Proposal to Provide First Aid Kits in Primary and Secondary Schools

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					FIELD STUDIES
RESOURCE BOOK:
Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and
Secondary Schools

     Vancouver Board of Education
Foreword

“Field studies provide teachers and students with unique opportunities to learn through direct experience. Field
studies facilitate intellectual development in students, foster their natural curiosity, increase their knowledge and
abilities, and complement and extend several curricular areas. In addition to the educational benefits, field studies
provide students with opportunities to interact socially and contribute to their physical, emotional, and social
well-being and development”. Ken Haycock, 1992.

The Vancouver Board of Education’s Field Studies Resource Book is designed to support teachers and
administrators by highlighting important district policy and procedural information. These details are important
for the successful planning and actualization of field studies programs.




Preface to the Fourth Edition

The original edition of the Field Studies Resource Book was written in 1978, and the book was a combination of
policy protocols and field trip ideas. In 1990, and 1992 the Field Studies Resource Book was revised by Program
Services, with input from teachers, administrators, and other Vancouver district personnel, to incorporate policy
updates and updated field trip ideas.

The current edition of the Field Studies Resource Book reflects a significant revision of the earlier editions with
a more specific focus on field study policies and a new focus on risk-assessment for outdoor education activities,
incorporating pertinent resources from the VBE TREK Program Manual and Youth Safe Outdoors (2005). The
fourth edition also includes a new section on student conduct, with an emphasis on behavioural expectations
during field studies, and staff and supervisor duty of care.

The district expects that school Principals, Vice Principals, and teachers will find the current edition of the book
useful for the planning and successful actualization of field studies and outdoor education programs and pursuits.




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 3
4 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Contents

Forward and Preface to the Fourth Edition                                                                         3


Introduction                                                                                                     11

     VBE Guiding Principles for Field Studies                                                                    11

     Staff, Student, Parent Responsibilities                                                                     13


Section 1:     Policies and Procedures for Planning Field Studies                                                15


     Field Studies Categories                                                                                    16

     Inappropriate Field Studies                                                                                 17

     Excursions outside the School Calendar Year                                                                 17

     Expectations for Field Studies Planning                                                                     17

     Approval Process                                                                                            18

     Parent Communication and Authorization                                                                      19
             Consent Requirements                                                                                20
             Waivers                                                                                             21
             Why Consent is Important                                                                            21
             Request for Approval of Field Studies Form                                                          22
             Parent/Guardian Field Trip Consent Form Template                                                    23
             Medical/Emergency Consent Form Template                                                             25


     Supervision                                                                                                 26
             Teacher Guidelines                                                                                  26
             Volunteer Guidelines                                                                                26
             Supervision Ratios                                                                                  26
             Gender Specifications                                                                               27


     Risk Minimization                                                                                           28

     Planning for Field Studies: Additional Considerations                                                       29



                     FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 5
      Planning Field Studies: Sample Proposal Form and Planning Checklist                                       30

Planning for Extended Off-Continent Field Studies                                                               35

     - International Field Study Application and Approval                                                       36
     - Supervision                                                                                              37
     - Financial Matters                                                                                        37
     - Extended Off-Continent Field Study Preliminary Approval
       from Associate Superintendent, Area                                                                      38



Section 2: Specific Considerations for Overnight Outdoor                                                        41
Education Programs and Higher-Risk Outdoor Pursuits


     Designing Overnight Outdoor Education Programs and Higher-Risk                                             42
     Outdoor Pursuits


      Specific Guidelines for Outdoor Education and Higher-Risk Outdoor Pursuits                                42
              Off-Site Experience Checklist for Administrators                                                  44
              Higher-Risk Field Studies Proposal Form                                                           45

      Risk Assessment for Category 3 Pursuits – Determining                                                     47
      Readiness and Suitability
              Teacher/Leader Considerations                                                                     47
              Student Considerations                                                                            48
              Program Considerations                                                                            48

      Category 3 Field Study Supervision                                                                        52

      Guides and Instructors                                                                                    52
              Guide Qualifications                                                                              52
              Guide Documentation                                                                               53
              Liability Insurance for Guides                                                                    53

     Safety Considerations                                                                                      53
  		          Safety Equipment                                                                                  54
  		          Protocols for Ski Trip/Winter Activities                                                          54

      Outdoor Education Programs Site Selection Criteria                                                        55

      Outdoor Education Site Selection Checklist                                                                56




                   6 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Section 3: Liability, Transportation and Safety                                                                59

     Liability and Insurance Coverage                                                                          60

     Liability and Insurance Coverage for Teachers and Volunteers                                              60

     Liability and Insurance Coverage for Students                                                             60
            Student Accident Insurance Plan                                                                    60
            Travel Insurance                                                                                   61

     Planning for the Safe Transportation of Students                                                          61
            Seat Belts                                                                                         63
            Booster Seats                                                                                      63
            Public transportation                                                                              63
            Private vehicles                                                                                   63
            Vans                                                                                               63
            Buses

     General Emergency and First Aid Guidelines                                                                65
            Emergency Procedures                                                                               65
            First-Aid                                                                                          65
            First-Aid Kits                                                                                     65


Section 4: Fundraising and Accountability for Funds/Cash Handling                                              69

     Fees                                                                                                      70

     Fundraising                                                                                               70
            Purpose of Fundraising                                                                             70
            Nature of Fundraising Activities                                                                   71
            Participants in Fundraising Activities                                                             71

     Accountability for Funds/Cash Handling                                                                    71
     	      Guidelines and Procedures for Handling Cash                                                        72


Section 5: Student Conduct and Staff Duty of Care                                                              75

     Student Conduct                                                                                           76
            Student Responsibility                                                                             76
            Alcohol                                                                                            76
            Drugs                                                                                              76
            Smoking/Tobacco Use                                                                                76
            Student Behaviour Contract Template                                                                77

     Staff and Supervisor Conduct                                                                              78
            Standard of Care                                                                                   78


                   FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 7
     Duty of Care: Teachers                                                                                      78
     BCTF Professional Responsibility and Code of Ethics                                                         79
     VBE Guidelines for Adults Interacting with Students                                                         79
     Abuse and Harassment: Definitions and Procedures                                                           789


VSB Policies List for Field Studies Planning
     All VSB policies are available for review at www.vsb.bc.ca/policy-manual

     JF             Student Rights and Responsibilities
     JFC            Student Conduct
     JFCC-R         Student Conduct on School Buses
     JFCH           Alcohol Use by Students/Student Drug Abuse
     JHA            Student Insurance Program
     JHF            Student Safety
     JHFA           Supervision of Students
     JL             Student Gifts and Solicitations
     JM             Staff-Student Relations
     JN             Student Fees, Charges and Financial Hardship
     IGD            Co-curricular and Extra Curricular Programs
     IGDFA          Fund-raising Activities
     IICA           Field Studies
     IICA-R         Field Studies Planning & Implementation
     IIOA-R2        Extended Off-Continent Field Studies
     EEA            Student Transportation
     EEA-R          Student Transportation Regulation
     EEAD           Special Use of School Buses
     EEAD-R         Special Use of School Buses Regulation
     EEAE           Student Transportation in Private Vehicles
     EEAE-E Student Transportation in Private Vehicles – Exhibit
     EIB            Liability Insurance
     EIB-R          Liability Insurance Regulation




                   8 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Additional VSB Resources

     VSB Guidelines for Elementary School Administration: Accounting and Banking Procedures

     VSB Guidelines for Secondary School Administration: Accounting and Banking
     Procedures

     VBE Guidelines for Adults Interacting with Students

     VSB Staff Guidelines Emergency Procedures Flip Book




                   FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 9
10 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
        VSB First Aid Attendants Manual

        YouthSafe Outdoors: Off Site Experience Safety for BC Schools
        https://www.vsb.bc.ca/websiteBfile/healthsafety/youthsafety/StartHere.pdf
Introduction
The Board of Education of School District No. 39 - Vancouver (the “Board”) encourages schools to plan field
studies for groups of students, to provide supplemental opportunities which enhance learning in curriculum and
to expand on athletic, cultural, musical, linguistic, or other educational endeavours. The Board further believes
that in planning for any learning experience including field studies, consideration must be given to student safety,
curricular relevance and the appropriateness of the activity to the student’s educational program. In all cases it
is necessary for adult supervising staff to have the requisite skills and experience to provide safe and appropriate
field trip experiences.

The Board assigns each Principal primary responsibility and authority to conduct student field studies, and ensure
planned field studies prescribe to board policies.

The Board assigns the Superintendent or designate responsibility and authority to establish district practices and
standards for the conduct of students during field studies; and provide approval for specified trip categories.



Guiding Principles

        1. The Board considers the purpose of field studies is to enable students to participate in quality off-site
           educational studies that:
           a) are an integral part of the educational process;
           b) are closely connected to curriculum and prescribed learning outcomes; and
           c) are relevant, effective, affordable and accessible.

        2. The Board views a field study to be an outgrowth of a school program that
        involves a clearly defined class or group; such as, a Grade 7 division, second language learners, band or
           athletic team.

        3. The Board believes it is of paramount importance that student field studies are
        selected, planned, organized and conducted in the context of:
           a) the safety and security of all participants;
           b) risk assessment and management of off-site activities; and
           c) protection of students, staff, volunteers and the school district.

        4. Eligibility criteria to participate in field studies must be established. No eligible student may be denied
           access to participate in a day field study held during instructional hours due to financial hardship. A
           Principal, or Board designate, may exclude a student from the activity if the student does not meet
           the eligibility criteria.

        5. The Board will provide free of charge to school-age students resident in the district and enrolled
           in an educational program at one of its schools field studies where attendance is mandatory and/
           or assessment will take place. The Board may charge fees for the expenses such as transportation,

                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 11
   accommodation, meals, entrance fees and equipment rentals for optional supplementary field studies.
   Efforts to minimize costs to students/parents should be evident in all field trip planning. Students/
   parents should also be advised of the Policy File JN: Students Fees, Fines and Financial Hardship with
   respect to field studies costs.

6. All details of fund raising activities and requirements for the proposed field study must be
   communicated clearly to students and parents and agreed upon at the outset of the field trip planning
   process.

7. The Board believes that student field studies should generally involve low risk activities.

8. Field studies should occur as close to the district as is reasonable without compromising the quality of
   the learning experience.

9. All details of proposed field studies must be clearly communicated to students and parents.

10.Field studies should not seriously interfere with the education of students who remain at school nor
   the students who are participating on the field study. This includes the class(es) that a teacher may
   miss as a result of sponsoring a field study.

11.School sponsored field studies are considered to be school program activities and as such are subject
   to both the regulations of the school and to all School District 39 (Vancouver) board policies. When




              12 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
           other agencies (e.g., Rotary, Government of Canada) contact schools regarding opportunities for
           students to participate in activities sponsored by their organizations, parents should be made aware
           that such activities are not school field studies.



Responsibilities
Parent/Guardian Responsibility: Parents/Guardians are responsible to determine whether their child may
participate in a student field study. In order to provide informed consent, comprehensive student field study
information that clearly describes the educational benefits and safety risks must be communicated to parents and
guardians.

Student Responsibility: Students participating in a field study are responsible to comply with the school rules,
Student Code of Conduct, Board policies, fulfill the preparatory requirements and cooperate with all supervisors.

Educator-in-Charge Responsibility: The Educator-in-Charge is responsible to:
a) ensure the field study is appropriately planned, authorized and organized;
b) ensure parents have been provided with comprehensive student information that clearly describes the
educational benefits and safety risks of the field study;
c) exercise supervision on a full-time basis;
d) ensure detailed contact and trip information is left with the school Principal; and
e) take whatever precautions are necessary to ensure the proper conduct, appropriate behaviour and safety of
students.

Field Study Supervisor Responsibilities: Supervisors (teachers, volunteers, contracted instructors) are responsible
to supervise students 24 hours per day, to serve as role models to students, to act as ambassadors of the school
district and to conduct themselves accordingly, and within the expectations of the Board’s Guidelines for Adults
Interacting with Students. No alcohol or non-prescription drugs are to be consumed while on, or before,
supervising students as supervisors must be capable of reasoned judgment in case of an unexpected emergency
at all times during the field study. This expectation includes international locations where the cultural norms may
vary.
                                                                                                                   Policy Reference: IICA




                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 13
14 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Section 1:
Policies and Procedures
for Planning Field Studies




         FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 15
Field Study Categories
The Board expects all Board employees responsible for planning and authorizing field studies to be
knowledgeable of the category definitions for field studies.


Category 1: Same Day Field Studies
These may last up to a full day. Destinations and activities are determined by learning outcomes; examples of such
field studies are visits to museums, law courts, art galleries, nature parks, etc.

Note: Local neighbourhood excursions that are based on a specific class activity/learning outcome, such as a
grade 3 class going to the local park to collect leaves for an art project, or a grade 11 Physical Education class
jogging in the local neighbourhood, are not considered field studies. However, teachers must always ensure that
the school Principal is aware of such neighbourhood learning activities when they are occurring.


Category 2: Overnight or Outside the Lower Mainland Field Studies

        a) Overnight Field Studies
        These may last for one or more days and take place within the province of British Columbia. Such
          excursions require an additional level of approval by the Associate Superintendent - Area.

        b) Outside Lower Mainland Field Studies
        Excursions outside the Lower-Mainland require Associate Superintendent approval because of the
           extensive travel required. Field studies that extend beyond the Lower-Mainland, even if lasting only
           one day, are classified as Category 2.

Note: The Lower-Mainland includes two Regional Districts: Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley Regional
District. Metro Vancouver is bordered on the west by the Strait of Georgia, to the north by the Squamish-
Lillooet Regional District, on the east by the Fraser Valley Regional District, and to the south by Whatcom County,
Washington in the United States. The Fraser Valley Regional District lies east of Metro Vancouver, comprises
the cities of Abbotsford and Chilliwack, the districts of Mission, Kent, and Hope, and the village of Harrison Hot
Springs.

Category 3: Higher Risk Outdoor Field Studies
These are outdoor education based field studies that may last up to a full day, or may last for two days or more,
and entail a level of risk that is higher than activities in which students are normally engaged in at school. These
would typically be:

        a) Outdoor School Programs: where an outdoor setting is important and it
           becomes the classroom. Examples include Outdoor Education and Physical Education Activities.

        b) Outdoor Pursuits: refers to activities related to self-propelled travel on land, water and snow or ice
           (ie. hiking, kayaking, skiing). The definition of outdoor pursuit includes higher risk activities, such as
           skiing, and extended wilderness travel. Outdoor pursuits are typically of a higher care nature and
           as such these environments require some more specialized awareness, planning, instruction and
           leadership. Outdoor pursuit does not include local ice area activities, such as skating, hockey or
           curling.


                       16 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Category 4: Out of Province (Canada and Continental Unites States)
These field studies involve travel outside of British Columbia, but within Canada or the continental United States,
and last typically for 5-14 days, such as cultural and linguistic exchanges where students travel outside B.C. to
be immersed in the language and culture of another area. Examples are the annual exchanges of the French
Immersion Grade 7 student exchange with Quebec.

Category 5: Extended Off-Continent Field Studies
These comprise travel to foreign countries for the purpose of broadening students’ understanding of other
cultures and of helping them to see their relationship in the world as a Canadian. Extended Off-Continent Field
Studies include excursions during Spring Break.

Inappropriate Field Studies
Field Studies may be deemed to be inappropriate by either the school administrator, or the board designate.
Inappropriate field studies are characterized as those involving:

        a) activities that have significant risk for serious injury;
        b) dangers that cannot be overlooked regardless of their attention of risk and planning (such as
           supervision ratios, equipment, instruction and supervisors/ instructors experience and training);
        c) not age or developmentally appropriate for students, individually or as a group;
        d) involve travel time that is excessive for the age of the children;
        e) involve excessive absence from the school for both students and teachers;
        f) incur inordinate expense or excessive absence from school;
        g) include travel to areas where Foreign Affairs Canada has published a travel advisory; or
        h) fail to comply to the policies and procedures of the Board.

Excursions During the Non-Instructional Year (school closure in June to school
opening in September)
Excursions planned for the non-instructional period of the year (typically the months of July and August) will be
supported as school-sponsored excursions provided all requisite field studies policies, guidelines, and approval
processes have been followed.

