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STRATEGY TEMPLATE by liaoqinmei

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									Last revised 14/01/02

CAMBRIDGE CITY DRAFT COMMUNITY SAFETY STRATEGY 2002-05

Contents
Vision & goals for 2002-2005                                                             2
Context and history                                                                      4
           Progress since 1998 ............................................................................................................................ 4
           Audit findings ....................................................................................................................................... 5
Anti-Social Behaviour                                                                    6
        Understanding of problem & existing approach ...................................................................................... 6
           Graffiti .................................................................................................................................................. 7
           Disruptive young people ...................................................................................................................... 7
           Aggressive begging and street drinking .............................................................................................. 8
           Criminal damage ................................................................................................................................. 8
           Racial harassment ............................................................................................................................... 8
        Related plans/strategies/targets .............................................................................................................. 8
        Strategic aims .......................................................................................................................................... 9
        Translating aims into action ..................................................................................................................... 9
Safer Futures                                                                            11
        Understanding of problem & existing approach .................................................................................... 11
        Strategic aims ........................................................................................................................................ 13
        Translating aims into action ................................................................................................................... 13
Property Crime                                                                           14
        Understanding of problem & existing approach ............................................................................. 14
        Related plans/strategies/targets (see Appendix C) ............................................................................... 14
        Strategic aims ........................................................................................................................................ 15
        Translating aims into action ................................................................................................................... 16
Violent crime / hate crime                                                               17
        Understanding of problem & existing approach .................................................................................... 17
           Violent crime ...................................................................................................................................... 17
           Robbery ............................................................................................................................................. 17
           Domestic violence ............................................................................................................................. 18
           Hate crime (racial or homophobic motivation)................................................................................... 18
        Strategic aims ........................................................................................................................................ 18
        Translating aims into action ................................................................................................................... 19
Substance Misuse                                                                         21
        Understanding of problem & existing approach .................................................................................... 21
        Related plans/strategies/targets ............................................................................................................ 23
        Strategic aims ........................................................................................................................................ 23
        Translating aims into action ................................................................................................................... 23
Tackling persistent offenders                                                            24
        Understanding of problem & existing approach .................................................................................... 25
        Related plans/strategies ........................................................................................................................ 26
        Strategic aims ........................................................................................................................................ 26
        Translating aims into action ................................................................................................................... 26
Reassuring Communities                                                                   26
        Understanding of problem & existing approach .................................................................................... 27
        Related plans/strategies/targets ............................................................................................................ 27
        Strategic aims ........................................................................................................................................ 28
        Translating aims into action ................................................................................................................... 28
           Communications Strategy ................................................................................................................. 29
Working better together in Partnership                                                   Error! Bookmark not defined.Error!
Bookmark not defined.
Making things happen and reviewing progress                                                 32
Resourcing the work                                                                         32
Appendices                                                                                  33




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Introduction
Who we are, why write a strategy, the role of agencies, vol orgs and residents of Cambridge, refer to
contacts page, summary document available, thanks all those who will play a part in delivering this
strategy
Signed by Partnership Board members?
[include photo of partnership]


Partnership structure chart


Partnership contacts (put on back cover?)
Useful general numbers?
Safer City Grants

Relating to the work in this strategy:
Police
City Council
County Council
Health
Probation Service
Drug Action Team
Youth Offending Service
Council for Voluntary Services

Vision & goals for 2002-2005

The Cambridge Community Safety Partnership exists to make Cambridge a safer place
The Partnership will:
 Focus the everyday work of the agencies involved to make the most difference in reducing crime
   and disorder in Cambridge; and
 Identify opportunities for joint project work, combining expertise and resources for maximum
   reduction in crime and fear of crime.


                      Cambridge Community Safety Partnership’s Values
 We will involve as many people as possible in seeking solutions to the City’s problems
 We will draw on community experiences, plus local and national research when planning
  projects / service delivery
 We will listen to and support the more vulnerable members of the Cambridge community
 We will allocate funding using transparent procedures and based on the available evidence
 We will work to ensure that partnership resources are used as effectively as possible through
  monitoring and evaluating our work
 We will ensure our work is integrated with relevant national, regional and local strategies where
  this best serves Cambridge people




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During 2002-05 our strategic aims are:
To address Anti Social Behaviour; specifically
 To reduce the number of incidents of serious and persistent anti-social behaviour in the City of Cambridge
   by working in partnership with local people and agencies through
         Taking enforcement action in response to problems of anti-social behaviour in the community,
             using multi-agency Problem Solving Groups
         Preventative work to address identified community concerns – initially graffiti, disruptive young
             people and associated criminal damage, aggressive beggingand alcohol abuse in public places
         Giving high priority to racially motivated anti-social behaviour

To create a Safer Future; specifically
 To initially target 10-17 yr olds resident in East Chesterton, Kings Hedges, Arbury and Abbey
 To reduce offending and victimisation rates amongst 10-17 yr olds and, over time, 17-20 yr olds resident in
   the target areas
 As resources allow, to extend the approach to other areas of need as evidenced by crime & deprivation data

To reduce Property Crime; specifically
 To reduce the rate of domestic burglary in Cambridge City - target still to be worked out but could be
    something like “to below the family group average by 2003/4” (2000/1 Cambridge rate is 28.4 and family
    group average is 19.8. National target is to see 25% reduction on 2000 rates by 2005 but Cambridge is
    currently amongst worst 25% of districts nationally)
 To ensure that not more than 7.5% of those burgled become a repeat victim within the next 12 months
    (figure subject to final APA approval).
 To reduce total annual vehicle crime (theft of & from) - target still to be worked out but could be something
    like “to less than 1500 offences by 2003/4” (2000/1 total is 1901 – represents a reduction of over 20%,
    already seen an almost 10% reduction and currently below family group average)
 To reduce total annual cycle theft - target still to be worked out but could be something like “to less than
    1500 offences by 2003/04” (2000/01 total is 2009 – represents a reduction of 25%)

To reduce violent/hate crime; specifically
 To reduce the number of violent offences committed in a public place per 1,000 population
 To reduce the number of robberies per 1,000 population in Cambridge City - target still to be worked out but
    could be something like “so that we are in top quartile of our family group by 2003/4”. (2000/1 Cambridge
    rate is x and top quartile boundary is x – currently represents a reduction of x offences)
 To increase reporting of domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime. (BCS estimates that all of these are
    under-reported by at least 10%)
 To reduce repeat victimisation in domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime (need to establish a
    baseline)
 To increase the support available to victims of domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime

To address the problems of substance misuse; specifically
 To improve the information available for assessing patterns of drug-related offending and monitoring and
   evaluating the impact of project work
 To recognise that, in Cambridge, young people (under 18s and under 25s) and the homeless are most
   vulnerable to substance misuse and to target work accordingly
 To recognise that, in Cambridge, heroin/cocaine and alcohol are the misused substances in a significant
   number of drug-related offences and to target work accordingly.
 To reduce the proportion of people reporting use of illegal drugs, especially in the target groups (The
   baseline figures can only be based on national surveys of population, data quoted elsewhere indicates
   current levels of drug use)
 To increase the number of convictions for supply of illegal drugs, especially to the target groups


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 To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by 2005 (There is no
  nationally agreed way of monitoring this; locally we are using Probation and Arrest Referral monitoring data
  as an indicator)

To reduce repeat offending; specifically
 To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by 2005 (see Substance
    Misuse priority area)
 To reduce the number of young people (under 25yrs of age) re-offending

To reassure Cambridge City residents, workers and visitors by reducing fear of crime and disorder and
responding to factors which generate that fear


Context and history
The boundary of Cambridge Community Safety Partnership and the City Council are coterminous.
The population of Cambridge City represents approximately one fifth of the total county population.
Cambridge City consists of 14 wards with a mid year 2000 population estimate total of 110,800,
representing an estimated increase of 4.5% since 1991. This is expected to grow by a further 1.6%
over the next ten years. Cambridge also has a significant transient population of tourists and
language students; approximately 4.1 million visitors came to Cambridge in 1999.

The age structure in Cambridge City shows that there are a lower proportion of young people aged
0-14 years in Cambridge than in Cambridgeshire as a whole. It also has proportionally less people in
the older age groups 40+ than the county. Nearly 6% of the resident population in Cambridge
described themselves as from a non-white ethnic group in the 1991 census. Overseas students are
a significant proportion of the usually resident ethnic population of Cambridge.

The unemployment rate in Cambridge City, in April 2001, was 2.3%. The rate was higher for males
(3.2%) than for females (1.2%). No wards in the district lie within the most deprived 10% nationally
although the northeast of the district is generally more deprived.

Progress since 1998
During the first three years of the partnership there were 7 priority areas:
 Cycle Crime
 Residential Burglary
 Young people as victims and offenders
 City Centre
 Substance misuse
 Vulnerable groups
 Anti-social behaviour (since 2001)

From 1998/99 to 2000/01 the number of recorded offences in the Cambridge Community Safety
Partnership area has fallen by 6.5% from 14,650 offences in March 1999 to 13,696 in March 2001.
Crime has fallen specifically; residential burglary (-12.4%), vehicle crime (-8.7%), cycle theft (-
27.5%), burglary from residential sheds/garages (-38.9%) and shop theft (-2%). Violent crime, non-
residential burglary and criminal damage have on the other hand increased during this period.

Since the outset of this first strategy a number of initiatives were introduced to help to achieve the
overall reduction in recorded offences. As well as achieving better inter-agency working the
Partnership has also succeeded in setting up the Open Out Scheme to make it easier to report racial
incidents; installed CCTV in vulnerable areas; employed a domestic violence coordinator; set up a
graffiti task force; targeted prolific offenders; and introduced projects such as the Dec bus (mobile
youth provision) and the Bobby Scheme (to protect older people against bogus callers) to the area.




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Audit findings
In order to inform a new three-year strategy, in 2001 the Partnership undertook an audit of the
available information on crime and disorder in Cambridge City. Data was collected from police
recording systems, the Probation Service, the Youth Offending Service, council departments, and
Victim Support amongst others. Local people were asked about personal opinions and experiences
through surveys and a community conference. Focus groups were also set up to consult those
traditionally „hard to reach‟ through general consultation methods; these included the gay
community, the ethnic minority community, older people, and disabled people. Consultation done
through the City Council‟s Youth Participation service was also included.

The main findings from the audit are:
In the Cambridge Community Safety Partnership area, the police recorded 13,696 offences in the 12
months to March 2001, representing a fall of 9.8% compared to the previous 12 months. Criminal
damage and „other‟ (mainly various types of theft) were the largest offence categories in 2000/01,
each accounting for 18% of recorded crime. Cycle crime represented 15%, vehicle crime 14% and
violent crime 11%; this was broadly similar for the previous year 99-00, although cycle crime was the
largest offence type that year 21%.

The Home Office have put Community Safety Partnership areas into “family groups” for comparative
purposes. Cambridge compares favourably with its family group in 4 crime categories (Sexual
Offences, Violence, Theft of and from Vehicle) and less favourably for 2 (Burglary Dwelling and
Robbery). Our “family group” members are listed in Appendix A.

The estimated cost of crime to Cambridge organisations and residents in 2000/01 was £90,678,799.
This was calculated using nationally researched costs for various crime types and local crime
figures.


Introduction to priority areas

This strategy sets out the Partnership‟s priority areas for crime
and disorder reduction, with the aim of making best use of limited      “reducing violent crime,
financial and human resources. These priorities have been                 drug & alcohol abuse
determined through analysis of crime information and                      and repeat offending
consultation; they reflect the aims of the National Crime                   remain top of the
Reduction Strategy where these have been found to be justified
                                                                          government agenda”
locally. The results of the local research and consultation that
informs this strategy are detailed in the 2001 Crime and Disorder        (John Denham quoted in
Audit; a copy of this is available on request from the Crime                  Safety First 3)
Research Team (see contacts list on page X)

The priority areas have broad headings, such as “Property Crime”, with more detailed strategic aims
under each. In these aims the Partnership sets out its goals for the next three years and beyond.
The aims are then broken down further into the interventions that are necessary and initial
commitments to action. A more detailed action plan, with timescales and further targets, has been
developed by those implementing work in each priority area. These are working documents, subject
to quarterly review; current copies are available from the Partnership Support Officer (see contacts
list on page X).

Whilst the geographic focus of our work may move over time, the partnership‟s commitment to
supporting communities address local problems remains. Some of the partnership‟s work will
naturally be reactive; in particular the Anti Social Behaviour Problem Solving Groups will operate in
areas of need city-wide. Any local community group who need financial support in their plans to
reduce crime, fear of crime or anti-social behaviour can apply for a City Council Safer City Grant. In
addition partner agencies will continue to invest in areas not specifically mentioned in this strategy
and deliver all their regular services across the city.


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In all its work the Partnership aims to improve the local information on, and understanding of, crime
and disorder and how to tackle it. This strategy is subject to regular reviews and the interventions
/actions set out here may be changed if new information or experience suggests that this is
necessary. The results of the reviews will be published annually and available from any of the
partner agencies.

This strategy cannot be developed or implemented in isolation. In the national, regional and city
arena there is a lot of related work happening. For maximum impact and efficiency this strategy
needs to recognise and build on the gains from other initiatives and the crime and disorder targets
contained here need to be adopted in related plans/strategies. It would be no good for the Crime &
Disorder Reduction Strategy set targets to reduce the number of young people committing crime
without regard to the Youth Offending Service and its targets. It is also important that the
Cambridge Community Safety Partnership involves the key agencies and communities necessary to
translate aims into actions. Whilst some very specific actions are in this strategy, more detailed
action plans will be developed in some areas. Crime reduction theory suggests that the
Partnership‟s action plans should address the motivations of offenders, the security of potential
targets and the presence of „capable guardians‟ (such as wardens, police officers and CCTV) in our
community. This requires a broad range of expertise and community involvement and the
Partnership recognises that working to achieve this is critical to its success.

