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Bus Mgmt _ Mktg Mgmt Program Review 2009

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					            Business Management and Marketing Management

                         Business and CIS Division




    Business Management and Marketing Management Program Review

                                 Fall 2009




This Program Review was prepared and evaluated by the following individuals:




                               David Cooper
                                Ann Hovey
                               Delores Reha
                               Wallace Ritter
                             Kathleen Standen
                                Jane Troop
                              Marcus Wilson
                             Robert Yamaguchi




                            September 24, 2009
This program review was prepared by those listed in an open and collaborative process. The full-time
faculty has reviewed the report, and the report was made available to the division as a whole prior to
being submitted to PCC.




David Cooper            _______________________________________

Delores Reha            _______________________________________

Wallace Ritter          _______________________________________

Kathleen Standen        _______________________________________

Jane Troop              _______________________________________

Robert Yamaguchi        _______________________________________

Marcus Wilson (Department Coordinator) ________________________

Ann Hovey (Division Dean) _____________________________________
I.   Program Description
        A. Program Description and History

            The Business Management and Marketing Management Programs provide the student
            with the opportunity to acquire an Associate in Arts Degree, an Associate in Science
            Degree, or a certificate in their choice of study. Students may earn an Associate of
            Science Degree with an emphasis in Business Management, Entrepreneurship,
            International Business Management, or Marketing Management. Certificates are issued
            with an emphasis in Managerial Communications, Project Management, Marketing
            Management, International Business Management, International Business,
            Entrepreneurship, E-Business Development, Business Management, and Business and
            Technology Skills. Over the years the program has expanded through the development
            of new courses. The program provides the conceptual foundations and behavioral skills
            needed to manage successfully in the global community. Furthermore, the use of across
            the disciplines learning has been integrated into several courses. Courses necessary for
            student advancement and skill training are recommended through our advisory
            committee.

        B. Program Goals

            A six-year review of the Business Management and Marketing Management Programs
            was begun in 2008-2009 school year and continues. All courses have stated Student
            Learning Outcomes (SLOs). Currently, the assessments are being developed for each
            course. Courses that were considered obsolete were not reviewed and upgraded and
            are not currently being offered such as Business Mathematics (Bus 51).

            A review of the Business Certificate programs has taken place. Adjustments to these
            certificated programs have been discussed and changes have been implemented into
            these courses. Certificate changes in course offerings are more central with a core
            offering of 9 units per certificate and a broad base of selected course offerings in the
            business field that the student can select. Courses that have a transfer option are
            maintained across the curriculum and departmental perspective.

            Departmental Expected Learning Outcomes:

            Upon successful completion of the Business Management and Marketing Management
            Programs, students will be able to:

               Analyze and describe the functions of management;
               Communicate both orally and verbal effectively;
               Understand and apply management theory;
    Understand business terms and concepts, and effectively communicate using the
     language of business;
     Make effective business decisions using a systematic, evaluative, information-based
     approach;
    Develop and exhibit high standards of professional practice, demonstrating
     awareness of ethical and social responsibilities in today’s multi-cultural, team-
     oriented, rapidly-changing environment;
    Exhibit analytical skills and logic deduction in evaluation of problems;
    Acquire management certifications in various fields of study;
    Transfer to colleges and universities;
    Obtain entry level positions; and
    Examine and determine a career path.

Assessment:

The Business Management and Marketing Management Program’s ongoing process of
evaluation, planning, and implementation, and re-evaluation of SLOs is centered on
several important activities:

     a) The day-to-day interaction between instructors and students in the educational
     environment. Interactions consist of class presentations, discussions, and in-class
     problems are the most immediate means of evaluating student success in meeting
     student learning outcomes. Instructors are constantly assessing student learning
     outcomes by asking students to perform various assignments, reports, projects, and
     tasks and respond appropriately to instructor questions.
     b) Instructors use of homework and quizzes. The use of homework and quizzes
     are an immediate means that instructors use to assess student learning outcomes.
     These instruments provide the instructor feedback as to whether the students are
     progressing appropriately or whether they need to adjust their teaching style
     and/or spend more time on a particular topic.
     c) Exams. A well-written exam is the most objective means of evaluating student
     learning outcomes. If students understand business, law, and management
     terminology and are capable of performing various business, law, and management
     tasks, they will perform well on the exam.
Skills acquisition:

Students in Business Management and Marketing Management develop skills and
competencies in vital areas of:

1.   Communications presentation (written and oral)
2.   Ethics
3.   Accounting Principles
4.   Computer Skills
    5.   Vocabulary
    6.   Economic Applications
    7.   Managerial Skills
    8.   Marketing Skills
    9.   Legal Background

C. Program Degrees and Certificates Offered:
   The Business Management and Marketing Management Programs offer a variety of
   degrees and certificates in the management field. The program allows the student to
   select a field of study of their choice. Furthermore, the student is allowed the possibility
   of acquiring certificates in more than one field of study. The following degrees and
   certificates are available:

    Business Administration Associate in Arts Degree
    Business Management Associate in Science Degree
    Business and Technology Skills Certificate
    Business Management Certificate
    E-Business Development Certificate
    Entrepreneurship Associate in Science Degree
    Entrepreneurship Certificate
    International Business Management Associate in Science Degree
    International Business Certificate
    International Business Management Certificate
    Managerial Communications Certificate
    Marketing Management Associate in Science Degree
    Marketing Management Certificate
    Project Management Certificate

    Admission requirements:

    Admission requirements to the Business Management and Marketing Management
    Programs are governed by the admission requirements as outlined in the catalog of
    Fullerton College. The catalog specifies that admission is governed by the laws of the
    State and such supplementary regulations as have been prescribed by the Board of
    Trustees. Admission requirements include:

        Any high school graduate, OR
        Any person possessing a California high school proficiency certificate, OR
        Any person 18 years of age or older who may benefit from instruction, OR
        Any K-12 student qualifying as a “Special Admit” student.
List of required courses by degree/certificate:

There are fourteen different degrees and certificates offered by the Business
Management and Marketing Management Programs. The following is a listing of the
degree/certificate programs and the requirements for obtaining the degree/certificate.

