: Teen Sex and
    Pregnancy, 1999).

   The above data reflects the number of 2nd births by teen parents ages 10-19 years. Care should be taken not to
    compare this data with teen pregnancy rates measuring births plus abortions ages 10-17 years/1,000.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                                                           Page 114
                                         JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                   Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                                            High-Level Outcome 16: Reduce Teen Pregnancy
                                                  Sexual Behavior and Responsibility
                                                                1999

              Agency                           Program                   Number Served       Number Served        Number Served       Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8            Ages 9-12            Ages 13-18        Families/Adults
 American Red Cross               HIV Education                                                         522                 1,573
 Planned Parenthood               Cabaret/Youth Theater                                                  3,000                7,000             2,000
 Planned Parenthood               RAPP/Baby Think It Over/                                               2,000                2,150             1,000
                                  Community Education Presentations
 Public Health/Jackson County     STARS                                                                    490                1,165
 School Districts
 Planned Parenthood/Public        Family Planning Expansion Program                                                           4,810
 Health                           July 2000/July 2001
                                  Community Education Outreach for
                                  Public Schools
 Child Support Enforcement        Middle School Male Responsibility
 North Medford High School        Teen Parent Program                                                                           93

 South Medford High School        Teen Parent Program                                                                          103
 Crossroads                       Teen Parent Program                                                             (2000-01)     36
 Eagle Point High School          Teen Parent Program                                                             (2000-01)     14


Service Summary:

   85% of an estimated 12,000 secondary students are involved in at least one of the sexual responsibility programs.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                   Page 115
                        GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

                    High-level Outcome 16.              Reduce Teen Pregnancy

Introduction:

Teen pregnancy rates are continuing to decline in Jackson County. Multiple approaches, creative
partnerships and collaborative efforts seem to be paying off. Jackson County Public Health, Planned
Parenthood, and Community Health Clinics provide sexuality education and family planning services. Many
of these services are provided in the schools, institutions, and community. The Health Department, Adult
and Family Services (AFS), Job Council, School District Teen Parent programs, Medford Teen Parent
Advisory Board and other agencies all work together to offer coordinated case management for teen parents.
The Reduce Adolescent Pregnancy Project (RAPP) focuses on pregnancy prevention for teens 9-19 years.
They have become a model for the state for their innovative ideas and willingness to share with other
counties. The faith community has stepped forward to manage a new teen parent home this year. Support
Enforcement provides paternity education to middle school boys. Soroptomist volunteers act as mentors for
at-risk girls and after-school programs implement resistance skills programs.

Peer education through the STARS program has been very successful and we have an exceptional teen
theater group sponsored by Planned Parenthood. However second births among teen parents is still an issue
and there is an increase in single parenting. The following inventory of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities,
and threats provides a basis for community discussion on how we can continue effective efforts to reduce
teen pregnancy rates and at the same time work to address other concerns of second births and single
parenting for young mothers.

Strengths:

   One of the biggest changes in the last ten years has been the transformation from competitive to
    collaborative relationships between teen pregnancy prevention agencies in Jackson County. The
    formation of the RAPP group in 1994 has been instrumental in effecting this change. RAPP has
    provided the structure for building trust, respect and collaborative partnerships. Leadership and
    responsibility is shared between key agencies (CCF, Public Health, Planned Parenthood, AFS). RAPP
    has sponsored an annual Parent-Daughter educational fair since 1995, aimed at enhancing parent-child
    communication, especially around issues of sexuality. This is just one example of RAPP’s collaborative
    projects.

   STARS (Students Today Aren’t Ready for Sex) is an abstinence program aimed at 6th and 7th graders,
    taught by high school teens. STARS has trained over 800 high school teen leaders to teach more than
    10,200 middle school children in the last five years. Community-public-private relationships at the state
    and local level have been instrumental in the success of this program. STARS is being implemented in
    all the school districts except Ashland. This year (2001) a program called ―Safer Choices‖ has been
    selected as a STARS booster and will be implemented as a pilot program in the Phoenix-Talent School
    District. Safer Choices is a two-year HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and pregnancy
    prevention program for high school students.

   The Health Department has school based health clinics in Ashland High School, Crater High School,
    Scenic Middle School, Jewett Elementary School, and Crossroads Alternative School.

   The Medford Teen Parent Advisory Group has played a major role in bringing together school, business,
    community, and agency representatives to improve educational and career opportunities for teen parents.
    On-site child care programs, Adult and Family Services, Job Council, the Health Department,

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                         Page 116
    AmeriCorps all provide services for the teen parent programs. As a result both North and South Medford
    High School teen parent programs have grown in capacity and quality. Younger teen moms who are
    homeless have been a growing concern for the group. Through their planning a long awaited house for
    homeless teen parents opened in 2001 where teens receive case management to help them remain in
    school and become successful mothers.

   There has been a 45% decline in teen pregnancy in Jackson County over the last nine years. Teens are
    involved in several successful peer education programs, e.g. STARS, Teen Theater, Public Service
    Announcements. Planned Parenthood provided a ―Baby Think It Over‖ success story. Recently a young
    18 year old man called Planned Parenthood explaining that his 16 year old girlfriend wanted to have a
    baby. He thought if she could borrow the ―Baby Think It Over‖ doll, it might help change her mind.
    After taking the doll home for four nights, she decided to wait. During the process Planned Parenthood
    learned that the girl was not on birth control. Now she is! Teens deserve credit for becoming involved
    and making better decisions.

   Jackson County is focusing more on broad based prevention planning than in the past. There is more
    public discussion about prevention strategies as well as the development of a statewide plan.

   The State RAPP group, AmeriCorps Program, Oregon Action Agenda Strategic Plan, funding, and
    technical support. CCF funding, leadership, and support for RAPP ongoing collaborative projects.

   RAPP AmeriCorps Program. Jackson County has the good fortune to have excellent AmeriCorps
    members for the last three years who have helped to reduce our pregnancy rates. Several of the
    volunteers are now employed in Jackson County where they are continuing to work in this field, e.g.,
    Healthy Start, Job Council – Teen Parent Case Management. This year we have a minority male who is
    working in an after-school program and has created innovative programs targeting at-risk young males.

   Teen parents who are low income and drug free have a chance to attend college through ―Fairy
    Godmother‖ Scholarships (2 year scholarships @ $1,500/year). A retired woman living at the Rogue
    Valley Manor who learned about the need through a Health Department nurse, sponsors this program.

   Community based mentoring programs for at-risk young girls and boys in several elementary and middle
    schools (Project Dove).

   Over the last two years, RAPP and the Prevention Council have worked together to sponsor fun and
    educational events for 8th grade boys transitioning to middle school. The event will be expanded to
    include 8th grade girls.

Weaknesses:

   Housing for young teen parents is lacking even with recent successful efforts to establish a teen parent
    home in Medford. In order to stay in the home, teen moms must be enrolled and active in school; they
    lack emergency childcare when their children are sick.

   There aren’t enough school-based clinics at the high school and middle school levels. The Health
    Department has nurses at Crater and Ashland High Schools and Scenic Middle School. Although there
    are off-site clinics to serve adolescents, the rural areas such as Prospect and Butte Falls do not have easy
    access to them.

   No effective curriculum to prevent second births to teen parents.

   There needs to be more countywide education to teach parents how to talk to their kids about sex.


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 117
   Lack of awareness and commitment of key decision makers, e.g., school officials, legislators,
    government officials, and parents to support successful teen pregnancy prevention strategies. In the last
    year, RAPP has been presenting to several policy-making groups. RAPP will sponsor another
    Community Educational Forum in January 2002. We will have RAPP members sit in on each breakout
    session to hear the concerns of citizens and policy makers. Changing community norms and values is a
    slow process.

   Currently there is no consistency in the health education offered in grades K-12 across school districts.

   The State Department of Education has no outlined benchmarks for the CIM and CAM around health
    education.

Opportunities:

   Because of the growing number of younger teens becoming pregnant, Medford School District
    curriculum directors are re-evaluating the health curriculum to find effective ways to reach younger,
    especially male, students.

   RAPP re-examined their structure, vision, and decision-making processes after planning for a conference
    on European methods of teen pregnancy prevention became very controversial and threatened to disrupt
    long-standing relationships. They learned that RAPP needed a more formalized mode of operating, to
    avoid future frustrations and engaged the State RAPP to assist them in their re-structuring process. In
    order to continue a community dialogue, RAPP plans to sponsor a community conference Spring 2002
    around the Oregon State Action Agenda.

   Eagle Point School District started a teen parent program this year.

   The ministerial community has formed a group to discuss and support effective sex education and
    contraceptive access in the schools.

   An educational campaign to encourage parents to talk with their children about sexual choices and access
    to disease and pregnancy prevention methods will be launched in 2001.

Threats:

   Differing theological/philosophical community values relating to teen sexual behavior often make it very
    controversial to provide -- or even discuss providing -- effective sex education or contraceptive access in
    the schools.

   Conflicting media messages (music, T.V.) relating to sexual behavior can undermine prevention efforts.

   A recent conference was held to educate the community on European methods of preventing teen
    pregnancy. The project became extremely controversial and threatened to disrupt collaborative efforts to
    reduce teen pregnancy in our county.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                           Page 118
Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

   (Strength) Services have been steadily increasing in bilingual and bicultural capacities to deal with the
    growing Hispanic population. There is an increasing awareness that programs must be designed to fit the
    culture to be effective. To this end, a Hispanic curriculum has been developed for the STARS program.
    If Jackson County STARS program receives a grant from the Anna May Foundation this school year, the
    Hispanic STARS Program will be implemented in the Education Service District Hispanic-only classes.

   (Weakness) Both prevention and intervention programs still deal with language and cultural barriers
    which limit or delay services.

$   (Opportunity) Agencies are seeing more Hispanic girls coming back to school after having babies.

$   (Threat) Gay and lesbian youth are not able to be open, as their behavior is not well tolerated by the
     community.

$   (Threat) More Hispanic males are fathering babies.

Strategies for the Future:

What really works to prevent teen pregnancy? Teen pregnancy is a very complex problem and no single
effort can be expected to solve it. Community values, available resources, services already available, local
politics, preferences of teens and parents all must be considered. Parent and families, peers, schools, faith
communities, social service agencies, and the media are all part of the solution. The State has developed an
Oregon Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention - Action Agenda 2000 to reduce the number of teen pregnancies.
Rather than a single approach, six strategies are outlined in the Oregon Action Agenda - 2000. These
strategies help guide the work of the Jackson County RAPP coalition and local programs. Broadly based
goals include:

$   Maintenance of present service system which successfully meets outcomes.
$   Implementation of Oregon Action Agenda 2000 strategies (norms, life skills, abstinence, access to birth
    control, male involvement).

Planning Groups:

$   Commission on Children and Families
$   Reduce Adolescent Pregnancy Project (RAPP)
$   Medford Teen Parent Advisory Committee
$   Public Health Advisory Committee

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

$   Jackson County RAPP Plan
$   Public Health Strategic Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                           Page 119
                                          GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

                                        High-level Outcome 17. Decrease Youth Suicide
                                                    County and State Data



                                                Suicide Attempts Rate 1992-1999
                                                        Ages 10-17 Years
                                                  Jackson County and Oregon
                                          300
             per 100,000 Ages 10 -17




                                          250
              Suicide Attempts Rate




                                          200

                                          150

                                          100

                                           50

                                            0
                                                1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999
                                       Jackson 104.4 135.5 234.5 222 254.5 121.6 257.8 266.5
                                       Oregon 205.2 211.6 221.3 214.4 217.7 202.4 200 204.7
     Source: Oregon Health Division, 2001.




Trend Analysis:

       Jackson County has experienced a 155% increase in the rate of youth suicide attempts between 1999
        (266.5/100,000) and 1992 (104.4/100,000). During the same period of time the State experienced a
        slight 2% decrease in suicide attempts.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 120
                                                    Number of Suicide Attempts 1992-1999
                                                             Ages 10-17 Years
                                                       Jackson County and Oregon

                Number of Suicide Attempts
                                                    60
                                                                                                                   800
                                                    50                                                             700
                                                                                                                   600
                       Ages 10 -17
                                                    40
                                                                                                                   500
                                                    30                                                             400
                                                    20                                                             300
                                                                                                                   200
                                                    10
                                                                                                                   100
                                                    0                                                              0
                                                         1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

                                             Jackson     18      24    43     41     47      23       55     54
                                             Oregon      685    723    773   753     778     736   761       785
            Source: Oregon Health Division, 2001.




Trend Analysis:

       Jackson County has experienced an alarming increase in the number of attempted suicides from 23 in
        1997 to 54 in 1999, among youth 10-17 years of age. Our rate was 266.5/100,000 in 1999 compared
        to a state rate of 204.7/100,000 in the same time period.



                                                                   Jackson County
                                                               Suicide Attempts by Age
                                                                     1996 - 1999
                                                                                            Total
                                             Under 12          13-14         15-17         Attempts        % Under 15
           1999                                 6               12            36              54             33.3%
           1998                                 8               17            30              55             45.5%
           1997                                 4                1            18              23             21.7%
           1996                                 5               11            31              47             34.0%


Trend Analysis:

       Suicides are reported for youth under age 12, 13 to 14, and 15 to 17 years. Using these age
        breakdowns, approximately one third (33.6% average over 4 years) of the reported suicide
        attempts are for children under the age of 15 years. Gender data was not available.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                             Page 121
                   HOMELESSNESS: A RISK FACTOR FOR TEEN SUICIDE

According to The Oregon Plan for Youth Suicide Prevention: A Call to Action (December 2000), risk
factors associated with suicidal behavior include: suicidal ideation and previous suicide attempts, depression
or other mental health issues, substance abuse, history of physical or sexual abuse, family history of suicide,
incarceration, homelessness, sexual orientation and access to firearms.


                                                     Homelessness, 1994-1996
                                                    Jackson County and Oregon

                                                6

                                                5
                    Avg. # o f Homeless Youth

                          per 10,000 <18
                          Given Shelter




                                                4

                                                3

                                                2

                                                1

                                                0
                                                    1994          1995                   1996
                                    Oregon          1.48           1.64                  2.01
                                    Jackson         0.98           1.49                  4.81


         Source: "Pathw ay to a Healthy Future," Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs




Trend Analysis

   The above data is reported as the average number of homeless youth (0-17) in a shelter on a given night
    of the year per/10,000 juveniles 0-17 years. The above chart indicates that Jackson County experienced
    a dramatic 391% increase in the rates of homeless youth using shelters compared to a 53% increase
    statewide from 1994 to1996. Jackson County’s rate of homeless youth in 1996 (4.81/10,000) is more
    than double the state rate (2.01/10,000) during that time. However, Jackson County has a 10 year
    federally funded Runaway and Homeless Youth Program with an operating data system. Many areas of
    the state have no ongoing method of counting or tracking homeless youth. This may affect the higher
    rates of homeless youth reported in Jackson County than statewide.

   In 1999, Jackson County population data indicates there were 44,157 children ages 0 - 17 years. This
    means that based on the above 1996 homelessness rate of 4.81/10,000, Jackson County would have
    around 19 youth using shelters. Obviously not all homeless youth will use a shelter, thus data is
    undercounted.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                           Page 122
             Community Works – Homeless and Runaway Teens (HART) Program

HUD Definition of Homeless

The HUD definition of homeless is used by Community Works in their tracking system. A person is
homeless if, without the HUD assistance, they would spend the night in a shelter or in a place not meant for
human habitation (e.g., parks, sidewalks, abandoned buildings).

Community Works manages the Homeless and Runaway Teens (HART) Program offering a variety of
services for homeless and runaway youth. The HART program includes: the Transitional Living Program
(TLP); Reunification Services (RS); and Street Outreach Services (SOS) started in late 1998. Tracking
systems for these programs do not capture the numbers of homeless and runaway youth not being served
through Community Works. Thus, the numbers of homeless and runaway youth in Jackson County are
undercounted.

The number of homeless teens served through Community Works in 2000 (237) increased 63% from the
number served in 1996 (145). A four year trend shows there were twice as many girls as boys who were
reported as runaway and/or homeless by Community Works tracking systems. Staff stated that the higher
number of girls may be because it is often easier to get females involved in the HART program. Many of the
females are also pregnant and/or parenting and more in need of services.