A detailed look at each priority area of work for the Partnership is set out below.


Anti-Social Behaviour
Definition
Anti Social Behaviour (ASB) is not easy to define; for the purposes of this strategy ASB is defined as
“where there is persistent conduct which causes or is likely to cause alarm, distress or harassment,
or an act or situation which is, or has the potential to be, detrimental to the quality of life of a resident
or visitor to Cambridge City.” ASB largely relates to low-level or sub-criminal activity.

Understanding of problem & existing approach
A multi-agency ASB Strategy group was set up in late 2000 and formally adopted by the Partnership
in 2001. A draft ASB Strategy was adopted by the City Council in July 2001. The Strategy‟s
purpose is to “reduce the incidents of serious and persistent anti-social behaviour in the City of
Cambridge by working in partnership with local people and agencies”.

Recording incidents of Anti Social Behaviour
Individual incidents of anti social behaviour may not be thought to be serious enough to warrant
reporting; however when these types of behaviours combine and are repeated over a long period of
time they can become extremely distressing. If they are reported they are usually sub-
criminal/”nuisance” offences and not currently fed into any central recording system. Some
problems will have been reported elsewhere but the number of different agencies/departments
involved means information is disparate and not consistently recorded.

From April 2002, police recording systems will be changing so that sub-criminal and „nuisance‟
offences are consistently captured. A database is being developed to coordinate the information
reported to various City Council departments to enable a consistent response to problems and city-
wide monitoring. The Police and the City Council are piloting incident report forms used in the
gathering of evidence. This work is in its early stages and more comprehensive systems need to be
finalised and communicated to all relevant front-line staff across these agencies and others so that
reports of ASB are collected and responded to in a consistent way and the public have confidence in
the approach being adopted.

As recording improves the ASB group will need to review its priorities to see that they are in line with
what the systems show to be the local issues. In order to do this, new terms of reference will be
agreed and „Thematic Groups‟ set up to examine particular problems and respond to them. These


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groups are strategic by nature and will not discuss individual cases which will be left to Problem
Solving Groups (see below).

Enforcement
Once evidence of serious and persistent ASB has been collected a Problem Solving Group,
involving all the relevant agencies, is set up to decide the most appropriate interventions. The group
looks at both enforcement and preventative measures.

Alongside the traditional policing measures for criminal offences the Crime and Disorder Act (1998)
brought in new enforcement measures to particularly address anti-social behaviour. The main one,
the Anti Social Behaviour Order (ASBO) is designed for use in a variety of situations and it can
specifically refer to sub-criminal behaviour. Breaching the order becomes a criminal offence.

In Cambridge a multi-agency protocol (including aprotocol for sharing confidential information) for
use in applying for ASBOs has been agreed. Anti Social Behaviour Orders are seen as one tool to
use but not in isolation; enforcement is balanced with preventative measures e.g. diverting offenders
into beneficial activities. Preparing evidence for an ASBO takes a significant amount of time and
financial resources. In Cambridge so far one ASBO has been secured. It was breached and was
successfully prosecuted. Since then ASB in that area has reduced and no more complaints about
the individual, or others who were involved, have been received.

Other enforcement tools include Acceptable Behaviour Contracts These are being used as an initial
step with troublemakers; they sign up to a list of actions they will carry out and behaviours they
agree will cease and it is made clear to them that if they continue to cause problems the next step
could be an ASBO. Injunctions and „undertakings‟ on tenancy agreements for Council tenants, in
which tenants specifically agree not to breach the conditions of their tenancy, have also been used
as a form of enforcement. Although injunctions and „undertakings‟ have been used for a number of
years, the effectiveness of other types of intervention has so far not been specifically evaluated.

Prevention
Work so far has focussed on graffiti, intimidating/disruptive young people, and aggressive begging.

Graffiti
Cambridge has not suffered unduly from graffiti in the past, however the number of incidents have
increased recently to a point where citizens and elected members have voiced concern. The main
increase during 2001 has been in „tagging‟ (personal graffiti identifiers) on walls, shop fronts,
hoardings and street furniture. The majority of „tags‟ originate from a small number of individuals.
Graffiti makes an area look uncared for and can increase the fear of crime.

The City Council has significantly increased its budget for graffiti removal in 2001 and waived the
charge for removing it from private property. It has run a campaign to increase reporting and has
invested additional money in graffiti initiatives such as anti-graffiti treatments at sites that suffer from
frequent abuse to ease future cleansing, to the development or promotion of positive alternatives to
reduce indiscriminate graffiti. The Police and the City Council are working together, sharing
information so that prolific offenders can be targeted. The three strands of this work are
complementary and need to continue until the problem is under control.

Disruptive young people and associated criminal damage/vandalism
ASB by young people is the most commonly experienced crime (13%) in a recent countywide
survey. In Cambridge most incidents of serious and persistent ASB investigated by problem solving
groups have involved young people (under 25 yrs of age). Their behaviours have involved racial
harassment, intimidation, criminal damage and graffiti. This shows the close working relationship
the ASB Strategy group needs to have with other working groups of the partnership.

Criminal damage makes up the largest offence type and in 2000/01 was 18% of all recorded crime
(2430 crimes). Research needs to be done to confirm when, where and why the bulk of the
incidents are happening. 52% in 2000/01 was damage to motor vehicles. Petersfield, Market, Kings
Hedges and West Chesterton accounted for over half of all criminal damage in the city. Petersfield

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had the highest rates of criminal damage to vehicles, Market to public/commercial property and
Kings Hedges had the highest rate for criminal damage to dwellings. Other, neighbouring, wards
also had high counts. All forms of criminal damage fell between 1999/2000 and 2000/01. It may be
that the Partnership‟s work in other areas, such as substance misuse, will mean that these figures
continue to fall. There is little information on offenders for this offence type.

The Police have set up the Guardian Awareness Programme as an „early intervention‟ initiative
aimed at under 18s. In short, appropriate adults are made aware of circumstances where police
officers have had cause to speak to young people whose conduct has placed them at risk. The
primary aim of the initiative is, „to reduce the likelihood of young people becoming vulnerable to the
risk of involvement in crime or anti-social behaviour, either as victims or offenders‟.

The Anti Social Behaviour Strategy group and the Safer Futures (young people as victims and
offenders) group have been working in parallel, with the Safer Futures group looking at longer term
measures to prevent young people becoming offenders and the ASB Strategy group securing
resources for more reactive work. This has usually been to enable young people at risk of offending
to participate in more constructive activities, alongside positive role models. The ASB group will
continue to be in the best position to target specific individuals who are offending or at risk of
offending.

“Young people hanging around” also contributes to people‟s fear of crime. Much can be done to
alter this perception and the ASB and the Safer Futures groups again have a joint role in this work;
in empowering communities to address concerns and publicising young people‟s positive
contributions to their communities.

Aggressive begging and street drinking
Include a para to explain what is meant by “aggressive begging” and “street drinking”

These issues often come up in consultation about community safety and consultation has shown
that vulnerable groups, such as people with learning difficulties, can feel particularly threatened.

Cambridge has the highest count of people on the streets outside London and the Cambridge Street
Life Strategy is being developed to specifically address the needs of these people and the
Cambridge community. The ASB group has a role in advising and implementing the strategy from a
crime and disorder angle.




Racial harassment
A prompted questionnaire used earlier this year in a local shopping centre and then at an ethnic
minority groups evening found that anti social behaviour was the second highest concern generally
(45%) but the highest concern for members of ethnic minorities with 74% concerned. This suggests
that some ASB has a racial motive if ethnic minorities are suffering disproportionately. Racial
harassment was also a concern for members of ethnic minorities. The Partnership intends that the
national “zero tolerance” approach to racism will be reflected locally.


Related plans/strategies/targets
 Draft ASB Strategy (Cambridge Community Safety           PAT 8 report (national gov)
  Partnership)                                             National Drugs Strategy
 Safer Futures action plan (Cambridge Community           National Probation Service Strategic Framework
  Safety Partnership)                                       2001-04
 Police Performance Plan                                  Health Improvement Plan
 City Council report on Street Drinking (Nov 2000)        Youth Justice Plan 2001/02 (County)
 City Council Rough Sleepers Strategy                     Connexions Business Plan 2002-05
 Cambridge Street Life Strategy                           Behaviour Support Plan (Education - County)
 Cambs Cultural Strategy                                  Best Value Performance Plan
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 Street Wardens work programme                                  Empty Property Strategy (district)
 Police Reform Bill (currently at white paper stage)

Strategic aims
    To reduce the number of incidents of serious and persistent anti-social behaviour in the
     City of Cambridge by working in partnership with local people and agencies through
              Taking enforcement action in response to problems of anti-social behaviour in
                the community, using multi-agency Problem Solving Groups
              Preventative work to address identified community concerns – initially graffiti, disruptive young people
                and associated criminal damage, aggressive begging and alcohol abuse in public places
              Giving high priority to racially motivated anti-social behaviour

This is the long-term goal of the work. However, a coherent recording system is currently being
established and from April 2002 police recording systems will also document “disorder” as well as
crime. This makes it an inopportune moment to try and establish a statistical baseline. Public
consultation will be used as a qualitative measure of progress and quantitative baselines and targets
will be set during the lifetime of this strategy.

It is recognised that this work should also serve to reduce the public‟s fear of crime; this is dealt with
more fully under “Reassuring Communities” on page X.

Translating aims into action

OBJECTIVE                              ACTION                                                    LEAD
To reduce the number of incidents of serious and persistent anti-social behaviour in the
City of Cambridge by working in partnership with local people and agencies
To develop systems for recording        Set up a database to record ASB                         City Council
ASB within Cambridge City to provide  Implement new police recording systems to capture         Police
a baseline, and to allow monitoring to    more effectively lower-level crime and disorder
take place                              Establish procedures for responding to information      City Council
                                        Establish monitoring and review procedures              City Council
Improve the reporting of incidents of   Train front-line staff to have a consistent approach to City Council (multi-
ASB                                       recording and responding to reports of ASB             agency)
                                        Publicise the system for responding to serious and      City Council (multi-
                                          persistent anti social behaviour                       agency)
To set headline targets for reducing    After 6 months of data collection, analyse police and   Police/City Council
ASB in enforcement and preventative       database information to establish overlap, main
work so that success can be               behaviours reported, consistency. Set targets by April
measured                                  2003.                                                  ASB Strategy
                                        Review the themes of the ASB strategy after 6 months group
                                          data collection
To use good practice to improve the     Implement the recommendations of the City Council‟s     City Council
service to residents                      Best Value Review of Community Safety
To involve local people and other       Develop and implement a communications strategy         City Council
stakeholders through raising their      Involve community groups in themed preventative         City Council/Police
awareness of the role they can play       work
in reducing ASB.
Taking enforcement action in response to problems of anti-social behaviour in the
community, using multi-agency Problem Solving Groups;




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To investigate through Problem         Set up Problem Solving Groups (PSG) in response to       City Council/Police
Solving Groups referrals of serious,    serious and persistent ASB                               PSG
persistent ASB, taking appropriate     Consider most effective enforcement/preventative
action to change the behaviour of       option to deliver a rapid response – using tough
perpetrators                            enforcement actions for the „hard core‟ where
                                        necessary                                                PSG to identify
                                       Implement enforcement/preventative action                PSG
                                       Monitor behaviour of perpetrators to assess change       PSG
                                       If behaviours are changed, close case and monitor/ if
                                        not changed, issue certificate to seek ASBO if
                                        necessary                                                City Council/
                                       For breach of Orders seek a legal remedy                 Police
Support victims and witnesses where  Carry out investigations where perpetrator(s) is           Police
possible                                unknown to the victim
                                       Offer victims a referral to a support service such as    Frontline staff
                                        Victim Support.
                                       Where appropriate, refer to scheme such as “Home         Frontline staff
                                        Safe” to secure dwellings
                                       Feedback progress to victims/those reporting             City Council
                                        persistent or serious ASB
                                       Annual satisfaction survey of victims/witnesses to       City Council
                                        identify where improvements need to be made
Develop common procedures and          Review and develop current use of Acceptable             City Council
protocols between local agencies to     Behaviour Contracts and Incident Report Forms
ensure a consistency of actions;       Advise and train frontline staff in the use of incident  City Council (multi-
review and improve the operation of     report forms and the collection of evidence to support   agency)
the groups in line with national        the preparation of case files, should this be necessary
guidance and local initiatives         Set up Problem Solving Groups and share information ASB Strategy
                                        using countywide Anti Social Behaviour Protocol.         group
                                       Keep magistrates informed of approach to ASB             Probation/ Police
                                       Use Strategy group to monitor the progress of            City Council (chair)
                                        thematic groups
Monitor and evaluate effectiveness of  Use ASB Database to track interventions and any          City Council
interventions                           resulting behavioural change
Preventative work to address identified community concerns – initially graffiti, disruptive
young people, criminal damage, street drinking and aggressive begging.
To reduce artistic graffiti, personal  Encourage the reporting of graffiti so that sites can be City Council
tags and flyposters from Cambridge      identified and graffiti removed promptly
buildings, streets and open spaces in  Remove offensive graffiti within one day                 City Council
partnership with local people and      Remove other graffiti within five days                   City Council
agencies, giving priority to the       Monitor amount of graffiti removed within target         City Council
removal of of „hate messages‟ and      Build profiles where types of graffiti/tags can be       City Council/ Police
detecting their perpetrators.           attributed to an individual or group so that evidence of
                                        previous incidents is available for prosecution, etc.    City Council
                                       Set up a “community art” project at the Junction to      /Junction
                                        educate young people about the impact of graffiti on
                                        the environment and to divert people at risk from
                                        committing indiscriminate graffiti                       City Council
                                       Evaluate community art project and roll out to other
                                        locations if successful                                  Probation/YOS
                                       Set up a reparation programme to confront
                                        perpetrators with the impacts of graffiti                Graffiti sub group
                                       Develop an exit strategy for graffiti work to be
                                        implemented once problem reduces to acceptable           City Council
                                        levels.
                                       Develop strategy to tackle flyposting within Cambridge