Business Administration Associate in Arts Degree:

Curriculum leads to the Associate in Arts Degree. This degree requires 18 units chosen
from the list below. Any courses listed below taught as Honors courses will also apply to
this AA degree.

Complete 18 units from the following:                          Units
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                                 4
ACCT 101BF Managerial Accounting                                4
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                     3
BUS 131 F Principles of International Business                  3
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                  3
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business or                      3
BUS 241AF* Business Law                                         3
BUS 241BF Business Law                                          3
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers or                        3
CIS 111 F Intro to Information Systems                          3
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                      3
ECON 102 F Principles of Economics — Macro                      3
MATH 120 F Introductory Probability and Statistics              4
MATH 130 F Calculus for Business or                             4
MATH 150AF Calculus I                                           4
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                    3
PHIL 160 F Introduction to Ethics or                            3
PHIL 170 F Logic and Critical Thinking                          3
Total Units: 18

*See counselor for determination of correct course.

Business Management Associate in Science Degree:

The Associate in Science Degree in Business Management requires 30-31 units, all of
are required courses. Completion of this degree will provide the skills necessary to be
employed in a business capacity within an organization.

One Course from the following for a total of 3 units:         Units
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                           3
                 or
CIS 111 F Intro to Information Systems                       3

One course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:    Units
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                    3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                   3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                              4

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:      Units
BUS 111 F Business Communications                            3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                               3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:      Units
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                 3
                or
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                          3
                or
BUS 131 F Principles of International Business               3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:      Units
BUS 162 F Business Economics                                3
               or
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                   3
               or
BUS 251 F Business Finance                                   3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:      Units
(See counselor for determination of correct course)
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                      3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                       3

Three courses from the following for a total of 9 units:   Units
BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business                       3
                or
BUS 267 F Principles of Supervision                          3
                or
BUS 225 F International Management                           3
                or
BUS 271 F Leadership and Business Ethics                     3
                or
BUS 262 F Principles of Management                           3
One course from the following for a total of 3 units:          Units
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                    3
                 or
BUS 224 F International Marketing                                3
                 or
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing and Promotion                       3
Total Units: 30-31
Business and Technology Skills Certificate:

The Business and Technology Skills Certificate requires a total of 38-44 units of which 28
units are required courses.
Required Courses (28 units) Units
BUS 111 F Business Communications                                  3
BUS 151 F Business Mathematics                                     3
BUS 262 F Principles of Management                                 3
BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business                              3
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers or                           3
CIS 111 F Intro to Information Systems                             3
COUN 141 F Career Exploration                                      1
OT 080 F Keyboarding — Beginning                                   1.5
OT 081 F Keyboarding: Speed and Accuracy                           1.5
LANG 101 F Elementary Foreign Language* or                         3
MKT 208 F Principles of Selling                                    3
READ 142 F College Reading: Logical Analysis/Evaluation            3

*This course meets the Multicultural Course Requirement.

Restricted Electives (10-16 units)
Student selects four electives that have been pre-approved by the counselor and
program coordinator and that provide the skills required for the student’s career path.
Student is responsible for completing any necessary prerequisites.

BUS 061 F Business Skills Internship                             1-4
TECH Elective 1                                                  3
TECH Elective 2                                                  3
TECH Elective 3                                                  3
TECH Elective 4                                                  3
Total Units: 38-44

Business Management Certificate:

The Certificate in Business Management provides the skills necessary to obtain a job in a
business capacity in an enterprise. The certificate requires total of 30-31 units.

One Course from the following for a total of 3 units:          Units
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                           3
                 or
CIS 111 F Intro to Information Systems                           3
One course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:     Units
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                     3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                    3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                               4

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
BUS 111 F Business Communications                            3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                  3
                or
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                           3
                or
BUS 131 F Principles of International Business                3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
BUS 162 F Business Economics                                 3
               or
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                    3
               or
BUS 251 F Business Finance                                    3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
(See counselor for determination of correct course) Units
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                       3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                        3

Three courses from the following for a total of 9 units:    Units
BUS 262 F Principles of Management                           3
                or
BUS 271 F Leadership and Business Ethics                      3
                or
BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business                         3
                or
BUS 267 F Principles of Supervision                           3
                or
BUS 225 F International Management                            3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing                                 3
               or
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                  3
                 or
BUS 224 F International Marketing                               3
Total Units: 30-31

E-Business Development Certificate:

The E-Commerce Business Development Certificate requires a total of 15-17 units of
which 15-17 units are required courses.