Teachers, or other Board employees, who participate in a supervisory role during non-instructional year
excursions do so as volunteers, without salary compensation or the expectation of time in lieu. Liability
insurance coverage under the School Protection Plan does extend to any Board employee or volunteer acting in
a supervisory capacity during the non-instructional year provided the excursion is a school-sponsored field study
and all requisite field studies policies have been followed.
                                                                                                                    Policy Reference: IIC
Planning Field Studies
Principals and school staffs are encouraged to do long-range planning for school-based field studies. Such
studies should provide significant educational experiences related to the planned program of the school and the
established curriculum. They should be undertaken because they provide superior learning opportunities to those
available in the classroom. The specific objectives of the field study should be clearly in mind prior to the planning
of the field study, and plans should ensure that time spent in travel is educationally worthwhile.

Curriculum Objectives
Student field studies are to be directly related to the curriculum and undertaken only to provide superior and/or

                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 17
supplemental opportunities for learning beyond that which are available in the classroom.
Specific educational objectives for the learning experience are to be clearly in mind prior to planning the field
study and subsequently, all activities should be directed to achieve these ends.

Students should be exposed to a sequential and expanding pattern of field studies as they progress through their
school years.

Evaluation of field studies is recommended to occur at two levels:

        a) Student learning evaluation, when applicable, in order to determine if educational objectives have
           been met.

        b) The field study as a whole, to ascertain the quality of the total experience and to share the conclusions
           with other appropriate members of staff.

Eligibility & Access
Eligibility criteria must be established to define the students who may participate in field study. Eligibility criteria
may include definition by grade, class, subject, team or other characteristics related to the delivery of an
education program. Eligibility criteria may also include school code of conduct expectations.

Parents and guardians may, in whole or in part, financially support supplemental field studies, and will be advised
of the Board’s financial hardship policy and procedures. As outlined in Board policy JN Student Fees, Fines
and Financial Hardship no fees shall be charged for field studies during instructional hours where attendance is
mandatory and/or assessment will take place. Information about the Board’s financial hardship policy must be
included on the parent consent form.


Planning For Approval
Preliminary Approval. Educators-in-Charge will obtain the preliminary approval of the Principal for field
studies before communication with parents and students, before making commitments, and before commencing
fundraising.

Educational Rationale. Educators-in-Charge will submit an educational rationale for the Principal’s approval
that explicitly describes how the field study is expected to provide significant educational value related to the
school program and curriculum.

School-Wide Impact. Before approving a student field study, the Principal must consider the school-wide effect
arising from the absence of Educators-in-Charge and students, and the financial impact of fundraising on the total
school community.

Policy Adherence. The Educator-in-Charge will plan the field study in compliance of Board policies, related
regulations and the VBE Field Studies Resource Book. Before approving the field study the Principal will ensure
that the Educator-in-Charge has planned the excursion in compliance of applicable Board policies, related
regulations, and the VBE Field Studies Resource Book.


Approval Process
Field studies approval is dependent on the adherence to Board policies. No field study activity may proceed
unless it has received the appropriate approval, as defined by the applicable field study category.


                        18 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Category 1: Day Field Studies
        •	 approval	of	the	Principal

Category 2: Overnight and Outside the Lower- Mainland Field Studies
        •	 approval	of	the	Principal
        •	 approval	of	the	Associate	Superintendent-Area	no	less	than	3	weeks	before	trip	commences		
        •	 approval	of	the	Associate	Superintendent	must	be	sought	before	the	field	studies	plan	is	presented	to	
           or communicated with students and parents and before any funds are collected.

Category 3: Higher Risk Outdoor Field Studies
        •	 approval	of	the	Principal
        •	 approval	of	the	Associate	Superintendent-Area	no	less	than	3	weeks	before	trip	commences.		
        •	 approval	of	the	Associate	Superintendent	must	be	sought	before	the	field	studies	plan	is	presented	to	
           or communicated with students and parents and before any funds are collected

Category 4: Out of Province Field Studies (Canada and Continental USA)
        •	 approval	of	the	Principal
        •	 approval	of	the	Associate	Superintendent-Area	no	less	than	6	weeks	before	trip	commences		
        •	 approval	of	the	Associate	Superintendent	must	be	sought	before	the	field	studies	plan	is	presented	to	
           or communicated with students and parents and before any funds are collected

Category 5: Extended Off-Continent Field Studies
        •	 subject	to	additional	approval	requirements	as	outlined	in	IICA-R2	

Obtaining Associate Superintendent Approval: VBE Request for Approval of Field Studies
Form
To secure the approval of the Associate Superintendent for Category 2, 3, 4 and 5 field studies a VBE Request for
Approval of Field Studies form (REQ-SC-015) must be submitted.

Attached must be copies of the draft parent information letter, draft parent consent form, and proposed trip
Itinerary. A full disclosure of risks must be included in these documents. Field Studies Regulation IICA-R2
outlines additional approval requirements for Category 5 field studies.


Parental Communication & Authorization
In all cases, parents must be informed, and provide consent when students are to be absent from school premises
through a customized field studies parent consent form.

The information conveyed to parents through the field studies consent form must appropriately disclose all details
of the field studies, and provide information on the Board’s financial hardship policy. The parent signature serves
as verification of parental consent and documentation that the parent/guardian received the notice and that the
parent/guardian is requesting to have the student participate in the activity.

There are some circumstances where one parent consent form, or an annual consent, may be appropriate for
a series of common activities. For example, a Basketball team travelling to a series of local tournaments, or an
elementary class partaking in regular nature walking trips in the local neighbourhood may be covered by one
consent form.


                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 19
An annual consent (i.e., one form for the whole year) provides the parent or guardian the opportunity to list the
activities from which the student is to be excluded, but the onus of responsibility is on the Educator-in-Charge to
see that the student does not participate in those activities for the remainder of the school year.


Contents of Parent Permission and Consent Forms
The contents of the parent consent letter must include:

A. Educational Rationale and Curricular Objectives
Description of the educational purpose and learning objectives of the field study.

B. Trip Details
Full disclosure of all activities to be undertaken during the duration of the field study. Supervision and travel
arrangements must also be disclosed through the trip consent form.

C. Known Risks
The parent consent form must clearly outline all potential known risks of the field study to ensure informed
consent is being obtained from the parent/guardian.

D. Safety Plan
Consent forms must provide indication to parents/guardians that an appropriate safety plan is in place, and the
particulars of the safety plan should be made available to parents/guardians for higher-risk outdoor pursuits.

E. Behaviour Expectations
All students participating in field studies are expected to comply with the school’s expectation for students and
the school’s code of conduct, cooperate fully with all supervisors of a field study, and participate in a responsible
and cooperative manner at all times during the field study.

Both parents/guardians and students should be advised of behavioural expectations for any field study. This
includes specific consequences for series behavioural breaches. For example, if a student will be sent home,
at parent expense, from a field study this consequence must be communicated on the parent consent form.
Consent forms should be used to outline student conduct expectations and consequences or, at minimum,
must require parent acknowledgment that their child has been informed that he/she is to abide by the rules and
regulations of the field study.

For overnight field studies teachers should consider having students, especially those in the senior grades, sign a
specific field studies behaviour contract.

E. Medical Consent
A specific parent emergency medical consent form must be collected in addition to the school-based parent
consent form for all Category 2, 3, 4, and 5 field studies. Medical information about each participant on the field
study should also be obtained.




                       20 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Waivers
School-based parent consent forms are not considered waivers that release teachers from legal responsibility.

Legally, parents or guardians cannot waive the rights of a minor (the student). As such, the Board discourages
the use of industries/commercial enterprises that require parents to sign student waivers as a condition of
participation in field studies. An industry/commercial enterprise may request signed informed consent of the
parent/guardian, in addition to the signed informed consent obtained through the school-based parent consent
form.

If an industry or commercial enterprise insists on a waiver of liability the Educator-in-Charge must, in consultation
with the Principal, consider whether the proposed activity and the risks associated with the activity should be
pursued. If it is decided that the activity will go forward, parents must be informed of their legal rights with the
following inclusion on the consent form:

_____________ (name of organization) requires a parental waiver for your child
to participate in this activity. Please be advised that the parental waiver does not
legally waive the rights of a minor (the student) in case of accident or injury.

                                                                                                                    Policy Reference IICA-R1



Why Consent is Important
Board liability insurance covers anyone involved in approved school-based activities; therefore, as a matter of
practice, teachers should get permission from their principal for any activity beyond that which might normally
be expected. If the teacher does not obtain permission to engage in an activity, it might be interpreted that the
teacher is acting outside the scope of employment and conducting an unauthorized activity. If so, the insurers may
be in a position to deny coverage to the teacher.

Vancouver Board of Education consent form samples are provided in the following pages.




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 21
               Request for Approval of Field Studies Form: Category 2, 3, 4 and 5
                               Excursions) - REQ-SC-015
                      VANCOUVER BOARD OF EDUCATION
                      REQUEST FOR APPROVAL OF FIELD STUDIES
                      (CATEGORY 2, 3, 4 AND 5 EXCURSIONS)
  APPROVAL CHECK LIST: (Check if answer is yes)                                                            Date Submitted:

           Have you referred to the Field Studies Resource Book for additional                             School:
           policy information and risk-assessment guidelines?
                                                                                                           Educational Purpose of Excursion:
           Has the field studies excursion been organized in compliance with Vancouver
           Board of Education policies, particularly Field Studies, (IICA) & Field Studies
           Planning and Implementation, (IICA-R1)

  	        Have you ensured that appropriate supervision ratios (either Vancouver Board
           of Education or industry standard ratios for higher-risk outdoor pursuits) are met?

           Have you attached a copy of the School-Based Parent Consent Form (that
  	        includes the Vancouver Board of Education statement of informed consent) to
           this application?

           Does the Parent Consent Form include appropriate detail, including: reference to a
  	        developed safety plan, reference to student behaviour expectations, details of
           the activities to be undertaken during the excursion and an “opt out” section for
           parents to complete if they choose to do so?

           This application must be forwarded to the Associate Superintendent - Area for
  	        approval by the appropriate timeline listed in policy IICA-R.



Destination:

Number of Students:                      /                 Grade:                                                      Supervision Ratio:
                               MALE           FEMALE

Teacher Sponsor(s)	            Male:	                                                               Female:

Other Supervisors:	    Male:	                                                   Female:
Please include name and designation (teacher, VSB employee, parent volunteer, spouse . . . )

Trip Leaves From:	                                                                               Date:	                                      Time:

Trip Returns To:	                                                                                Date:	                                      Time:

Form of Transportation:                                    Company Name:

Have you checked that transportation arrangements meet all requirements? (eg., School Bus Licence, Drivers Licence, etc.) Yes                            No

Approximate Net Cost to Pupil: ________________________________________

Approved at school by:
                                                   SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR (please print)                                   SCHOOL ADMINSTRATOR SIGNATURE



Approval of Associate Superintendent - Area: Yes                    No


Comment:


 DISTRIBUTION KEY:
      White: Area Office
      Yellow: Area Office - to be returned to school confirming approval
      Pink: School Copy                                                                                   ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT - AREA



        REQ-SC-015 (Rev. 7, 09 - 11)




                              22 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
              Sample School-based Parent Consent and Medical Consent Forms

                                    Parent/Guardian Field Studies Consent Form Template

                                                      School Name
                                       Parent/Guardian Field Studies Consent Form
                                                    School Address
                                                School telephone Number
     Teacher:____________________________

     To the Parent(s)/Guardian(s) of: ____________________________________________ Grade/Division: _______________
     The purpose of this form is to inform you about a proposed field studies involving your child, and to seek your support and
     permission for your child to participate. Field studies are part of the school program and they provide students with valuable
     learning experiences. However, should you not wish your child to participate in this activity, school staff will assign the student
     other learning activities at the school.

     This is an important document. Please review the contents of this Consent and Acknowledgement of Risk form carefully
     prior to providing permission for your child to participate in this excursion. Clarify any questions or concerns with the
     Lead Teacher BEFORE signing it.

     If this form is not signed and returned to the school by __________________, your child WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO ATTEND.
     PROGRAM/ACTIVITY INFORMATION
     DESTINATION/ACTIVITY: ___________________________________________________ DATE(S): _____________________
     SERIES OF ACTIVITIES TO BE UNDERTAKEN (Specify program): ________________________________________________
     ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
     PURPOSE OR EDUCATIONAL GOAL(S): ____________________________________________________________________
     ITINERARY/ACTIVITIES: __________________________________________________________________________________
     METHOD OF TRANSPORTATION: ________________________________ BY: _____________________________________
     EDUCATOR-in-CHARGE: _________________________________________________________________________________

     TRIP SUPERVISORS PLANNED: ___________________________________________________________________________
     COST TO THE STUDENT: ________ WHAT TO BRING: ________________________________________________________
     OTHER CONSIDERATIONS: _______________________________________________________________________________
     BEHAVIOUR EXPECTATIONS:_____________________________________________________________________________

     SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES
     The board will make every reasonable effort to ensure or ascertain that:
       a. The staff, volunteers and/or service providers involved are suitably trained and qualified.
       b. The students are adequately supervised over all aspects of the program/activity.
       c. The location(s) used are appropriate and safe for the activity(ies) and group.
       d. A Safety Plan is in place to identify and manage known potential risks.
      e. An Emergency Plan is in place to deal with an injury or illness to any of the students.
     POTENTIAL KNOWN RISKS AND SPECIAL SAFETY INFORMATION
     The purpose of this section is to detail and reinforce with parents all potential known risks of participation in the field study to
     ensure parents/guardians are providing informed consent. Safety issues and precautions which have been discussed with
     students should also be referred to. For example, if the students will be required to wear any specific safety equipment, such as
     goggles or helmets.



     Additional Comments/Requirements:




----------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
See reverse for Parent Consent portion of template


                                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 23
CONSENT AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RISK

 [School Name Printed Here]

 Destination/Activity/Program: ________________________________________________ Dates: ______________________

 (please ensure the following wording is used on all Vancouver Board of Education school-based field studies consent forms)

 While school staff will take reasonable steps to prevent injuries to students, some degree of risk is inherent in the nature of this
 activity, and may occur without fault on the part of the student, school board, its employees or agents, or the facility where the activity
 is taking place. By allowing your child to participate in this activity, you are agreeing that the activity described above is suitable for
 your child, and that there is a risk of injury associated with the activity.

        My child has been informed that he/she is to abide by the rules and regulations, including directions and instructions from the school’s
        and/or service provider’s administrators, instructors, and supervisors over all phases of the program/activity.
        In the event my child fails to abide by these rules and regulations, disciplinary action may require his/her exclusion from further
        participation, or that I be contacted to have him/her picked up, unless I have specified other transport arrangements.
        I acknowledge that the trip supervisors may secure transport to emergency medical services as they deem necessary for
        my child's immediate health and safety, and that I shall be financially responsible for such services.


I, _____________________(Name of parent/guardian) give permission for (Name of student) ____________________________
to participate in the field study described above. I understand that my child may be exposed to a risk of injury due to accident
while participating in this activity.

Date: ___________________ Name (Please print): _______________________ Signature: ____________________________

Parent/Guardian Contact Numbers: Day ________________ Evening _________________

Comments (please include any restrictions or limitations which would prevent your child from fully participating in this trip, or any other special
concerns which Board staff should be aware of surrounding your child.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

NOTE:
Efforts to minimize costs have been made to support student participation. In accordance with Board policy JN Students Fees,
Fines and Hardship no student shall be denied an opportunity to participate in an activity because of an inability to pay fees.
Please contact the teacher or Principal if you have questions or concerns regarding the amounts listed above.




                          24 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
                                      Medical/ Emergency Consent Form Template



                                                            School Name
                                                Medical Information For Field Studies
                    The collection and retention of information requested on this form is authorized and governed by
                     the British Columbia School Act and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.