                                          COMMUNITY WORKS
                                Homeless and Runaway Youth Program
                                              1996, 1999, 2000
                                              1996          1999            2000
                           Female             97              95             146
                                           (66.9%)         (62.9%)         (61.6%)
                           Male               48              56              91
                                           (33.1%)         (37.0%)         (38.4%)
                           Total             145             151             237


Adult Homelessness in Jackson County

The Veterans Administration at the V.A. Domiciliary in White City tracks adult homelessness. They use the
HUD definition of homelessness and conduct a yearly survey in March. Numerous agencies participate in
the survey including the emergency shelters and meal sites, law enforcement, jails, the V.A. programs, social
service agencies such as ACCESS, CERVS, Employment Department, Job Council, La Clinica, On Track
etc. The following data represents unduplicated numbers and shows a 36% increase in the number of
homeless adults in the last five years from 615 homeless in 1995 to 838 homeless in 2000.


                                         JACKSON COUNTY
                                          Adult Homelessness
                                             1995 – 2000
                                        (Unduplicated Numbers)
             Year            1995       1996      1997       1998                  1999    2000

          # Homeless         615        733          609             692             690   838




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                         Page 123
                                         JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                    Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                                             High-Level Outcome 17: Decrease Youth Suicide
                                               Non-traditional Youth Living Environment
                                                                 1999

            Agency                             Program                   Number Served   Number Served   Number Served    Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12       Ages 13-18     Families/Adults
 Community Works HART             Reunification Services                                                            150                50
 Program
 Community Works HART             Street Outreach                                                                   59                23
 Program
 Community Works                  Transitional Living                                                               55                24
 HART Program
 Services to Children &           Independent Living Program                                                        19
 Families




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                      Page 124
                       GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

                         High-level Outcome 17.          Decrease Youth Suicide


Introduction:.

According to The Oregon Plan for Youth Suicide Prevention: A Call to Action (December 2000), risk factors
associated with suicidal behavior include: suicide ideation and previous suicide attempts, depression or other
mental health issues, substance abuse, history of physical or sexual abuse, family history of suicide,
incarceration, homelessness, sexual orientation and access to firearms. The following analysis attempts to
pinpoint current strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that exit to help reduce suicides among
Jackson County youth.

Strengths:

$   The Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors survey was administered to 2,375
    eighth and tenth graders in seven school districts in the Fall of 1999. The survey measured strengths
    and assets present in the lives of kids – according to them. Results indicated that Jackson County
    exceeds national averages with 47% of our County’s youth having more than 20 assets. Compared to
    the national sample, more Jackson County youth reported higher levels of commitment to learning
    including achievement motivation, school engagement, homework, bonding to school, and reading for
    pleasure. Students also reported higher levels of support including family support, positive family
    communication, other adult relationships, caring school climate and parent involvement in school.

$   A strong Direct Service Network Team (DSNT) is placed in six school districts of Jackson County.
    These teams consist of representatives of the schools, Juvenile Department, Adult and Family Services,
    and other youth serving agencies.

$   Medford School District provides a Homeless Education Coordinator who works to enroll homeless
    youth and reduce barriers for those students.

$   There are school-based clinics at three of the six area high schools.

$   The Jackson County Crime Prevention plan calls for a comprehensive assessment to identify youth with
    multiple risk factors.

$   Community Works, a large not-for-profit agency, manages the Homeless and Runaway Teens (HART)
    Program offering a variety of services for homeless and runaway youth. The HART Program includes:
    the Transitional Living Program (TLP); Reunification Services (RS); and Street Outreach (SOS) started
    in late 1998.

$   Community Works operates a mediation system which attempts to reconcile youth and their families
    whenever possible to minimize homelessness. The system works with youth and families, if they reside
    in Jackson County, to stabilize and maintain the home placement.

$   A number of families, operating informally or through a formal foster home system, take in and often
    shelter youth who are runaway or homeless.

$   Education Service District sponsors an annual, Suicide Prevention Training for local educators.

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                          Page 125
$   Southern Oregon Child Study and Treatment Center (SOCSTC) provides school-based assessment and
    counseling services for children, youth and families in the Ashland and Phoenix-Talent School Districts.

Weaknesses:

$   Lack of funding for school-based clinics at all six high schools.

$   Few youth and families have access to treatment and counseling to reintegrate them back into the
    community after incarceration.

$   Smaller school districts do not having funding to provide counseling services.

$   Mental health services are limited to youth and families that have private insurance or the Oregon
    Health Plan. Uninsured families have limited access to services.

$   Tracking systems for homeless and runaway youth capture only youth being served by Community
    Works. Thus the number of homeless and runaway youth in Jackson County are undercounted.

$   Lack of a shelter system for status offenders who are unable to immediately return home. The shelter
    for Juvenile Department and SCF youth is currently closed. Youth are being sheltered in adjoining
    counties.

$   There is a scarcity of case management, independent living skills training and crisis management
    services for homeless youth.

$   Shortage of foster homes for adolescents.

$   Lack of advertising funds available to promote Live Wire, an Internet based, peer counseling service.

Opportunities:

$   Streetwise (formerly The Lighthouse) a program that provides food, clothing, shoes, towels and blankets
    to homeless youths 11 – 22 years of age, has recently moved to a larger facility and will be able to serve
    more youth.

$   Live Wire (formerly Teen Line) established an Internet based network for teens to talk to trained peer
    counselors about any topic that is bothering them. Community Works is trying to get the word out to
    kids that the service exists.

$   Jackson County will be receiving new monies for mental health and alcohol and drug programs. Some
    of these funds may be directed to at risk youth.

$   In Winter 2000, there was a Suicide Regional Planning Session which focused on local community
    capacity to prevent suicide.

Threats:




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                         Page 126
$   Many of the programs utilized for youth ages 9-18 were cut by legislative action in 2001. Many of the
    youth are from ―working poor‖ families and will have difficulty getting services now.

$   The State Legislature recently passed a State Budget that will reduce funds for programs for youth age
    9-18 by 30%.

$   In the 1999 Oregon Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 16% of the state’s youth reported seriously
    considering suicide.

$   A recent study published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report notes that teen suicide rates
    increase in the Spring semester.

Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

$   (Strengths) Many Hispanic Youth are involved in positive activities such as dance and sports. Good
    examples are the VIBES Hispanic Break Dancers, Ballet Folklorica Latin Reflection Dancers, and
    Bulldog Boxing Association.

$   (Weaknesses) Lack of sufficient bilingual/bicultural counseling services.

$   (Weaknesses) Many in the Hispanic community are reluctant to reach out for services because of their
    illegal immigration status.

$   (Opportunities) Southern Oregon University held its first annual Hispanic Youth Academy, a week-
    long residential program during the summer of 2001.

$   (Threats) The Oregon Youth Risk Behavior Survey reports that the rate of suicide attempts is greater
    amongst minority youth.

Summary:

Teen suicide is a serious problem in our community. In Jackson County there is a great need for affordable
mental health services system-wide. With state budget cuts affecting youth programs along with educational
cutbacks affecting counseling and outreach services, high-risk youth will be harder to identify.

Planning Groups:

$   Commission of Children and Families
$   Juvenile Justice Advisory Council
$   Jackson County Child Fatality Review Team

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

$   Jackson County Juvenile Crime Prevention Plan
$   The Oregon Plan for Youth Suicide Prevention
$   Oregon Runaway, Status Offender and Homeless Youth Project




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                       Page 127
                                       GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH

             High-Level Outcome 18. Reduce High School Dropout Rate
                              County and State Data


                                                             High School Dropout Rate
                                                       Jackson County and Oregon, 1992 - 2000
                                             20%




                                             15%
              Dropout Rate




                                             10%




                                               5%




                                               0%
                                                       1992    1993      1994        1995    1996    1997    1998    1999    2000
                                  Jackson              6.7%     6.2%     7.6%        7.8%    7.7%    7.3%    6.4%    7.7%    7.2%
                                  Oregon               5.8%     5.7%     6.6%        7.4%    7.2%    6.7%    6.9%    6.6%    6.3%
                                  Hispanics (Oregon)           14.0%     16.2%       17.9%   16.5%   15.7%   16.4%   14.9%   13.3%

                             Note: GED recipients were not included in the dropout
                             rate from 1997 on. Department of Education, 2001




Trend Analysis

   Dropout is defined as a student who withdraws from school without receiving a high school diploma,
    GED Certificate, or alternative award. 1996-97 is the first year reported under the new dropout
    definition as defined by the 1997 Legislative Assembly. Previously, dropouts included students who had
    obtained a GED Certificate.

   The Department of Education reports that dropout rates for Hispanic, Native American and Black
    students are twice the dropout rate of Asian and White students. At the state level, the Hispanic dropout
    rate for 2000 was 13.3%, down from 14.9% in 1999.

   Jackson County’s dropout rate for the 1999-00 school year was 7.2%, a slight decrease from the previous
    1998-99 school year rate of 7.7%, a four-year high for Jackson County.

   The largest share of minority students in Jackson County is Hispanic. Sixty-eight of all minority
    students in 1999 were Hispanic.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                         Page 128
                                       STUDENT ENROLLMENTS


Total Student Enrollment 1999 - 2000

Total student enrollment in Jackson County for 1999-2000 was 27,795 students. Elementary students K-5
account for 46%, middle school students 6-8 account for 24%, and high school students 9-12 account for
29% of the enrollments. School ranking according to size are: Medford, Central Point, Eagle Point,
Ashland, Phoenix-Talent, Rogue River, Butte Falls, Prospect, and Pinehurst. Medford accounts for 42% of
the enrollments.

Home Schooled Students         2000 - 2001

Based on total student enrollments in 1999-2000 and current enrollments of home schooled students, it can
be estimated that home schooled students account for about two to three percent of total enrollments. Butte
Falls has the largest percentage of home schooled students with six to seven percent. Prospect has around
five percent and most other districts have around three percent home schooled students.



                                              JACKSON COUNTY

                                        Total Student Enrollment
                                  By School District and By Grade Level
                                                1999-2000

         JACKSON                      K-5          6-8         9 - 12     TOTAL             Home-
         COUNTY                                                                            schooled
                                                                                          2000-2001
         Ashland                      1,328        828         1,063        3,219             44
         Butte Falls                   102          65          133          300              22
         Central Point                1,987       1,123        1,274        4,384             98
         Eagle Point                  1,791        964         1,059        3,814             147
         Medford                      5,795       2,767        3,346       11,908             396
         Phoenix-Talent               1,309        648          719         2,676             88
         Pinehurst                    (23) 45 (22)               0            45               0
         Prospect                      68           36           62          166               9
         Rogue River                   543         320          420         1,283             43
         TOTAL                       12,946       6,773        8,076       27,795             847

        Source: Jackson County Education Service District.
        Note: Pinehurst K-8 data split between K-5 and 6-8 for chart purposes only
        Note: Home-schooled information is based on students currently being home-schooled although notification
                of termination of being home schooled is not required by law. 2000-01 data is used because it is more
                reliable than 1999-2000 data.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 129
                                    MINORITY ENROLLMENTS


  In 1999, the largest percentage of minority students in Jackson County were enrolled in the Phoenix-Talent
  (19.5%), Medford (15.9%), and Eagle Point (11.7%) School Districts. In 1999, the largest percentage of
  minority students were Hispanics (2,613 - 68%) compared to American Indians (512 - 13%), Asian/Pacific
  Islanders 474 - 12%), and Blacks (258 - 7%).



                                          JACKSON COUNTY

                           Average Percentage Student Minority Enrollment
                                         By School District
                                            1995 – 1999

                                      1995        1996         1997        1998         1999
         JACKSON COUNTY             10.43%       11.12%       11.7%        12.6%       13.0%
         Ashland                      7.3%        7.4%         7.9%        8.3%         9.1%
         Butte Falls                  2.2%        1.6%         3.0%        2.5%         1.7%
         Central Point                8.6%        9.1%         8.7%        9.0%         8.6%
         Eagle Point                  9.3%       10.0%        10.6%        11.6%       11.7%
         Medford                     12.0%       12.7%        13.4%        14.6%       15.9%
         Phoenix-Talent              15.7%       17.2%        18.6%        19.5%       19.5%
         Pinehurst                    6.5%        2.3%         7.5%            0          0
         Prospect                     7.9%        1.5%         1.5%        1.9%         1.1%
         Rogue River                  6.2%        7.1%         7.3%        8.3%         8.7%
            Source: Oregon Department of Education October Reports 1995-1999




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                        Page 130
                                         JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                     Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth
                                         High-Level Outcome 18: Reduce High School Dropout Rate
                                               Community Support for Educational Success
                                                                   1999

            Agency                             Program                   Number Served   Number Served    Number Served   Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12        Ages 13-18    Families/Adults
 ACCESS                           Junior Achievement/Early                                        3,665
                                  Intervention
 ACCESS                           Junior Achievement/High School                                                    320
 ACCESS                           Junior Achievement/Middle School                                                  150
 Ashland Schools                  Alternative Programs                                                              250
 Boys & Girls Club                Central Point After School Program                35              25
 Boys & Girls Club                Gold Hill After School Program                    25              20
 Boys & Girls Club                Phoenix After School Program                      50              30
 Britt Society                    Educational Programs                             250            1,000             500               300
 Central Point Schools            Alternative Programs                                                              146
 DSNT/Level 7                     Safety Net/DSNT                                                   68              333




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                       Page 131
                           GOAL 3: HEALTHY, THRIVING YOUTH
                          High-Level Outcome 18. Reduce High School Dropout


Introduction:

The Oregon Department of Education produces an annual report of ―Dropout Rates in Oregon High Schools.‖ The
report indicates that when you combine age and sex, a consistent pattern emerges. Boys and girls dropout in about
the same numbers at ages 14 and 15, but in the next three ages, boys dropout in greater numbers than girls do. The
peak ages for boys to dropout are, from highest to lowest, at age 18, 17 and 16. For girls the peak ages are arranged
differently – 17, 16, and 18. The report also points out persistent differences by race and ethnicity. Hispanic
students have the highest dropout rate of any of the five federal racial/ethnic groups. However, this rate has shown
steady decline from its peak in 1994-95. Dropout rates for African American and American Indian/Alaskan Native
are consistently higher that the state average. Dropout rates for White and Asian/Pacific Islander students are
consistently below the state average.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 1997 unemployment rate for high school dropouts was more than
twice that of high school graduates. In addition to facing employment barriers, high school dropouts confront
increased risk for personal and social problems such as criminal behavior, substance abuse and teen pregnancy. The
following analysis attempts to pinpoint current strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and treats that exist to help
reduce dropout rates among Jackson County high school students.

Strengths:

$   The Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitude and Behaviors survey was administered to 2,375 eight
    and tenth graders in seven school districts in the Fall of 1999. Results indicated that Jackson County exceeds
    national averages with 47% of our county’s youth having more than 20 assets. Compared to the national
    sample, more Jackson County youth reported having higher levels of commitment to learning including
    achievement motivation, school engagement, homework, bonding to school and reading for pleasure. Students
    also reported higher levels of support including family support, positive family communication, other adult
    relationships, caring school climate and parent involvement in school.

$   A strong Direct Service Network Team (DSNT) is placed in six school districts of Jackson County. These
    teams consist of representatives of the schools, Juvenile Department, AFS, and other youth serving agencies.
    Youth-at-risk are identified by the DSNT process and the youth/family/referring party are provided with
    information and referral to appropriate programs.

$   Medford School District provides a Homeless Education Coordinator who works to enroll homeless youth and
    reduce barriers for those students.

$   The Safe Schools Compact is a collaborative agreement between the Juvenile Department, Mental Health,
    schools and police to address violence in the schools.

$   A consortium of 12 agencies developed KARE (Kids Acting Responsibly Everywhere), a program to assist
    high risk youth age 7 and over, who are having serious difficulties in school, the family and/or community.
    KARE provides assessment, intensive case management, parent training, mental health and substance abuse
    treatment.

$   There are Alternative Schools serving all seven school districts. These programs include both middle and high
    school ages as well as night school alternatives. Rogue Community College, a strong, growing community
    college in Jackson County, offers younger students opportunities to take classes in the evening and on
    weekends, e.g. General Education Diploma (GED), Driver’s Education.
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 132
$   Two high schools in Medford offer Teen Parent Programs, which include school-based child care. These
    programs allow the teen parent to complete their education and learn parenting skills. One program has a
    work experience case manager who works with teen parents to identify and develop career goals as well as
    provide on-the-job work experiences. This year Crossroads Alternative School in Medford opened a teen
    parent program with child care on site. Eagle Point High School also started a teen parent program.