Required Courses (9 units):
BUS 170 F Principles of E-Business                              3
BUS 182 F Doing Business Online                                 2
CIS 150 F Introduction to the Internet                          2
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing                                    2

One course from the following for a total of 2-3 units:
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                             3
               or
BUS 181 F Business Plan Developments                            2

One course from the following for a total of 2-3 units:
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                           3
                 or
CIS 105 F Spreadsheet I                                         2

One course from the following for a total of 2 units:
CIS 050 F Web Page Design I                                     2
                 or
CIS 152 F Web Page Design II (HTML)                             2
Total Units: 15-17

Entrepreneurship Associate in Science Degree:

The Associate in Science Degree in Entrepreneurship: Small Business Management
requires a total of 29-31 units are required courses.

Choose three courses from the following required Courses (9 units):
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                            3
BUS 262 F Principles of Management                             3
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                    3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:   Units
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                           3
                 or
CIS 111 F Intro to Information Systems                          3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3-4 units: Units
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                        3
              or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                       3
              or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                                  4

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:   Units
BUS 111 F Business Communications                                3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                   3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 2 or 3 units:Units
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                     3
                or
BUS 170 F Principles of E-Business                               3
                or
BUS 181 F Business Plan Developments                             2
                or
BUS 182 F Doing Business Online                                  3
                or
MKT 201 F Small Business Promotions                              3
                or
BUS 224 F International Marketing                                3
                or
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing and Promotion                       3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:   Units
BUS 162 F Business Economics                                     3
               or
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                       3
               or
BUS 251 F Business Finance                                       3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:   Units
(See counselor for determination of correct course)
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                          3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                           3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:   Units
BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business                            3
                 or
BUS 267 F Principles of Supervision                              3
                 or
BUS 271 F Leadership and Business Ethics                         3
                 or
BUS 290 F Managerial Communications                              3
Total Units: 29-31
Entrepreneurship Certificate:

The Certificate in Entrepreneurship: Small Business Management requires a total of 29-
31 units.

Required Courses (6 units):                                  Units
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                            3
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                    3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:        Units
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                          3
                 or
CIS 111 F Intro to Information Systems                         3

One course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:      Units
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                       3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                     3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                                4

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:        Units
BUS 111 F Business Communications                              3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                 3

One course from the following for a total of 2 or 3 units:   Units
BUS 182 F Doing Business Online                                3
                or
BUS 170 F Principles of E-Business                             3
                or
BUS 181 F Business Plan Developments                           2
                or
BUS 269 F Managing Business Projects                           2
                or
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing and Promotion                     3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:        Units
BUS 162 F Business Economics                                   3
               or
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                     3
               or
BUS 251 F Business Finance                                     3
One course from the following for a total of 3 units:      Units
(See counselor for determination of correct course)
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                       3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                        3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business                         3
                or
BUS 267 F Principles of Supervision                           3
                or
BUS 262 F Principles of Management                            3
                or
BUS 271 F Leadership and Business Ethics                      3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:       Units
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                  3
                 or
MKT 201 F Small Business Promotions                           3
Total Units: 29-31

International Business Management Associate in Science Degree:

The Associate in Science Degree in International Business Management requires a total
of 29-30 units, of which 15 are required units.

Required Courses (15 units)
BUS 131 F Principles of International Business                3
BUS 132 F Principles of Import/Export                         3
BUS 224 F International Marketing                             3
BUS 225 F International Management                            3
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                         3

One course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                      3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                    3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                               4

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 111 F Business Communications                             3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                   3
                or
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                                3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:
(See counselor for determination of correct course)
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                            3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                             3
                or
BUS 242 F International Law                                        3

One course from the following for a total of 2 units:
CIS 150 F Introduction to the Internet                             2
                 or
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing                                       2
                 or
OT 070 F Business Protocol and Ethics                              2
Total Units: 29-30

International Business Certificate:

The International Business Certificate requires a total of 9 required units.

Required Courses (9 units)
BUS 131 F Principles of International Business                     3
BUS 132 F Principles of Import/Export                              3
BUS 224 F International Marketing or                               3
BUS 225 F International Management                                 3
BUS 242 F International Law                                        3
Total Units: 9

International Business Management Certificate:

The Certificate for International Business Management requires a total of 29-30 units.

Required Courses (15 units)
BUS 131 F Principles of International Business                     3
BUS 132 F Principles of Import/Export                              3
BUS 224 F International Marketing                                  3
BUS 225 F International Management                                 3
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                              3

One course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                           3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                         3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                                    4
One course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 111 F Business Communications                               3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                  3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                     3
                or
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                             3

One course from the following for a total of 3 units:
(See counselor for determination of correct course)
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                         3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                          3
                or
BUS 242 F International Law                                     3


One course from the following for a total of 2 units:
CIS 150 F Introduction to the Internet                          2
                 or
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing                                    2
                 or
OT 070 F Business Protocol and Ethics                           2
Total Units: 29-30

Managerial Communications Certificate:

The Managerial Communications Certificate requires a total of 9 required units.

Required Courses (9 units)
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                  3
BUS 290 F Managerial Communications                             3
BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business or                        3
BUS 267 F Principles of Supervision                             3
BUS 271 F Leadership and Business Ethics                        3
MKT 208 F Principles of Selling                                 3
Total Units: 9

Marketing Management Associate in Science Degree:

The Associate in Science Degree in Marketing Management requires a total of 29-30
units, of which 5 are required courses.