                                                        10
Last revised 14/01/02

                                            City, continuing with the themes of enforcement and
                                            prevention
To reduce repeat offences of ASB           Continue to operate the Guardian Awareness                Police
caused by young people (under 18)           Programme
                                           Secure pot of money to enable immediate referral to       Partnership Board
                                            diversionary activities for those at risk of offending    PSG
                                           Where possible, plan an exit strategy for each
                                            individual involved in diversionary activities            Safer Futures
                                           Consider information on ASB hotspots when targeting
                                            long-term preventative work                               Probation/YOS
                                           Encourage reparation of victims by young people
To reduce the community‟s fear of          Promote intergenerational work in Arbury, Kings
disruptive young people                     Hedges, East Chesterton and Abbey through existing        City Council
                                            community partnerships
                                           Consult tenants federation on measure to reduce           City Council
                                            community fear of disruptive young people
                                           Publicise positive images of young people through         City Council
                                            community newsletters
                                           Support local communities in finding solutions to local   Police/City
                                            problems                                                  Council/County
                                           Increase visibility and accessibility of Community Beat   Police
                                            Officers
                                           Publicise the work that is going on and the response      City Council
                                            that the group will take to reports of serious &
                                            persistent ASB
To reduce criminal damage to               Identify resources and realistic timescale for research   (See property
vehicles in Petersfield,                    to increase understanding of patterns of criminal         crime) County
public/commercial property in Market,       damage to vehicles in Petersfield; public/commercial      Research Group
and dwellings in Kings Hedges               property in Market, and dwellings in Kings Hedges
                                           Carry out research projects according to timetable        ASB Strategy
                                           Consider research findings and areas for action           group
                                           Build actions into action plans
To support the development and             Investigate the use of new enforcement powers to
implementation of the Cambridge             prevent drinking in public places
Street Life Strategy
Giving high priority to racially motivated anti-social behaviour
To recognise any racial motivation        To involve the Racial Harassment Service whenever a        City Council
behind the perpetrating or reporting       report comes in and a racial motive is suspected
of anti-social behaviour and act          To immediately follow up 100% of reports where a           City Council
quickly to prevent further victimisation   racial motive is suspected
                                          To remove graffiti “hate messages” within a day            City Council
To work with the hate crime task          Monitor incidents of racial harassment and report hot-     ASB Strategy
group on longer-term preventative          spots to the hate crime task group                         group
actions where hot-spots occur             Implement appropriate preventative interventions           Hate Crime task
                                                                                                      group




Safer Futures
Understanding of problem & existing approach
Local and national research shows that young people, those under 25 in particular, are either the
victims or offenders in a disproportionate number of crimes. A more detailed analysis of the
statistics and research shows that a similar set of risk factors influences the likelihood of someone
being a victim or offender. These risk factors particularly relate to the circumstances of a person‟s
childhood. Research suggests that one way of tackling crime and disorder is to intervene early in a
young person‟s life to address the „risk factors‟ and reduce the risk of them becoming a future victim
                                                          11
Last revised 14/01/02

of crime or criminal. This is the approach the “Safer Futures” group has been developing; it involves
a range of measures, such as parenting support groups and youth provision and, crucially,
coordinating the services being provided so that those communities where risk factors are
particularly prevalent are given appropriate support.

In 2000/01, 56% of detected juvenile offenders lived in East Chesterton, Kings Hedges, Abbey and
Arbury. This suggests there are a higher number of „risk factors‟ for youth offending in these
communities. Kings Hedges and Arbury have well established and wide ranging existing provision
and require a different approach to East Chesterton and Abbey. Youth Action Groups, getting
young people involved in finding solutions to the problems in their area, have been set up in Kings
Hedges and East Chesterton. Through the work of the last strategy there is also a multi-agency
group looking at young people and crime in Kings Hedges that works with the Youth Action Group.

An important decision is what age of children should be targeted. This is complicated by the
different age boundaries of the statutory organisations working with “young people”. Any age
boundary is slightly arbitrary and it would be impossible to exclusively work within it. However, the
Youth Offending Service have a remit for 10-17 year olds, which, for the purpose of focussing work
so that it can be monitored and evaluated, covers a significant age group and provides a useful data
source. 10-15 yrs of age is a critical period; the primary to secondary school transition is often very
significant in a child‟s development; the young person is exposed to more opportunities for crime
around this age; they are also more able to get involved in finding solutions to problems. The peak
age of offending for many crime types is 15-19 yrs.



The Safer Futures aim in the 1999-2001 strategy was; “to work with young people in the Kings
Hedges and Trumpington wards to improve their safety and to develop measures that will reduce
the risks of them becoming offenders or victims of crime and disorder”. Targets were set around
reducing crime and anti social behaviour, the number of young offenders and the fear of crime in
these areas. Clear definitions and baselines were not established at the start and the group has
found it impossible to measure progress in these terms. However, it has been possible to see the
numbers of young people involved in Youth Action Groups, and to see the difference some of the
projects they carried out have made. One example is the Northfields Road underpass in Kings
Hedges, which was redecorated with a graffiti style mural and new lighting put in; more people are
using the underpass as a result. Developing specific and realistic measures for progress will be vital
to establish the value of this work.

Young people in Kings Hedges and Trumpington have been surveyed on their experience of crime
and concern about safety. This information has been used to develop several small-scale
environmental improvement projects. Youth Provision in the city has been mapped and published in
2001 Review of youth provision and Research in Cambridge by Leanne Weber. The results are
being analysed in terms of what is “sufficient” provision, as defined by young people.

Since the formation of the ASB Strategy group the Safer Futures group has increasingly focussed
on developing a long-term preventative strategy.

Related plans/strategies/targets
   Children & Young people‟s Unit (National)                Sure Start programme in Kings Hedges & Abbey
   Children‟s Fund (National)                               Area Child Protection Committee Plan
   National Drugs Strategy                                  Children‟s Services Plan 2001-04 (Social Services)
   PAT 12 (National Strategy for Neighbourhood              Quality Protects Management Action Plan (Social
    Renewal)                                                  Services)
   National Probation Service Strategic Framework           Community Education plan (Education)
    2001-04                                                  Care and Education Plan 2001-2004
   NSPCC report Building Safer Communities for              Behaviour Support Plan (Education - County)
    Children                                                 Draft Cultural Strategy (County)
   ASB Strategy (Partnership)                               Connexions Business Plan 2002-05
   Youth Justice Plan 2001/02 (County - YOS)                Education Development Plan
                                                     12
Last revised 14/01/02

   Police Performance Plan                                     Play Strategy (District)
   Domestic Violence Action Plan                               Health Improvement Plan (Health Authority)
   DAT plan                                                    Economic Development Strategy (District)
   Youth Participation programme (District)                    Voluntary Sector Strategy (District)
   Youth Development Plan (District)                           Best Value Performance Plan

Strategic aims
 To target 10-17 yr olds resident in East Chesterton, Kings Hedges, Arbury and Abbey.
 To reduce offending and victimisation rates amongst 10-17 yr olds and, over time, 17-20
  yr olds resident in the target areas.
 As resources allow, to extend the approach to other areas of need as evidenced by crime
  & deprivation data.

Offending rates will be measured using recorded crime statistics and YOS data. Victimisation rates
will be measured using recorded crime statistics.
The Safer Futures group will be looking to achieve their strategic aims through developing
an integrated, multi-agency preventative model which reflects national and local strategic
priorities and has the active involvement of young people and families.

Translating aims into action
OBJECTIVE                            ACTION                                                   LEAD
To reduce offending and victimisation rates amongst 10-15 yr olds resident in the target areas
To deliver results through            Ensure appropriate forums exist for target areas       City Council
resourcing and coordinating existing  Ensure key providers are on Safer Futures steering     YOS
service providers                       group                                                 3CV
                                      Consider ways of increasing the numbers of trained     City Council
                                        youth workers working in Cambridge
                                      Identify gaps in existing provision based on model of Safer Futures
                                        interventions
                                                                                              P‟ship Board/SF
                                      Use results from key projects to target existing
                                        resources more effectively
                                      Secure funding to pump prime initiatives and
                                        provide guidance on potential funding streams         P‟ship Board/SF
                                      Work towards long term funding being put in place to
                                        make successful projects sustainable                  Safer Futures
                                      Work with the Connexions service as it becomes
                                        more established
To involve young people in                                                                   City Council/
developing solutions                  Continue/develop Young People‟s action groups          County Council/vol
                                                                                              orgs
                                      Involve young people in action planning, review ,      Safer Futures
                                        local consultation and implementation
To develop and evaluate a range of  Identify proven key interventions to address risk        YOSSafer Futures
interventions for use in each area,     factors and how these relate to what other strategies
based on addressing risk factors        are delivering - include parent support, safe places
(many common to victims &               for young people to meet, affordable provision        City Council/YOSPDF
offenders)                            Develop indicators and systems for collecting          Safer Futures
                                        information that will allow interventions to be
                                        evaluated                                             Safer Futures
                                      Start in Arbury/Kings Hedges – audit existing activity
                                        against the agreed interventions                      P‟ship Board
                                      Plan evaluation in at first stages of implementing
                                        model in East Chesterton and Abbey
                                      Secure resources for evaluation
                                     
To encourage and enable the           Support the development of youth venues                Safer Futures

                                                       13
Last revised 14/01/02

development of appropriate youth        Support the development of innovative approaches        Safer Futures
provision                                for working with young people e.g. mobile facilities,
                                         community based initiatives
                                        Work with educational establishments to enhance         County Council
                                         and develop existing work
                                        Look at appropriate responses to transitional period    Romsey Mill/ Citu
                                         that 17-20 year olds face                               Council
                                     

Property Crime
Understanding of problem & existing approach
Burglary, motor vehicle theft and cycle theft are all high
volume crimes in Cambridge City, respectively accounting for                      “The most successful
9%, 14% and 15% of all recorded crime in 2000-01. The audit                     initiatives tackle a range
and experience shows that the strategic approach needed to
reduce property crime is similar across these crime types.
                                                                                 of crime types and not
                                                                                 one specific category”
Poor security in car parks, low-security student
accommodation and a shortage of cycle parking each                    (2000 Government PCRAT
contribute to a significant percentage of crimes (see audit for
details). The Partnership has been running a project, using                         report)
Home Office money, to reduce theft from student
accommodation and this work needs to be consolidated and procedures established to pass the
messages on to successive generations of students. CCTV has been installed in 3 major city centre
car parks and Park Street Car Park has been redecorated, security features installed, and is working
towards Secure Car Park Status. There are still more improvements to be made in the other major
car parks. There is national work going on to improve the security of new vehicles and reduce the
distribution networks for stolen vehicles. Home Office funding has enabled the Partnership to run a
Cycle Theft Reduction project that has seen cycle theft decrease by 33% since it started; however
levels are still high and the lessons learnt from the project need to be rolled out further.
A large proportion of thieves are opportunist and could be deterred by simple crime prevention
measures of which the public are not always aware . Knowing this information also makes people
feel more secure – older people, disabled people and ethnic minorities particularly express a
disproportionate fear of burglary which needs to be addressed. The police currently deliver crime
prevention messages to the community and these need to continue to be targeted at hotspots and
vulnerable groups. The Cambridge Community Safety Partnership offers access to a wider variety
of possible communication channels for these messages. There are also further national publicity
campaigns planned, particularly with vehicle crime prevention messages.

Based on national research it is likely that for all the above types of property crimes, over 50% of
offenders are aged 15-19. A small proportion of offenders will commit a high proportion of the
offences. In the short term increasing detection and prosecution of these offenders will significantly
decrease property crime rates; in the longer term, effective preventative work with young people will
keep crime rates down.

There are some aspects of the local property crime patterns that are not fully understood and further
research might enable more effective interventions in future. There are also examples of successful
initiatives elsewhere which should be investigated to find those most suitable for our local situation.

Related plans/strategies/targets (see Appendix C)
      National Crime Reduction Strategy / Best Value Performance Plan
      Property Crime Reduction Action Team Report
      Vehicle Crime Reduction Action Team Report
      National Probation Service Strategic Framework 2001-04



                                                         14
Last revised 14/01/02

Strategic aims
 To reduce the rate of domestic burglary in Cambridge City – target still to be
  worked out but could be something like “ to below the family group average by
  2003/4” (2000/1 Cambridge rate is 28.4 and family group average is 19.8. National
  target is to see 25% reduction on 2000 rates by 2005 but Cambridge is currently
  amongst worst 25% of districts nationally)
 To ensure that not more than 7.5% of those burgled become a repeat victim within
  the next 12 months (figure subject to final approval).
 To reduce total annual vehicle crime (theft of & from) – target still to be worked
  out but could be something like “ to less than 1500 offences by 2003/4 (2000/1 total
  is 1901 – represents a reduction of over 20%, already seen an almost 10% reduction
  and currently below family group average)
 To reduce total annual cycle theft – target still to be worked out but could be
  something like “ to less than 1500 offences by 2003/04 (2000/01 total is 2009 –
  represents a reduction of 25%)

Recorded crime rates will form the basis for measuring each of these.