OFF-SITE EXPERIENCE EMERGENCY MEDICAL INFORMATION
The following information will be helpful to the teacher in making your child’s field studies experience comfortable, safe and pleasant.
(Please print carefully and legibly)

Student Name: ________________________________________________________ Birth Date: ________________________

Grade/Program:___________________________________                              Teacher:___________________________________

Address:_______________________________________________________________________________________________

BC Medical Services Plan Personal Health No.: __________________              Student School Accident Insurance:           Yes      No

Allergies (e.g., specific drugs, certain foods, insect stings, hay fever) Specify:
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Reaction(s) to above? ____________________________________________________________________________________

Carries Epi pen?     Yes     No     Inhaler?       Yes     No      Medical Alert Bracelet?        Yes     No

Date of last Tetanus shot: __________________________

Medical/physical conditions that may affect participation in the stated program/activity (e.g., recent illness or injury, recent hospitalization or
surgery, chronic conditions, phobias, etc.). Be specific:
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Specify the condition(s) and requirements for program modification or specific activities your child should not participate in:
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prescribed medication(s) taken at this time (name, reason, dosage, storage, potential side effects/treatment of such):
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Other Health/Medical/Dietary Concerns/restrictions:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Emergency Contacts:
1) ____________________________________ Phone: (H) ___________________ (W) __________________ (C) __________________

2) ____________________________________ Phone: (H) ___________________ (W) __________________ (C) __________________

Name of Physician ____________________________________________________________ Phone # ___________________________


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF CONSENT

Parent/Guardian who is filling out and signing this form:__________________________________________________________________

Should it become necessary for my child to have medical care, I hereby give the teacher permission to use his/her best judgment in
obtaining the best of such service for my child. I understand that any cost will be my responsibility. I also understand that in the event of
illness or accident, I will be notified as soon as possible via the emergency contact information listed above.

Name (please print) _______________________________________________ Signature _______________________________________




                           FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 25
Supervision
Field Studies planning and preparation must include a supervision plan with consideration of: special supervision
risk factors affecting the ratio of students to supervisors, needs for specialized skills and qualifications, and the
need for female and male supervisors, and students with special needs.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference: IICA-R1


Teacher Guidelines
Subject to the provisions of the School Regulation, Sec. 5(7)(g), the Principal is responsible for administering and
supervising the school, including the general conduct of students, both on school premises and during extra-
curricular activities off the school premises that are organized or sponsored by the school.
School Regulation, Sec. 4(1)(b) and (c) specifies that teachers must provide such assistance as is necessary for
the supervision of students on school premises and at school functions whenever and wherever held. Thus,
teachers involved in school-based field studies are responsible under the authority of the school principal for the
supervision of students at all times.


Volunteer Guidelines
Volunteers should be advised of expectations for their roles as supervisors and should understand the regulations
outlined in policy IICA-R.

The role of the volunteer supervisor is very important. In general, the following suggestions can be used when
defining the role of a volunteer:

         assist with supervision of an assigned group throughout the course of the programmed activities
         assist with keeping students in groups and partners, and together as a class
         encourage student participation by staying in the background but supporting the participation of
          students in the educational activity. Encourage students to ask questions during the activities, and wait
          until the end of the program to ask questions of personal interest of the presenter(s).
         parents can be encouraged to help with the group that does not have his/her own child in it
         enjoy the program and share an experience with the students that can be discussed later


Supervision Ratios
The degree of supervision depends on:
       •	 the	age	and	maturity	of	the	student,	
       •	 the	needs	of	the	students,
       •	 the	inherent	danger	of	the	activity,	
       •	 the	circumstances	of	the	particular	activity	(e.g.,	a	trip	to	the	museum	would	not	need	as	many	
          supervisors as a higher risk outdoor trip).

The Educator-in-Charge is responsible for vigilant supervision of students at all times, and must always be in
charge although the Educator-in-Charge may be assisted by volunteer supervisors. Volunteer supervisors must be
selected, oriented and supervised to effectively perform their roles. All supervisors must be knowledgeable of
and abide by the Vancouver Board of Education Guidelines for Adults Interacting with Students.

The minimum acceptable standard of supervision for all student field studies, unless specifically required and


                       26 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
adjusted by the Principal, or involving Category 3 (Higher Risk Outdoor activities) activities are:

        Grade          Category 1                      Category 2*                    Category 3                Category 4*
                       Day Studies                                  Out of Province
                                                       Overnight/Outside              Higher-Risk
                                                                    but within Canada
                                                       Lower Mainland
                                                                    & Continental USA
        ___________________________________________________________________________
        K-3      2 supervisors      1 supervisor for  N/A           1 supervisor for
                 per class          8 students                      8 students

        ____________________________________________________________________________
        4-7      1 supervisor per       1 supervisor for  Activity   1 supervisor for
                 class, with additional 10 students       Dependent  10 students
                 supervision support
                 required dependent
                 on activity
        ____________________________________________________________________________
        8-12         1 supervisor per 1 supervisor for   Activity   1 supervisor for
                     per class         15 students       Dependent  15 students

        NOTE: Policy IICA-R2 outlines supervision ratios for Category 5 field studies.


Additional supervision is required when:

        a) There is an increased risk (see Category 3 requirements).
        b) There is participation of students with special needs.
        c) There are crowded venues.

Additional supervision requirements will be determined by the Educator-In-Charge of planning the field study, and
agreed to by the Principal. This will be done prior to initiating the required field study approval process.


Gender Specifications for Supervision
For all overnight excursions, it is recommended that there should be at least two (2) supervisors, no matter the
size or age of the group. For co-educational excursions, supervision must include both male and female
adult supervisors.

For all higher-risk outdoor pursuits (Category 3), and day field studies where travel extends beyond the Lower-
Mainland (Category 2) it is recommended that supervision include both male and female adult supervisors, but it
is not required.

Please review Section 2 for specific and additional supervision requirements for Higher-Risk -
Category 3 - field studies.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference: IICA-R1




                        FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 27
Risk Minimization
A paramount consideration on selecting, planning, organizing and conducting student field studies is to minimize
risk to everyone as all field studies entail some added element of risk. Risk cannot be eliminated; but it can be
managed. Careful consideration of the management of risks is an expectation of all staff involved in student field
studies.

Student field studies involve different degrees of risk and accordingly call for different levels of care, conduct,
communication and consent.

When planning field studies, opportunities within the district should not be overlooked. All other factors being
equal, local field studies may eliminate many of the negative factors and risks often associated with travel outside
the community.

In order to minimize risk and maximize safety, the following measures apply:

        a) Student group characteristics of age, developmental level, area of study, skills and self-discipline are to
             be considered in selecting appropriate field studies.
        b) Parent/guardian information is to be provided on field study opportunities to enable them to decline
             those which they believe may be inappropriate for their child or exceed their risk tolerance.
        c) Parental permission is to include the opportunity for parents to advise of their child’s unique medical,
             dietary and other special considerations.
        d) Safety assessment must be addressed before plans are finalized for all new field studies. This will vary
             from informal information gathering on routine or repeat field studies to systematic review of more
             complex field studies.
        e) Specialized resources needed are to be identified and incorporated into the program. These resources
             may include:
        i. safety equipment;
        ii. first aid kit and cell telephone;
        iii. qualified instructors; and/or
        iv. guides familiar with the area.

        f) Students with special needs must be provided with appropriate safety equipment both for their
           transportation and their participation in activities.
        g) Preparatory instruction of students will include both the development of physical skills and the self-
           discipline to participate.
        h) Parent meetings may be organized both to provide parents/guardians with risk assessment information
           and to have parental reinforcement of school expectations.
        i) Supervision plan is established.
        j) Volunteers are selected, orientated and supervised
        k) Transportation is planned to be safe and volunteer drivers are selected, orientated and supervised
        l) Critical incident response plans/ safety plans are developed before travel in order to respond to
           emergent situations.
        m) Emergency contact/health forms are accessible during the course of the field study
        n) Extended field studies involving international air travel require more extensive planning and special
           approvals as defined in IICA-R2: Extended Off-Continent Field Studies.

                                                                                                                     Policy Reference IICA-R1

                       28 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Planning Field Studies: Additional Considerations
Thoughtful planning for a field study includes consideration of the following elements:

 Objectives: Establish the purpose for the study. (What understandings do you wish students to attain?
What attitudes and abilities will be fostered?)

 Accommodating the Needs of All Students: Think about the needs of each student. One
activity can provide the basis for numerous valuable and appropriate learning outcomes for a range of students.

 Curriculum Linkage: Consider which goals of the provincial curriculum could be enhanced through a
field study.

 Curricular Integration: Consider all the possibilities for enhancing the various curriculum goals:
language development, mathematics skills, science processes, art appreciation, social studies understandings,
etc.

 Cooperative Learning: Consider which activities associated with the field study can be completed by
cooperative groups.

 Preparatory Activities: Prior to the visit, decide if there are any fundamental understandings that
students should have in order to maximize the on-site experience. Information to “set the stage” should be
imparted and motivation and curiosity piqued through preparatory activities. (For very young students, this may
include understanding the purpose of a field study.) Expectations for behaviour on-site could be discussed.

 On-site Activities: Pose interesting questions that require students to speculate about their
observations and to interpret the meanings or importance of things they see. Data collection is important, but try
not to dampen enthusiasm with a search for “right” answers.

 Follow-up Activities: Consider the range of activities students could engage in to draw on their
observations and interpretations: role playing, oral reports, art projects, additional research, creative writing, etc.

 Evaluation and Assessment: Plan appropriate ways to assess student learning and to collect
information upon which you may evaluate the field study.

 Accommodating Students with Special Needs: Field studies can accommodate the vast
differences among students found in a typical classroom, and, because the types of activities included in field
studies involve direct experience, all students benefit from participation. The actual learning outcomes for each
student, however, may be different.




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 29
The following outline, with excerpts from YouthSafe Outdoors, provides some suggestions for accommodating
special needs students.

         Learn about the particular disability and how it affects the individual, and what his or her abilities
          (e.g. mobility, fitness, skills), limitations (physical, cognitive and psychological) and interests are. This
          knowledge will facilitate appropriate preparation to allow maximum inclusion.
         Ensure the parent/guardian of the student with a disability is aware of the itinerary and activities and
          the modifications that are planned to accommodate their child and that they provide their consent.
         Supervisors should be trained or briefed regarding understandings and tasks they will likely be called
          upon to perform.
         Supervisor ratios may need to be adjusted to provide sufficient assistance to a student with a disability.
         Consider how to group/buddy the students and encourage inclusive behaviour and responsibility of
          the whole group.
         The physical venue or area may need to be inspected prior to the trip to ensure the student can get
          around (wheelchair accessibility).
         Activities must be appropriately planned to provide achievable yet enjoyable outcomes for the student
          with a disability. It may be appropriate to modify equipment and/or environmental/facilities.
         Contingency plans and emergency procedures should be in place to handle foreseeable incidents
          related to the disability or affecting a student’s ability to respond to emergencies.
         Prior to the field study, have the class discuss ideas for including students with special needs. Ask
          students to suggest effective strategies.
         Have students work in cooperative groups whenever possible.


       Accommodating Students with English as a Second Language:
English as a Second Language (ESL) students must have opportunities to take part in field studies. Field studies
offer a meaningful context for language learning, so consider the following principles when planning for a field trip:

         Language is learned through meaningful experiences in several contexts.
         Students’ cognitive and academic growth should continue while the second language is developing.
         Thinking skills are interdependent with language and content and are common to all subject areas.
         Key visuals such as diagrams, graphs, and timelines are essential elements in bridging the gap between
           thinking, content, and language.
         ESL students have developed a range of thinking and language skills commensurate with their
           chronological age but based on experiences in another language and culture.
         Efficient instruction aims to meet several objectives concurrently. Efficient language instruction
           integrates the building of subject matter, knowledge, thinking, and language skills.



Planning Field Studies: Sample Proposal Form and Planning
Checklist
The purpose of the following sample tools are to assist teachers in self-assessing their planning, and to assist
administrators in ascertaining that a proposed field studies is well-planned with respect to safety. Regardless of
what school-based planning tools are used, it is the teacher’s responsibility to provide sufficient information so
that an administrator can be confident when signing off on the proposed trip plan. The sample tools that follow
are intended for day field studies. A sample proposal form for higher-risk outdoor and overnight pursuits is
                       30 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
contained in Section 2.

                    Field Studies Proposal Form Template (PLANNING FORM A)
  School Logo                Field Studies Proposal Form Template (PLANNING FORM A)                                                   School Name
                                                            (Local, Low-risk Daytrip)
                                                                                                                                         Page 1 of 2

   DESTINATION:
   DATE:                                                DEPARTURE TIME:                                     RETURN TIME:
   EDUCATOR-in-CHARGE:
   PHONE:                                               FAX:                                  EMAIL:
   AREA OF STUDY:                                       PURPOSE OF TRIP:
   GRADE/HOME ROOM:                                     # OF STUDENTS:                        # OF MALE:                   # OF FEMALE:

   NAMES OF SUPERVISORS (Please print; add rows if needed):                        Staff (S)/Volunteer (V)/Other (O)                 GENDER: M/F
   Educator-in-Charge:
   Other Supervisor:
   Other Supervisor:
   Other Supervisor:
   TOTAL NUMBER OF SUPERVISORS:                                                                /                 /
   NAME OF SERVICE PROVIDER (SP) (If applicable):                                  SP CONTACT PERSON:                                SP PHONE:



           TRANSPORTATION (check all that apply)                      ESTIMATED COST OF TRIP:
   METHOD                           DRIVER                            SOURCES OF FUNDING (i.e., cost/student, other sources) If so
       Walking                           Professional driver          accommodated

       School-owned bus                  Volunteer driver
       Public transport                 (staff/other supervisor)
                                                                      EQUAL ACCESS FOR ALL STUDENTS:
                                        Volunteer driver
       Charter bus                                                        Yes      No      See attached
                                       (student)
        15 passenger van            Other (specify): ________         SPECIAL NEEDS ADDRESSED:
       Rental van                                                         Yes       No       N/A      See attached

       By service provider                                            ALTERNATIVE ACTIVITY FOR NON-PARTICIPANTS:                           Yes    No
                                                                      CONTINGENCY PLAN:
   Other (specify): ________



   EDUCATIONAL VALUE
   Goals and/or Student Learning Outcomes:




   SAFETY GUIDELINES
   I am familiar with relevant board policies, district procedures and the VSB Field Studies Resource Book (2009):          Yes     No


   SAFETY PLAN
   Briefly describe (or attach in Trip Plan) the risk assessment and safety planning process to address any key risks related to the site/area,
   weather, activity and/or group:




                             FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 31
SUPERVISION PLAN
Briefly describe the supervision processes to be used: e.g., large or small group setting(s); lead/sweep; head counts; buddy
system; level of supervision (constant visual, on-site, in the area); other elements of supervision plan as relevant:




VOLUNTEER PLAN (if relevant)
Process to identify, screen if/as appropriate, and brief re: roles and responsibilities (e.g., briefing to be conducted when, where,
how, by whom):




EMERGENCY PLAN
First Aid kit(s) (stocked and carried/accessible):
   Yes             No

Emergency communications equipment carried and/or accessible (check any and all that apply):
   Telephone         Cell phone         Service Provider Responsibility    None         Other (specify): ___________________________

Contacts and numbers, if relevant: ___________________________________________________________________________________

Name of Primary First Aider, if relevant: ______________________________ Certification Held: _______________________________



ATTACHMENTS CHECKLIST (check all that apply and attach to this form):
   Program/Activity/Trip Plan                                             Volunteer Driver Authorization Application Form
   Parent/Guardian Correspondence                                         Service Provider Proposal, Agreement and/or Contract
    Parental Consent and Acknowledgement of Risk Form                     Passenger List

Other (specify):


   Completed Off-Site Experience Checklist attached.

