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					                                             2008
             Socorro County Health
                    Profile



                            Socorro County Options, Prevention and Education
                                    A comprehensive health council




Ernest Pargas, President                                   Nadine Ulibarri-Keller, Vice President
Carol Sullivan, Treasurer                                  James Nettleton, Secretary
Bobbi Jo McIntire, Coordinator




Funded by New Mexico Department of Health
Fiscally Managed by Socorro Mental Health
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

Our Community Partners
ARC of New Mexico - Socorro County
Boys and Girls Club
Literacy Volunteers of Socorro County
Magdalena Medical Center
New Mexico Department of Health
New Mexico Department of Labor
New Mexico GRADS
New Mexico Human Services Department
New Mecico Tech - Performing Arts Series
Puerto Seguro, Inc.
Socorro Baptist Temple
Socorro City Council
Socorro Community Health Center
Socorro Consolidated Schools
Socorro County DWI Program
Socorro General Hospital – Healthy Family Inititive
Socorro General Hospital – Heritage Program for Senior Adults
Socorro Mental Health, Inc.
Socorro Police Department
Socorro Senior Center
Socorro Storehouse
Wells Fargo
...and growing!




SCOPE Health Council 1200 Highway 60 West Socorro, NM 87801


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                             SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                                     Table of Contents
1     Executive Summary .............................................................................................................. 10
2     Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 12
    2.1      Council description ....................................................................................................... 12
    2.2      Mission, Vision and Purpose of Council ...................................................................... 12
    2.3      Definition of Health ...................................................................................................... 13
    2.4      Purpose of Profile ......................................................................................................... 13
    2.5      Profile development ...................................................................................................... 13
3     Community Description ........................................................................................................ 14
    3.1      Geographic Description ................................................................................................ 14
    3.2      Population Description.................................................................................................. 15
      3.2.1          Population ............................................................................................................. 15
      3.2.2          Gender ................................................................................................................... 16
      3.2.3          Age ........................................................................................................................ 16
      3.2.4          Gender by Age ...................................................................................................... 17
      3.2.5          Race, ethnicity....................................................................................................... 18
      3.2.6          Income................................................................................................................... 20
      3.2.7          Income Inequality ................................................................................................. 21
      3.2.8          Poverty .................................................................................................................. 22
      3.2.9          Education .............................................................................................................. 23
          3.2.9.1       National Rating ................................................................................................. 23
          3.2.9.2       Graduation Rates ............................................................................................... 23
          3.2.9.3       Dropout Rate ..................................................................................................... 23
      3.2.10         Languages spoken ................................................................................................. 24
      3.2.11         Employment and Industry ..................................................................................... 25
      3.2.12         Other ..................................................................................................................... 26
          3.2.12.1          Homelessness ................................................................................................ 26
          3.2.12.2          Hunger......................................................................................................... 267
    3.3      Community Assets and Wellness.................................................................................. 27
      3.3.1          Physical ................................................................................................................. 27
      3.3.2          Education .............................................................................................................. 28
          3.3.2.1       School Districts ................................................................................................. 28


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                            SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

          3.3.2.2      Preschool ........................................................................................................... 29
          3.3.2.3      Home schooled.................................................................................................. 29
          3.3.2.4      Post-Secondary Education ................................................................................ 29
          3.3.2.5      Libraries ............................................................................................................ 30
      3.3.3         Social/Arts............................................................................................................. 30
      3.3.4         Individuals............................................................................................................. 30
      3.3.5         Other ..................................................................................................................... 30
    3.4     Interpretation of the information in the Community Description section..................... 30
4     Community Health Status ..................................................................................................... 30
    4.1     Maternal child health indicators.................................................................................... 30
      4.1.1         Total Births ........................................................................................................... 30
      4.1.2         Births by Age ........................................................................................................ 31
      4.1.3         Low birth weight ................................................................................................... 32
      4.1.4         High birth weight .................................................................................................. 32
      4.1.5         Births to teens ....................................................................................................... 33
      4.1.6         Births to single mothers ........................................................................................ 35
      4.1.7         Prenatal care level ................................................................................................. 35
      4.1.8         Infant mortality ..................................................................................................... 36
    4.2     Mortality – General ....................................................................................................... 36
      4.2.1         Total Deaths .......................................................................................................... 36
      4.2.2         General Mortality or Death Rate........................................................................... 37
      4.2.3         Deaths by Gender .................................................................................................. 37
      4.2.4         Deaths by Age Group............................................................................................ 37
      4.2.5         Deaths by Race/Ethnicity...................................................................................... 38
    4.3     Leading Causes of Death .............................................................................................. 40
    4.4     Chronic Disease Indicators ........................................................................................... 40
      4.4.1         Years of Potential Life Lost (YPLL) .................................................................... 40
      4.4.2         Heart Disease ........................................................................................................ 40
      4.4.3         Cancer (Malignant Neoplasms) ............................................................................ 41
      4.4.4         Stroke (Cerebrovascular Diseases) ....................................................................... 43
      4.4.5         Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) ................................................ 43
      4.4.6         Diabetes................................................................................................................. 43
      4.4.7         Arthritis ................................................................................................................. 44

