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					TRIMESTER 1
REVIEW FOR FINAL EXAM
Grade 8 Honors
What to Study:
PLOT (Chapter 1): exposition, inciting incident, development,
    climax, resolution, denouement, subplot, parallel episode,
    conflict
CHARACTER: (Chapter 2): direct characterization, indirect
    characterization, motivation
GLORY FIELD: Comprehension questions on Muhammad,
    Lizzy, Elijah, and Luvenia
FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: (yellow study guide): alliteration,
    allusion, assonance, hyperbole, simile, metaphor,
    onomatopoeia, personification, antithesis, apostrophe,
    anaphora, idiom, metonymy
GRAMMAR: fragments, run-ons, complete sentences, sentence
    combining
What to Study:
HISTORY OF ENGLISH: Four classifications of English (Old to
    Modern); key invasions of England
LITERARY DEVICES: irony (situational and dramatic),
    foreshadowing, flashback), symbolism, suspense, surprise
    ending
PARTS OF A PARAGRAPH: Writing Workshop 7: topic
    sentence, thesis statement, unity, coherence, introduction,
    conclusion, supporting sentences, fact, opinion, statistic,
    narrative, persuasive, descriptive, expository, transitions,
    organizational patterns
SHORT STORY ANALYSIS: figurative language, literary
    devices, plot elements, motive, setting, point of view, theme
Plot Elements: What is…..
A struggle between opposing characters or
    opposing forces

A.   Antagonist
B.   Conflict
C.   Resolution
D.   Climax
Plot Elements: What is…..
A struggle between opposing characters or
    opposing forces

A.   Antagonist
B.   Conflict
C.   Resolution
D.   Climax
Plot Elements: What is…..
The part of the plot that gives information about
   the characters and their problems or conflicts
   (also called basic situation)

A.   Foreshadowing
B.   Climax
C.   Resolution
D.   Exposition
Plot Elements: What is…..
The part of the plot that gives information about
   the characters and their problems or conflicts
   (also called basic situation)

A.   Foreshadowing
B.   Climax
C.   Resolution
D.   Exposition
Plot Elements: What is…..
The point in a story that creates the greatest
   suspense or interest

A.   Climax
B.   Inciting Incident
C.   Resolution
D.   Flashback
Plot Elements: What is…..
The point in a story that creates the greatest
   suspense or interest

A.   Climax
B.   Inciting Incident
C.   Resolution
D.   Flashback
Plot Elements: What is…..
The final part of a story when the conflict is
   resolved

A.   Refrain
B.   Development
C.   Resolution
D.   Exposition
Plot Elements: What is…..
The final part of a story when the conflict is
   resolved

A.   Refrain
B.   Development
C.   Resolution
D.   Exposition
Plot Elements: What is…..
A minor part of a story that relates in some way
   to the main story

A.   Suspense
B.   Exposition
C.   Parallel Episode
D.   Subplot
Plot Elements: What is…..
A minor part of a story that relates in some way
   to the main story

A.   Suspense
B.   Exposition
C.   Parallel Episode
D.   Subplot
Plot Elements: What is…..
After the resolution, when all loose ends are tied
   up; brings a close to the story

A.   Denouement
B.   Exposition
C.   Development
D.   Inciting Incident
Plot Elements: What is…..
After the resolution, when all loose ends are tied
   up; brings a close to the story

A.   Denouement
B.   Exposition
C.   Development
D.   Inciting Incident
Plot Elements: What is…..
Introduces the central conflict

A.   Exposition
B.   Inciting Incident
C.   Development
D.   Climax
Plot Elements: What is…..
Introduces the central conflict

A.   Exposition
B.   Inciting Incident
C.   Development
D.   Climax
Literary Devices: What is…..
The use of clues or hints to suggest events that
   will occur later in the plot

A.   Suspense
B.   Flashback
C.   Foreshadowing
D.   Dialect
Literary Devices: What is…..
The use of clues or hints to suggest events that
   will occur later in the plot

