Proposal Memo Requesting Permission to Write About a Topic - PDF by yqe17762

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									SENIOR PROJECT
    GUIDE




    2008 – 2009
                           Senior Project Index
School Board Memo…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
Parent Letter……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….4
Parent Permission form………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5
Senior Project Components/ Affects to English Grade……………………………………………………..6
1st Quarter requirements
Project Selection…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………8-9
Project Proposal / example……………………………………………………………………………………………………….10-11
Mentor Information/ Guidelines..…………………………………………………………………………………………….12
Mentor Request Letter……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….13
Sample Mentor Request Letter………………………………………………………………………………………………..14
Mentor Do’s and Don’ts……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….15
Phone Script………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….16
Mentor Agreement Form……………………………………………………………………………………………………………17
2nd Quarter requirements
Autobiographical Essay.……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..19-20
Portfolio…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………21-22
Portfolio check-sheet…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………23
Sample cover letter…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….24
Portfolio rubric/evalution.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………25
Project Paper Part 1 instructions.……………………………………………………………………………………………26
Title Page Formatting Instructions    ………………………………………………………………………………… 27
Sample Title Page………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..28
Body of the Paper/ Part 1………………………………………………………………………………………………………….29-30
Research Tips……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….31
Sample paper………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..32-33
Works Cited Information………………………………………………………………………………………………………….25
Rationale Issues…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..34
Part 1 checklist…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….35
3rd Quarter requirements
Part 2 paper……………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………..37
Formatting and Part 2 requirements……………………………………………………………………………………...38
Mentor Interview log…………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………39-40
Common Problems…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………41-43
Part 2 checklist/evaluation………………………………………………………………………………………………………..44
4th Quarter requirements
Presentation Information………………………………………………………………………………………………………….46-47
Presentation Evaluation Form…………………………………………………………………………………………………..48-49
Community Service Guide/Expectations…………………………………………………………………………………50
FAQ’s about Community Service..…………………………………………………………………………………………….55
Community Service Activity Log Form…………………………………………………………………………………….59
Senior Project Mentor Hour Verification Form….………………………………………………………….…….57
Senior Project Student evaluation form…………………………………………………………………………………58
Mentor Thank-you letter……………………………………………………………………………………………………………59




                                                                             2
Memo
To:   Class of 2009
From: HUHSD School Board
Date: 9/3/2008
Re:   Senior Projects



As an incoming senior, Hamilton High School would like to congratulate you on your
successful admittance into this important and final level of your high school career.
Within your senior year, you will have many opportunities to display the skills,
knowledge, and thinking abilities that you have acquired over the past eleven years. One
of those opportunities is the Senior Project.

Hamilton High School’s Senior Project (established 1995) is the last in a series of
graduation requirements that is unique in many ways. Your Senior Project gives you the
possibility of creating a special course of study that will allow you to unify and display
your learning process in ways that any one class or project has never been able to do.
The Senior Project represents an extraordinary challenge and responsibility that is only
attainable by the oldest, wisest, and most experienced students on our campus, the
seniors.

We, the Board, charge you with delivering proof to us that you have the ability to
assimilate your years of learning by independently developing and carrying out a Senior
Project. Your Senior Project advisors will provide you with criteria, directions for
completing the project, as well as coaching and supervision throughout the duration of
the project. You will decide what and how you will meet the criteria and display your
knowledge.

You will submit several articles of proof including a project proposal, mentor letter, two
written reports, an oral presentation and a career development portfolio. Carefully
follow the specific guidelines and due dates. Please provide us with the “Project
Proposal” as soon as you have prepared it, but no later than September 15. Upon
approval, you may proceed with your project. Other proofs will be due in the winter and
in the spring.



                                                                                          3
September 3, 2008



Dear Parent:

Hamilton High School’s Senior Project (established 1995), the last in a series of graduation
requirements, is unique in many ways. The Senior Project gives your student the possibility of
creating a special course of study that will allow him/her to unify and display his/her learning
process in ways that any one class or project has never been able to do. The Senior Project
represents an extraordinary challenge and responsibility that is only attainable by the oldest,
wisest, and most experienced students on our campus, the seniors.

Hamilton High School and the School Board charge your student with delivering proof to us that
he/she has the ability to assimilate years of learning by independently developing and carrying
out a Senior Project. The Senior Project Advisors will provide your senior with criteria,
directions for completing the project, as well as coaching and supervision throughout the
duration of the project. The Senior Project Advisors are:
    Kelly Langan             School Counselor            klangan@glenncoe.org          826-3261
                                                                                       ext. 212
    Mrs. Rina Gonzalez       Senior English teacher      rgonzalez@glenncoe.org        ext. 213
    Mrs. Lupe Funderburk     AP English teacher          lfunderburk@glenncoe.org      ext. 230
    Mrs. Alex Charlon        Math Instructor             alexadracharlon@hotmail.com   ext. 218
    Mrs. Betty Mercado       Spanish teacher             bmercado@glenncoe.org         ext. 236
    Mrs. Amanda von Kleist   Special Education teacher   avonkleist@glenncoe.org       ext. 232


Your student has been provided a Senior Project Guide that includes due dates, expectations
and examples of each required component. This guide may also be accessed through the
Hamilton High School Library page (http://www.glenn-co.k12.ca.us/ham-hs/library.html) by
clicking on the “Senior Project Packet” link near the bottom of the page. Please review this
information in detail with your senior. We ask that you read and sign the enclosed “Parent
Permission Form” and return it to main office. This form is also in the booklet on page 7.
Your student will submit/complete several items including a project proposal, mentor letter, two
written reports, an oral presentation and a career development portfolio. The specific
guidelines and due dates are outlined on page 6.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact me at 530/826-3261 ext. 212, Monday
through Friday from 8:00a.m to 4:00p.m.

Sincerely,




Kelly Langan
School Counselor


                                                                                                   4
                              PARENT PERMISSION FORM

My student                                         , has chosen to complete his or her
senior project on                                         . I approve my student’s
project selection and I have reviewed the “Senior Project Guide” with my student. I
understand that my student is expected to complete a project that “stretches” his or
her learning by choosing a project that he or she wants to learn about rather than
something already known.

I also understand that the senior project is a graduation requirement for my student
and is part of my student’s English 12 or AP English grade. All components must be
submitted and receive an “acceptable” rating for my student to participate in the
graduation ceremony.

Please provide the requested information below if you are able to take phone calls or
receive other correspondence:

Parent contact information
      Parent name (print)
      work phone:
      cell phone:
      email address:



Student contact information
     cell phone:
     email address:




Parent Signature:

Student Signature:




                                                                                         5
                              Senior Project Components
                                     2008-2009
The following items are what you will be expected to complete for your senior project. Each
item will be a portion of your senior English grade. Each item is listed below with how it will
affect your grade. All items are due to Mr. Langan, Mrs. Gonzalez (English 12) or Mrs.
Funderburk (AP English) at the end of the specified school day.

1st Quarter
         Item                Due Date                  Affects to English Grade
 Project Proposal        September 12
 Mentor Letter           October 3             25% of 1st Qtr. English grade
 Autobiographical        October 3
 Senior Essay

2nd Quarter
 Portfolio               October 24

 Part 1: Career          December 5th          25% of 1st semester English grade
 Research and
 Education

3rd Quarter
 Mentor Interview        January 30, 2009
 Part 2: Mentor          February 27, 2009
 information and
 Field experience                               35% of 3rd Qtr. English grade
 paper

4th Quarter
 Paper submission #2     March 27th
 Presentations           April 29th & 30th

 Mentor Time             May 1st
 Verification Due
 Submit Community        May 1st               35% of 2nd semester English grade
 Service Project
 hours
 Mentor Thank-you        May 8th
 letter
 Paper submission #3     May 15th


                                                                          Revised September 3, 2008




                                                                                                 6
                   1st Quarter components

        Item            Due Date          Affects to English Grade
Project Proposal    September 12
Mentor Letter       October 3      25% of 1st Qtr. English grade
Autobiographical    October 3
Senior Essay




                                                                     7
                          PROJECT SELECTION
                   Points to Think About When Selecting Your Project

Choose Something That Interests You
      Myth: Your project needs to be career related.
      Truth: Your project DOES NOT need to be related to a career. Students in the past
      have researched hobbies, such as acting, model building, ceramics, pilot, etc.

We can’t say this strongly enough! Choose something that you may be interested in researching.
You will spend a great deal of time developing a quality project, don’t just select a project
because you have a family friend that can be your mentor, choose something you really want to
learn about. This is the WHOLE POINT of the senior project, for you to research something
YOU want to know about. Your topic can be anything APPROPRIATE.

Think about the school topics that interest you. Do you like math and science? Or do you like
English and Social Studies? Do you like to talk with people? Or are you not a “people person”?
Thinking about how you behave with friends and what you do during your own time will help you
to select a project that will be enjoyable to you.

Looking into a specific career? Do you really know all you need to know about a career you
intend to do? The senior project provides a great opportunity for you to discover if you really
want to do a specific career. It is equally valuable to you to discover that you don’t want to do a
specific career as it is to find out that you do!

The Challenge

You will need to choose a project that is a “personal stretch” for you. That means you cannot
select a project that you already know a great deal about. For example, if you have rebuilt an
engine in a car, you cannot do a project on engine rebuilding. However, if you have rebuilt a
break system in a car and now you want to learn how to rebuild the engine, you can select that
for your project. A “personal stretch” means you may have some basic knowledge, but you will
need to show how you expanded your knowledge. If you are unsure of what would be considered
a challenge, see Mrs. Gonzalez or Mr. Langan to discuss your project interest.