Required Courses (5 units)
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                           3
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing                                    2
Choose one course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                         3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                       3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                                  4

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 111 F Business Communications                                3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                   3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                      3
                or
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                              3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 162 F Business Economics                                     3
                or
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                       3
                or
BUS 170 F Principles of E-Business                               3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
(See counselor for determination of correct course) Units
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                          3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                           3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                     3
                or
BUS 224 F International Marketing                                3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
MKT 103 F Principles of Advertising                              3
               or
MKT 205 F Multicultural Markets in U.S.                          3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
MKT 201 F Small Business Promotions                              3
                 or
MKT 208 F Principles of Selling                                  3
Total Units: 29-30
Marketing Management Certificate:

The Marketing Management Certificate requires a total of 28-30 units.

Required Courses
CIS 100 F Intro to Personal Computers                            3
MKT 151 F Internet Marketing                                     2

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3-4 units:
ACCT 001 F Accounting for Small Business                         3
               or
ACCT 100BF Financial Accounting Principles                       3
               or
ACCT 101AF Financial Accounting                                  4

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 111 F Business Communications                                3
               or
BUS 211 F Writing for Business                                   3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 100 F Intro to Business                                      3
                or
BUS 180 F Small Business Management                              3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
BUS 162 F Business Economics                                     3
                or
ECON 101 F Principles of Economics — Micro                       3
                or
BUS 170 F Principles of E-Business                               3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
(See counselor for determination of correct course) Units
BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business                          3
                or
BUS 241AF Business Law                                           3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
MKT 100 F Intro to Marketing                                     3
                or
BUS 224 F International Marketing                                3

Choose one course from the following for a total of 3 units:
MKT 103 F Principles of Advertising                              3
               or
MKT 205 F Multicultural Markets in U.S.                          3
   Choose one course from the following for a total of 2-3 units:
   BUS 269 F Managing Business Projects                             2
                    or
   MKT 090 F Current Issues in Marketing                            .5-3
           (Minimum of 2 units meets requirement)
                    or
   MKT 201 F Small Business Promotions                              3
                    or
   MKT 208 F Principles of Selling                                  3
   Total Units: 28-30

   Project Management Certificate:

   The Project Management Certificate program requires a total of 6.

   Required Courses (6 units)
   BUS 269 F Managing Business Projects                             2
   CIS 120AF Project Management I                                   2
   CIS 120BF Project Management II                                  2
   Total Units: 6

D. Program Course Offered
   The following is a listing of the courses offered by the Business Management
   Department.

   ACCT 105 F Accounting for Supervisors and Managers
   BUS021 F The Securities Market
   BUS 022 F Common Stock
   BUS 023 F Fixed Income Securities
   BUS 024 F Stock Options
   BUS 025 F Investment and Retirement Plans
   BUS 041 F Survey of Business Law
   BUS 051 F Basic Business Mathematics
   BUS 055 F Business English
   BUS 061 F Business Skills Internship
   BUS 080 F E-Business Technology
   BUS 090 F Current Issues in Business
   BUS 100 F Introduction to Business
   BUS 101 F Personal Financial Management
   BUS 111 F Business Communications
   BUS 113 F Introduction to Technical Writing
   BUS 131 F Principles of International Business
   BUS 132 F Principles of Import/Export
   BUS 151 F Business Mathematics
   BUS 162 F Business Economics
   BUS 170 Principles of E-Business
   BUS 180 F Small Business Management
   BUS 181 F Business Plan Development
   BUS 182 F Doing Business Online
   BUS 201 F Personal Investments
   BUS 211 F Writing for Business
   BUS 211HF Honors Writing for Business
   BUS 224 F International Marketing
   BUS 225 F International Management
   BUS 240 F Legal Environment of Business
   BUS 240HF Honors Legal Environment of Business
   BUS 241 AF Business Law
   BUS 241 BF Business Law
   BUS 251 F Business Finance
   BUS 262 F Principles of Management
   BUS 266 F Human Relations in Business
   BUS 267 F Principles of Supervision
   BUS 269 F Managing Business Projects
   BUS 271 F Leadership and Business Ethics
   BUS 290 F Managerial Communications
   BUS 298 F Advanced Topics in Business

   The following is list of classes offered by the Marketing Management program:

   MKT 090 F Current Issues in Marketing
   MKT 100 F Introduction to Marketing
   MKT 103 F Principles of Advertising
   MKT 151 F Internet Marketing
   MKT 152 F Internet Advertising
   MKT 153 F Customer Service on the Internet
   MKT 201 F Small Business Promotions
   MKT 205 F Multicultural Markets in U.S.
   MKT 208 F Principles of Selling

E. Program Faculty
   The Business Management and Marketing Programs faculty includes the following
   individuals:
   David Cooper
   Delores Reha
   Wallace Ritter
   Kathleen Standen
   Jane Troop
   Marcus Wilson
   Robert Yamaguchi
   The program currently has ten adjunct faculty.

F. F. Program Advisory Committee
   The Business Management and Marketing Management Advisory Committee members
   as 2008-2009 are listed as follows:

   Ms. Nicole Coats
   Economic Development Manager
   City of Fullerton
   303 W. Commonwealth Avenue
   Fullerton, CA 92832

   Mr. & Mrs. James Bauer
   3001 Valera Way
   Fullerton, CA 92835

   Mr. Richard Cassel
   1749 Baronet Place
   Fullerton, CA 92833

   Mr. Christopher Castle
   1101 N. Cornell
   Fullerton, CA 92831

   Mr. Gustavo Chamorro
   Digital Media Center
   1300 S. Bristol
   Santa Ana, CA 92704

   Ms. Betty Chavis
   Business Administration & Economics
   California State University, Fullerton
   P.O. Box 6848
   Fullerton, CA 92834-6848