A.   Suspense
B.   Flashback
C.   Foreshadowing
D.   Dialect
Literary Devices: What is…..
Repeated elements of the plot

A.   Dialogue
B.   Parallel Episode
C.   Foreshadowing
D.   Subjective Writing
Literary Devices: What is…..
Repeated elements of the plot

A.   Dialogue
B.   Parallel Episode
C.   Foreshadowing
D.   Subjective Writing
Literary Devices: What is…..
A contrast between expectations and reality

A.   Irony
B.   Anecdote
C.   Flashback
D.   Inversion
Literary Devices: What is…..
A contrast between expectations and reality

A.   Irony
B.   Anecdote
C.   Flashback
D.   Inversion
Literary Devices: What is…..
When the audience or the reader knows
  something a character does not know

A.   Situational Irony
B.   Verbal Irony
C.   Dramatic Irony
D.   Ironic Irony
Literary Devices: What is…..
When the audience or the reader knows
  something a character does not know

A.   Situational Irony
B.   Verbal Irony
C.   Dramatic Irony
D.   Ironic Irony
Literary Devices: What is…..
When a story concludes in an unexpected way

A.   suspense
B.   synchronism
C.   symbolism
D.   surprise ending
Literary Devices: What is…..
When a story concludes in an unexpected way

A.   suspense
B.   synchronism
C.   symbolism
D.   surprise ending
Literary Devices: What is…..
When a character thinks about something that
  happened in his/her past

A.   flashback
B.   foreshadowing
C.   irony
D.   suspense
Literary Devices: What is…..
When a character thinks about something that
  happened in his/her past

A.   flashback
B.   foreshadowing
C.   irony
D.   suspense
Literary Devices: What is…..
When an author uses something to represent
  something else

A.   flashback
B.   foreshadowing
C.   symbolism
D.   synchronism
Literary Devices: What is…..
When an author uses something to represent
  something else

A.   flashback
B.   foreshadowing
C.   symbolism
D.   synchronism
Literary Devices: What is…..
In The Glory Field, Muhammad’s shackles are
    symbolic of

A.   death
B.   working in cotton fields
C.   the Middle Passage
D.   slavery
Literary Devices: What is…..
In The Glory Field, Muhammad’s shackles are
    symbolic of

A.   death
B.   working in cotton fields
C.   the Middle Passage
D.   slavery
Character: What is…..
The main character in a work of literature

A.   Narrator
B.   Author
C.   Protagonist
D.   Playwright
Character: What is…..
The main character in a work of literature

A.   Narrator
B.   Author
C.   Protagonist
D.   Playwright
Character : What is…..
The reasons a character behaves in a certain way

A.   Metamorphosis
B.   Foreshadowing
C.   Connotation
D.   Motivation
Character : What is…..
The reasons a character behaves in a certain way

A.   Metamorphosis
B.   Foreshadowing
C.   Connotation
D.   Motivation
Character : What is…..
Conversation between two or more characters

A.   Dialect
B.   Dialogue
C.   Diagram
D.   Diatribe
Character : What is…..
Conversation between two or more characters

A.   Dialect
B.   Dialogue
C.   Diagram
D.   Diatribe
Character : What is…..
A person or an animal in a story, a play, or
   another literary work

A.   Narrator
B.   Analogy
C.   Character
D.   Hero
Character : What is…..
A person or an animal in a story, a play, or
   another literary work

A.   Narrator
B.   Analogy
C.   Character
D.   Hero
Character : What is…..
The way a writer reveals the personality of a
   character

A.   Chronological Order
B.   Autobiography
C.   Characterization
D.   Exaggeration
Character : What is…..
The way a writer reveals the personality of a
   character

A.   Chronological Order
B.   Autobiography
C.   Characterization
D.   Exaggeration
Character : What is…..
A characterization method where a writer simply
   tells readers that a character is amusing or
   evil or dull.

A.   Indirect Characterization
B.   Description
C.   Biographical Characterization
D.   Direct Characterization
Character : What is…..
A characterization method where a writer simply
   tells readers that a character is amusing or
   evil or dull.