EVALUATION
Criteria for success of off-site experience:

Process to determine success:



Name of Lead teacher (please print):                              Date (year/month/day)            Signature
                                                                           /         /
Name of Administrator (please print):                             Date (year/month/day)            Signature
                                                                           /         /




                      32 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
                           Field Studies Checklist (PLANNING FORM B)
                                                  (Local, Low-risk Daytrip)
To be completed by the lead teacher planning the field study:

Teacher:_______________________________________                               Grade/Class/Course:______________________

Field Trip Destination: ___________________________                            Date: _______________________

1.     _____ Decide on appropriate field study (Refer to Planning Field Studies: General Considerations
       section)
2.     _____ Plan a unit of study that includes preparatory, on-site and follow-up activities.
3.     _____ Obtain approval from your school administrator. Ensure that approval is also obtained from the
       Associate Superintendent – Area for all overnight, outside the Lower Mainland or higher-risk outdoor
       excursions.
4.     _____ Arrange for and review reference material about the site as soon as possible.
5.     _____ Based on the anticipated number of students participating in the trip, plan for the appropriate
        number of adult supervision (Refer to Supervision Ratios section). Ensure you plan for both male and
       female supervision for overnight trips.
6.     _____ Make arrangements with the site to be visited. Arrangements should include:

         description of program and/or program outline provided by site to be visited and any other print
           material obtained
         confirmed date of trip (start and end dates and/or times)
         length of trip or tour
         minimum and maximum group size permitted by site
         costs
         adult supervision required
         number of Instructors and/or Tour Guides if required
         a review of all facilities to be used during the trip
         supplies required by the students (special clothing and/or educational materials)
         safety precautions at the site and a complete assessment of risks involved in trip activities
         a preview visit to the site if possible
7.     _____ Transportation to be arranged (by the teacher).
       If private cars are to be used to transport students, the driver must complete the VSB Volunteer Driver
       form, and the driver’s name, address, phone number, insurance coverage and license number must be
       kept on file at the school. (Refer to Transportation section).
8.     _____ Develop and send home a Parent Information Letter, Parent Consent
       Form and Student Medical Information Form (Refer to Permission and Consent Forms section). The
       Parent Consent Form must include the following details:

         the date(s) of the trip
         destination
         educational purpose of the trip
         mode of transportation
         a description of the activities students will be involved in during the trip
                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 33
       a disclosure of any higher risk activities students will be involved in during the trip
       behaviour expectations
       safety plan/emergency plan
       information about meals on the trip
       information about facilities to be used during the trip (i.e. sleeping accommodations if applicable)
       a tear off section that parents/guardians return signed. The tear off section must include space where
         parents/guardians are encouraged to indicate any activities that they do NOT want their child to
         participate in.
9.    _____ Collect Parent Consent Forms and Medical Information Forms from
      students. Determine the actual number of students that will be involved in the trip.
10.   _____ Based on participating students, confirm the number of adult supervisors
      required and ensure that they are notified of their responsibilities well ahead of the trip’s departure date.
11.    _____ Notify any members of your school staff that may be affected by your
      absence, and arrange for:

       classes to be covered by a TOC as necessary (Refer to Teachers On Call section)
       supervision for any clubs or coaching activities you sponsor as necessary
12.   _____ Discuss trip routines and information with students several days ahead of
      departure, with a full review on the day of the trip. Student information should include:

       trip itinerary
       assignment of partners and or groups
       behaviour expectations (students may be asked to sign a trip specific Student Behaviour Contract
        prior to the trip departure)
       safety plan/emergency plan
       necessary equipment or supplies
13.   _____ Plan and host a parent information meeting that reviews the same information
      with parents listed in #12.

14.   ______ Confirm prior to the trip’s departure that you have appropriate:

       adult supervision
       trip site staff as required
       transportation
       safety plan/emergency plan
       equipment and supplies (educational, first aid)
15.   _____ Before departing from the school on the trip ensure you have:

       all student permission forms and medical records
       left behind assignments for students not attending the trip
       given a final attendance list of students to the school office
       left trip details and your emergency contact information (cell phone number) while off site with the
         school office
       paired and grouped students as necessary and reviewed with them the trip itinerary and emergency
         procedures.


                     34 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Planning For Extended Off-Continent Field Studies
(Category 5)
An extended international field study (Category 5) involves absence from school for normally (5) days or more,
and international land or air travel and as such involves additional risks. These risks arise from:

        a)   travel beyond the community of the school district;
        b)   group living 24 hours per day;
        c)   activities which are different than everyday;
        d)   language, custom and cultural differences; and
        e)   living in areas with a different social infrastructure.

Accordingly, additional caution must be exercised when planning extended field studies.


Extended Off-Continent Field Study Application and Approval
The extended international field study application is a time sensitive 3-step approval process that has been
established to enable systematic planning, review and approval by the Principal and Associate Superintendent-
Area, with ample time for feedback on the trip proposal.

Step One of Approval
Educators sponsoring extended international field studies must obtain the signed preliminary approval of the
Principal before communicating with parents, and making any commitments.

The sponsoring Educators must provide Principals with an Extended Off-Continent Field Study Preliminary
Application (REQ-SC-031), preferably attached to a detailed Field Studies Proposal Form.

Before approving the preliminary Extended Off-Continent Field Study Preliminary Application; the Principal will
ensure that the proposal:

        a) has substantive educational rationale;
        b) has a duration and number of days absent from school which is reasonable; (The maximum number of
           days for an extended field study is fourteen (14) days in total, with only 5 of the 14 days being school
           “Instructional” days.)
        c) co-ordinates with overall school programs and considers learning and program delivery of other
           classes remaining in the school;
        d) appears to be a safe activity for the planned group;
        e) has an appropriate safety assessment and plan;
        f) is not a prohibited activity or does not involve travel to an area where Foreign Affairs Canada has
           published a travel advisory on their website: http://voyage.gc.ca/destinations/menu_e.htm or www.
           bcspp.org;
        g) has appropriate travel and activity arrangements;
        h) establishes criteria for appropriate access and eligibility;
        i) is affordable for the intended group and co-ordinates with the overall school plans for fundraising;
        j) has appropriate business and financial arrangements established for the trip including travel contracts,
           insurance coverage and cancellation losses responsibility;
        k) has a prudent plan of student supervision
        l) provides for appropriate communications to parents, guardians, students, teachers, staff and

                        FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 35
           volunteers on the plans, risks and financial arrangements as the basis of providing informed consent to
           be involved; and
        m) provides for appropriate pre-travel preparations and the establishment of expectations with students
           and all other participants.

The Principal will review the Extended Off-Continent Field Study Preliminary Application form before approving
it to ensure that it is diligently completed and the field study is well planned, has inherent and substantive
educational value, and addresses the considerations in this policy and regulation.

Step Two of Approval
Upon the Principal’s approval, The Educator-in-Charge will submit a copy of the Extended Off-Continent Field
Study Preliminary Application (REQ-SC-031) form and supporting documents to the Associate Superintendent –
Area to obtain preliminary approval no less than 4 months prior to the proposed departure date.
Preliminary approval of the Associate Superintendent-Area is required before making any financial commitments
and commencing fundraising or fund collection of any nature.
Once the Associate Superintendent-Area provides Stage 2 Approval, the sponsors can go forward with trip
planning and fundraising

Step Three of Approval
Once all trip details have been finalized, including the number of students participating, supervisors identified,
travel arrangements, and complete trip itinerary confirmed the Educator-in Charge must submit the VBE
Request for Approval of Field Study form (REQ-SC-015) to the Principal and Associate Superintendent for final
signed approval no less than 6 weeks prior to the departure date.

Attached must be copies of the drafted parent information letter, parent consent form, and proposed trip
Itinerary. A full disclosure of risks must be included in these documents.


Extended Off-Continent Supervision
The selection of supervisors for extended international field studies must address the following considerations in
addition to the general supervisor selection considerations identified in Regulation IICA-R1.

Ratios for Category 5 Field Studies

        Category 5

        K-3 N/A
        -------------------------------------------------
        5-7 1 supervisor for every 5 students
        -------------------------------------------------
        7-12 1 supervisor for every 10 students

Qualifications
        a) field studies outside of Canada will include a least one supervisor who is certified to provide First Aid;
           and
        b) field studies outside of the United States will, wherever possible, include at least one supervisor or
           guide who has first-hand knowledge of the customs and culture of the country being visited.

                       36 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Responsibilities
It is required that a meeting of all supervisors, and the Principal be held to:
         a) state who is in charge and define the roles of the volunteers
         b) communicate that supervisors are to serve as role models to students, as ambassadors for the school
             district and they are expected to conduct themselves accordingly;
         c) inform volunteers of appropriate supervision and leadership techniques;
         d) review that students must be supervised 24 hours per day including sleep time and unscheduled time
             – plans for such supervision must be made well in advance of travel;
         e) discuss consistency in the application of guidelines, rationale, responsibilities, expectations and follow-
             up;
         f) state that the use of alcohol by students is strictly prohibited during field studies regardless of the
             circumstances, the age of the students, or local laws, customs and culture;
         g) outline the expectations concerning the restricted consumption of alcohol by supervisors;
         h) prohibit the use of illegal substances by all participants;
         i) discuss the issue of smoking and provide clear expectations that will be consistently applied
             throughout the field study, that are consistent with Board policy;
         j) define a critical incident plan to deal with health, financial or discipline emergencies that includes a
             telephone tree and arrangements for two-way communication;
         k) agree on what type of behaviour will be deemed inappropriate for both students and supervisors; and
         l) agree on the consequences of inappropriate behaviour.

Meeting of all Involved in the Extended Off-Continent Field Study
A meeting of all involved (staff, supervisors, students and parents/guardians) in the extended field study, must be
called to:
         a) discuss student behaviour, discipline and their role as ambassadors of the school district;
         b) distribute the itinerary and information on the planned activities, including site based contact
            information (addresses, phone numbers etc);
         c) distribute a written statement of expectation about student behaviour;
         d) distribute a written statement outlining the possible consequences and liabilities of inappropriate
            behaviour;
         e) discuss any potential risks and plans to minimize those risks;
         f) define how the identifiable school unit is to be maintained during travel; and
         g) communicate the actions which will be taken should a serious problem emerge in relation to health,
            finances or discipline.

Extended Off-Continent Financial Matters
Before any financial contributions are accepted, parents must be notified, in writing, that should the travel have to
be cancelled for any reason the district is not responsible for any costs incurred.

Financial arrangements for staff and volunteer travel costs must be transparent, including the use of a “free”
tickets and the accruing of travel benefits earned from the group’s travel.

Funds raised by all participants (educators, students and supervisors) for an extended international field study will
first be used to benefit students and secondly for the benefit of other participants.

An accounting of all funds related to an extended field study must be provided to the Principal within two weeks
of completion of the travel.
                                                                                                                    Policy Reference: IICA-R2

                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 37
  Extended Off-Continent Field Study Preliminary Approval Form
                          (REQ-SC-031)
                                    EXTENDED OFF-CONTINENT STUDY
                      PRELIMINARY APPROVAL FROM ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT - AREA
                                          (to be submitted 4 months prior to proposed departure date)


  SCHOOL:

  EDUCATOR-IN-CHARGE:                                                                EMAIL:

  PROPOSED DESTINATION:

  PROPOSED DEPARTURE DATE:                                       PROPOSED RETURN DATE:

  AREA OF STUDY:                      EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE OF TRIP:



  GRADE(S):                          TOTAL # OF STUDENTS:                 # OF MALE:                       # OF FEMALE:


  TOTAL PROJECTED COST:              PROJECTED COST                      PROJECTED BUILT-IN                PROJECTED COST TO
                                     PER STUDENT:                        COST PER TEACHER:                 TEACHER (if any)




  PROPOSED EXCURSION DETAILS: (or Attach “High-Risk Planning form”)




  SUPERVISION PLAN: (number of Supervisors required to meet ratio, will they be teachers, volunteers, or other)




 ATTACHMENTS CHECKLIST
 q     Program/Activity/Trip Plan
 q     Draft Parental Consent and Acknowledgement of Risk Form
 q     Service Provider Proposal, Agreement and/or Contact
 Other (specify): ________________________________________________________________________________________________
 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This excursion will be planned in compliance with Policy IICA-R2, and corresponding Policies IICA and IICA-R1.

 Educator-in-Charge (signature)                                                                         Date (year/month/day)
                                                                                                              /          /

 Principal Approval (signature):                                                                        Date (year/month/day
                                                                                                            /         /

 Preliminary Approval of associate Superintendent-Area (signature):                                     Date (year/month/day)
                                                                                                            /         /

               FINAL APPROVAL MUST STILL BE REQUESTED FROM THE ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT-AREA
     VIA THE REQUEST FOR APPROVAL OF FIELD STUDIES FORM (REQ-SC-015) 6 WEEKS PRIOR TO THE DEPARTURE DATE

     REQ-SC-031



                           38 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
             Permission for Student Travelling Without Parent Sample Form
        In most circumstances a copy of the signed parent field study consent form will suffice as documented
parent approval for a student to travel internationally or off-continent. However, the below resource could also
be used, in addition to the signed consent field study consent.

To Whom It May Concern
Re: Permission for Student travelling without Parent
RE: INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL FIELD TRIP
I (We) __________________________________________________________________________________ (full
name(s) of custodial and/or non-custodial parent(s) / legal guardian(s), am (are) the lawful custodial parent and/or
non-custodial parent(s) or legal guardians of:

Child’s Full Name: ___________________________________________________________________________
Date of birth (DD / MM / YY): __________________________________________________________________
Place of birth: _______________________________________________________________________________
Canadian Passport Number: ___________________________________________________________________
Date of issuance of Canadian passport (DD / MM / YY): _____________________________________________
Place of issuance of Canadian passport: __________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________ (child’s full name), has my (our) consent to
travel with:

Full name of Sponsor Teacher __________________________________________________________________
Canadian or foreign passport number: ___________________________________________________________
Date of issuance of passport (DD / MM / YY) _____________________________________________________
Place of issuance of passport: __________________________________________________________________
to visit ________________________________________________ (name of foreign country) during the period of
____________________________________________ (dates of travel: departure and return). During that period
my child (full name) will be under the supervision of the sponsor teacher and will be residing at the following
address(es) - hotels or homestays.

Hotel(s) / Homestays _________________________________________________________________________
City, province / state, country: __________________________________________________________________

Any questions regarding this consent letter can be directed to the Parents/Guardians

Number / street address and apartment number: ___________________________________________________
Province / state, country: ______________________________________________________________________
Telephone: (work and residence): _______________________________________________________________

Signature(s): ______________________________________________________ Date: _____________________
(Full name(s) and signature(s) of custodial parent, and/or non-custodial parent(s) or legal guardian(s).

Signed before me, _________________________________________________ (name of witness), this ________
(date) at ________________________________________________________ (name of location).

Signature: _______________________________________________ (name of witness)
                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 39
40 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Section 2:
Specific Considerations
for Outdoor Education Programs
and Higher Risk Outdoor Pursuits




        FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 41
Designing Outdoor Education Programs and Higher-Risk
Outdoor Pursuits - Category 3 Field Studies
Overnight outdoor education programs and higher-risk outdoor pursuits offer teachers and their students unique
opportunities for meeting environmental education and subject area curriculum objectives in a memorable way.
Outdoor education and higher-risk outdoor pursuits field studies (Category 3) may last up to a full day, or may
last for two days or more, and entail a level of risk that is higher than activities in which students are normally
engaged in at school. These would typically be:

        a) Outdoor School Programs: where an outdoor setting is important and it
           becomes the classroom. Examples include Outdoor Education and Physical Education Activities.

        b) Outdoor Pursuits: refers to activities related to self-propelled travel on land, water and snow or ice
           (ie. hiking, kayaking, skiing). The definition of outdoor pursuit includes higher risk activities, such as
           skiing, and extended wilderness travel. Outdoor pursuits are typically of a higher care nature and
           as such these environments require some more specialized awareness, planning, instruction and
           leadership. Outdoor pursuit does not include local ice area activities, such as skating, hockey or
           curling.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference: IICA-R


Specific Guidelines for Category 3 Field Studies

Category 3 based field studies entail a level of risk that is higher than activities in which students are normally
engaged in at school and must prescribe to the additional following expectations.
The same planning and preparation criteria as outlined in this policy apply to higher-risk outdoor pursuits. The
fact that higher-risk pursuits are more extensive means that other additional factors must be considered and
Educators-in-Charge must consider whether they have the capacity to provide for the safety of their students
within the context of the activity.

All Category 3 field studies must be approved by the Principal, and the Associate Superintendent – Area by
completing the VBE Request for Approval of Field Studies form (REQ-SC-015). Approval by the Associate
Superintendent-Area should be sought no less than 3 weeks before trip commences, and before the field studies
plan is presented to or communicated with students and parents and before any funds are collected.

                                                                                                                     Policy Reference IICA-R

Many excursions are “higher-risk” in that students may be subject to a risk of injury while engaged in the activity.
The purpose of identifying certain activities as High-Risk field studies is to ensure that when students are involved
in the activity more extensive planning, risk management, supervision and instruction is provided. As such, when
an activity is defined as a high-risk field study it requires several more processes and procedures than standard
field study practice.

High-risk field studies have been deemed inappropriate for primary aged students K-3 by policy IICA-R1 page 11.

The following sample list identifies excursions that can be performed by staff exercising standard duty of care
and good field study practice, and excursions that should only be undertaken with specialized attention to risk-
management and instruction.