Projects that have proven to be difficult
• Cosmetology
• Preschool Teacher
• Construction
• Auto/Farm Mechanics
• Speaker Box Construction
• Some medical field projects


                                                                                                  8
For cosmetology and preschool teacher the difficulties have been that students cannot collect
enough information or develop enough knowledge to write a quality paper. If you select either
of these areas, you will be expected to work very closely with your mentor and you can expect to
complete a minimum of 20 hours to develop a good project.

If you select construction or mechanics, typically the problems have been that the student is
unable to write a paper that provides the detail necessary for the reader to understand. If you
select these projects, you will want to focus on a specific area within the topics and expect to
develop a paper that provides very detailed information for your reader. This type of writing
can be very difficult, so you may want to decide what type of writer you are before you select
this type of project.

Selecting a project where you build a specific item like a speaker box has proven to be too
narrow a focus. It is difficult to find enough information about speaker boxes to write a quality
paper that doesn’t sound like it came out of the encyclopedia or right off the Internet.

Some of the medical field projects have proven to be difficult because of patient/doctor
confidentiality. You may want to discuss this with a perspective mentor prior to choosing this
type of project. Some doctors are very open to asking patients to allow you to observe, while
others are not. Be sure to select mentor who will allow you to observe medical procedures so
you can really understand the occupation you are exploring.




                                                                                                 9
                                 Project Proposal

The project proposal will identify the topic of your senior project, why you chose it and
what you hope to learn. It will also include three possible sources to secure a mentor
and a Works Cited draft.

What is your personal background with this topic?
Why did you pick this project?
Where did you get the idea of this project?
Did it have anything to do with your past or did you just develop an interest in this project?
Was there a particular person who influenced you to pick this project?
What do you hope to learn, do, experience during this project?
How will you use what you learn on the project?




                                                                                       #1234, pg, 1

                        Project Proposal example
       Dr. Phil is my idol. All kidding aside, I’m intrigued by his profession and respect him for

his candid communication with his guests and his intervention techniques. I believe the

counseling profession is right for me. For this reason, I hope to work with a counselor to gain a

greater understanding of the profession. I would love to work with school-aged children and

help them deal with issues of self-esteem, loss and separation, addiction and disorders.

Working in a school setting would be ideal. My school counselor in high school was very

instrumental to my academic success. He not only advised me about academic matters but

talked openly about other pertinent issues in my life. This relationship helped me deal with the

divorce of my parents, social issues in school as well as plan for my life following high school.

Through this project, I hope to solidify my goal of becoming a counselor and seeing if it is the

career for me.

                                                                                                    10
                                                                               #1234, pg, 2


Possible mentor sources for counseling would be:

1.    High School Counseling
      Chico High School
      901 Esplanade
      Chico, CA 95926
      891-3026

2.    Victims of Domestic Violence
      Catalyst
      Chico: 343-7711

3.    Counseling Solutions
      130 Yellowstone Drive
      Chico, CA 95973
      879-5991




Possible research sources, excluding my mentor, may be:



“Counselors”. U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational Outlook

      Handbook. 2008-2009 Edition. September 3, 2008.

      http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos067.htm

“CSU, Chico”. Eureka Career Information System. Eureka CCIS Online 2008. September 3,
2008.

      www.eureka.org.

Langan, Kelly. Personal Interview. November 1, 2008

“School Counselors”. Eureka Career Information System. Eureka CCIS Online 2008.

      September 3, 2008. www.eureka.org.




                                                                                           11
                        MENTOR INFORMATION
MENTOR GUIDELINES

Four objectives for having a mentor component:
      1. To develop and practice your communication skills: You must search out and
         meet an expert in the field of your choice.
      2. To gain knowledge and experience from an expert.
      3. To gain professional support and coaching from someone who is not your
         family or school staff.
      4. To develop a long lasting professional relationship that can continue after
         you leave high school.

Time and timelines
   • Minimum of 10 hours spent with the mentor through a combination of acceptable

      methods (see below).
   • The 10 hours does not include paper writing or preparing project boards.

   • You must complete your time before you write your paper.

   • You must complete your time outside of school – students will not be released

      from class to complete this assignment unless your mentor has requested your
      presence at an event that is essential for your project.

NOTE: If release time is required, a note from your mentor and parent needs to be submitted to Mr.
Langan (or a senior project advisor) for approval at least 24 hours prior to the activity.


Acceptable methods (how to accomplish the objectives):
     •  Watch or shadow your mentor (observation)
     •  Apply what your mentor has taught you (practice)
     •  Check back with your mentor (reflection and discussion)
     •  Connect with others your mentor recommends (networking)
     •  Phone calls
     •  E-mail correspondence
     •  Written letters
     •  In-person visits
     •  Research recommended by mentor

Proofs (what documents will provide evidence):
      •  Logs – detailed and signed
      •  Journals – detailed and signed

                                                                                                 12
      •   Phone records
      •   Printed e-mails
      •   Written letters
      •   Video tape
      •   Time card
      •   Summary letter at the end of the project – detailed and signed



                          Senior Project Mentor Request Letter

1. Address the letter to your mentor using proper titles, company name, and address.
2. Explain your project idea, your initial plans to complete the project and the time commitment
   needed from the mentor.
3. Tell the mentor when you are available to meet with them (inform them of your school,
   athletics, work, and any other schedules).
4. Provide your name, address, and phone number and the best time to reach you, and when you
   will contact them to set your first appointment.
5. Prepare an envelope for mailing the letter and give your letter and envelope to Mr. Langan.
   He will mail it for you.




Return Envelope Sample


 Student Name
 P.O. Box 488
 Hamilton City, CA 95951



                                    Mr. Louis Freen, Director
                                    Federal Bureau of Investigation
                                    702 Broadway
                                    Chico, CA 95926




                                                                                             13
                                            Sample Letter

You are writing a business letter that MUST have the following components:
• Who you are
• What you want
• What do you want to do for your project
• What do you want to do with the mentor
• When is the best time to work with you?
• When you will be contacting him or her.

(The sample is done in 10 point font, your letter will need to be in 12 point font.)



Student Name
P. O. Box 488
Hamilton City, CA 95951
       (2 lines)
Date

       (3 lines)
Mr. Louis Freen, Director
Federal Bureau of Investigation
702 Broadway
Chico, CA 95926

Dear Mr. Freen:

I am a senior at Hamilton Union High School and I am preparing a senior project on becoming an FBI
agent. I plan to spend time with an expert in this field asking questions about the job, education
requirements, and job opportunities. I am interested in observing an agent while they perform their
duties and practicing some of their training activities. I will also independently research career
information about FBI agents. Then I will develop a written report and an oral presentation.

Thank you for agreeing to be my mentor me for this project? I must spend a minimum of ten hours both
with you and in follow-up activities related to my project. I attend school Monday through Friday, 8:00am
to 3:15pm and I work Tuesday and Thursday evenings. I would be available to meet with you after school.

My address is at the top of this letter and my evening and message phone is 826-3261. I will phone you
(put a date about one week later than you mail the letter) to set up our first appointment. Thank you for
being my mentor.

Sincerely,

(signature goes here) (4 lines)

Your Name


                                                                                                        14
                           Senior Project Mentor Do’s and Don’ts
Selecting a Mentor
Choosing the proper mentor to work with you is critical to the success of your senior project.
If you choose a mentor who doesn’t have time to work with you or one who has little knowledge
of the area you have selected, you will have a difficult time acquiring the knowledge you need to
write a successful paper and complete a quality presentation. Some key questions to ask when
selecting a mentor are:
• How many years have you worked in this field?
• What education do you have?
• Do you own your own business?
• What is your time availability to work with me?

Cosmetology – If you have chosen cosmetology, your mentor MUST work in a salon. Mentors who
work in their homes will not be acceptable for you to use.

Mechanics/Construction – If you have chosen either mechanics or construction, you must work
with a mentor who has been working a minimum of five years in the field.

Preschool Teacher – If you have chosen to study the profession of a preschool teacher, you
must work with a director who has a minimum of five years experience and you must complete a
series of projects in the preschool setting.

                                            Mentor Do’s
•   Your mentor should have specific knowledge of your topic and be willing to make time to work
    with you. You will be able to judge their interest in you and your project when you make
    contact with them.
•   Mentors are very busy; they are usually involved in some sort of work and you will need to
    work around their schedules. Most people work during the day. Do not call a business at
    night unless your mentor has given you those instructions. Be respectful of their time and
    show up when you say you will, and call early if you will be late or to reschedule. Do not
    reschedule for frivolous reasons (i.e. I had to go to the game!).
•   Notify you senior advisor of your potential contacts before you call so we can avoid
    duplication.
•   You may use the phones in the office or Mr. Langan’s office during break, lunch, or after
    school. Do not ask your teacher(s) to set you free. Follow the phone contact tips sheet.
•   Log your time and activities with your mentor. Do not wait until the last minute. You have
    four months until your paper is due. You should target about five hours of project/mentor
    time per month.
•   Provide your own transportation to meet with your mentor.
•   Be prepared. Think about the questions you want to ask. Bring paper and a writing
    instrument. Take notes. Remember to thank your mentor for their time, every time!




                                                                                               15
                                     Mentor Do’s (continued)

•   Work with your mentor outside of school time. You may obtain prior approval from
    your advisor to work with your mentor during school only if the activity will occur only
    during school time (i.e. surgery, special speaker, etc.). You will need parent and
    advisor permission and check out and in with the main office.
•   When you visit your mentor, allow plenty of travel time, as well as time to park to get to the
    meeting on time.
                                          Mentor Don’ts
•   No relatives -- the exercise is designed to help you meet and work with other people outside
    your family.
•   No school staff without prior approval, which will only be granted if no other options are
    available).

