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ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMS

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ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMS Powered By Docstoc
					                  ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMS
Bethlehem            TechGRYLS, WAND (Women Achieving New Directions)

Bucks County         TechGRYLS, YWCA Employment Services, Financial Literacy Program, Financial Literacy
                     for Youth
Carlisle             Gather the Women (economic self-sufficiency)

Delaware             Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship

Gettysburg           Lego’s Robotics, STEM Savvy

Harrisburg           YW Works (housing program)

Lancaster            High School Child Care Program for Teen Parents

National Capital Area Washington Area Women in the Trades Workforce Literacy Program

Pittsburgh           YW Enterprising Women, Financial Empowerment, Family Savings Account Program

Steubenville         Y Teens

Westmoreland         Computer Skills Training, TechGRYLS

York                 Quantum Opportunities Program



                                  WOMEN’S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS




                                                     1
BETHLEHEM, PA                                      Stephanie Hnatiw                                    Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Lynn Nonnemacher                         Empowerment Center Director                   610-867-4669               lnonnemacher@ywcabethlehem.org


Program                                                          Audience                                     Description - continued
                                            Elementary and Middle School Girls.                (3) Enhance the technical and literacy competence of
TechGRYLS                                   Participants need to have some knowledge of        TechGRYLS participants; (4) Give girls the opportunity
                                            using a computer, such as how to use a mouse to think of transferring their technical skills into career
                                            and how to navigate the tool bar.                  pursuits later in life; (5) Raise girls’ level of self-
                                                                Description                    confidence, natural curiosity and ability to function
                                            The TechGRYLS program works to (1) Bridge          successfully in technology.
                                            the digital divide among genders and economic
                                            levels; (2) Help girls develop communication,
                                            critical thinking, time management, teamwork
                                            and presentation skills;
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                            Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                      This program specifically addresses our mission to empower women by
The YWCA Bethlehem measures the number of participants in the                 exposing girls to potential careers with higher earning power, as well as
program participant evaluations (how they view technology in their lives), the necessity for a college education.
grant evaluations (how we fulfill our grant requirements) and financial
evaluations (is the program self-sufficient). We will begin to measure the
impact TechGRYLS has on the participants’ school attendance, and
math and reading grades. This information will be available on the
student’s report cards. The desired results are an increase in attendance
and better grades.
                       How program is funded                                  United Way, individual donors, Educational Improvement Tax Credit
                                                                              (EITC) program, other grants/foundations




                                                                           2
BETHLEHEM, PA                                    Stephanie Hnatiw                                     Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Lynn Nonnemacher                       Empowerment Center Director                    610-867-4669                lnonnemacher@ywcabethlehem.org


Program                                                      Audience                                               Description
                                         This program is offered to women in the            The WAND Program is a six-week career development
WAND                                     community over the age of 18 who are in need       course that teaches women job search skills, such as
                                         of job search skills or career development. The    networking, writing a cover letter and resume, and
(Women Achieving New Directions)         YWCA Bethlehem provides this program to            preparing for an interview. The program also enables
                                         economically disadvantaged women free of           women to discover more about themselves in order to
                                         charge, while middle class women are charged       find a career that fits their personality, skills, and values.
                                         a fee.                                             This program helps women succeed in finding a career
                                                                                            and obtaining a position.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    This program specifically addresses our mission to empower women by
The YWCA Bethlehem measures program attendance, satisfaction                working with them to find employment that allows them to support
surveys from the participants and number of women who prepare a             themselves and their families.
resume, get interview clothing, obtain an interview and get a job.
                      How program is funded                                 Interest from endowment.




                                                                        3
BUCKS COUNTY                                    Lorna Michelson                                  Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Kristin Chapin                          Director of Youth Services             215-953-7793, x 112                 kchapin@ywcabucks.org


Program                                                   Audience                                        Description - cont
                                        Girls, ages 9-13, from low to moderate income    Each program cycle operates 12 sessions:
YWCA Tech GRYLS                         households in YWCA Family Centers in Bucks
                                        county participate in this program.                    Girls complete modules outlined in the
                                                                                                curriculum to develop computer technology, life
                                                             Description                        and leadership skills;
                                          TechGRYLS empowers girls and young                     
                                                                                                Mentors guide the girls and motivate them to
                                          women by providing access to and knowledge            explore career opportunities in the technology
                                          of technology, and ultimately helps shape their       field;
                                          future economic success. Girls learn how to            
                                                                                                Girls take a practical field trip to a technology-
                                          utilize technology to solve problems facing their     based business to observe first hand the
                                          communities, including gender and racial              possibilities that are available to them.
                                          empowerment through communication and
                                          equal access to state-of-the-art computer
                                          equipment. Working in collaborative learning
                                          groups, girls conduct research, brainstorm
                                          solutions and create projects that address
                                          critical issues facing them. The program helps
                                          them develop awareness about, and provides a
                                          tangible venue that confronts the gender gap in
                                          technology education and access for girls and
                                          young women.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                           Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                     TechGRYLS empowers girls and young women by broadening their
Percentage of students who display an increase in knowledge of               knowledge of computer technology by using computer programs for
technical terminology, internet usage and basic computer applications.       multimedia projects and encourages them to consider careers in

                                                                       4
                                                                             technology. The program raises girls’ interest, confidence and
Percentage of students who demonstrate improved computer skills              competence in the crucial area of technology, while helping them
related to enhancing projects with music, conducting internet research       develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Participants have the
and designing a web page.                                                    opportunity to invent, design and showcase their work at the completion
                                                                             of the program.
Percentage of students who express increased self-confidence in their
technological abilities, and in their ambitions for career planning.

Measurement tools: Participant journals, staff journals, skills and
thoughts inventories, pre- and post-surveys, evaluation forms.

                       How program is funded                                 Valentine Foundation, Verizon, Educational Improvement Tax Credit
                                                                             (EITC), Bucks County Children & Youth Social Service Agency.




                                                                         5
BUCKS COUNTY                                       Lorna Michelson, Ph.D.                                Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Helen Miller                           Director of Employment Services                    215-245-0264                      hmiller@ywcabucks.org


Program                                                      Audience                                                   Description
                                          Free services to low-income, underemployed             YWCA Employment Services provides job counseling,
YWCA Employment Services                  or unemployed women, families and teens                job placement and career education to program
                                          residing in Bucks County, PA                           participants. Recognizing individual needs and often
                                                                                                 multiple barriers to employment, the YWCA provides
                                                                                                 individualized one-one-one services. Barriers, such as
                                                                                                 limited public transportation and language skills, can
                                                                                                 impede an individual searching for employment
                                                                                                 opportunities. The comprehensive approach utilized by
                                                                                                 YWCA Employment Services program evaluates each
                                                                                                 client, using formal and informal assessment tools, to
                                                                                                 determine job search skills, overall job readiness and
                                                                                                 employability. In addition, referrals are made for such
                                                                                                 services as GED preparation, computer training, and
                                                                                                 literacy/English classes. The attainment and retention of
                                                                                                 gainful employment is essential to the goal of family
                                                                                                 stability and financial independence, which directly
                                                                                                 addresses the hallmark issue of women’s economic
                                                                                                 advancement.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                              Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                        The current economic downturn makes employment services to the most
During initial interviews, participants complete pre-assessment surveys         vulnerable populations in the county extremely necessary. The YWCA
that determine the areas where they need assistance—the JIST                    Employment Services program assists women, teens and adults with
Publishers Job Search Knowledge Scale and interview Style Scale are             attaining employment in a climate of increased unemployment and
utilized. In addition, the O’NET Career Interests Inventory is completed.       economic instability. Providing this service leads to greater self-
Post-assessments surveys are sent to participants 3-12 months after             sufficiency and economic advancement for women and their families.
their initial contact to determine their employment status. The YWCA
                                                                            6
employment Services program had many notable accomplishments and
achievements during the last year. During this period, 81 adult clients
received individualized employment training related to job search skills,
basic skills required for successful job placement, and assistance in
overcoming barriers to employment. YWCA Employment Services
assisted a total of 68 clients in securing employment, and 11 clients
enrolled in some form of education program to assist them in their job
search.
                        How program is funded                                   Bucks County Human Services, United Way of Bucks County, YWCA




                                                                            7
BUCKS COUNTY                             Lorna Michelson, Ph.D                               Executive Director




Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Sandy Blitzstein                 Director of Family Services              215-953-7793, x114                  sblitzstein@ywcabucks.org


Program                                            Audience                                        Description - continued
                                 Low-income, immigrant and minority women,           receives their own Financial Management Kit, which
YWCA Financial Literacy          teens and families living in Bucks County PA,       consists of a portfolio, binder, calculator, budgeting
Program                          who benefit from the classes by learning how        notebook, pens, and course curriculum.
                                 to better manage their finances.
                                                                                     The program modules covers a broad area of Finance
                                                   Description                       topics over the 5- to 10-week delivery of the program:
                                 The Financial Literacy Program for Adults is          Bank On It—an introduction to bank services
                                 offered at YWCA Family Centers and other              Borrowing Basics—an introduction to credit
                                 locations in Bucks County. Program                    Check It Out—how to choose and keep a checking
                                 information is presented on a basic level that is      account
                                 easily understood, and some materials are             Money Matters—how to keep track of your money
                                 available in the Spanish language. The                Pay Yourself First—why you should save
                                 program is designed as a 10-week course,              Keep It Safe—your rights as a consumer and identity
                                 based on the FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance           theft
                                 Corporation) Financial Education Curriculum.          To Your Credit—how your credit history will affect
                                 Classes meet for 90 minutes, and are                   your credit future
                                 presented by a trained facilitator and specialist     Charge It Right—how to make credit cards work for
                                 in specific subject areas. The 10 weeks are            you
                                 divided into modules and presented in a group         Loan To Own—know what you are borrowing before
                                 setting, and can be delivered during the day in        you buy
                                 a school setting. Child care is provided on site      Your Own Home—what home ownership is all about
                                 for those with young children. Each participant




                                                                 8
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                    The YWCA Financial Literacy Program provides financial information
Pre- and Post-tests are administered to participants.       necessary for women, teens and families to achieve self-sufficiency and
                                                            economic advancement. This program offers sound advice on how to
Outcomes measured: Percentage who will:                     manage finances in a time of increased economic instability.
      Learn how to budget their money
      Avoid unnecessary bank fees and charges
      Save for education and other purposes
      Choose appropriate types of bank accounts
      Manage their debt
      Purchase appropriate insurance.