                       42 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
High-Risk Activity Sample Delineation

     Standard Field Study Practice                                           High-Risk (Category 3)

  •	 	 Residential	Camping	–	Stanley	Park	urban	                •	 Base	Camping/Backcountry	camping/Winter	Camping
       camping, school-gym                                      •	 Mountain	hikes/Backpacking
  •	 	 City	walks/	Cross-country	running                        •	 Race	Cycling	(single	file,	speed	defined,	
  •	 	 Cycling	–	local	neighbourhood/local	path                    competitive based), on-hill Mountain Biking/BMX
  •	 	 Low	Ropes	courses                                        •	 High	Ropes	Courses	and	Zip	Lines
  •	 	 Pony	Rides                                               •	 Rock	Climbing	(artificial	and	real)
  •	 	 Swimming	Pool,	Water	Park                                •	 Repelling	
  •	 	 Pool	Snorkelling                                         •	 Archery
  •	 	 Indoor/Rink	Skating                                      •	 Horseback	Riding
  •	 	 Hockey                                                   •	 Open	Water	swimming	(lake,	river,	ocean)
  •	 	 Curling                                                  •	 Open	Water	snorkelling
  •	 	 Snowshoeing	–	resort	daytrip                             •	 Paddlesports	(canoeing,	kayaking,	rafting)
  •	 	 Cross-Country	skiing	–	resort	day	trip                   •	 Windsurfing,	Board	sailing
                                                                •	 Power-Boating,	Sailing
                                                                •	 Scuba	Diving	(pool	and	open	water)
                                                                •	 Open	Water	Ice	Skating	(Pond)
                                                                •	 Snowshoeing	–	out	back/overnight
                                                                •	 Cross-Country	skiing	–	out	back/overnight
                                                                •	 Tobagganing/Sledding/Tubing
                                                                •	 Alpine	(downhill)	skiing
                                                                •	 Snowboarding




Category 3 Sample Forms

The following sample tools are to assist teachers in self-assessing their planning, and to assist administrators in
ascertaining that a proposed field study is well-planned with respect to safety. Regardless of what school-based
planning tools are used, it is the teacher’s responsibility to provide sufficient information so that an administrator
can be confident when signing off on the proposed trip plan.




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 43
                           Off-Site Experience Checklist for Administrators


                                                         School Name                                     √ = Met
                                                Off-Site Experience Checklist                            X = Not Met
                                                     For Administrators                                  ? = Need More Information
                                                                                                         – = Not Applicable

Met      Criteria
         Administrative process respected (e.g., proposal submitted to appropriate administrator in time to be considered)
         Off-site experience accessibility/eligibility policy addressed (e.g., equal access; voluntary participation, if appropriate;
         special needs addressed; alternative activity for non-participants)
         Educational value of the trip is evident (e.g., goals, student learning outcomes, curricular connections)
         Trip is appropriate for the students (e.g., age/grade, preparation, and follow-up)
         Duration of the trip is appropriate and can be accommodated in the school calendar
         Destination or route adequately assessed (through pre-visit or other data collection) and appears appropriate
         Itinerary and activities are outlined and fit the objectives
         The group appears adequately prepared for trip (e.g., knowledge, skills, attitudes, fitness, clothing, equipment)
         Information to be given parents/guardians is appropriate for the type/duration of trip
         Parent/guardian information meeting date is planned, if holding one is appropriate for the trip (e.g., overnight trip)
         Parental/Guardian consents to be collected (e.g., consent to attend, consent to secure medical treatment)
         Relevant student health and medical information to be secured from parents
         Additional insurance needs addressed, if relevant (e.g., out of province medical, hospital care)
         Budget and financial arrangements appropriate (e.g., financial accessibility, legality of any fees charged as per hardship
         policy)
         Transportation arrangements acceptable (type of vehicle and type of driver) and parental consent secured
         Number and gender(s) of supervisors and supervision plan are appropriate for group, activities and sites/areas
         Plan to ensure all participants are clear re: behavioral expectations and consequences
         If overnighting, accommodations arrangements are acceptable, (e.g., hygiene, security)
         Leadership is competent to instruct/lead the particular group in the identified activity(ies) and environment(s)
         Plan in place to brief supervisors re: trip purpose, logistics, roles/responsibilities, safety plan, emergency plan, etc.
         Safety plan is appropriate (i.e., procedures for managing the key inherent risks of the activities, environments and
         participants)
         Emergency plan is in place to deal with injured/ill/lost/stranded participant(s) (e.g., training, kits, communications
         equipment, back-up transportation, Emergency Services access)
         Confirmation of the presence of appropriate alternative contingency plan(s) if the trip/part of the trip can’t happen
         Destination contact and phone number, e.g., outdoor centre, camp, local authority(ies)
         List of documents teacher will carry (e.g., trip plan, permits, passenger lists, medical conditions and emergency contacts
         of participants).
         Office to receive copy of finalized trip plan, signed consent forms, passenger lists, and names of no-shows.
         Is there an appropriate plan in place to evaluate the trip (e.g., criteria for success, process to evaluate)
         Other relevant information unique to the particular trip. Specify: ______________________________________________

 Comments:




 Name of Lead teacher (please print)                        Date (year/month/day)           Signature
                                                                         /          /
 Name of Principal (please print)                           Date (year/month/day)           Signature
                                                                     /          /
 Additional approval (as needed) Specify:                   Date (year/month/day)           Signature
                                                                     /          /



                          44 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
                Higher-Risk Field Studies Proposal Form (PLANNING FORM C)
                                            (Overnight, Outdoor Pursuits, International)

School Logo      Higher-Risk Field Studies Proposal Form Template (PLANNING FORM C)                                        School Name
                                              (Overnight, Outdoor Pursuits, International)
                                                                                                                             Page 1 of 2
 EDUCATOR-in-CHARGE:
 PHONE:                                             FAX:                                EMAIL:
 DESTINATION:
 DEPARTURE DATE:                            DEPARTURE TIME:                        RETURN DATE:                 RETURN TIME:
 AREA OF STUDY:                                     PURPOSE OF TRIP:
 GRADE/HOME ROOM:                                   # OF STUDENTS:                      # OF MALE:                  # OF FEMALE:

 NAMES OF SUPERVISORS (Please print; add lines as needed):                    Staff (S)/Volunteer (V)/Other (O)            GENDER: M/F
 Educator-in-Charge:
 Other Supervisor:
 Other Supervisor:
 Other Supervisor:
 TOTAL NUMBER OF SUPERVISORS:                                                             /               /
 NAME OF SERVICE PROVIDER (SP) (If applicable):                               SP CONTACT PERSON:                           SP PHONE:



        TRANSPORTATION (check all that apply)                     ESTIMATED COST OF TRIP:
 METHOD                          DRIVER                           SOURCES OF FUNDING (i.e., cost/student, other sources) If so
     Walking                         Professional driver          accommodated
     School-owned bus                Volunteer driver
     Public transport            (staff/other supervisor)
                                                                  EQUAL ACCESS FOR ALL STUDENTS:
     Charter bus                     Volunteer driver
                                 (student)                           Yes      No     See attached
      15 passenger van
                                                                  SPECIAL NEEDS ADDRESSED:
      Rental van                                                     Yes      No       N/A      See attached
                                 Other (specify): ________
     By service provider
                                                                  ALTERNATIVE ACTIVITY FOR NON-PARTICIPANTS:                   Yes     No
    Other (specify):
                                                                  CONTINGENCY PLAN:
 ____________________

 EDUCATIONAL VALUE
 Goals and/or Student Learning Outcomes:

 Activity(ies) that will occur (or include on attached Program/Activity/Trip Plan and/or Itinerary Card):

 Student preparation (e.g., re: knowledge, skills, attitudes, fitness):

 Follow-up activity(ies) that will occur:

 SAFETY GUIDELINES
 I am familiar with relevant board policies, district procedures, the VSB Field Studies Resource Book (2009) and the YouthSafe
 Outdoors: Safety First! Guidelines for BC School Off-site Experiences (2005):         Yes No
 SAFETY PLAN
 Briefly describe (or attach in Detailed Trip Plan) the risk assessment and safety planning process to address key risks related to:
 Environment (e.g., weather, terrain/site, wildlife):

 Activity (e.g., transportation, outdoor pursuits/aquatic specific):

 Group (e.g., clothing, equipment, water, food, behaviour):



                           FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 45
                                                                                                                                     Page 2 of 2
SUPERVISION PLAN
Briefly describe the supervision processes to be used: e.g., large or small group setting(s); lead/sweep; head counts; buddy
system; level of supervision (constant visual, on-site, in the area); other elements of supervision plan as relevant:




VOLUNTEER PLAN
Process to identify volunteer candidates:


Volunteer screening processes (check any and all that apply):
   Background Check                 Reference Check              Criminal Records Check


Volunteer briefing process re: their roles and responsibilities (e.g., briefing to be conducted when, where, how, by whom):




EMERGENCY PLAN
Contingency kit(s) carried (stocked and accessible) (check all that apply):
   First Aid             Repair                Survival

Emergency communications technology carried/available (check any and all that apply):
   Telephone        Cell phone       Satellite Phone      Radio (VHF, UHF)      Family Radio Service (FRS)       None         Other (specify): ____


Name of Primary First Aider: __________________________________ Current Certification Held: ___________________________________
Name of School Contact Available 24/7: _________________          Phones: (H)_______________ (W) _______________ (S) _______________



ATTACHMENTS CHECKLIST (check all forms that will apply and attach blank copies to this form):
    Program/Activity/Trip Plan                                                Volunteer Driver Authorization Form
    Assessing Teacher/Leader Readiness Form                                   Service Provider Proposal, Agreement and/or Contract
    Parental Consent and Acknowledgement of Risk Form                         Class List


Other (specify): _________________________________________________________________________________________


EVALUATION
Criteria for success of off-site experience:

Process to determine success:



Completed Off-site Experience Checklist attached                    Yes          No

Name of Educator-in-Charge (please print):                            Date (year/month/day)              Signature
                                                                               /         /
Name of Principal (please print):                                     Date (year/month/day)              Signature
                                                                               /         /
Associate Superintendent, Area (please print):                        Date (year/month/day)              Signature
                                                                               /         /




                            46 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Risk Assessment for Category 3 Pursuits – Determining
Readiness and Suitability
When taking students off-site or teaching/leading outdoor pursuits, there is often the need for more specialized
knowledge, skill and expertise. Teachers must consider whether they have the capacity to provide for the safety
of their students within the context of the activity. Teachers must self-assess their readiness and capacity to lead
an activity. Teachers/leaders must also assess the suitability of the activity for the students under their instruction.
This is an important element of risk assessment.
                                                                                            YouthSafe Outdoors, 2005

The competency and capability of the teacher, or teacher readiness, is one of “the most important determinants
of the safety and success of a given off-site activity involving higher care activities…Readiness is the interactive
combination of relevant knowledge, skill, health and fitness, attitude, behavior, confidence, experience and
judgment”. YouthSafe Outdoors includes a self-assessment tool for a teacher to self-check his or her readiness
and capacity.



Risk Assessment - Determining Readiness and Suitability
For increased risk activities, competent instruction and vigilant supervision is mandatory. Competence may be
established by virtue of a certificate from a governing body, such as a Canoeing Instructor’s Certificate from
Canoe Sport B.C. In areas where certificates are not issued, competency may be that recognized by the leader’s
peers by virtue of experience and demonstrated expertise in the activity.

The Principal and Associate Superintendent-Area must be satisfied that the Educator-in-Charge will provide
adequate supervision, competent instruction, and follow recognized
safety procedures for the planned activities, and that supervision meets the level of competence required for the
activity.
                                                                                                                    Policy Reference IICA-R1


Readiness and Suitability
Some sample questions to consider when considering a Category 3 pursuit may include, but are not limited to:

Teacher/Leader Considerations
         Am I as a leader experienced and competent enough to properly assess this type of risk in relation to
           my own abilities and those of the group I am leading?
         Do I as an outdoor leader have the ability to deal with this risk or does its presence challenge my
           skills?
         Do I as leader have sufficient emergency, first aid and survival training to deal with any accidents which
           are foreseeable eventualities of accepting the risk?
         Will the other leaders and the group be able to carry on without me in the event that I am injured?
           Will they be able to deal with any emergency that may arise?
         In addition to my moral and ethical obligations to the students, will the acceptance of this risk violate
           any legal duties I or the Vancouver Board of Education have for the students.
         Are the teachers and guides qualified and experienced for such a trip?
         Is this risk of the type which I should discuss with my colleagues/supervisors?


                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 47
         Note:
         The term teacher/leader is used to denote and support the role and of the Lead Teacher (teacher
responsible and accountable for planning, organizing and coordinating the outing) and other school staff involved,
as well as the roles of service providers, contract instructors or trip leaders contracted by the school and or
volunteers appointed to augment school staff capacities.
                                                                                          YouthSafe Outdoors


        Student Considerations

         What is the real risk (physical, social, psychological) to the individual students engaging in the activity at
          this time?
         Are the students physically, mentally and emotionally prepared to deal with the risk present in the
          situation? Are they of insufficient age, intelligence and experience to personally assume this risk?
         Have the students been adequately prepared/instructed (knowledge and skills)?

        Program Considerations

         Is the acceptance of this risk essential or highly desirable in order to meet the objectives of the
           program and of the students or is it extraneous and irrelevant?
         Is the overall risk of the activity caused by a single risk or a combination of interacting or independent
           ones?
         Is the risk readily avoidable?
         Does the proposed trip meet the goals and objectives of the program?
         Have the necessary permits been obtained?

YouthSafe Outdoors includes detailed checklists for determining teacher readiness and program suitability. A
sample form follows:




                       48 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
       Assessing Teacher/Leader Readiness for Higher-Risk Outdoor Pursuits


School Logo                     ASSESSING TEACHER/LEADER READINESS                                  School Name
                                 FOR HIGHER-RISK OUTDOOR PURSUITS                                        page 1 of 2
Name of Teacher/Leader      ______________________________________________________
Proposed Program/Activity ________________________________________________________________

1.   Have you taken any relevant formal training in outdoor education, outdoor pursuits or related
     disciplines? Include certification courses, academic coursework, non-academic courses, other courses
     or workshops, but not first aid/CPR.                                                   Yes    No

     If yes, complete the table below with respect to the most relevant course(s). Write in your responses to
     the first five rows, and place checkmarks for Yes responses over the remaining items per course. Be
     prepared to share examples for these items.

 Course Particulars                                     Course 1             Course 2            Course 3
 Name of course and level, if appropriate
 Institution/organization offering the course
 Year the course was taken (approximate)
 If led to certification, is the ticket current now?
 Approximate course hours (face-to-face)
 Were your technical skills developed?
 Were your instruction skills developed?
 Were your trip leadership skills developed?
 Did you learn relevant safety procedures?
 Did you learn relevant emergency procedures?
 Did you instruct/lead peers over the course?
 Did you instruct/lead children over the course?


2. What, if any, first aid certification do you hold? _____________________________________________.
   Is this certification considered current by the certifying body?                     Yes    No
3. What, if any, CPR certification do you hold? _______________________________________________.
   Is this certification considered current by the certifying body?                 Yes    No
4. Do you have relevant personal recreational and/or sport experience in the activity?           Yes         No
   If yes, please answer the following:
   Number of years of participation in the activity                                              ___________ years.
   Days of involvement in the activity over the last three years                                 ___________ days.
   Involvement as part of an organized group (e.g., club, team)                                  Yes     No
   Have you had a significant mentor in the activity/environment?                                Yes     No
5. Have you instructed/led this program/activity formally in the past?                            Yes        No
   If yes, answer the following, in relation to the proposed program/activity:

      Particulars of Instruction/Leadership Experience                                             Yes        No
      Have you taught/led this same program/activity before with similar students?
      Have you taught/led this or other activities in a similar area/site?
      Have you instructed/led students in relevant technical skills?
      Have you instructed/led students in relevant safety procedures?
      Other relevant experience. Specify:
6. If a new activity for you, have any other schools of which you are aware conducted this activity (note
   which school, grade, activity and site/area)?


7. When, if at all, were you last at/on the proposed site/route? Date: _______________________________
   Describe nature/level of pre-visit _________________________________________________________

8. For any gaps in personal or professional relevant training, knowledge, skills, health and fitness, and/or
   experience, what is your plan for addressing this area(s)?



                     FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 49
School Logo                     ASSESSING TEACHER/LEADER READINESS                                             School Name
                                 FOR HIGHER-RISK OUTDOOR PURSUITS                                                page 1 of 2


General Assessment Based on Responses Above

Readiness Element                                Perceived Contribution to Overall Readiness
                                                 Low         Mod.        High      Comments
Formal Training/Courses
First Aid/CPR Certification
Recreational/Sport Experience
Instruction/Leadership Experience
Familiarity With Site/Area/Route
Interpersonal “Soft” Skills
Addressing of Gaps


Overall Readiness for the Proposed Program/Activity

(circle one)                    Low                          Moderate                          High

Comments (e.g., general, requirements for program modification and/or resourcing):




                 50 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Category 3 Field Study Supervision
As outlined in YouthSafe Outdoors, “there is no precise method for determining the exact number of supervisors
required for any outdoor pursuits activity”.