   Mr. Greg Climaco
   1373 Quail Lane
   Brea, CA 92821

   Ms. Nicole Coats, Economic Development Manager
   City of Fullerton
   303 W. Commonwealth
   Fullerton, CA 92832
Ms. JoBeth Cooper
508 S. Dawn Street
Anaheim, CA 92805

Ms. Andrea DeCaro
Kneadle
444 N. Harbor Blvd., #200
Fullerton, CA 92832

Mr. Henri Duong
Vista Interactive Media
10 Corporate Park, Suite 315
Irvine, CA 92612

Mr. Kevin Donnelly
Plasticolor Molded Products
801 S. Acacia Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92831

Mr. William Davey
Banker’s Small Business Community Development Corp. of O.C.
901 E. Santa Ana Blvd.
Santa Ana, CA 92701

Mr. Eduardo Figueroa
Hispanic Business Consultants
901 E. Santa Ana Blvd.
Santa Ana, CA 92701

Mr. Gary Graves
Graves Design & Communications, LLC
114 E. Amerige Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92832

Mr. Peter Kan
Beckman-Coulter, Inc.
200 S. Kraemer Blvd., MS W 125
Brea, CA 92822-8000

Ms. Mary Keenan
1151 North Tustin Avenue, Suite 1000
Santa Ana, CA 92706

Mr. Neil Kuritzky
P.O. Box 4756
Irvine, CA 92616
Ms. Laura Lindblom
121 S. Beth Circle
Anaheim, CA 92806

Mr. Ben Lai
Best in Town
1710 Chantilly Lane
Fullerton, CA 92833

Mr. David Miller
1907 Glenwood Lane
Newport Beach, CA 92660

Ms. Kay Miller
2435 E. Commonwealth
Fullerton, CA 92831

Dr. Rebecca Morgan
Fullerton College
Fullerton, CA 92831

Ms. Leila Mozaffari
Orange County Small Business Development
2323 North Broadway
Santa Ana, CA 92706

Mr. Ragu Nath
O.C. Small Business Development Center
901 E. Santa Ana Blvd., Suite 102
Santa Ana, CA 92701

Mr. Barry Pasternack
Management Science
CSU Fullerton, CA 92834-9480

Ms. Robin Patino
Schools First Federal Credit Union
15442 Del Amo
Tustin, CA 92780

Mr. Robert Powers
Robert Powers & Associates
2106 Ipsen Way
Placentia, CA 92670

Ms. Allison Pratt
26762 Via Zaragosa
Mission Viejo, CA 92691
           Ms. Sallie Salinas
           Institute for Women Entrepreneurs
           2323 North Broadway
           Santa Ana, CA 92706

           Mr. Peter Sibbald
           P.O. Box 4014
           Fullerton, CA 92834

           Mr. Joshua Troesh
           2408 N. Mountain
           Upland, CA 91784

           Mr. Michael Whited
           Schools First Federal Credit Union
           7251 Warner Avenue, Suite A
           Huntington Beach, CA 92647

           Mr. Henry Xie
           Grand Inn
           1000S. Euclid Street
           Fullerton, CA 92832

II. Program Key Performance Indicators

       The following page reflect the departments overall performance evaluation for the five
       period ending for the school year 2009-2009. Historically the department has suffered many
       setbacks during the past ten year period. These include the loss of faculty through attrition
       and retirement. Further reductions were incurred in the area of class offerings with cuts to
       the program that were the results of budgetary constraints. Overall the key indicators
       reflect that the department was very efficient in the providing of service to the student
       through course selections and amount of offerings during this period. However, the Spring
       2010 semester brings additional cuts to course offerings; thereby, reducing the availability
       of classes offered for students to complete their degrees and certificates as well as acquire
       transfer units. Because of the cuts to course schedules and incurring increased enrollments,
       the FTE of the department improved.
III. Program Outcomes Analysis
        a. Report on Status of Previous Review Outcomes Analysis:
        b. Summary of Data:
           Business Management Department:
           The Business Management summary of data is presented in a spreadsheet format on the
           previous page. Key performance indicators are course information, student information,
           program resources, program efficiency and program outcomes. A summary of the
           information shows that the program has increased its course offerings over the period
           with the development of new courses. Furthermore the overall offering of classes show a
           modest increase in number of sections offered. The bulk in increase is in the offering of
           more online courses from 4 to 11 over the past five year period consisting of 18 sections.
           Additional data reflected an increase in enrollment into the Business Management
           program over the past five years showing a growth rate of 21 percent.

           All students have access to the Business Management Program and its course offerings.
           Special arrangements are necessary for our students with disabilities such as testing,
           access to lecture materials, videos, etc. Several classes require prerequisites such as
           Writing for Business (Bus 211) and Business Mathematics (Bus 151); however, all other
           courses do not have such prerequisites. The only limitation is the available seat count
           and classroom fire ordinance per number of students allowed in a classroom. Hence, all
           students do have immediate access to the Business Management Program.