                    How program is funded                   PA 21st Century Community Learning Center-Bristol Borough,
                                                            Department of Health and Human Services, YWCA




                                                        9
BUCKS COUNTY                                       Lorna Michelson, Ph.D.                              Executive Director


Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Andrea Walls                           Assistant Director of Youth Services            215-953-7793, 113                    awalls@ywcabucks.org
Professional, trained teachers
(changes seasonally)


Program                                                     Audience                                            Description - continued
                                          Elementary-age students. Children in grades 1-6         skills necessary to close the gender gap related to
                                          from low to moderate income households in               women’s economic empowerment.
Financial Literacy for Youth              YWCA after-school programs, Summer Camps,
                                          and YWCA Family Centers in Bucks County, PA.            Teachers deliver each FLYP lesson from the curriculum
Programs (FLYP)                                                                                   packet:
                                                              Description                          Lessons consist of a staff-led discussion, followed
                                          FLYP encourages monetary responsibility and                by an activity that reinforces the discussed focus
                                          sensibility, and the importance and value of               concept.
                                          saving in a framework that is exciting, fun and can      Lessons have been designed for delivery as follows:
                                          grow with the participants. The goal of this               60 minutes once per week for five weeks, for a total
                                          program is to help each student learn and develop          of five lessons for two age groups (1st - 3rd grade
                                          good financial habits that will enable them to             students and 4th - 6th grade students).
                                          make wise financial decisions now and in the             Incentives for good financial choices are earned
                                          future. This program educates children about the           throughout the course of the program.
                                          importance of developing critical financial habits in    At the culmination, students can use the money
                                          the present and in the future, further providing the       earned through the incentives to purchase
                                                                                                     something from the FLYP store.

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and results)                     Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
Outcomes measured: Percentage of students demonstrated an increase in           While educating boys and girls, FLYP empowers girls and young women
knowledge of concepts of fiscal responsibility, including the value of money,   by broadening their knowledge of savings accounts, budgeting, credit
differentiating between wants and needs, the benefits of saving and             card debt, and making responsible financial decisions that impact their
sharing, and creating a budget.                                                 daily lives. Children are encouraged to share their newly acquired
                                                                                financial knowledge with their families, and to understand the
                                                                                consequences of monetary decisions. Participants have the opportunity
                                                                          10
Measurement tools:                                                         to apply their decision-making skills by budgeting their reward points and
 Pre- and post-test designed to measure knowledge gained in the content   purchasing items in the FLYP store at the completion of the program.
  areas being taught.
 Measurement tools are developed to measure the degree of change in
  appropriate grade-level knowledge and are broken down into two age
  groups: 1st - 3rd grade and 4th - 6th grade.


                      How program is funded                                PA 21st Century Community Learning Center-Bristol Borough,
                                                                           Philadelphia Foundation, Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC),
                                                                           YWCA




                                                                     11
CARLISLE, PA                                     Barbara Kohutiak                                  Executive Director


Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Sonya Browne                               Women Program Director                      717-243-3818                 sbrowne@ywcacarlisle.org


Program                                                   Audience                                         Description – con’t..
                                         Women with limited financial resources.
Gather the Women                                                                           The director of the program meets with participants on a
                                                                                           quarterly basis to help them set three economic goals
                                                          Description                      and to monitor whether they have met their economic
                                                                                           goals for the past quarter. The director provides case
                                         Gather the Women is an economic self-             management to help the women meet their goals—
                                         sufficiency and personal growth program for       these services may range from helping them access
                                         women with limited financial resources. It        their credit report to connecting them with a volunteer
                                         impacts the issue and community by providing      who will help them begin to repair their credit. The
                                         women with the skills and support they need to    program manager's job is to connect the women with
                                         maintain stable housing for themselves and        available community resources—from a visit to Family
                                         their children, and gain educational or job skillsHousing to help them find stable housing, to a first-time
                                         needed to improve their employment. Program       homebuyers' workshop, to a free workshop on the
                                         goals are to:                                     fundamentals of finance. If a woman needs help with
                                             1. Prevent homelessness among women           school work, the program manager or another volunteer
                                                 with few financial resources;             will provide tutoring.
                                             2. Improve the economic status of
                                                 participants;
                                             3. Provide participants with the support
                                                 and skills needed to make more positive
                                                 life choices.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                         Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                   According to data compiled by the Center for American Progress, 14.1
1. Women meet quarterly self-sufficiency goals (number and                 percent of the women in this country live in poverty, 17.6 percent of
   percentage of women who follow up on referrals, number and              children live in poverty and 42.7 percent of poor children live with a
   percentage of women who successfully meet quarterly economic            single mother. Joy Moses, a policy analyst and attorney with the Center
   goals).                                                                 for American Progress, has said, ―Certainly there are people living in
                                                                         12
2. Women demonstrate personal growth (number and percent of                poverty who can pull themselves up by their bootstraps and achieve the
   women who follow up on referrals, number and percent of women           American dream. However, we need to recognize as a society that those
   who successfully meet personal growth goals).                           people who are starting from the bottom have far more barriers to
3. Women maintain stable housing (number and percent of women who          achieving the American dream than people who start from the middle or
   remain in the same housing for one year and number and percent of       start from high incomes. The goal of public policy should be about
   women in subsidized housing who meet the terms of their leases).        reducing those barriers and making sure that more people have avenues
   An annual outcome report is generated at the end of the fiscal year.    to achieving the American dream, that they just have access to
                                                                           opportunity.‖ Gather the Women seeks to reduce the barriers women
                                                                           with limited resources have to achieving economically stable lives.
                     How program is funded                                 United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County, the Progress Education
                                                                           Foundation, and the Women's Fund, along with individual donations




                                                                          13
DELAWARE                                          Ginny Marino                                      CEO


Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Olakunle Oludina                         Acting Director, Center for                 302-224-4060                    ooludina@ywcade.org
                                         Women’s Entrepreneurship


Program                                                     Audience                                             Description
                                         The typical client of the Center for Women’s       The YWCA Delaware Center for Women’s
Center for Women’s                       Entrepreneurship is a female minority (African     Entrepreneurship directly impacts the economic
Entrepreneurship                         American, Hispanic, Latina) head of household      advancement of women in communities throughout
                                         who earns less than $35,000 a year.                Delaware. The program includes management training
                                                                                            and workshops, a 12-week business plan series, loan
                                                                                            packaging and technical assistance for start-up
                                                                                            emerging business owners.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    The YWCA Delaware Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship program is
The program is measured quantitatively (outputs) and qualitatively          designed to empower women with the skills and knowledge to control
(outcomes) in these areas: attendance at workshops and trainings,           their economic destiny and build wealth through entrepreneurship.
participation in individual counseling, business plan development,
business capitalization, business gross and net revenue (i.e., household
income.)
                        How program is funded                               Cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration—
                                                                            under the Office of Women’s Business Ownership (OWBO)




                                                                           14
GETTYSBURG AND     ADAMS COUNTY                  Deb Yocum                                         Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Deb Yocum                                    Executive Director                   717-334-9171 x124                dyocum@ywcagettsburg.org
Program                                                    Audience                                        Description – con’t.
                                          th     th
                                         4 and 5 grade girls through a local              The girls use the physics lab under the guidance of their
LEGOs Robotics                           elementary after-school program.                 mentors and volunteer science professors to execute
                                                                                          the LEGOs® Robotics curriculum, which teaches them
                                                          Description                     to design, build and control robots using software,
                                                                                          actual LEGOs® and other mechanics. The girls not only
                                          Participants are driven from the elementary
                                                                                          learn the science of robotics, which involves cognitive
                                          school to Gettysburg College one day per week
                                          from 3:30-5:00pm to meet with volunteer         thinking, physics, mathematics, information technology
                                          college mentors recruited through the Center    and engineering, but also learn to work as a team and
                                          for Public Service. On average, there is one    build self-esteem and confidence in their abilities as
                                          mentor for every girl. The mentors are trained  scientists.
                                          by a lead student, and each mentor maintains
                                          a journal of their progress and experiences.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    The most striking outcome of this program is to see the girls self-
Not measured at this point, working on an evaluation tool—pre and           actualize their potential as future astronauts, doctors, scientists,
post—as well as following the girls through the STEM program we             engineers and programmers. The long-term goals of LEGOs® are to
sponsor at the high school and their decisions that follow.                 increase the number of women in STEM fields, thus increasing their
                                                                            payscale and narrowing the gender wage gap, and to prepare the next
                                                                            generation to face the tough technological and scientific challenges
                                                                            facing our world.
                      How program is funded                                 Grants, local Rotary and Thrivent




                                                                        15
GETTYSBURG AND ADAMS COUNTY              Deb Yocum                                           Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Deb Yocum                            Executive Director                   717-334-9171 x124                  dyocum@ywcagettsburg.org
Maxine Willis                         Board Member                          717-334-4005                    maxinewillis@embarqmail.com


Program                                           Audience                                            Description – con’t.
                                 High school students, grades 9-12.                 Each year, participants build a rocket to enter into a
STEM Savvy                                                                          state competition, which engages their new-found
                                                   Description                      knowledge of science into a very technical practice. It
                                 STEM Savvy is a high school, after-school          also builds communication skills, teamwork and self-
                                 program that encourages girls to pursue            esteem. To promote STEM and to educate the
                                 advanced education and careers in science,
                                                                                    community, the girls have given demonstrations to
                                 technology, engineering and math (STEM)—
                                                                                    youth, most recently Eisenhower Elementary where
                                 fields that are severely underrepresented by
                                 women. The program is held in a designated         they co-built gliders. It is the intention of the program to
                                 classroom at Gettysburg Area High School,          increase the number of girls enrolling in advanced,
                                 and supervised by a YWCA volunteer and a           elective STEM classes at the high school level, such as
                                 high school chemistry teacher, who volunteers      engineering and mechanics, and technological
                                 her time. The program has three primary goals:     concepts, and to further their knowledge in these fields
                                 career awareness, community education and
                                                                                    at the collegiate level.
                                 outreach, and technical applications. Activities
                                 to accomplish these goals include field trips
                                 and tours to colleges and university science
                                 programs and labs, museums, and STEM
                                 businesses, such as Schindler elevator and the
                                 PSU Nuclear Plant.