A.   Indirect Characterization
B.   Description
C.   Biographical Characterization
D.   Direct Characterization
Character : What is…..
A characterization method where a writer reveals
   personality through what a character does,
   thinks, or says

A.   Indirect Characterization
B.   Direct Characterization
C.   Biographical Characterization
D.   Denotative Characterization
Character : What is…..
A characterization method where a writer reveals
   personality through what a character does,
   thinks, or says

A.   Indirect Characterization
B.   Direct Characterization
C.   Biographical Characterization
D.   Denotative Characterization
Character : What is…..
In indirect characterization, a character’s
    personality is revealed through which four
    things?

A.   Words, hobbies, looks, athletic ability
B.   Political beliefs, actions, skills, intelligence
C.   Actions, thoughts, gestures, occupation
D.   Words, actions, looks, thoughts
Character : What is…..
In indirect characterization, a character’s
    personality is revealed through which four
    things?

A.   Words, hobbies, looks, athletic ability
B.   Political beliefs, actions, skills, intelligence
C.   Actions, thoughts, gestures, occupation
D.   Words, actions, looks, thoughts
Character : What is…..
Which of the following is an example of direct
  characterization?

A.   Lou stomped his foot and stormed out.
B.   Nessa thought that she would be asked out.
C.   Henry told me that he wants to eat carry-out.
D.   Lisa is athletic, so she went to the tryouts.
Character : What is…..
Which of the following is an example of direct
  characterization?

A.   Lou stomped his foot and stormed out.
B.   Nessa thought that she would be asked out.
C.   Henry told me that he wants to eat carry-out.
D.   Lisa is athletic, so she went to the tryouts.
Character: What is…..
A guess based on clues

A.   Opinion
B.   Inference
C.   Generalization
D.   Idiom
Character: What is…..
A guess based on clues

A.   Opinion
B.   Inference
C.   Generalization
D.   Idiom
Character: What is…..
The point of view in the following sentence:
“He walked slowly down the road; he wondered
   how he could go home and face his family.”

A.   first person
B.   second person
C.   third person, limited
D.   third person, omniscient
Character: What is…..
The point of view in the following sentence:
“He walked slowly down the road; he wondered
   how he could go home and face his family.”

A.   first person
B.   second person
C.   third person, limited
D.   third person, omniscient
Character: What is…..
The point of view in the following sentence:
“This is how you make a balloon animal. First,
   you blow up a balloon….”

A.   first person
B.   second person
C.   third person, limited
D.   third person, omniscient
Character: What is…..
The point of view in the following sentence:
“This is how you make a balloon animal. First,
   you blow up a balloon….”

A.   first person
B.   second person
C.   third person, limited
D.   third person, omniscient
Writing Terms: What is…..
When all sentences in a paragraph or essay “stick
  together” because they are arranged in an
  order that makes sense to the reader

A.   Coherence
B.   Unity
C.   Enumeration
D.   Main idea
Writing Terms: What is…..
When all sentences in a paragraph or essay “stick
  together” because they are arranged in an
  order that makes sense to the reader

A.   Coherence
B.   Unity
C.   Enumeration
D.   Main idea
Writing Terms: What is…..
Words and phrases that show how ideas are
  connected

A.   Statistics
B.   Anecdotes
C.   Facts
D.   Transitions
Writing Terms: What is…..
Words and phrases that show how ideas are
  connected

A.   Statistics
B.   Anecdotes
C.   Facts
D.   Transitions
Writing Terms: What is…..
Which transition would go best in the blank?
“You don’t want to scratch the surface by using
   a brush. _____, use a soft cloth.

A.   Although
B.   However
C.   Instead
D.   Additionally
Writing Terms: What is…..
Which transition would go best in the blank?
“You don’t want to scratch the surface by using
   a brush. _____, use a soft cloth.