                                            15
Last revised 14/01/02

Translating aims into action
OBJECTIVE                          ACTION                                                 LEAD
To increase the security of         Public car parks to introduce „pay on foot‟ to       City Council
property through securing its        remove tickets that give potential thief indicator
location; particularly focussing     of expected return time
on:                                 Achieve Secured Car Park Status for Park             City Council
 Secure car parks                   Street, Queen Anne and any new public car
 Secure cycle parking               parks
 Secure student                    Encourage use of secure cycle park in                City Council
    accommodation                    basement of Park Street car park
                                    Use evaluation of Cycle Theft Reduction              City Council
                                     Project to develop recommendations for future
                                     city centre cycle parking provision (timed and
                                     costed)
                                    Use evaluation of Cycle Theft Reduction
                                                                                          City Council
                                     Project to ensure new developments have
                                     adequate cycle parking
                                    Encourage use of Secure Accommodation                City Council
                                     Scheme by Universities.
                                    See also action to improve built environment in
                                     “Reassuring Communities” section
To ensure crime prevention          Work with Universities to ensure that burglary       Police
advice is given to those             prevention advice is passed on to each
vulnerable to property crime;        generation of students
particularly focussing on:          Prioritise Disability groups and ethnic minority     Police
 Students regarding burglary        groups for crime prevention advice
 Disabled people and ethnic        Continue to support the Bobby scheme and             Police/ Property crime
    minorities regarding burglary    work with relevant organisations to strengthen       group
 Older people living in their       referral links to the project.
    own home regarding bogus        Social Services will work with older people to       County Council
    callers                          reduce the risk of them becoming victims of
 Car park users and those           Distraction burglary
    living in residential hotspots  Trading Standards will continue to promote the       County Council
    (e.g. South Newnham)             „We‟re not buying it „ campaign and the
    regarding theft from vehicles    Doorstep selling hotline
 Those parking cycles at           Take crime prevention messages to car park           Police /City Council
    shopping centres, the station    users
    or in colleges regarding cycle  Take crime prevention messages to residential        Police
    theft                            hotspots for vehicle theft
                                    Take crime prevention messages to cycle theft        Police
                                     hotspots & cycle users
                                    Ensure crime prevention messages are well-           Crime Prevention
                                     advised and coordinated                              Panel
To target young property crime      Increase detection rate for burglary and vehicle     Police/Crimestoppers?
offenders (particularly 15-19 year   crime
olds); particularly focussing on:   Ensure 90% of reports prepared for Courts are        YOS
 Prolific offenders                 submitted within the timescales prescribed by
 Diversionary activities            National Standards
                                    Targeted projects with prolific young offenders:     YOS/Probation
                                    Longer term preventative work with those at          Safer Futures group
                                     risk of offending
To improve the targeting of         Identify resources and realistic timescale for       Partnership Funds /
                                                      16
Last revised 14/01/02

future work through research;        research                                     County Research Group
particularly looking at:            Carry out research projects according to     County Research Group
 The patterns of criminal           timetable
    damage to vehicles in           Consider research findings and areas for     Property crime group/
    Petersfield                      action                                       ASB group
 Cycle theft offenders             Build actions into action plans
 Emerging hotspots for theft       Monitor vehicle crime hotspots               County Research Group
    from vehicles                   Research good examples of where “Watch       Police/Neighbourhood
 The use elsewhere of               Schemes” have been used effectively          Watch
    „Watch Schemes‟, including       elsewhere & bring recommendations to
    Neighbourhood Watch and          Property Crime steering group
    Vehicle Watch, to address
    property crimes


Violent crime / hate crime
Definitions
In police recording systems „violent crime‟ is defined as including violence, robbery and sexual
offences. Domestic violence is recorded in the violence category but it obviously requires a different
set of actions from street violence and so it is considered separately below. When you look at crimes
associated with racial/homophobic incident markers they are often violent crimes i.e. assault, ABH
or robbery, which is why they are grouped in the same priority area in the strategy.

Understanding of problem & existing approach
Violence, largely assaults and robbery, are the two highest volume violent crimes in Cambridge.
However volume is not the only aspect that is important in this high-impact crime; some groups of
people are particularly vulnerable and need specific support and protection. This is true for young
people, ethnic minorities and the gay community.

In the current Crime and Disorder Reduction Strategy (1999-2002) „vulnerable groups‟ was
highlighted as a priority area. The primary objective was “to work with groups of people who suffer
disproportionate levels of crime and harassment – identifying and tackling domestic violence,
homophobic assault and harassment and racial assault and harassment”.

Violent crime
Public consultation consistently shows high levels of concern about violent crime. Increasing the
chances of the crimes being detected increases people‟s feeling of security and decreases the
chances of an offender re-offending. The highest numbers of assaults (over 60% of violent crime)
were in Market ward, followed by Petersfield. Over half of violence against the person incidents
occur in public places (countywide research). The detailed information to support the extent to
which it is alcohol-related has not been easily available locally but anecdotal evidence suggests that
Friday and Saturday evenings, especially around pub/club closing time, are particular flash-points.
This is backed up by National research however further research needs to be done locally to identify
more precisely particular problem times and places and to understand triggers for violent incidents.

As part of the City Centre priority in the 1999-2002 strategy, a night bus service and new taxi ranks
have been introduced to take people away from the City Centre more quickly at the end of an
evening out. Unsuccessful bids for national funding were made for CCTV along parts of Mill Road;
the lighting in Mill Road has been improved. “Barlink” has been set up to link city centre licensed
premises directly to the CCTV control room for support if there are incidents.

Robbery
Robbery comprised 11% of all violent crime for 2000/01. As with violence, it mainly occurs in public
(76% according to countywide research) and in the city it is concentrated in Market ward (25%),
followed by Petersfield (16%). Anecdotal police evidence shows that language school/foreign
                                                  17
Last revised 14/01/02

students have been particularly vulnerable to robbery. The Columbus project was set up by the
Police in partnership with local language schools to help visiting students minimise their vulnerability
to crime. The messages need to get to each successive intake of students and work needs to be
done to ensure this happens.

The British Crime Survey found that 93 per cent of robbery offenders were men – whatever the
gender of the victim. Seventy per cent of offenders were aged 16-24. Again, enforcement and
prevention measures need to go hand in hand with this target group.

Domestic violence
. Domestic Violence is a greatly under-reported crime. It is also inadequately recorded by agencies.
Therefore the limited source of data, coupled with under-reporting, masks the true extent of the
crime in the area. This suggests that the 199 incidents in Cambridge City recorded by the police in
2000/01are the minimum extent of the problem. Domestic violence is essentially a pattern of
behaviour where one person, usually a man, exerts power and control over another person, usually
a woman, within the context of an intimate relationship, be that current or in the past. Nationally, the
British Crime Survey 2000 found that in 74% of domestic violence incidents the victim was a woman.
Unlike stranger violence, the victim of domestic violence is known and often living with the
perpetrator of the crime. Consequently the victim is particularly vulnerable to repeat incidents of
abuse. Children frequently witness of hear the abuse and are themselves at risk of harm.

The Domestic Violence Forum for Cambridge City and South Cambs has produced information on
the support available to women who may be experiencing DV. They have run a training day for
frontline staff in partner agencies to help them signpost people to services. They are also aware of
the need for more refuge places, better facilities for parents to bring their children to meet their
father/mother under access arrangements without putting themselves at risk, and tailored support
for victims in the ethnic minority communities. They are looking at the possibility of a project to work
with perpetrators of DV.

Hate crime (racial or homophobic motivation)
These crimes are under-reported. Activities during the last strategy have sought to address this.
The Open Out Scheme enables incidents to be reported in public venues across the city, such as
the Central Library or Macdonalds; joint police/council community surgeries have been held in
various locations to make it easier to report racist incidents or access advice, an leaflet about the
support available to victims of homophobic assault or harassment has been produced and widely
distributed.

Related plans/strategies/targets (see Appendix C)
      Best Value Performance Plan
      Police Performance Plan
      Youth Justice Plan (YOS)
      National Probation Service Strategic Framework 2001-04
      Supporting People Strategy (county)
      Domestic Violence Coordinator‟s Action Plan

Strategic aims
 To reduce the number of violent offences committed in a public place per 1,000
  population
 )To reduce the number of robberies per 1,000 population in Cambridge City -
  target still to be worked out but could be something like “so that we are in top
  quartile of our family group by 2003/4”. (2000/1 Cambridge rate is x and top
  quartile boundary is x – currently represents a reduction of x offences
 To increase reporting/recording of domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime
  (BCS estimates that all of these are under-reported by at least 10%)
 To reduce repeat victimisation in domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime
  (need to establish a baseline)

                                                        18
Last revised 14/01/02

 To increase the support available to victims of domestic violence, racial &
  homophobic crime

Recorded crime rates will form the basis for measuring each of these targetsIt is important
to recognise that these crime rates are measured per 1,000 of resident population and this
does not reflect the large numbers of visitors and non residents who use City facilities and
may be victims of crime

Translating aims into action

OBJECTIVE                           ACTION                                               LEAD
To reduce the number of violent offences committed in a public place per 1,000
population in Cambridge City
To increase the chance of these  Increase the number of police officers in the          Police
crimes being detected in a public     City Centre/Mill Road on Fri/Sat evenings
places; particularly focussing on:  Improve quality of street lighting in areas         County/City Council
 Pub/club closing times at           Market/P‟field where research suggests
     weekends                         violence is a problem
 Market Square & Mill Road          Investigate how CCTV could be funded to            City Council
                                      tackle violent crime along Mill Road
                                     Continue to develop use of Barlink (direct 24/7 City Council
                                      link for licensed premises to CCTV control
                                      room)
To decrease the number of            Work with licensees to manage emptying of          City Council
„flash-points‟ for violence;          premises at closing time
particularly focussing on:           Implement a training scheme for doorstaff of       City Council
 Pub/club closing times at           licensed venues
     weekends                        Review night bus service and taxi rank             City Council
 Market Square & Mill Road           provisions as part of looking at pub/club closing
 Waiting times for transport         time measures.
     home                            Conduct research to better understand triggers Police
 Other „flash-points‟ indicated      for violent incidents
     by further research             Act on findings of above research
To reduce the vulnerability of       Dealing with aggression/personal safety advice Police CSU
victims; particularly focussing on:   to be targeted at users of city nightlife/students
 Young people (aged 15-29           Consulting young people, ethnic minorities and City Council
     but 20-24 especially)            the gay community about things that make
 Ethnic minorities                   them feel vulnerable (especially to
 The Gay Community                   violence/robbery) in the city centre
                                     Act on findings of above research
To undertake a more accurate         Use multi agency public protection panels          Probation/Police
and effective assessment /of and  Increase the ongoing support to victims of            Probation
management of dangerous               serious sexual and other violent crime
people in the community

To reduce the rate of robbery in Cambridge City
To increase the chance of these  Improve the lighting of primary pedestrian/cycle City/County Council
crimes being detected in a public    routes, especially in Market and Petersfield and
places; particularly focussing on:   where violent crime hotspots have been
 Hotspots identifies by further     identified.
    research e.g. “green            Secure resources to invest in mobile CCTV        City Council
    spaces”
                                                     19
Last revised 14/01/02

 Market & Petersfield
To target young offenders            Increase detection rate for violence and            Police/Crimestoppers?
(largely 16-24 year old males);       robbery
particularly focussing on:           Ensure 90% of reports prepared for Courts are YOS
 Prolific offenders                  submitted within the timescales prescribed by
 Diversionary activities             National Standards
                                     Targeted projects with prolific young offenders YOS/Probation
                                     Longer term preventative work with those at         Safer Futures group
                                      risk of offending
To reduce the vulnerability of       Dealing with aggression/personal safety advice Police
victims; particularly focussing on:   to be targeted at users of city nightlife/students
 Foreign language students          Consulting young people, ethnic minorities and City Council
 Ethnic minorities                   the gay community about things that make
 The Gay Community                   them feel vulnerable (especially to
 Other victim groups                 violence/robbery) in the city centre
     identified by further research  Act on findings of above research
                                     Continue to support & publicise Columbus            Partnership funding
                                      project for foreign language students               Police
                                     Analyse further the patterns of victimisation for Police
                                      robbery and deliver crime prevention advice to
                                      those that are especially vulnerable if not
                                      covered above.
To increase reporting/recording of domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime
(BCS estimates that all of these are under-reported by at least 10%)
To increase reporting of             Identify new locations for Open Out reporting       Partnership funding
domestic violence, racial &           centres                                             Police
homophobic crime                     Monitor and evaluate effectiveness of existing
                                      Open Out scheme reporting centres
                                     Continue community surgeries for advice and         Open Out scheme
                                      information                                         coordinator
                                     Publicise Open Out scheme and community             Hate crime task group
                                      surgeries
                                     Ascertain problems asylum seekers may face          Police/City
                                      due to their origin and race                        Council/Diverse
                                     Training for frontline staff in partner agencies to City Council/Police
                                      support them in handling the reporting of
                                      domestic violence                                   County Council
                                     Encourage all relevant agencies to improve the
                                      quality of the data they collect on domestic
                                      violence incidents and collate this information     County Council
                                      annually to inform DV Forum‟s work
To reduce repeat victimisation in domestic violence, racial & homophobic crime
To establish a baseline of repeat  Develop a mechanism for flagging up repeat            Police/City Council
victimisation in each of these        victims on existing databases                       (hate crime) County
crime types                                                                               Council (DV)
To work with domestic violence       Implement Domestic Violence Perpetrator             County Council
perpetrators to reduce re-            project
offending and ensure the safety of
women survivors and their children
To increase the number of cases  Collect more effective evidence when                  Police / Crown
of domestic violence that are     investigating domestic violence incidents             Prosecution Service
successfully prosecuted
                                                     20
Last revised 14/01/02

To reduce the acceptability of    Run Media/education campaigns targeted at        Partnership funding –
these crimes within the            young people/young adults (11-24?)               hate crime/DV group
community
To increase the support available to victims of domestic violence, racial &
homophobic crime
Evaluate existing support         Create database of existing support services     Hate crime group
                                   and use to identify gaps in provision
                                  Consult victims to assess satisfaction with the Hate crime group
                                   support they received
To improve the services
available to victims of these     Provide information on services available that   Hate crime group
crimes; in particular:             reaches these „hard-to-reach‟ communities
                                 Progress plans for a Website                     Hate crime group
 Information on services         Produce a resource and good practice             County Council
    available that reaches these   handbook on supporting victims of domestic
    „hard-to-reach‟ communities    violence – distribute to both frontline staff in
 Refuge places for DV             partner agencies and local employers
    victims                       Investigate whether there are sufficient refuge Domestic violence
 Family contact points for DV     places for DV victims                            group
    victims                       Research successfully run „family contact        Domestic violence
                                   points‟ for use by DV victims                    group

Substance Misuse
Drug related crime is defined as „encompassing any criminal activity, which is committed either to
fund or as a consequence of drug misuse‟. Recorded drug offences show only crimes of supply or
crimes of possession; an idea of the volume and type of crimes committed as a consequence of
dependency or intoxication comes from those working with offenders such as the Arrest Referral
Scheme and Probation data.