Phone Script

First phone call to a potential mentor. “Remember that you do not get a second
chance to make a first impression.”

“Hello, may I speak to                , please?* Hello, my name is                 and
I am a senior at Hamilton High in Hamilton City. As a part of graduation
requirements, I am doing a senior project. I am doing my senior project on (briefly
explain your project and what you want to accomplish) and I would like to ask you to
be my mentor.

I will spend a minimum of 10 hours on my project and I will need your support to
advise me and help me carry out my project. My final paper is due in January, so
I have 4 months to complete my project. (This gives them time to plan out when it is
best for them). I know your are busy, but I have free time on
             (this is where you talk about times you are available).

At this point, set up a time to meet. Write it down in your planner so you don’t forget!
Write down the phone number, the address, and directions if you need them. Ask about
how to dress at their business.

* (No, would you like to leave a message?) You may ask “when is the best time to
reach them?” and offer to call then OR say, I can be reached at
(your home number) at these times                          OR you may leave the school
number 826-3261 ext. 0 and have them call during break, lunch, or after school. You
would then have to be available for your call. We can take messages, but you will have to
check with us.

                                                                                                16
                                Hamilton Union High School
                                 Senior Project Team
                                     P.O. Box 488
                             Hamilton City, California 95951
                                Phone (530) 826-3261
                                  Fax (530) 826-0440



         Mentor Agreement Form
                                   2008 - 2009 School Year


Dear Senior Project Team:

                                   has requested that I serve as a mentor for his/her Senior
Project. I have expertise in the area of                                 and will provide support
in this field to help the student complete a successful Senior Project. I have received and
reviewed the student’s mentor request letter. As the student proceeds through his/her ten
plus hours of project work, we will collaborate on a number of topics, including but not limited
to: job shadowing, career advice, encouragement, reviewing the written report, instruction in
my field of expertise, and professional guidance.         I will review and initial Senior Project
mentor documentation each period of time the student and I collaborate on his/her project. I
understand I will be invited to serve as a panel judge for the Senior Project Presentations in
the spring, but am under no obligation to do so.


My telephone number is                             and the best time(s) to contact me is/are:
                                                                                       .




Mentor Signature                                   Mentor Printed Name



Mailing Address                                    City                        State       Zip



E-mail address



                                                                                                 17
   2nd Quarter (1st semester) components
Portfolio        October 24
Part 1: Career   December 5th   25% of 1st semester English grade
Research and
Education




                                                                    18
                 AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY

The Autobiographical essay gives you the opportunity to tell the admission office or
scholarship review panal about circumstances in your background that may not be
evident in other parts of your college or scholarship application. You will communicate in
writing with the intended audience (college admission staff, scholarship review board
and community partners) who will make a decision regarding your admission or
scholarship award. They will be reading to understand what you have learned
throughout high school, what activities you have been involved in and what you plan for
the future. Be descriptive, but make your point succinctly and do not repeat
information over and over and over.

Two options are outlined below. Both responses must be a minimum of 1000 words.
Students applying to a University of California (UC) campus must complete option 2.

OPTION 1: General admission or scholarship response.

•   Personal: Suggested one-half page long. Describe who you are. Include information
    about your background: racial/ethnic background, family members,
    important/influential people who have significantly impacted you, etc. Discuss any
    significant events that have occurred: migrating to the United States, learning
    English as a second language, the death of a family member, illness/health crisis,
    surgeries, accidents, etc.

•   Interest: Suggested one-half to one page long. Describe your interests and your
    goals. Use results from your personality assessments completed in class. What
    activities have you been involved in (athletics, clubs, conferences, Student Body,
    etc.)? What are your talents? Skills?



•   Education: Suggested one-half to one page long. Explain why you are applying to this
    school and what you hope to accomplish. Describe what type of training or education
    you are planning to obtain, i.e., training program, certificate, degree, etc. Elaborate
    on the school’s qualities and how this fits your needs. Verify that you meet (or
    exceed) the school’s admission requirements and why you are their “best choice” for
    admission.




                                                                                         19
OPTION 2: Personal Statement for the University of California (UC) Undergraduate
Application

Applicants will be asked to respond to two prompts, using a maximum of 1,000 words total.

The prompts are posted at
http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/undergrad_adm/apply/how_apply/personal_statement.html .


Instructions:

    •    Respond to both prompts, using a maximum of 1,000 words total.
    •    You may allocate the word count as you wish. If you choose to respond to one prompt at
         greater length, we suggest your shorter answer be no less than 250 words.
    •    Stay within the word limit as closely as you can. A little over—1,012 words, for example—
         is fine.



Prompt #1:
Describe the world you come from – for example, your family, community or school – and tell us
how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations.

Prompt #2:
Tell us about a personal quality, talent, accomplishment, contribution or experience that is
important to you. What about this quality or accomplishment makes you proud and how does it
relate to the person you are?




Each option will be typed, submitted on or before the due date and include a word count at
the end of the document.




                                                                                                           20
                                    PORTFOLIO
What exactly is a portfolio?

A portfolio is a showcase for your achievements and talents, which can be used to show samples
of your work certificates, diplomas, awards, letters of commendation, and so on. It is most
often presented in a good quality three-ring binder, and many of the items it contains are
inserted in plastic sheet protectors. Think of it as a sophisticated scrapbook.

Why do you need a portfolio? What are the advantages to using it?

Here are just a few of the reasons why having a portfolio to show employers can work to your
advantage:

   •   It allows you to expand on your résumé in a more comprehensive manner. With résumés,
       we are usually limited to one or two pages. Having a portfolio allows you to expand as fully
       as you want to on any area of your expertise.
   •   Your portfolio can demonstrate tangible proof of your skills and abilities. Instead of just
       talking during a job interview about what you have done or can do, you can actually show
       samples of your work or letters of commendation testifying to the quality of your work.
   •   It helps you keep all of your essential work-related samples and documents in one place
       and protected so that you can easily find and access those materials when you need them
       for a job search, performance appraisal, or application for a promotion.
   •   Employers aren't used to seeing portfolios on a regular basis. When you put one together,
       it will really help you stand out from the crowd.
   •   In job interviews, it can act as a reminder of the things you want to highlight in
       promoting your skills.
   •   You will need it for scholarship interviews.
   •   Some scholarships require that you send a copy of your portfolio for scholarship
       selection.

What is required for your portfolio?

Many people set up their portfolio in a professional looking binder with labeled sections
separated by tab dividers. Examples of what might be contained in each section include:

   •   A copy of your résumé. (This needs to be current!)
   •   A general cover letter.
   •   Job Application. (This needs to be current!)
   •   Senior essay.
   •   Three letters of recommendation. One school source, two outside sources.




                                                                                                21
Portfolio Extras: (Put in what you have, not all listed below are required)

•   Academic awards.
•   Perfect attendance awards.
•   Sports or club awards.
•   Copies of positive performance appraisals. (Program Certificates of Completion).
•   E-mails, thank you letters, and handwritten notes complimenting you on a job well done.
•   Documents you may have designed-brochures, flyers, pamphlets, report covers, reports.
•   Flyers, conference brochures, or other materials describing presentations, workshops or
    seminars you have presented.
•   If you are into creative arts, you might include a video you have made or photos of a
    display of your work.
•   Photographs representing projects you have been involved in. (For example, a photograph
    of a conference display booth you created for a previous employer.)




                                                                                         22
                              PORTFOLIO CHECK-OFF SHEET

Include this check-off sheet in the front of your portfolio binder when you turn it in.

My portfolio has all of the following, current documentation:

   Resume (Resume tab)

   Cover Letter (Cover letter tab)

   Job Application (Job Application tab)

   Senior Essay (Career Goals tab)

   Three Letters of Recommendation. (References tab)
      Note: For letters to be considered authentic they must be:
         1.) printed on school, company, or individual original letterhead
                                         OR
         2.) possess contact information with a signature in blue ink.

                 School Source – Letter of Recommendation
                    From: _______________________
                 Outside School Source – Letter of Recommendation
                    From: _______________________
                 Second Outside School Source – Letter of Recommendation
                    From: ________________________

   Portfolio Extras
      (Achievements tab)
       - Academic Awards
       - Sports or club awards
       - Other awards
       (Performance Samples tab)
       - Judging sheets from interviews
       - Pictures of projects
       - Outstanding class papers
       - Outstanding class tests



I have updated and reviewed my portfolio. The resume, job application, cover letter and senior
essay are ERROR FREE!

__________________________________                          __________________
Signature                                                      Date

                                                                                             23
                                         Sample Cover Letter

Acover letter needs to have:
• Your Address
• Date
• Contact person, company and address
• First paragraph – What position are you applying for?
• Second paragraph – What qualifications do you have for this position?
• Third paragraph – How can you be contacted?
• Your signature in between “Sincerely” and your typed name.
• Enclosures, usually your resume and a job application
                                                SAMPLE
(start 2 inches down, use a 12 point font. Arial or Times New Roman)
Your Address
City, State, zip code
Date (followed by 4 "Enters")



Mrs. Coleen Parker
Glenn County Office of Education
525 W. Sycamore Street
Willows, CA 95988

Dear Mrs. Parker:

I would like to be interviewed for your part-time position as a cashier in your store. I believe I
am the right employee for this job because of my many qualifications and skills I have
developed while in high school.

I have been the varsity volleyball team captain for the past two years and I have also been a
member of the Future Farmers of America. I have competed in several public speaking
contests and I am the president of our student body council. These opportunities have
provided me with the necessary skills to work with the public. I understand the importance of
providing quality customer service that is fast and efficient.