A.   Although
B.   However
C.   Instead
D.   Additionally
Writing Terms: What is…..
The sentence that clearly states the main idea of
   a paragraph

A.   Thesis statement
B.   Topic sentence
C.   Concluding sentence
D.   Supporting evidence
Writing Terms: What is…..
The sentence that clearly states the main idea of
   a paragraph

A.   Thesis statement
B.   Topic sentence
C.   Concluding sentence
D.   Supporting evidence
Writing Terms: What is…..
The sentence that clearly states the main idea of
   an essay

A.   Thesis statement
B.   Topic sentence
C.   Concluding sentence
D.   Supporting evidence
Writing Terms: What is…..
The sentence that clearly states the main idea of
   an essay

A.   Thesis statement
B.   Topic sentence
C.   Concluding sentence
D.   Supporting evidence
Writing Terms: What is…..
A text structure that writers use to show how two
    or more things are alike or different

A.   Order of importance
B.   Chronological order
C.   Compare and contrast
D.   Cause and effect
Writing Terms: What is…..
A text structure that writers use to show how two
    or more things are alike or different

A.   Order of importance
B.   Chronological order
C.   Compare and contrast
D.   Cause and effect
Writing Terms: What is…..
The writer’s most important point, opinion, or
   message in a nonfiction text

A.   Main idea
B.   Underlying meaning
C.   Generalization
D.   Paraphrasing
Writing Terms: What is…..
The writer’s most important point, opinion, or
   message in a nonfiction text

A.   Main idea
B.   Underlying meaning
C.   Generalization
D.   Paraphrasing
Writing Terms: What is…..
When all of the sentences in a paragraph or essay
  relate to the main idea

A.   Coherence
B.   Paraphrase
C.   Quotation
D.   Unity
Writing Terms: What is…..
When all of the sentences in a paragraph or essay
  relate to the main idea

A.   Coherence
B.   Paraphrase
C.   Quotation
D.   Unity
Writing Terms: What is…..
A sentence that gives specific details that
   explain, elaborate on, or prove the main idea

A.   topic sentence
B.   thesis statement
C.   supporting sentence
D.   concluding sentence
Writing Terms: What is…..
A sentence that gives specific details that
   explain, elaborate on, or prove the main idea

A.   topic sentence
B.   thesis statement
C.   supporting sentence
D.   concluding sentence
Writing Terms: What is…..
Words that appeal to sight, hearing, touch, taste,
  and smell

A.   examples
B.   facts
C.   opinions
D.   sensory details
Writing Terms: What is…..
Words that appeal to sight, hearing, touch, taste,
  and smell

A.   examples
B.   facts
C.   opinions
D.   sensory details
Writing Terms: What is…..
A statement that can be proven true by direct
    observation or by checking a reliable
    reference source

A.   example
B.   fact
C.   opinion
D.   concession
Writing Terms: What is…..
A statement that can be proven true by direct
    observation or by checking a reliable
    reference source

A.   example
B.   fact
C.   opinion
D.   concession
Writing Terms: What is…..
A specific instance or illustration of a general
   idea

A.   example
B.   fact
C.   opinion
D.   sensory detail
Writing Terms: What is…..
A specific instance or illustration of a general
   idea

A.   example
B.   fact
C.   opinion
D.   sensory detail
Writing Terms: What is…..
Explains similarities between two things

A.   opinion
B.   paraphrase
C.   quotation
D.   comparison
Writing Terms: What is…..
Explains similarities between two things

A.   opinion
B.   paraphrase
C.   quotation
D.   comparison
Writing Terms: What is…..
Presents details according to their location in
   space

A.   chronological order
B.   spatial order
C.   order of importance
D.   cause and effect
Writing Terms: What is…..
Presents details according to their location in
   space

A.   chronological order
B.   spatial order
C.   order of importance
D.   cause and effect
Writing Terms: What is…..
A paragraph that tells a story or relate a sequence
   of events

A.   narrative
B.   descriptive
C.   expository
D.   persuasive
Writing Terms: What is…..
A paragraph that tells a story or relate a sequence
   of events

A.   narrative
B.   descriptive
C.   expository
D.   persuasive
Writing Terms: What is…..
A paragraph that reveals information about a
   subject

A.   narrative
B.   descriptive
C.   expository
D.   persuasive
Writing Terms: What is…..
A paragraph that reveals information about a
   subject

A.   narrative
B.   descriptive
C.   expository
D.   persuasive
History of English:
What do you call words that have come from the
  same ancestral root?