Understanding of problem & existing approach
The current strategy‟s overall objective is; “to work with the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Drug
Action Team and the local Drug and Alcohol Reference Group to support the community in reducing
levels of substance misuse and acquisitive crime.” Cambridgeshire now has a separate Drug Action
Team from Peterborough. Cambridgeshire also has an Arrest Referral Scheme, a Drug Treatment
& Testing Order team, a Youth Offending Services YOS, HM Prison Service, Police and specialist
agencies working to reduce drug-driven offending. These agencies have supplied information used
to guide this strategy.

Drug misuse
The scale of the problem is difficult to measure and may be skewed as the level of recorded drug
offences closely correlates with policing activity. Drug crime (possession & supply offences) was
officially 2% of total crime in 2001 but the figures we know are very likely to be under-estimates and
resources should not simply be channelled to these areas. Some resources are needed to improve
the information and understanding we have of the local problem.
Other statistics give an indication of the wider scale of drug-related crime. It should be noted that
the Arrest Referral Scheme data quoted below is not statistically robust due to the small sample
size, it merely gives an indication of trends.
 One in five offenders in Cambridgeshire admit that drug use was a major contributor to their
    offending (county)
 Research by Cambridgeshire Constabulary estimates that 40% of burglary, theft/handling and
    fraud offences, and 55% of shoplifting offences are drug-related.
 Local Probation data also finds that drug misuse is an influential factor in offending; it is most
    commonly linked to theft/handling and violent crime.

                                                   21
Last revised 14/01/02

  Drug-related crime consistently comes out in the top five crime/disorder issues of concern in
   public surveys. The responses to the 2001 Annual Report questionnaire to community groups &
   organisations found that over half (53%) supported the Partnership prioritising drug-related
   crime.
DRUG TYPES
 Arrest referral data shows that, countywide, offenders are most commonly heroin, cannabis and
   amphetamine users (some are poly-drug users).
 The Youth Offending Service substance misuse specialist had 20 young offenders (under 18)
   from Cambridge referred to him in 2000-01. The numbers are already higher for 2001-02 (36 by
   Feb 02). Some had started using Class A drugs such as heroin. The most commonly used
   drugs by young offenders were cannabis and alcohol.
 In a Cambridge Drugs and Alcohol Arrest Referral Scheme client sample three drug types were
   identified as equally misused, 27% each for alcohol, cannabis and heroin.
 Police intelligence suggests that dealers are increasingly pushing crack cocaine.
USERS
National research shows:
 One in four 14-15 year-olds will experiment with illegal drugs
 More than half of 16-19 year-olds have used an illegal drug
 Drug use happens in all our communities (rural youths are more likely to use drugs (27.4%) than
   urban youths (18%), and it is not just among the socially deprived or excluded - 21.4% in affluent
   areas)
 Anecdotal evidence from those working locally with entrenched street sleepers suggests that a
   significant majority of these people have a drug or alcohol addiction
OFFENDERS
 In the Arrest Referral Scheme client sample offenders were heavily concentrated in under 24
   age group.
 Arrest referral data shows that over a third of drug-related offenders fall into the 18-25 age group
   and around a quarter are 26-35.
 The data received from the Arrest Referral Scheme also highlighted the sources of funding for
   their drug habits – 39% said benefits, 18% said legitimate paid work, 16% admitted to
   shoplifting, but the proportions could be higher.
 Police intelligence suggests that dealers often come from outside the area; some come from
   London
 Anecdotal evidence suggests Cambridge is known as a place to get drugs by newly-released
   offenders.


The Arrest Referral Scheme and Drug Treatment and Testing Orders have been rolled out nationally
and are in the early phases of implementation locally. Both are designed to encourage drug-using
offenders into treatment. The courts are sentencing people to Drug Treatment and Testing Orders
and although it is early days and we are not yet up to the nationally recommended input of 20hrs
per week per order they are making an impact.

Community-based Safer Futures groups have identified a need for drugs-awareness training. The
groups have recommended that training/information be given to parents, young people and those
working with young people.

The Communities Against Drugs (CAD) money is likely to be the main driver for project work over
the next three years (until 2004). This has an enforcement focus and is not for tackling alcohol
abuse. A spending plan has been agreed for 2001-02. Health Authorities will be notified of
additional funds to support treatment service developments in 2002/03 in January 2002.
Investments will be in line with the Drug Action Team‟s Treatment Plan. A CAD Management group
is being set up to oversee the 3 years of spending.

Alcohol misuse
National research shows:
 Alcohol abuse is one of the five top issues related to offending
                                                 22
Last revised 14/01/02

  Alcohol is linked to 65% of murders, 75% of stabbings, 15% of road traffic accidents and 40% of
   domestic violence incidents
 (nationally)
The Youth Offending Service (10-17yrs) data shows that alcohol is one of the most commonly used
drugs by young offenders.

Related plans/strategies/targets
      DAT plan                                                     National Probation Service Strategic Framework
      Youth Justice Plan (YOS)                                      2001 -2004
      National Drugs Strategy                                      National Alcohol Related Crime Action Plan
      Police Performance Plan                                      Health Improvement Plan
      City Council Rough Sleepers Strategy                         Supporting People Strategy (county)
                                                                    Empty Property Strategy (district)

Strategic aims

 To improve the information available for assessing patterns of drug-related offending and
  monitoring and evaluating the impact of project work

 To recognise that, in Cambridge, young people (under 25s) and the homeless are most
  vulnerable to substance misuse and to target work accordingly

 To recognise that in Cambridge, heroin/cocaine and alcohol are the misused substances
  in a significant number of drug-related offences and to target work accordingly.

 To reduce the proportion of people reporting use of illegal drugs, especially in the target groups

 To increase the number of convictions for supply of illegal drugs, ()

 To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by 2005
  (There is no nationally agreed way of measuring this; locally we are using Probation and Arrest
  Referral monitoring data as an indicator)


Translating aims into action

OBJECTIVE                             ACTION                                                        LEAD
To improve the information available for assessing patterns of drug-related offending and monitoring and
evaluating the impact of project work
Work with the Arrest Referral          Recruit and task a CAD Information Officer                  DAT
Scheme, Drug Treatment & Testing
Order team, Youth Offending Services
(YOSs), HM Prison Service, CARATS,
Police and specialist agencies in the
voluntary sector to improve data
Work with local communities to gather  Recruit and task a CAD Community Support Worker             CAD
„soft‟ data                                                                                         management
                                                                                                    group (CAD)
To reduce the proportion of people reporting use of illegal drugs, especially in the target groups.
To increase awareness of the           Repeat Study Safely (Arts educative project) to target      CAD
dangers of drug-misuse through            university freshers
education                              Work with Student Support Services to ensure                CAD
                                          information leaflets/advice reflects local situation
                                       Support Life Education Centres to target children of        County Council
                                          primary school age

                                                        23
Last revised 14/01/02

                                         Ensure that school-based drug and alcohol education,       Health
                                          and parent education programmes reflect local issues
                                         Design and implement a local drugs education               County Council
                                          programme to meet the needs of excluded young
                                          people
                                         Provide parent/youth worker education programmes           CAD/ Safer
                                          within communities on a needs-led basis                    Futures
To reduce the opportunity and            To provide local activities for young people where the     CAD/ Safer
inclination to misuse drugs through       CAD Community Support Officer has identified needs         Futures
providing diversionary activities        Youth alcohol abuse?
                                         Homeless?

To reduce the ongoing abuse of           Evaluate the success of the Arrest Referral Scheme         DAT
substances through effective              and develop the scheme according to the outcomes of
engagement in treatment services          the evaluation
                                         Increase the number of hours treatment for those on        DAT
                                          Drug Treatment and Testing Orders to the nationally
                                          recommended level
                                         Increase the number of offenders on DTTO‟s to the          Probation
                                          national target of 90 across the county per year
                                         Continue to implement the DAT‟s Treatment Plan,            DAT
                                          improving and developing our treatment services to
                                          meet the needs of all client groups, including young
                                          people and the homeless
                                         Ensure suitable, supported housing provision is
                                          available to users at each stage of treatment? (not
                                          currently part of DAT strategy)
                                         Address substance misuse by looked after children          County Council
                                          where this is an issue
To increase the number of convictions for supply of illegal drugs, especially to the target groups
Decrease illegal use and supply of      Design and implement local training & registration          City Council
drugs/alcohol in licensed venues         scheme for doorstaff
                                       Encourage licensed venues to improve their security          City Council
                                         through the use of CCTV etc
                                       Promote the Proof of Age scheme                              Health
Increase the risk of dealing           Use mobile, covert CCTV cameras to gather evidence           Police
                                         towards arrests and successful convictions
                                       Increase police resources available for targeted drugs       Police
                                         operations
                                       Use police intelligence to make environmental                Police/City
                                         improvements in drug-dealing hotspots to increase           Council
                                         natural surveillance
                                       Commit to all new developments reaching „Secured by          City Council
                                         Design‟ standards
Increase the cost of dealing           Invest more resources into targeted police operations        Police/CAD
                                       Improve the quality of evidence gathered                     Police
                                       Increase the number of convictions for drug dealing          Police
                                       Work with criminal justice agencies to ensure consistent     Police
                                         and effective sentencing
To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by 2005
Target prolific offenders                  See “Tackling persistent Offenders” section




Tackling persistent offenders
                                                        24
Last revised 14/01/02

The Home Office defines a persistent young offender as “a young person aged 10- 17 years who
has been sentenced by any criminal court in the UK on three or more occasions for one or more
recordable offences and within three years of the last sentencing occasion is subsequently arrested
or has information laid against him for a further recordable offence “ (Home Office 1997). A similar
definition for adult persistent offenders is in the process of being drawn up by the Home Office.

Understanding of problem & existing approach
When the person committing a crime has been caught, their criminal record can be examined to see
if they have a history of offending. In 2000/01 in Cambridge 28% of adult offenders detected had
offended more than once that year. Half of these had offended more than twice; the maximum was
13 offences during the one year.

Over a quarter of Cambridge offenders (2000/01) were aged 15-19. Those under 17 are termed
„juvenile offenders‟. The re-offending rates for juvenile offenders were found to be similar to those of
adult offenders – 31% had committed more than one crime, over half of these had committed more
than 2 crimes.

The national Youth Lifestyles Survey (1998/99) found
 that the average number of offences committed by a persistent offender under 18 was five
   compared to four for persistent offenders aged 18 to 30
 Younger offenders tend to commit more commonly detected offences (e.g. criminal damage or
   shoplifting) whereas older persistent offenders were more involved in fraud and theft from the
   workplace, which are less likely to result in a caution or court appearance.
 the most prolific 10% of offenders were responsible for nearly half of all crimes by the sample.

Clearly work to stop persistent offenders re-offending, whilst challenging, has a significant effect on
crime rates. This is crucial amongst juvenile offenders to prevent them entering a lifetime‟s
involvement with the criminal justice system.

Early interventions with those at high risk of offending is also important and is part of the remit of the
Safer Futures group. Alongside this a project has been developed and funded in order to support
drug misusers and to help prevent them re-offending. An understanding of the risk factors for
persistent offending allows targeted work. They are not dissimilar for those for low-frequency
offending but some come out more strongly in persistent offenders. It should be noted that risk
factors are not necessarily causing offending but simply have a high correlation. The information
below particularly highlights drug use and mental illness (often itself related to drug use) as issues
related to persistent offending.

The following table shows, in order, the most predictive risk factors of 12-17 year old
persistent/serious offenders (findings from the Youth Lifestyles Survey 98/99)

Ordered risk factors predicting serious or persistent offending: 12 to 17 year old males.
                                                  Percentage that exhibited the factor
                                                  Serious/persistent
                                                                               Total YLS sample
                                                  offenders
Drug user (has used drugs in the last year)       52                           18
Disaffected from school                           36                           15
Hanging around in public places                   80                           52
Delinquent friends or acquaintances               64                           37
Poor parental supervision                         47                           22
Persistent truant (at least once a month)         16                           6
 A recent report by the Office for National Statistics, Psychiatric Morbidity Among Young
   Offenders, found that 9 in 10 young offenders aged between 16-20 years old showed evidence
   of mental illness.
 40% of prisoners under 21 have been in care at some stage in their lives.