$   Community Works, Health and Human Services, Mediation Works, On Track, Planned Parenthood, Southern
    Oregon Child Study treatment center (SOCSTC), Southern Oregon Drug Awareness (SODA) and Support
    Enforcement provide school-based training/education and intervention/treatment to help decrease the risk
    factors leading to school dropout, juvenile delinquency, teen pregnancy and substance abuse.

$   SOCSTC runs a Foster Home Program licensed through Services to Children and Families. They currently
    have 17 homes with intensive case management services for youth and their families.

       School based mentoring programs, such as, Lunch Buddies, Special Friends, Caring for Kids, and SMART
        reading programs match community volunteers with students of all ages.

       The Boys and Girls Clubs and Kids Unlimited provide after school programs at school sites in Central
        Point, Gold Hill and Phoenix. They also have clubs in Talent and White City.

       Hope Equestrian Riding Program, Easter Seals Saturday/Summer Respite Programs provide some services
        to ―special needs‖ children and youth.

Weaknesses:

       Lack of funding to meet local school district needs, e.g. overcrowded classrooms, building in need of
        repair.

       Lack of funding to expand successful after-school programs and school based volunteer programs.

       Lack of affordable after school programs countywide.

       Lack of funding/volunteers to expand school community based mentoring programs for at-risk school age
        youth.

       Lack of funding/volunteers to initiate and expand after school/respite programs for ―special needs‖ children
        and youth.

       Lack of tolerance for differences (e.g., sexual orientation, race) within our community and school
        environments. As a result ―different‖ students often become isolated from the mainstream.

       Home-schooled students may not be closely supervised. There is no responsible party for monitoring
        home-schooled students.

       Although school districts employ a number of strategies to reduce high school dropout, there are no
        formalized written plans available.

Opportunities:

       At least three local school districts have started to offer vocational training to students who are not college
        bound.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 133
       The Certificate of Advanced Mastery (CAM), a new credential will be introduced to all schools this fall
        2001; it will take until 2004-05 to get it all in place. The CAM will require students to meet new standards
        in addition to the 10th grade standards they already must meet to earn a Certificate of Initial Mastery (CIM).




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 134
        The CAM will require students to put their skills to use as they explore career paths, which may mean
        spending time in the workplace in job shadow and internships. By allowing students to explore individual
        interests and connect learning to life outside school, they have an opportunity to become more connected to
        school. A greater school connection will help reduce school dropout.

       When the new Juvenile facility is constructed, it will have classrooms available so that incarcerated
        students will not get behind with their schooling.

       Southern Oregon Child Study Treatment Center (SOCSTC) opened a Girls Group Home in August 2000 in
        Central Point for seven girls with serious behavioral issues. They just received approval from the
        Department of Education to set up an alternative education program for those girls.

       The Job Council’s Work Experience Youth Team will now provide case management all year long instead
        of just during the school year.

       Jackson County Boys and Girls Club has merged with Josephine County Boys and Girls Club. This merger
        will help to stabilize our local club and increase county-wide after school program opportunities.

       A teen parent home will be opened in West Medford, Fall 2001 and managed through the Catholic Church.

Threats:

       Budget cuts passed during the last Legislative session may mean loss of current prevention programs at
        both the middle school and high school levels. Programs targeting youth 9-18 lost 30% of their funding.
        Many of these youth come from ―working poor‖ families who tend to fall between the cracks.

       School Districts have implemented cutbacks for counseling/child behavioral specialists who are able to
        provide intervention for at-risk students and help keep them in school.

       Adults/youth working toward their GED diploma in English have until December 2001 to complete the
        testing process or they will have to start again with a new series in January 2002. The Spanish version is
        expected to change also in 2003.

       The state budget reduced funding by 30% for youth programs for youth age 9-18. Many youth case
        management services will be drastically cut as a result.

Cultural Competence (ethnic, gender, special needs):

       (Strengths) La Clinica del Valle is partnering with Phoenix/Talent School District to offer a girls
        mentoring program with SOU’s Nursing Program.

       (Weakness) Lack of sufficient bilingual/bicultural case management services.

       (Weakness) Students do poorly at school because they cannot speak or do not understand the English
        language.

       (Weakness) Lack of specialized programs to deal with Hispanics school success, particularly early dropout
        rate.

       (Opportunity) Other Districts may adopt the dual language program offered in the Talent-Phoenix School
        District.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 135
       (Opportunity) Experiments are being conducted to provide computer-assisted learning in native languages
        as well as using simultaneous translation in the classroom.

       (Opportunity) West Medford Family Center has structured a Hispanic services approach. The Hispanic
        Focus Group is currently looking for and creating new ways to outreach and educate the Hispanic
        population.

       (Threat) Hispanic dropout is high in Jackson County. It is often more difficult to address related risk
        factors with migrant families or families with language and cultural differences.

       (Threats) High school graduation may not be a priority to minority families who need their children to go
        to work to help support family needs.

       (Threats) Gang related activity might discourage youth from participating fully in academic affairs.

Summary:

The changing racial and ethnic composition of Jackson County’s student population will have a profound effect on
public education in the future. As the proportion of minority students increases, the need for careful evaluation of
student achievement will become even more important. Challenges arise in developing school and district capacity
to meet the demand for minority teachers, bilingual teachers and second language instructors. Serving traditionally
underrepresented students will be especially crucial if all students are to achieve the promise of a quality education
with high academic standards and a full range of opportunities to succeed in areas of personal interest and career
choices.

Planning Groups:

       Commission on Children and Families
       School District Boards and Administration meetings
       Medford Teen Parent Advisory Council
       Jackson County Prevention Council
       Juvenile Justice Advisory Council

Existing Plans Integrated into Findings:

Because this planning process is occurring during the summer months, we are unable to get copies of school district
plans.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 136
                                          JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON
                                               CHILDREN & FAMILIES
                                             2001 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN




       GOAL 4:
        GOAL 4:
                                                    High-Level Outcomes

          CARING
      CARING
     COMMUNITY
    COMMUNITIES
                                                    $ Community
                                                      Engagement

                                                    $ Systems Integration




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 136
                                GOAL 4: CARING COMMUNITIES

                 High-Level Outcome 19. Increase Community Engagement
                                 County and State Data

Volunteerism in Jackson County

One indicator of a caring community is the number of people who are willing to donate their time, energy, and
resources to helping others in need. Jackson County relies on many volunteers to do this as illustrated by Retired
Senior Volunteer Program, CASA, United Way, DHR Community Partnership Team, and local hospitals.

Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)

Rogue Valley Manor Community Services Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) provides a variety of
opportunities for the retired and senior population age 55 and above to participate fully in the life of their
community through significant volunteer service.

Volunteers provide service at 105 non-profit organizations or programs throughout Jackson County. In addition
they also directly coordinate programs to: provide transportation and respite care to the elderly or disabled; operate
an information booth at the Rogue Valley International Airport; assist individuals with Medicare; and mentor child
care providers to meet quality standards of child care.

The number of registered volunteers ranges from approximately 790-800 each year. The following numbers reflect
the average number of active volunteers in any given quarter of that particular year; also listed are the number of
service hours recorded for each of the past five years. While the average number of active volunteers per quarter
has increased 5% in five years time, the number of their volunteer hours has increased 25%!


                                      Retired and Senior Volunteer Program
                                                   1995 - 2000
                          Fiscal Year    Average # Active        # Recorded Hours
                                         Volunteers/Quarter

                            1995 - 1996              505                     93,260

                            1996 - 1997              505                    100,486

                            1997 - 1998              536                    101,486

                            1998 - 1999              532                    108,112

                            1999 - 2000              524                    115,077

                            2000- 2001               530                    117,146




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 137
Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)

The mission of CASA is to provide advocacy for abused and neglected children. The Jackson County CASA
program is 10 years old and currently has 72 well-trained volunteers advocating for 219 children. Last year (2000)
CASA volunteers worked 8,445 hours, saving the county a total of $125,000.

United Way

Last year (2000), United Way raised over 1.1 million dollars from business and community donations to help
support 53 local programs. Volunteers contributed 34,509 hours in 2000, an increase compared to 32,866 hours
contributed in 1999. To kick off their annual campaign, United Way
sponsors an annual Day of Caring where volunteers work on community          “We make a living by what we
projects. Day of Caring activities make it possible for nonprofit agencies   get, we make a life by what
such as the American Red Cross and Advocates for the Severely                we give.”
Handicapped to complete projects they typically could not afford.
Thanks to the Day of Caring, White City Boys and Girls Club now has a                    Sir Winston Churchill
new basketball court and the Addictions Recovery Center has a new
fence, horseshoe pit, picnic tables and shrubs. The 5th Annual Day of Caring was held September 15, 2001, just
four days after the September 11th tragedy. Although United Way was concerned about volunteer turnout, they had
250 volunteers who completed five projects that day. They rebuilt the campfire circle and fire pit at Wilderness
Trails; installed gutters and french drains at the MOMS Residential Treatment Program; held a Children’s Fair for
CASA kids; built storage shelves, brochure racks, and a kiddie corral at Consumer Credit Counseling; and did
landscaping, built picnic tables, fence repair and more at Goodwill.

Department of Human Services (DHS) – Community Partnership Team

DHR Volunteer Program provides volunteers for the Lunch Buddy and Big Brother/Big Sister mentor programs,
transportation services for teen parents and SCF foster children, staff support for community organizations and
community development activities. DHR reports 258 volunteers contributed 30,158 hours during 2000.
ChildSpree, a program of DHS Volunteer Program and Mervyn’s Department Store saw $26,000 in community
donations plus $2,600 in discounts going to more than 250 low income, handicapped, or special needs children
during a day in August. Each of the 250 children had a volunteer chaperone from the community spend three hours
helping each child obtain $110 worth of back-to-school clothes. In addition, each child received a $40 backpack
and school supplies from the department store.

Providence Hospital and Rogue Valley Medical Center

Volunteers serving in local hospitals assist staff and patients including infants and children contribute many hours.
Providence Medford Medical Center reports 317 volunteers contributed 53,646 hours during 2000. Rogue Valley
Medical Center reports that 280 volunteers contributed 40,000 hours during 2000.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 138
                                         JACKSON COUNTY PARTNERSHIP SERVICE SURVEY
                                                      Goal 4: Caring Communities
                                         High-Level Outcome 19: Increase Community Engagement
                                                Community Engagement and Collaboration
                                                                  1999

            Agency                               Program                 Number Served   Number Served    Number Served    Number Served
                                                                           Ages 0-8        Ages 9-12        Ages 13-18     Families/Adults
 Community Works                  The Grove - Youth & Family Center                 32              243              153
 Crater Lake Council              Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity                  651             520              816             3,500+
 Boy Scouts of America            Scouting, Venture, Explorer
 Department of Human              Big Brother/Big Sister                             2              19                4
 Services/ Community
 Partnership Team
 Department of Human              Lunch Buddies                                     17             103
 Services/ Community
 Partnership
 Master Gardeners of Jackson      Master Gardener Program                                                                              300
 County
 Search Institute                 40 Developmental Assets Survey                                                   2,375
 Special Olympics of Southern     Special Olympics of Southern                      16              22              154                103
 Oregon                           Oregon (Jackson County)
 Winema Girl Scouts               Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadets               276             442               68                766
 YMCA, Ashland                    After School                                                     120                                 100
 YMCA, Ashland                    Kinder Care                                      100                                                  75
 YMCA, Ashland                    Summer Day Camp                                   60             100                                 135
 YMCA, Medford                    Camps, Youth Sports                                              126               13
 YMCA, Medford                    Child Care                                       261             251
 YMCA, Medford                    Health/Fitness                                    50             150              200              1,500




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                        Page 139
                               GOAL 4: CARING COMMUNITIES

                            High-level Outcome 19. Community Engagement


Introduction:

There are many ways to engage communities from providing meaningful volunteer opportunities for adults and
youth to increasing collaboration among agencies and their partners. The following analysis attempts to list some
of the current strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats revolving around community engagement that may
help us to achieve our goal of providing caring communities for all children and families in Jackson County.

Strengths:

       Volunteers: Jackson County has a large volunteer base of dedicated people who volunteer for nonprofit,
        church, and youth activities. In 2000-2001, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) reported 530
        active volunteers contributed 117,146 hours. While the number of volunteers has increased 5% in five years
        time, the number of volunteer hours has increased 25%. We have a very proactive United Way that
        focuses on community service and planning as well as funding. United Way sponsored their fourth annual
        Day of Caring (1999-00) where 350 volunteers worked on five community projects. When the Day of
        Caring started in 1997, 200 volunteered worked on five projects.

       School Connections: Many more citizens are becoming connected to the schools through school based
        volunteer programs such as Lunch Buddies and the SMART reading program. Parent Teacher Associations
        are becoming more vital. Central Point citizens recently approved a school bond in support of the schools.

       Active Citizen/Neighborhood Associations: The White City Civic Improvement Association, West
        Medford Community Coalition, and Ashland’s Building A Resilient Community (BARC) groups all
        represent active citizen involvement in their neighborhoods.

       Community Justice System: Jackson County has a Community Justice System which increasingly
        integrates law enforcement, corrections and the court system into the communities they serve. In Fall 1999,
        a new commission was formed in Jackson County, SALT (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) as a
        result of the Jackson County Sheriff’s Department, AARP, and ACCESS, Inc. coming together with a
        vision to better serve the seniors in Jackson County.

       Jackson County Healthy Communities - Healthy Youth Asset Development Initiative: As a result of a
        community training on asset development in Spring 1999, many community groups have become more
        involved with each other to build assets in youth. The Commission on Children and Families awarded 21
        mini-grants of $150 each to groups such as Big Brothers/Big Sisters who developed unique asset building
        projects. Mentors and youth involved in the Big Brother/Big Sister program used the funds to hold a
        holiday celebration party in a retirement center where youth, their Big Brother/Sister, and seniors made
        crafts and enjoyed getting to know each other. The celebration was so successful, they are now planning
        this as an annual event.

       Youth Involvement: Teens are involved in many community service projects throughout the county. In
        Butte Falls, a local citizen donated scholarship money to inspire youth who completed community projects.
        The local cemetery was renovated, a Little League baseball field repaired, and a Teen Center started.
        Nearly 400 youth have become involved in the Healthy Communities, Healthy Youth Asset Building
        projects. There are four teen theater groups who perform county wide for many community forums and
        events free of charge. In Central Point, two student actors donated the profits from their school play to the
        Central Point Asset Project. Senior projects encourage senior high school students to become more
        involved in their communities as they complete service projects. Through the Juvenile Department’s
        restitution program, young people are learning work skills and giving back to their community through
        work projects throughout the county.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 140
       Service Clubs: Many active service groups and women’s organizations contribute time, energy, and
        funding for projects benefiting children and families. The Association of American University Women
        recently formed a community group partnership with the West Medford Family Center Integration site
        specifically to help develop assets in our youth. Every year, Soroptomists help with the annual
        Parent/Daughter Fair sponsored by the Reduce Adolescent Pregnancy Project. Rotary, Kiwanis, and Lions
        Clubs have all contributed resources to local school and community projects.

       Media: Public access television brings a variety of policy group meetings to the public.

       Community Input: The Commission on Children and Families, United Way, and Rogue Valley Medical
        Center Foundation (RVMC) have all designated funds for community projects with the help of many
        people and organizations. RVMC allocated funding in 1999 for key areas of concern identified through
        community meetings: violence/abuse; smoking/drug abuse; teen pregnancy/sex education; and
        poverty/basic needs. United Way conducted a county-wide needs assessment in 1996 where residents
        identified the county’s top three most serious problems to be
        drugs, growth, and unemployment/wages. Community leaders identified delinquency, youth
        development, and child abuse as the top three problems in our county. United Way has provided
        a forum for providers to discuss available programs, develop common goals, and measure their
        success.

       The Commission on Children and Families Board represents a variety of interests and service groups.
        Finding ways to engage more community members is a high priority with the Commission. The
        Commission allocates resources specifically for community projects and concerns:
            o Continuing sponsorship of Jackson County Healthy Communities - Healthy Youth Asset
                Development Initiative involving community wide training, asset survey, and mini-grants to build
                assets.

            o    Sponsorship of Legislative forums and community advocacy for pro youth policies

            o    SB555 planning which engages multiple groups in the community

            o    Beginning outreach to Hispanic community. Sponsored a forum on Hispanic issues and how to
                 engage Hispanics as effective board members. Board training and mentoring is now offered for
                 interested Hispanics through the Rogue Valley Council of Governments. There is also a CCF staff
                 liaison to the Hispanic Interagency Coalition.