                                                                16
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                       Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                 By encouraging girls’ interest, education and advancement in STEM
No formal evaluation system—in the process of developing. The            fields, we are empowering women to be trailblazers in a high-paying field
                                                                         dominated by men. As women’s representation in these fields increase,
program's success was evidenced by its first ever graduating
                                                                         we hope the gender wage gap will decrease. And we hope to increase
participants, almost all of whom went to a post-secondary school with    the scientific discourse on the technological challenges facing our world
the intention of majoring in a STEM field. Many had scholarships or      today.
awards for that specific purpose.

                      How program is funded                              Grants, local Rotary, and Thrivent




                                                                        17
HARRISBURG                                    Tina Nixon                                         CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

William Reed                       Director, Economic & Neighbor Dev                717-234-7931                        wreed@ywcahbg.org
Karen Buck                         Retention Specialist                             717-234-7931                        kbuck@ywcahbg.org
Wendy Prescott                     Employment Specialist                            717-234-7931                      wprescott@ywcahbg.org
Adlih Carrillo                     Employment Specialist                            717-234-7931                       acarrillo@ywcahbg.org
Susan Parker                       Employment Specialist                            717-234-7931                       sparker@ywcahbg.org
Dan DeFloria                       Veterans Employment Specialist                   717-234-7931                      ddefloria@ywcahbg.org
Tyrone Thomas                      Transportation Supervisor                        717-234-7931                      tthomasWywccahbf.org

Program                                                Audience                                                 Description
                                       Single women and women with children with           The YWCA Greater Harrisburg provides employment
                                       YWCA Housing and Violence Intervention              readiness training and job placement assistance to
YW Works
                                       Program.                                            single women and families through the YW Works
                                                                                           program. Those being served are low to moderate
                                                                                           income and unemployed or underemployed;
                                                                                           predominantly minorities, women, single families and
                                                                                           having one or more significant barriers to employment.
                                                                                           The services provided empower clients through
                                                                                           seminars, one on one coaching, placement, and job
                                                                                           retention follow-up.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and results)              Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
The YWCA YWC Works program achieves its goals and objectives             YW Works is a comprehensive employment empowerment service that
through the following key components:                                    helps low-income or unemployed members of the community build the
                                                                         skills they need to find, keep and improve their employment. The goal of
Skills Assessment: Goals and career assessment for an employment plan    this program is to help clients achieve self-sufficiency by earning a living
suitable to each individual through an employment specialist.            wage and to increase self-confidence through the achievement of
                                                                         personal goals.




                                                                    18
Training and Education: Completion of employment-related seminars, life
skills classes, GED or Adult Basic diplomas, completed computer classes,
vocational partnerships, resume development, interview skills, job
placement and retention.

Statistics are measured by benchmarks tracked quarterly. During the past
year, the YWCA YW Works program served 629 persons and contacts
with outreach, referral and direct services—250 YW Works clients became
fully vest clients and 113 were placed in employment.
How program is funded                                                      HUD Supportive Services, United Way




                                                                      19
LANCASTER                                 Maureen Powers                                     Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Cheryl Gahring                Director of Child Care Services             717-393-1735 est. 266               cgahring@ywcalancaster.org

Christelle Thaw-Bolton        McCaskey Child Development                      717-391-8616                   chamilton@ywcalancaster.org
                              Center Director



Program                                           Audience                                          Description – con’t.
                                  Lower income teen mothers at risk of dropping     They took turns caring for their babies, and had very
YWCA McCaskey Child               out of school.                                    few subject choices. Their attendance was poor,
Development Center                                                                  averaging about 42 percent daily. Many did not
                                                   Description                      graduate, and those that did had not received a
                                                                                    comparable education as their non-parenting peers.
                                  Child care inside the Lancaster City High
                                  School (J.P. McCaskey) for children of            Lack of a high school diploma is one of the key
                                  students of the School District of Lancaster.     indicators of future poverty for women. Pregnancy is the
                                  The center enables teen mothers to complete       number one reason teen girls drop out of school. The
                                  their high school education and have the full     child care center tears down a big barrier to high school
                                  range of classes available to them.               completion for teen mothers. It also makes it possible
                                                                                    for them to choose from the full range of classes offered
                                  Prior to the existence of the in-school center,
                                                                                    in this large, urban school district, so they can preserve
                                  teen mothers in Lancaster attended school for
                                                                                    their options for the future, be it college, trade school, or
                                  a half day only, in an off-site location in a
                                                                                    other paths. Without a decent high school education,
                                  downtown church.
                                                                                    the economic future for these teen mothers is bleak.




                                                                 20
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                           Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                     The overwhelming majority of students using the McCaskey Child
The first impact was felt in consistency of school attendance. The first     Development Center are low-income young women of color. The YWCA
year of operation of the center, the attendance rate of the teen moms        cooperates with case managers from the Urban League, Family
went from 42 percent to 72 percent, close to the overall school average      Services, and the Spanish American Civic Association to provide
daily attendance rate.                                                       education and support to the teen mothers. By providing child care for
                                                                             them, and being part of the team that encourages consistent school
Longer-term impacts are measured by the number of teen mothers using         attendance and achievement, we are helping them to enter adulthood
the center graduating from high school. Last year, 34 teen parents           with the same chance for educational preparation as their sisters in more
remained in school because of the on-site child care, and 14 graduated       prosperous, predominantly white suburban school districts.
from high school.
                                                                             Additionally, the education of the mother is a highly significant
Statistics are also kept on the development of the children and the          benchmark for predicting future success of children, so helping young
participation of the parents in conferences regarding the same, but those    mothers stay in school and graduate is an important contribution to the
are not as directly related to hallmark outcomes.                            health of the community. As a side benefit, it also helps get the children
                                                                             off to a good start by stimulating their brain development in the most
                                                                             crucial period.


                      How program is funded                                  United Way, donations (fundraising), Government fees and grants, fees
                                                                             for services, school district fees, membership fees




                                                                            21
NATIONAL CAPITAL AREA                            Tamara Smith                                         CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Alice Drew                             Director of WAWIT/Workforce                   202-626-0700 x 18                   adrew@ywcanca.org
                                                Development


Program                                                     Audience                                                Description
                                         1. WAWIT: Low-income women 18 years or               1. WAWIT women who have graduated and been
1. WAWIT (Washington Area                older with a GED or high school diploma,             placed in jobs are (a) employed when previously
Women in the Trades                      interested in non-traditional trades, specifically   unemployed, and (b) earn a more livable wage if they
                                         construction.                                        have a previous work history.
2. Workforce Literacy Program
                                       2. WLP: Women 18 years or older interested            2. The WLP program just started in September 2008.
(WLP)
                                       in building basic literacy skills, as well as         Data is not available yet.
                                       attitudes and behaviors essential to workplace
                                       success.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    1. The WAWIT program empowers women economically by training
For both programs, general demographics are collected at the beginning unemployed women to develop skills for non-traditional jobs in
and end of the program including:                                           construction, with estimated hourly wages of $12 or higher.

1. Reading and math skill levels: Pre-test at admission and post-test       2. The WLP is a new program that will train unemployed women to have
after a minimum of 50 hours of instructions. The information is recorded    basic workplace skills to prepare and assist them with job placement.
in PLATO and LACES databases, and lesson plans are developed to
address areas that need improvement.
2. Goals and date of achievement: Students indicate 1-3 goals they have
set for themselves. The information is entered in the database. Goals
are updated in the data base as they are met.




                                                                           22
3. Financial history and assistance with improving budgeting skills and
credit history: Students provide financial information on their application.
The financial management classes address financial responsibility and
budgeting. Students receive credit management counseling at Operation
HOPE and their financial records are maintained there.
4. Students’ weight and physical fitness ability are evaluated by the
trainer the first week of the program. The trainer records the information
and provides nutrition and training plan.
5. Students provide medical and housing information. The information is
entered in LACES. The case manager discusses the need for assistance
with the need for daily basic needs and provides referrals to resources.
6. Applicants report their involvement and status with the legal system.
Weekly reports are provided to probation officers.
7. Applicants report the status of custody for children under 18 years of
age. This information used to document the number of participants who
regain custody of their children.
8. The curriculum provides classes on domestic violence, parenting,
substance abuse and health education.
                        How program is funded                                   Individual donors, special event luncheon, DC Mayor earmark, Moriah
                                                                                Fund, Washington Area Women’s Foundation, United Planning
                                                                                Organization




                                                                               23
PITTSBURGH                                   Maggie Jensen                                    CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Melinda Sinkule                     Director of Asset Development              412-255-6748                  msinkule@ywcapgh.org


Program                                                Audience                                          Description
1. YW Enterprising Women             All three programs are geared toward low and      1. YW Enterprising Women: provides business
                                     moderate income women.                               plan development, participation in peer support
                                                                                          networking groups, advanced business
                                                                                          workshops, access to markets, micro-loan
                                                                                          assistance, and business coaching.
                                                                                       2. YWCA Financial Empowerment Program: a
                                                                                          series of financial literacy workshops enabling
2. YWCA Financial Empowerment                                                             low-income women and families to set
   Program                                                                                meaningful financial goals, develop a budget,
                                                                                          use bank and credit union services, understand
                                                                                          and improve credit, and invest in their future.
                                                                                       3. Family Savings Account Program: enables
                                                                                          home ownership, educational advancement,
                                                                                          business start-up, and home repair through a
3. Family Savings Account Program                                                         matched savings account. Participants can save
                                                                                          up to $2,000 over a three-year period with one-
                                                                                          to-one dollar matching funds for a maximum
                                                                                          savings of $4,000. Clients must complete the
                                                                                          Financial Empowerment Program.