A.   Cognates
B.   Coined words
C.   Idioms
D.   Synonyms
History of English:
What do you call words that have come from the
  same ancestral root?

A.   Cognates
B.   Coined words
C.   Idioms
D.   Synonyms
History of English:
What do you call the origin or historical
  development of a word?

A.   Cognate
B.   Etymology
C.   Structural analysis
D.   Syntax
History of English:
What do you call the origin or historical
  development of a word?

A.   Cognate
B.   Etymology
C.   Structural analysis
D.   Syntax
History of English:
The English spoken from 1500-1800

A.   Old English
B.   Middle English
C.   Early Modern English
D.   Modern English
History of English:
The English spoken from 1500-1800

A.   Old English
B.   Middle English
C.   Early Modern English
D.   Modern English
History of English:
The English spoken from 450-1100

A.   Old English
B.   Middle English
C.   Early Modern English
D.   Modern English
History of English:
The English spoken from 450-1100

A.   Old English
B.   Middle English
C.   Early Modern English
D.   Modern English
History of English:
The English spoken from 1100-1500

A.   Old English
B.   Middle English
C.   Early Modern English
D.   Modern English
History of English:
The English spoken from 1100-1500

A.   Old English
B.   Middle English
C.   Early Modern English
D.   Modern English
History of English:
This group migrated to England in 500 BC

A.   Romans
B.   Vikings
C.   Celts
D.   Germans
History of English:
This group migrated to England in 500 BC

A.   Romans
B.   Vikings
C.   Celts
D.   Germans
History of English:
This group invaded England in 55 BC and ruled
   until about 450

A.   Romans
B.   Vikings
C.   Celts
D.   French
History of English:
This group invaded England in 55 BC and ruled
   until about 450

A.   Romans
B.   Vikings
C.   Celts
D.   French
History of English:
This group invaded England in 450 and their
   language formed the basis of Old English

A.   Vikings
B.   Germans
C.   Celts
D.   French
History of English:
This group invaded England in 450 and their
   language formed the basis of Old English

A.   Vikings
B.   Germans
C.   Celts
D.   French
History of English:
The German group was comprised of all of these
   except

A.   Angles
B.   Druids
C.   Saxons
D.   Jutes
History of English:
The German group was comprised of all of these
   except

A.   Angles
B.   Druids
C.   Saxons
D.   Jutes
History of English:
The group that invaded England in 787 and
   plundered cities

A.   Anglo-Saxons
B.   French
C.   Scandinavian Vikings
D.   Russians
History of English:
The group that invaded England in 787 and
   plundered cities

A.   Anglo-Saxons
B.   French
C.   Scandinavian Vikings
D.   Russians
History of English:
The group that invaded England in 1066 and
   added 10,000 words to the language

A.   Anglo-Saxons
B.   French
C.   Romans
D.   Spanish
History of English:
The group that invaded England in 1066 and
   added 10,000 words to the language

A.   Anglo-Saxons
B.   French
C.   Romans
D.   Spanish
Sentence Structures:
Identify the sentence fragment:

A.   Helen wrote a letter to her friend.
B.   Because she likes her friend.
C.   Tomorrow Helen will mail the letter.
D.   On Tuesday, her friend will write back.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the sentence fragment:

A.   Helen wrote a letter to her friend.
B.   Because she likes her friend.
C.   Tomorrow Helen will mail the letter.
D.   On Tuesday, her friend will write back.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the sentence fragment:

A.   Hiking the Rockies was always a goal.
B.   To me the weather was just perfect.
C.   Before we took the trip, we read about caves.
D.   The wildflowers growing along the
     mountain.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the sentence fragment:

A.   Hiking the Rockies was always a goal.
B.   To me the weather was just perfect.
C.   Before we took the trip, we read about caves.
D.   The wildflowers growing along the
     mountain.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the sentence fragment:

A.   Ninety-five percent of Antarctica covered
     with ice.
B.   One type of bird in Antarctica is the penguin.
C.   No native people live on the continent.
D.   Also, sometimes winds reach high speeds.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the sentence fragment:

A.   Ninety-five percent of Antarctica covered
     with ice.
B.   One type of bird in Antarctica is the penguin.
C.   No native people live on the continent.
D.   Also, sometimes winds reach high speeds.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the run-on sentence:

A.   Brown bears include the grizzly, the largest
     bear on record.
B.   In the wild, bears can live long and thrive.
C.   Don’t feed a grizzly, it may bite you!
D.   Joe Smith, a noted environmentalist, is trying
     to save the bears’ habitat.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the run-on sentence:

A.   Brown bears include the grizzly, the largest
     bear on record.
B.   In the wild, bears can live long and thrive.
C.   Don’t feed a grizzly, it may bite you!
D.   Joe Smith, a noted environmentalist, is trying
     to save the bears’ habitat.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the run-on sentence:

A.   Do ferns require special care, or are they
     hardy plants?
B.   Ron is a horticulturist; Sally is a botanist.
C.   I read a book about ferns that grow in Chile.
D.   Boston ferns have pointed leaves they have
     thorns on the end of each leaf.
Sentence Structures:
Identify the run-on sentence:

A.   Do ferns require special care, or are they
     hardy plants?
B.   Ron is a horticulturist; Sally is a botanist.
C.   I read a book about ferns that grow in Chile.
D.   Boston ferns have pointed leaves they have
     thorns on the end of each leaf.
Sentence Structures:
How should these sentences best be combined:
Jack went swimming. Jack lost his watch. The watch
    was a Timex.

A.   Jack went swimming, so he lost his Timex watch.
B.   Jack lost his Timex watch while swimming.
C.   Swimming, the watch Jack lost was a Timex.
D.   The Timex watch that Jack lost when he was
     swimming.
Sentence Structures:
How should these sentences best be combined:
Jack went swimming. Jack lost his watch. The watch
    was a Timex.

A.   Jack went swimming, so he lost his Timex watch.
B.   Jack lost his Timex watch while swimming.
C.   Swimming, the watch Jack lost was a Timex.
D.   The Timex watch that Jack lost when he was
     swimming.
Sentence Structures:
How should these sentences best be combined:
Mary has a lamb. The lamb is little. The lamb is lost.
   Mary cries.

A.   Mary cries after losing her little lamb.
B.   Losing a lamb, Mary cries that her lamb is little.
C.   Mary’s lamb, which is little, cried after being lost.
D.   The little, lost lamb of Mary, who is crying.
Sentence Structures:
How should these sentences best be combined:
Mary has a lamb. The lamb is little. The lamb is lost.
   Mary cries.

A.   Mary cries after losing her little lamb.
B.   Losing a lamb, Mary cries that her lamb is little.
C.   Mary’s lamb, which is little, cried after being lost.
D.   The little, lost lamb of Mary, who is crying.
Figurative Language:
A figure of speech in which one word or phrase
    is substituted for another with which it is
    closely associated.
A. metaphor

B. personification

C. idiom

D. metonymy
Figurative Language:
A figure of speech in which one word or phrase
    is substituted for another with which it is
    closely associated.
A. metaphor

B. personification

C. idiom

D. metonymy
Figurative Language:
A rhetorical device in which a speaker or writer
   addresses an absent person, an abstraction, or
   an inanimate object.
A. allusion

B. personification

C. apostrophe

D. hyperbole
Figurative Language:
A rhetorical device in which a speaker or writer
   addresses an absent person, an abstraction, or
   an inanimate object.
A. allusion

B. personification

C. apostrophe

D. hyperbole
Figurative Language:
A reference to a statement, a person, a place, or
   an event from literature, history, religion,
   myth, politics, sports, science, or pop culture.
A. antithesis

B. alliteration

C. idiom

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
A reference to a statement, a person, a place, or
   an event from literature, history, religion,
   myth, politics, sports, science, or pop culture.
A. antithesis