       Jackson County is recognized for effective collaboration among both formal and informal systems. This
        collaboration has helped to stretch limited resources of both funding and people. Identifying goals, sharing
        information and resources, and engaging in ongoing communication have helped break down barriers and
        establish a common purpose for many groups in our county. Collaboration is becoming the community
        norm.

Weaknesses:

       Time issues with working parents.

       Many older people have moved here for retirement and have little community commitment, particularly for
        children.

       There is a lack of public transportation particularly for outlying rural areas such as Prospect and Butte
        Falls.

Opportunities:

       In the past it has been difficult to recruit Hispanics to community policy groups including the Commission
        on Children and Families Board. Language barriers, fractionalization of the Hispanic community, lack of
        available time of Hispanic adult population, all have contributed to the lack of Hispanic involvement.


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 141
         However, there is a growing population of Hispanics in professional capacities who are active members of
         emerging Hispanic groups. This provides opportunity to establish meaningful relationships and recruit
         them to various boards.

        (Strength/Opportunity) There are now five Family Service Integration Centers (Ashland, Central Point,
         West Medford, White City, and Rogue River) in our county which bring community-based integration to
         high-risk families. Community partners based at the various sites include: Adult and Family Services;
         Health & Human Services; Job Council; Employment Department; Corrections; On Track; Services to
         Children and Families. Service Integration Team meetings encourage resource sharing and opportunities
         for citizen involvement.

        More schools are incorporating community service as part of their graduation requirements. Southern
         Oregon University offers practicum experiences for students to work in local community placement sites.
         AmeriCorps and VISTA volunteers offer their involvement for minimal match requirements on the part of
         agencies.

Threats:

        Background checks and fingerprinting are required for volunteers who work with children. Time
         consuming and expensive multiple checks are needed if the volunteer works for more than one agency.
         Information sharing through one central location for record checks and fingerprinting is needed.

        Community norm of minding your own business and noninvolvement.

        Our changing community environment often discourages engagement. Houses are built closer together and
         become ―walled-off enclaves‖. There is a loss of natural community systems that could help create
         togetherness such as block parties.

Success Stories:

There are many success stories that illustrate the benefits of collaboration and volunteerism in Jackson County:

I.     West Medford Community Coalition is a group of West Medford citizens, school, government, and nonprofit
       representatives working together to improve conditions for West Medford, a high poverty neighborhood.
       Through neighborhood clean-ups, home buying programs, and community dinners, West Medford is
       becoming a cleaner, safer, and more stable community. One effort feeds into the next. The West Medford
       Family Center - Integration site, recently located in this area to provide neighborhood based social and health
       services. In Spring 1999, these two groups collaborated with the Commission on Children and Families to
       co-sponsor a community wide conference on Healthy Communities - Healthy Youth Asset Development.
       This successful event kicked off a county-wide initiative that now involves many groups and individuals
       throughout the county.

II.    The Family Addiction Community Team (FACT) provides yet another example of a community coalition
       coming together for a common purpose - to fight substance abuse. They have identified a key element in any
       effort, ―Solutions to substance abuse are part of a long-term process, not a short term event‖. FACT brings
       together diverse groups, personalities, and agendas, developing consensual projects and goals, and producing
       positive benefits for the community. Effective strategies must be designed to meet the needs and interests of
       designated target population.

III.    The Commission on Children and Families kicked off a Healthy Communities – Healthy Youth Asset
       Development Initiative in Jackson County, March 1999 with a county-wide conference, ―We Give Our Hearts
       to Kids.‖ The community response was extremely positive with agencies and community organizations
       stepping forward to contribute additional funding and volunteers. With their help we were able to offer $150
       mini-grants and sponsor additional trainings. Mini-grant projects included : 1) a summer reading academy at
       Jackson Elementary School targeting pre-kindergarten through first grade English and Spanish speaking




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 142
     students; 2) a new mother’s playgroup with emphasis on first-time West Medford moms; 3) incentives and a
     caring adult to encourage at-risk students at Talent Middle School to improve poor attendance. American
     Association of University Women became excited about asset building and formed an AAUW Community
     Team and partnered with the West Medford Family Center to help with projects that build assets in children
     and families.

Our community also conducted a survey to find out how many assets our kids have. Using the Search Institute’s
Assets Survey, we surveyed 2,375 eighth and tenth grade students from six school districts in Fall 1999. Results
showed that Jackson County is indeed a good place to raise kids! Jackson County results exceed the national
averages with 47 percent of our county’s youth having more than 20 assets. Our Commission held another
community conference in Spring 2000 as well as a series of youth focus groups to gather community input on next
steps. Based on that response, the Commission has supported community involvement in helping to build specific
assets identified as important for our county:

               Family Support
               Community Values Youth
               Bonding to School
               Cultural Competence

The Commission is currently following the progress on 15 community grants and 11 youth grants. Most exciting
was the youth response to becoming involved in building assets in other youth. Nearly 400 youth have become
involved in building assets through Commission sponsored activities. It was youth who planned and facilitated
training for kids to learn about assets and how to write grants. Eleven grants were awarded in March 2001
including: 1) a backpacking club at Scenic middle school; 2) high school students teaching German to elementary
kids; 3) high school students educating their peers about grief through classroom presentations and sharing
personal experiences; 4) Hanby Middle School Water Fountain Memorial Project; 5) ―Expression of Youth‖ Asset
Wall in a local park; 6) ―Welcome to McLoughlin‖ Middle School Project; 7) Community Fun Swim Meet;
8) Community Appreciation Day at Talent Middle School; 9) Cultural Diversity Fair; 10) getting a SMART
program started at Butte Falls Elementary School; and 11) Teens caring for a Community Park.

Summary:

Jackson County has many opportunities for involvement as the above list demonstrates. Lack of time,
transportation, and energy can become barriers for many people. The Commission on Children and Families and
other community groups can help increase community involvement by understanding and implementing effective
motivational strategies. ―Many people want to help but don’t know how or haven’t found the right way for them.‖
The State can help by assisting in changing policies and protocols that make it difficult or expensive for volunteers
to become involved, e.g., one centralized background check.

Planning Groups:

       Commission on Children and Families
       Managers of Volunteers in Action (MOVIA)
       Community Services Consortium
       Jackson County Integration Team
       Hispanic Interagency Committee
       West Medford Family Center – Hispanic Focus Group
       West Medford Community Coalition
       White City Improvement Association
       Family Addiction Community Team
       Rogue Valley Civic League




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 143
                                GOAL 4: CARING COMMUNITIES

                     High-level Outcome 20. Increase Systems Integration
                                    County and State Data

                                    FAMILY SELF SUFFICIENCY SCALE
                                             Survey Results

Trend Analysis

Over a period of approximately two and a half years (1998-2000), the Family Self Sufficiency Scale was used to
measure improvement over time with 304 clients receiving services through four integration sites in Jackson
County. Each integration site used focus groups to target specific populations.

Data Summary

       Range of Scores
        The Family Self Sufficiency Scale contains 17 items measuring progress towards increased self-sufficiency
        on a scale of 0 to 4. A total of 68 points are possible. Pre test scores ranged from 1 to 55. Post test scores
        ranged from 4 to 62. The average pre test score was 27 and average post test score was 35 points.

       Time with Clients
        Pre and post assessments were completed over a period of 31 months (12/29/97 to 7/26/2000). The average
        amount of time spent with a client was 9.23 months

       Improvement over Time
        The average improvement for all clients over time was 7.52 points. The maximum change was an increase
        of 29 points and the minimum change was a decrease of 21 points.


                                        Jackson County Integration Sites
                                          Family Self-Sufficiency Scale
                                                12/29/97 – 7/26/00
                                       Integration Site              Average
                                                                   Improvement
                               Ashland Family Center                    6.52
                               Central Point Family Center              8.40
                               Rogue Family Center                      7.39
                               West Medford Family Center               7.89
                               Overall                                  7.52




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 144
                                        JACKSON COUNTY INTEGRATION SITES
                                              Family Self-Sufficiency Scale
                                                   12/29/97 – 7/26/00

Integration Site/Focus Group               Number of Clients                     Improvement
                                                                       Average   Maximum       Minimum

Ashland Family Center                                                                            1.00
      0-4 years                                       21                 12.67     27.00         0.00
      Secondary                                       15                  3.33      8.00        -1.00
      Welfare to Work                                 20                  2.45      9.00
                                                                                                -1.00
Total Site                                            56                  6.52     27.00

Central Point Family Center
       0-4 years                                      18                  7.11     15.00         0.00
       Elementary                                     19                  9.32     19.00         0.00
       Secondary                                       8                  9.13     21.00         2.00

Total Site                                            45                  8.40     21.00         0.00

Rogue Family Center
      0-4 years                                      115                  7.39     29.00        -12.00

Total Site                                           115                  7.39     29.00        -12.00

West Medford Family Center
      0-4 years                                       36                  5.86     25.00        -14.00
      Secondary                                        4                 14.50     27.00          5.00
      Transitional Families                           11                  2.82      8.00        -21.00
      Welfare to Work                                 37                 10.65     26.00         -4.00

Total Site                                            88                  7.89     27.00        -21.00
Overall                                              304                  7.52     29.00        -21.00

Note:        Total site averages represent weighted responses

Analysis by: Sarah Heath, CCF Project/Services Coordinator – September 2000




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 145
                                GOAL 4: CARING COMMUNITIES

                                 Outcome 20. Increase System Integration


Introduction:

Jackson County is one four counties selected by the Oregon Department of Human Services as a prototype county
for service integration. Jackson County has a countywide, policy-level integration planning team whose mission
over the past eight years has been to build, develop, and maintain effective service integration. There are five
community service integration sites in these areas of the county: West Medford, the Upper Rogue (White City),
Ashland, Central Point, and Rogue River. Each site includes a variety of co-located providers, an integrated
staffing system, and multiple local community ties. In addition to the integrated sites, the planning team supports
and encourages effective collaboration and integration in all program areas impacting human services.

Strengths:

$   Jackson County has a strong history of effective community collaboration and integration. It is the accepted
    norm – the way we do business in Jackson County.

$   There are a variety of integration models and partners across a wide variety of service areas including social
    services, health, corrections, employment, job training, and the courts.

$   There are a variety of partners from all spheres: nonprofits, county agencies, state agencies, and private
    providers who have history, experience, and success with integration projects.

$   Integration partnership has been willing to spend the time and resources to be inclusive, and to find ways to
    include nonprofit providers, rural areas, and other partners who traditionally lack access because of resource
    barriers.

Weaknesses:

$   Some integration efforts and systems lack sufficient infrastructure (coordination, receptionist time, family
    advocate time).

$   Communication, data management, and integrated staffing is hampered by non-compatible technology and
    data systems at all levels (one state department to another, state to local, local to local).

$   The gains in effective integration show up in long-term outcomes and change. Effective integration takes
    more staff time up front. Neither state nor local organizations can dependably make that commitment.

$   There are a significant number of multi-risk families and children who do not meet eligibility standards for
    state-directed staffing and case management services. Community integration sites are faced with significant
    numbers of clients in need whom they cannot serve.

$   Each organization is directed by specific eligibility standards. The whole picture leaves many people
    uncovered and under-covered.

$   Integration efforts struggle to find resources and time to maintain sufficient community presence and outreach
    to effectively engage the community.
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 146
Opportunities:

$   The Children’s Plan offers the potential to have a better-integrated service system for young families.

$   Co-location of key organizational partners offers opportunities to consolidate facilities, services, cost-centers,
    and increase client accessibility.

$   The Department of Human Service reorganization offers opportunities to maximize state DHS resources which
    support integration.

$   The development of the School Medicaid Administration system in the county will increase school resources
    to support integration-focused human service activities.

$   The SB555 comprehensive planning can support and maintain integrated planning and data collection.

$   The addition of several new private foundations focused on human services in Jackson County increases the
    available resource base, particularly for start-up projects for nonprofits.

$   Increase in Oregon Health Plan eligibility will allow more clients to access physical, mental health, and
    substance abuse treatment.

$   The increased focus on outcomes by state and local policy planners may result in improvements in program
    effectiveness and focus.

$   The ―No Wrong Door‖ training developed by the integration partners may improve client access of services in
    all partnerships including human services, health education, and corrections.

Threats:

$   Federal and state administrative rules that are obstacles to effective service.

$   Shifting priorities at all policy levels for resources which obstruct continuity and effective long-range
    planning.

$   Funding and staff reductions that threaten the existing service system.

$   The rising cost of health care.

$   The focus on immediate outcome results which do not allow sufficient time to even establish accurate existing
    baseline data.

$   The existing data systems are often incompatible, inefficient, and non-productive. It is clear that some of the
    data presently collected is never used by anyone for anything.

$   The lack of capacity to let go of existing systems to develop improved and integrated systems.

$   The challenge of rolling out service integration to 36 counties without losing gains in existing systems or
    requiring counties to adopt models which will not work for them locally.

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                    Page 147
$   The lack of resources to engage nonprofits as full partners in the service system.




Cultural Competency (ethnic, gender, special needs):

$   (Strength) The creation of integration focus groups centered on culturally competent services and integrated
    service to the Hispanic community.

$   (Strength) Increasing numbers of bicultural, bilingual professional and front-line staff.

$   (Strength) Increase in translated program information, forms, and educational material.

$   (Weakness) The under-representation of minorities in integration policy planning efforts.

$   (Weakness) Lack of client representation in planning and program development.

$   (Opportunity) Creation of new community planning and network teams focused on minority populations.

$   (Threat) Lack of resources for non-legal residents.

Summary:

Jackson County has established a strong service integration system. The challenge will be to maintain and extend
the system in the face of organizational challenges, public policy changes, and shifting priorities for resources. A
second challenge will be to continue to focus integration work around what will best help children and adults in the
system rather than on organizational needs or maintenance of existing or emerging bureaucratic systems.

Planning Groups:

$   Jackson County Integration Policy Team
$   Jackson County Site Integration Planning Team
$   Hispanic Interagency Council

Existing Plans:

$   Jackson County Integration Plan
$   Community Partnership Team Plan
$   Early Childhood Comprehensive Plan




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 148
                                            JACKSON COUNTY COMMISSION ON
                                                 CHILDREN & FAMILIES
                                               2001 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN




                                                       Priorities & Strategies


                                                      $ Child Abuse and
                                                        Neglect

                                                      $ Teen Alcohol,
                                                        Tobacco and Other
                                                        Drug Use

                                                      $ Juvenile Crime

                                                      $ System Integration




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 149
                                    HIGH-LEVEL OUTCOME
                               REDUCE CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT




  PRIORITY:         Increase capacity of county-wide systems to provide comprehensive,
                    integrated services to address multiple issues of families at risk of child
                    abuse and neglect.


  STRATEGY:         Strengthen connections between the Community Safety Net system and the
                    constellations of programs and schools that support its mission through:
                    (The Community Safety Net mission is to create seamless community
                    resources/supports for at-risk families and children).
                        a.    Identifying the connections
                        b.    Engaging children and families
                        c.    Coordinating the case management, advocacy, and follow-up to
                              ensure effectiveness.




  PRIORITY:         Increase community awareness, support, and prevention capacities to
                    reduce child abuse and neglect.


  STRATEGY:         Develop and provide professional training focused on child abuse and neglect
                    problems related to mental health, drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence,
                    and parents with developmental delays. Primary focus will be on prenatal to
                    age five.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001              Page 150
SELECTION PROCESS FOR HIGH PRIORITY OUTCOMES:

The Early Childhood Partnership Team (ECPT) was created in 1999 to focus on children ages 0-8 years and their
families. The ECPT is a collaborative membership that includes representatives of major early childhood service
delivery systems and programs that address the needs of young children and families. The ECPT has assumed
leadership responsibilities in planning approaches and strategies to reduce child abuse and neglect, one of the high
priority outcomes for Jackson County.

An extensive and thorough process was used to select the high priority outcome and plan for its accomplishment.
The process included review, analysis, and discussion of: 1) Phase I planning; 2) existing services related to child
abuse and neglect; 3) community strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; 4) data on founded cases of
abuse including information on children removed from the home; 5) data on unfounded cases of child abuse and
neglect; and 6) community input (please refer to Community Involvement section).

In selecting priorities and strategies related to the reduction of child abuse and neglect, the ECPT considered best
practices related to Clara Pratt’s data regarding child maltreatment issues and effective strategies. Additionally,
Lizbeth Schorr’s research on successful programs (Common Purpose, 1997), and State Workgroup Quality
Assurance Standards were also considered by the Early Childhood Partnership Team as they developed priorities
and strategies for 2001-2003.