                                                                    24
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                           Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                     Programs are geared to empower women economically by providing
   1. For fiscal year 2007-2008: YW Enterprising Women: 76 clients           participants with financial literacy skills along with the knowledge and
      received 25 hours of business training in three classes: 45 clients    skills needed to create their own businesses.
      completed a business plan, 43 clients received additional post-
      training services, including networking, access to markets and
      micro-loan opportunities.
   2. Financial Empowerment Program: 352 individuals attended 12
      workshops; 76 business training clients received financial literacy
      education.
   3. Family Savings Account Program: The savings accounts are
      monitored by YWCA staff; 100 clients deposited more than
      $40,000 in savings accounts. A total of $24,800 was distributed
      in match funds to 13 individuals who completed the program.
      One graduate purchased her first home.

                      How program is funded                                      1. YW Enterprising Women: Richard King Mellon Foundation,
                                                                                    McCune Foundation, Huntington Bank (formerly Sky Bank) –
                                                                                    funded revolving loan fund, Citizens Bank – funded revolving
                                                                                    loan fund, Fifth Third Bank
                                                                                 2. Family Savings Account Program & Financial Literacy Education,
                                                                                    PA Department of Community & Economic Development

                                                                             The Asset Development Initiative also receives a portion of the YWCA’s
                                                                             allocation from the United Way of Allegheny County.




                                                                            25
STEUBENVILLE, OH                                 Melissa Greico                                     Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Melissa Greico                               Executive Director                      740-282-1261                     steubenvilleywca@att.net


Program                                                    Audience                                                Description
Lunch and Learn                          High school age Y-Teen girls, approximately       Y-teens meet monthly during the school year (not in
                                         25-30 girls per session.                          December). Four sessions are dedicated to economic
                                                                                           advancement, with training topics ranging from planning
                                                                                           for the future, job interviewing, resume building, college
                                                                                           options, and money/budget/financing.

                                                                                           Sessions are held at the high school and the YWCA,
                                                                                           and are facilitated by the YWCA Executive Director.




Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                         Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                   Understanding the importance of first impressions, how to best convey
Participants evaluate the program—participants indicate they are better    oneself, and what generally is involved in a job interview prepares
prepared for job interviews.                                               young girls for their first real job interview and subsequent employment
                       How program is funded                               Esther Simmons Grant




                                                                          26
WESTMORELAND COUNTY                                                   Bonnie Lewis                                     Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Gina McGrath                                 Director of Technology                      724-834-9390                  ginam@ywcawestmoreland.org


Program                                                     Audience                                                  Description
Technology                                 Women who need to learn or improve                   Computer skills training—referral from county job
                                           computer skills.                                     readiness and career development programs to the
                                                                                                YWCA Technology Center. The Center teaches
                                           Preteen girls who are in jeopardy of dropping        computers skills that improve the marketability of
                                           out of math and science classes.                     women for employment and also improves skills to help
                                                                                                women achieve advancement in existing positions.
                                                                                                Direct link to Economic Advancement Hallmark Issue.

                                                                                                 The Tech GYRLS program teaches basic computer
                                                                                                 programming and robotics to preteen girls in five area
                                                                                                 school districts. Teachers target girls who are in
                                                                                                 jeopardy of dropping out of math and science classes in
                                                                                                 order to expose them to these subjects in a supportive,
                                                                                                 creative environment. Math and science careers are
                                                                                                 generally known to pay better than other positions
                                                                                                 leading to future economic advancement for these
                                                                                                 students.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                             Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                       Computer skills training: mission-focused changed is direct, marketable
Computer skills training: successful completion of course materials;           skills that improve economic advancement opportunities for women.
survey of client satisfaction; informal reporting of job and career success
from students. Extremely high satisfaction reported.                           Tech GYRLS: mission-focused change is direct influence of girls-only
                                                                               educational opportunity that improves girls’ interest in math and science,
                                                                               a path that leads to better-paying jobs.


                                                                              27
Tech GYRLS: student post-program survey. Annual questionnaire to
inquire about students’ continued enrollment in math and science
classes. High satisfaction reported. Most students return for additional
program segments. New interest in math and science reported by
participants. Teacher observation suggests very high impact on
students.
                       How program is funded                                Fees for service, special events, foundation grants and endowment
                                                                            income




                                                                           28
YORK                                              Deb Stock                                         CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Gary Calhoun                                  QOP Coordinator                    717-845-2631 ext 134                 gcalhoun@ywcaofyork.org
Mike Smith                                    QOP Coordinator                    717-845-2631 ext 118                  msmith@ywcaofyork.org


Program                                                     Audience                                               Description
                                          Students in grades 9-12 at high risk for          QOP is a program designed to encourage school
Quantum Opportunities                     dropping out, receiving free or reduced lunches   success in high-risk students through academic
Program (QOP)                             in York City School District.                     support, community service, supportive and mentoring
                                                                                            staff, and tutoring. The program offers incentives to the
                                                                                            students for involvement in the program for four years
                                                                                            (from grades 9-12) and supports higher education after
                                                                                            graduation. About half of QOP participants are female,
                                                                                            who find empowerment through the QOP program.
                                                                                            They are encouraged to succeed academically and to
                                                                                            be champions for their community.

                                                                                           Last year, the winner or our YWCA ―Young Women
                                                                                           Who Make a Difference‖ award went to a graduate of
                                                                                           our QOP program.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                         Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                   A large responsibility of QOP is to empower all students to overcome
Success of the QOP program is dependant on student’s ability to meet       impoverished situations to be successful, contributing members of the
their required community and academic support hours, the increase in       community.
their GPA, the success on the SATs and entrance into a higher
education program (certificate, credential, degree program or technical
program).


                                                                          29
QOP coordinators collect interim reports and report cards, monitor
homework and tutor support and track community hours and
college/higher education admission.

Outcomes are reported to our funding agencies. The goals for QOP
include:

        95 percent of QOP students will remain in school.

        90 percent of QOP students will achieve passing final GPAs.

        70 percent of QOP seniors will attend a postsecondary school
         or training program.

        90 percent of QOP students will not become teen parents.

During the 2008/2009 program, we achieved and exceeded all of our
stated goals for the program.


                      How program is funded                              Neighborhood Assistance Tax Credit, Educational Improvement Tax
                                                                         Credits, United Way of York County, Private Foundations, Gifts and
                                                                         Donations




                                                                        30
               RACIAL JUSTICE PROGRAMS
Bethlehem       Reading Circles, Study Circles
Canton          Anti bias child care curriculum
Carlisle        Youth Leadership Conference
Delaware        Building Bridges for the Future Youth Leadership Program, Study Circles on
                Race and Racism
Elyria          Community Anti-Hate Task Force
Gettysburg      Time To Talk, Friday Night Cultural Nights
Harrisburg      Cultural Bridges Training, Business Diversity Work Conference, YWCA Book
                Club
Lancaster       Racial Justice training, Study Circles on Race and Racism, Racial Justice
                Institute, Anti Bias Child Care Curriculum
Westmoreland    Race Matters Roundtable
York            Anti-Bias Child Care Curriculum, SKYNN Deep Study Circles




                                       31
BETHLEHEM, PA                                Stephanie Hnatiw                                 Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Lynn Nonnemacher                   Empowerment Center Director                 610-867-4669


Program                                               Audience                                                Description
                                     This program is open to elementary students in   For elementary students: This program engages
Reading Circles                      the Bethlehem Area, as well as adults in the     elementary school students in a discussion on diversity
                                     community.                                       and prejudice in their lives and communities. The
                                                                                      program is 45 minutes long and includes reading the
                                                                                      poem ―The Sneetches‖ by Dr. Seuss, a focused
                                                                                      discussion on prejudice and diversity, and an activity
                                                                                      linking all participants together by what makes each
                                                                                      person unique. The program directly addresses the
                                                                                      negative impacts of racial justice at an elementary level.

