Project Work of Organising an Event by ifs98397

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									Running a Human Rights event


VCAL units

Work related skills Unit 2
Personal development skills Unit 1
Reading and Writing
Oral Communication
Numeracy (for fundraising events)


VCAL unit level

This unit is focused on the Intermediate and Senior levels of VCAL. Senior level
students should work more independently and show leadership skills in organising
and undertaking the required tasks. The tasks may be modified to be taught at the
Foundation level.


Overview of the learning activities

In this unit students organise an event to raise awareness of Amnesty International
and human rights concerns.

This Unit is designed to support schools/VCAL providers and their students to
establish an action group to organise and run an Amnesty International event.
Students will develop an action plan and organise the final event. The Learning
Activities are related to the planning, organisation and running of an event, and a
debriefing about the tasks undertaken.


Purpose

Human rights:
Students undertake the challenge and responsibility to run a campaign that raises
awareness of Amnesty International and Human Rights issues. The event focuses on
making others in the community aware of Amnesty International and Human Rights
issues and how they can help make a difference.

VCAL:
Through participation in planning and running an event, students develop
organisational planning skills, knowledge, practical skills, problem solving and
interpersonal skills. The learning activities aim to:

    improve knowledge and understanding of human rights issues
    develop skills for planning, organising and running an event
    develop an understanding of social issues and civic responsibility
    develop problem-solving skills
    develop skills of planning, organisation and working in teams

Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
    develop self-management skills
    develop leadership skills
    develop interpersonal communication skills
    develop teamwork skills


Useful resources

The following resources can be downloaded from the Amnesty International Australia
website at www.amnesty.org.au

    How to hold a great stall
    How to promote your group
    Student networking and mini regional student conferences
    Meetings
    How to start an Amnesty school group
    Fundraising and campaigning


Useful dates

Date                   Occasion
MARCH 8                International Women’s Day
MAY (2nd Sunday)       Mother’s Day
MAY 28                 Amnesty International Birthday
JUNE 19                Aug San Suu Kyi’s birthday
                       (Women of Burma Day)
JUNE 20                World Refugee Day
AUGUST 9               International Day for Indigenous People
SEPTEMBER (1st Sunday) Father’s Day
SEPTEMBER 19           International Day for Peace
OCTOBER 7-13           Refugee Week
OCTOBER                Amnesty Week
NOVEMBER 20            Universal Children’s Day
DECEMBER 10            Human Rights Day


Contact details

Victorian Activist Resource Centre
Locked Bay No 7 Collingwood VIC 3066
Suite 8, 134 Cambridge St

Telephone: (03) 94120700
Fax: (03) 94120720
Email: vicaia@amnesty.org.au
Web address: www.amnesty.org.au




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Learning outcomes

Activity                  Units and learning outcomes
                          Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
Planning the event        1. Plan and organise a complex activity
                          5. Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information
                          Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                          1. Writing for Self-expression
                          2. Writing for Practical Purposes
                          Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                          3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                          Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                          3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                          Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                          1. Collect, analyse and organise information for a work-related goal
                          2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal
                          3. Communicate ideas and information for a work-related goal
                          4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.

Organising the            Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
event                     1. Plan and organise a complex activity
                          2. Demonstrate self-management skills for goal achievement
                          3. Demonstrate knowledge, skills and abilities in the context of an activity or project
                          5. Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information
                          Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                          1. Writing for Self-expression
                          2. Writing for Practical Purposes
                          Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                          3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                          Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                          1. Oracy for knowledge
                          3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                          Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                          2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal
                          3. Communicate ideas and information for a work-related goal




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
                          4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.
                          5. Use mathematical ideas and techniques for a work-related goal.
                          6. Solve problems for a work-related purpose.

Running the event         Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
                          1. Plan and organise a complex activity
                          5. Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information.
                          Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                          1. Writing for Self-expression
                          2. Writing for Practical Purposes
                          Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                          3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                          Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                          1. Oracy for knowledge
                          3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                          Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                          2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal
                          3. Communicate ideas and information for a work-related goal
                          4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.
                          6. Solve problems for a work-related purpose.

The debrief               Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
                          4. Describe leadership skills and responsibilities.
                          Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                          3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                          Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                          3. Writing for knowledge: Write a short report or explanatory text
                          Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                          2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal.
                          4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.
                          5. Use mathematical ideas and techniques for a work-related goal.
                          6. Solve problems for a work-related purpose.