Situational factors must be considered when determining the appropriate number of supervisors for a higher-
risk activity. Generally, outdoor pursuits include risks that mandate more supervisors than a regular field studies
excursion. In determining the appropriate number of supervisors required for an outdoor pursuit, assess:

        1. Industry standards for supervision (the ratios set by specific industries/ organizations that govern the
           outdoor pursuit/activity);

        2. Leadership factors (knowledge, skills, experience of the supervisors);

        3. Student factors (age, grade, knowledge, fitness, skill, experience, behaviour, social needs); and

        4. Trip factors (nature of activity, nature of environment, duration of outing, season, communication
           capacity, time/distance from emergency response)

Appropriate supervision of a higher-risk outdoor pursuit must take into account the ability to maintain adequate
supervision during the execution of a safety plan/emergency response plan.
In approving a higher-risk outdoor pursuit trip proposal the Principal must be satisfied that the Educator-in-
Charge will provide adequate supervision and competent instruction, and follow recognized safety procedures
for the planned activities. As such, it is imperative that those Educators who involve themselves in higher-risk
outdoor pursuits have the required certification and/or competence. YouthSafe Outdoors (2005) includes
detailed checklists for determining teacher and student readiness and program suitability.

                                                                                                                    Policy Reference: IICA-R1

The following supervisor to student ratios for high-risk activities may be used as a guide for the following activities
for grades 4-12. The suitability of these activities for younger aged students is questionable.


        hiking and backpacking                           1:7
        ocean kayaking                                   1:5
        canoeing (flatwater)                             1:7
        canoeing (moving water)                          1:5
        rock climbing                                    1:7
        cycle touring                                    1:7
        back-country(telemark) skiing                    1:7
        cross-country(nordic) skiing                     1:10




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 51
For aquatic (swimming activities) industry standard requires at least one Life Saver (eg. Bronze Cross) for each
class of 25-30 and at least one certified Lifeguard minimum per two classes (approximately 50 students). In
addition an instructor/supervisor ratio should be maintained as follows:


        Grade K -1                  1:4
        Grades 2 – 4                1:7
        Grade 5 – 8                 1:10
        Grades 9 -12                1:15


Category 3 Field Supervision
Guides and Instructors
As outlined in YouthSafe Outdoors, school groups may wish to (or be required to) contract a special type of
service provider, a guide or instructor. An experienced outdoor education guide or instructor may be employed
to assist teachers in carrying out their responsibilities and duties during outdoor education activities but the guide/
instructor complements, but does not replace the teacher. The teacher retains responsibility for and authority in
the group. A teacher may also be a guide/instructor if they have the appropriate training and/or experience to
lead the group in a particular activity/mode of travel (ie. kayaking).

The teacher is ultimately responsible for each student who is in their care. The teacher must accompany students
to and from the facility/area and remain on-site regardless of whether that teacher has any direct instruction/
leadership responsibilities with the students. The teacher also has full responsibility for any students who are
unable to participate in the activity.

Guides are best found through the applicable outdoor association, such as:
        Canada West Mountain School (Vancouver)
        Whistler Guides Bureau (Whistler)
        Association of Canadian Mountain Guides
        Association of Canadian Sea Kayak Guides
        Sea Kayak Guides Alliance of BC
        Recreation Canoeing Association of BC


Guide Qualifications
In selecting an outdoor education Guide review the following criteria:

         current certification and/or qualifications
         Advanced Back-country First Aid (or equivalent), or Occupational First Aid Level III (or equivalent),
           and current CPR certification
         WCB coverage
         Insurance coverage
         knowledge of, and documented experience in the area of travel
         understanding of risk assessment and management
         awareness of program policies and practices
         awareness of both the program and trip objectives
         previous experience leading trips with adolescents
         safety record in guiding and demonstrated competence in navigational skills
                       52 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
         essential outdoor skills as required (ie. minimum impact camping, outdoor cooking, first aid, map
           & compass, weather interpretation, snow shelter construction, equipment preparation, clothing
           selection, trip planning, avalanche assessment & risk reduction)


Guide Documentation
Guides should submit the following prior to any leading:

         Resume (must show experience and/or training in teaching or leading young people, and outdoor
          skill(s) experience and/or training)
         Photocopy of Guides Certification – if certified
         Photocopy of Driver’s License
         Photocopy of First Aid Certificate
         Completed Medical Information Form
         Completed Criminal Record Search
         A minimum of two reference checks


Liability Insurance for Guides
Under VSB Liability Insurance Policy, the Board is covered for comprehensive liability by the Schools Protection
Program. This coverage extends to all employees and volunteer workers of the Board while acting within the
scope of their duties. The Schools Protection Program liability coverage does not extend to personnel who are
members of professional associations and are hired through their associations, as their liability coverage would be
extended through the associations. Individuals who may be ticketed/certified, but not a member of a professional
association, may be covered through the district’s coverage for liability, if they are considered a volunteer to the
school. Volunteers can receive an honorarium for their services.



Safety Considerations
A safety assessment must be conducted for all off-site activities. A safety plan/emergency response plan must be
included in the planning process for all field studies. Supervisors must be aware of any potential student medical
problems, e.g. bee sting allergies. Students with emergency alert situations will be under the direct supervision of
a supervisor.

For field studies that are safety sensitive (ie. Category 3) the Educator-in-Charge must organize for:
         •	 a	first	aid	kit	appropriate	to	the	needs	of	the	students/nature	of	the	event
         •	 a	chain	of	notification	in	the	event	of	an	emergency.		This	chain	must	include	the	parents,	the	Principal,	
            and the Associate Superintendent-Area.
         •	 a	means	of	emergency	communication	should	be	available	
         •	 a	supervision	plan	that	supports	both	the	injured	student	and	the	remaining	students	participating	in	
            the activity
         •	 students	to	carry	some	form	of	personal	identification	

For any student injured on a field study, the Incident Report form must be completed as soon as practicable. A
copy of the form and the signed consent form must be forwarded to the Secretary Treasurers Office.




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 53
Safety Equipment
Safety helmets must be worn by all participants, including supervisors/chaperones involved in cycling, skating,
downhill skiing, snowboarding, rock climbing, skateboarding, rollerblading, and whitewater activities.

It is recommended that snowboarders wear wrist guards.

Safety vest and/or red or yellow pinnies must be worn by all participants cycling on any public road.

For boating activities, students must be wearing Ministry of Transport (M.O.T.) Approved Lifejackets or Type I
Approved Personal Flotation Devices) life jacket, or be following the specific rules for competition (e.g. rowing).



Protocols for Ski Trip/Winter Activities
The Educator-in-Charge must ensure suitable attendance records are maintained and shared with supervisors.
Additionally, a cell phone or communication device for supervisors should be available for use throughout the trip.

Attendance must be taken prior to the departure and made available to the school office.

Upon arrival, all students must remain together while mountain personnel provide instructions, lessons and
designate appropriate ski areas based on skill level observed. The Educator-in-Charge of the ski/snowboard
activity shall be responsible for coordinating with on-hill resort personnel/instructors.

Supervisors shall provide designated “on hill” minimum supervisory rations of 1:8 for elementary and 1:10 for
secondary students. Supervisors may include mountain staff when students are involved in a prescribed ski/
snowboard program

Supervision shall involve movement around different slopes at set times designated by the Educator-in-Charge.

Each supervisor shall have responsibility for a specific group of students and shall take attendance at designated
times throughout the day.

Supervisors will actively monitor and enforce areas of use on the hill re: out-of-bounds areas, and ensure runs are
appropriate for the level of the skier.

Attendance must be taken before departing from the ski area.

The Educator-in-Charge must check with mountain personnel for messages or complaints about on hill infractions
before leaving the site.

                                                                                                                     Policy Reference: IICA-R1




                       54 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Outdoor Education Programs Site Selection Considerations
        Vancouver schools are involved in a variety of overnight field study experiences. Many schools conduct
their overnight field study programs at residential camps. Programs based on a particular aspect of the curriculum
are easier to organize when:

         the field site is easy to reach
         resident camp staff are available to provide program and administrative leadership
         the hazards of a site are known by either camp staff and/or VBE staff


Factors considered to be important in evaluating the appropriateness of a given site were developed by a district
Field Studies Committee in consultation with teachers, principals, camp directors, outdoor educators in other
school districts, and university specialists in environmental education. Sites should be chosen for field study work
according to predetermined educational objectives. For this reason, there is a need for long-range planning of
residential programs to ensure booking the desired camp at the appropriate time in the school’s overall program.

The following checklist is provided to assist school staffs in selecting appropriate residential sites for field study.
The criteria are not applicable to wilderness or rugged settings. It is expected that teachers choosing to use
wilderness or rugged sites will have extensive environmental education backgrounds including specialized
training and certified competence in wilderness first aid and survival techniques. It is also expected that as a
demonstration of financial responsibility, camps with significantly greater costs than those established in the
criteria will not be selected for use by Vancouver schools.




                        FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 55
School Logo               Outdoor Education Site Selection Checklist                                                 School Name

When selecting a site for an overnight field study for students, consider the following questions. If you can answer
“Yes” to most of the questions, you have probably found an appropriate site.


        Access
         Does the site have a clear, all-weather road?
         Is it accessible to vehicles or is it within easy walking distance of the road/car park?                    (Note: Year-
           round use necessitates easy accessibility under a variety of weather conditions.)
         Is the site reasonably close to Vancouver (less than three hours, one way)?

        Communication
         Will camp and school staff cooperatively plan and teach the field studies program?
         Is communication between camp and school staff open and supportive?

        Costs
         Is the cost of the camp reasonable on an overall and per capita basis?
         Is the cost of transportation reasonable?

        Does the site have potential in that it:
         allows for the development of satellite programs in surrounding areas?
         will accommodate more students than originally planned for?
         may be adapted to meet changing program needs?

        Equipment
         Does the site provide environmental education supplies and equipment such as canoes, boats,
          rainwear, microscopes, and reference materials?
         Does the site have a well-maintained supply of outdoor studies equipment and resources?

        Facilities
         Are the facilities clean and well maintained?
         Does the site provide adequate washroom space?
         Separate male/female sleeping areas?
         A separate sleeping space for staff?
         A large indoor gathering area (other than the dining area)?
         A storage area for resource materials?
         A drying area for wet rain gear/hiking boots etc.?

        Food
         Are food services provided on site?
         Is the food nutritious and appropriate in quantity to the age of the students?

        Geography
         Does the site contain or is the site within easy access to two or more of the following environments:

                       56 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
            alpine, pond, forest, river, lake, stream, marine, swamp, or marsh?
Note: A primary justification of residential experiences is the “hands on” nature of the learning. The more
natural resources available for study, the greater the opportunity for program quality.


        Medical Assistance
         Do you have a plan for unexpected situations that require medical assistance?
         Is medical assistance easily accessible? (That is, is it within 30 minutes of travelling time?)
         Does the nearest hospital contain well-maintained emergency facilities?

        Program Potential
         Does the site, or the area immediately around it, offer opportunities for intensive study of many facets
           of our environment? That is, does it provide students with the opportunity to study two or more of
           the following: agriculture, nature, community, recreation, heritage, urban, industry?

        Resident Staff
         Does the facility provide competent on-site staff who can assist teachers in providing program
          opportunities for students?
         Does the residential staff include educators who are experienced in environmental
          education programs?


        Safety
         Have you warned students of any hazards that exist on the site?
         Have signs been posted?

        Note: Although all camp situations present some risks, those with unnecessary dangers should be
          deemed inappropriate for use by Vancouver schools.


        Other Items
         Are teachers familiar with the site, school traditions, and the policies of the camp?
         If the surrounding community is to be studied, has the cooperation of the people involved been
           obtained?




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 57
58 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Section 3:
Liability, Transportation, and Safety




         FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 59
Liability and Insurance Coverage
Merely participating in the everyday activities of life provides a degree of hazard. In the event of a mishap, the
loss or injury must be borne by the individual responsible. It is only when the law finds someone else legally liable
that a damage action can be successful. The Board, as employer, would be liable if the teacher is acting within
the scope of his/her employment. For teachers, the best protection against such liability is careful planning, the
acceptance and use of proven procedures and standards, and the presence of well-qualified leaders.

Liability for injury resulting from supervision can be established when the following four conditions exist:

         the standard of care that a court of law would likely use as a criterion in negligence action is that which
          would be exercised by a careful parent of a large family, and it is the duty and obligation of a teacher to
          use a standard of care for the protection of others against unreasonable risk of injury;
         failure to conform to the above standard;
         a reasonably close connection between the conduct of the person in charge and the resulting injury;
         actual loss or damage to the injured person.


Liability and Insurance Coverage for Teachers and Volunteers
Teachers, in order to feel comfortable and secure when involved in out-of-classroom activities, should be aware
of their legal rights and protection as a Board employee. The following information outlines the Board’s insurance
policy as it relates to school-based field studies:
Under the terms of the policy, parents are considered as volunteer workers and, as such, the policy protects the
Board and the volunteers for liability imposed by law as a result of possible negligence by one of these volunteer
workers.

If the supervisors of the group are negligent in the care and custody of the students, both the Board and the
supervisor are protected.

The Board, teachers, and volunteers are protected on a 24-hour basis during the school-based field study. The
coverage is in effect so long as teachers and volunteers are acting within the scope of their employment; for
example, a teacher would not be covered if a student was taken on an unauthorized venture for personal reasons
during the field study. Similarly, the teacher might also not be covered if a field study was organized without
getting the permission of the principal or Associate Superintendent. If the Board were held liable by the courts as
a result of such unauthorized activity, it would be covered under its policy, but the insurers may have the right to
recover from the teacher any payment that it is obliged to make on behalf of the Board.



Liability and Insurance Coverage for Students
Student Accident Insurance Plan
Children often get into accidents whether on field studies, playing sports or simply playing on the school yard.
Parents can purchase Student Accident Insurance to cover some of the injuries sustained by their children that
may not be covered under their own health or dental plans. It is recommended that Principals promote the
Student Accident Insurance option to parents and ensure they understand that the School District does not
provide accident insurance for students. These plans are sponsored and approved through the District Parent
Advisory Committee (DPAC). The forms are sent out from the school at the beginning of each school year and
the parents deal with the insurance company directly.

                       60 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Travel Insurance
It is highly recommended that all students travelling internationally have comprehensive travel insurance
coverage, including trip cancellation and trip interruption for their entire trip, and that schools ask for proof of
this before they leave. Comprehensive travel insurance, available in Youth/Student plans from leading insurance
providers, is preferable to medical insurance alone. Comprehensive coverage includes medical insurance, and
covers cancellation due to a myriad of reasons, such as travel advisories, inclement weather, or a missed flight due
to changes in airport security screening.

International travel provides students with unique opportunities and experience; however, in the event of an
illness or injury, the usual problems can be complicated by inadequate local medical facilities and transportation
difficulties. When participating in international excursions students should have the best comprehensive
protection to fully enjoy the educational experience provided.

Encourage parents to read their travel policies carefully as many policies exclude injuries from high-risk activities
such as scuba diving, parasailing, white water rafting, motor cycling (including mopeds), etc. For example, in a
case documented by the Schools Protection Plan (SPP) a student suffered a serious decompression injury from a
diving accident in the tropics. His family found that thousands of dollars of their expenses were not covered by
their travel insurance policy, as the expenses were not pre-authorized by their insurer.

Schools should notify parents of all the activities planned on a trip, and parents should ensure that the activities
planned are not excluded from their insurance coverage. Schools should make it clear to parents that, should
their child be injured or become ill, any costs of an emergency evacuation will be the parents’ responsibility. It is
also recommended that teachers have a contingency plan in place with their school to deal with any crisis which
might arise.



Planning for the Safe Transportation of Students
Where a group of students is transported by a single vehicle (bus), the Educator-in-Charger is to accompany the
group. Where students are transported in several vehicles, the Educator-in-Charge will generally accompany the
largest section of the group. Included in this group would be those students with exceptional needs which would
be unfamiliar to volunteer supervisors.

A list of students assigned to each bus or vehicle must be completed and a copy filed at the school. The list
should be utilized to account for all students before beginning the return travel of a field study. The Field Study
Transportation Record form is designed for this purpose.