                                                                                     For adults: This program acts as a book club that
                                                                                     focuses on books by multi-cultural authors discussing
                                                                                     multicultural topics.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                   Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                             The program allows children to think about the negative impacts of
The YWCA Bethlehem measures the number of participants and           prejudice and racism in their lives and their classmates’ lives. Each
participant evaluations.                                             student leaves with an understanding of the benefits of diversity in the
                                                                     classroom. For adults, the program actively involves participants in
                                                                     understanding diversity in their community.
                   How program is funded                             General funds




                                                                   32
Association/Staff Completing Questionnaire

BETHLEHEM, PA                                     Stephanie Hnatiw                                   Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Lynn Nonnemacher                        Empowerment Center Director                   610-867-4669              lnonnemacher@ywcabethlehem.org


Program                                                       Audience                                               Description
                                          This program is open to adolescents involved       Study Circles consist of 5 -15 people who agree to meet
Study Circles                             in after-school programs targeting teens from      together several times to address racial discrimination
                                          diverse high schools and adults participating in and diversity in a democratic and collaborative way.
                                          the Association’s Dr. Reverend Martin Luther       Participants engage in discussion and learn from each
                                          King, Jr. Holiday Observance Breakfast, as         other to find common ground and often develop action
                                          well as community leaders who attended             steps for change.
                                          Association-led workshops at Northampton
                                          Community College on white privilege,
                                          institutional racism and gender bias.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    Study Circles directly affect the participants’ understanding of diversity
The YWCA Bethlehem measures the number of study circle groups,              by discussing tough issues of racial injustice. By the end of each study
group attendance, and number of groups that create and implement their circle, every participant engages in the effort to eliminate racism in the
action plan. Each study circle is encouraged to work on an action plan to community through an action plan.
combat racial injustice or increase understanding of diversity.
                       How program is funded                                Race Against Racism, endowment interest




                                                                         33
BUCKS COUNTY                             Lorna Michelson                                    Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Sandy Blitztein                  Director of Family Services              215-953-7793, x114                 sblitzstein@ywcabucks.org


Program                                             Audience                                       Description continued
                                 Diverse group of women (8-12 per group). The       of how they have experienced or witnessed racism in
YWCA Sisters United              YWCA recruits participants through                 their own lives.
                                 organizations, including the NAACP, Links,
                                 Inc., Latino Leadership Alliance, the Peace        Session 2: Our Ethnic Backgrounds—Individuals share
                                 Center and YWCA board and staff.                   personal items and stories about their own ethnic and
                                                                                    racial background. Case studies/scenarios are
                                                    Description                     distributed and participants divide into two groups to
                                 The main goal of the program is to provide a       discuss how they would react under these
                                 forum for diverse groups of women to meet and      circumstances. The group discusses the 10 Simple
                                 have informal discussion on racism led by          Rules to Eliminate Racism sheet.
                                 trained facilitators. Based on the Study Circles
                                 model, participants are encouraged to begin or     Session 3: Our Unequal Nation—Group members share
                                 continue their journey to eliminate racism by      examples of inequities in the media as they relate to the
                                 ―passing forward‖ knowledge gained during the      terms defined in the last session. The group participates
                                 program.                                           in an exercise, called Move Forward, Move Backward,
                                                                                    which demonstrates some of the advantages and
                                 Session 1: Making Connections—Discussion           disadvantages related to skin color and ethnic
                                 on the overall expectation of the group            background.
                                 members, including guidelines for the group
                                 discussion, which assures members that what        Session 4: Looking at Our Community—During this
                                 was said was kept confidential. Group              session, participants review the results of their
                                 participants in an I Am exercise, which resulted   Community Report Cards, which each participant had
                                 in a discussion of social groups and how they      been asked to complete as an assignment. These cards
                                 effect our involvement in society, both            measure fairness/equal opportunity in the areas of
                                 positively and negatively, and how others view     education, employment, criminal justice, leadership,
                                 us. Group members share personal examples          social services, media, healthcare, and public works.
                                                                34
                                                                                            Session 5: Creating an Action Plan—During this
                                                                                            session, group members share examples of how they
                                                                                            have already begun to pass forward the ideas
                                                                                            discussed in the program. The group lists community
                                                                                            assets, which include people, places and institutions.
                                                                                            The group then brainstorms action ideas that could be
                                                                                            implemented using the community assets.

                                                                                            Session 6: Moving to Action—Group members reflect
                                                                                            on what was discussed during previous sessions and
                                                                                            focus on how they would incorporate these ideas into
                                                                                            their own action plans to ―pass it forward.‖ Participants
                                                                                            write down their plans and leave copies with the group
                                                                                            facilitators, who will mail these plans back to
                                                                                            participants after three months.


Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    The participants of this program are required to ―pass forward‖
Participants complete a Racial Justice Sisters United pre- and post-        information through individual action plans, which have a positive impact
program assessment. Outcomes measured include:                              on changing attitudes of others in their communities.
    Percentage of participants who display an increase in
        understanding of the difference between race and ethnicity.
    Percentage of participants who consider awareness and
        education of racial justice to be important in the workplace and
        community.
    Percentage of participants who have an increased knowledge of
        Racial Justice and ways to impact change.
                       How program is funded                                YWCA




                                                                           35
CANTON, OH                                       Margaret Egbert                                       Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Stacey Miller                           Children’s Services Director                    330-453-7644                    smiller@ywcacanton.org


Program                                                     Audience                                              Description
YWCA Where Little Children Grow and      Child care: Children, ages 6 weeks through 10       Raise children without prejudice, through education and
Early Learning Initiative (ELI)          years, and their families.                          modeling, via educational modules that imbue the value
                                                                                             of non-discrimination.
                                         ELI: Children, ages 3-5, and their families.

                                           Low-income and diverse populations.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                        Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                  Help to eliminate racism. Children who are not taught to hate do not
Children grow into ―color-blind‖ adults—this cannot be measured.          learn to hate.
Enduring social change cannot be measured in short-term increments—
this is requires generational changes.
                       How program is funded                               Program fees




                                                                         36
CARLISLE, PA                                   Barbara Kohutiak                                     Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Kristen Trout-Roebuck                        Youth Director                         717-243-3818                    ktroutroebuck@ywcacarlisle.org


Program                                                  Audience                                                   Description
                                       Youth from eight high school districts.              Carlisle’s annual Youth Leadership Conference is held
Youth Leadership Conference                                                                 during the Week Without Violence. Participants from 8-
                                                                                            10 school districts explore issues of racial justice
                                                                                            through a combination of lecture and experiential
                                                                                            exercises, and develop action plans for their respective
                                                                                            schools. In addition to the day-long conference, the
                                                                                            YWCA follows up with a visit to each school during the
                                                                                            year to facilitate the implementation of the action plans.
                                                                                            Schools are invited to the YWCA on its Day of
                                                                                            Commitment to the Elimination of Racism to report back
                                                                                            at the end of the school year on the activities of their
                                                                                            team. The YWCA also manages a blog and posts
                                                                                            quarterly information on it that is related either locally or
                                                                                            nationally to racial justice. Students who attend the
                                                                                            Youth Leadership Conference are invited to participate.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                       Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                 Teaching Tolerance reports that 1 in 10 students say that someone at
The Youth Leadership Conference has three outcomes and an indicator      school has called them a derogatory word related to race, religion,
to measure each goal.                                                    ethnicity, disability, gender or sexual orientation in the past six months.
                                                                         Student exposure to biased speech is among 19 indicators the federal
   1. To raise awareness about issues of discrimination (number and      government uses to assess school safety. Students who feel unsafe are
      percentage of students who can articulate an increased             not ale to learn readily.
      understanding of issues of discrimination;
   2. To increase the understanding of individuals through education     By providing students with increased awareness and the skills to make a
      and training (number and percentage of students who report new     difference, the climates in local school districts can improve. In addition,
      skills); and                                                       students have gained skills that they will carry into a diverse world.
                                                                       37
   3. To change the behavior of individuals (number and percentage of
      students who implement action plans in their respective schools).

Both evaluation surveys and follow-up visits to schools are utilized to
measure the outcomes. An annual outcomes report is generated.
                     How program is funded                                 United Way of Carlisle & Cumberland County




                                                                          38
DELAWARE                                         Ginny Marino                                       CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Kietra Winn                                Director Youth Services                  302-655-0039, x321                   kwinn@ywcade.org


Program                                                     Audience                                         Description – con’t..
Building Bridges to the Future Youth     The typical participant is a 10th to 12th grade    understanding among students from different races,
Leadership Program                       student.                                           religions, ethnicities and cultures. Through workshops,
                                                                                            interaction with other youth and adults, participants
                                                                                            build skills around leadership, inclusion and diversity.
                                                          Description
                                                                                            Advocacy Projects (Fall to Spring): With the help of
                                                                                            YWCA staff, participants share their knowledge and
                                         Building Bridges to the Future (BBF) is a youth
                                                                                            complete service projects in their communities. During
                                         leadership program that takes place over the
                                                                                            these projects, youth decide on an issue they would like
                                         course of one year. Youth engage in
                                                                                            to address dealing with bias, bigotry or racism. They
                                         developing skills in self-awareness, diversity,
                                                                                            meet after the retreat to develop a project around these
                                         education, conflict management, advocacy and
                                                                                            issues. Past projects included co-facilitating a workshop
                                         leadership.
                                                                                            for peers, dialogues with younger students about the
                                                                                            importance of education, and presenting a series of
                                          Retreat: This is a weeklong retreat for youth
                                                                                            morning announcements during Black History Month.
                                          designed to promote respect and
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    YWCA Delaware’s Building Bridges to the Future Youth Leadership
The program is measured quantitatively (outputs) and qualitatively          Program helps youth learn new skills in self-awareness, diversity
(outcomes) in these areas;                                                  education, conflict management, advocacy and leadership. They
  Attendance at retreat and subsequent advocacy project meetings           demonstrate use of these new skills during signature advocacy projects
  Changes in knowledge, attitude and actions are captured by survey        that positively influence their peers in eliminating racism and bias.
   at the end of the retreat and monitored throughout the program,
   including the advocacy project and activities in the community.
                       How program is funded                                Department of Education Grant

                                                                          39
DELAWARE                                           Ginny Marino                                        CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Faye Bonneau                                 Director, Racial Justice                302-655-0039, x227                   fbonneau@ywcade.org


Program                                                       Audience                                                 Description
                                           Study Circles participants are typically the         broadly impact the success of people of color, and the
Study Circles on Race and Race             general public, often associated with local          entire Delaware community. These forums and
Relations                                  corporations and agencies with which the             workshops are designed to reach and engage political,
                                           YWCA partners.                                       corporate and community leaders in dialogue to
                                                                                                respond to the need for bias reduction and increase
                                                              Description                       civic involvement to effect change of critical community
                                                                                                problems. These events are part of a broader plan to
                                                                                                bring about change in policies and practices of specific
                                            Over the years, YWCA Delaware’s Study
                                                                                                issues that define racism. Action groups follow opening
                                            Circles program on Racial Justice has
                                                                                                events to provide a forum for engaged leaders to have
                                            impacted many individuals. It has engaged
                                                                                                ongoing interactive dialogue to make recommendations
                                            business, government and political leaders in
                                                                                                for change. Together, willing individuals, executive and
                                            Action Forums and workshops to create
                                                                                                public policymakers become proactive in finding
                                            opportunities for open and honest dialogue
                                                                                                common ground to close the racial divide in Delaware
                                            regarding social and racial justice issues that
                                                                                                communities.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                             Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                       YWCA Study Circles on Race and Racism intends to provide and
The program is measured quantitatively (outputs) and qualitatively             mobilize the community with practical recommendations for actions that
(outcomes) in these areas:                                                     organizations, institutions and individuals can take to improve race
  Attendance;                                                                 relations and racial equity.
  Changes in knowledge, attitude and action (inclination) are captured
   by post-evaluation issues at the end of the Study Circle session;
  Action for community change is monitored during workshops and
   action groups.