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Ass

Assessment

To use the activities in this unit as assessment tasks, students will need to collect evidence. This may include:

-    teacher checklist and observation
-    student documentation of planning and organising the event
-    the timeline
-    materials produced as part of tasks undertaken
-    promotional materials
-    record of interviews
-    photos or video of the event
-    final report




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Sample assessment record sheet: Intermediate


Unit name: Human rights event                                                       VCAL Level: Intermediate

Student name: ...............................................................       Form: .......................................................


Unit Outline:

Through participation in planning and running a human rights event, students develop organisational planning skills, knowledge, practical skills,
problem solving and interpersonal skills.

The learning activities aim to:

    Improve subject specific knowledge applicable to running a human rights campaign
    Learn skills applicable to planning, organising and running an educational and community focused goal related to a human rights issue
    Develop an understanding of social issues and civic responsibility
    Develop problem-solving skills
    Learn skills of planning, organising and working in teams
    Develop self management skills
    Develop leadership skills
    Develop interpersonal communication skills




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Learning outcomes and performances:

 Activity                Learning outcomes                                                                         Performance   Evidence/comments
 Planning the            Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
 event                   1. Plan and organise a complex activity
                         5. Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information
                         Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                         1. Writing for Self-expression
                         2. Writing for Practical Purposes
                         Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                         Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                         Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                         1. Collect, analyse and organise information for a work-related goal
                         2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal
                         3. Communicate ideas and information for a work-related goal
                         4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.

 Organising the          Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
 event                   1. Plan and organise a complex activity
                         2. Demonstrate self-management skills for goal achievement
                         3. Demonstrate knowledge, skills and abilities in the context of an activity or project
                         5. Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information
                         Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                         1. Writing for Self-expression
                         2. Writing for Practical Purposes
                         Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                         Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                         1. Oracy for knowledge
                         3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                         Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                         2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal
                         3. Communicate ideas and information for a work-related goal




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
 Running the             Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
 event                   1. Plan and organise a complex activity
                         5. Utilise interpersonal skills to communicate ideas and information.
                         Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                         1. Writing for Self-expression
                         2. Writing for Practical Purposes
                         Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                         Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                         1. Oracy for knowledge
                         3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                         Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                         2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal
                         3. Communicate ideas and information for a work-related goal
                         4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.
                         6. Solve problems for a work-related purpose.

 The debrief             Personal Development Skills Intermediate Unit 1:
                         4. Describe leadership skills and responsibilities.
                         Reading and Writing Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Writing for knowledge: Write a short report or explanatory text
                         Numeracy Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Numeracy for Personal Organisation — Money and Time
                         Oral Communication Skills Intermediate:
                         3. Oracy for exploring issues and problem solving
                         Work Related Skills Intermediate Unit 2:
                         2. Plan and organise activities for a work-related goal.
                         4. Work with others and in teams to achieve a work-related goal.
                         5. Use mathematical ideas and techniques for a work-related goal.
                         6. Solve problems for a work-related purpose.




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human Rights event – Teacher notes


Activity 1: Planning the event

1. Exploring different types of events


a) Students need to work in small groups.                               Give each group a set of cards
     (Worksheet 1, enlarged to A3 size). Explain that each card shows actions a group
     can take in campaigning for human rights.


b) Ask students to group the cards under the following headings (Worksheet 2,
     enlarged to A3 size):
     -    Actions which engage young people
     -    Actions which attract media attention
     -    Actions which appeal to people with a wide range of interests
     -    Actions which have a lasting impact
     -    Actions which help create initial awareness of human rights issues


     Explain that some cards may fit under more than one category. Ask students to
     add their own action ideas. (This activity can also be done on butchers‘ paper)


c) Students think about the goals that these events could achieve and the type of
     audience they would suit, and then fill out the columns in Worksheet 3.


d) Ask student to identify which activity appeals to them most and why.


e) Students look at campaigns that Amnesty school groups have carried out in the
     past (See Appendix 1-3 for examples). Students work in small groups to map out
     the steps involved in organising an event and to complete Worksheet 4.


-    What happens in the lead up to the event to create awareness?
-    What happens at the event itself?
-    What happens afterwards? Think about the next steps that will build on the event
     and maintain interest and give people a chance to take their interest further.

Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
-    What opportunities for action for human rights are involved?


Explain that the examples don‘t necessarily show all of the steps and so they may
have to imagine what might have happened.