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                        SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

  4.4.8         Asthma .................................................................................................................. 44
  4.4.9         Disability ............................................................................................................... 44
  4.4.10        Oral Health ............................................................................................................ 44
  4.4.11        Other ..................................................................................................................... 45
4.5     Infectious Disease Indicators ........................................................................................ 45
  4.5.1         Leading causes of infectious diseases ................................................................... 45
  4.5.2         Influenza ............................................................................................................... 45
  4.5.3         Pneumonia............................................................................................................. 45
  4.5.4         Food-borne Infectious Diseases (Campylobacter, Salmonella, E. coli, Shigella) 45
  4.5.5         Hepatitis ................................................................................................................ 45
  4.5.6         Whooping Cough (Pertussis) ................................................................................ 46
  4.5.7         Tuberculosis .......................................................................................................... 46
  4.5.8         Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis ....................... 46
  4.5.9         Sexually Transmitted Diseases: HIV/AIDS.......................................................... 48
  4.5.10        Other ..................................................................................................................... 48
4.6     Environmental Health Indicators .................................................................................. 49
  4.6.1         Safe streets, neighborhoods, parks ........................................................................ 49
  4.6.2         Food Safety ........................................................................................................... 49
  4.6.3         Water Quality ........................................................................................................ 49
  4.6.4         Air Quality (Indoor, Outdoor)............................................................................... 50
  4.6.5         Lead....................................................................................................................... 50
  4.6.6         Other ..................................................................................................................... 51
      4.6.6.1      Environmental Health Forum ........................................................................... 51
      4.6.6.2      Housing ........................................................................................................... 512
4.7     Injury, Violence, Substance Abuse Indicators .............................................................. 52
  4.7.1         Violent Deaths (homicides, suicides, workplace, firearm-related, etc.) ............... 52
      4.7.1.1      Homicide ........................................................................................................... 52
      4.7.1.2      Suicide............................................................................................................... 52
      4.7.1.3      Weapons, Violence and Youth ......................................................................... 53
  4.7.2         Abuse/neglect or violence (child, elderly, domestic violence) ............................. 53
      4.7.2.1      Child Abuse ...................................................................................................... 53
      4.7.2.2      Elder Abuse ....................................................................................................... 54
      4.7.2.3      Domestic Violence ............................................................................................ 54

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                            SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

      4.7.3         Unintentional injury .............................................................................................. 56
      4.7.4         Substance Abuse ................................................................................................... 56
          4.7.4.1       Alcohol .............................................................................................................. 56
          4.7.4.2       Tobacco ............................................................................................................. 57
          4.7.4.3       Illicit Drugs ....................................................................................................... 57
    4.8      Risk, Resiliency Indicators: .......................................................................................... 57
      4.8.1         Youth Resiliency Factors ...................................................................................... 57
    4.9      Interpretation of Community Health Status Information .............................................. 58
5     Health-related Services: Capacity, Access and Use (Utilization) ......................................... 58
    5.1      Capacity: What services exist for whom ...................................................................... 58
      5.1.1         Maternal Child Health (MCH) .............................................................................. 58
          5.1.1.1       Access to Care................................................................................................... 58
          5.1.1.2       Services and MCH plans ................................................................................... 58
          5.1.1.3       County Funding ................................................................................................ 59
      5.1.2         Dental Health ........................................................................................................ 59
      5.1.3         Infrastructure ......................................................................................................... 59
          5.1.3.1       Public Safety ..................................................................................................... 59
          5.1.3.2       Communication ................................................................................................. 60
      5.1.4         Health and Community Resources........................................................................ 60
          5.1.4.1       Access to Health Care ....................................................................................... 60
          5.1.4.2       Transportation ................................................................................................... 60
          5.1.4.3       Licensed Health Professionals .......................................................................... 61
          5.1.4.4       Medical Specialties ........................................................................................... 61
          5.1.4.5       Resource Directory ........................................................................................... 62
          5.1.4.6       SCOPE Community Partners ............................................................................ 62
          5.1.4.7       Community nonprofit organizations ................................................................. 68
          5.1.4.8       Public Health and Social Services .................................................................... 69
    5.2      Access: what influences access to services for different groups .................................. 70
    5.3      Utilization: who utilizes these existing services ........................................................... 70
6     Health Disparities.................................................................................................................. 70
7     Summary of Profile Highlights & Overall Interpretation ..................................................... 70
    7.1      What Issues Strongly Impact Health of County Population ......................................... 70
      7.1.1         Mental Health........................................................................................................ 70

