VE New Coordinator Training by zhangyun

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									 2010 SCVEN New
Coordinator Training

   History & Structure
  SC Virtual Enterprise Network -
  Philosophy
The South Carolina Virtual Enterprise
  Network is founded on the five
  fundamental beliefs that-
 All students can learn
 Learning should be relevant
 Students should apply what they
  learn
 Students should be encouraged to
  explore career options
 Students should understand the
  world of work
SC Virtual Enterprise Network
~What is it? ~
   A simulated business
       Setup and run by students to prepare them for
        working in a real business environment
   Students
       Determine nature of their business
       Determine products and/or services offered
       Develop the management structure
       Engage in the daily operations of running a
        business
   Teacher (“consultant”)
       The Guide on the Side –
          NOT the Sage on the Stage

   Business Partners
   Business Software
       Emphasis is placed on using current business
        software, communications, and the Internet for
        business transactions.
SC Virtual Enterprise Network
~What is it? ~ (cont.)
   Brings the business world to the students
       Stock Market Game
       Junior Achievement
            Teach entrepreneurship
            Practical skills essential to career readiness
            Promotes healthy competition to motivate
             students
       The Virtual Enterprise Program
            Follows in the footsteps of these other efforts
            Has the added advantage of linking students in a
             global business network.
   Takes the teacher outside of the traditional
    instructional paradigm
   Places the students on the front lines of
    the business world
SC Virtual Enterprise Network -
What is it? (Continued)

• No real cash is used at all
• Products and services are produced in
    facsimile only
•   Employees are paid, and business is
    conducted, via electronic funds transfer
•   Enterprises are linked together in
    regional, national and global networks
•   The firms have each other as trading /
    business partners
•   Network permits standardization and
    coordination of activities among all
    firms
The History of the
Virtual Enterprise, International
    Virtual Enterprise began in Europe
     after WWII, though the idea dates
     back to apprenticeship concepts of
     the 17th century. There are now over
     5,000 Practice Firms from 42
     countries participating in the
     program. In 1994 and 1995,
     representatives from the New York
     City Board of Education first
     observed the success of the program
     on a visit to schools in Vienna,
     Austria. They decided to pioneer the
     concept in the United States.
The History of the
Virtual Enterprise, International

    The first Virtual Enterprises,
     International program in the
     United States was implemented
     in seven New York City high
     schools in September 1996.
     Currently, there are over 500
     practice firms operating in the
     United States at secondary and
     post-secondary levels.
The History of the
SCVEN Program

James F. Byrnes High School
   Established the SC Network of
   Virtual Enterprises in 2000.
   SCVEN was incorporated as a Non-
   Profit organization in 2003 and
   serves as the the Virtual Enterprise
   Center (VEC) for the State of South
   Carolina.
    South Carolina Virtual Enterprise
    Network - Central Office
   SC Virtual Enterprise Center (VEC)
      Located in Spartanburg, South Carolina
   For participating schools, the SCVEN VEC provides
    the following services:
      Coordinates electronic banking (a clearing house
        with other national and international banks)
      Electronic mail
      Network web site
      Data collection
      Network meetings
      Curriculum resources
      Acts as a communication center for the network.
        Organizes activities for many SC students to
        attend State and National Trade Fairs.
      Offers annual coordinator training for new
        participants in the network (a mandatory
        component of the SC simulation)
The Virtual Enterprise Central
Office – What is it’s role in VE?
1.    Communication Center – E-mail and Phone
2.    Training Center – Offers network trainings
3.    Network Web Page Host
4.    E-mail Exchange Administrator - Email
5.    Curriculum Development Center – Makes sure
      that curriculum aligns with state standards
6.    On-Line Assessment Coordinator – Measures
      student success on business core standards
7.    Develops Network Calendar of Events
8.    Standardizes Network Tasks
9.    Coordinates State Steering Committee
      meetings
10.   Represents SC VE network nationally and
      internationally
International Network
   The International Network
     Provides structure for all Virtual
      Enterprise financial transactions.
     EUROPEN is the international
      network of practice firms
         Consists of forty-two countries with
          over 5,000 practice firms (virtual
          enterprises in the U.S.)
         Primary objective of EUROPEN
               supports the training of people in the
                business simulation around the world
               EUROPEN web site
                http://www.europen.de/englisch/index.html
  Program Structure – Content
• Essential business skills are delivered
  throughout the program
  - Entrepreneurial Skills
  - Information Processing
  - Understanding of Global Economy
  - Money Management
  - Presentation Skills
  - Guiding Principles / Workplace Skills
  Program Structure – Content
• VE firms are engaged in a business with current
  and emerging career opportunities
  • The program may serve as a capstone to a vertical
    career or tech prep program