Where there is travel advisory issued by authorities, the Educator-in-Charge will consult with the Principal before
travelling.

                                                                                                                    Policy Reference IICA-R1




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 61
                                          Field Study Transportation Record Form



  Board Logo                                          Field Study Transportation Record                                                   School Name
Personal information contained on this form is collected under the authority of the School Act, for the purpose of participating in school trips. If you have any questions
about this form, please contact your school administrator.




 Trip Destination: __________________________________________________________ Date(s) _______________________


 DRIVER/VEHICLE INFORMATION


 Driver’s Name: __________________________ Vehicle Make/Model: ___________________ License Plate #:_____________


 PASSENGER LIST
 1.                                                       25.                                                        49.

 2.                                                       26.                                                        50.

 3.                                                       27.                                                        51.

 4.                                                       28.                                                        52.

 5.                                                       29.                                                        53.

 6.                                                       30.                                                        54.

 7.                                                       31.                                                        55.

 8.                                                       32.                                                        56.

 9.                                                       33.                                                        57.

 10.                                                      34.                                                        58.

 11.                                                      35.                                                        59.

 12.                                                      36.                                                        60.

 13.                                                      37.                                                        61.

 14.                                                      38.                                                        62.

 15.                                                      39.                                                        63.

 16.                                                      40.                                                        64.

 17.                                                      41.                                                        65.

 18.                                                      42.                                                        66.

 19.                                                      43.                                                        67.

 20.                                                      44.                                                        68.

 21.                                                      45.                                                        69.

 22.                                                      46.                                                        70.

 23.                                                      47.                                                        71.

 24.                                                      48.                                                        72.




                               62 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Seat-belts
B.C. seat-belt legislation requires that: “drivers and passengers must properly use the seat-belts provided.” It is
also the responsibility of the driver to see that students aged six to sixteen properly use the seat-belts provided.
The Board advises that students should not be transported in private vehicles, unless there is a seat-belt provided
for each one. No vehicle used for transporting students on field studies should ever be overloaded.


Booster Seats
Booster seat use has become mandatory in British Columbia as of July 1, 2008. The B.C. Motor Vehicle Act
requires the use of approved booster seats in vehicles for all children whose body weight is 18 – 36kg (40-80lbs)
or until a height of 4’9” or age 9.


Public Transportation
Public buses and trains (Translink) are adequately insured for the passenger limitations for which they are licensed.

Private Vehicles
The Board of School Trustees (the “Board”) recognizes the occasional need for transporting students in privately-
owned vehicles. To safeguard the district, employees, parents, and students in matters of liability, the Board
will arrange for excess third-party liability insurance for teachers, parents, officers of the Board, or volunteers
while transporting students in their own vehicles in the course of a school-related activity, provided such use is
authorized by the Board or persons delegated by the Board.
Persons who wish to have this coverage must be approved by the principal or his/her designate on an annual
basis, and this can be obtained by having the owner of the vehicle complete a Volunteer Driver Registration
and Approval Form (a sample form is included at the end of this section) and submit it to the school. After the
principal or his/her designate has signed the form, a copy will be kept on file in the school as proof of coverage;
the other copy should be given to the driver. It should be suggested to the owners/driver that they read the form;
if they have any doubts about the provisions, they should see their insurance agent.
All schools should ensure that the use of student drivers on school outings is restricted and that public
transportation is used whenever possible.
Also see policy EEAE, “Student Transportation in Private Vehicles”.


Vans
Educators-in-Charge contracting vans must be knowledgeable of applicable licensing and safety requirements.
Any vehicle with a seating capacity of more than ten persons including the driver is defined by the Motor Vehicle
Act as a “bus”. A “bus” used to transport students is required to have a Valid School Bus Permit and MUST carry
Third Party Liability Limits of $10,000,000. This will include volunteers’ vehicles, rental vehicles and vehicles
owned, leased or contracted by the School Board for student transportation. If the on-site childcare operator is
providing the driver the driver of the vehicle must carry a class 4 license and complete a VSB volunteer drivers
form.


Buses
Schools considering buying or leasing a school bus and providing their own driver must be aware of the proper
driver’s license required for transporting passengers in the vehicle and requirements of the Motor Carrier Act.
For insurance purposes, school-owned buses/vehicles must be registered in the name of the district and the
insurance must be purchased through the district office to ensure appropriate minimum coverage is met.
Also see policy EEAD-R, “Special Use of School Buses”.



                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 63
Volunteer Driver Application and Approval Form (REG-SO-005)

                   VANCOUVER BOARD OF EDUCATION
                   VOLUNTEER DRIVER REGISTRATION AND APPROVAL FORM

 SCHOOL:



 NAME OF OWNER:



 ADDRESS OF OWNER:



 *NAME OF DRIVER:



 ADDRESS OF DRIVER:



 STAFF                     STUDENT                     PARENT                        OTHER                               Specify




 VEHICLE TO BE USED                                                      Vehicle 1                                                       Vehicle 2


 YEAR/MAKE/STYLE


 COLOUR

 LICENSE PLATE NO. (B.C. ONLY)

 PASSENGER CAPACITY


 # FUNCTIONAL SEAT BELTS

 # AIR BAGS†

 †
     1.   NO child 12 years or under can be sitting in the passenger front seat where there is an air bag.
 †
     2.   Children 12 years of age or younger should ride in the back seat away from air bags. If the back seat has air bags, make sure the child does not
          lean against them, and the area in front of the air bag is free from books, toys, or anything else that could become a projectile if the air bag
          deploys.
 3.       NO child 4 years or under, OR 40 LBS. OR UNDER, can travel in a car without an approved car seat which is properly attached as required by
          law.
 4.       No child between 40 - 80 lbs., or until a height of 4’9” tall, or age nine, can travel in a car without an approved booster seat. The booster seat is
          to be provided by the child’s parent.

          All “trip drivers”+, including volunteer drivers are advised that, in order to bring into effect the Board’s excess liability insurance, they must:

 (a)      Use a licensed automobile which carries valid automobile Third Party Liability insurance as required under BC legislation;
 (b)      Provide the school board with prompt written notice, with particulars, of any accident arising out of the use of a licensed automobile during a trip
          on board-related business;
 (c)      Be aware that the school board’s Excess Automobile Liability insurance comes into effect only after the vehicle owner’s primary Third Party
          Liability insurance limit has been exhausted;
 (d)      Be aware that any damage to the volunteer’s vehicle, the cost of any insurance deductible or premium adjustment as the result of an accident
          while the vehicle is being used on board-related business is NOT covered by the school board’s Excess Automobile Liability insurance.

 +
  A “trip driver” is defined as any person authorized by the board who has agreed to be a driver for a certain trip while they are driving their own or another
 licensed automobile. This includes, but is not limited to: Trustees, employees, teachers, parents, volunteers, officials of the school board.


 Approval for the use of the above described vehicle(s) when driven by ________________________________________________________ to assist the
                                                                                                                    Name of Driver(s)
 school in connection with school activities is granted until 20_______ June 30.

 DRIVER’S STATEMENT:
 I certify that I have a valid class __________ driver’s license no. ____________________________ and the above vehicle information is accurate. The
 vehicle(s) listed above is/are licensed and insured in the Province of British Columbia. I certify that I have had no moving violations, no impaired driving
 charges, and no criminal charges related to a motor vehicle in the past 24 months. The vehicle(s) is/are maintained in a safe operating condition and
 will be equipped with tires appropriate for winter driving conditions. I agree to wear a seat belt and require all passengers to wear a seat belt. I agree that
 I will not permit a child under 13 years of age to occupy the front passenger seat of the vehicle equipped with a passenger seat air bag. I agree that I
 will require a child (4 years or under, or 40 lbs. or under) to travel in the vehicle(s) with a car seat. I agree that I will require a child (between 40 - 80 lbs.,
 until a height of 4’9” tall, or age nine) to travel in the vehicle(s) with a booster seat. I agree to operate the vehicle(s) in a safe and legal manner, and I will
 not operate the vehicle(s) if a seat belt is not used or a child 12 years or under is placed in a seat with an air bag.

 Date:________________________________________                               Signature of Driver:________________________________________________


 Date:________________________________________                               Signed:__________________________________________________________
                                                                                             Principal/Vice-Principal or Associate Superintendent - Area

 *If the vehicle is to be operated by a person other than the owner, the following statement must be completed.
 I consent to the above described driver operating the vehicle and transporting passengers in connection with school activities.

      DISTRIBUTION KEY:
      White:    Original to Driver
      Yellow:   Copy to School Records                                                                  Signed:____________________________________________
                                                                                                                                          Owner

          REG-SO-004 (Rev. 5, 08–07)




                 64 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
General Emergency and First-Aid Guidelines
In general terms, any safety procedures that apply at the school similarly apply on field studies. In addition, any
teacher supervising a field studies experience should have an appropriate safety plan in place to deal with an
emergent situation that includes, and 24 hour contact information for a school administrator.


Emergency Procedures
The Vancouver School Board has developed the Staff Guidelines Emergency Procedures Flipbook as an
emergency reference tool. It has recently been revised to include additional topics. The Flipbook contains
guidelines for the following emergency procedures:

        Emergency and Resource Phone Numbers
        Room Clear
        Evacuation
        Emergency or Crisis Communications Procedure
        Personal Safety Considerations
        Serious Injury, Medical Condition or Death
        Suicide Threat / Suicide Attempt
        Fights / Weapons
        Fire or Explosion
        Hazardous Material Spill
        Bomb Threat
        Bomb Threat Phone Checklist
        Earthquake
        Child Abuse
        Missing Child / Abduction
        Threats
        Critical Incident Response
        Crisis Response Checklist - Staff Guidelines
        Intruder on School Grounds
        School Act - Section 177
        Communicating with the Media
        School-Wide Security Alert System

The Flipbook is available in print and on-line at: https://myvsb.vsb.bc.ca/vsbresources/admin/HSES/Pages/
EmergencyProcedureFlipbook.aspx


First-Aid
Teachers should familiarize themselves with details contained in the following the VSB First Aid Attendants’
Manual (1999), available online at: https://myvsb.vsb.bc.ca/vsbresources/admin/HSES/Documents/
FirstAidManualRevised.pdf.


First Aid Kit
Teachers should refer to the First Aid Attendants’ Manual for first aid kit guidelines or the Trip Leadership
Resource section of YouthSafe Outdoors 2008.

A sample first aid kit is listed below. The key factor in determining what to carry is time/distance from Emergency
Medical Services arrival on scene or transport of a casualty to a medical facility.

                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 65
                                                SAMPLE FIRST AID KIT

Local (< 20 minutes to get casualty to EMS or from EMS arriving on-site)
Quantity         Item                                                          Use(s)
1 pr.            Scissors / EMT shears                                         Cutting tape, Moleskin or other blister
                                                                               protection, etc.
1 pr.            Tweezers                                                      Removing splinters, ticks, etc.; cleaning wounds
4                Safety pins                                                   Fastening tensors, removing splinters, etc.
1                CPR Microshield Mask or pocket mask                           Protects first aider during artificial respiration
1 bar            Cleansing soap                                                Cleaning around wounds, washing first aiders’
                                                                               hands
5                Antiseptic towlettes                                          Cleaning wounds
10               Adhesive bandages                                             Minor cuts, scrapes
2                Triangular bandages                                           Bandaging, splinting
1 roll of 6 cm   Tensor bandage                                                Sprains, strains, holding dressings in place, etc.
1 roll of 6 cm   Gauze roller bandage or Kling                                 Holding dressings in place, creating pressure
                                                                               bandages
10 6 x 6 cm      Sterile gauze pads                                            Wound dressings
2                Pressure dressings                                            Major wounds
1 roll           Hospital or athletic tape                                     Taping dressings or splints, stabilizing joints, etc.
6                Butterfly or steri-strips                                     Wound closure
1 pkg.           Second skin                                                   Blisters, abrasions, weeping wounds, burns
4                Cotton-tipped swabs                                           Removing foreign material from eye
2 pr.            Latex or nitrile gloves                                       Protection of first aider from blood/other fluids
1                Space blanket, blanket, sleeping bag                          Keeping immobilized casualty warm
1                Instant cold pack                                             Prevents inflammation (use with caution)
1                First aid booklet                                             Reference
1                List of first aid kit contents                                Reference, restocking after use
1                Pencil (soft, waterproof); paper / forms                      Note taking, recording vital signs, etc.



Semi-remote (> 20 minutes to < 3 hours to/from EMS) Add the following:
2                Oral airways                                                  Airway maintenance
1                Anaphylactic kit or Epi – pen                                 Severe allergic reaction (know contra-
                                                                               indications)
                 Betadine (Povidone-iodine) ointment,                          Antiseptic cleanser for wounds,
                 scrub or solution.                                            water disinfectant
6                Wound closure strips                                          Close wounds (stronger than butterflies
                                                                               or steri-strips)
1 tube           Super glue                                                    Sealing small cuts to prevent infection,
                                                                               reduce irritation
2 25 x 40 cm     Non-adherent dressings                                        Open wounds
1 tube           Double topical ointment (e.g., Polysporin)                    Prevention of infections, speeds healing of
                                                                               wounds
1 12 x 24 cm     Molefoam                                                      Blisters (can cut donut around blister to reduce
                                                                               pressure)
1                SAM Splint or ensolite pad                                    Immobilizing joints and fractures

                       66 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
3 1-litre        Re-sealable zip-lock bags                                    Sucking chest wounds, stowing disposable items,
                                                                              etc.
1                Sub-temperature thermometer                                  Monitoring temperature
10 tablets       Dextrosol                                                    Hypoglycemia, insulin reactions in diabetics,
                                                                              hypothermia
3                Assessment Checklists                                        Recording results of primary/secondary
                                                                              assessments, vitals

Increase the quantity of supplies noted under local trips; e.g., triangulars, tape, gauze, gauze pads, pressure
dressings, tensors, cotton swabs, steri-strips, antiseptic towlettes and Second Skin. The actual amount needed
should be based on the considerations noted in the document. Consider medications, as appropriate.

Remote (> 3 hours to/from EMS) Add the following:
1 20 cc          Bulb syringe with catheter tip                               Flushing wounds
2                Sterile abdominal pad / field dressing                       Dressing large wounds
1 tube/vial      Toothache ointment / Oil of Cloves                           Toothache pain management

Increase the quantity of supplies noted for local and semi-remote trips, especially if trip is of long duration
(> 1 week).
See notes regarding the addition of medications, as inclusion of at least some is indicated.



Other considerations in selecting kit components include:
          group size
          trip purpose
          trip length
          environment
          season
          pre-existing conditions/illness of participants, and
          first aid training/qualifications in the group

All supervisors should know where the kit is located. Students should not be permitted to have unsupervised
access to the kit; make them come to a supervisor. For trips into semi-remote and remote environments
students can also be encouraged to carry some of their own basic items (e.g. bandages).




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 67
68 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Section 4:
Fees, Fund-Raising and Accountability for
Funds/Cash Handling




         FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 69
Fees
The revised school fees legislation was introduced in March of 2007 as part of Bill 20. The legislation assures that
no fees will be charged for educational programs that are required in order for students to graduate.

As such, fees are not permissible for mandatory, curricular field studies.

Fees are permissible for optional field studies. Therefore, for optional field studies students may be expected
to pay for expenses such as transportation, accommodation, meals and entrance fees. School Principals are
expected to monitor such fees to ensure that the spirit of the School Act is observed. Field studies must be
planned with a due regard to economy in order to be affordable.

Revenues and expenditures in relation to student field studies are to be accounted for pursuant to the
methodology described in District’s Guidelines and Procedures for Handling Monies outlined by the Accounting
and Finance Department.

Before any personal contributions are accepted for field studies, contributors must be notified, in writing that the
district is not responsible for any losses which may arise from cancellation.

Employee-On-Call expenses to replace staff absent on field studies may be factored into the study’s financial
planning.

Where parents and guardians are financially contributing to field studies, financial arrangements for staff and
volunteer travel costs must be transparent, including the use of any “free” tickets and the accruing travel benefits
earned from the group’s travel.

                                                                                                                     Policy Reference IICA-R1


Fund-Raising
Funds for field-studies may be raised in the context of Policy IGDFA “Fund-Raising”.

The Board of School Trustees (the “Board”) appreciates that fund-raising at the school level is often necessary
to support extra-curricular activities. The fund-raising activity can often be a rewarding event for the students,
parents, and teachers. The common goal of the event can be an excellent life skills lesson and enhance the
curriculum. To ensure that individual schools and parent advisory committees (DPAC’s) are allowed to retain
their initiative in involving communities, the Board will continue to support decision-making for fund raising at the
local school level.