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                             SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

   7.2        Important health priorities in Socorro County .............................................................. 71
   7.3        Explanation or discussion, from council’s perspective................................................. 71
References Cited.......................................................................................................................... 72
Appendix A: Explanation of Per Capita Income ..................................................................... 75
Appendix B: Local American Cancer Society Medical Information ..................................... 76
Appendix C: Simplified SCOPE Resource Guide.................................................................... 79
Appendix D: Community Satisfaction Survey ......................................................................... 85


                                                        List of Tables
Table 1: Socorro County 2005 Population Estimates by Age and Race/Ethnicity………….. ….16
Table 2: Age breakdown of Alamo Residents ……………………………………….…………17
Table 3: Socorro County Nativity and Citizenship …………………………………...…………18
Table 4: Alamo Reservation Race Distribution, 2000 …………………………………..………19
Table 5: 1999 Income for Alamo Reservation Residents ……………………………………….21
Table 6: Estimated Number of Percent and People in Poverty, 2004 ……………..…………… 22
Table 7: Alamo Reservation Poverty Level………………………………………………….….22
Table 8: Socorro County Food Stamps and TANF Cases ………………………………………22
Table 9: Socorro County 2004-2005 School District Dropout Rates ……………..…………….23
Table 10: Languages Spoken Socorro County ……………………………………….………….24
Table 11: Socorro County Population speaking English less than "very well" ………….….…..24
Table 12: US Census 2003 Business Quickfacts Socorro County ………………………………25
Table 13: New Mexico Department of Labor Employment 2006 Quarter 1 ………………..…..25
Table 14: New Mexico Department of Labor Socorro County 2006 Quarter 2 Employment ….26
Table 15: Alamo Community School Profile, 2000 ……………………………………….……29
Table 16: Socorro County Home Schooled Students …………………………………………...29
Table 17: Socorro County Resident Live Births by Age of Mother, 1995 and 2005 ……….…..31
Table 18: Socorro County Resident Live Births to Mothers <20 Years of Age, 2005 ………….31
Table 19: Socorro County Percent Low Birth Weights, 2000 – 2005 …………………...…….. 32
Table 20: Socorro County Percent High Birthweight, 1994-2005.…………………………..….32
Table 21: Socorro County Adequacy of Prenatal Care 2000-2004.………………………...…..36
Table 22: Socorro County Resident Infant Deaths, 2000-2005……………………….…………36




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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

Table 23: Socorro County Number of Deaths by Sex, 2005…………………………………….37
Table 24: Socorro County Morality Rates Among Non-Hispanic White Males, 1995-2004
          Aggregated …………………………………………………………………………....38
Table 25: Socorro County Cancer Morality Rates Among Hispanic Males, 1995-2004
          Aggregated …………………………………………………………………………....38
Table 26: Socorro County Cancer Morality Rates Among Non-Hispanic White Females,
        1995-2004 Aggregated ………………………………………………………………..39
Table 27: Socorro County Cancer Morality Rates Among Hispanic Females, 1995-2004
        Aggregated ……………………………………………………………………………39
Table 28: Leading Causes of Death, 2005 ………………………………………………………40
Table 29: Number and Rate of Death from Heart Disease, 2005………………………………..40
Table 30: Cancer Among Non-Hispanic White Males Number and Incidence Rate, 1995-2004
        Aggregate ……………………………………………………………………………...41
Table 31: Cancer Among Hispanic Males Number and Incidence Rate, 1995-2004 Aggregate 41
Table 32: Cancer Among Non-Hispanic White Females Number and Incidence Rate, 1995-2004
         Aggregate ……………………………………………………………………………...42
Table 33: Cancer Among Hispanic Females Number and Incidence Rate, 1995-2004 Aggregate
         ………………………………………………………………………………………….42
Table 34: Rate of Asthma Hospital Discharges by Age Group, 1999-2003 Average …………..44
Table 35: Socorro County Food-borne Infectious Diseases, 2005 ……………………………...45
Table 36: Socorro County Hepatitis Rates, 2005 ……………………………………..…………45
Table 37: Socorro County Pertussis Rates, 2005 ………………………………………………..46
Table 38: Socorro County Tuberculosis Cases by Rate, 2005 ……………………………..……46
Table 39: Socorro County Watersheds and Reported Issues ………………………...………….49
Table 40: Child Maltreatment Cases, Quarter 1 SFY08…………………………………………53
Table 41: Socorro County Adult Abuse Cases 2002 ……………………………………………54
Table 42: Socorro County Domestic Violence Rates per 1000, 2001-2005 …………………….54
Table 43: Percent Socorro County Domestic Violence Cases Involving Weapons Use, 2001-2005
          ………………………………………………………………………………………...55
Table 44: Percent Socorro County Domestic Violence Cases With Injury, 2001-2005 ……...…55
Table 45: Victims of Alcohol-involved Crashes, 2004 …………………………………………56
Table 46: Alcohol-involved Crashes and DWI Convictions, 2004………………….. …………56
Table 47: Socorro County Emergency Medical Services 2003 ….……………………………...59