Given some of the qualifications I have listed, I would like to meet with you for an interview to
discuss my qualifications further. I can be contacted at 826-1234, Monday through Friday, from
5:00pm to 10:00pm. I look forward to meeting with you.

Sincerely, ("Enter" 4 times)

(3 blank lines)
Mary Smith

Enclosures: Resume, Job Application




                                                                                                     24
                                                 PORTFOLIO RUBRIC
Student Name: ________________________________                                                                  Total:             /60

Portfolio Requirements: All items are required and must be deemed “Acceptable”. If any item scores “Amateur”,
the portfolio will fail and will need to be resubmitted for evaluation and grading. All items must be current (dated
within the past 12 months).
    Scoring Item               Exceptional             Admirable               Acceptable               Amateur
                               (10 points each)              (8 points each)             (7 points each)                 (0 points)
Overall                    The student provides a       The student provides a      The student provides a       The student does not
                           notebook with name in        notebook with the           notebook with the            present the portfolio in a
Presentation of            plain view; all items are    student’s name in plain     student’s name in plain      notebook form.
Portfolio                  neat, clean, and             view; all items are         view. All items are
                           provided in easily           provided in correct         provided but not in order
                           discernable order, in        order by sections, all      by section.
                           three hole punched           pages are neat, clean,
                           plastic protectors           and three-hole punched.
Resume                     The student presented a      The student presented a     The student presented an     The student was not able
                           complete, neat,              complete,                   incomplete typewritten       to present a complete
                           typewritten resume,          neat, typewritten           resume                       resume in appropriate
                           which described              resume, which               using and inconsistent       format.
                           education and                adequately described        format. The student was
                           experience in                education and               able to partially
                           professional language.       experience. The format      describe education and
                           The format was               was consistent but          experience.
                           consistent and did           exceeded one page.
                           not exceed one page.
Cover Letter               The letter follows the       The letter follows the      The letter follows the       The letter does not
                           business letter format       business letter format      business letter format       follow the format
                           exactly, is typed neatly     exactly, is typed neatly    exactly, is typed neatly     provided and has errors.
                           and error free and           and error free and          and error free and
                           provides information         provides information        provides basic
                           about the job wanted,        about a job wanted and      information about a job
                           why the person is            contact information.        of interest.
                           qualified for the position
                           and contact information.
Job Application            The application is typed     The application is hand-    The application is hand-     The application is written
                           neatly, free of errors and   written in ink neatly,      written in ink.              in pencil and includes
                           up-to-date.                  error free and up-to-                                    spelling errors or lacks
                                                        date.                                                    information.
Senior Essay               The essay is typed           The essay is typed          The essay is typed           The essay has numerous
                           neatly, error free, meets    neatly, error free, meets   neatly, meets the two-       spelling errors and does
                           the two-page                 the two-page                page requirement and         not reflect the student’s
                           requirement and              requirement and             provides basic               qualifications.
                           provides at least three      provides some examples      information about the
                           specific examples of         of student’s abilities.     student’s qualifications.
                           student’s abilities.
Work Samples               In addition to 3 print       The student is able to      The student is able to       The student is not able to
                           samples, the student         provide 3 samples of        provide a sampling of        provide a sampling of his
                           work. The student            his/her best work, which    his/her best work .          or her best work.
                           includes certificates,       highlight his/her
                           awards, interview            abilities and/or
                           judging rubrics.             interests. The samples
                                                        are appropriate to share
                                                        with a potential
                                                        employer.

Students must ensure authenticity of each letter of recommendation for portfolio to be accepted. Review the authenticity requirements
described on the “Portfolio Check-off Sheet” (pg 49). Student will not be credited or penalized for letter quality.
3 Letters of                                                                             Not current or confirmed as authentic
                               School Letter is current and deemed authentic.                 School Letter
Recommendation                 Outside Letter #1 is current and deemed authentic.             Outside Letter #1
                               Outside Letter #2 is current and deemed authentic.             Outside Letter #2



                                                                                                                                         25
                       PROJECT PAPER Part 1
The Senior Project Paper will include two distinct parts. Part 1 will focus on
career/topic research and education. For a hobby or recreational project such as
karate or instrument assembly, the research component would include the history,
origin or fundamentals of the topic. The education component would focus on the
training, courses and/or skills and abilities necessary for this topic.

                                  Formatting Instructions
Paper Length

Part 1 should include a minimum of three (3) pages of text not including the cover page
or Works Cited page.



Font Size

Times New Roman 12-point font only.

Paper Set Up

Cover Page – MLA format (see example) Use your student number only to identify your
paper.

One – inch margins on top, bottom, right and left sides of paper

Page numbers: top right of text pages only (not on cover page or Works Cited page)

Part 1 Works Cited Page. Cite a MINIMUM of four sources. See the Hamilton High
School Library Works Cited handout for instructions on works cited page and
parenthetical citing.

Stapled – Upper left-hand corner, NO folders.

Illustrations and Graphics

Illustrations, graphics, tables, etc. may be used, but will not count as part of the text
page number count. If you use these, you do need to cite your source.



                                                                                            26
                            How to Format Your Title Page
•   Go to “Page Layout” tab, click Margins icon and select Normal for 1” margins

•   Right click on the light blue status bar near the bottom (next to “Words” count) and
    check the “Vertical Page Position” customization. This will allow you to view where the
    curser is located on the page. The Career Title should be printed at 3.4 and the first
    line of the identifying information should begin at 6.6.

•   Do not include a page number on this page.

•   Use standard 12 pt Times New Roman. Do not bold or underline the title.

•   No pictures!




                                                                                              27
     School Counseling




           #1927

     Mrs. L Funderburk

AP English Language, Period 2

         5 Dec 2008




                                28
                                        Body of the Paper


         Faculty expects students to maintain a high standard of academic honesty and integrity.
Plagiarism will not be tolerated by any student. Plagiarism includes: copying or failing to give
credit for ideas, statement of facts, or conclusions derived from another source, submitting a
paper downloaded from the Internet or submitting a friend’s paper as your own.

Students have three scheduled dates to submit their final paper. Students may receive 100%
on the first scheduled submission date only. Each subsequent submission will result in a 10%
grade reduction, therefore the second submission maximum will be 80% (earning no higher than
a ‘B’) and the third and final submission maximum will be 70% (earning no higher than a ‘C’). If
you do not receive a passing grade by the third submission, you will not graduate, be allowed
to participate in the ceremony and must attend summer school to complete your paper.



The following questions are a SUGGESTED list of questions you may use to help you decide how
to write each section of your paper. You DO NOT need to answer all of the questions in your
paper, use them only as a guide to help you organize your thoughts. Label each section of your
paper using the titles below, left justified and then a double space following the title.


                            Part 1: Career Research and Education

Rationale: (½ to ¾ page). Refer to Rationale issues on page 30

The rationale explains why you chose this project and what you hope to learn about it.

What is your personal background with this topic?
Why did you pick this project?
Where did you get the idea of this project?
Did it have anything to do with your past or did you just develop an interest in this project?
Was there a particular person who influenced you to pick this project?
What do you hope to learn, do, experience during this project?
How will you use what you learn on the project?



Career Research: (1-2 pages)

Describe your research findings including, description/definition, history, nature of the work,
requirements and job opportunities/employment outlook. Research earnings for this occupation
and provide an approximate annual income. All information should be stated in your own
words, not copied from your reference sources.



                                                                                                 29
Education: (1-2 pages)

Describe what type of training or education you need for this occupation, i.e., training program,
certificate, degree, etc. Research a school or program that provides training in this career and
highlight its attributes. Name the institution and provide demographic information about the
campus (location, size, tuition costs, etc). Admission requirements, program/degree information
and graduation requirements should also be addressed.




                                                                                               30
                                  Senior Project Research Tips

An important part of your senior project and paper is the research you conduct about your
topic. You will be researching the education and training required, skills needed, job
responsibilities, salary, benefits, job outlook, and more. Here are some tips for locating
quality sources of information.

Books: The Hamilton High Library has a rich selection of books in our Career section. We are

        constantly adding new titles according to senior recommendations. Use the Library Catalog to

        search for the book you need or ask Mrs. Walker for assistance.

Occupational Outlook Handout: www.bls.gov. Under Publications on right column of page, click

       the Occupational Outlook Handbook. Click A-Z Index or utilize the “Search the Handbook”

       feature to locate career or topic. This U.S. Dept of Labor website is a tremendous resource of

       valuable, extensive, up-to-date, and accurate career information. Google it and make it your

       first online resource.

Eureka: www.eureka.org. Utilize Career and/or Education tabs at top of page to locate information.

       Another great occupational website…you need an account to access it. See Mr. Langan for

       login information.

Your Mentor: Your mentor is an invaluable resource and should be used as a Personal Interview.

Other websites: Evaluate other websites carefully to determine if they are authoritative, reliable

       sources of information. Look for websites sponsored by organizations noted for their ties to

       the profession. Ask your mentor if he/she belongs to a professional organization and visit that

       organization’s website for information. Be wary of sites created by individuals or small

       businesses. These are often not the most reliable sources of information. Mrs. Walker can

       assist you with evaluating a source and determining if it’s appropriate for your project.

TIP: Be sure to get all the information you need to fully cite your source. For example, if you’re

       photocopying from a book, copy the page with publishing information as well. For websites,

       be sure to record the URL and other information to fully create your Works Cited entry later.