                                                   25
Last revised 14/01/02


A project to work with drug-misusing prolific offenders to reduce re-offending has been developed by
the Probation Service and funding has been secured through the Communities Against Drugs
programme. It is planned to start running the programme in 2002.

Related plans/strategies
      National Probation Service Strategic Framework 2001-04
      Youth Justice Plan 2001/02
      National Drugs Strategy
      Police Performance Plan
      Intensive Supervision and Surveillance Plans

Strategic aims
Recorded crime rates will form the basis for measuring each of these –

 To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by 2005
  (linked to Substance Misuse priority area)
 To reduce the number of young people re-offending
  (linked to Safer Futures priority area)

Translating aims into action

OBJECTIVE                             ACTION                                                                  LEAD
To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by 2005
Target prolific offenders                 Intensive supervision and surveillance of identified               ISSP project
                                                offenders in their community
                                               Rapidly return offenders to court or parole board for         Probation
                                                breach or reoffending
                                               Confront attitudes towards drug misuse and offending          Probation / ARS
                                               Deal with drugs problems related to offending                 Probation
                                               Deal with problems associated with social reintegration       Probation
                                               Provide offenders with strategies to live law-abiding lives   Probation
                                                through tried and tested group work programmes and
                                                individual supervision
To reduce the number of young people re-offending
Reduce re-offending rates amongst           Confront young offenders with the consequences of                YOS
10-17 year olds and 18-25 year olds          their offending (10-17s)
                                            Encourage reparation of victims by young people (10-             YOS
                                             17s)
                                            Offender programmes that have a track record in                  Probation
                                             reducing re-offending (18-25s)
                                            Assist in the development of a programme to improve              Health
                                             the care and treatment of young people by building up
                                             locally-based child and adolescent mental health
                                             services.
                                            Increase the basic skills of offenders to enable them to         Probation
                                             get into employment
                                            Increase the amount of supported accommodation                   Probation/ YOS
                                             available for offenders under supervision


Reassuring Communities
Reassurance can be defined as „how safe the public feel, and how much confidence they have that
crime, disorder and incivility are under control‟.


                                                            26
Last revised 14/01/02

In recent years the police and partners have been successful in reducing crime especially in the
areas of vehicle crime and burglary. However, the public perceives crime is rising and there is a
disproportionate fear of crime. Crime reduction itself will not reduce the fear of crime and deliver the
desired outcome of reassurance.

Living in fear of crime clearly can have a negative impact on someone‟s quality of life just as actual
experience of crime can. Consequently as partnership work continues to address the actual causes
of offending itself, so too we will be concentrating on reducing fear as a specific priority in the next
three years.

Consultation has showed that some sections of the community have a higher than average fear of
crime where they feel more vulnerable to certain crime types. For example, disabled people, older
people & ethnic minorities have a significantly higher fear of burglary than the general population;
women are more concerned about being mugged; ethnic minorities and the gay community feel
particularly vulnerable to abuse, harassment and other hate-based crimes.

The way crime is reported in the media and the amount of disorder / anti-social behaviour in
people‟s neighbourhoods are both significant influences on people‟s level of concern.

Understanding of problem & existing approach
The Partnership has already a wealth of information available to it following local consultation and
National research. Interestingly, as is often the case in many other cities, there are some wards of
Cambridge where although the actual crime rate is higher, the fear of crime is lower. Conversely
there are other wards where crime is relatively low and yet people fear crime more.

We need to understand why this is.

Research has suggested what type of things make residents more fearful of crime or disorder. It is
apparent that even when crime is actually falling, as is the case in Cambridge, there are factors that
still make people feel unsafe.

Some examples:
 People begging
 Groups of people (youths) hanging around
 Boarded up windows
 Graffiti
 Abandoned/burnt-out vehicles
 Damaged bus shelters
 Vandalised telephones
 Overgrown shrubs/bushes (places to hide)
 Poor lighting

There are other elements that actually make people feel safer, such as:
 More sustained visible, accessible, knowledgeable & locally known policing
 Improved communication between agencies and the public, particularly in telling Cambridge
   people what is going on and offering practical advice.

The Partnership already has information on some of these factors, we need to establish base line
information on as many as we can to better manage our response. The Partnership will therefore
seek the views of citizens and agencies working in the community to inform an audit of their local
areas and plan further action.

Related plans/strategies/targets
   Cambridgeshire Police Communications Strategy
   Cambridge City Council Press Release guidelines
   Cambridgeshire County Council Communications Strategy
   Cambridge Community Safety Partnership Communications Strategy
                                                     27
Last revised 14/01/02

 Anti Social Behaviour Communications Strategy (Partnership)

Strategic aims
    To reassure Cambridge City residents, workers and visitors by reducing fear of crime and
     disorder and responding to factors which generate fear and lead to negative concepts.

A survey will measure
a) Percentage of residents who said that they feel „fairly safe‟ or „very safe‟ after dark whilst outside
in the local authority area
b) Percentage of residents who said that they feel „fairly safe‟ or „very safe‟ during the day whilst
outside in the local authority area

It is proposed that the police are refocused to take a key role in delivering greater reassurance
alongside partner agencies through the local Community Safety Partnerships. This will require the
co-ordination of an interagency response to a wide range of environmental, nuisance and disorder
issues, which instil fear in the public.

Achievements in public reassurance will produce the following outcomes:
 Reduced concern about crime
 Reduced feeling of fear
 More visible locally known officers in neighbourhoods
 Greater public trust and confidence in the police and the extended police family (neighbourhood
   rangers, etc)
 Greater information flow and intelligence which in turn can be used to address crime and
   disorder.

Translating aims into action
OBJECTIVE                            ACTION                                                    LEAD
To reassure Cambridge City residents, workers and visitors by reducing fear of crime and disorder and
responding to factors which generate fear and lead to negative concepts.
To identify the most significant      Develop a method for quantitatively measuring fear of   Partnership Board
influences on a community‟s fear of      crime and its triggers.
crime                                 Use this measure to guide work in this area             Partnership Board
To improve the visibility and         Ensure Community based officers (Community beat         Police
accessibility of the police              Managers, Special Constables and Sector staff)
                                         become more recognised on their beats, through
                                         increased numbers of foot / cycle patrols, local beat
                                         offices and surgeries, mobile police stations, and
                                         community events.
                                      Support local communities in finding solutions to local Police/ City
                                         problems, accessing funding and publicising success   Council
                                      Increase involvement in schools and youth venues        Police
                                      Make opportunities to meet with and listen to hard to   Police
                                         reach groups such as older people and minority
                                         residents.                                            Police
                                      Make it easier for the community to contact their local
                                         police, by phone, electronically or in person.        Police
                                      Ensure feedback is given to those who have cause to
                                         contact the police and offering prompt and well-
                                         informed advice.
To improve the visibility and         As with police officers, enhance the visibility of      City Council
accessibility of other “capable          patrolling uniformed City council Neighbourhood
quardians” e.g. rangers, wardens.        Rangers across the City.
                                      Explore opportunities to engage and work to enhance     Police/ City
                                         other visible signs of guardianship in the local      Council
                                         community, such as Neighbourhood Watch schemes,
                                         publicising CCTV networks and so on.
                                                       28
Last revised 14/01/02

To agree and implement a joint               Ensure any press releases are (a) in context and (b)      Police/ City
communications / marketing Strategy           are designed not to increase fear whilst still offering   Council
                                              reassurance.
                                             Publicise the work of Cambridge Community Safety          Partnership
                                              Partnership                                               Board / groups
                                             Publicise successes and deal with any major incidents     Police
                                              quickly and corporately.
                                             Develop a Partnership Communication / Media Strategy      Partnership
                                                                                                        Board
To particularly support vulnerable           Prioritise work to address Domestic Violence, Racial      Partnership
groups with a higher fear of crime i.e.       and Homophobic assault and harassment
older people, ethnic minorities,                                                                        Partnership/ Property
                                             Continue to support Bogus Caller initiatives and the      Crime group
women and the gay community.                  Bobby Scheme
                                             Prioritise Disability groups and ethnic minority groups   Police
                                              for crime prevention advice
To reduce visible levels of disorder in      Develop “visual audit” as a tool for measuring visible    Police/ City
neighbourhoods                                signs of disorder in neighbourhoods and prioritising      Council
                                              action accordingly
                                             Continue work to address graffiti (see ASB section)       City Council/
                                                                                                        Probation
                                             Meet published targets for street cleanliness             City Council
                                             Use changes in legislation and council policy to remove   City Council
                                              abandoned vehicles more quickly
                                             Empty Homes strategy                                      City Council
                                             Enable residents to improve their neighbourhoods with     City Council
                                              Environmental Improvement Grants                          City Council
                                             Continue to support 24 hour CCTV in the City Centre,
                                              Arbury Court and other existing schemes                   City Council
                                             Seek to obtain further private finance for provision,
                                              cleaning and maintenance of public toilets                City Council
                                             Remove fly tips within 1 day
                                             Increase public satisfaction with the cleanliness of      City Council
                                              roads and public spaces                                   City Council
To improve the built environment             Increase the level of Crime Prevention through            City Council/
                                              Environmental Design principles incorporated within       Police
                                              new developments
                                             Identify areas where poor design and conditions are       Police
                                              aiding the generation of crime, the fear of crime and
                                              anti-social behaviour and prioritise for action
                                             Target environmental improvements and improved            City Council
                                              maintenance to these areas as resources allow

Communications Strategy
Communication plays a major part in reassuring communities. British Crime Survey research has
shown that the fear of crime is often disproportionate to the actual risk of victimisation and that it can
adversely affect the quality of life of certain communities. The effects are not evenly distributed, they
are concentrated within certain communities, and the most vulnerable people in society are often
affected. Public perceptions of local crime levels overestimate the problem and so it is important for
members of the community to have access to the facts. Targeting public perceptions can have a
greater effect on the fear of crime than the actual level of crime.

In 1999 the Audit Commission made a recommendation to partnerships regarding the need to draw
together diverse communication networks into a single communication framework. In consequence,
it is essential for the Partnership to consider its current communication practices and, if necessary,
develop and implement a new approach. A well thought out communication strategy can provide a
systematic means for working with the media; providing the community with a true picture of crime
and disorder in their area, and enable the Partnership to raise their profile.

                                                            29
Last revised 14/01/02


When communicating with key audiences, the Partnership will:
 Provide local community with clear information about crime in their area and what the
  partnership is doing to address this
 Consider the impact on the fear of crime
 Aim to raise the profile of the Partnership
 Ensure that communication is a two-way process


Working better together in Partnership
The Crime and Disorder Act (1998) requires that local authorities and the police work together , with
other key agencies, to develop and implement strategies for reducing crime and disorder at district
level.

In order to facilitate better working relations within partnerships established by the Crime and
Disorder Act (1998) the Cambridge City Community Safety Partnership, guidelines will be
established and followed.

In order to continue to develop as an effective partnership, the CSP acknowledges the need for
constant maintenance over the long-term. The Partnership will endeavour to:

   Establish a clear identity for the Partnership.
   Establish a clear role expectation for each partner.
   Realign services, strategies and policies where necessary.
   Set aside an appropriate amount of time to partnership building
   Provide adequate training to allow for all members to make a valuable contribution to Cambridge
    City Partnership.
   Consult with and involve the local community.


Partners roles and responsibilities
As mentioned above, it is necessary for each partner agency to have a clearly identifiable role to
enable them to contribute to the overall work of the Partnership. The City Partnership agencies will
provide

   A chair that is rotated yearly
   Drive to ensure delivery
   The expertise needed to make good decisions
   Investigate what resources are needed
   Resources to carry out agreed work or actions
   Commitment to hold the Partnership together
   Performance management to monitor the Working groups group’s progress
   Structures that ensure tasks are completed

In addition Cambridge City Partnership will encourage the involvement of elected members, produce
an updated Partnership development to review individual agencies‟ contribution and encourage
agencies not already fully engaged become more involved.

Information Sharing Protocol
Section 115 of the Crime and Disorder Act “establishes the power to disclose information, which is
central to the Act‟s partnership approach” (Crime and Disorder Act 1998: Introductory Guide, Home
Office). In Cambridgeshire, an Information Sharing Protocol has been in place since 2000 and is
signed by the six district councils in old Cambridgeshire, the Probation Service, County Council,
Cambridgeshire Constabulary and the Health Authority.

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The protocol provides guidance on how officers and employees of each signatory agency can
lawfully and fairly exchange personal, depersonalised and non-personal information that can be
used to:

Assist strategic planning under the Act;
Help local partnerships to implement the provisions of the Act;
Assist Youth Offending Teams in accordance with the Act.