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                   SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                    List of Figures
Figure 1: Detailed map of Socorro County, New Mexico …………………...….. …………….14
Figure 2: Age breakdown of Socorro County 2005 Population ……………………………..….17
Figure 3: 2005 Age and Gender Distribution Socorro County ………………………...………..18
Figure 4: 2004 Population Distribution by All Ages By Race ………………………………….19
Figure 5: Per Capita Personal Income Socorro County 2000-2005 ……………………………..20
Figure 6: Annual Average Wage-Salary Per Job Socorro County 2000-2005 ………...………..21
Figure 7: Socorro County and New Mexico Crude Birth Rates 2000-2005 …………...………..30
Figure 8: Socorro County Resident Live Births to Mothers Age 15-17, 2000 – 2005 ………….33
Figure 9: Socorro County Percent Resident Live Births to Single Mothers, 2000 – 2004 ...……35
Figure 10: Age-Adjusted Death Rates, 2000-2004 ..…………………………………….………37
Figure 11: Socorro County Reported Chlamydia Cases, 2000-2005 ……………...……………46
Figure 12: Socorro County Cases of Chlamydia for Males and Females, 2000-2005 …….……47
Figure 13: Socorro County Rate of Gonorrhea, 2000-2005 ……………………………….……47
Figure 14: Socorro County Reported Gonorrhea Cases, 1999-2005 ……………..……………..48
Figure 15: Socorro County Percent of Children Tested with Blood Lead Levels 1994-2000 …..50
Figure 16: Percent Socorro County Domestic Violence Cases Involving Alcohol/Drug Use,
          2001-2005 …………………………………………………………………………...55




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                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

1 Executive Summary
 Socorro County Options, Prevention and Education (SCOPE) is a comprehensive community
 health council, funded by a grant from the New Mexico Department of Health, and fiscally
 managed by Socorro Mental Health. Currently, there are 21 community partners in the
 SCOPE membership, which welcomes participation from residents and any community
 agency. Over the past year SCOPE has sponsored many activities relating to teen pregnancy,
 substance abuse, and obesity/diabetes.
 This Health Profile serves to summarize Socorro County health data and to identify current
 priorities for SCOPE. The majority of health data cited and discussed within this document
 has been obtained from secondary sources; however, the results from the 2007 Community
 Satisfaction Survey were also made available. Although many efforts were made to update
 data, wherever possible, the most current data available on the Alamo Reservation residents
 is from the 2000 US Census.
 Socorro County covers over 4,200,000 acres in central New Mexico and contains 2.7% of the
 county roads in New Mexico. Socorro County was estimated to have 18,148 people in 2005,
 with 55.1% urban residents and 44.9% rural residents giving a population density of 2.7
 people per square mile. This vastness creates much travel time for residents traveling to
 work, medical services, and recreation. Many residents on the County border elect to utilize
 other county’s services as they are proximally closer than the established services in Socorro
 County.
 Between 1990 and 2004 there has been a constant increase in the total personal income in
 Socorro County. This is also true of the per capita personal income and annual average wage
 for Socorro County and New Mexico. However, Socorro County residents have averaged
 less than New Mexico residents over the last 15 years. In 2004, it is estimated that 23.6% of
 County residents live in poverty.
 Currently, the Socorro Consolidated Schools and Magdalena Municipal School District
 average a 98% graduation rate for the 2005-2006 school year. However, the Alamo Navajo
 Community School had a 39% graduation rate for 1999-2000 school year. Socorro
 Consolidated Schools served 45.5% of its students free lunches and 8.9% price reduced
 lunches from 2005-2006.
 Socorro County has many assets. Many parks are located in the City of Socorro, as well as a
 public swimming pool which is open during the summer. There are many outdoor areas for
 biking, camping, and bird watching. The Public Library and New Mexico Tech Library are
 available for general use. There are also over 25 different churches are located throughout
 the County.
 Crude birth rates from 2000-2005 for Socorro County ranged from 7.5 – 14.4. This is
 roughly half that of New Mexico’s (ranging from 15.0-14.6). Teen birth rates range from
 28.5 to 41.7 births per 1000 15-17 year old females between 2000 and 2005 in Socorro
 County. The 2005 Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey (YRRS) indicates that over 55% of
 Socorro County students reported never having sexual intercourse, while 11% of students
 who reported having intercourse, also reported having two or more sex partners in the last 12
 months. Nearly 11% of Socorro sexually active students reported they had not used a