                                                                           40
Desired outcomes are to increase awareness, education, and action that
bring about policy change and practices, on key social issues of
race/gender bias reduction.
                      How program is funded                               United Way




                                                                         41
ELYRIA, OH                                      Jeanine P. Donaldson                             Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Jeanine Donaldson                           Executive Director                    440-322-6308                        jpd@elyriaywca.org


Program                                                    Audience                                            Description
                                        Community leaders (agency directors, police      This program provides law enforcement with individuals
Community Anti-Hate Task Force          chiefs, clergy, educators).                      throughout the community who have increased
                                                                                         awareness of the problems facing minority communities
                                                                                         and a structure for coming together in the event of a
                                                                                         crisis.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                      Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                Law enforcement uses task force members to discuss strategies for
We measure the attendance at quarterly task force meetings and the      working in diverse communities. Minority communities are creating
annual conference. We also track the number of hate crimes in the       opportunities to dialogue with law enforcement.
northeast Ohio area.
                     How program is funded                              General funds




                                                                       42
 GETTYSBURG AND      ADAMS COUNTY                   Deb Yocum                                          Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Brian P. Allen                               Development Director                   717-334-9171 x113                  ballen@Ywcagettysburg.org

Program                                                   Audience                                                    Description
Time to Talk                              The entire Adams County community.                 It’s Time to Talk is held the fourth Wednesday of each
                                                                                             month from 3:30- 5:00pm. The discussion has varying
                                                                                             topics, but all focus on diverse issues of race, gender,
                                                                                             religion/spirituality, culture and ethnicity, and the many
                                                                                             ―isms‖ that seek to divide us instead of unite us. It’s time
                                                                                             to move beyond that fear and create a space where
                                                                                             dialogue heals, where mutual sharing and questioning
                                                                                             lead to a better understanding, and where a better
                                                                                             understanding of difference creates acceptance and
                                                                                             appreciation of difference.

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                             Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                     Gettysburg and the Adams County community are often targeted by
The proposed outcome of this program is to change attitudes toward           groups, such as the KKK to conduct rallies. Pennsylvania has one of the
others in order to create a more tolerant community. There have been         highest rates of hate group activity in the country. The worst weapon
three dialogues thus far, each with different groups of people ranging in    against racism and bigotry is apathy. Since no outcomes are measured
number from 12 to 25. There are currently no tools in place to measure       at this time, it is difficult to gauge the impact of these dialogues.
outcomes, but a survey could be developed to measure both immediate          However, by the sheer nature of bringing different types of people to the
and long-term attitudinal changes as a result of the program. The            table, each with different attitudes and experiences, and encouraging
program’s structure might also need to be changed to keep the same           discourse around a set topic (thus far, race and politics, women and
audience over a set period of time, so that an intake and outtake would      economics, immigration, community unity and hate group activity), we
allow for more accurate outcome measurement.                                 equip our community with empathy. They learn to ask question about
                                                                             race, gender and class, challenge hate, and, hopefully, to see their
                                                                             community through a multifaceted lens, not just a myopic one.
                      How program is funded                                  Corporate sponsors



                                                                            43
GETTYSBURG AND ADAMS COUNTY              Deb Yocum                                   Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Deb Yocum                           Executive Director                717-334-9171                   dyocum@ywcagettysburg.org
Brian Allen                        Development Director               717-334-9171                    ballen@ywcagettysburg.org

Program                                          Audience                                           Description
Friday Night Cultural Nights     All of Adams County.                       Friday Night Cultural Nights are part of a series of
                                                                            events sponsored by the YWCA Hallmark & Mission
                                                                            Committee, the vision of which is to expand cultural
                                                                            awareness, racial justice and the appreciation of
                                                                            diversity, with the intention of eventually achieving the
                                                                            YW mission of eliminating racism and empowering
                                                                            women. Activities include The Unity Walk in October,
                                                                            India Night in November, a Chinese New Year
                                                                            Celebration in January and a Cinco de Mayo
                                                                            Celebration. All events are designed with the whole
                                                                            family in mind.


Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and           Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                     By exposing the community to various cultures, we hope to inspire
There are currently no outcomes for this program.            understanding and acceptance of difference, and find common elements
                                                             that bind us as humans and unite us as a community.
                 How program is funded                       General Funds




                                                            44
GREATER HARRISBURG                            Tina Nixon                                       CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Tina Nixon                          Chief Executive Officer & Pres              717-724-2240                       tnixon@ywcahbg.org
Pamela Rhoads                       V.P. of Resource Development                717-724-2241                      prhoads@ywcahbg.org
Gillian Byerly                     Resource Development Assistant               717-724-2248                      gbyerly@ywcahbg.org


Program                                                Audience                                             Description
                                      Community.                                       The YWCA Greater Harrisburg works to raise
Racial Justice Committee                                                               awareness through collaboration with programs and
                                                                                       organizations throughout the community. The
                                                                                       Association hosts an annual Cultural Bridges training for
                                                                                       the community, Race Against Racism, Youth Art
                                                                                       projects, multi-cultural festival and a Business Diversity
                                                                                       Work Conference. Additionally, a YWCA book club
                                                                                       meets quarterly with facilitators to discuss cultural
                                                                                       diversity. Bringing this issue to the forefront in our
                                                                                       community impacts the community at large.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                    Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                              This work directly supports the mission through training and events that
Results are measured by reviewing the annual community attendance     speak to the elimination of racism.
and response to events, such as the Annual Race Against Racism,
Racial Justice Training.
                       How program is funded                          General Funds, Race Against Racism proceeds




                                                                     45
LANCASTER                                            Maureen Powers                                       Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Dorothy Evans                              Assistant Executive Director               717-393-1735 ext/ 228                devans@ywcalancaster.org


Program                                                       Audience                                            Description con’t.
Racial Justice training                     Businesses, institutions, organizations and          broader program on many types of diversity. A variety of
                                            agencies in Lancaster County, PA.                    methods are employed: power point, lecture, DVDs,
                                                                                                 small group discussion, and other interactive
                                                              Description                        techniques.

                                              We offer customized anti-racism and diversity         The impact varies with the length and type of
                                              training to businesses, institutions,                 presentation. We strive to give people a basic
                                              organizations and agencies in Lancaster               understanding of racism and a common vocabulary with
                                              County, PA. These can range from an hour or           which to discuss it. This usually involves definitions of
                                              two to one- or two-day trainings, depending on such things as prejudice, racism, institutional racism,
                                              the client’s needs. Sometimes the goal is to          white privilege, etc. Racism is not going to be
                                              help a group understand people of other               eliminated by half-day or day-long workshops. But if we
                                              backgrounds, perhaps because of a                     can give people the tools with which to recognize and
                                              precipitating incident. Sometimes it is directly      discuss it, that’s a start—and we encourage them to
                                              tied to race; sometimes there is an interest in a make a life-long journey and commitment.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                                Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                          Hopefully, relations among colleagues at workplaces where we do these
Results are measured through post-training surveys of participants, who trainings improve, as well as relations with clients. Changing people’s
self-report on topics such as whether they learned anything new and if            perceptions of race, challenging the validity or the concept or race,
their attitudes about race/racism have changed. Depending on the depth history as it has been traditionally taught, and the notion of a level
of the training, we might also ask what action they plan to take as a             playing field where people can pull themselves up by their bootstraps
result.                                                                           can have far reaching effects in ways we may never know. We seek to
                                                                                  create conditions to begin a dialogue about a subject that is too often
The results of these trainings are difficult to aggregate, and we are             viewed as taboo, dangerous, or unimportant. As a result of a recent in-
working on improving our ability to report racial justice outcomes as part service training for teachers, the school district requested further training
                                                                                  that was provided in the form of two six-week study circles.
                                                                                46
of our strategic plan. But one example of a concrete result is that after a
recent day-long in-service for teachers, several of them said it would
change the way they teach history, while others declared they would
treat children in their classrooms differently in the future.
                         How program is funded                                 Individual donations, program fees, investment income, corporate
                                                                               sponsorship




                                                                              47
LANCASTER                                Maureen Powers                                       Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Dot Evans                       Assistant Executive Director              717-393-1735, ext 228                devans@ywcalancaster.org


Program                                             Audience                                            Description – con’t.
Study Circles                    Individuals, businesses, institutions,               More recently, we have also utilized the book
                                 organizations and agencies in Lancaster              Witnessing Whiteness by Shelly Tochluk in settings
                                 County, PA.                                          where there is little or no racial diversity.

                                                  Description                         Through Study Circles, we create a safe place for
                                                                                      people to talk about power and privilege, as well as
                                                                                      fear, anger and disappointment. Study Circles offer
                                 Study Circles on Racism are guided, small-           participants an opportunity to explore issues from a
                                 group discussions using a six-week curriculum        range of experiences and viewpoints. While everyone
                                 published by Study Circles. Groups of 8-12           will not agree on the nature of racism in our country,
                                 people meet for two hours a week for six             Study Circles make it possible for people from diverse
                                 weeks. Most frequently, we use the curriculum,       backgrounds to acknowledge the seriousness of the
                                 ―Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation,‖                 challenges our country and communities face in
                                 developed by the Study Circles Resource              creating a just society.
                                 Center. Topics include looking at ethnic
                                 backgrounds and racism; the role of racism in        At best, Study Circles result in practical ways to address
                                 our national history; inequities in our nation and   racism and action to redress inequities.
                                 community; paradigms for analyzing inequities,
                                 especially institutional and systemic racism,
                                 and white privilege; and planning for action.