RATIONALE FOR PRIORITIES & STRATEGIES:

The rationale for selecting the high priority outcome of reducing child maltreatment was built on local data and
relevant research. The following key points support the selection.

$     Families at risk of child abuse and neglect usually have multiple issues of drug/alcohol abuse, poor parenting
      skills, domestic violence, and mental illness (Services to Children and Families data). Clara Pratt’s research
      indicates that ―secondary prevention focus‖ is a critical component - ―targeted, intensive, family support
      services to strengthen families at higher levels of risk‖. Families respond best to case management
      approaches. A combination of therapeutic care, including individual, family and group services is most
      successful.

$     Lizbeth Schorr’s research demonstrates that successful programs see children in the context of their families,
      have a long-term preventive orientation, are well-managed by competent, committed individuals, and
      encourage strong relationships based on mutual trust and respect.

$     State Workgroup Quality Assurance Standards include effective partnerships, family-centered practices and
      results-based accountability as crucial components to effective service systems.


Listed below are the two strategies that have been developed by the Early Childhood Partnership Team.
The rationale for their selection follows each strategy.

Strategy:       Strengthen connections between the Community Safety Net system and the constellations of
                programs and schools that support it’s mission through:
                       a. identifying the connections;
                       b. engaging children and families; and
                       c. coordinating the case management, advocacy, and follow-up to ensure
                           effectiveness.

Rationale: This strategy builds on existing strengths. Our county already has an existing Community Safety Net
system to connect at-risk families and children with community resources. A successful strategy for managing this
system has been identifying specific connections within agencies, e.g., Head Start has a designated individual as a
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 151
contact person who follows up on Community Safety Net referrals. However, more identified connections are
needed. Personal relationships help to successfully engage children and families, e.g., Central Point School District
has a Family Advocate to reach out to families and bridge them to services. West Medford Family Center -
Integration site uses a Family Focus Group for ages 0-4 to ―coordinate case management, advocacy and follow-up
to ensure that plans are carried out.

Strategy:       Develop and provide professional training focused on child abuse and neglect problems
                related to mental health, drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence, and parents with
                developmental delays. Primary focus will be on prenatal to age five.

Rationale: Local data from Services to Children and Families indicates that the highest incidence of child
removal is age 0-5 years. There is a high incidence of ―chronic neglect‖ as family factor of removal - a critical
issue for infants who are at the highest level of vulnerability. Clara Pratt’s research suggests that effective
strategies address multiple family factors related to child abuse/neglect. This particular strategy will increase the
skill level of community professionals, home visitors, and family advocates in understanding these multiple issues
and effective strategies in responding to them. The medical community has already requested continuing education
training specific to child abuse and neglect. Jackson County has already had success in providing professional
training. In 1999, several agencies pooled their limited training dollars to provide the Supported Parenting
Conference to address a shared training need.


KEY POINTS RELATING TO ALL STRATEGIES:

$     Both priorities will address a continuum of services to reduce child abuse and neglect for children ages
      prenatal – 18 years.

$     Strategies will incorporate appropriate cultural competency issues relating to gender, ethnicity, and special
      needs.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 152
                              HIGH-LEVEL OUTCOME
               REDUCE TEEN ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE




PRIORITY:         Increase prevention programs for school-age children.


STRATEGY:         Expand structured mentoring programs for all youth during and after school
                  hours. Effective mentoring programs may provide:
                       Peer education mentoring
                       Prevention activities during key transition times in students’ lives
                       Curriculum-based mentoring programs
                       Targeted intervention for at-risk youth
                       School and community mentoring partnerships



PRIORITY:         Increase family involvement in prevention programming.


STRATEGY:         Provide opportunities for parent involvement in school, after-school, and
                  community-based prevention activities. Identify and recruit at-risk families.



PRIORITY:         Promote community-based prevention programming.


STRATEGY:         Change community norms around youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001               Page 153
SELECTION PROCESS FOR HIGH PRIORITY OUTCOMES:

The Jackson County Prevention Council was created in 1998 to integrate primary prevention planning activities to
reduce youth substance abuse, teen pregnancy, school dropout and juvenile delinquency in Jackson County. The
Council allows for better coordination, support and advocacy for primary prevention planning. Membership
includes representatives from schools, law enforcement, non-profit agencies, community coalitions, after-school
organizations, integration sites, health clinics, and local government agencies. The Prevention Council is
responsible for feeding primary prevention information to various groups interested in such information including
the Local Alcohol Drug Planning Committee (LADPC) and the Commission on Children and Families.
The Prevention Council has assumed leadership responsibilities in planning approaches and strategies to decrease
teen alcohol, tobacco and other drug use, one of the high priority outcomes for Jackson County. An extensive and
thorough process was used to select the high priority outcome and plan for its accomplishment. The process
included review, analysis, and discussion of: 1) Phase I planning; 2) existing services related to prevention of teen
alcohol, tobacco, and drug use; 3) community strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; 4) survey data on
teen ATOD use; and 5) community input (please refer to Community Involvement section). Final priorities and
strategies were reviewed by the Local Alcohol Drug Planning Committee (LADPC) and the Commission on
Children and Families.


RATIONALE FOR PRIORITIES & STRATEGIES:

The rationale for selecting the high priority outcomes of reducing teen alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use was
built on local data and relevant research. The following key points support the selection.

       Clara Pratt - Integrated Approaches:
        Best practices are those strategies, activities or approaches that have been shown through research and
        evaluation to be effective at preventing and/or delaying youth alcohol, tobacco, or other drug use. No
        single best practice will be successful at preventing youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use. To be as
        comprehensive as possible, best practices addressing prevention strategies in all areas of our community
        were implemented where relevant.
                1. Supportive communities and neighborhoods
                2. Family support and supervision
                3. Positive peer relationships and social competence
                4. Educational progress and success
                5. Personal vulnerability and life difficulties

       Oregon’s Student Drug Use Survey:
        The survey is based on the Risk and Protective Factor framework developed by Hawkins and Catalano at
        the University of Washington. This framework examines factors in four domains (community, family,
        school, and individual/peer) that are associated with risk or protection from alcohol and other drug use.
        Results of the survey demonstrate the effectiveness of focusing prevention on younger youth.

        Compared to 8th and 11th graders, 6th graders who have used alcohol or other drugs in the past month are
        significantly more likely to engage in violent, criminal, and other risky behaviors and to engage in
        behaviors that lead to poor school performance and grades. On the other hand 6th graders who live in
        families with clear family rules about alcohol and other drugs are significantly less likely to have used in
        the past month. Sixth graders who participate in prevention programs used alcohol, tobacco, and other
        drugs less frequently than 6th graders who did not participate in prevention programs.

       Search Institute - 40 Developmental Assets:
        The Search Institute has identified 40 developmental assets that help young people grow up to be healthy,
        principled, and caring adults. The more assets young people have, the more likely they are to be engaged
        in positive behaviors, such as volunteering or doing well in school. In addition, they are less likely to be
        engaged in at-risks behaviors such as alcohol and drug use, sexual activity, and violence. In Fall 1999, the

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 154
        Search Institute Asset Survey was conducted with 2,375 students in six school districts. Student focus
        groups were also held. As a result, our local Commission decided to focus funding on projects to help
        build four developmental assets:
                1. Family Support
                2. Community Values Youth
                3. Bonding to School
                4. Cultural Competence


Listed below are the three strategies that have been developed by the Jackson County Prevention Council in
partnership with the Local Alcohol Drug Planning Committee and the Commission on Children and Families. The
rationale for their selection follows each strategy.

Strategy:       Expand structured mentoring programs for all youth during and after school hours.
                Effective mentoring programs may provide:
                        a. peer education mentoring
                        b. prevention activities during key transition times in students lives
                        c. curriculum based mentoring programs
                        d. targeted intervention for at-risk youth
                        e. school and community mentoring partnerships

Rationale: Mentoring is a relationship over a prolonged period of time between two or more people where an
older, caring, more experienced individual provides support to the younger person as they go through life.
Available research supports the efficacy of mentoring as a strategy to reduce the likelihood of drug use (Sherman et
al. 1997 in Mentoring Initiatives: An Overview of Youth Mentoring, CSAP, April, 2000). An 18-month study of
Big Brother/Big Sisters involving a sample of 10-16 year-old youth in eight cities demonstrated that mentored
youth were less likely to use drugs and alcohol, less likely to skip classes, and had improved grades and family
relations (Public/private Ventures, 1995).

Mentoring programs are versatile and relatively low in cost to implement when compared to other school
improvement efforts. They are being designed for students of all ages and from all segments of the student
population. Although mentoring is often considered to be primarily for students with low grades and limited
opportunities, it is useful for gifted and mainstream students as well, who might otherwise become involved in teen
alcohol and drug use. Mentoring can be used to help students develop job and communication skills, practice
decision-making, and learn more about subjects such as art, science, history, math, and technology (NW Regional
Educational Laboratory, 2001 Website).

Special attention will be focused on mentoring programs geared to younger and more vulnerable students in
elementary and middle schools. Survey data and best practices tell us that early prevention has a better chance to
delay use (Student Use Survey, Clara Pratt, 1997). Community input from our adult and youth refocus groups
(2001) also support intervention at younger ages.

Strategy:       Provide opportunities for parent involvement in school, after school, and community based
                prevention activities. Identify and recruit at-risk families.

Rationale: Best Practices inform us that family-focused prevention efforts have a greater impact than strategies
that focus on parents only or children only (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2001). For the last three years,
Jackson County has been focusing on increasing family involvement and communication as well as reducing family
conflict through a variety of parent education programs. Most of the parent mini-grants in 2001 have been
successful. Both Southern Oregon Drug Awareness (SODA) and On Track, Inc have been implementing research
based parent education programs funded through the Parent Initiative grants from the state. Parent education and
outreach with the Hispanic community has been particularly successful and has involved both parents and children.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 155
Strategy:       Change community norms around youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.

Rationale: Community programs are more effective when they are accompanied by school and family
interventions (NIDA, 2001). We already have strong community coalitions in our county including SODA,
Tobacco-Free Jackson County, Family Addiction Community Team (FACT), Reduce Adolescent Pregnancy
Project (RAPP), and Healthy Communities - Healthy Youth, Jackson County Asset Development Initiative. We
also have organized minority groups who have interest in alcohol, tobacco, and other drug prevention, e.g. La
Clinica del Valle Tobacco Prevention Task Force, West Medford Hispanic Focus Group, Hispanic parent support
groups/PTA and the Hispanic Interagency Council.

SODA has taken a leadership role in the Community Norms Group established several years ago. A Community
Readiness Survey was conducted in 2001 through the Community Norms Group; survey results indicate
community support for engaging in activities to change community norms related to underage drinking. The focus
of this strategy will be to reduce 8th grade drinking by changing adult perceptions that support underage drinking.


KEY POINTS RELATING TO ALL STRATEGIES:

$   Strategies include universal, selective, and indicated prevention activities (Institute of Medicine Model).

$   Programs will be research based, culturally competent, gender specific, and demonstrate knowledge of positive
    youth development principles (Clara Pratt, 1997).

$   Strategies will address transportation and child care issues as key components of program success.

$   School and community partners will collaborate and/or coordinate their prevention efforts whenever possible.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 156
                                       HIGH LEVEL OUTCOME
                                    JUVENILE CRIME PREVENTION




PRIORITY:           Service to high-risk pre-offenders ages 7-17.


STRATEGY:           Increase best practice case management service which bonds with identified
                    youth and family, develops an individual plan around risk and protective
                    factors, and works with youth and families to implement the plan.


STRATEGY:           Increase probation officer time to do risk assessment and provide case
                    management services to identified high-risk offenders and pre-offenders.



PRIORITY:           Service to high-risk first offenders.


STRATEGY:           Maintain and increase service system to provide best practice community
                    services identified through individual risk assessment to high-risk first
                    offenders and pre-offenders.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001               Page 157
PLANNING PROCESS

The Jackson County Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) is the primary planning committee for the
juvenile crime outcome. JJAC is a working subcommittee for both the Commission on Children and Families
(CCF) and the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC). The CCF Director and the Community Justice
Director co-chair the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee. JJAC has been planning around the juvenile outcome
since the juvenile crime prevention initiative concept was first developed in the state over four years ago. The plan
was implemented in midyear 2001. JJAC is committed to implementing the priorities and strategies for a two-year
period, examining outcomes achieved over those two years and revising the plan as appropriate the following year.
This planning timeline has had to be extended an additional year because the initial program evaluation forms
developed by the state were discontinued and the new forms will not be available for utilization until winter of
2002. Our plan is to use those forms through winter of 2003 and review and make appropriate changes by the
summer of 2003.


RATIONALE FOR PRIORITIES & STRATEGIES

Strategy:       Increase best practice case management service which bonds with identified youth and
                family, develop an individual plan around risk and protective factors, and work with youth
                and families to implement plan.

Strategy:       Increase probation officer time to do risk assessment and provide case management services
                to identified high-risk offenders and pre-offenders.

Rationale: The Oregon Juvenile Crime Prevention Assessment Instrument was developed around research-proven
risk and protective factors contributing to juvenile delinquency. Youth identified for services show risk factors in
at least three of the five areas surveyed. Case management will be focused on reducing risks and increasing
protective factors. The new assessment to begin winter of 2002 focuses on individual success in these areas.

Strategy:       Maintain and increase service system to provide best practice community services identified
                through individual risk assessment to high-risk first offenders and pre-offenders.

Rationale: Successful resolution of some of the risk and protective factors with youth require professional services
targeted to individual needs: mental health therapy, substance abuse treatment, sex offender treatment, youth
shelter, family therapy, and parent education. Treatment needs to be individualized based on the needs of youth
and their families and each treatment utilized needs to operate under best practice standards for their service
element.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 158
                                                JUVENILE CRIME PREVENTION LOGIC MODEL


     Priority and Related                 Strategy                         Outputs                    Intermediate Outcomes          Related High-Level
    Higher Level Outcome                                                                                                                  Outcome

    Lower Juvenile Crime          Assessment and case             Community agencies               Reduce risks and             Reduce school dropout.
     Rate.                          management with                  assess and case manage            increase protective
                                    identified high-risk             150 pre-offenders ages            factors as measured by       Reduce youth substance
    Lower Juvenile                pre-offenders.                  7-17, priority to upper           the Oregon Juvenile           abuse.
     Recidivism.                                                     elementary and middle             Crime Prevention
                                   Reduce antisocial                school.                           Assessment.
    Maintain OYA Bed               behavior as measured by
     Capacity.                      post survey of youth                                              Reduce antisocial
                                    referrers.                                                         behavior as measured by
                                                                                                       post survey of youth
                                                                                                       referrers.



    Lower Juvenile Crime          Assessment and case             Juvenile probation assess        Reduce risks and             Reduce school dropout.
     Rate.                          management with                  and case manage 75                increase protective
                                    identified high-risk first       high-risk first offenders.        factors as measured by       Reduce youth substance
    Lower Juvenile                 offenders.                                                         the Oregon Juvenile           abuse.
     Recidivism.                                                                                       Crime Prevention
                                   Reduce antisocial                                                  Assessment.
    Maintain OYA Bed               behavior as measured by
     Capacity.                      post survey of youth
                                    referrers.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                         Page 159
     Priority and Related                 Strategy                        Outputs                    Intermediate Outcomes          Related High-Level
    Higher Level Outcome                                                                                                                 Outcome

    Lower Juvenile Crime          Maintain and increase          60 pre-offenders and first       Reduce risks and             Reduce school dropout.
     Rate.                          youth service system to         offenders will receive            increase protective
                                    provide best practice           mental health services.           factors as measured by       Reduce youth substance
    Lower Juvenile                 services to meet                                                  the Oregon Juvenile           abuse.
     Recidivism.                    identified needs of high-      15 pre-offender families          Crime Prevention
                                    risk first offenders and        will receive intense              Assessment.
    Maintain OYA Bed               pre-offenders.                  parent training services.
     Capacity.                                                                                       Reduce recidivism rate
                                                                   40 sex offenders will             of youth completing sex
                                                                    receive sex offender              offender treatment to
                                                                    treatment.                        10%.

                                                                   30 youth offenders with          Reduce risks and
                                                                    substance abuse issues            increase protective
                                                                    will be enrolled in youth         factors as measured by
                                                                    drug court and receive            the Oregon Juvenile
                                                                    Functional Family                 Crime Prevention
                                                                    Therapy.                          Assessment.