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                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

method to prevent pregnancy or they were not sure whether they had used protection with
their last intercourse.
During 2005, there were 156 deaths in the county, 52% were male, 48% were female, and
7.52% were infants. The top three leading causes of death for Socorro County in 2004 and
2005 were: Malignant neoplasms (cancer), diseases of the heart, and accidents due to
unintentional injuries. Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer among Socorro County
males and breast cancer is the most diagnosed cancer for Socorro County females.
Communicable or infectious disease rates within counties are indicative of population health
status. In 2005, incidence of food-borne Campylobacter and Salmonella illness rates in
Socorro County were respectively 4X and 2X higher than those in New Mexico. Socorro
Hepatitis A infections were nearly 7X higher; Pertussis (whooping cough); Chlamydia, and
Gonorrhea infection rates were half as high; and AIDS infection rates were one third as high
as New Mexico rates.. Shigella, Acute Hepatitis B, Tuberculosis and Syphilis were not
reported for Socorro in 2005.
From the 2007 Community Satisfaction Survey, Socorro County residents feel the
neighborhoods and parks are safe, but there are not enough biking lanes or biking paths in the
County. Currently, there are no air monitoring stations for Socorro County. None of the
watersheds in Socorro County are vulnerable to pollutants.
In 2005, Socorro County was ranked 8th in the State for domestic violence with a rate of 13.1
per 1000 compared to the State’s rate of 15.6. Between 2001 and 2005, more than 40% of
domestic violence cases involved alcohol and/or drug use, only 11-17% involved weapons,
and 60-91% resulted in injury.
The 2005 YRRS indicated that 45% of Socorro County students had their first alcoholic
drink before the age of 13, and 68.3% of those who drink usually do so at home or another
person’s home. More Socorro County residents smoke than New Mexicans, 25.8%
compared to 22.3%. Eighteen percent of students reported initiating marijuana use at age 12
or younger in 2005 compared to 25% in 2001.
Many agencies and organizations in Socorro County are committed to improve the health of
Socorro County residents. Funding has been sought through Federal, State and County
sources as well as through private donations. More health services have been extended to
Northern Socorro County residents. The City of Socorro has implemented public
transportation within the city limits.
After review of the data at hand, the SCOPE membership determined the priorities for
Socorro County should be: Fitness and Nutrition, Substance Abuse, Teen Pregnancy and
Access to Care in Northern Socorro County. The 2007 Socorro County Health Plan further
identifies activities that will address these issues, bring awareness, and education to Socorro
County residents.




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                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

2 Introduction
 2.1 Council description
    Socorro County Options, Prevention and Education (SCOPE) became a comprehensive
    community health council in February 2001. The New Mexico Department of Health
    began funding SCOPE for the fiscal year of 2002 with $20,000. Since then the funding
    has increased to $121,000 for the fiscal year of 2007. This is the first time that an award
    was given for direct services in the amount of $50,000. Currently, Socorro Mental
    Health, Inc. has been awarded the position of fiscal agent for SCOPE.
    SCOPE members, listed on page 2, represent diverse community organizations,
    healthcare providers, government agencies, and individuals working together to improve
    the well-being of community residents. There is also collaboration with agencies outside
    of SCOPE. This also initiates invitations to outside agencies to upcoming SCOPE
    meetings and events. Work of the council is conducted through the main body,
    committees, and two Sub-councils: Mayor’s Drug Task Force and Healthy Family
    Initiative, which meet separately. The council consists of an elected executive board and
    approximately thirty members who meet on the third Thursday of the month from 11:30
    a.m. to 1:00 p.m., but is open to everyone. The meeting locations are hosted by members
    and changes on a quarterly basis. Currently, SCOPE is working to increase participation
    from the faith-based community as our definition of health includes spiritual well-being.
    This year SCOPE has collaborated with Congressman Pearce’s office to hold a Meth
    Summit for the community. The local Wal-Mart Supercenter donated toys for the Alcohol
    Awareness Fiesta held in the City of Socorro. Terra Luna Counseling’s licensed alcohol
    and substance abuse counselor participated in the Prescription Drug Seminar. The
    University of New Mexico’s Casa Program provided a Spanish speaker and materials in
    Spanish for the Veguita Alcohol Awareness Fiesta. SCOPE participated in the Family
    Funfest organized by New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department in Socorro.
 2.2 Mission, Vision and Purpose of Council
    SCOPE’s vision is:
       Socorro County, a safe and healthy community.
    SCOPE’s mission is:
       to work together
              to provide a method for community health decision making,
              to identify and prioritize health and safety needs,
              to establish and plan strategies for community health goals
       for the improvement of the health and quality of life in families and individuals of
       Socorro County.
    SCOPE, the council, provides the administrative tools to carry out the vision and mission
    stated above. The meetings are designed to provide educational opportunities on health
    related topics, allow reporting of current activities of partner organizations and ensure
    community needs, gaps, and duplications are identified. During the February 2007


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                SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