• Technology is infused throughout the curriculum
  • All students develop computer literacy
  • Student employees take advantage of appropriate
    communication tools: telephones, fax machines, e-
    mail, Internet
  Program Structure – Content
    and Supporting Activities
• Local Trade Fairs & Business Conferences
• National Trade Fairs / Video Conferences
• Job Shadowing & Internships with
  Corporate Partners
• Business and Annual Report Presentations
• Company Grand Openings
• Open Houses
   Program Structure – Process
Student learning is facilitated through
  innovative practices
   • They don’t just go to class, they go “to work”
   • They learn by doing not by memorizing
   • They understand the corporate organizational
    structure by working in teams
  • Their assignments are managerial tasks
  Program Structure – Process
Technology is used to enhance instructional
 outcomes
  • All work is expected to be produced in a
    professional format
  • Student employees use current office
    software products: Word, Excel, PowerPoint,
    Access, Publisher, Macromedia, etc.
  • Web sites encouraging e-commerce
  • Use of on-line banking
  • E-mail communications
   Program Structure – Process
Design, implementation and facilitation of change
  is a continuous process
   • Once a virtual company is established it grows and
     changes every year with the influx of new employees
   • There is no correct formula to make this work (scary,
     but true!)
   • First year programs have the steepest learning
     curve….but it does get easier in the second year.
 2009 SCVEN New
Coordinator Training

Getting a Virtual Enterprise
      Company Setup
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
         Setup – Equipment
•   Many computer setups are currently being used.
    •   VE program is scalable.
    •   Groups form different departments.
    •   At least 1 computer per 2 students (Good)
    •   1 to 1 computer ratio (Best)
•   Software - Microsoft Office
    • Word
    • Excel
    • Access
    • PowerPoint
    • FrontPage
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
         Setup – Equipment
  •   Software Configuration
       •   Internet Explorer
 • Office Equipment (Optional, but recommended)

 •How much can you make it look like an office?
      •Fax Machine (Could business partners donate?)
      •Scanner
      •Copier
      •File Cabinets
      •Office Furniture - Tables and Chairs
      •Set up a meeting with your administration and
      technician to discuss your needs fully
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
  Setup – Equipment and Supplies
    In trying to outline what kinds of supplies and equipment are
     needed for Virtual Enterprise, you may want to look at what is
     used by other businesses. However, all Virtual Enterprises will
     very in the supply and equipment needs.
     Office furniture and equipment: This should be based on the
     model of 20-25 students in the class. There will be a need for
     chairs, desks, tables, file cabinets, partitions, dry-erase boards,
     computers, printers, copy machine, fax machine, and
     telephones). If all of these items could be obtained before the
     students ever walk in the door on the first day, it would be great.
     However, the business can be run with much less to start out
     with. The appearance of your office (room) is an important step
     in making the students feel like actual employees and in the
     starting of a successful Virtual Enterprise.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
  Setup – Equipment and Supplies
       Therefore, the following types of equipment should be
       considered:
   •   Chairs - A minimum of 30 chairs to be placed in the office would
       be appropriate. These would be for both students and any
       guests that may visit the company.
   •   Desks - As many work stations that would benefit and suit the
       company and the room would be appropriate. If desks are
       unavailable, shared tables can be used.
   •   Tables - It is recommended that the company have at least one
       conference table for the office. If there is space, more could be
       added.
   •   File Cabinets - A minimum of one file cabinet per department
       would be recommended. These could be 2 - 4 drawers file
       cabinets; they may have wheels and locks on them to move out
       when other classes come in. Depending upon wall space, several
       4 drawer file cabinets would be helpful.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
  Setup – Equipment and Supplies
       Therefore, the following types of equipment should be
       considered:

   •   Partitions - These can be used to make the room look more like
       an office with separate work spaces/stations.
   •   Dry-Erase Boards - Any type of board would work well - a dry-
       erase boards for notices that need to be changed frequently;
       bulletin boards for notices, employee information, etc., that can
       be posted for a period of time. Several boards would be helpful
       depending upon space.
   •   Computers - CD-ROM, Word, Access, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook,
       Photo Editor for Digital Camera, etc.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
  Setup – Equipment and Supplies
       Therefore, the following types of equipment should be
       considered:

   •   Printers - A minimum of two working printers would be best.
       These printers should be networked with all computers, as
       needed. A color printer would be highly recommended.
   •   Copy/Fax/Scanner Machine - A multiuse machine that can copy,
       scan, and fax would work well in the Virtual Enterprise. This can
       be an invaluable tool in helping the office run well.
   •   Digital Camera – Invaluable in documenting every step in the
       business process…..a must if you can get one.
   •   DVD Burner – A real storage help handy for pictures, digital
       video, and large file storage.
      Fax Machine and Telephone: Phone extensions for each Dept.
      Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company Setup – Equipment
                             and Supplies