Extension tasks:


a) Ask students to reflect on events or festivals that they have participated in.
     -What goes on behind the scenes to make the event appeal in the way it does?
     -What aspects of a major event or festival (such as Big Day Out) could be
     replicated on a smaller scale with fewer resources?


b) Discuss how a major event can be supported by smaller initiatives, such as
     holding an information stall in the lead-up to the event, or a school assembly. The
     class could then work on a range of activities which complement each other to
     support the event.




2. Thinking of an idea or concept


a) In small groups, students discuss:
     -Who will be the audience for their event?
     -What goal they would like to achieve in communicating with this audience. (ie.
     What they hope the audience to do in response/what difference do they hope the
     event will make?)
     -Where they could hold the event


b) Then, as a whole class, students decide which human rights issue they would like
     to focus on and the date they will hold their event. (Worksheet 5)


Extension task:
Students write a summary of how campaigns may affect public opinion and lead to
greater participation in global human rights concerns.



Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
3. Writing an Action Plan


Students use Worksheet 6 to consider:
     -    Is the venue suitable for the number of people coming? What facilities does it
          have? Do they have access to a free facility? (eg. school hall)
     -    What materials and equipment are likely to be required.
     -    Are there any community groups or people within the school that may be able
          to help out with resources or speak at the event?
     -    Legal or Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) issues that need to be taken
          into account.
     -    How and where the event will be promoted.
     -    How the event will be evaluated.
     -    What opportunities for action for human rights are involved.              (See
          http://action.amnesty.org.au for more information).




4. Working out a timeline


Once these items have been discussed and decisions made, a timeline will need to be
drawn up. Students should draw a chart and list all of the tasks to be completed prior
to the event and on the day itself. As each task is completed it should be marked off.


The timeline will need on-going revision, particularly in the early stages as decisions
about when and where the campaign will be held are made.


Extension tasks:


a) Senior level students should show leadership skills in class discussion, developing
     the timeline and in the allocation of tasks.


b) All students could draw up a list of their skills and abilities, strengths and
     weaknesses and align these to the tasks to be undertaken.



Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
5. Forming teams


Students may choose to work in small teams around tasks such as project
management, publicity, marketing, logistics and stage management. The teacher may
wish to combine teams, for example marketing/publicity and logistics/stage
management may join together. If you are working at a Foundation level you may
choose not to use the publicity activities at all. There are extension activities available
for Senior VCAL students.


Each team should include students with a range of skills, so that the tasks can be
distributed between team members.                        However, some tasks will require a more
collaborative approach. The teacher should be familiar with the VCAL levels and
expected prior learning.


Teacher asks students to:
     a) Decide which team they would like to be involved in
     b) Write down why they are interested in that role and what relevant skills they
          already have to compliment the role



Assessment
To use the above activities as assessment tasks you would need to collect evidence
such as:


-    teacher checklist
-    notes from meetings
-    the initial timeline and allocated tasks.
-    Reflective journal commending on skills and development throughout the project
-    Student logbook to indicate individual areas of responsibilities, time commitments
     and identifying those support systems that are available.




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Teacher notes

Activity 2: Organising the event

Students undertake the tasks that were identified in the action plan and allocated to
individuals or groups in Activity 1 (Planning the event). Meetings should be held
regularly with all students involved in organising the event. Students should take
notes at each meeting. Notes should be kept by each group of students.


Tasks involved in organising the event may include:
-    Seeking approval to run the event
-    Booking and liaising with the venue
-    Liaising with school administration
-    Organising speakers/presenters
-    Organising equipment required
-    Organising catering (if appropriate)
-    Developing a feedback questionnaire to be given to participants
-    Regularly keeping track of progress on all tasks
-    Working with personnel at the school responsible for the newsletter, website
     and/or school radio
-    Contacting the local newspaper and radio station to discuss the possibility of
     promoting the event
-    Preparing promotional material/advertisements/posters
-    Preparing media releases
-    Organising and participating in media interviews

Please refer to the Action Plan: A planning guide for event management.


Extension task:
Students discuss the progress of the event and group work. Students may talk or write
about what it takes to organise an event effectively, the challenges and how they may
be addressed.