           Program resources include funding, personnel, and equipment available for instruction
           have declined. Because of the State of California’s budgetary crisis over the past several
           years, the funding available to the educational system has declined. This decline in
           available revenues has filtered down through the system and has resulted in a budget
           decrease to the community college system. The extended day funding for the 2009-2010
           school year for this institution has been dropped by 20 percent resulting in the
           cancellation of classes and the dismissing of adjunct faculty. CCA President, Ron Norton
           Reel said at recent meeting of the Board of Directors that “many districts, like North
           Orange, are cutting classes taught by part-time faculty and using carryover funds to cover
           the funding gaps for this year. Reel indicated that next year’s cuts will be even worse”
           (United Faculty Minutes, September 23, 2009). Furthermore, budgetary cuts have
           resulted in the decline in the number of faculty in the department. As faculty members
           have left the school or have retired from the department, these positions were either not
           refilled or were reallocated to another department. Because of the decline in faculty
           positions, the existing faculty has taken the overload in classes to maintain the level of
           course offering to serve our students. The non-filling of these positions has caused the
           department to lose the funding base/allocation which has been recaptured by the
           administration. As cuts continue, the availability of new equipment or technological
           upgrades has been set back. However the problem that does exist is the getting the
existing computers fixed on a timely basis and the uploading of current software
necessary to be current with business applications.

The program efficiency can be seen in the statistics. With the repeated cuts in revenues
and a historical downsizing of the department, the department has shown a steady
increase in enrollments. Enrollments from 3,271 in the 2001-2005 school years to 3,953
in the 2008-2009 school year represent an increase of 682 students or a 21 percent in the
major over the five year period. Hence, student enrollment has caused more faculty to
add students to classes over their limits. Our FTE Faculty equivalency has steadily risen
from 21.4 in 2004-2005 school year to 24.7 in the 2008-2009 school year. The
department’s overall efficiency is seen in the WSCH per FTEF figure that has increased
from 425 in 2004-2005 to 449 in 2008-2009 or a 5 percent increase over the five year
period. Over this five year period, the department has been extremely efficient even with
the cuts in revenues, classes and faculty. The fall 2009 enrollments and fill rate as of the
second week is 100 percent with 1973 seats available and 1979 seats filled.

Student success is reflected in the retention rate and course success completion
statistics. Course retention has historically been maintained as an average of 79 percent
(rate as of the fourth week of the semester). Successful completion of the course for the
last five years averaged 62 percent (the receiving of a grade of D or higher). However, the
student transfer rate has declined markedly over the past four years from 362 students in
the 2004-2005 school year to 183 students in the 2007-2008 school year or by 49
percent. Degrees awarded remain constant at 152 for the 2008-2009 school year.

Marketing Management Department:

Student information on Majors reflect an increase from 135 in 2004-2005 school year to
208 in 2008-2009 school year or an 54 percent increase over the period. However, FTES
has remained constant over the period. Whereas WSCH has increased by 60 from 922 in
2004-2005 school year to 982 for the 2008-2009 school year which represents a 6.5
percent increase.

Program efficiency such as average section size has increased from 27.6 students during
the 2004-2005 fall semester to 35 students in the 2008-2009 fall semester or an 26.8
percent increase. The overall average slightly increased for the period. This overall WSCH
per FTEF increased from 408 in 2004-2005 school year to 457 in 2008-2009 or by 49
which represents an 12 percent increase. Course retention rate remained constant at 79
percent over the period. However course success slightly declined from 62 percent in
2004-2005 school year to 59 percent in 2008-2009.
c. Identification of Trends


    As of the writing of this 2009 Program Review, the unemployment rate for the State of
    California now exceeds twelve percent as reported by the Los Angeles Times on
    September 19, 2009. This is the highest unemployment rate since the 1940’s. The Los
    Angeles Times reports “though the state may be in the early stages of an economic
    rebound, the latest figures underscore what many economists fear: There is no obvious
    engine of job growth to put California’s more than 2.2 million unemployed residents
    back to work quickly” (Los Angeles Times, September 19, 2009). The nation’s
    unemployment rate rose to 10.2 percent as of November 5, 2009, as reported by the
    government. The community college has been the underlying force behind the
    reeducation of the workforce during economic downturns. Individuals return to the
    educational institution to retrain and change career paths in large numbers. This
    recession/depression economy has seen the crush of enrollment on the community
    colleges. The forecast for California is continued unemployment in the double digit area
    for several years to come because of construction and housing industry decline.
    Therefore, enrollment in the community colleges will be at extreme limits of capacity to
    handle the increase of students.

    In reviewing the Business Management and Marketing Management Programs, it is
    necessary to examine several risk factors that may or may not affect the overall level
    and efficiency of instruction of the Business Management and Marketing Management
    Programs. First and foremost is the condition of the State of California budget system
    that affects the available funding for the community college system. Second, the
    changing economy may affect the types of programs being offered. Third, the student’s
    educational level and the knowledge base that they may possess. The student’s prior
    preparation to tackle a college education may dictate types of course offerings to
    prepare them for entry as a productive individual. These risks will be discussed.

    Economy of the State of California
    As mentioned earlier, the unemployment rate has increased. The true figure for
    unemployment could be much higher than the officially reported rate since many
    individuals have fallen from the unemployment rolls and are still unemployed looking
    for work. The State of California is losing residents from the state. During 2008, the
    State lost a net 144,000 citizens. Not only is the state losing citizens, the state is losing
    jobs. “Manufacturing job levels have shrunk rapidly in California and across the nation.
    During the past nine years manufacturing job levels fell by 5.4 million in the nation and
    nearly 540,000 in California “ (Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy,
    July 2009). The study covered up to May 2009. The State’s Head of Insurance said on
    CNBC on September 18, 2009, that the state was losing at least 3,000 residents a week
    from the tax rolls. This will cause a decrease in the amount of tax revenue that the state
will receive. Therefore the coffers of the state will receive less money. Already the state
is experiencing a loss in property tax revenues because of property foreclosures and the
layoff of workers. The crash of the stock market has led to a further decline in the
state’s revenues received through investments. With an over twenty-two billion dollar
state deficit, the state is forced to cut back on the allocations of revenues to finance the
state’s educational system.