                                                                                                       31
                                       Sample Senior Project Paper
                                                                                                  #1927, 1

Rationale:


       Dr. Phil is my idol. All kidding aside, I’m intrigued by his profession and respect him for his

candid communication with his guests and his intervention techniques. I believe the counseling

profession is right for me. For this reason, I hope to work with a counselor to gain a greater

understanding of the profession. I would love to work with school-aged children and help them deal

with issues of self-esteem, loss and separation, addiction and disorders. Working in a school setting

would be ideal. My school counselor in high school was very instrumental to my academic success.

He not only advised me about academic matters but talked openly about other pertinent issues in my

life. This relationship helped me deal with the divorce of my parents, social issues in school as well as

plan for my life following high school. Through this project, I hope to solidify my goal of becoming a

counselor and seeing if it is the career for me.

Research:

       Counselors work with clients to help promote a healthy lifestyle. They can work with

individuals, couples, families and groups regarding personal, academic, emotional and social

difficulties. Counselors work in many different settings and with different populations. Counselors

can specialize in a particular population, such as gereatrics, adolescent, marriage and family,

addictions, domestic violence, etc. They may also work in different settings ranging from health care

facilities, schools and foster care agencies. (Counselors).

       I would love to specialize in school counseling and work in a high school setting. Counselors

at the high school work with ninth through twelfth grade students in the classroom, individually and in

small groups. They work to ensure their academic, social, and emotional success. Counselors also

work with parents, teachers, administrators and community service providers to advocate for the

students well-being. (School Counselors).
                                                                                                         32
THIS SECTION SHOULD CONTINUE TO PROVIDE RESEARCH INFORMATION
REGARDING THE CAREER. DISCUSS PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS, WORK
ENVIRONMENT, SALARY, SKILLS AND ABILITIES.

Education:

       In some states you can provide some counseling duties with a bachelor’s degree if you are

working under the supervision of a licensed or credentialed counselor. A master’s degree is required

to become a counselor in the state of California. A master’s degree requires two years of education

beyond a bachelor’s degree. Some programs allow a counselor to earn a master’s degree in one year if

their bachelor’s degree was earned in the same field. School Counselors must have a Pupil Personnel

Services (PPS) credential which is often earned while obtaining a master’s degree (School

Counselors).

       I plan to pursue a bachelor of art degree at CSU, Sacramento located in Sacramento, California.

I chose CSU, Sacramento because of it reputable counseling program, close proximity to home, and

size. Sacramento State’s undergraduate student population is approximately 23,000, with a gender

make-up of 58% female, 42% male. I meet the minimum requirements for admission, having taken the

SAT examination and completing the 15 required units with C’s or better. Tuition to attend will be

approximately $14,000 annually, including room and board, books and other expenses. (CSU,

Sacramento).

THIS SECTION SHOULD CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EDUCATION INFORMATION
INCLUDING, SPECIALIZATIONS, COURSES, AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS.

FOUR SOURCES ARE REQUIRED IN PART 1. BE SURE ALL FOUR SOURCES ARE
CITED CORRECTLY WITHIN THE TEXT AND ON THE WORKS CITED PAGE.




                                                                                                       33
                                       Rationale Issues

Insults

        I have chosen to do my senior project on building bicycles. I have chosen this project
because it will be easy for me to do and I don’t really know why we have to do this anyway. This
is just a waste of my time but since I want to graduate, I will study bicycles.

Problem: You are insulting the audience. The people who come to read the senior project papers
believe in this project, that is why they give up a day at work to come and read them. Insulting
the project is not a way to win over your reader!

        I have chosen to do my senior project on building bicycles. I have chosen this project
because I ride my bike to school every day and I want to know how the bicycle works and how to
fix it.

Audience Grabbers

       The fat dripped from his fingers as he ripped open the chicken to remove the insides.
This is what you would see every day if you worked at a chicken processing plant, and that is
what I want to do for my senior project.

Problem: Using a gripping opening line should not make your reader sick! Being gross is not the
way to engage your reader.

       Thirty-five million chickens are raised each year for human consumption. I want to work
in a meat processing plant to see how chickens are processed for consumer sale.

Incorrect Terms

      When I was little, I wanted to be a pharmacist.       I always liked the blue coats the
pharmacist wore.

Problem: Little and big do not refer to age. Use the word young to refer to age.

      When I was a young girl I wanted to be a pharmacist. I always liked the blue coats the
pharmacist wore.




                                                                                             34
                                  Senior Project Part 1 CHECKLIST

No papers will be accepted without having satisfied every item on the Checklist for the research paper.
If a paper is not accepted by the English teacher or Senior Project coordinator, it will be returned to the
student for further revision.

CONTENT REQUIREMENTS:
   LENGTH OF PAPER MUST BE THREE (3) PAGES.
   Introduction “hooks” readers; includes a clear definition of topic (5 sentence. min.)
   Clear, issue-based thesis idea or focus of the investigation and research
   Well-developed body paragraphs with topic sentences (min. 5 sentences each)
   Incorporates and cites evidence from various sources: texts, interview, observations, field work
   Provides ample commentary that explains, analyzes and evaluates the evidence
   Transitions smoothly; Includes appropriate diction and varied syntax
   Conclusion reflects on and synthesizes all evidence and ideas; asserts emphatic closing tone


MLA FORMAT, DOCUMENTATION and MECHANICS REQUIREMENTS:
   12 pt. font; Times (or similar type); one (1) inch margins
   ALL lines double-spaced (no single or double-double spaced lines)
   TITLE PAGE with student’s ID #, teacher’s name, course title & period, date submitted
   HEADER 1/2 inch from top right corner with student’s ID# and page number
   List of Works Cited: MINIMUM OF FOUR (4) SOURCES
   4 parenthetical citations within the text AND formatted correctly on Works Cited.
   Spell-checked; Proofread



Part 1:
Exceptional (25 pts)       Admirable (20 pts)            Acceptable (15 pts.)         Amateur (0 pts.)
Exceptional                Thorough understanding        Basic understanding of       No understanding of
understanding of           of project expectations       project expectations         project expectations
project expectations       and requirements              and requirements             and requirements
and requirements

Exceptional                Thorough understanding        Basic understanding of       No understanding of
understanding of           of education or training      education or training        education and training
education or training      requirements                  requirements                 requirements
requirements
Exceptional senior level   Admirable senior level        Acceptable senior level      Unacceptable for senior
writing skills.            writing skills.               writing skills.              level writing.




                                                                                                               35
                   3rd Quarter components
Mentor Interview    January 30, 2009
Part 2: Mentor      February 27, 2009
information and                         35% of 3rd Qtr. English grade
Field experience
paper




                                                                        36
                           Senior Project Paper Part 2:

Part 2 of the Senior Project Paper will highlight your mentor’s professional history
and provide an in-depth description of your field experience.

                                  Formatting Instructions
Paper Length

Part 2 should be a minimum of three (3) and a maximum of five (5) pages of text. A
cover page is required but not included in the page count. This section does not require
a “Works Cited” page or parenthetical citations within the text but should identify your
mentor.

Font Size

Times New Roman 12-point font only.

Paper Set Up

Cover Page – MLA format (see example) Use your student number only to identify your
paper.

One – inch margins on top, bottom, right and left sides of paper

Page numbers: top right of text pages only (not on cover page or Works Cited page)

Stapled – Upper left-hand corner, NO folders.

Illustrations and Graphics

Illustrations, graphics, tables, etc. may be used, but will not count as part of the text
page number count. If you use these, you do need to cite your source.




                                                                                            37
                                How to Format Your Title Page
   •   Go to “Page Layout” tab, click Margins icon and select Normal for 1” margins

   •   Right click on the light blue status bar near the bottom (next to “Words” count) and
       check the “Vertical Page Position” customization. This will allow you to view where the
       curser is located on the page. The Career Title should be printed at 3.4 and the first
       line of the identifying information should begin at 6.6.

   •   Do not include a page number on this page.

   •   Use standard 12 pt Times New Roman. Do not bold or underline the title.

   •   No pictures!

                      Part 2: Mentor information and Field Experience

Mentor’s Professional History: (¾ to one page). Refer to Mentor’s Professional History issues
on page 31

The mentor’s professional history is specifically about your mentor. Information that discusses
the field in general needs to be included in your “Field Experience” section.

What is your mentor’s name, training, education, years of experience in this field?
How did he or she get into this field?
What does this career involve, what is it all about?
What is your relationship with your mentor? Was he or she nice at first or intimidating?
What personal qualities does your mentor have that you see in yourself?



Interview Questions for your Mentor

What made you decide to work in this career field?
What kind or training, education, specialty licensing and experience do you have?
What skills are required for this business?
What do you enjoy most about your job?
What do you enjoy least about your job?
What opportunities are there for advancement?
How much money can a person expect to make in this field?
Are there any fringe benefits? (health insurance, life insurance, retirement plans, etc.)
What are your work hours?




                                                                                                 38
                        Mentor Interview Response Log
Student Name: ____________________ Senior Project Topic: _________________

       Mentor Interview                       Response
Interview questions
   Tell me how you became
   interested in…
   Tell me about the path you
   followed to get to this
   position?
   What suggestions would you
   give to someone who is
   pursuing this career?
   What skills and qualifications
   are essential for success in
   this field?
   What do you believe is the
   most difficult part of being..?
   How much do you expect this
   position would pay for an
   entry-level position?
   What school classes/training
   would help prepare someone
   for..?
   What kind of hours could I
   expect to work in this
   career?
   What are some of the
   objectives you would like to
   see accomplished in this job?
   What are some of the more
   difficult problems one would
   have to face in this position?
   What freedom would I have
   in determining my own work
   objectives, deadlines, and
   methods of measurement?
   What significant changes do
   you foresee in the near
   future?
   What accounts for success in
   this field?