                                                                                                     60% of youth will show
                                                                                                      improvement in school
                                                                                                      attendance.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                                                        Page 160
                                     HIGH LEVEL OUTCOME
                                INCREASE SYSTEMS INTEGRATION




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 161
PRIORITY:         Clients feel that they are welcomed, heard, and that their needs are being
                  met.


STRATEGY:         Increase development/implementation of inter-organizational front-line training.


STRATEGY:         Increase development of a culturally diverse human service workforce.



PRIORITY:         Increase positive outcomes in high-risk clients/families served by multiple
                  agencies/organizations.


STRATEGY:         Maintain or increase family/client advocate resources that effectively engage and
                  do outreach with high risk families.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                Page 162
SELECTION PROCESS

Jackson County is one of four counties selected by the Oregon Department of Human Services as a prototype county
for service integration. Jackson County has a countywide, policy-level integration planning team, whose mission
over the past eight years has been to build, develop, and maintain effective service integration.

The planning team consists of the top policy-makers for state, county, and nonprofit agencies which center on
delivering human services to high-risk families. The planning team meets twice a month and directs the integration
work over organizational, funding, and population boundaries. Over the past two years, the integration project has
used client focus groups, multiple staff planning groups, and community meetings to gather input and promote
dialog. The integration team and the Commission developed the priorities and strategies listed on the previous page
for the 2001/2003 biennium.


RATIONALE FOR PRIORITIES & STRATEGIES:

Strategy:        Increase development/implementation of inter-organizational front line training

Rationale: Historically, clients and community members have been confused and unclear about where to go for
needed services. Too many times, families in great need have been ―turned away‖ because they have gone to the
wrong organization for the needed service. In addition, high-risk families needing multiple services have struggled
with entry into a service system with so many fragmented doors. The ―No Wrong Door‖ strategy is being developed
with the goal that front-line staff, in as proactive a way as possible, will be able to connect families with the services
they need and help them to access those services. Both Clara Pratt and Lizbeth Schorr cite access to services as a
research-based best practice. This includes services provided by other organizations in other locations. The goal is
that the client access the needed service.

Strategy:        Increase development of a culturally diverse human service workforce.

Rationale: Jackson County is a Southern Oregon county with a relatively new and growing minority population.
The Hispanic population has tripled in the last 20 years, and now comprises 6.7 percent of the total population.
Public and nonprofit organizations have been struggling to effectively serve this growing population. One of the
strategies to develop effective minority service is to increase minority representation in the human service work force
at both the front line and management levels.

Strategy:        Maintain or increase family/client advocate resources that effectively engage and do outreach
                 with high-risk families.

Rationale: High-risk families generally have multiple obstacles that prevent them from receiving services and
treatments that would allow them to make positive changes in their lives. Advocate service is designed to make
contact and engage with people to work with them and a professional staffing team so they access and become
engaged with services. Advocates typically connect with family members in their own environments – home, work,
and school – and work with extended family and community resources. In our county, we have documented that
effective advocate service combined with a professional staffing team have more than doubled the number of adults
with substance abuse issues accessing and completing treatment. It has also resulted in families making significant
positive family changes as measured by the Family Self-Sufficiency Scale.

The family advocate strategy would focus on increasing advocate time at existing integration sites to work with
multi-problem families who are involved with two or more service systems.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                      Page 163
                               APPENDIXES
                        Appendix A.             Bibliography

                        Appendix B              Definitions/Acronyms

                        Appendix C.             Community Involvement
                                                 Membership Lists
                                                 Survey Instruments
                                                 Focus Group Formats




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 164
                                          APPENDIX A.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 164
                                              BIBLIOGRAPHY

Jackson County Overview

    Population Counts
       United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. (2001). 2000 Census of Population and
       Housing, General Population Characteristics, Oregon. 2000 CP-1-39. Washington, DC: Government
       Printing Office.

    Population Growth; Age Distribution; Hispanic Population
       United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. (2001). 2000 Census of Population and
       Housing, General Population Characteristics, Oregon. 2000 CP-1-39. Washington, DC: Government
       Printing Office.

Goal 1: Strong, Nurturing Families

    Adult Substance Abuse
       Department of Human Resources, Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, agency printout of clients
       served, June 2001.

        Department of Human Resources, Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, Jackson County Databook
        2000. page 13 and 45. < http://www.oadap.hr.state.or.us/2000db.html>; (accessed 12 May 2001).

    Family Demographics (FYI – chart not included)
      United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. (2001). 2000 Census of Population and
      Housing, General Population Characteristics, Oregon. 2000 CP-1-39. Washington, DC: Government
      Printing Office.

    Domestic Violence
      Oregon State Police, Law Enforcement Data System, Report of Criminal Offenses and Arrests, pages 1-34
      to 1-35, publication years 1994 –1999. Salem, Oregon.

   Divorce Rates
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Oregon Vital Statistics Annual Report, years
       vary. For 1999 on-line: < http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/chs/arpt/99v1/1-03.pdf> (accessed 30 May 2001)

   Children Affected by Divorce
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Center for Health Statistics and Vital Records,
       on-line: <http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/chs/divkid/divkid.htm> (accessed: 30 May 2001)

    Poverty
       United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. (1993). 1990 Census of Population and
       Housing, Summary Tape File 3A., CD-ROM. CD90-3A-02. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.
       [On-line] http://www.census.gov/cdrom/lookup/. (accessed 21 May 2001).

        United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates,
        1993, 1995, 1997.
        [On-line] <http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/saipe/estimatetoc.html>; (accessed 21 May 2001).


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 165
    TANF (Monthly Data) (FYI – chart not included)
      Oregon Department of Human Resources, Adult and Family Services Division (March 2001). Public
      Assistance Programs Branch and District Data. Salem, Oregon. [Online]<http://www.afs.hr.state. or.us
      /papage. html>; (accessed: 21 May 2001).

    Average Annual Earnings
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Employment Department, Research, Tax and Analysis Division.
       (2000). 1999, Oregon Covered Employment and Payrolls. Salem, Oregon

   Unemployment
      Oregon Department of Human Resources, Employment Department, Research, Tax and Analysis Division.
      (April 16, 2001). Annual Average Unemployment Rates, 1980-2000. Salem, Oregon. [On-line]
      http://www.olmis.org/olmisj/PubReader?itemid=00001264; (accessed 23 May 2001).

Goal 2: Healthy, Thriving Children

    Child Abuse and Neglect
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, State Office for Services to Children and Families. (2001). The
       Status of Children in Oregon’s Children Protection System, 2000. Salem, Oregon. [On-Line]
       <http://www.scf.hr.state.or.us/abusereports.htm /> (accessed: 30 May 2001)

        Child Maltreatment 1999: Reports from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System
        NCANDS

        Portland State University, Child Welfare Partnership (February 2001). The Southern Regional Report for
        Children Entering Foster Care Between 1995 to Mid- 1997. Salem, Oregon.

        Portland State University, Child Welfare Partnership (September, 2001). COHORT 4, Jackson Branch
        Report. Salem, Oregon.

    Percent Women Receiving First Trimester Prenatal Care
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Center for Health Statistics and Vital Records.
       (2000). Resident Births by First Trimester Prenatal Care by County of Residence, Oregon 1999 Final Data.
       [On-line]
       http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/chs/finalabd/99/birthpc.htm; (accessed: 30 May 2001).

    Percent Two-Year Olds Who Are Adequately Immunized
       Oregon Department of Human Services, Oregon Health Division – Immunizations Department (2001)
       Immunization Tracking And Recall System (ITARS) for 19-24 months and 19-35 months (503) 731-4684
       Nathan Crawford. New system being implemented in 2001 that will allow comparison with State and
       Nation. http://www.cdc.gov (National Immunization Survey)

        Department of Human Services, Oregon Health Division, Center for Disease Control, National Immunization
        Survey (1995-1999)

    Alcohol/Drugs while Pregnant
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Center for Disease Prevention and Epidemiology,
       Center for Health Statistics. (2001). Oregon Vital Statistics Annual Report, Years vary. Vol. 1. Portland
       Oregon.



Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                             Page 166
    Uninsured Children (FYI – chart not included)
      Office of Economic Analysis, Department of Administrative Services, Oregon Population Survey (1990 –
      2000). 2000 Survey data accessed on-line [http://www.oea.das.state.or.us/ops2000/ops.htm] (accessed 4 June
      2001).

    Mental Health Services to Children (FYI – chart not included)
      Jackson County Mental Health. Medford, Oregon. Contact by telephone. (541) 774-8201 (Roy Gardner or
      Allen Mandel)

    Child Care Availability
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Employment Department, Child Care Division. (2001). [Child
       Care Supply Benchmark]. Unpublished data.

    Children Entering Kindergarten Ready to Learn
       Oregon Department of Education, Office of Educational Support Services, School Finance and Data
       Information Services. (2001). Salem, Oregon.

    Assessment scores in Reading and Math Skills, 3rd and 8th Grades (FYI–Chart not included)
       Oregon Department of Education. (2001). [2000 3rd Graders Meeting Skill Levels : Reading]. Salem,
       Oregon. Unpublished data.

Goal 3: Healthy, Thriving Youth

    6th, 8th and 11th Grade Use of Tobacco, Alcohol and Marijuana
         Department of Human Services, Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs (OADAP). Planning,
         Evaluation, Research and Technology Unit. (2000). Public School Drug Use Survey.

        Jackson County Juvenile Department. Juvenile Department Annual Report, 1999. Substance abuse related
        data.

        Oregon Research Institute. Annual Oregon Healthy Teens Survey (replaces the Public School Drug Use
        Survey and Youth Risk Behavior Survey – 2001). Eugene, Oregon. [Contact Joy Wells, (541) 484-2123]
        Website: www.oht.ori.org

    Juvenile Arrests
       Oregon Department of State Police, Law Enforcement Data System. (2000). ―Number of Arrests By Age‖.
       Salem, Oregon. [Unpublished Agency Printout; Contact Jeff Bock (503) 378-3057]

    Juvenile Recidivism
       Oregon Youth Authority, Oregon Juvenile Department Director’s Association and Oregon Commission on
       Children and Families (2001). Juvenile Recidivism, Oregon’s Statewide Report on Juvenile Recidivism
       1995-1998. [On-line] <http://www.oya.state.or.us/data.html >; (accessed: June 15, 2001).

   OYA Compliance
     Oregon Youth Authority, Program Office. Salem, Oregon. Reports on monthly discretionary bed allocations
     by county. [Contact Judy Satrum (503) 373-7387]

    Teen Pregnancy Ages 10 –17
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Center for Health Statistics. (2001). Oregon
       Vital Statistics County Data 1999. Portland, Oregon. [On-line]
       <http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/chs/finalabd/99/birthpc.htm>; (accessed: 30 May 2001).


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                             Page 167
   Births to Unwed Mothers 15-24
       Kissler, G.R. & Fore, K. N. (2000). To Improve the Well-Being of Oregonians: Public Policy for a Changing
       Economic and Social Context. Report can be viewed at http://www.econ.state.or.us/OPB/wellbeing.pdf

        Oregon Vital Statistics County Data, Department of Human Resources, Center for Disease    Prevention and
        Epidemiology, Center for Health Statistics.

        Snyder, H.N. & Sickmund,M. (1999). Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report. U.S. Department of
        Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

                                       Second Births to Teen Mothers Ages 10-19
        Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Center for Health Statistics. (2001). Unpublished
        agency printout. Portland, Oregon.

    Youth Suicide Attempts
       Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Oregon Vital Statistics Annual Report, years
       vary. For 1999 on-line: <http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/chs/arpt/99v1/1-03.pdf> (accessed 30 May 2001)

        Oregon Department of Human Services, Health Division, Injury Prevention & Epidemiology Program.
        Salem, Oregon. The Oregon Plan for Youth Suicide Prevention December 2000.

   Homelessness
      U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Washington, D.C. Contacted by telephone (202) 708-
      1112 (202) 708-1455

    High School Dropout Rates
       Oregon Department of Education. Dropout Rates in Oregon High Schools 1999-2000. (2001). [On-line]
       <http://www.ode.state.or.us/stats/schoolFinance/dropout.htm>; (accessed: 30 May 2001).

    Student Enrollment
       Oregon Department of Education. (2000). Number of Students as of October 1, 1999. [On-line]
       <http://www.ode.state.or.us> (accessed: 15 June 2001)

Goal 4: Caring Communities

    Community Engagement – Volunteerism
      Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). Medford, Oregon. [Contact Becky Synder, Director. (541) 779-
      5257]

        Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). Medford, Oregon. [Contact Carol Davis, Program Manager
        (541) 734-2272]

        United Way of Jackson County. Medford, Oregon. [Contact Dee Anne Everson, Director (541) 773-5339]

        Jackson County Department of Human Services (DHS), Volunteer Program. Medford
        Oregon. [Contact Kathy Garrett Canopy, Program Manager (541) 776-6164] (Note: DHS Volunteer
        Program position was eliminated in Fall 2001 due to DHS reorganization)

        Providence Hospital. Medford, Oregon [Contacted by Mickey Ketchum, CCF]

        Rogue Valley Medical Center. [Contacted by Mickey Ketchum, CCF]

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 168
Minority Outreach

    Hispanics in Jackson County
       United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. (2001). 2000 Census of Population and
       Housing, General Population Characteristics, Oregon. 2000 CP-1-39. Washington, DC: Government
       Printing Office.

    Hispanic Distribution in Schools By District
       Oregon Department of Education, Office of Educational Support Services, School Finance and Data
       Information Services. (2001). ―Number of Students as of October 1, 1999.‖ Salem, Oregon. [on-line]
       <http://www.ode.state.or.us/stats/students/sf0007ns.pdf>




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                            Page 169
                                          APPENDIX B.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 170
                                          DEFINITIONS/ACRONYMS

                                                   DEFINITIONS


Resiliency:
        Resilience can be defined as the capacity to spring back, rebound, successfully adapt in the face of adversity,
        and develop social competence despite exposure to severe stress.

Wellness:
       Wellness is a condition in which the physical, emotional, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural well-
       being of all children and families are nurtured and preserved.

Protective Factors:
        Protective factors are elements of natural settings or systems that tend to foster resilience and decrease the
        risk for adverse behaviors, e.g., substance abuse, juvenile delinquency, high school dropout, and teen
        pregnancy.

Accountability:
      Activities and/or processes that hold groups and programs accountable to the public, to themselves, and to
      any predetermined process and outcome objectives.

Benchmarks:
      Benchmarks are goals set to monitor the long-term outcome measures to gauge progress in building a healthy
      community.

Objectives:
       Objectives are the activities - or what staff/volunteers do - for instance, number of counseling hours
       provided, numbers of bed/nights provided, number of workshops, and number or participants trained in
       workshops. Objectives are measurable, specific, and time-bound.

Outcomes:
      Outcomes measure performance - or what has changed - in the lives of individuals, families, or the
      community as a result of the program. Outcomes respond to the ―So what?‖ question. How has the program
      made a difference? Specific levels of achievement are targeted in outcome measurement. For instance, one
      of the Youth Substance Abuse Treatment program outcomes is: 65% of youth in treatment will show
      decreased use of alcohol and drugs through self-report to counselor and random urinalysis.

Collaboration:
       Collaboration is a mutually beneficial and well-defined formal relationship of two or more individuals or
       organizations, which results in a service or product. Partnerships may occur within and between agencies at
       the community, county, state, and federal levels.

Family Resource Center/Integration Site:
       Family Resource Centers and Family Service Centers: ideally have at least 2-7-year incremental
       implementation process with measurable outcomes; have viable structures for delivering a service
       continuum; may be school-based or integrated into neighborhood-based services with the intent that services
       be available to all families to promote their children’s wellness; may serve as the treatment/community
       development arm of the delivery system.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                     Page 171
Coalition:
        A coalition is an alliance of distinct parties, persons, or states, for joint action.

Adjudicated:
       Arrested, charged, and found guilty of a crime by the Court.

Level 7 Youth:
        Youth ages 11-17 years, who are chronically acting out or neglected, but non-adjudicated; not being served
        by Services to Children and Families or the Juvenile Department. Includes but is not limited to: school
        dropouts; truants; runaways; homeless; street youth; youth beyond parental control; youth who are having
        behavioral problems at school, at home or in the community which are significant and present over a period
        of time (six months or longer); youth who are having problems in a family of non-involvement, neglect, or
        severe family conflict; youth who are gang-affected, self-destructive, pregnant, or parenting.