Although the Federal Reserve Chairman, Ben Bernanke, said the “recession is very likely
over at this point…employment will be slow to come down…It will come down, but it
will take some time” (WSJ, September 15, 2009). However the state still faces
degradation to its revenue system for the next several years. Hence, the forecast for
additional cuts to educational programs will continue for an extended period of time.
This means that the state will be forced or rather pressured into increased taxation to
cover expenses and support social programs. A new round of class closures and fee
increases will be instituted within the educational system; thereby, the student will be
force to reevaluate whether to go to college or find work because of the increased cost
of education.

Increase Enrollment
The downturn in the economy with the near collapse of the financial system with the
failures of Lehman Brothers, AIG, Freddy, Fannie, Wachovia, and Washington Mutual
Bank as well as other financial institutions has frozen the credit markets. The closing of
banking entities continues today. Furthermore, with this economic decline, being led by
Wall Street and the housing market collapse, has forced millions of workers onto the
rolls of the unemployed. “The jobless rate rose to 10.2% in October from 9.8% in
September -- first time in the double digits since 1983. Employers cut 190,000 jobs last
month, although the pace of job losses continues to slow” (Los Angeles Times,
November 6, 2009). Because of this increase in unemployment, the revenues the state
receives will decline. This includes property tax revenues that the state has borrowed
from the cities. However, during recessionary periods the community colleges fill the
role of the reeducation of the workforce as they return to school to be retrained and
educated in a new career track or path. The enrollment at these institutions swells with
individuals seeking new opportunities. The community colleges are at the forefront of
this redevelopment process through the offerings of both vocational and professional
certifications. Hence, these programs made available must be sufficient to help take
these individuals to be more able to find viable careers and worker skills. The Advocate
date Nov/Dec 2009 reports that “*f+igures recently released by the Chancellor’s Office
revealed a 4.9 percent –or 135,000 student—increase in enrollment in the 2008-09
school year with an even higher number expected for the 2009-10 year. But those
figures fail to depict the human toll that budget cuts are taking” (p. 1).
The overall national economy has seen some form of life. However, this life is in the
form of government spending along the lines of Keynesian economic theory in the using
of public money to stabilize output and spur economic growth. The current government
policy is a return to the depression era economic policy with increased government
spending to spark growth. As seen in the 1930’s, the increase in government spending
did spur some life into the economy; however, the increase in taxes during the 1930’s
dropped the economy back into a depression. The government spending for World War
II brought the United States out of the depression. Society has seen this type of
government spending during the 1930’s – 1940’s. Therefore, government’s spending
directed at state projects in January 2009, unless the project is shovel ready, will not
provide the incentive because most states will not see the revenues from the Federal
Government for at least two years until all EPA regulations have been cleared or met.
Hence, state economic growth will be lower than expected. Because of this lower than
expected economic growth, community colleges should see increased enrollments as
workers return to be reeducated. However, if the Federal Government raises taxes, the
current economic recovery, although small, will collapse. Therefore, expect to see a “W”
recovery rather than a “V” bottom if taxes are imposed. This means that economic
growth will not be seen for several years out in the future. The state will be forced to
raise taxes to acquire income to fund its programs. According to an article, “How Does
the Budget Situation Really Affect Us?”, in Senaterostrum by President Jane Patton on
September 2009, colleges should see an increase in fees; thereby, forcing may students
who would go to the university or state college system into the community college
program (Senaterostrum, p. 19). Overall, the enrollment in community colleges should
remain high for several more years as well as being constrained by less funding to
provide full services to students.

This small economic growth is due to government spending rather than consumer
spending. The spending by the Federal Government is enormous. The bailout of General
Motors by the government was necessary to save the jobs of a million and a half
workers. Because of the constant likelihood of losing jobs (unemployment rate is the
highest in twenty-six years); the consumer has cut back on debt and spending. The
United States economy is historically directed by the consumer. Consumer spending
amounts to 70 percent of economic growth. Consumers have moved from a 6 percent
deficit spending to a 6 percent savings position. This represents a 12 percent move from
consumer spending. This curtailment in consumer spending has led to a major pull back
in the economy to a depression type level. Because of this pull back, retail entities and
large ticket items have seen a marked decline in sales. The result is a paradigm shift by
the consumer to paying off debt and the saving of money. The further increase of
unemployment and the continued foreclosures of housing will led to further declines in
consumer spending which will further stagnate the economy. Therefore, the current
growth is falsely induced by government spending that has led to a huge twelve trillion
dollar deficit. The deficit will eventually lead to higher inflation as some point in the
future.

The community college’s programs that are being offered must have relevance for a
changing economy and worker preference. Programs offered must provide the student
with an opportunity for advancement through the skills they receive or acquire by being
educated. Society demands that these skills be relevant and useful. Therefore, a critical
study of the courses offered is necessary as to their relevance.