                                                                        39
Field Experience: (two to three pages). Refer to Field Experience issues on page 32

This section should cover what YOU DID in detail on your project. Be sure to write this portion
as if your reader knows nothing about your topic. If you talk about a specific piece of
equipment used at the work site, describe what it IS and what it DOES and HOW it is used.

What did you DO specifically? (Observed, used equipment, made, discussed)
What happened?
What did you observe?
What happens in a regular work day?
What did you learn from your mentor?
What skills, education and training are required?
What surprised you or didn’t surprise you about this field?
What specialized equipment is required, what is it, how does it work and why is it needed?
How many people work at this site at a time?
How does a typical workday go?
Does your mentor interact with the employees? What does he or she do?

Other tips for writing your “Field Experience” section.

•   Take photographs so you can remember each detail.
•   Collect any brochures or pamphlets your mentor has about his or her business.
•   Don’t be fancy in your writing. Write as you would write, don’t try and sound like someone
    else.
•   Have another student read it for you and if they ask any questions about what they are
    reading, answer them in your paper.
•   Have someone read your paper out loud to you so you can hear any run-on sentences,
    grammar errors, etc.
•   Visualize each step of using a piece of equipment, then describe each step.




Reflection: (¾ to one page). Refer to Reflection issues on page 33

Your reflection is what you thought of this project, what did you learn and now what will you do
with the information you learned.

What did you learn?
What do you think about this career now?
What part of the career was the most fun to you?
What was not fun?
How have your ideas changes because of this research?
Do you still want to do this career? Why or why not?


                                                                                                 40
                            Common Problems Seen in Past Papers

Common Grammar Problems

•   Conflicting pronouns.

Example: He used a filet knife to remove the bones from the fish and then they went to the
frying pan to sear the fish before serving it. He and they do not work together, he means
one person, they means more than one.

•   Using the wrong verb tense.

Example: He use a filet knife to remove the bones from the fish. If you are doing something
right now or giving a command, you use present tense. If you have already done it, you
will use past tense. He used a filet knife.

•   Run on sentences.

Example: He used a filet knife to remove the bones from the fish and then he took the fish to
the pan to fry it and then he went to the refrigerator to get the vegetables. This sentence is
too long! To decide when to make a new sentence, keep information dealing with one task
together.

Example: He used a filet knife to remove the bones from the fish and then he took the fish to
the pan to fry it. (This deals specifically with what he is doing with the fish) He then went
to the refrigerator to get the vegetables. (This action is in addition to working with the
fish, so the sentence should be separate from the actions of dealing with the fish).

•   Spelling errors not caught by spell check.

Example: He came form the country to work in the factory. Form is a word, so spell check will
not mark it as incorrect. However, it is clearly wrong for this sentence. READ your paper
thoroughly to make sure you do not have any spelling errors.

•   Use of contractions.

Example: He can’t open the jar and he shouldn’t try to! Any word that can be shortened with
an apostrophe should not be used. Example: Don’t should be do not. This is a formal
paper, no contractions!




                                                                                             41
                             Mentor’s Professional History Issues

Boring Details

       First I got on the phone to call this person in the phone book. He said he didn’t want to
be my mentor. I called the next person in the phone book, but nobody answered, so I called the
third person. She sounded very nice on the phone and said she would love to help me with my
senior project.

Problem: We don’t want to know the process you went through to get your mentor, just who
your mentor is and details about him or her.

       My mentor is Coleen Parker. She has been in the cheese manufacturing business for the
past sixteen years. She owns Stony Creek Cheese in Chico and makes a variety of specialty
cheeses.

Too Personal

        My mentor, Coleen Parker, has three children and she lives in Orland. She has a three
bedroom house and she owns 20 acres. Two of her children are in college and one will be going
into high school this year.

Problem: This is personal information that has nothing to do with your actual project. When
talking about the mentor, only include information that relates specifically to your project.

       My mentor, Coleen Parker, owns 20 acres in Orland where she grows organic produce to
sell. Organic produce is a highly successful business and Mrs. Parker says that growing Okra is
one of the best ways to make money.

                                   Field Experience Issues

Lack of Specifics

       First we put up the two by four walls and then we installed the electrical boxes. After
we put in the boxes, we strung the electrical wire to the boxes.

Problem: This does not give enough specific information on what you are doing. Be sure to
explain everything in detail and include state codes if necessary. When you explain things in
detail, you should not have trouble meeting the paper length requirements and your reader will
understand exactly what you did for your project.

       First we put up the two by four walls that the framer put together at the job site. The
studs, which are the name for the type of two by four’s used for framing, are set 16 inches a
part. The walls must be attached to the cement floor using the large foundation bolts that are

                                                                                             42
put into place when the cement floor is poured. The walls are screwed onto the foundation
bolts with large flat washers and nuts. Once the walls are in place, the electrical boxes are
nailed to the two by four’s according to the blue print plans. “Electrical boxes must be placed a
minimum of four feet apart on each wall and at least 16 inches from the base of the wall”
(National Electrical Code, Article 90-2).

Too Much Encyclopedia, Not Enough Project!

        According to the Occupational Outlook, pediatricians can earn up to $250,000.00
annually. They must complete four years of a specific degree. Usually pediatricians choose a
Bachelor’s of Science in Chemistry or Biology before entering into the medical program. The
chemistry degree requires 15 courses in chemistry, eight in biology and 48 units of lower
division units. My mentor has a degree in chemistry.

Problem: The schooling information does not really relate to your project in that you spend too
much time discussing what classes are taken. This is too much detail taken from the
encyclopedia. Research should be very specific and relate to your project.

       My mentor has a degree in chemistry. Dr. Tao says he had to take 15 chemistry classes
for his degree. He enjoyed organic chemistry the most. A degree in chemistry will allow a
student to enter directly into medical school because the coursework meets the scientific
requirements necessary for medical school.

                                        Reflection Issues
Shallow Reflection

       I really liked my project. I am not sure what I will do when I leave high school, but I am
going to college.

Problem: The reflection should be about your project and a more in-depth study of yourself and
your project. What did you like or what didn’t you like. Now what will you do?

       I really liked my project and my mentor. I enjoyed learning some of the medical
terminology she had to learn to be a Medical Transcriber. I plan to attend Butte College next
year and, in addition to my general education studies, I am enrolling in a medical terminology
class. I want to be a Medical Transcriber and this class will help me with my career goal.

        I really liked my mentor and enjoyed working with her. I did not enjoy the job of the
Medical Transcriber. The medical terminology my mentor has to know is very confusing to me
and I do not like listening to a tape of the doctor’s notes for transcribing purposes. This would
clearly not be a job for me.
I plan to attend Butte College next year and I will look into another medical field to study.
Perhaps I would enjoy working as a medical receptionist because I like to type and I enjoy
working with people.

                                                                                                 43
                                 Senior Project Part 2 CHECKLIST

No papers will be accepted without having satisfied every item on the Checklist for the research paper.
If a paper is not accepted by the English teacher or Senior Project coordinator, it will be returned to the
student for further revision.

CONTENT REQUIREMENTS:
   LENGTH OF PAPER MUST BE FOUR (4) PAGES.
   Introduction “hooks” readers; includes a clear definition of topic (5 sent. min.)
   Clear, issue-based thesis idea or focus of the investigation and research
   Well-developed body paragraphs with topic sentences (min. 5 sentences each)
   Incorporates evidence from mentor interview, observations, field work
   Provides ample commentary that explains, analyzes and evaluates the evidence
   Transitions smoothly; Includes appropriate diction and varied syntax
   Conclusion reflects on and synthesizes all evidence and ideas; asserts emphatic closing tone
   Works Cited attached including mentor and any other resources used for mentor or field experience
   sections.

MLA FORMAT, DOCUMENTATION and MECHANICS REQUIREMENTS:
   12 pt. font; Times (or similar type); one (1) inch margins
   ALL lines double-spaced (no single or double-double spaced lines)
   TITLE PAGE with student’s ID #’s, teacher’s name, course title & period, date submitted
   HEADER 1/2 inch from top right corner with student’s ID # and page number
   INTERVIEW with at least one expert or authority
   Spell-checked; Proofread


Part 1:
Exceptional (25 pts)       Admirable (20 pts)          Acceptable (15 pts.)         Amateur (0 pts.)
Evidence that mentor       Clear evidence that         Basic evidence that          No understanding of
hours were completed       mentor hours were           mentor hours were            project expectations
above and beyond reqs.     completed                   completed.                   and requirements
Exceptional and detailed   Clear evidence of           Basic evidence of            No evidence of project
evidence of project        project field               project field                field experience.
field experience.          experience.                 experience.
Exceptional senior level   Admirable senior level      Acceptable senior level      Unacceptable for senior
writing skills.            writing skills.             writing skills.              level writing.




                                                                                                         44
                  4th Quarter components
Paper submission #2   March 27th
Presentations         April 29th & 30th

Mentor Time           May 1st
Verification Due                          35% of 2nd semester English grade
Submit Community      May 1st
Service Project
Hours
Mentor Thank-you      May 8th
letter
Paper submission #3   May 15th




                                                                              45
                              Project Presentation Information
Attire
Gentlemen – Slacks, dress shirt and a tie.
Ladies – Pants suit or skirt, blouse, nylons and close-toed shoes.
NO GUM, hair should be neat and out of your face.
No tight clothing or see through clothing. Shirts and blouses should be tucked in so that no skin
shows during the presentation.


Presentation Times
All presentations start at 7pm. We allow a half an hour for each presentation. However, all
presenters are expected to be there by 7pm because presentations may be shorter than a half
an hour.