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Assessment
To use the above activities as assessment tasks you would need to collect evidence
such as:


-    teacher checklist
-    notes from meetings
-    the revised timeline
-    materials produced as part of tasks undertaken
-    promotional materials, media release, posters, advertisements
-    student logbook and records of their involvement at each stage
-    reflective journal commenting on skills and development throughout the project
-    action plan that identifies tasks, dates and expected outcomes
-    feedback questionnaire
-    media interviews (recorded)




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Teacher notes

Activity 3: Running the event

Students undertake the tasks that were identified in the action plan and allocated to
individuals or groups in Activity 1.


Tasks to be undertaken on the day of the event may include:
-    Setting up the venue
-    Welcoming participants and speakers
-    Distributing materials/information
-    Handing out and collecting feedback questionnaires
-    Managing the activities
-    Ensuring the program runs on time
-    Cleaning up afterwards


Tasks to be undertaken once the event is over may include:
-    Ensuring that the venue is cleaned up
-    Returning any equipment that has been borrowed or hired
-    Writing letters thanking any speakers, guests or volunteers



Assessment
To use the above activities as assessment tasks you would need to collect evidence
such as:


-    teacher checklist
-    photos or video of the event
-    student logbook
-    reflective journal
-    questionnaire results
-    newspaper articles, radio/TV reports of the event




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Teacher notes

Activity 4: The debrief

After the event, students should meet to consider how it went. The success could be
considered against:
-    The goals of the event
-    The feedback from those who attended
-    The running of the event – presentations, activities, equipment, timing, etc.
-    Self-evaluation and student reflections


a) At this meeting, all students should take notes about the main points discussed.


b) Students should write a reflective report on the event organisation, team work,
     identifying effective processes used and issues and how they were overcome or
     ways in which they could have been overcome.


c) Students analyse the results of the feedback questionnaires given to participants at
     the event. Students should write a short report that summarises the feedback
     received from the questionnaires and explain how they contributed to the event.
     Students could also put their results into a chart or table.


d) Students write instructions for other students who may want to run a similar event.
     The instructions should include a timeline, tasks to be undertaken, advice about
     how to set up an event, equipment requirements, sample letters and promotional
     material.




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Assessment
To use the above activities as assessment tasks you would need to collect evidence
such as:


-    teacher checklist
-    notes from the debrief meeting
-    final report
-    reflective journals
-    a list of do‘s and don‘ts for the next year‘s group of VCAL students




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Worksheet 1

Campaign ideas

Social justice breakfast
Invite guest speakers from human rights organisations to speak to students and teachers about
human rights projects in different parts of Australia or the world.


Human rights activity day
Organise activities such as panels and displays focusing on human rights. The day should aim
to involve as many students, teachers, parents and members of the community as possible.


Information stalls
Set up an information stall to raise awareness, promote a campaign, and recruit new members.
Display Amnesty International information and action material, sign petitions, sell Amnesty
International merchandise.

Free a prisoner
Lock up volunteer prisoners (these could be other students or teachers) for an hour. Their
freedom can then depend on letters written, petition signatures collected or money collected.


Library displays
Set up a library display to support your event and raise awareness of Amnesty International
and human rights issues.


Drama, street theatre, art exhibitions and concerts with human rights themes
- Plan a dance exhibition promoting a variety of dances and music.
- Organise a photography exhibition with stories of refugees from the local community.


Organise a school assembly
Profile a human rights issue to the other students and explain what Amnesty International is
all about.


Set up a model of a refugee camp
Display the camp in the school to raise awareness of refugees/asylum seekers and Amnesty
International.


Hold a community festival
Link up with the local council or other organisations that support human rights

Organise a competition / break a world record.


Display a replica of the Guantanomo Bay cell.


Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Worksheet 2

Action which engage                      Actions which attract                      Actions which appeal to    Actions which have a   Actions which help
young people                             media attention                            people with a wide range   lasting impact         create initial awareness
                                                                                    of interests                                      of human rights issues




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Worksheet 3


Event                                    This kind of event would be useful if we wanted to…




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Worksheet 4


Look at the different campaigns that Amnesty International school groups have
carried out in the past. Work in groups to map out those steps that were involved in
organising the event. Use the following questions to help you.


Name of campaign: __________________________________________________

Where was it held? __________________________________________________


What happened in the lead up to the event to create awareness?
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________


What happened at the event?
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________


What do you think happened after the event? (Think about the next steps that
will build on the event and maintain interest and give people a chance to take
their interest further)

___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________


What opportunities for action for human rights were involved?
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Worksheet 5

Planning an event

Firstly, you have to be clear on what your goals are. What do you want your event to
achieve? A story in the local newspaper? More members or donations for Amnesty
International? Distribution of information on a specific human rights issue?