For more information on the protocol please contact…

Accountability
The Partnership will develop processes to ensure accountability using

SMART targets,
Quarterly monitoring
Annual reviews

Mainstreaming/ Section 17
Section 17(Crime and Disorder Act 1998) is a guiding principle of all partnerships and requires the
following provisions. Cambridge City Partnership will respond in the following way

Provide Section 17 training for all engaged in the field of community safety.
Consider Section 17 and mainstreaming in all policies and strategies produced.
Consider crime and disorder reduction in business planning processes

Translating aims into action
OBJECTIVE                                ACTION                                                        LEAD
To develop more effective partnerships
To ensure that the partnership is           To review and amend the Partnership development           Partnership
constantly developing and reviewing it       plan
processes to maintain its efficiency        Through the development plan there should be a            Partnership
and effectiveness                            consistent review of the partners goals and purpose in
                                             order to maintain support for the vision and purpose of
                                             the partnership                                           Partnership
                                            To ensure that agencies not fully engaged are
                                             encourage and supported to do so                          Partnership
                                            To ensure the greater involvement of elected members      Partnership
                                                                                                       Partnership
                                            To encourage the active involvement of private sector
                                                                                                       Partnership
                                            To encourage the active involvement of the voluntary
                                             sector
Ensure that knowledge and                   Establish a plan of training through the partnership      Partnerships
understanding of Section 17 of the           development plan to ensure that mainstreaming is an       Board
Crime & Disorder is maintain                 intrinsic part of partnership working
throughout partnership members and
those in the field of community safety

To maintain the effectiveness of            The review of the existing information sharing protocol   Partnership and
existing information sharing protocols       and for all partners to sign up to this                   individual
and establish new systems to improve        To introduce the routine presentation of crime and        agencies
communication and information                disorder data and changes in patterns into partnership
sharing between partners                     meetings
                                            To ensure that actions are determined to address the
                                             above
To ensure accountability for                All community safety strategies and working group         Partnership and

                                                          31
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continuous improvement of the               action plans drawn will contain targets, realistic      Working groups
partnership and working groups work         timescales, and systems for evaluation and review

To work closely with the designated working group to devise and deliver projects
To establish better links to the           Establish quarterly meetings between the working        Partnership
working groups and the partnership          group leaders and a representative of the Partnership
board in order to                           board to provide and two-way feedback process
                                           Draw up simple monitoring forms to establish and        Partnership and
   Establish a feedback process            record the process of the working groups action plans   working group
   Facilitate the Working Groups           and circulate to all working group and the board        leaders
    action plans                           Provide each working group with a designated
   To prevent duplication of work by       Partnership board member to provide partnership
    the task groups                         feedback and support and to ensure that the needs of
                                            the working groups are communicated to the
                                            Partnership Board



Ensure the effectiveness of the            Annual review of each working groups in conjunction     Partnership and
working groups and maintain the             with the working group leader to ensure that            Working Group
productiveness of the working groups        membership of the group in conducive to effective
                                            project working and meeting the aims of the action
                                            plans                                                   Partnership
                                           Ensure that working groups are provided with up to
                                            date information on where to obtain resourcing for
                                            projects




Making things happen and reviewing progress
Over the next three years the Community Safety Partnership will be working to implement this
strategy and will endeavour to achieve the objectives set within it. Detailed action plans are at
present being put together by the working groups to enable this to occur.

Each action plan will exist for a one-year period; it will be reviewed annually and a new plan
established for the forthcoming year. Each plan is a step on the way to achieving a successful
strategy. Targets set within this process will be monitored on a quarterly basis by the Partnership,
and lead officers held accountable if a slippage occurs.

The multi-agency Crime Research Team will be a vital component of the monitoring process.
Following on from the research collated for the audit, the team will provide the working groups with a
more detailed analysis of the issues they face and enable baselines to be drawn for subsequent
comparison.

An annual review will be published at the end of each financial year and will be widely distributed via
channels including the new Partnership website. The website will be updated regularly and will also
provide additional details regarding projects.

Resourcing the work
Partners bring considerable human and financial resources to the Partnership from their mainstream
budgets. In addition, contributions to a partnership Pooled Fund of £12k will be made by the
statutory partners for 2002 and possibly annually for 2003-2005. Cambridge City Council has £80k
Safer City Grants available each year, the aim of this grant is to reduce crime, the fear of crime and
                                                         32
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anti-social behaviour, particularly in partnership priority areas. The Partnership will also explore the
possibility of sponsorship funding from local businesses and accessing funding streams in related
areas e.g. Arts/Sports.

The government gave Cambridge Community Safety Partnership a grant of £116.7k for
Communities Against Drugs in 2001 and is expected to do the same for 2002. The Home Office
also gave the Cambridge £46k for Partnership Development (training, information systems, etc) in
2001 which will be repeated in 2002. There are other funding streams available nationally which the
partnership will bid for in 2002-2005, for example a successful Street Warden bid was made in 2001
and bids will continue to be made for all the relevant grants available nationally.

The Cost of Crime in Cambridge
Using an approach based on national research on the costs of crime and the police CDRP data on
crime it is estimated that the cost of crime in Cambridge City is £90 million.

Appendices
Glossary of terms

Cambridge Community Safety Partnership’s Home Office Family Group

Audit data sources/consultation

Related plans/strategies/targets

PROPERTY CRIME
Plan               Targets
National Crime     BV126 Domestic burglaries per 1000 households and percentage detected
Reduction          126 Target: To reduce domestic burglary by 25%, with no district having a rate more than 3x national average, by
Strategy / Best    2005
Value              BV128 Vehicle crimes per 1000 population and percentage detected
Performance        128 Target: To reduce vehicle crime by 30% by 2004
Plan
Property Crime     To reduce burglary, arson & criminal damage by 25% by 2006
Reduction Action   “The most successful initiatives often tackle a range of crime types and not one specific category”
Team Report
Vehicle Crime      The main elements of the VCRAT strategy are:
Reduction Action
Team Report
                   Improving new and used car security

                        electronic immobilisers have been required by EU law on all new cars manufactured since October 1998.
                        encourage manufacturers to fit deadlocks and laminated side and rear glazing;
                        encourage retailers to sell cars with a security package consisting of an electronic immobiliser (or mechanical
                        immobiliser if more appropriate) locking wheel nuts and window etching.

                   Improving car park security

                        The ACPO Secured Car Parks scheme has proved its effectiveness in reducing crime, with a sample
                        showing average reductions of about 70%. There are currently over 700 Secured Car Parks.
                        Funding of £153 million for CCTV has been made available over 3 years and a significant proportion will go
                        towards improving car park security:
                        So far 258 car park schemes with a capital value of over £45 million have been approved. These will deliver
                        improved security in 659 car parks, of which 410 aim to achieve “Secured” status.

                   Improving procedures at the DVLA and better regulation of the salvage industry

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Last revised 14/01/02


                       Improved vehicle registration procedures centre around raising the status of the Vehicle Registration
                        Document (V5) so that it is better protected from fraud and contains more information of value to the
                        consumer
                       Requiring a Vehicle Identity Check before DVLA re-register a vehicle previously notified as written-off.
                        Reducing the market for stolen vehicles will in turn, over time, reduce the amount of vehicle theft. Better
                        regulation of the salvage industry will help stop cars being stolen for spare parts and to help combat “ringing”:
                       existing voluntary Code of Practice between the insurance and salvage industries has been enhanced to
                        make it harder for thieves to dispose of stolen vehicles.
                       maximising the benefits of the enhanced Code of Practice requires it to be given statutory backing. A public
                        consultation document was published on 27 April. This link also contains a copy of the voluntary Code of
                        Practice

                    Better enforcement

                        improving information. The Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill, currently before Parliament, makes
                        provision for information from DVLA‟s driver records to be accessed through PNC on a 24 hour basis
                        work is in progress to give police access on a 24 hour basis to computerised MOT records and to an
                        insurance industry database of insured vehicles and drivers.

                    Raising levels of vehicle security awareness amongst motorists

                    Motorists need to help:

                       generate a demand for better vehicle security by taking vehicle security more into account when making
                        purchasing decisions
                       generate a demand for more Secured Car Parks.
                       change their behaviour and do simple things like locking their car and not leaving valuables in it; and buying
                        and using appropriate security products.

Youth Justice       Commitment to reduce levels of burglary
Plan
National            Offender programmes that have a track record in reducing reoffending
Probation Service   Reduce reoffending rates by 5% for offenders under supervision
Strategic
Framework 2001-
04
Cambridgeshire      Social services will work with older people to reduce the risk of them becoming victims
County Council      YOS will target young burglars and car thieves through Final warning and court based interventions
Corporate
Community
Safety Strategy




VIOLENT CRIME
Plan                Targets
City Council        BV127 Violent crimes per 1000 population and percentage detected, of those robberies per 1000
Best Value          population and percentage detected (to be replaced with targets relating to alcohol-related violence &
Performance         violence in public places)
Plan                BV174 The number of racial incidents recorded by the authority per 100,000 population (01-02 target is
                    30)
                    BV175 The percentage of racial incidents that resulted in further action (01-02 target is 80%)A3 The
                    number of domestic violence refuge places per 10,000 population which are provided or supported by
                    the authority (01-02 target is 03)
Police              We will identify and protect vulnerable sections of the community, including repeat victims, ethnic
Performance         minority groups and victims of domestic violence;

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Last revised 14/01/02

Plan
                   Policing will be undertaken in active partnership with other agencies and the public. We will fully
                   support the local Community Safety Strategies (CSSs) in order to improve community safety, crime
                   prevention and crime reduction. CSSs will inform Divisional Performance Plans;

                   Violent crimes per 1000 population

                   Violent crimes percentage primary detected

                   BV175 The percentage of reported racial incidents resulting in further investigation(01-02 target is
                   100%)
Youth Justice      County PSA target
Plan (YOS)         – To reduce the number of young people re-offending.
National           More involvement of victims of serious sexual and other violent crime
Probation          Valuing and achieving diversity in the National Probation Service and the service it provides
Service            Risk assessment and multi agency protection panels
Strategic
Framework
2001-04
Cambridgeshire     The County Council Community safety Team will manage The Countywide domestic violence project
County Council
Corporate          The Community Safety Team will provide support and development for the Open Out scheme
Community
Safety Strategy
Supporting         Funding support services in supported housing, including specialist projects e.g. places of safety for
People             victims of domestic violence
Strategy
(county)
Domestic           All actions related to increasing reporting of DV and reducing repeat victimisation
Violence
Coordinator‟s
Action Plan


ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Plan                    Targets
ASB Strategy            Improving data and recording systems before setting SMART targets. Has set three themed areas.
(Cambridge              Developing a toolkit of measures to respond to low-level outbreaks of anti social behaviour.
Community Safety        Problem-solving groups convened to address acute cases of anti social behaviour.
Partnership)
Safer Futures           ..set up projects to address crime & anti social behaviour in Kings Hedges and Trumpington
action plan             To develop protocols with agencies to share information about young people who have a high risk of
(Cambridge              offending or victimisation
Community Safety        To review environmental design in “hotspot” areas
Partnership)            ..research into sufficiency of youth provision in Cambridge…
                        …summer holiday programmes for known offenders and those at risk of offending
                        ..development of a multi-agency preventative strategy in the reduction of youth offending in
                        neighbourhoods in Cambridge…
Police Performance      Supports priorities in local Crime & Disorder Reduction Strategies as part of ministerial priority "To
Plan                    reduce local problems of crime and disorder in partnership with local authorities, other agencies and
                        the public"

                        We will respond positively to disorder and nuisance and work with local agencies and the
                        community in seeking solutions to improve people's quality of life;

                        We will work closely with others to prevent and detect youth crime, deal speedily and
                                                             35
Last revised 14/01/02

                        effectively with young offenders and reduce re-offending;
City Council report     …improving support and referral services for entrenched street drinkers.
on Street Drinking      .. a study into the nature of street begging in Cambridge and the appropriateness of alternatives...
(Nov 2000)              … bid to the Rough Sleepers Unit, for people with substance misuse problems..
                        .. adoptive powers to tackle misbehaviour associated with the consumption of alcohol in public places rather
                        than the making of local bye laws.
                        .. influence the joint strategies of commissioners of substance misuse services to ensure that they recognise
                        and respond to the needs of entrenched street drinkers.
City Council Rough      Lots indirectly relevant – directly relevant are:
Sleepers Strategy       Explore the possibility of co-opting the Single Homelessness and Rough Sleepers Coordinator onto
                        the Crime & Disorder group and of including people who sleep rough as a „vulnerable group‟ within
                        the Group‟s work plan.
                        Work with the DAT, HA, Lifespan and provider agencies to establish the exact need for any service
                        options designed to meet the needs of homeless people with substance misuse problems (in
                        particular additional detox beds and both „wet‟ and „dry‟ accommodation.
Cambridge Street        Currently being prepared
Life Strategy
Cambs Cultural          Currently being prepared
Strategy
PAT 8 report            Key recommendations include:
(national gov)
                             piloting neighbourhood agreements in deprived areas where communities agree clear
                             standards of acceptable behaviour and service providers set out the services that the
                             community can expect;
                             a named person in each local authority (LA) district to co-ordinate action on anti-social
                             behaviour;
                             a practical advice pack and an expert group to disseminate „what works in reducing anti-
                             social behaviour‟ to local practitioners;
                             tackling the hard core through setting clear expectations of behaviour, taking tough
                             enforcement action using Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) and injunctions, via effective
                             action through the criminal courts and evicting where necessary;
                             encouraging the development of local authority level specialist teams that are made up of
                             representatives from a variety of agencies working together to combat anti-social behaviour;
                             good practice protocols and simpler guidance to encourage agencies to share information
                             whilst remaining within the law; and
                             minimising the perverse outcomes of exclusion (such as homelessness) by action to
                             change perpetrators‟ behaviour and transparent exclusion policies on a case-by-case basis.
National Drugs          Aim 2 - To protect our communities from drug-related anti-social and criminal behaviour
Strategy
                        KPT2 - To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by
                        2005 and by 50% by 2008
Health
Improvement Plan
Youth Justice Plan      Primary objectives:
2001/02 (County)         Preventing offending by children and young people
                         Tackle offending and the risk factors associated with it
                         Coordinate the provision of youth justice services
                        Key themes
                         Swift administration of justice
                         Confronting young offenders with the consequences of their offending
                         Tackle the factors which place a young person at risk of offending
                         Encourage reparation o victims by young people
                         Reinforcing the responsibility of parents
Behaviour Support       Statutory duty under Education Act 1997 to set out policies and arrangements of supporting schools
                                                               36
Last revised 14/01/02