               The following kinds of basic office supplies for the Virtual
               Enterprise classroom should be considered:


Paper Clips              Staplers (one per department)              Staples
Staple Removers          Rubber Bands                               3-Hole Punch
1-Hole Punches           Rulers                                     Brads
Name Tags                Small Note Pads                            Post-its
Pens and Pencils         Manila Folders                             Kleenex
Pencil Sharpener         Company Address Stamp                      Phone books
3 Ring Binders           3-Hole Folders with Pockets                Scissors
White Out                Thumb Tacks/Push Pins                      Dry Erase Pens
Highlighter Pens         Dry Ink Erasers                            Computer Disks
Reams of Cardstock       4 Cases of Paper for Printers              Digital Camera
Legal Size Envelopes     Ink Cartridges for Printers                Desk Calendars
Masking Tape             Scotch & Masking Tapes                     Copier
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
      Setup – Course of Study

 What type of credit are you going to
  offer?
 Five Hour Program vs. Ten Hour
     Five hour program meets one hour a day for
      five hours a week
     Ten hour program meets two hours a day for
      ten hours a week or Block schedules meet
      approximately 7 hours a week
 2009 SCVEN New
Coordinator Training

  Business Partners
    The Importance Of Business and
         Educational Partners

   The role of an instructor changes in Virtual Enterprise

       They become a guide on the side or a facilitator
       Student Centered vs. Teacher Centered Class
       Student run company, not teacher run
       The business community is involved in partnerships, mentoring,
        etc.
       Because of these factors the importance of business and
        educational partners is critical to an effective VE
       Help create student ownership of business
       Students engage in a combination of exploratory and expository
        learning by assuming professional roles in the business
    The Importance Of Business and
         Educational Partners
   Where do you find business partners?

       Chamber of Commerce
       Service Clubs (Lions, Elks, Rotary)
       Parents of Students
       Friends, Family, or Spouse
       Co-Workers at School
       Junior Achievement
       Local Teacher Credit Union
       Alumnus Business Partners
       “If you do not ask….you do not get”
    The Importance Of Business and
         Educational Partners
   What do I ask business partners for?
       Time and Expertise
       Job Shadowing
       Mentoring
       Host activities
       Interview panel members
       Presentation panel members
       Extra equipment (fax machine, computers, software,
        tables, chairs, file cabinets, etc.)
       Money is the last resource you ask for – build a
        relationship first
 2009 SCVEN New
Coordinator Training

  Student Recruitment
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
   Started – Student Recruitment
   Hints and Suggestions
     Meet with your administration and discuss
      goals of your VE (schedule and times)
     Meet with counselors and discuss your needs
      (this group can sink your program)
     Meet with your department to explain the new
      class on campus (why are you getting extra
      equipment?)
     Failure to meet and explain the class to others
      can cause you trouble at your school
     Turn these people in to allies, not enemies

     When the class starts invite them to everything
      (grand openings, presentations, trade fairs)
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
   Started – Student Recruitment
   Students recruiting students:
   Employees (students) of the company explaining to
    students and friends about Virtual Business Class.
   Employees (students) explaining the type of business and
    the work that is done during the course.
   Employees (students) explaining the experiences that
    students can gain from the Virtual Business class.
   Employees (students) creating recruiting video for
    counselors to show during Spring and Fall registration
   Employees (students) visiting classes with counselors
    during Spring preferencing for Fall semester.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
   Started – Student Recruitment

   VE Consultant visiting classes:

   Consultant (VE teacher) explaining what the
    Virtual Business class is all about and what work
    is done in this class.
   Consultant (VE teacher) explaining the types of
    job positions that may be included in the
    business.
   Consultant (VE teacher) explaining the process
    for job application for the company.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
   Started – Student Recruitment
 Ads and stories about Virtual Business class placed
   in school newspaper several times during the fall
   semester and again during the spring semester
   when students are registering for the next fall
   classes.
  Announcements in the school’s daily bulletin
   right before students register for the fall
   semester.
  Virtual Business class can become an FBLA club

 Note: Get control over who is in your program
 2009 SCVEN New
Coordinator Training

 First Days of Class
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
 Started – In the First Days of Class
Business Selection
   When the virtual business class meets for the
    first time as a group, there are many things to
    consider and to decide upon. The first major
    decision for this group may be the selection of
    the type of business they want to establish.
    They will need to determine if their business will
    be a product retail company, a service-based
    company, or a combination. Then they will need
    to decide what will be their service(s) and\or
    their product(s).
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
 Started – In the First Days of Class
Business Selection

   The students may do this in a variety of ways.
    They may get together in groups, research
    different company ideas, and write up a
    rationale as to why the class should have this as
    their business. The consultant (teacher) may
    want to set guidelines for this process and limit
    the voting to perhaps three of the best
    rationales.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
 Started – In the First Days of Class
Some of the following considerations for the type of
  businesses decided upon could be:

   Is this service and\or product easy to market and
    sell?
   Who will be the buyers of this service and\or product?
   Is there another Virtual Enterprise company with the
    same service and\or product?
   Is there an appropriate local corporate business that
    would serve as a partner to the VE?
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
 Started – In the First Days of Class

•    Start Student Portfolios in preparation for Job
     Interviews. What items should be placed in the
     portfolio?