   SCOPE meeting the data in this profile was presented to the Council. Hence the
   priorities for 2008 were determined.
2.3 Definition of Health
   Health is defined by SCOPE as:
      Health is more than the physical well-being of individuals, or the mere absence of
      disease or infirmity; health refers to the social, economic, emotional, cultural and
      spiritual well-being of a community.
2.4 Purpose of Profile
   SCOPE has compiled and published the information contained in this health profile
   through a New Mexico state funded grant with the support and encouragement of its
   fiscal agent, Socorro Mental Health, Inc. (SMH) and the New Mexico Department of
   Health (NMDOH), Public Health Division (PHD), Improving Health Initiative (IHI).
   The health profile reports county-specific health status indicator and demographic data
   collected from state and federal organizations. The review and interpretation of this data
   is meant to offer insight to the health and well being of Socorro County residents. It also
   reflects the community’s resources, strengths, weaknesses, and gaps. It is also meant to
   aid the SCOPE council in determining its health priorities. The profile can also provide
   insight into possible factors affecting the community’s wellness to the general public and
   organizations that provide services to Socorro County residents.
   This profile is an evolving document which will be published and distributed to Socorro
   County residents and professionals to fulfill our mission. This profile, along with our
   2007 Socorro County Health Plan, creates a working base for our SCOPE executive
   board, SCOPE council, and Sub-Councils to provide the best possible service to all
   stakeholders in Socorro County, to create project priorities for the council, and to avoid
   duplication of services among community partners.
2.5 Profile development
   The information contained in this profile was collected, collated and interpreted primarily
   by the salaried SCOPE Coordinator Bobbi Jo McIntire. The 2005 Socorro County Health
   Profile was used as a template for collecting the 2007 profile information; then revised in
   format to follow the Community Health Assessment & Planning Guidebook Version 2.0
   released November 2006 by the NM Department of Health.
   The data in this profile was collected from a variety of secondary data sources: the
   Internet, New Mexico state/Federal/nonprofit organization publications, and SCOPE
   Community Partners. Primary data came from the SCOPE Community Satisfaction
   Survey for 2007, and reflects the local community health needs that were not otherwise
   known or available. Interpretation of the data was not conducted by a trained statistician
   and therefore quotation by readers should be undertaken with caution.
   This data would have been much harder to collect without the public information
   disseminated at the state and federal levels. In particular, the New Mexico state agencies
   and the New Mexico Department of Health (NM DOH) reports have been the most useful
   in identifying Socorro County specific data. SCOPE partners were also willing to supply
   data that was available to them. New Mexico DOH, Region 5 epidemiologist, Janet


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                SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

    Flores and NMDOH Health Information Librarian, Gay Romero were invaluable assets in
    providing access to information and in their feedback comments as the profile evolved.

3 Community Description
 3.1 Geographic Description
    As stated in the 2002 Socorro County Chamber of Commerce’s Socorro County Visitor’s
    Guide, Socorro County is the third largest county in the state of New Mexico. It is
    located in the central part of the state and covers 4,240,640 acres. Federal entities own
    the largest share of the land at 54.7% (2,318,458 acres), followed by private ownership at
    29.4% (1,247,637 acres), then State ownership at 14.4% (609,517 acres), and lastly, the
    Alamo Navajo Indian Reservation encompasses 65,028 acres (1.5%).
    As depicted in Figure 1 below, Interstate 25 (I-25) is the primary north-south corridor
    running parallel to the City of Socorro, the county seat. Highway US 60 West junctions
    in Socorro and passes West through the Village of Magdalena and continues into
    Arizona. Highway US 60 East begins on I-25, twenty-five miles North of Socorro, and
    continues into Texas. Highway US 380 East begins at the I-25 exit at San Antonio
    continuing into Texas.