B. alliteration

C. idiom

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
A figure of speech that makes a direct
    comparison between two unlike things.
A. simile

B. metaphor

C. antithesis

D. assonance
Figurative Language:
A figure of speech that makes a direct
    comparison between two unlike things.
A. simile

B. metaphor

C. antithesis

D. assonance
Figurative Language:
A figure of speech in which opposites are placed
    together to make the features of each seem
    more intense.
A. metonymy

B. onomatopoeia

C. hyperbole

D. antithesis
Figurative Language:
A figure of speech in which opposites are placed
    together to make the features of each seem
    more intense.
A. metonymy

B. onomatopoeia

C. hyperbole

D. antithesis
Figurative Language:
A phrase that must be taken as a whole, usually
   having a meaning that is not clear from the
   meanings of the individual words.
A. hyperbole

B. anaphora

C. idiom

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
A phrase that must be taken as a whole, usually
   having a meaning that is not clear from the
   meanings of the individual words.
A. hyperbole

B. anaphora

C. idiom

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
The repetition of a word or phrase at the
   beginning of several successive verses,
   clauses, or paragraphs.
A. anaphora

B. assonance

C. alliteration

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
The repetition of a word or phrase at the
   beginning of several successive verses,
   clauses, or paragraphs.
A. anaphora

B. assonance

C. alliteration

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
The comparison between two or more objects
   using like, as, resembles, or similar to
A. simile

B. metonymy

C. metaphor

D. apostrophe
Figurative Language:
The comparison between two or more objects
   using like, as, resembles, or similar to
A. simile

B. metonymy

C. metaphor

D. apostrophe
Figurative Language:
When an inanimate (nonliving) object is given
   human characteristics
A. allusion

B. hyperbole

C. onomatopoeia

D. personification
Figurative Language:
When an inanimate (nonliving) object is given
   human characteristics
A. allusion

B. hyperbole

C. onomatopoeia

D. personification
Figurative Language:
Exaggeration used for effect
A. simile

B. hyperbole

C. onomatopoeia

D. metonymy
Figurative Language:
Exaggeration used for effect
A. simile

B. hyperbole

C. onomatopoeia

D. metonymy
Figurative Language:
When words imitate sounds
A. anaphora

B. vrooom words

C. onomatopoeia

D. apostrophe
Figurative Language:
When words imitate sounds
A. anaphora

B. vrooom words

C. onomatopoeia

D. apostrophe
Figurative Language:
“Wanda loves the snap, crackle, and pop of her
   Rice Krispies.”
A. hyperbole

B. alliteration

C. onomatopoeia

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
“Wanda loves the snap, crackle, and pop of her
   Rice Krispies.”
A. hyperbole

B. alliteration

C. onomatopoeia

D. allusion
Figurative Language:
“It will take a Herculean effort to clean up my
    room.”
A. antithesis

B. allusion

C. metonymy

D. apostrophe
Figurative Language:
“It will take a Herculean effort to clean up my
    room.”
A. antithesis

B. allusion (from Greek hero Hercules)

C. metonymy

D. apostrophe
Figurative Language:
“Cecily Smith sat under the tree.”
A. idiom

B. allusion

C. metaphor

D. alliteration
Figurative Language:
“Cecily Smith sat under the tree.”
A. idiom

B. allusion

C. metaphor

D. alliteration (“s” sounds)
Figurative Language:
“All the world is a stage, and we are but its
   players.”
A. apostrophe

B. antithesis

C. idiom

D. metaphor
Figurative Language:
“All the world is a stage, and we are but its
   players.”
A. apostrophe

B. antithesis

C. idiom

D. metaphor (world = stage)
Figurative Language:
“I was glum and morose on the happiest day of
    my life.”
A. anaphora

B. antithesis

C. assonance

D. simile
Figurative Language:
“I was glum and morose on the happiest day of
    my life.”
A. anaphora

B. antithesis (glum/morose vs. happy)

C. assonance

D. simile
Figurative Language:
“The sea wrapped her icy fingers around the
   boy’s body.”
A. metaphor

B. antithesis

C. metonymy

D. simile
Figurative Language:
“The sea wrapped her icy fingers around the
   boy’s body.”
A. personification

B. antithesis

C. metonymy

D. simile
Figurative Language:
“Spirit, bring all of the animals a good bounty.”
A. personification

B. metaphor

C. apostrophe

D. understatement
Figurative Language:
“Spirit, bring all of the animals a good bounty.”
A. personification

B. metaphor

C. apostrophe

D. understatement
Figurative Language:
“The movie was so bad, you could smell it from
   the back row of the theater!”
A. personification