    1.   Resume
    2.   Cover Letter
    3.   Job Application
    4.   Letters of Recommendation
    5.   Work samples should be required and added
         throughout the year.
    Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
     Started – In the First Days of Class

•    Staffing Office –How many departments should
     each company have to handle a staff of 20-30?

    1.   Administration or Production (3-5 employees)
    2.   Human Resources (2-4 employees)
    3.   Sales and or Marketing (4-10 employees)
    4.   Accounting (2-5 employees)
    5.   Advertising or Technology (2-4 employees)

Note: other departments can be added or subtracted
 Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company
Started – Organization Chart Example
Do you need to pick a CEO right away?
                                                  Robert Grubb
                                                     CEO


   Brandon Trost          Daniel W astaferro      Zack W endler         Brian Hoven           Chris Mushett
   VP Advertising          VP Production        VP Sales\Marketing     VP Accounting       VP Huamn Resources


    David Garcia            Matt Rickman            Sara Trout         Brian Goddard            Phillip Elmer
Grafic Artist Designer   Production Manager         sales clerk            payroll              HR manager


    Adam Owen              Matt Richardson         Ben Mares          Maggie Hanson             Nikole Miller
    Art Director            R&D specilast        research comm.       Branch Manager          Comm. Specialist


                           John Simmons           Brian Rounzin        Heather Yancey            Katy Cruse
                         Production Assistant     Sales Designer     Accounts Recievable        HR Arbitrator


                                                  Troy Snyder          Mike Cummings            Kyle Henisey
                                                Marketing Director    Accounts Payable         Public Relations


                                                                       Monica Parker          Jacklyn Corrales
                                                                       General Ledger           Receptionist


                                                                                             Jennifer Coleman
                                                                                           Administrative Secretary
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company Started –
           Project Based Instruction



   Step 1 – Select Business
   Step 2 – Interview and Staff Office
   Step 3 – Divide projects up by
    departments and individuals. All of the
    following projects can be started and
    worked on at the same time.
Getting a Virtual Enterprise Company Started –
              Project Based Instruction

   Step 3 (Continued) – Divide projects up
    by departments and individuals.

       Business Plan (Executive Summary, Financial
        and Marketing Plans)
       Employee Manual
       Company Catalog – Product Line
       Company Web Site
       Company Forms
 2009 SCVEN New
Coordinator Training

  Work Flow Issues
Task Calendar - Work Flow Issues and Training

Do all students work on all the same projects?
 No they are in a project based learning environment.
  Each department has different roles or tasks they
  complete for the company.
 Work flow in the office is one of the first things that must
  be addressed. (Who does what?)
 Define roles for departments and employees
 Let people know what their role or job is and then let
  them do their job. (How can I do my job if I don’t know what to do?)
 Staff development will be required to help in this
  process. This is where you might invite business
  partners into the class to help with their expertise to
  mentor and offer business knowledge to the students.
Task Calendar - Work Flow Issues and Training

Do all students work on all the same projects?
 Accountability is part of the students grade and should
  be explained early in the class during the employee
  evaluation discussion.
 Teamwork during the class will be a struggle. To develop
  good team working skills can be one of the hardest parts of
  virtual enterprise but it is a needed skill that must be taught to
  better prepare students to enter the work force. (One of the
  number one skills recommend to be taught in VE by business
  partners)
 Does general school work teach team work?
Task Calendar - Work Flow Issues and Training



 Schedule appointments with business partners in the
  areas you need expertise or help. That is part of the
  facilitating teachers role (pick up the phone and make
  some calls)
 Business Plan - Get help from following types of people
  in writing the plan:
    Banker
    Accountant
    Lawyer
    Business Owner
    Marketing and Sales managers
Task Calendar - Work Flow Issues and Training



 Schedule appointments with business partners in the
  areas you need expertise or help. That is part of the
  facilitating teachers role (pick up the phone and make
  some calls)
 Employee Manual- Get help from following types of
  people in writing the plan:
   Human Resource Director
   Office Manager
   Office Secretaries

   Note: Use this model for all projects you need help with.

								
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