Write your goals here:
a) ______________________________________________________________
b) ______________________________________________________________

1. As a class, start thinking about your own Amnesty International event. Write
     your ideas below.

a) What human rights issue or cause would you like to focus on?
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________


b) Who will be interested in your event? How many people do you think will
come to the event?
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________


c) What venues are available to hold your event at your school or in the local
area?
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________


a) When will you run your event?

Date: ___________________________________________________________
Time: ___________________________________________________________




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human rights event – Worksheet 6

Writing an Action Plan

a) Working in small groups, draw up an ‗Action Plan‘ for running your own Amnesty
     International event. This can be done as a mind map with a list of things that you
     have to do in order to run the event.

Use the following questions to help guide you:
-    Venue - Is the venue suitable for the number of people coming? What facilities
     does it have? Do you have access to a free facility? (eg. school hall)
-    Equipment - What materials and equipment do you need?
-    Community - Are there any groups in the community or people within the school
     that might be able to help out with resources or speak at the event?
-    Legal and health and safety concerns - Are there any legal or occupational
     health and safety issues that need to be taken into account ?
-    Promotion - How and where will you promote the event?
-    Evaluation - How will you evaluate the event? How will you know if it was a
     success?




b) Compare your mind map with other groups. Make notes below, and reflect upon
     any goals:
-    that are similar
-    that are different
-    that you believe are essential for running a successful event
-    that you could run an event without


_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Working out a timeline

Once your group has completed an action plan, a timeline will need to be drawn up
that lists all of the tasks to be completed prior to the event, on the day of the event and
after the event.


-    What needs to happen before the event?
-    What needs to happen on the day of the event?
-    What needs to happen at the event?
-    What needs to happen after the event?




As each task is completed it should be marked off. Write a checklist of activities that
you need to complete each week leading up to the event.




For example:


Week 1
Confirm date
Define concept
Hire venue
Initial press release
Preliminary budget (for a fundraising event)




Your timeline will need to be revised regularly, particularly in the early stages when
you are making decisions about when and where the event will be held.




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Decide who is responsible for different tasks

You now need to decide how you are going to delegate the responsibility of the tasks
to individuals or groups. You may choose to work in small teams, based on your
skills, abilities and interests.


The main responsibilities will include:


Administration:
-coordination: keeping the whole process together, etc
-ensure all necessary permits are received, legal requirements
-prepare worksheets and to maintain communication between all of the teams


Publicity and Promotion:
-design, printing and distribution of posters, flyers, advertisements
-writing of media releases and sending to relevant media outlets
-organising community announcement on the local radio station
-organising community announcement in the local newspaper
-organising interviews with the media


Production/venue management:
-finding a venue
-arranging guest speakers, video/DVDs
-arranging equipment
-preparing schedules and worksheets
-organising technical requirements (sound and lighting)




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human Rights event – Appendix 1


The St Patrick’s College - Welcome Mat!

The St Patrick‘s College Amnesty International student Group understood that the
public perception about refugees and asylum seekers was in many ways, the way the
media and others represented (portrayed) people who were fleeing from oppression.

The students decided to do something about such demeaning messages as - Queue
jumpers - boat people - terrorists - economic refugees - people who throw children
overboard - illegals and other myths.

That saw the start of the project named - ―Not a red carpet just a welcome mat‖.

 they built an enormous Welcome Mat, so big that it could only be displayed on the
school oval
 they distributed an event program to explain the reasons for the welcome mat. This
invitation was sent to other schools, the public, relevant organisations like AI, Red
Cross, Refugee community groups and the local media.
 an invitation was also sent to the Afghan Tiger 11 Soccer team who had played
soccer with St Patrick‘s College soccer team. A story within a story.
 the Amnesty International student group involved their own school in the design
and development of a one and a half hour long program of guest speakers, live
performances of drama, music and audio/visuals, before an audience in the school
auditorium.
 the audience of about 1000 students, teachers and guests then moved to the oval for
the impressive launch of the Welcome Mat.




            St Patricks College – “Not a Red Carpet – Just a Welcome Mat”.
                    (Photo courtesy of Quest Community Newspapers).