Direct Service Network Team (DSNT):
        School and agency representatives within individual school districts who meet monthly to discuss and plan
        for identified at-risk youth.

Teen Pregnancy Rate:
       The total number of teen births and teen abortions. Abortion rate may not be accurate, so should be used in
       conjunction with teen birth rate.

Community Safety Net:
     The safety net for Jackson County includes the following categories: essential support services for families
     and victims; alcohol and drug treatment, prevention, and education; health care; emergency services; legal
     services and public safety.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 172
                                                   ACRONYMS


AAUW            American Association of University Women
A&D             Alcohol and Drug
AFC             Ashland Family Center
AFS             Adult and Family Services
ARC             Addictions Recovery Center
ATOD            Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs
CAC             Children’s Advocacy Center
CASA            Court Appointed Special Advocate
CCBG            Child Care Block Grant
CCF             Commission on Children & Families
DHS             Dept. Of Human Services
DSNT            Direct Service Network Team
FACT            Family Addiction Community Team
HS              Human Services
JCCATF          Jackson County Child Abuse Task Force
JCCCF           Jackson County Commission on Children & Families
JCDVC           Jackson County Domestic Violence Committee
JJAC            Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee
LADPC           Local Alcohol & Drug Planning Committee
LPSCC           Local Public Safety Coordinating Council
MDT             Multidisciplinary Team
NWYC            North West Youth Corps.
OCCF            Oregon Commission on Children & Families
OYCC            Oregon Youth Conservation Corps.
RAPP            Reduce Adolescent Pregnancy Project
RCC             Rogue Community College
RFC             Rogue Family Center
RFP             Request for Proposal
RSVP            Retired Senior Volunteer Program
RVMS            Rogue Valley Manor Services
SCF             Services to Children and Families
SMART           Start Making a Reader Today
SOCSTC          Southern Oregon Child Study & Treatment Centers
SODA            Southern Oregon Drug Awareness
SOU             Southern Oregon University
STARS           Students Today Aren’t Ready for Sex
TANF            Temporary Assistance to Needy Families
WIC             Women, Infants, Children
WMFC            West Medford Family Center




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 173
                                          APPENDIX C.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 174
                      COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT


                                          MEMBERSHIP LISTS

                                  Early Childhood Partnership Team

                                  Prevention Planning Council

                                  Jackson County Integration Planning Team

                                  Juvenile Justice Advisory Board

                                  Hispanic Planning Group – West Medford




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 175
                              EARLY CHILDHOOD PARTNERSHIP TEAM
                                      Jackson County Oregon
                                               2001

            Name                 Agency/Address                       Name                 Agency/Address
Dennis Alexander           The Job Council                    Cynthia Lallo          YMCA Childcare
                           673 Market St.                                            522 W. 6th St.
                           Medford, OR 97504                                         Medford, OR 97501
Debbie Baker               Community Works                    Tedra Mandell          Jackson County Mental Health
                           900 E. Main St.                                           1005 E. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97504                                         Medford, OR 97504
Claudia Clark              Medford School District            Lori McClure           DHS/Child Welfare
Special Ed Coordinator     500 Monroe St.                                            909 Royal Ct.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                         Medford, OR 97504
Debbie Frierson            Jackson County Health Dept.        Kathleen McLeary       Jackson County Health Dept.
                           1005 E. Main St.                                          1005 E. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97504                                         Medford, OR 97501
Dori Glockler              Jackson County Health Dept.        Eileen Micke-Johnson   Community Member
                           1005 E. Main St.                   Jackson County CCF
                           Medford, OR 97501
Mary-Curtis Gramley        Community Member                   Ruth Miller            Jackson County Justice Bldg.
Jackson County CCF                                            Family Court Coord.    100 S. Oakdale Ave.
                                                                                     Medford, OR 97501
Sarah Heath                Jackson County HHS                 Tim Mobley             Phoenix-Talent School District
Jackson County CCF         1005 E. Main St.                                          PO Box 698
                           Medford, OR 97504                                         Phoenix, OR 97535
Karen Holt                 Community Works                    Carin Niebuhr          Jackson County HHS
                           900 E. Main St.                    Director,              1005 E. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97504                  Jackson County CCF     Medford, OR 97504
Blair Johnson              Early Head Start                   Nancy Nordyke          Southern Oregon Head Start
                           PO Box 3819                                               PO Box 3819
                           Central Point, OR 97502                                   Central Point, OR 97502
Brenda Johnson             La Clinica del Valle               Kerry Prince           OnTrack, Inc.
                           3617 S. Pacific Hwy                                       221 W. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                         Medford, OR 97501
Younghee Kim               SOU Education Department           Linda Roadman          DHS/Child Welfare
                           1250 Siskiyou Blvd.                                       909 Royal Ct.
                           Ashland, OR 97520                                         Medford, OR 97504
Sue Kline                  Child Development Services         Karen Smith            Rogue Family Center
                           945 S. Riverside Ave.                                     3131 Avenue C
                           Medford, OR 97501                                         White City, OR 97503
Barbara Kozol              Child Development Services         Robin Turgesen         Jackson County Health Dept.
                           945 S. Riverside Ave.                                     1005 E. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                         Medford, OR 97504




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 176
                                   PREVENTION PLANNING COUNCIL
                                           Jackson County
                                                2001
           Name                  Agency/Address                       Name               Agency/Address
Sandy Calta                Girl Scouts                        Muriel Johnson       Tree House Books
                           2001 Keene Way Dr.                 (CCF)                15 N. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97504                                       Ashland, OR 97520
Mavis Cloutier             Planned Parenthood                 Cynthia Lallo        Medford YMCA
(RAPP)                     724 S. Central #101-A                                   522 W. 6th St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford, OR 97501
Ginger Casto               Community Member                   Linda Lewis          OnTrack
                                                                                   221 W. Main St.
                                                                                   Medford, OR 97501
Tom Cole                   Kids Unlimited                     Christine Marchand   Josephine County Mental
                           1 E Main St.                                            Health
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       714 Northwest A
                                                                                   Grants Pass, OR 97526
Cydne Collins              West Medford Family Center         Carin Niebuhr        Jackson County HHS
(AFS)                      914 W. Main                                             1005 E. Main St
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford, OR 97504
Cydne Collins              West Medford Family Center         Chris Reed           Central Point School District 6
(AFS)                      914 W. Main                                             451 N. 2nd St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       Central Point, OR 97502
Les Couch                  Jackson County HHS                 Ginger Rilling       Mediation Works
(FACT Coordinator)         1005 E. Main                                            33 N. Central #306
                           Medford, OR 97504                                       Medford, OR 97501
Juli Di Chiro              Ashland School District            Jeff Ruscoe          OADAP
                           885 Siskiyou Blvd.                                      500 Summer ST NE
Superintendent             Ashland, OR 97520                                       Salem, OR 97309
Carl Erickson              Jackson County Juvenile            Jeff Smith           Boys & Girls Club
                           Services                                                of the Rogue Valley
                           1504 Armory Dr.                                         203 SE 9th St
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       Grants Pass OR 97526
Ron Farley                 Medford School District            Stephanie Soares-    SODA
                           500 Monroe St.                     Pump                 604 N. 2nd St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       Central Point, OR 97502
Rick Foertsch              SOU Department of Education        Sharri Stratton      Job Council
                           1250 Siskiyou Blvd.                (JJAC)               673 Market St
                           Ashland, OR 97520                                       Medford, OR 97504
Michelle Grush             Rogue River Middle School          Chuck Todd           DARE/Sheriff’s Office
                           PO Box 1045                        (DARE)               787 W 8th
                           Rogue River, OR 97537                                   Medford, OR 97501
Carolyn Hayes              Medford School District            Maria Ramos-         La Clinica del Valle
                           500 Monroe St                      Underwood            3617 S Pacific Hwy
                           Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford OR 97501
Sarah Heath                Jackson County CCF
                           1005 E. Main
                           Medford, OR 97504




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 177
                           JACKSON COUNTY INTEGRATION PLANNING TEAM
                                              2001
            Name/Agency                              Name/Agency                       Name/Agency
Norma Barnes                               Robin Giesbrecht                    Carin Niebuhr
DHS Facilities                             District Secretary                  Director
Salem, Oregon                              DHS/AFS                             Jackson County CCF
Alan Berlin                                Ellen Gray                          Phil Niemeyer
Southern Oregon Head Start                 Access                              DHS Child Welfare
Angus Brownfield                           Arnie Green                         Theresia O’Grady
Grant Writer                               Executive Director                  Casework Manager
Community Works                            Community Works                     Community Justice
                                                                               Juvenile Services
Don Bruland                                Bob Grindstaff                      Mark Orndoff
Director                                   Director                            Deputy Director
Senior/Disabled Services                   Jackson County Community Justice    Jackson County HHS
Patty Claeys                               Diana Hills                         Chris Reed
Director                                   Jackson County HHS                  Alternative Learning - Integrated
Access                                     Rogue Family Center                 Services School District 6
                                                                               Central Point
Cydne Collins                              Susan Hollingsworth                 Ida Saito
AFS Site Manager                           Jackson County HHS                  DHS Service Delivery Area
West Medford Family Center                                                     Manager
Hank Collins                               Karen Holt                          Bob Satnik
Director                                   Program Manager                     Employment Division
Jackson County HHS                         Community Works
Craig Contreras                            Abe Huntley                         Karen Smith
Oregon Youth Authority                     Deputy Director                     DHS/AFS
                                           Community Justice                   Rogue Family Center
Sue Cottle                                 Brenda Johnson                      Rita Sullivan
The Job Council                            La Clinica del Valle                Executive Director
                                                                               OnTrack, Inc.
Les Couch                                  Taylor Kohn                         Robin Wassom
FACT Coordinator                           AFS Site Manager                    DHS/AFS
Jackson County HHS                         Ashland Family Center               Medford
Fran Curtis                                Lisa Lewis                          Jean Work
Mental Health Outpatient Program           DHS/AFS                             Employment Division
Manager
Jackson County HHS
Anne Daugherty                             Frank Lucas                         Kathie Young
Program Manager Maternal Child             Assistant Regional Mgr.             Program Administrator
Health/Healthy Start                       DHS/AFS                             Senior/Disabled Services
Jackson County HHS
Dani Dodge                                 Doug Mares
Mail Tribune                               DHS Senior Manager
                                           DHS Child Welfare
Carl Erickson                              Christine Mason
Juvenile Services Program Manager          Executive Director
Jackson County Community Justice           Rogue Valley Addictions Recovery
                                           Center




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                               Page 178
                             JUVENILE JUSTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
                                              2001
          Name                   Agency/Address                           Name           Agency/Address
Jim Adams                    Jackson County Courts            Jim Lewis              City of Jacksonville
Trial Court Administrator    100 S. Oakdale Ave.              Mayor                  PO Box 1198
                             Medford, OR 97501                                       Jacksonville, OR 97530
Sgt. Mark Bell               City Hall                        Doug Mares             DHS/Child Welfare
Medford Police Dept.         411 W. 8th St.                   Branch Manager         909 Royal Ct.
                             Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford, OR 97504
Ben Bergreen                 Phoenix-Talent Schools           Steve Mitchell         Community Member
Superintendent               PO Box 698                       LPSCC Citizen Member
                             Phoenix, OR 97535
Hilary Best                  Mediation Works                  Jim Mueller            220 Laurel St.
                             33 N. Central Ave. #306          Attorney at Law        Medford, OR 97501
                             Medford, OR 97501
Craig Contreras              Oregon Youth Authority           Carin Niebuhr          Jackson County HHS
                             818 W. 8th St.                   Director               1005 E. Main St.
                             Medford, OR 97501                Jackson County CCF     Medford, OR 97504

Clay Cooke                   OnTrack, Inc.                    Theresia O’Grady       Juvenile Services
                             221 W. Main St.                  Casework Manager       1504 Armory Dr.
                             Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford, OR 97501
Fran Curtis                  Jackson County HHS               Ray Olsen              The Job Council
Program Manager/Outpatient   1005 E. Main St.                 Program Director       673 Market St.
Mental Health                Medford, OR 97504                                       Medford, OR 97504
Dan Durbin                   OSP                              Judge Rebecca Orf      Jackson County Courts
Oregon State Police          4500 Rogue Valley Hwy. #A        Circuit Court Judge    100 S. Oakdale Ave.
                             Central Point, OR 97502                                 Medford, OR 97501
Dan Durbin                   OSP                              Debra Price            Community Member
Oregon State Police          4500 Rogue Valley Hwy. #A        LPSCC Citizen Member
                             Central Point, OR 97502
Ron Farley                   Medford School District          Sue Sauls              Jackson County Courts
At-Risk Programs             500 Monroe St.                   LPSCC Coordinator      100 S. Oakdale Ave.
                             Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford, OR 97501
Joe Ferguson                 Juvenile Services                Judge Mark Schiveley   Jackson County Courts
Detention Facility Manager   1504 Armory Dr.                  Circuit Court Judge    100 S. Oakdale Ave.
                             Medford, OR 97501                                       Medford, OR 97501
Arnie Green                  Community Works                  Rita Sullivan          OnTrack, Inc.
Director                     900 E. Main St.                  Director               221 W. Main St.
                             Medford, OR 97504                                       Medford, OR 97501
Bob Grindstaff               Jackson County Community         Jack Walker            Board of Commissioners
Director                     Justice                          County Commissioner    10 S. Oakdale Ave.
                             123 W. 10th St.                                         Medford, OR 97501
                             Medford, OR 97501
Robert Kennedy               Sheriff’s Office
Sheriff                      787 W. 8th St.
                             Medford, OR 97501


Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                             Page 179
                                       HISPANIC PLANNING GROUP
                                              West Medford
                                                         2001

          Name                   Agency/Address                         Name                Agency/Address
Laura Atkins               OnTrack, Inc.                        Roxann Jones           Jackson County HHS
                           221 W. Main St.                      Community Safety Net   1005 E. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                    Coordinator            Medford, OR 97504
Silvia Baez                Samaritan Counseling Center          Kathy Keesee           West Medford Family Center
                           PO Box 4592                          Jackson County HHS     814 W. Main St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                           Medford, OR 97501
Jose Cacho                 OnTrack, Inc.                        Mickey Ketchum         Community Member
                           VA Domiciliary                       Jackson County CCF
Gabriela Castro            Access                               Pam Lucas              Jackson ESD
                           PO Box 4666                                                 101 N. Grape St.
                           Medford, OR 97501                                           Medford, OR 97501
Aurelie Danko              West Medford Family Center           Naurine McCormick      Community Member
                           814 W. Main St.                      AAUW
                           Medford, OR 97501
Toti Enders                Jackson County Health Dept.          Shien Polehn           Community Member
                           1005 E. Main St.                     AAUW
                           Medford, OR 97504                    LWV
Juanita Ephraim            Multicultural Association            David Ramirez          DHS/AFS
                           Community Works                                             PO Box 1190
                                                                                       Medford, OR 97501
Sandy Garcia               Rape Crisis                          Maria Ramos            La Clinica del Valle
                           724 S. Central Ave.                  Underwood              3617 S. Pacific Hwy
                           Medford, OR 97501                                           Medford, OR 97501
Mauricio Gutierrez         DHS/W. Medford Family Ctr            Ginger Rilling         Mediation Works
                           814 W. Main St.                                             33 N. Central Ave. #306
                           Medford, OR 97501                                           Medford, OR 97501
Sarah Heath                Jackson County HHS                   Milo Salgado           Employment Division
Jackson County CCF         1005 E. Main St.                                            PO Box 1968
                           Medford, OR 97504                                           Medford, OR 97501
Steve Hunt                 EEOC                                 Maria Swann            Medford Police Department
                           909 First Ave. #400                                         411 W. 8th St.
                           Seattle, WA 98104                                           Medford, OR 97501
Rodolfo Hurtado            EEOC                                 Will Young             Boys & Girls Clubs
                           909 First Ave. #400                                         PO Box 770
                           Seattle, WA 98104                                           Phoenix, OR 97535
Martha Ibarra              Oregon Child Dev. Coalition
                           1057 Court St. #B
                           Medford, OR 97501




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 180
                      COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT


                                       SURVEY INSTRUMENTS

                                CCF Selection of High-Level Outcomes
                                (English/Spanish)

                                Hispanic Planning Group – Input on Selected
                                High-Level Outcomes (English/Spanish)

                                Early Childhood Partnership Team Parent Survey
                                (English/Spanish)




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001     Page 181
                              JACKSON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

                                                    SUMMARY




                        An opportunity to have local input and action on the major
                        Issues that affect children and families in our community.