                        Figure 1: Detailed map of Socorro County, New Mexico




                        Source: http://www.socorro-nm.com/images/socorrocounty2.pdf


                                                                                      14
                SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

   Travel time to any type of service (work, medical, recreation) in Socorro County is much
   higher than in urban areas. Residents in Alamo and the Village of Magdalena have to
   travel 30 to 90 minutes to the City of Socorro. San Acacia residents travel up to 30
   minutes to the City of Socorro for services. For residents of the county’s borders, in
   many instances it is easier for them to procure services in other counties because they are
   demographically closer. Many Veguita residents choose to travel the 12 miles to Belen
   in Valencia County rather than the 40 miles to the City of Socorro.
   According to the 2004 New Mexico Department of Transportation Facts and Figures
   report Socorro County cities, municipalities, and county maintenance departments are
   responsible for 1,336 miles of road out of 49,985 statewide non federal or state roads (p.
   24). Thus, Socorro County has 2.7% of the total county miles reported in New Mexico.
3.2 Population Description
3.2.1 Population
   The 2000 US Census data lists the population of Socorro County at 18,078. In 2005, the
   US Census data estimates a population of 18,148; Indicating that the county grew 22.4%
   from 1990 to 2000. The City of Socorro with a population of 8,900 is the county seat. It
   is the most densely populated city or municipality in the county (El Defensor Chieftain,
   2005). The biggest concentrated populations live in the City of Socorro and in the
   Village of Magdalena. The County population is estimated to be 55.1% urban and the
   remaining 44.9% are rural residents. According to the 2000 US Census the Native
   American population reported for the Alamo Navajo Chapter was 2,072. The 2005
   population estimates can be seen in Table 1, which also includes the breakdown of age
   and race/ethnicity for Socorro County.
   The defining features of Socorro County’s population include the following:
             Very low population density – 2.7 people per square mile versus that for New
              Mexico of 15.8 people per square mile.
             Very high level of poverty – An estimated 23.6% of county residents of all
              ages live in poverty.
             Relatively young median age of 32.4 reported by the 2000 US Census.




                                                                                    15
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


               Table 1: Socorro County 2005 Population Estimates by Age and Race/Ethnicity
                                  ONE RACE
                                 American                      Native         Two or
  Age                                                                                      Total
                                  Indian /                   Hawaiian /        More
 Group       White    Black                      Asian                                   Population
                                   Native                   Other Pacific     Races
                                 American                     Islander

Total        15,181     204             2,243       311                10          199       18,148
<5              812      16               237         9                 1           15        1,090
5 to 9          899      20               192        11                 0           27        1,149
10 to 14      1,005      26               242         5                 0           24        1,302
15 to 19      1,438      17               227        11                 0           21        1,714
20 to 24      1,396      24               239        69                 2           31        1,761
25 to 29      1,008      15               172        69                 3           21        1,288
30 to 34        711      15               127        38                 1            8          900
35 to 39        809       8               158        37                 2           10        1,024
40 to 44      1,024      13               152        20                 0           11        1,220
45 to 49      1,156       7               128        11                 0            9        1,311
50 to 54      1,121      13               102        12                 0            9        1,257
55 to 59      1,005       9                72         5                 1            9        1,101
60 to 64        806      13                53         3                 0            3          878
65 to 69        665       4                55         2                 0            1          727
70 to 74        517       1                37         3                 0            0          558
75 to 79        346       1                20         3                 0            0          370
80 to 84        270       0                18         1                 0            0          289
85+             193       2                12         2                 0            0          209
                               Source: http://www.unm.edu/~bber/demo/tot2005.xls

3.2.2 Gender
         According to the 2005 population estimate, Socorro County has a total population of
         18,148 with 9,199 males (50.7%) and 8,949 females (49.3%) as shown below in
         Figure 3.
         For the Alamo Reservation, the 2000 US Census reported a total population of 2,702
         with 984 males (47.5%) and 1,088 females (53.5%) as shown below in Table 2.
3.2.3 Age
         The 2005 population estimates published by the Bureau of Business and Economic
         Research (BBER), University of New Mexico lists the age breakdown in Figure 2.
         The 2000 Census for New Mexico lists the median age as 34.6 ranking the state 11th
         lowest in the nation. For Socorro the median age is 32.4 ranking the county 6th among
         all the state counties based on the 2002 Analysis of Selected Indicators of Health and
         Well Being in Socorro County.
         From the estimated population of Socorro County, 29.0% of the population is under
         19 years old. This large youth population does impact the services provided to
         Socorro County residents as there are many services and non-profit organizations that
         service this population (see Appendix for Socorro County Resource Guide).

                                                                                              16
                         SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                 Figure 2: Age breakdown of Socorro County 2005 Population

                                            2005 Population Estimates By Age Group

                         2,000

                         1,500
            Population

                         1,000

                          500

                            0
                                 <5   5 to 10 to 15 to 20 to 25 to 30 to 35 to 40 to 45 to 50 to 55 to 60 to 65 to 70 to 75 to 80 to 85+
                                       9    14    19    24    29    34    39    44    49    54    59    64    69    74    79    84

                                                                           Years of Age


                                            Source: http://www.unm.edu/~bber/demo/tot2005.xls


     For the Alamo Reservation, the 2000 Census shows the age breakdown in Table 2.
     This table indicates that the median age of an Alamo resident is 24 and 43.8% of the
     population is under the age of 19. No information is available to the author at this
     time to explain this disparity in ages and the impact it has on its community.