B. hyperbole

C. metonymy

D. metaphor
Figurative Language:
“The movie was so bad, you could smell it from
   the back row of the theater!”
A. personification

B. hyperbole

C. metonymy

D. metaphor
Figurative Language:
“Could you give me a lift? I just ran out of gas.”

A.   apostrophe
B.   hyperbole
C.   metonymy
D.   personification
Figurative Language:
“Could you give me a lift? I just ran out of gas.”

A.   apostrophe
B.   hyperbole
C.   metonymy (the car ran out of gas)
D.   personification
Figurative Language:
“I want to build a boat. I want to fly a plane. I
    want to drive a car…..

A.   onomatopoeia
B.   anaphora
C.   assonance
D.   alliteration
Figurative Language:
“I want to build a boat. I want to fly a plane. I
    want to drive a car…..

A.   onomatopoeia
B.   anaphora
C.   assonance
D.   alliteration
Figurative Language:
“His eyes resembled glittering sapphires.”

A.   metaphor
B.   simile
C.   onomatopoeia
D.   hyperbole
Figurative Language:
“His eyes resembled glittering sapphires.”

A.   metaphor
B.   simile
C.   onomatopoeia
D.   hyperbole
Glory Field: (Here are a few sample questions.)
Muhammad is captured by a group of people
    from the next village:
True
False
Glory Field:
Muhammad is captured by a group of people
    from the next village:
True
False
Glory Field:
Miss Julia truly cares about Lizzy and wants to
    see slavery end.
True
False
Glory Field:
Miss Julia truly cares about Lizzy and wants to
    see slavery end.
True
False
Glory Field:
On the rescue of David, Abby thinks that she can
    steer the boat all by herself.
True
False
Glory Field:
On the rescue of David, Abby thinks that she can
    steer the boat all by herself.
True
False (Abby is a boy)
Glory Field:
Elijah wants to earn the reward money to pay for
    grandma’s taxes.
True
False
Glory Field:
Elijah wants to earn the reward money to pay for
    grandma’s taxes.
True
False
Glory Field:
Lizzy decides to run North to Canada, the only
    place she will find freedom.
True
False
Glory Field:
Lizzy decides to run North to Canada, the only
    place she will find freedom.
True
False (she followed Lem and Joshua in the
    Union regiment)
Glory Field:
Joshua leaves Lem and Lizzy in the trees so he
    can find Neela.
True
False
Glory Field:
Joshua leaves Lem and Lizzy in the trees so he
    can find Neela.
True
False
Glory Field:
Sheriff Glover has a new-found respect for
    Elijah after the rescue of David and Foster.
True
False
Glory Field:
Sheriff Glover has a new-found respect for
    Elijah after the rescue of David and Foster.
True
False
Glory Field:
Lizzy and Lem survive the Civil War and are
    married.
True
False
Glory Field:
Lizzy and Lem survive the Civil War and are
    married.
True
False (Lizzy marries Richard)
Glory Field:
Even though Florenz says that “colored people”
    are inferior to white people, Luvenia
    honestly likes Florenz for her “bubbly”
    personality.
True
False
Glory Field:
Even though Florenz says that “colored people”
    are inferior to white people, Luvenia
    honestly likes Florenz for her “bubbly”
    personality.
True
False
Glory Field:
The reason that Mr. Deets fires Luvenia is
    because she lies.
True
False
Glory Field:
The reason that Mr. Deets fires Luvenia is
    because she lies.
True
False

				
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