Source: The ―How to‖ series, Amnesty International Australia, Unit 8: Using the media


Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human Rights event – Appendix 2


The Whitsunday Anglican School Op Shop Ball




A night-time event when class, style, groove and human rights made a joint
appearance. Participants from five different schools, public and private, were swept
up in the theme of a shabby formal. Three piece suits, berets, ties, grandpappy suits,
woolen ties, gloves, scarves and Cinderella dresses dominated the evening.


The 250 attendees raised several thousand dollars for Amnesty International Australia.
Organisers tried to achieve a blend of music that incorporated the best of dance, pop,
punk, R & B, while the MC promoted petitions able to be signed on the evening
(supporting Australian Asylum seekers, and the struggle for democracy in Burma).


Those who participated were not only immaculately dressed in retro gear, but came
equipped with the energy to burn the floor, as they danced at the Mackay
Entertainment Centre. The local press also supported the venture, as did several local
businesses who donated funds towards seeing the Ball reach fruition.


The student organisers proved that youth can take on an event of huge proportions,
and yield success. They have demonstrated that high-school students do care for
human rights. Their dress, dance and novel style made the Op Shop Ball an event
worth remembering.

Source: The ―How to‖ series, Amnesty International Australia, Unit 5: Fundraising and campaigning




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Human Rights event – Appendix 3

11,000 Candles


On 25 June, the eve of the International Day for Survivors of Torture Amnesty
International Australia lit 11 000 candles forming the words, ‗Stop Torture‘. On each
candle was the name of a person who opposes the use of torture.


This flaming image saw Amnesty International Australia enter the Guinness Book of
World Records and was the centrepiece of a rally held in Brisbane‘s Riverside Park.


The first of the flames was lit by Terry Hicks, father of Australian, David Hicks who
has been held in Guantanamo Bay for approximately 5 years without facing trial.


Source: http://nsw.amnesty.org.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/37645/Young_Conspiracy.pdf




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Hip Hop lights fire for Darfur


Wollongong was jumping when 700 people rocked out to well-known hip hop artists
The Herd and raised money for Amnesty International.                                Fire inside the Wire,
organised by the Wollongong University group, raised more than $12,000 and
increased awareness of the desperate situation in Darfur.


―With this gig we‘re sending a message – loud and clear – and it‘s set to a hip hop
beat‖ said Adam Everill, convenor of the Wollongong Uni group. ―The comfort of
Wollonggong is a world away from the horrors of Darfur, but by coming along to Fire
inside the Wire, people have done their bit for the people of Sudan.‖


The Herd was joined by local artists Free Agent Crew, Copal Deep and Amy Lee
Wilson. Between acts, the audience watched a UN documentary about gender-based
violence during conflict and another from the Darfur Australia Network.


The night was a huge success and Adam Everill says he already started organising the
next one. ―This is the way to go to get young people involved. Our generation loves
music and going to events that are exciting and interesting.‖




Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007
Running an Amnesty International event sample checklist

DETAILS OF THE EVENT
 Confirm date
 Define concept
 Check with Amnesty International well in advance if you plan to use Amnesty‘s name
VENUE
 Seek approval from the school to run the event
 Book the venue and confirm details in writing, including access times and facilities.
 Organise equipment and materials required
 Venue signage – Amnesty International banner is clearly displayed
 Technical considerations – PA, lights, sound checks (if required)
 Decorate the venue
 Catering (if required)
 Make arrangements with the police and other authorities for any permits that may be
needed.

PRESENTERS/ GUESTS/PARTICIPANTS
 Organise presenters/guest speakers/performers/local celebrities
 Confirm details in writing
 Contact other Amnesty International groups and schools in the area and send invitations to
them
 Follow-up RSVPs to invitations
 Prepare copies of feedback questionnaires to be given to participants on the day of the
event.

PUBLICITY
 Write a community announcement for community radio and the local newspaper
 Write a notice for a school newsletter/community noticeboard
 Send media releases and follow-up with the media agency: check with                 Amnesty
International media office well in advance if the event uses Amnesty‘s name
 Organising interviews with the local media
 Distribute posters as widely as possible – schools, shops, community noticeboards
 Prepare handouts for distribution on the day of the event


Written by: Bianca Spence
Graduate Diploma of Education (Applied Learning) student, Deakin University, 2007

								
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