                                                                 48
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                            Results – cont.
results)                                                                        4) We hired one of the members to be a part-time Racial Justice
Results are measured through post-training surveys of participants, who            Trainer for us, and another member became a volunteer trainer.
self-report on such topics as whether they learned anything new, if their       5) Students in the area raised $1,000 and donated it to the YWCA
attitudes about race/racism have changed and what action they plan to              of Lancaster to further our Racial Justice work, enabling us to
take as a result.                                                                  scholarship three people for our Racial Justice Institute.

The results of these trainings are difficult to aggregate, and we are
working on improving our ability to report racial justice outcomes as part
of our strategic plan. But anecdotally, a Study Circle held last winter in
an area where there had been some racist incidents resulted in the
following:                                                                    Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
     1) Five members of the group took the training to become Study           Changing people’s perceptions of race, challenging the validity or the
        Circle facilitators, and four of those have gone on to conduct        concept or race, history as it has been traditionally taught, and the notion
        Study circles.                                                        of a level playing field where people can pull themselves up by their
     2) A nucleus of the group continues to meet regularly nine months        bootstraps can have far reaching effects in ways we may never know.
        later, and has added more people in their quest to delve more         We seek to create conditions to begin a dialogue about a subject that is
        deeply into racism.                                                   too often viewed as taboo, dangerous or unimportant.
     3) Five participants went on to take our three-day Racial Justice
        Institute.


                      How program is funded                                   Individual donations, investment income, corporate sponsorship




                                                                             49
LANCASTER                                         Maureen Powers                                    Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Dot Evans                                Assistant Executive Director            717-393-1735 ext/ 228              devans@ywcalancaster.org


Program                                                     Audience                                             Description
                                          Businesses, institutions, organizations,         The Racial Justice Institute is an intensive three-day,
Racial Justice Institute                  agencies and individuals in Lancaster County,    interactive anti-racism training conducted by the
                                          PA.                                              national trainers, Cultural Bridges.

                                                                                           In Part I, participants develop a common framework for
                                                                                           identifying racist behavior and effecting positive change
                                                                                           in their organizations and lives. They also create action
                                                                                           plans for eliminating racism from their environments.

                                                                                           Part II, another three-day event, gives participants tools
                                                                                           and strategies to take leadership in effectively
                                                                                           challenging racism and other injustices in their
                                                                                           organizations and daily lives.

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                         Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                   The RJI encourages a deepening awareness of all forms of prejudice
Results are measured through post-training surveys of participants, who    and oppression, especially racism, and seeks to mobilize a significant
self-report on such topics as whether they learned anything new and if     number of community members to make a long-term commitment to
their attitudes about race/racism have changed. We also ask what action    eliminating racism and forging a just community. The training seeks to
they plan to take as a result.                                             enable participants to:

Participants overwhelmingly report positive impacts on their lives from           1. Be able to talk about racism using a common language and
the RJI. Representative comments include:                                            framework.
                                                                                  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the linkage among racism,
        “…extremely powerful and eye opening…I was armed with the                    sexism, heterosexism, ableism, anti-Semitism, ageism and
tools to start becoming anti-racist.”                                                other forms of oppression.
                                                                          50
        “I have been through a lot of seminars and diversity trainings, but           3. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical, political and social
this one will stay with me like no other.”                                               context for racism as it exists today.
        “I’m much more comfortable discussing the issue of racism, but                4. Develop pride in their own cultural heritage.
also much better equipped. I’ll continue the work in all aspects of my                5. Be able to identify individual, institutional and cultural racism.
life.”                                                                                6. Have the leadership skills, tools and strategies for effectively
        “It has changed my perception entirely.”                                         challenging racism and other injustices in their organizations
        “…opened my eyes to question my own actions and gave me a                        and daily lives.
chance to ask some difficult questions.”                                              7. Create an action plan for eliminating racism and make a
                                                                                         commitment to make a difference.
The results of these trainings are difficult to aggregate, and we are
working on improving our ability to report racial justice outcomes as part
of our strategic plan. Participants are asked to make a
personal/institutional plan for eliminating racism on the last day of the
Institute. We recently held a follow-up meeting with prior attendees and
sent out a survey to ascertain what has resulted from their participation
in the RJI.

                      How program is funded                                    Individual donations, program fees, investment income, corporate
                                                                               sponsorship




                                                                              51
LANCASTER                                  Maureen Powers                                  Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Mary Ross                                Youth Director           717-393-1735 ext/ 229                     mross@ywcalancaster.org



Program                                           Audience                                         Description – con’t.
Anti-Bias Curriculum             School-age youth in Lancaster County, PA.         against prejudice. It also provides materials to help
                                                                                   teachers address issues of prejudice and discrimination.
                                                   Description
                                 The Anti -Bias Curriculum is five one-hour,       The mid-elementary grade level, 3rd through 5th,
                                 school-based sessions of education to break       curriculum includes the following topics:
                                 the cycle of prejudice, hate and racism. It is             What is Diversity
                                 designed to introduce school-age children to               Who We Are
                                 cultural and ethnic differences, understanding             Diversity on Display and As We Play
                                 and appreciation.                                          Diversity in Lancaster
                                                                                            Decisions About Diversity
                                 The program is available to elementary through             Diversity Begins With You
                                 middle school grade levels at the current time.
                                 Three curricula are used. The curriculum for      The middle-school grade level, 4th through 8th
                                 the elementary kindergarten through second        curriculum topics include:
                                 grade level, Different and the Same, is a                  Respecting Diversity
                                 prejudice-reducing project for early elementary            Who Am I
                                 children developed by the producers of Mr.                 Definitions of ism
                                 Rogers’ Neighborhood.                                      Isms in the United States
                                                                                            Isms in Lancaster County
                                 The program uses videos and animal puppets                 What can you do as an individual to take
                                 to present in understanding and engaging ways                action against ―isms‖
                                 such complex issues as stereotyping,
                                 excluding others, speaking different languages,   The curriculum also includes activities, and group
                                 friendship across racial lines, and standing up   activities, i.e., peace circle.


                                                                52
                                                                                             The curriculum also includes group activities, such as
                                                                                             Circle of Honor, Connection card game, and students
                                                                                             develop and take home a ―diversity begins with you
                                                                                             chart‖ to discuss with their parents.

                                                                                             The Cultural curriculum for mid-elementary and middle
                                                                                             school students was developed by the Anti-Bias
                                                                                             Curriculum Task Force of our Racial Justice Committee
                                                                                             in collaboration with Millersville University’s Education
                                                                                             and Psychology Departments to ensure educational
                                                                                             standards are met. The Task Force continues to work
                                                                                             on the curriculum for the high school level.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    The Anti-Bias program is designed to halt prejudice, fear and racism,
Results are measured after each of the five sessions. At the end of each    and to introduce school-age children to cultural and ethnic differences
session, an evaluation is done. Some of the measurement questions           and understanding. The Lancaster County population is predominantly
include:                                                                    white. Hence, many of the schools are mostly white and some schools
       1. Record and explain at least three things you have learned that    have only a very low level of diversity in student population. The Anti-
          might have changed your pre-observation ideas about any           Bias program introduces young children and youth to factual information
          other cultures.                                                   about cultural and ethnic differences. The series of sessions helps
       2. How can you apply what you have learned?                          students recognize racism and prejudice in many different forms, and
       3. What did you learn from each of the activities?                   provides students with tools for dealing with it. We hope to break the
       4. How can you relate ―ism‖ to your own life?                        cycle of prejudice and racism or at least have it challenged.
       5. What did you learn about stereotyping?
       6. What have you learned from the Anti-Bias Curriculum?
                      How program is funded                                 United Way




                                                                           53
WESTMORELAND COUNTY                                                  Bonnie Lewis                                    Executive Director



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Bonnie Lewis                                   Executive Director                      724-834-9390                 bonniel@ywcawestmoreland.org


Program                                                       Audience                                              Description
Race Matters Roundtable                    White and black women in the community with       Race Matters Roundtable brings together 10-15 women
                                           an interest in developing a better                of different races for a four-week program of dinner and
                                           understanding about the impact of race and        discussion. Using trained facilitators, various issues of
                                           racism in our community.                          race and racism are addressed and discussed.
                                                                                             Participants are given reading materials to facilitate the
                                                                                             discussion.

                                                                                               Once the participants have attended the Race Matters
                                                                                               Roundtable, they are invited to join the Advanced Race
                                                                                               Matters Roundtable, where additional activities are
                                                                                               provided along with discussion of more complex
                                                                                               subjects related to race and racism in our community.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                           Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                     The Race Matters Roundtable focuses directly on the elimination of
The participants complete client satisfaction questionnaires that provide    racism through education and activities that lead to better understanding
opportunities for clients to share impact on their views of race and         of issues of racism. There is an advocacy component to the program
racism.                                                                      that encourages action beyond the program sessions.

Continued participation in YWCA and community programs related to
eliminating racism is also measured.