Presentations
Use of job-related items: If you bring items from the job site, be sure to talk about the items
during the presentation. Move the judges to where you need them to be for your presentation.
Example: If your presentation is about a car engine, take the judges outside to see the car.

Beginning Presentation:      Shake the hands of all judges. Write your name on the board or put
it into your presentation so they do not have to guess at the spelling of your name. Example:
List your name on your presentation board, or in your PowerPoint. If you don’t use a board or
PowerPoint, you may write it on the chalkboard.

Presentation: Cover these areas: 1) what is your project, 2) why you chose this project, 3)
explain what you did for your project, 4) what did you learn, and 5) what will you do with this
information you have learned.

Ending Presentation: 1) Don’t abruptly end your presentation. Cue your audience when you are
ending. It may be appropriate to say, in conclusion, finally, or in summary. 2) Then you must ask
“Do you have any questions?” If you do not ask, your presentation will not pass.

Answering Questions: Be honest! If you don’t know an answer to a question, say, “I didn’t
research that, but I believe…” You can then give your opinion. When answering a question, take
a moment to formulate what you want to say rather than blurting out information in an
unorganized manner. Shake the judges’ hands when you are finished answering questions and
thank them for coming to see your presentation.


Pay Attention to Details
Eye Contact – Make sure you look at each judge during your presentation. Try not to focus on
any one person in the room.

Dry Run – Be sure to go through your presentation before you have to do it for the judges. It’s
best to do the presentation for someone; your parents, teachers, or senior project staff

                                                                                                  46
because you may get nervous in front of the judges. This might make you move through your
presentation too quickly and you won’t meet the seven-minute minimum time requirement.

Don’t Fidget – Pay attention to how you are moving your body during your presentation, if you
are nervous, you may fidget your feet or hands, practicing your presentation prior to giving it to
the judges will help you to identify your body movements and control them.


Presentation Audio/Visuals
Using a Stand –Up Board – You are not required to put together a presentation board if you have
some other type of visual material. However, if you choose to do so, 1) Only put information on
your board that you want the judges to read, 2) Check your spelling, 3) Headers should be two
to three inches in size, 4) Choose a font that is easy to read, no Old English! Times New Roman,
Arial or Tahoma are nice fonts, 5) Use no more than seven words per written line, 6) Use
pictures for your board. If you have pictures you took for your presentation of something you
did, scan them and blow them up large enough to see. If you do not have pictures, find some
graphics to use so you do not have big empty spaces on your board.

PowerPoint – If you choose to use PowerPoint for your presentation, you need to sign up with Mr.
Langan. We only have three rooms that can use PowerPoint for presentations, so you cannot
decide the day of your presentation that you want to do a PowerPoint. The rooms designated
for PowerPoint are usually completely booked and there will be no availability the day of
presentations.

Job-Related Materials – If you use job-related materials, be sure to discuss each item. Do not
bring items just for display purposes. If you have a large object, such as a car, you will be
placed in a room that accesses the parking lot.

Job-Related Clothing – If you wear job-specific clothing, you need to let the judges know what
you are wearing, just as you would a piece of equipment. If you do not indicate your clothing is
job specific, you will be marked down for improper attire. Example: Mechanic’s overalls are
appropriate attire for a mechanic.

Food Materials – If your project revolves around some type of food preparation, you will need to
be sure you have all of the ingredients before your presentation and will not be able to clean up
the dishes you use until the last presentation has finished. Do not bring food for the judges
unless your project relates to food.




                                                                                                47
                               HAMILTON UNION HIGH SCHOOL
                     SENIOR   PROJECT PRESENTATION EVALUATION FORM

NAME                                          DATE           TOTAL POINTS
PRESENTATION TOPIC

                    Exceptional           Admirable        Acceptable          Amateur
                   (10 pts each)        (8 pts each)       (7 pts each)         (0 pts)
APPEARANCE       Shirt/tie/slacks    Buttoned             Pull over        Messy, not
                 or                  shirt/slacks or      shirt, tucked    professional
                 dress/skirt/suit.   neat                 and clean or     dress
                 Professional or     dress/skirt/slacks   more casual
                 appropriate                              dress
                 topic costume
CONTENT          Sophisticated       Less sophisticated   Average level    Unable to
                 and elaborate       or elaborate, but    of               accurately
                 with an             many strong          sophistication   discuss the
                 abundance of        points made          and              information
                 accurate                                 elaboration
                 material clearly                         without
                 supported with                           strong
                 quoted sources                           support
ORGANIZATION     Topic clearly       Most information     Concepts         Choppy;
                 stated and          presented in a       loosely          disjointed, vague;
                 developed;          logical sequence     connected;       no apparent
                 strong              and is well          lacks clear      organization;
                 organization        organized but        transitions;     and/or conclusion
                 that flows well;    could have           jumps around;
                 clear and           stronger             conclusion is
                 relevant            transitions;         weak but
                 conclusion          conclusion is        present
                                     present and
                                     relevant
CREATIVITY       Very original       Some originality,    Presented        Repetitive; no
                 presentation and    good variety, and    with little      variety;
                 captures            blending of          originality or   unimaginative
                 audience’s          materials and        interpretation
                 attention           media




                                                                                                48
VISUALS AND       Included           Included             Visuals or      None present or
SUPPLEMENTAL      exceptional        computer             supplementary   very poorly made
MATERIALS         computer           generated or         materials       and/or used
                  generated or       handmade visuals     were present
                  handmade           that enhanced the    but not
                  visuals that       presentation and     smoothly
                  enhanced the       were connected to    used, of
                  presentation;      the topic            average
                  materials well                          quality,
                  balanced and                            and/or
                  connected to                            irrelevant
                  the topic
SPEAKING SKILLS   Poised, clear      Clear articulation   Some            Inaudible;
                  articulation;      but not as           mumbling;       unengaged;
                  proper volume;     polished or          little eye      monotone; read
                  steady rate;       confident; minor     contact; more   entirely from
                  good posture       references to        uneven rate     notes
                  and eye contact;   notes                and/or little
                  enthusiasm;                             expression;
                  confidence. Did                         some slang;
                  not read from                           higher
                  notes                                   reference to
                                                          notes
QUESTIONS         Correctly          Correctly            Answered only   Unable to answer
                  answered           answered             rudimentary     questions
                  questions and      questions with       questions
                  elaborated or      ease
                  explained
LENGTH (W/O       10-12 minutes      8-9 minutes or       7 minutes or    Under 7 or over
QUESTIONS)                           more than 13         more than 14    15 minutes
                                     minutes              minutes




                                                                                             49
                       COMMUNITY SERVICE
                 Hamilton Union High School District
                       Student/Parent Guide to Community Service

The purpose of this guide is to help you as you plan and implement your required
community service hours for the senior project.

What Is a Community Service Project?
Community service projects are planned, organized and voluntary efforts designed to
address a problem or need in the community. To be meaningful, community service projects
must address a real need or problem found within the school or community. The community
service project you choose to do should also reflect your personal interests and skills. In
addition, worthwhile community service projects require an ongoing commitment on your part

What Are the Community Service Graduation Requirements for Hamilton Union High
School?
To complete the community service graduation requirement, you must complete a ten hour
community service project your senior year.

What Types or Projects Meet the Requirement for Graduation?
You may do any of a variety of projects in order to meet the graduation requirement. You can
spend time with senior citizens in convalescent homes, tutor elementary students, and work
in a homeless shelter -and more! You may complete your project at a school or in the
community. You may work as an individual and or you may work in a group. Below is a brief
description of the types of projects that are acceptable

School-site Service Projects

School-site service is an excellent way of meeting the requirement for community
service while also helping meet special needs in a school. If you choose to complete a
school-site project, you should commit to providing on-going support and assistance to the
school. Additionally, if you work on a school-site project, the project must not be
completed as part of a regular school course in which you are receiving credit.

The project may not be a performance or performances that are part of the
specific curriculum you are following. They must be performances outside of the
regular school performance schedule.


Examples of School-Site Projects include:

• Student plans, coordinates, and monitors a school-wide letter writing campaign in support of
  an issue of local importance.
• Student tutors other students in reading or math for a semester.
• Student serves as a Community Service aide to an appropriate teacher or counselor and
  assists with the efforts to implement and monitor community service experiences.
                                                                                             50
• Student performs at another school or at a nursing home or similar facility.
• Student performs for school activity that is not part of the regular program, such as Black
  History Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, Earth Day, World AIDS Day, Red Ribbon Week,
  Cesar Chavez Day, Mix-It-Up at Lunch, Challenge Day, Every Fifteen Minutes, Career Day,
  or translating at parent teacher conferences.

NOTE: Competitions, honors, and recognition, do not constitute service.

Group Community Service Projects

Group community service projects provide excellent opportunities for you to complete your
community service requirement while also helping meet the special needs of an individual
neighborhood or community. Group community service projects provide excellent service
opportunities for organized student groups such as service clubs, honor societies, and
athletic teams. Membership in a service club or organization does not in itself meet your
community service responsibilities. However, you can work with others in the organization on
community service projects in order to meet your responsibility.

Examples of Group Community Service Projects include:

• Students develop an Adopt-A-Park program that includes organizing and monitoring regular
  work details and beautification.
• Students work regularly at a senior citizen’s center assisting with feeding and
  visitations.
• Students work regularly at a children's home and assist with child care or schoolwork (e.g.,
  reading stories or helping with homework).
• Club members volunteer to perform service for community organizations such as March of
  Dimes Walk, Special Olympics, Habitat for Humanity, Boys/Girls Club, Fight for the Cure,
  Relay for Life events, etc…

Individual Community Service Projects

Individual community service projects allow you to complete the service requirement while
addressing a community need that interests you. When working on an individual project, you
should be committed to providing on-going assistance to the community.