Communications Revolution
The change from an industrial society to a consumer oriented one forced change in the
educational system’s curriculum. Currently the information society exists. The rapid
change in technology is forcing institutions to update and upgrade course offerings. The
push of the internet and now social networking has affected the business community.
The business communities have embraced and have implemented these advances into
their everyday business life. The use of blogs and viral commercials allow business to
provide information, knowledge, and brand recognition by capturing a newer consumer
base. Organizations who do not offer blogs will be left behind in this advancement in
communications. Therefore, the community college needs to be at the forefront in the
offering of courses necessary to be current with new technological changes.
The younger student arriving at the college level is very familiar in the use of
technology. The older student who returns may or may not be as versed in technological
advancements. Therefore, a community college campus will be a very diverse
population. The needs of each of these individuals must be met in some form or
another. There must be programs that will meet the needs of the student. Some
individual’s requirements consist of retraining in a new career or vocation; others may
require the taking of courses necessary for an advanced degree, while still others
individuals may want to just take a refresher class or course at the college. The college
should be advanced enough so that the needs of those they represent can be met. If this
means the cancellation and the addition of new courses that requirement must be met
fully.

Risk Summary
In summary of the risks, the program offering must meet the needs of its constituency
that the college represents. Courses should be practical and allow for the advancement
of the individual. The state of economy is going to dictate the college’s offerings over
the next several years. The state cannot recover quickly enough back to the good years
before the crash. The process will a long, slow, and drawn out process of recovery. The
budget for the 2009-2010 NOCCCD Budget reflects: (1) “the elimination of forty” (40)
faculty positions; (2) “limit enrollment to CAP”; and (3) a “cut of $4.2 million to the
extended day budget” (United Faculty Minutes, September 9, 2009). Therefore, offering
courses necessary for individuals to return to economic stability are a necessity. The
    continued cuts in the school’s budget process will be a fact of history and life as the
    state tries to cope with a continued short fall in revenues.

d. Immediate Short-Term Plans

    Opportunity in the area of technological advancement in communications provides the
    development of new courses. A new course centered upon social networking will be
    necessary. Business is using social networking as an advertising tool to hear what the
    consumer says concerning products and services. A course that explains how an
    organization can use and develop this form of communications as a form of e-commerce
    is necessary. From a personal communications point of view, student’s need to be
    aware of My Space and Face Book as well as Twitter as a complete component in
    advancement of careers through the intergradations of these forms of communications.
    A study recently reported that 70% of human resource managers check an applicant’s
    website. Therefore, individuals need to know what they should or should not place on
    these web pages. Additional courses developed in the area of banking (commercial bank
    management), retailing (retail management), and marketing (marketing strategies) are
    necessary to remain current with the business environment. These areas are expected
    to see major changes over the next several years because of government regulations,
    international trade competition, and a slow recovery of the overall economy. Therefore,
    new marketing techniques will be derived forcing change. The consumer must be
    reached using new methods of advertising because the older modes of advertising such
    as newspapers have folded during the most recent downturn with many going to a
    paperless online method of delivery.

    A short-term goal is to continue the development of courses to present for the online
    environment. The online environment allows greater access to those students who need
    to work and support themselves with the opportunity to acquire college credits and
    additional skills without leaving work or home.

e. Long-Term Plans

    Course Delivery
    This brings the discussion to new methods of delivery. Our students are becoming more
    high tech. There exist today several generations living together who have witnessed the
    advancement from a sea transportation by sail, to steam, and to air transport during
    their life time. Information has more than doubled and this doubling is accelerating at a
    faster pace. The need for a brick-and-mortar organization is not necessary for the
    transfer of information. Educational institutions need to continue and streamline the
    presentation of educational materials through new modes of delivery. These new
    methods include online, online/hybrid, and I-phone delivery systems. Courses in the
    Business Management Program have advanced this movement with the development of
       online courses for Personal Finance, Supervision, and Business Communications. The
       newest offering online will be Business Mathematics (Bus 151). The Business
       Management and Marketing Management Programs continue to expand the horizon of
       different types of course offerings to assist students with different learning styles.

       Course Development
       Additional courses developed in the area of banking (commercial bank management),
       retailing (retail management), and marketing (marketing strategies) are necessary to
       remain current with the business environment. These areas are expected to see major
       changes over the next several years because of government regulations, international
       trade competition, and a slow economic recovery of the overall economy.

       Because of the recession/depression, several programs have been hit hard. The Real
       Estate program has seen decay in enrollments since 2007 with the beginning of the real
       estate market collapse. These courses still revolve around a certificated program. When
       the economy returns to normal levels and the real estate market recovers, these
       programs will once again become vital sources of employment for individuals. A minimal
       course offering is currently taking place to keep the program viable once the economy
       returns to normal.

       Degree/Certificate
       The long term goal is to be able to provide to students the ability to acquire their
       degrees/certificates through being able to complete the required course work totally
       from an online environment. The goal of the Business Management and Marketing
       Management Programs is to be able to provide degree opportunities for those students
       who are long-distance learners. Therefore, the offering of an Associates of Arts or an
       Associates of Science Degree from attending classes online is the goal of the
       department.


Request for Resources

       The Business Management and Marketing Management Programs has need of acquiring
       additional computers to replace the old systems in room 322. Furthermore, computers
       are being considered for installment in rooms 325 and 327 to be used during class
       instruction for course such as Business Finance, Personal Finance, Personal Investments,
       Marketing Management and Small Business Management. Assignments using spread
       sheets analysis and project preparation by students require the use of computing
       equipment.

       Additional equipment such as new overhead projectors for PowerPoint presentation is
       necessary in several rooms. The existing equipment is old and outdated. Also necessary
is the replacement of all DVD/television equipment and computer equipment so that
sub-captioned materials can be shown for the disable student.

				
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