                                               Senate Bill 555
The 1999 Oregon Legislature adopted Senate Bill 555, a comprehensive investment policy for Oregon’s children,
youth, and families. The bill calls for locally driven planning coordinated through the Commission on Children and
Families and based on the big picture, replacing fragmented activities with a single, comprehensive strategy.


                                                     Phase I
The Jackson County Comprehensive Plan 2000 represents Phase I of a six year county-wide planning effort to
produce a consolidated plan addressing issues facing children and youth through age 18 and their families. Phase I
consisted of data mapping, inventory of current services, and preliminary analysis of community strengths, gaps, and
barriers. Information for Phase I planning was gathered from 21 existing community plans and 18 government and
community groups.


                                                    Phase II
The goal for Phase II is to develop and put in place community strategies that will positively change services and
outcomes for children and families in our prioritized focus areas. The plan for Phase II will be completed in
December 2001.




                                            We need your help!
Please review the attached High Level Outcome and Its Measure form. From your personal and professional
experience, choose the top five outcomes you think the county should focus on in the next two years.




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                  Page 182
                               HIGH-LEVEL OUTCOMES FOR SB555 LOCAL PLANS

                                             High-Level Outcome and Its Measure
             Reduce adult substance abuse, as measured by the percentage of adults who abuse or are dependent on alcohol
              and drugs.
             Reduce domestic violence, as measured by the number of reported cases of domestic violence per 1,000 Oregon
              adults.
             Reduce poverty, as measured by the percentage of Oregonians with incomes below 100% of the Federal poverty
              level.*

             Reduce child abuse and neglect, as measured by the number of children who are abused or neglected per 1,000
              persons under age 18.*
             Improve prenatal care, as measured by the percentage of babies whose mothers received early prenatal care.*
             Increase immunizations, as measured by the percentage of two-year-olds who are adequately immunized.*
             Reduce alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use during pregnancy, as measured by the percentage of infants whose
              mothers used alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs during pregnancy.*
             Increase child care availability, as measured by the number of child care slots available for every 100 children
              under age 13.
             Improve readiness to learn, as measured by the percentage of children entering school ready to learn.*
             Improve third grade reading, as measured by the percentage of third graders achieving established reading skill
              levels.*
             Improve third grade math, as measured by the percentage of third graders achieving established math skill
              levels.*
             Decrease teen alcohol use, as measured by the percentage of eighth grade students who report using alcohol in
              the previous month.*
             Decrease teen drug use, as measured by the percentage of eighth grade students who report using illegal drugs
              in the previous month.*
             Decrease teen tobacco use, as measured by the percentage of eighth grade students who report using tobacco
              products in the previous month.*
             Decrease juvenile arrests, as measured by the number of juvenile arrests per 1,000 juveniles in Oregon.*
             Reduce juvenile recidivism (re-arrest), as measured by the percentage of juveniles with new criminal referral to
              a county juvenile department within 12 months of the original criminal offense.
             Reduce teen pregnancy, as measured by the pregnancy rate per 1,000 females 10-17.*
             Decrease youth suicide, as measured by the number of suicide attempts by minors per 1,000 youth ages 12-19.
             Reduce high school dropout rate, as measured by the percentage of public high school students who drop out of
              grades 9-12 in any given year.*
             Improve eighth grade reading, as measured by the percentage of eighth graders achieving established reading
              skill levels.*
             Improve eighth grade math, as measured by the percentage of eighth graders achieving establish math skill
              levels.*
             Increase volunteerism, as measured by the percentage of Oregonians who volunteer at least 50 hours of their
              time per year to civic, community, or non-profit activities.*
             Increase community engagement, as measured by the percentage of Oregonians who feel they are part of their
              community.*
             Increase systems integration, as measured by the percentage of key agencies that collaborate in planning and
              providing services for children and families.
       *    This high-level outcome is an Oregon Benchmark

Date                                                         Name of Group/Individual___________________________________

       Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                 Page 183
           RESULTADOS DE ALTO NIVEL Y SU MEDIDAS PARA PLAN LOCAL SB555
                                        Resultados de Alto Nivel y sus Medidas
       Reducir el abuso de sustancia en adultos, de acuerdo al porcentaje de adultos que abusan o que estan dependiente
        en el alcohol y drogas.
       Reducir la violencia domestica, de acuerdo al número de casos reportados de violencia domestica por cada 1,000
        adultos en Oregon.
       Reducir la pobreza, de acuerdo al pocentaje de habitantes de Oregon con ingresos bajos al 100% del nivel federal
        de pobreza. *
       Reducir el maltrato a los niños, de acuerdo al número de niños quienes han sido abusados o descuidados por cada
        1,000 personas menores de 18 años de edad.*
       Mejorar el cuidado prenatal, de acuerdo al porcentaje de bebes cuyas madres han recivido cuidado prenatal
        temprano.*
       Incrementar las inmunizaciones, de acuerdo al porcentaje de niños de 2 años qyuebes gab sudi ubnybuzadis
        adecuadamente*
       Reducir el uso del alcohol, tabaco y otras drogas durante los embarazos, de acuerdo al porcentaje de infantes cuyas
        madres usaron alcohol, drogas, tabaco, y otras drogas.*
       Incremental la disponibilidad de cuidado de niños, de acuerdo al número de espacios disponibles para cuidado de
        niños por cada 100 niños menores de 13 años.
       Mejorar la preparación para aprender, de acuerdo al porcentaje de niños que entran a la escuela listos para
        aprendar.*
       Mejorar el nivel de lectura en tercer grado, de acuerdo al porcentaje de niños de tercer grado que han logrado el
        nivel establecido de destrezas en la lectura.*
       Mejorar el nivel en matematicas en tercer grado, de acuerdo al porcentaje de niños de tercer grado que han
        logrado el nivel establecido de destrezas en matematicas.*
       Disminuir el uso de alcohol en los adolescentes, de acuerdo al porcentaje de estudiantes de octavo grado que han
        reportado usando alcohol el mes anterior.*
       Disminuir el uso de drogas en los adolescentes, de acuerdo al porcentaje de estudianted de octavo grado que han
        reportado usando drogas el mes anterior.*
       Disminuir el uso de tabaco en los adolescentes, de acuerdo al porcentaje de estudianted de octavo grado que han
        reportado usando tabaco.*
       Disminuir los arrestos juveniles, de acuerdo al número de arrestos juveniles por cada 1,000 casos juveniles en
        Oregon.*
       Mantener espacios residenciales disponibles para OYA, de acuerdo al cumplimiento con las acomodaciones a
        Oregon Youth Authority.
       Reducir la reincidencia juvenil, de acuerdo al porcentaje de jovenes con nuevas referencias a un departamento
        juvenil del condado entre los 12 meses de la ofensa criminal.
       Reducir los embarazos en los adolescentes, de acuerdo a la tasa de embarazos por cada 1,000 mujeres entre los 10
        y 17 años de edad.*
       Disminuir los suicidios en los jovenes, de acuerdo al número de intentos de suicidio de monores, por cada 1,000
        jovenes de edades entre 12 y 19 años de edad.
       Reducir el nivel de deserciones de escuelas preparatorias, de acuerdo al porcentaje de estudianted de escualas
        publicas quienes han desertada en cualquier tiempo de entre los grados 9 a 12.*
       Mejorar el nivel de lectura en el octavo grado, de acuerdo al porcentaje de alumnos del octavo grado que han
        logrado el nivel establecido en destrezas de lectura.*
       Mejorar el nivel de matematicas en el octavo grado, de acuerdo al porcentaje de alumnos del octavo grado que han
        logrado el nivel establecido en destrezas en matematicas.*
       Incrementar el voluntariado, de acuerdo al porcentaje de habitantes de Oregon quienes son voluntarios dedicando
        al menos 50 horas de su tiempo por año en actividades cívicas, de la comunidad o con fines no lucrativos.*
       Incrementar el compromiso con la comunidad, de acuerdo con el porcentaje de habitantes de Oregon quienes
        sienten que son parte de su comunidad.*
       Incrementar los sistemas de Integración, de acuerdo al porcentaje de agencias claves que colavoran en el
        planeamiento y ofrecimiento de servicios para niños y familias.
*    Este resultado de alto nivel es una meta para Oregon
Día:                                        Nombre de Grupo/Individual: _______________________________________
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                      Page 184
                             HISPANIC PLANNING GROUP SURVEY
                                  “YOUR HELP IS NEEDED”

The Oregon State Legislature requires a local planning group called the Commission on Children
and Families to listen to all the local community and then plan for programs that would benefit local
people on how to;

            1. Decrease child abuse and neglect.
            2. Decrease youth alcohol, tobacco, and drug use.
            3. Reduce juvenile crime and prevent youth from committing more crimes.

Have you heard about programs that help parents work with problems they may have with raising a
family? Yes _____ No _____ What programs do you know about? _________________________



Have you used these programs? Yes _____ No _____ If so, were they helpful?

Why or why not: _____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Are you able to access those programs? Yes ____ No ____ Why not: Transportation ____ Cost ____
Lack of child care ____ Appointment availability ____ Language ____ Health Insurance ____
Other _________________________

Are services available in Spanish when you need? Medical help? Yes ____ No ____
Educational help? Yes ____ No ____ Special help with other problems? Yes ____ No ____

What worked in your native country to keep youth off alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and juvenile
crime? Please explain. _________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Have you lived in Jackson County for more than two years? Yes ____ No ____

What area in the county do you live closest to? Check one.
Eagle Point/White City/Shady Cove ____ Medford ____ Central Point/Gold Hill ____
Phoenix/Talent/Ashland ____ Jacksonville/Applegate ____ Rogue River ____

Gender: Male ____ Female ____ Age: 18-29 ____ 30-39 ____ 40-49 ____ 50-59 ____ Over 60 ____

Location of survey: West Medford Family Center ____ La Clinica ____ Other ____________________
Please return surveys to Les Couch by September 14th. (774-7808) 1005 E. Main St. Bldg. A,
Medford, OR 97504

Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                  Page 185
                                 HISPANIC PLANNING GROUP SURVEY
                                    ―NECESITAMOS SU AYUDA‖

Los legisladores del estado de Oregon requieren que un grupo planificador llamado la Comisión de
Niños y Familias, presten atención a la comunidad, para luego implementar programas que
beneficiarán a las personas en los siguientes asuntos:

!       Reducir el abuso y neglegencia hacia los niños.
!       Reducir el uso de alcohol, tabaco y drogas entre los jóvenes.
!       Reducir crimenes cometidos por jóvenes y como prevenir que comiten otros crímenes.

¿Tiene usted conocimiento de programas que ayuden a los padres de familia a resolver problemas
dentro de sus hogares ? Si____ No____ Haga una lista de los programas que usted conoce.

______________________________________________________________________________

¿Ha recibido usted servicios de estos programas? Si_____ No _____ Sí no. ¿Por qué?:
Transporte____ Costo _____ Falta de cuidado de niños _____ Disponibilidad de citas _______
Lenguaje ________ Aseguranza Médica ____________

¿Hay servicios disponibles en español cuando los necesita?
Servicios Médicos Si___ No ____ Servicios Educativos Si _____ No ____ Ayuda especial con otros
problemas Si ____ No___

¿Cuáles programas fueron eficaces en su país de origen, para evitar el uso de drogas, tabaco, y
alcohol y reducir el crimen entre los jóvenes? Haga una lista

______________________________________________________________________________

¿Usted ha vivido en el condado de Jackson más de dos años?              Si___ No____

En cuál área vive usted o cuál le queda más cercana? Escoge una. Eagle Point/White City/Shady
Cove ______, Medford, _______ Central Point/Gold Hill ______, Phoenix/Talent/Ashland_____
Jacksonville/Applegate _____ Rogue River ______

Género: M _____ F ______          Edad: 18-29 ______ 30-39 _______ 40-49 _____ 50-59_____
Más de 60 ____

Dónde hizo la encuesta? Centro Familiar de West Medford _____ La Clinica del Valle _____
Otro ________________________________

Por favor, regresa las encuestas a Les Couch antes del dia 14 de Septiembre. (774-7808) 1005 East Main St.
Bldg. A, Medford, OR 97504




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                        Page 186
                              EARLY CHILDHOOD PARTNERSHIP TEAM


                                              Parent Survey


All agencies, schools and organizations working with young families in a community are part of a service system.
We are trying to find out what works well and what doesn’t work well in the service system we have now in our
county. Your answers to these questions will help us to figure that out and make changes to improve our services for
families.


1.    A.    What are the three biggest challenges you are facing today in raising your children?

      1)


      2)


      3)




1.    B. What do you need from your community to support you?




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 187
     2. When you go to agencies for services, what are the hassles? What has worked well in supporting you to raise
     happy, healthy children?




3.    If you are involved with many agencies, do they work well together in assisting you and your family? Are
      referrals and transitions between services clean and smooth?




4.    If you could dream up a perfect service system or agency to support young families, what would it look like?




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 188
                          EARLY CHILDHOOD PARTNERSHIP TEAM

                                               Encuesta para Padres


Todas las agencias, escuelas y organizaciones que trabajan con familias con niños pequeños en la comunidad son
parte de un sistema de servicios. Tratamos de determinar lo que funciona bien y lo que no funciona en el sistema de
servicios sociales actuales que existen en el condado. Sus respuestas a las preguntas que siguen nos ayudarán en
nuestros esfuerzos de mejorar los servicios para familias.

1) ¿Cuáles son los tres desafios más grandes que tienen que enfrentar en la crianza de sus niños?

   a)



   b)



   c)




2) ¿Qué necesita Ud. de la comunidad para apoyarle?




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 189
Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 190
3. ¿Qué clase de inconveniencias encuenta Ud. cuando va a las diferentes agencias para recibir servicios sociales?
¿Qué le ha ayudado en sus esfuerzos de criar niños alegres y sanos?




4. Si Ud. usa los servicios de muchas agencias, ¿están bien integradas para ayudarles? ¿Son fáciles las remisiones
y transiciones entre los varios servicios?




5. Si Ud. podría crear un ―sistemo perfecto‖ para proveer servicios sociales y apoyo para las familias con niños
pequeños, ¿qué tipo de sistema sería?




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                                Page 191
                     COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT


                                     FOCUS GROUP FORMATS

                                          Hispanic Focus Group

                                          Prevention Planning Council
                                          Focus Group




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001   Page 191
                                         HISPANIC FOCUS GROUP

                                                   July 24 2001

                                             9:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.

                                          West Medford Family Center
                                          914 W. Main St. - Medford




                                            PLANNING SESSION

                                What is the best way to involve the Hispanic
                                  community in county planning for all
                                           children and families?


                                                   AGENDA

                I.      Introductions
                II.     Commission on Children & Families (CCF) &               Mickey Ketchum
                        Family Addiction Community Team (FACT)                  Les Couch
                                 Background
                                 Comprehensive Planning Process
                III.    Comprehensive Planning                                  Ginger Casto
                        Why are we doing focus groups?
                        What are the mandated outcomes?
                                 Child abuse and neglect
                                 Youth substance abuse
                                 Youth delinquency

                III.    Planning for the Hispanic Focus Group with countywide
                        representation:
                                 Time
                                 Location
                                 Food
                                 Who should attend?
                                 What is the best way to ask questions/
                                 Translation




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                     Page 192
                                    Jackson County Prevention Council
                                           Focus Group Format
                                         September 17 & 25, 2001



Note: Additional questions may be added at the facilitators discretion.

Suggested Focus Group Agenda:

A.      Introductions
        - Facilitator introduction
        - Focus Group Members Introduction

B.      Overview of Commission Planning Process (done by CCF staff or CCF member)
        - Develops context for focus group

C.         Focus Group Questions for Alcohol & Drug Prevention Focus:
        1) Why did you start using alcohol and drugs?
        2) What would have prevented you from starting to use?
        3) What did you need from:
              - your family to stop using?
              - your peers
              - schools
              - community
        4) What worked?
        5) What didn’t work?
        6) What will prevent you from relapse?
        7) How are you going to prevent your children from using?

D.      Anything else you would like to add? (At this point, you can excuse adults from the focus group
        and ask this of youth or you can ask it of the group generally)

E.      Thank you and Adjournment




Jackson County Commission on Children and Families – Comprehensive Plan 2001                     Page 193

				
DOCUMENT INFO