Purpose of Fund-Raising
Fund-raising activities should be pre-defined and have a clear purpose. If fund-raising activities are planned,
there should be involvement of school administration, staff, and the PAC’s. Goal setting should be reviewed
at the start of each year. Parent involvement in fund-raising is essential, and all parties should work to avoid
misunderstandings. Where student councils or graduation committees are participating in fund-raising, it is
important that the goal of the activity be communicated to the PAC and parents. Fund-raising goals should be
directed to items and expenditures that are not supplied by the Board or Ministry of Education. Schools may
also be involved in some philanthropic fund-raising activities, and the organizers should be sensitive to the total
demands being placed on a community.



                       70 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
When the goals of a fund-raising activity have been achieved, an accounting should be made to the PAC, school,
and community. Where there are surplus funds following the expenditure on an item or service, the funds should
be placed in the same account for next year or appear as an agenda item to be discussed. Fund-raising is not
seen as a means to acquire a bank account of uncommitted funds. Although funds should be expended for the
committed purpose, an operating account with a reasonable balance may be maintained.

Nature of Fund-Raising Activities
      when selecting a fund-raising activity, the school staff and/or PAC should review and abide by the
           following criteria:
         the activity should be consistent with stated Board policy, e.g. nutrition policy, casino nights;
         the activity should be consistent with the Board’s educational goals for the students;
         the activity should be acceptable to the community and be sensitive to the values of the community;
         the activity should avoid unsupervised soliciting.

Participants in Fund-Raising Activities
Although fund-raising activities often involve parents, students, and teachers working together, there must be
no coercion or pressure to obtain the involvement. In addition, age of student participants should be taken
into consideration when selecting a fund-raising activity. The fund-raising event should be planned around the
voluntary participation of students, teachers, and families. Where there are cases of financial need, the school
should be sensitive to the possible embarrassment of students, parents, or guardians. Parents have the right to
not participate in an activity. In addition, as some parents consider competition in fund-raising to be unhealthy, the
school and/or PAC should be prepared to respect this position.
                                                                                                                   Policy Reference IGDFA
Accountability for Funds/Cash Handling
The Board recognizes the different methods presently employed in the handling of funds raised by schools,
student councils, and PAC’s. A fund-raising group must adopt a consistent approach that is meaningful to the
group and provides regular financial statements to all concerned. In order to monitor the situation, all schools
and PAC’s will submit an annual report of their major fund-raising activities to the associate superintendent -
area. The report will include the goals for the year, the method used to raise funds, the total amount raised, and
expenditures during the year.

When students and/or staff are sponsoring an event, a separate trust ledger card can be set up. The banking and
signing authority will be most often through school accounts and the One-Write System. Where the PAC retains
sponsorship for the fund-raising, the committee must choose to use one of the three systems:

         PAC’s may use the school’s One-Write System, if desired. A separate trust ledger card can be used
           with statements submitted to the PAC. The school will be responsible for banking monies, and the
           ledger card will be available to the parents upon request. Under this system, the principal will require
           written authorization of the PAC executive before the spending of funds.

         PAC’s may open a bank account in the name of the group. Any two of three designated members of
          the executive are named as authorized signatories of the account. Regular financial statements will be
          presented to the PAC executive and community. Individual members of the PAC may be held liable for
          the group funds.
         PAC’s raising and handling large sums of money may wish to consider incorporation under the B.C.
          Societies Act. This protects individual PAC members who act in a responsible manner from being
          personally liable for the funds. In these circumstances, a bank account will be opened in the society’s


                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 71
            name, with any two or three designated members of the executive as signatories.
If a PAC petitions to become a society, its constitution should include a section ensuring that the principal of the
school is a non-voting member of the executive and is present at meetings. The PAC should not be independent
from the school.

Some fund-raising activities have involved the receipt of substantial donations and the establishment of trust
funds. Where the donation is made to the Board, the funds can be held in a separate trust account by the Board
and later be returned to the school for administering. These funds will be acknowledged with the Board’s
registration number for tax deductible purposes and be eligible for a tax receipt.

Funds of a permanent nature (i.e. principle is invested to earn interest and only the interest income is expended)
may be administered by the Accounting Division of the Board, in accordance with the instructions set out by the
school. Scholarship funds fall under this category, and it is recommended that scholarship funds be administered
by the Vancouver School.


Guidelines and Procedures for Handling Cash
The Vancouver Board of Education outlines details for cash handling in two publications, made available to schools
by the Accounting and Finance department:

         Vancouver School Board Guidelines For Elementary School Administration

         Vancouver School Board Guidelines For Secondary School Administration

When planning and implementing a field studies teachers should be aware of expectations regarding handling
monies. Some pertinent guidelines that teachers must be aware of follow:



Cash Procedures Summary
Cash Disbursements and Payments must follow the details outlined in the Vancouver School Board Guidelines
for Elementary School/Secondary School Administration. Teachers must work through their school administrator
and Office Administrative Assistant when issuing any payments to vendors for field trip related expenses.

When a staff member collects money from students (i.e. for a field trip), these monies must be deposited into the
school’s bank account and recorded in the accounting system. The subsequent payment to a vendor (i.e. to pay
for the field study) must also be processed through the school’s accounting records.

It is not acceptable to make payments directly to vendors using undeposited collected monies. This results in a
lack of an audit trail, inaccurate and incomplete accounting records, and does not enable the school to receive a
GST Rebate on the expenditure.

When funds are received from teachers/sponsors, these funds should be accompanied by a receipt which
indicates the amount given to the Office Administrative Assistant and the source of the funds. We recommend
that schools use the three-part NCR form entitled “VSB Deposit Form”. This form is available to all schools
through VSB Printing and Distribution at no cost to the schools (please quote form number NOT-SC-014). This
form should be used on a regular basis, as part of the daily cash collection process and a copy of this form should
be kept in the accounting records to support the receipt of monies. A copy of each submitted form must be
retained within the school’s accounting records.


                       72 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Note that monies should not be held in the classroom. All money collected must be submitted to the office
daily. Once the amount of the funds actually received has been confirmed, it must be receipted in the accounting
system. All funds received by the Office Administrative Assistant should be receipted before the end of the day
and stored in a secure place (preferably a safe), to decrease the possibility of a theft. Should a theft occur, this
practice will enable any losses to be accurately determined. It is not acceptable to cash personal cheques using
deposit money received.

Deposits should be made a minimum of once a week. Excessive amounts of money should not be kept in the
school overnight with the maximum at $300 for Elementary Schools and the maximum at $500 for Secondary
Schools.

The Vancouver School Board insurance policy has a $3,000 deductible. Therefore, stolen funds under $3,000
cannot be claimed or recovered.




                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 73
74 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Section 5:
Student Conduct and Staff Duty of Care




        FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 75
Student Conduct
District and school policies detailing behavioural expectations of students must be communicated prior to field
studies and adhered to during the duration of all off-site experiences and excursions.

Student Responsibility
Students are expected to adhere to and act in accordance with the Policies and
Procedures as described in the School Code of Conduct, and VBE policy Student
Code of Conduct – Student Rights and Responsibilities. As such, consideration for
others, attendance, individual initiative, respect for school, private property and personal
dignity of others is expected at all times.


The School’s Student Code of Conduct
Under the School Act, the Board has the legal authority and duty to establish a code of conduct for students
and to see that they are observed. Under the Act, students are required to observe the rules or student code of
conduct of the school. Fairness requires that students be told clearly the standards of behaviour that are expected
of them and the consequences of misbehaviour; for that reason, the Board directs each school principal to make
school codes of conduct available to students and their parents through handbooks distributed annually.

Student Conduct Off Premises
Conduct of students off school premises occurring during the school day that adversely affects other students or
the operation of the school or other schools in the district and is a violation of the school’s code of conduct (or
school rules) will result in discipline.
                                                                                                                Policy Reference JF and JFC
Alcohol
In accordance with VBE policy: Substance Use by Students the possession, consumptions, or use of alcohol is
prohibited and contrary to any code of conduct established in the schools in Vancouver (School District No. 39).
The possession, or consumption of alcohol (“alcohol” includes beer, wine, cider, and spirits) during an activity
or trip is prohibited and will result in school disciplinary action as determined by the school principal or vice-
principal.


Drugs
In accordance with VBE policy: Substance Use by Students the possession, consumptions, or use of alcohol or
drugs is prohibited and contrary to any code of conduct established in the schools in Vancouver (School District
No. 39). The possession, or use of drugs (“drugs” refers to: “...substances, the possession of which is prohibited
under the Narcotic Control Act, or anything which contains such a drug or substance or any drug or substance
designated a restricted drug under the Food and Drug Act) during any activity or trip is prohibited and will result
in school disciplinary action as determined by the school principal or vice-principal.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference JFCH
Cigarette Smoking and Tobacco Use
In accordance with VBE policy: A Tobacco- Free Working and Learning Environment students are not permitted
to smoke or use tobacco products on school property, even when school is not in session. Tobacco-free
behaviour is expected of students during the course of all field studies since field studies are an extension of the
educational program. Students will not distribute, hold lighted tobacco, smoke or use tobacco products while
under school or district work site jurisdiction, or at any time while on school field trips, competitive events,
extra-curricular activities, or any other school-related activity.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference JFCG


                       76 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
Communication and Consequences
The consequences of inappropriate behaviour during a field study can range from providing a verbal warning
to being removed from the trip, with further school discipline subsequently assigned by a school administrator.
Reasonable classroom management practices should be employed when exercising judgement, and a school
administrator should be notified and consulted for more serious behavioural breaches that occur on a field study.

Both parents/guardians and students should be advised of behavioural expectations for any field study. This
includes specific consequences (e.g. parents/guardians will be called and will be responsible for the costs
associated with arranging immediate transport home of any student committing a serious infraction, including
costs related to ensuring adequate ongoing supervision of the group or student involved).

For overnight field studies teachers should consider having students, especially those in the senior grades, sign a
trip specific behaviour contract. A sample contract template follows:


                                              School Name
                                   Field Study Behaviour Expectations

Name of trip:
Date of trip:
Teacher(s):
Volunteer Supervisors:

During ________________trip each student will be acting as a representative of our school and class. As such,
it is expected that every student will conduct himself or herself in a manner that reflects positively on our school
community. All students are expected to follow the school’s Code of Conduct during this trip. In addition please
be reminded that:

List specific behavioural expectations you wish to highlight:
For example, if you are traveling somewhere where the legal age for alcohol consumption is lower than 19, you
may need to highlight that the district and school policies for alcohol consumption by students still apply.

Consequences:
For this trip, the following consequences, in addition to the consequences outlined in the school code of conduct,
have been set in place:

Agreement:
I understand the expectations of behaviour and accept the consequences that will be applied should I choose to
violate these expectations.


Student Signature _________________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature __________________________________

Teacher Signature _________________________________________

Date ________________________________


                       FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 77
Staff and Supervisor Duty of Care
Under the School Act, the Principal is responsible for administering and supervising the school, including the
general conduct of students, both on school premises and during school-sponsored activities off school grounds.
Principals must be consulted and informed of any student incidents that occur during the course of a field study.
The following guidelines are only intended to give teaching staff a general outline of their responsibilities. Many
individual instances of responsibility could be added.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference GBCC


Standard of Care
Teachers should take the same reasonable precautions for the safety of the students under their supervision as
a responsible parent would take. This standard of care of teachers for their students is based on the application
of the in loco parentis doctrine, whereby teachers are considered to hold a temporary delegation of parental
authority. This is a widely accepted position in education law.

With respect to higher-risk outdoor education pursuits the expected standard of care is shifting towards that of a
component leader, and as such an even greater enhanced standard of care is required.
(Heshka, Jon: Volenti in Higher Adventure Education)


Duty of Care: Teachers
        Teacher conduct during the course of field studies must adhere to the guidelines of Duty of Care for all
           students under their supervision. Duty of Care guidelines apply to the responsibilities of teaching
           staff in relation to their daily dealings with students entrusted to their care, as outlined in VBE Policy
           GBCC: Staff Responsibilities.
         Each teacher is required by the regulations to the School Act to provide teaching and other
           educational services, including advice and instructional assistance, to the students assigned by the
           Board of Education of School District No. 39 (the “Board”) or the Minister of Education.
         Each teacher is required under common law to maintain care that school activities are conducted in a
           suitable manner. When instructions or directions for the safety of students in school are issued, the age
           and ability of the students must be taken into account. If there are any special categories of students
           for whom different standards would apply (such as physically or mentally disabled youngsters), special
           rules may be necessary.
         The regulations to the School Act require each teacher to provide such assistance as is necessary for
           the supervision of students in school premises and at school functions, whenever and wherever held.
           Students should be under the supervision of a member of the school staff at all reasonable times while
           they are on school premises or attending school functions.
         All dangerous conditions in the school premises should be immediately reported to the principal or
           designate in charge of the school.
         Field studies must be approved by the Principal, and where applicable the Associate Superintendent
           - Area. If there are any questions concerning the trip, the principal should investigate the matter and
           either disapprove the excursion or impose appropriate limitations.
         It is advisable for the principal or designate in charge of the school to review with the teaching staff
           from time to time school rules regarding students’ safety.
                                                                                                                Policy Reference GBCC


                       78 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
VBE Guidelines for Adults Interacting with Students
The VBE Guidelines for Adults Interacting with Students outlines expectations for adult-student interactions for
all employee groups as well as non employee groups, such as parents and volunteers who interact with students
during school sponsored activities. As stated in the guidelines, “an adult must be particularly aware of maintaining
professional boundaries with students when in more informal settings, such as field studies”.



BCTF – Professional Responsibility and Code of Ethics
The Code of Ethics of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation (BCTF), of which every Vancouver teacher is a member,
states:

“The teacher speaks and acts toward pupils with respect and dignity and deals judiciously with them, always
mindful of their individual rights and sensibilities.”

The Board of Education of School District No. 39 - Vancouver (the “Board”) supports the kind of relationship
expressed in the Code of Ethics. Specifically, the Board believes that every teacher should:

         recognize the legal entitlement of students to consult with a teacher or administrative officer regarding
           his/her educational program;

         recognize the confidentiality of every student’s records and divulge information only as permitted
           or required in the School Act, the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, or other
           legislation (in most cases, such information should not be disclosed without the consent of the student
           or his/her parents/legal guardians, except where its release is required by law);

         recognize every student’s right to hold and express dissenting views, and to absent himself/herself on
           grounds of conscience from patriotic or other observances (after, as a courtesy, advising the teacher);

         respect the student’s private affairs and personal property;

         recognize that a student’s freedom to publish and distribute publications for students in his/her
           school should be limited only by the laws concerning libel, obscenity, and sedition, and by reasonable
           sensitivity to the feelings and values of others.
                                                                                                                     Policy Reference JM


Abuse
In accordance with Policy JHG: Reporting Abuse, every staff member has the legal obligation to report suspected
cases of child abuse and neglect, whether physical or mental in nature. If a student disclosure is made to an
adult during the course of a field study, the school principal should be consulted for guidance and clarification of
reporting procedures.

                                                                                                                   Policy Reference: JHG
Sexual Harassment
Staff must recognize and be committed to the right of all employees and students to work and learn in an
environment free from sexual harassment. To this extent the VBE, as outlined in policy GBCBA: Sexual
Harassment, will not tolerate any conduct that could be classified as sexual harassment and will make every
reasonable effort to ensure that no employee or student be subject to such harassment.


                      FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 79
Sexual harassment may be defined as any unwanted sexual attention of a persistent or abusive nature made by a
person who knows or ought reasonably to know that such attention is unwanted, or implied or expressed threat
of reprisal in the form of actual reprisal or the denial of opportunity for refusal to comply with a sexually oriented
request, or sexually oriented remarks and behaviour which may reasonably be perceived to create a negative
psychological and emotional environment for work.

The alleged victim of sexual harassment may be male or female. The harasser may be of the same or opposite
sex of the victim. The behaviour may not be intentional in order to be considered sexual harassment. If the
behaviour is offensive and is uncomfortable others, it will not be tolerated. Procedures for reporting harassing
behaviour that occurs on a field trip should be discussed with the school Principal.

                                                                                                                     Policy Reference GBCBA




                       80 FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK - Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools
FIELD STUDIES RESOURCE BOOK: Guidelines and Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools 81

				
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Description: Proposal to Provide First Aid Kits in Primary and Secondary Schools document sample