Examples of Individual Community Service Projects include:

• Student hosts story hours for younger children at a community library or at a nearby
  elementary school.
• Student reads to or record for the blind.
• Student serves as a volunteer at a museum or cultural center.
• Student choreographs, writes, or directs a piece that is performed for a school,
  service agency or the like.
• Student volunteers to paint for a community agency or designs a poster for a community
  agency for which he/she does not get paid and does not receive an award.



                                                                                            51
How Do I Select a Meaningful Community Service Project?

You should think about the following questions before selecting a community service project:

• What need or problem exists in the community that interests you?
• What project can you develop in order to work on this problem?
• Will your project provide an important service?
• Does the project match your interests, talents1 and abilities?
• Are there any special qualifications you need in order to work on the project?
• Will YOU be able to spend the necessary time on the project?
• What planning steps are needed before beginning the project?
• Who needs to be contacted before the project begins?

The organizations and agencies listed below typically welcome volunteers.

This list should help you:

• Chambers of Commerce
• Charities (ARC, Salvation Army, Boys/Girls Club, etc.)
• City governments
• Civic organizations
• Convalescent homes
• County agencies
• Cultural centers
• Daycare centers
• Elementary or middle schools
• Hospices, Hospitals, Nursing Homes
• Libraries, Museums
• Parks, Recreation Centers
• Political organizations
• Religious organizations
• Service organizations
• United Way agencies
• Zoos

Additionally, you are strongly encouraged to involve your parents or guardians in the
selection of your project; while this is your project, their support is also necessary.


WHAT CONSTITUTES “SERVICE” IN THE ARTS?

Theater

Participation in school performances that are part of your studies at Hamilton Union
High School, such as the fall and spring production
and rehearsal hours are not to be considered as service.

Only when these performances are presented for other non-profit organizations, elementary
schools, or convalescent homes can they be counted as service.
                                                                                          52
Visual Arts

All time spent creating artwork as part of your studies at Hamilton Union High School,
including work produced for the County Fair, Arts Festivals and other Festivals cannot be
considered as service. Only projects created for
organizations such as the School Board, or other nonprofit
agencies will be considered as service.

Music

All performances and rehearsal time spent on performances are considered part of your
program of studies at Hamilton Union High School and cannot be counted as service. Only
performances done for other schools, the School Board, or other non-profit agencies
will be considered as service. School performances that may be considered as service will
be performing at Graduation, Receptions, or Prom.

Dance

All performances as well as rehearsal times that are part the Cheerleading/ Dance program
at Hamilton Union High School are not service. Only those performances done for other
agencies, the School Board and other non-profits will be considered as service


How Do I Evaluate the Effectiveness of My Project? The Community Service Journal

How can you determine if you are accomplishing the plans you outlined in your
Community Service Project Proposal? How can you evaluate the effectiveness of your
project? Feedback from the people you are working with on your project can help you answer
this question. Your own feelings, however, about what you have accomplished are also very
important. To help you evaluate your progress toward meeting your project goals, it is
suggested that you keep a journal of your progress. Journal entries could be made each time
you work on your project, much like a diary, or they could be made periodically, much like a
progress report. It is suggested that you attach the journal entries to your Project Summary
Report to support what you say in your report.

Below are some questions you might consider for your journal. Feel free to add other
questions.

• What compliments or positive input have you received about your project?
• Whit criticisms, if any, have you received?
• Has the criticism caused you to change your project in any way? Describe the
  changes.
• What do you feel is the main contribution you have made to the project? -
• Have you been able to spend the time needed to make the project a success?
• What other assistance from students or the community is needed to improve the project?
• How does volunteering make you feel? Why do you feel this way?
• Overall, how do you fell the project is progressing?


                                                                                            53
How Do I Receive Credit for the Community Service Project when it is
Completed?

You may complete the required community service project anytime during your senior year;
however, it is strongly suggested that you not wait until the second semester to begin work on
this graduation requirement. To receive credit for the project, follow the procedures outlined
below.


Receiving Credit for Project

• As you participate in community service activities, complete the “Community Service
  Activity Log” (located in this guide on page 56) and secure contact information and a
  signature from the coordinator of each activity.

• Once a minimum of 10 hours have been acquired, secure a parent or guardian signature on
  the bottom of the form.

• The completed form must be submitted by 3p.m. on Friday April 24, 2009 to receive
  credit for the community service project. You should also keep a copy of this form for
  your records. Numerous scholarships are available based on community service activity
  and colleges often base admission decisions on such involvement.

• The final authority in matters related to a Student’s community service hours and the
  authenticity of the “Activity Log” rests with the school’s principal.




                                                                                           54
Frequently Asked Questions by Parents about the Community Service Graduation
Requirements

1. When does the community service graduation requirement go into effect? Students must
  complete a community service project in order to graduate from Hamilton Union High
  School District beginning with the graduating Class of 2007

2. What are community service projects?
  Community service projects are defined as well-planned, organized, and voluntary efforts
  designed to address a specific need in the community. Meaningful community service
  projects require an on-going commitment on the part of students.

3. Who is responsible for helping students select projects?
  While school personnel should assist students in selecting community service projects, it is
  ultimately the student's responsibility to select a meaningful project after consultation with
  his/her parent(s) or guardian(s).

4. When may students complete their community service requirement?
  Students may complete the community service requirement anytime during the twelfth
  grade. If they chose, students may begin a community service activity the summer prior to
  their senior year.

5. May students complete the requirement at a school or must the project be done in the
  community?
  Students may fulfill the community service graduation requirement at a school and/or in the
  community. If students choose to complete a school-site project, the project must not be
  performed within the context of a regular school course in which they are receiving
  credit with the exception of one of the community service elective courses.

6. May students work on several small projects or are they required to work on
   one project exclusively?
   Either option is acceptable.

7. How many hours of service must be completed in order for students to receive
   credit for the community service requirement?
   Hamilton Union High School District requires a minimum of 10 hours of
   service.




                                                                                              55
                                  Hamilton Union High School

                        COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY LOG
Student’s Name ________________________________ID# _______________

All students must use the Activity Log form to record their community service.

  Date(s)      Description of Community Service Activities     Hours      Name, contact info &
                                                             Completed
  (m/d/y)                                                                 signature of person
                                                                             verifying hours




                                                                     (Copy additional forms if needed)
I have reviewed my son’s/daughter's Activity Log Form I certify he/she has completed the
minimum number of hours in order to meet the graduation requirements for Hamilton Union
High School District.

Total Project Hours (add totals of all log forms, if more than one page) _______

Parent signature
_____________________________________________________________
Student Signature
____________________________________________________________
Senior Project Representative
________________________________________________________________



                                                                                                         56
                                   Hamilton Union High School

               SENIOR PROJECT MENTOR HOUR VERIFICATION


Student’s Name ________________________________ID# _______________

All students must use the Activity Log form to record their Senior Project hours.

  Date(s)        Description of Senior Project Activities     Hours     Name, contact info &
                                                            Completed
  (m/d/y)                                                               signature of person
                                                                           verifying hours




I have reviewed my son’s/daughter's Project Hour Verification Form. I certify he/she has
completed the minimum number of hours in order to meet the graduation requirements for
Hamilton Union High School District.

Total Project Hours (add totals of all log forms, if more than one page) _______

Parent signature
_____________________________________________________________
Student Signature
____________________________________________________________
Senior Project Representative
____________________________________________________________
Mentor Signature
 ____________________________________________________________



                                                                                               57
                    Senior Project Student Evaluation Form

Mentor’s Name: _____________________

Student’s Name: ____________________

                                                   Student Performance
             Criteria Evaluated                Good     Adequate      Needs
                                                                   Improvement
The student calls before our meeting to
verify he or she is coming.
The student shows up on time.
The student is prepared with questions.
During your meeting times, the student
uses time wisely.
The student gives you adequate notice (at
least 24 hours) if he or she cannot attend
a meeting. (N/A if no meetings have been
cancelled)
The student dresses appropriately for
your job site.
The student is respectful and appreciative
of your input.
The student shares research found.
The student shares his or her paper. (This
should happen on or about Mid-November)


Please indicate how much time you have spent working directly with the
student. ___________

Comments/concerns: ________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________

__________________________                   ____________________________
Mentor Signature                             Date                Phone Number


                                                                                 58
                                 Sample Mentor Thank You Letter

Your mentor thank you letter needs to have:
• Your Address
• Date
• Mentor’s name, company and address
• First paragraph – Thank them for being your mentor?
• Second paragraph – What you have valued most about this project?
• Third paragraph – What do you intend to do now?
• Your signature in between “Sincerely” and your typed name.
                                                SAMPLE
(start 2 inches down, use a 12 point font. Arial or Times New Roman)
Your Address
City, State, zip code
Date (followed by 4 "Enters")



Mrs. Coleen Parker
Stony Creek Cheese
2675 Highway 32
Chico, CA 95973

Dear Mrs. Parker:

I would like to thank you for taking the time to be my mentor for my senior project. I learned a
great deal from you about cheese manufacturing. I enjoyed our time together and I hope you
enjoyed working with me.

I believe the best part of working in your business was the production of the cheese. The
process for making the cheese is fascinating and I did not realize how much attention to detail
a person must have to produce a quality product.

In the fall I plan on attending California State University, San Luis Obispo next year to major in
Agriculture Business. My experience with you has made me realize that I enjoy working in the
food industry and specifically in agriculture. Thank you again for being my mentor it was a
great learning experience for me.

Sincerely, ("Enter" 4 times)

(3 blank lines)
Mary Smith




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