There is a very high satisfaction rate and a high continued participation
of customers.
How program is funded                                                        General funds


                                                                            54
YORK                                     Deb Stock                                          CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Ruby Martin                        Chief Program Officer                     717-434-1752                     rmartin@ywcaofyork.org




Program                                             Audience                                             Description
                                 All children, ages infancy through 12, in our    All children are harmed. On the one hand, struggling
Anti-Bias Curriculum             Early Learning Centers (four), State-Funded      against bias that declares a person inferior because of
                                 Pre-K Count’s Programs, School Age Before        gender, race, ethnicity or disability sucks energy from
                                                                                  and undercuts a child's full development. On the other
                                 and After Care Programs and Camp.
                                                                                  hand, learning to believe they are superior because
                                                                                  they are white, or male, or able-bodied, dehumanizes
                                                 Description
                                                                                  and distorts reality for growing children, even while they
                                                                                  may be receiving the benefits of institutional privilege.
                                 Anti-Bias Curriculum - Tools for Empowering
                                 Young Children (Derman-Sparkes, NAEYC,           The "practice of freedom" is fundamental to anti-bias
                                 Washington, D.C., 1989).                         education. Curriculum goals are to enable every child to
                                                                                  construct a knowledgeable, confident self-identity;
                                 Published Description from NAEYC:                develop comfortable, empathetic and just interaction
                                                                                  with diversity; and develop critical thinking and the skills
                                 Children are aware very young that color,        for standing up for oneself and others in the face of
                                 language, gender and physical ability            injustice.
                                 differences are connected with privilege and
                                 power. They learn by observing the differences   Anti-bias curriculum embraces an educational
                                 and similarities among people, and by            philosophy, as well as specific techniques and content.
                                 absorbing the spoken and unspoken messages       It is value based: differences are good—oppressive
                                 about those differences. Racism, sexism and      ideas and behaviors are not. It sets up a creative
                                 handicappism have a profound influence on        tension between respecting differences and not
                                 their developing sense of self and others.       accepting unfair beliefs and acts. It asks teachers and
                                                                                  children to confront troublesome issues rather than
                                                                                  covering them up. An anti-bias perspective is integral to
                                                                55
                                                                                            all aspects of daily classroom life.

                                                                                            NOTE: The Anti-Bias Curriculum was trained to all
                                                                                            YWCA of York, Children’s Program Staff in November
                                                                                            2007 and Implemented in February 2008. Since then,
                                                                                            active discussions and teachable moments regarding
                                                                                            the curriculum are occurring daily in all of our children’s
                                                                                            programs. Staff are exploring meaningful activism
                                                                                            activities to do with all children in our programs during
                                                                                            the 2008-2009 school year.

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                          Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                    Throughout the Anti-Bias Curriculum is a foundation that no topic be
Our final session on the anti-bias training occurred in February 2009.      avoided or disregarded in the classroom. The ―isms‖ are discussed
Staff started tracking the occurrence of discussions and exploration of     openly and honestly in all situations when raised by the children.
topics, including the ―isms‖ in the classrooms. In September 2009, staff    Opportunities are available for play and role play of scenarios
and directors will have initial conversations with children and family      surrounding the ―isms‖ that are discussed by the class as a whole.
members around topics related to the ―isms‖ defined in the Anti-Bias        Acceptance and knowledge are key in the elimination of racism—this
Curriculum description. At the completion of the school year in May         preventative approach starting in infancy is key to our mission at the
2010, conversations will occur again with documented responses. Our         YWCA.
goal, to improve awareness and understanding of the ―isms‖ and to
increase acceptance in all audiences.
                        How program is funded                               Program fees




                                                                           56
YORK, PA                                           Deb Stock                                       CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Tiffany Wimmer                               Director of Human                      717-434-1757                    twimmer@ywcaofyork.org
                                      Resources/Racial Justice Program
                                                Coordinator


Program                                                      Audience                                           Description
Racial Justice Community                  The audience included students, school        Basketball Hall of Fame Athlete, Harry Flournoy, spoke
                                          administrators, parents, YWCA staff,          to the community on how his team succeeded in the
Event (3/16/09)                                                                         face of racism. He was one of five black starters who
                                          community members, business leaders and
                                                                                        led the Texas Western Miners to the 1966 NCAA men’s
                                          local politicians.
                                                                                        basketball title, beating the all-white Kentucky Wildcats
                                                                                        in the final. It was the first step in the desegregation of
                                                                                        college sports and was immortalized in the movie ―Glory
                                                                                        Road.‖ It went on to become a landmark symbol of
                                                                                        success in the fight against racism. Harry spoke to York
                                                                                        to share his story of what he and his team faced during
                                                                                        this time. Following Harry's speech, a panel discussion
                                                                                        was held that brought the topic of race and racism to a
                                                                                        community level and a call to action on change for the
                                                                                        future.
Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                        Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                  Community awareness of the impact of racism—personal and systemic.
Follow-up requests for study circles, training and positive feedback
received via email and voice mails.
                      How program is funded                               Financial sponsorships by YSHRM, York Counts, individual donations by
                                                                          a variety of community members, in-kind donations




                                                                         57
YORK                                     Deb Stock                                         CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Tiffany Wimmer                       Director of Human                      717-434-1757                    twimmer@ywcaofyork.org
                              Resources/Racial Justice Program
                                        Coordinator



Program                                           Audience                                              Description
Skyn Deep Study Circles          The audience includes staff, youth, schools,    The impact is increasing the awareness for people to
                                 businesses, etc.                                have discussions about race and racism, providing
                                                                                 guidance on how to have conversations, and giving
                                                                                 insight to issues relating to racism (i.e., stereotyping).

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                          This directly links to the YWCA’s mission to eliminate racism by
Number of study circles conducted.                                introducing focused dialogue and learning about race and racism.

                 How program is funded                            Resource materials provided by YWCA USA; Race Against Racism.




                                                                 58
            RACIAL JUSTICE PROGRAMS
                       (IN PROGRESS)


Baltimore       Stand Against It

  York          Cultural Proficiency Assessment




                                   59
BALTIMORE                                           Vicki Sharif                                          Chief Executive Officer



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Vicki Sharif                                  Chief Executive Officer                      410-685-1460                    vsharif@baltimoreywca.org




Program                                                        Audience                                                 Description
Stand Against It                            Citizens of the greater Baltimore area, adults        Stand Against It is a multifaceted effort to eliminate
                                            and youth.                                            racism in our area through the gathering and
                                                                                                  mobilization of a large online and ―on-the-ground‖
                                                                                                  community of people, institutions, and organizations
                                                                                                  dedicated to using productive dialogue, resource
                                                                                                  sharing, and action to address race and race relations.
                                                                                                  The program will break new ground in the field of anti-
                                                                                                  racism work by utilizing traditional (study circles,
                                                                                                  curricula, events), as well as new (Web-based social
                                                                                                  networking applications) approaches to combating
                                                                                                  racism and fostering racial justice in the Greater
                                                                                                  Baltimore Area. The Stand Against It Web portal will set
                                                                                                  a new standard for the use of social networking
                                                                                                  applications to promote and facilitate cause-related
                                                                                                  action both on- and offline.

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                               Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)                                                                         The program uses an online vehicle to intentionally prompt conversation
Stand Against It is designed to produce community impact in such key             and action to eliminate racism.
areas as public awareness, public policy, and quality of life. In addition to
outcomes and outcome measures specific to our program, we will draw
on measures developed by other programs that may be adaptable to our
own, such as deliberation outcome measures developed by Peter
                                                                                60
Muhlberger for the Deliberative Democracy Consortium and America
Speaks (see his report on creating a ―deliberation measurement toolbox‖
at http://geocities.com/pmuhl78/DDCReport.pdf). We will conduct and
report on outcome evaluation throughout the course of the program.

Program success will also be gauged by our success at meeting specific
program objectives and completing key tasks. A timeline for program
objectives (population of a permission database up to 5,000 members
during Stand Against It’s first phase, for example) will be used to keep
the program on track toward meeting community impact goals. We will,
of course, also track Web metrics on site traffic, referral sites, unique
visitors, page views, participation in site tools, and online registrations in
order to ensure that we are meeting relevant benchmarks at each stage
of the program.

Program outcome areas will address such topics as the following,
among others:
    Participants’ understanding of racial justice issues and their
      impact on everyday well-being in areas such as housing, health,
      socioeconomic status, education, safety and security, and access
      to services.
    Individuals’ attitudes toward working collaboratively with others to
      address racism.
    Changes (over time) in individuals’ perception of levels of racism
      in our area, especially with respect to housing, employment,
      education, law enforcement and safety.
    Public policies’ effectiveness in promoting racial justice, and the
      extent to which Stand Against It helps to improve specific
      policies—such as those governing the handling of hate crimes––
      through grassroots advocacy and public education.
                       How program is funded                                      General funds




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YORK                                               Deb Stock                                          CEO



Staff Directly Responsible for Program

Tiffany Wimmer                               Director of Human                         717-434-1757                    twimmer@ywcaofyork.org
                                      Resources/Racial Justice Program
                                                Coordinator


Program                                                      Audience                                             Description
Cultural Proficiency                      The audience includes staff, children, youth,
                                          parents, clients and members.                     As the YWCA upholds the cultural proficiency vision,
Assessment (project in process)                                                             the organization will be seen as leading by example in
                                                           Description                      diversity-related initiatives, including eliminating racism.
                                                                                            Clients, members, staff, etc., are expected to feel
                                          The YWCA strives to be an organization that       increasingly comfortable at the YWCA and refer friends
                                          embraces change and diversity. With the           and families. Through increased referrals and utilization,
                                          assistance of staff, the organization developed   or simply retaining clientele due to increased
                                          a ―cultural proficiency vision‖ on how the        satisfaction, the YWCA will have increased opportunity
                                          organization wants people to feel when in         to spread the mission of eliminating racism.
                                          YWCA buildings and using the services.
                                          Cultural proficiency for the YWCA means
                                          ―creating a comfortable setting where everyone
                                          is respected, welcomed and feels safe.‖

Results (what is measured, how it is measured, and                            Mission focus change in a condition or set of conditions
results)
A list of action items is currently being developed. The action items will
be completed over the next several months, and follow up will occur to
measure results of any changes with the clients, parents, children, youth
members and staff.
                         How program is funded                                York County Community Foundation

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