Plan (Education -       with a view to reducing exclusion and truancy
County)
Best Value              Homelessness indicators – speed of processing applications & progression into permanent housing
Performance Plan        Average time taken to remove fly-tips
Street Wardens          Currently being prepared
work programme
Police Reform Bill      Civilian “community support officers” to tackle minor offences and public order
(currently at white     Revamp of ASBOs to clamp down harder on juveniles
paper stage)            National non-emergency telephone line for local residents to report worries about crime
                        Bonuses for police officers prepared to stay working on the beat
                        Public reassurance agenda – influenced by visual indicators in the community such as graffiti
Cambridgeshire          Social services will be involved in all Anti- Social Behaviour Problem Solving Groups
County Council
Corporate
Community Safety
Strategy
Empty Property          How the council will deal with empty property
Strategy (district)


SAFER FUTURES (YOUNG PEOPLE AS VICTIMS & OFFENDERS)
Plan                     Relevant targets
ASB Strategy             Improving data and recording systems before setting SMART targets but one of three themed
(Partnership)            priorities is “Tackling intimidation/disruptive young people”. Developing a toolkit of measures to
                         respond to low-level outbreaks of anti social behaviour. Problem-solving groups convened to
                         address acute cases of anti social behaviour. Recognises role of Safer Futures in developing
                         preventative measures.
Youth Justice Plan       County PSA target
2001/02 (County -         To reduce the number of young people re-offending.
YOS)                     Primary objectives:
                          Preventing offending by children and young people
                          Tackle offending and the risk factors associated with it
                          Coordinate the provision of youth justice services
                         Key themes
                          Swift administration of justice
                          Confronting young offenders with the consequences of their offending
                          Tackle the factors which place a young person at risk of offending
                          Encourage reparation of victims by young people
                          Reinforcing the responsibility of parents
Sure Start
programme in Kings
Hedges & Abbey
Area Child Protection    The Committee is an inter-agency forum, which brings together representatives of all the main
Committee Plan           agencies responsible for helping to protect children from abuse and neglect
Children‟s Services      Statutory duty under the 1989 Children Act. Providing information about need, current
Plan 2001-04 (Social     resources and proposals for change. Role of Children & Family Services in helping to prevent
Services)                delinquency.
Quality Protects         Targets for reducing offending by looked after children; also covers offending by children in
Management Action        need.
Plan (Social
Services)
Community                County PSA target; to promote social inclusion of vulnerable and disaffected young people by:
Education plan              - engaging young people, especially those in hard to reach groups, in youth participation
(Education)                      activities to promote active citizenship
                            - providing training in interview and research skills to 80 young people
                            - establishing 10 patch based and 2 district based youth fora
                            - providing training in planning, decision making and the democratic process to 120
                                                             37
Last revised 14/01/02

                                 young people
Care and Education      Key policies for 2001-02
Plan 2001-2004           Closing the gap in the availability of childcare between disadvantaged areas and others
                         Accessible, affordable childcare of quality in every community
                         Promotion of an integrated patchwork of childcare and supervised activity for 0-14+ year
                            olds in local communities
                         Out of school learning activities
                         Ensure connectivity between County and district services offering out of school learning
                            provision for 5-14+ yr olds
Behaviour Support       Statutory duty under Education Act 1997 to set out policies and arrangements of supporting
Plan (Education -       schools with a view to reducing exclusion and truancy
County)
Draft Cultural      Draft themes and objectives include:
Strategy (County)    To actively support and encourage social inclusion by taking positive action to stimulate
                         participation in cultural opportunities
                     To contribute to community safety by ensuring a wide and diverse range of cultural activity
                         is available to all
                     To support the regeneration of the county through he growth of the cultural economy
Connexions Business To help, support and guide young people through teenage years “..connecting policies and
Plan 2002-05        services from across the Government, local and national, so that they make sense to and
                    deliver results for all young people”
                    Key objectives are:
                     Information advice and guidance for all young people
                     Intensive support programme for those in need
                     Working with young people to remove barriers which may prevent them form achieving their
                         full potential
                     Inclusion – ensuring services for young people engage with young people whatever their
                         needs
                     Ensuring that young people take advantage of the education training and employment
                         services available to them
                    Continuous development and improvement to services for young people
Education           A three year LEA development plan to raise standards of achievement in schools by enhancing
Development Plan    curriculum provision, tackling underachievement and improving educational access, It is subject
                    to annual review,
Police Performance  Supports priorities in local Crime & Disorder Reduction Strategies as part of ministerial priority
Plan                "To reduce local problems of crime and disorder in partnership with local authorities, other
                    agencies and the public"

                        We will respond positively to disorder and nuisance and work with local agencies and
                        the community in seeking solutions to improve people's quality of life;

                        We will work closely with others to prevent and detect youth crime, deal speedily and
                        effectively with young offenders and reduce re-offending;
National Probation      Intervening early to take young people away from crime
Service Strategic       Offender programmes that have a track record in reducing reoffending
Framework 2001-04       80% of all community service work to be related to crime reduction
DAT plan (Youth         County PSA targets
Offending Service is     – To reduce Class A drug use among young people.
lead on second two       – to increase the number of young people (U18) engaged in treatment services as reported
targets)                      on the National Drug Treatment Monitoring Unit
                         – to reduce the % of young people (U18) engaged in treatment reporting heroin and cocaine
                              use by 30% by 2004
National Drugs          Aim 1 - To help young people resist drug misuse in order to achieve their full potential in society
Strategy
                        KPT1 - To reduce the proportion of people under 25 reporting use of illegal drugs in the
                        last month and previous year substantially and to reduce the proportion of young
                        people using the drugs which cause the greatest harm - heroin and cocaine - by 25%
                                                            38
Last revised 14/01/02

                           by 2005 and by 50% by 2008
PAT 12 (National           Recognises wealth of existing initiatives and understanding of risk factors for young people.
Strategy for               Looks at ways of bringing knowledge and practical work together to improve quality of life and
Neighbourhood              future expectations for young people.
Renewal)
NSPCC report               Recommends that to address the vulnerability of children and young people, strategies should
Building Safer             consider:
Communities for
Children                         child protection and victim support needs
                                 thinking about the specific needs of children & young people in all community safety
                                  projects
                                 the provision of family/parenting support services
                                 the provision of safe leisure and play services
                                 the provision of information on personal safety, health and citizenship
                                 initiatives to reduce the fear of crime

                           links to multi-agency planning documents such as children‟s services plans, domestic violence
                           strategies and HImPs
Domestic Violence
Action Plan
Youth Participation
programme (District)
Youth Development
Plan (District)
Play Strategy              Policy and service aims include:
(District)                 To target resources on families, communities and neighbourhoods which are under-resourced..
                           To develop and support voluntary sector provision, especially at local level; to involve children &
                           parents
Health Improvement         Children priority area – particularly safeguarding children & social exclusion priorities
Plan (Health               Additional family support services in priority neighbourhoods to reduce risk factors in future
Authority)                 offending.
Economic                   Providing support & training opportunities to the most disadvantaged
Development
Strategy (District)
Voluntary Sector           Recognises contribution and support needs of voluntary sector
Strategy (District)
Best Value                 Number of play areas provided by the council per 1,000 children under 12 (current perf & target
Performance Plan           is 4.4)



SUBSTANCE MISUSE

Plan                    Targets
DAT plan (Youth         County PSA targets
Offending Service        – To reduce Class A drug use among young people.
is lead on second        – to increase the number of young people (U18) engaged in treatment services as reported on
two PSA targets)             the Regional Drug Misuse Database
                         – to reduce the % of young people (U18) engaged in treatment reporting heroin and cocaine use
                             by 30% by 2004
                         2001-02 actions include
                         Research and work with local agencies on models of effective intervention
                         Work with YOS to meet PSA targets with young drug using offenders
                         Continue Arrest Referral and DTTO work
                         Develop methods to better identify and understand the needs of particular communities
                         Link with CDRPs to tackle local concerns

                                                               39
Last revised 14/01/02

                           Improve links with social housing providers
                           Develop further work with pubs, clubs and licensers
                           Review current treatment arrangements
                           Review ability to respond to homeless drug users
                           Develop local strategy to tackle alcohol misuse
                           Work with Eastern Region DATs, DPAS and HO Crime Reduction Unit to develop regional
                            approaches to stifling availability where appropriate
Youth Justice           County PSA target
Plan (YOS)              – To reduce the number of young people re-offending.
                         – to increase the number of young people (U18) engaged in treatment services as reported on
                             the Regional Drug Misuse Database
                         – to reduce the % of young people (U18) engaged in treatment reporting heroin and cocaine use
                             by 30% by 2004
National Drugs          Aim 1 - To help young people resist drug misuse in order to achieve their full potential in society
Strategy
                        KPT1 - To reduce the proportion of people under 25 reporting use of illegal drugs in the
                        last month and previous year substantially and to reduce the proportion of young people
                        using the drugs which cause the greatest harm - heroin and cocaine - by 25% by 2005 and
                        by 50% by 2008

                        Aim 2 - To protect our communities from drug-related anti-social and criminal behaviour

                        KPT2 - To reduce levels of repeat offending amongst drug misusing offenders by 25% by
                        2005 and by 50% by 2008

                        Aim 3 - To enable people with drug problems to overcome them and live healthy and crime-free
                        lives

                        KPT3 - To increase participation of problem drugs misusers, including prisoners, in drug
                        treatment programmes which have a positive impact on health and crime by 66% by 2005
                        and by 100% by 2008

                        Aim 4 - To stifle the availability of illegal drugs on our streets

                        KPT4 - To reduce access to all drugs amongst young people (under 25) significantly, and to reduce
                        access to the drugs which cause the greatest harm, particularly heroin and cocaine, by 25% by
                        2005 and by 50% by 2008
Police                  Supports priorities in local Crime & Disorder Reduction Strategies as part of ministerial
Performance Plan        priority "To reduce local problems of crime and disorder in partnership with local
                        authorities, other agencies and the public"

                        We will target drug related crime and seek to reduce the acceptability and availability of
                        drugs in partnership with other agencies;

National                Reduce reoffending rates by 28% for drug misusing offenders
Probation Service       Multi agency DTTO team to enable offenders to reduce their reliance on drugs and related
Strategic               involvement in crime
Framework 2001-
04
City Council            Lots indirectly relevant – directly relevant are:
Rough Sleepers          Explore the possibility of co-opting the Single Homelessness and Rough Sleepers Coordinator onto
Strategy                the Crime & Disorder group and of including people who sleep rough as a „vulnerable group‟ within
                        the Group‟s work plan.
                        Work with the DAT, HA, Lifespan and provider agencies to establish the exact need for any service
                        options designed to meet the needs of homeless people with substance misuse problems (in
                        particular additional detox beds and both „wet‟ and „dry‟ accommodation.
National Alcohol        Summary of Key Actions
                                                                 40
Last revised 14/01/02

Related Crime           Under age drinking
Action Plan             1. Rigorous enforcement of the legislative provisions set out in the Licensing Acts of 1964 and 1988
                        to prevent the sale of alcohol to under 18s.
                        2. The provisions of the Confiscation of Alcohol (Young Persons) Act 1997 to be widely used to
                        reduce the incidence of under age drinking and associated nuisance in public places.
                        3. More widespread use of "Proof of Age" schemes to restrict under 18s‟ access to alcohol in
                        licensed premises.
                        4. Establish whether more can be done to strengthen alcohol education for young people and
                        adults.
                        Public drunkenness
                        5. More widespread adoption of good practice in preventing alcohol-related problems on licensed
                        premises, including:
                        exclusion of troublemakers;
                        a refusal to sell alcohol to those who are already intoxicated
                        good design and management of premises to avoid factors which can increase the potential for
                        disorder.
                        6. Tough new powers for the police to enable them to close premises to deal effectively with violent
                        and disorderly behaviour.
                        7. Consideration of primary legislation to provide an adoptive power in place of existing byelaws to
                        prevent the consumption of alcohol and associated misbehaviour in
                        specified public places, and
                        allow the police to seize open bottles, glasses or cans.
                        8. Consideration to be given to the use of Fixed Penalty Notices as an effective and speedy
                        response to minor offences of public drunkenness.
                        9. Targeting of hotspots associated with alcohol-related crime and disorder.
                        10. Greater use to be made of information sharing schemes – such as Pub-watch schemes - to
                        keep troublemakers from pubs and clubs.
                        11. Support the role of both bar staff and door supervisors in helping to reduce incidents of disorder
                        on licensed premises.
                        12. More widespread use of toughened drinking glasses in pubs and bars.
                        13. More use of plastic "glasses" and refusal to sell beer in bottles in pubs and clubs.
                        14. Launch good practice "toolkit" on tackling alcohol and crime.

Health                  In prevention we will:
Improvement
Plan                            Ensure the maintenance and development of school-based drug and alcohol education,
                                 and parent education programmes
                                Seek ways of preventing future problems by targeting those considered most vulnerable in
                                 society.

                        In support of local communities and the reduction of crime, we will:

                                Work with local Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) to plan appropriate
                                 responses to tackle drug related crime in local areas, making use of existing resources
                                 and the new allocations under the Communities Against Drugs programme to the CDRP
                                 and DATs
                                Work with the Arrest Referral Scheme, Drug Treatment & Testing Order team, Youth
                                 Offending Services (YOSs), HM Prison Service, CARATS, Police and specialist agencies
                                 to improve data and planned action to ensure a reduction in drug driven offending.


Supporting              Funding support services in supported housing, including specialist projects e.g. for clients
People Strategy         undergoing detox / places of safety for victims of domestic violence
(county)
Empty Property          How the council will deal with empty property
Strategy (district)


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Last revised 14/01/02

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