                                            Table 2: Age breakdown of Alamo Residents




        Source: http://alamo.nndes.org/cms/kunde/rts/alamonndesorg/docs/429411100-09-29-2004-08-31-33o.pdf

3.2.4 Gender by Age
     The 2000 US Census data is presented below in Figure 3 with additional details by
     age and gender. Figure 2 is the estimated population by age in 2005 provided by
     BBER. . Both sets of data show the gender breakdown is approximately the same


                                                                                                                                  17
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     across all age distributions. However, at the age of 80+ more females are alive than
     males.
                     Figure 3: 2005 Age and Gender Distribution Socorro County

                                  Socorro County Age Distribution 2005
                                                                  80-84


                                                                  70-74


                                                                  60-64


                                                                  50-54


                                                                  40-44


                                                                  30-34


                                                                  20-24


                                                                  10-14


                                                                Under 5

              1200.0 1000.0    800.0     600.0      400.0   200.0         0.0   200.0     400.0   600.0   800.0    1000.0
                                                            Popluation
                                 Males                                                    Females

                                Source: http://www.unm.edu/~bber/demo/tot2005.xls

3.2.5 Race, ethnicity
     Socorro County’s nativity and citizenship according to the Social Science Data
     Analysis Network based on data from the 1990 and 2000 US Census :
                              Table 3: Socorro County Nativity and Citizenship
                                                                    1990           2000
                                                                    Percent of     Percent of
                                                                    population     population
                                Total Native Population             93.6           94.5

                                  Born in US                        93             93.9

                                       Born in NM                   63.6           64.2

                                       Born Other State             29.4           29.7

                                       Born Outside US              .6             .6

                                Total Foreign Born Population       6.4            5.5

                                  Naturalized                       1.6            1.3

                                  Non-Naturalized                   4.8            4.2




                                   Source: Social Science Data Analysis Network

     This data indicates that the majority of the population for Socorro County was born in
     New Mexico. This contributes to a sense of community and a continuation of native
     traditions in the diverse cultures that live within the county.
     In 2000 the US Census changed definitions for the determination of race. Hence it is
     not valid to compare the US Census 2000 data to prior data. Based on the Census, the
     current race distributions can be found in Figure 4.



                                                                                                                  18
                            SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                    Figure 4: 2004 Population Distributions by All Ages by Race

                             Population Dristribution All Ages By Race 2004 Population
                                                      Estimates

   Percent of Population   90%
                           80%
                           70%
                           60%
                           50%                                                                                          Socorro County
                           40%                                                                                          New Mexico
                           30%
                           20%
                           10%
                            0%
                                  White      Black    American    Asian      Native  Persons     Persons      White
                                 persons    persons    Indian    persons    Hawaiian reporting       of      persons,
                                                        and                and Other   two or    Hispanic       not
                                                       Alaska                Pacific    more     or Latino   Hispanic
                                                       Native               Islander   races      origin
                                                      persons



                                           Source: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/35/35053.html


Based on Table 3 and Figure 4, Socorro County contains a diverse population up to a
point. There are many races living in the County, but proportionally in 2000, the
Hispanic population is 12th highest among the 33 counties and White overall is the
highest percentage at 62.9%. Only 4.3% reported identifying with more than one
race. Although the Asian population comprises only 1.1% of the population, Socorro
County has the 5th highest concentration of Asians in the state. African Americans
comprise less than 1% of the county population, a small presence by National
standards. All of the reported populations in 2000 are proportional to the estimated
populations for 2005.
On the Alamo Reservation the 2000 Race distribution is given in Table 4. This
information indicates that on the reservation, 95.9% of the population is among the
American Indian/Alaska Native or Combination with Other Race.
                                           Table 4: Alamo Reservation Race Distribution, 2000




   Source: http://alamo.nndes.org/cms/kunde/rts/alamonndesorg/docs/429411100-09-29-2004-08-31-33o.pdf




                                                                                                                        19
             SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

3.2.6 Income
     The Bureau of Economic Analysis released the following information on Socorro
     County in their Bearfacts (2004):
        In 2004 Socorro had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $20,186. This PCPI
        ranked 24th in the state and was 77 percent of the state average, $26,184, and 61
        percent of the national average, $33,050. The 2004 PCPI reflected an increase of
        9.9 percent from 2003. The 2003-2004 state change was 5.2 percent and the
        national change was 5.0 percent. In 1994 the PCPI of Socorro was $13,030 and
        ranked 26th in the state. The 1994-2004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was
        4.5 percent. The average annual growth rate for the state was 4.0 percent and for
        the nation was 4.1 percent.
     According to the UNM BBER Economic Data, per capita personal income for
     Socorro County in 2004 was $20,186, only 77.1% of New Mexico per capita personal
     income. New Mexico’s per capita income of $27,912 gives it a rank of 45 among the
     50 states. The numbers in Figure 6, below, were obtained from the US Census
     Bureau. Note that New Mexico’s and Socorro County’s per capita income reported
     by the US Census Bureau differs substantially from that reported by US Department
     of Commerce for the same year. See Appendix A for an explanation of the disparity
     in these figures.
     The following two graphs also confirm that Socorro County income is significantly
     below the New Mexico state average. The effects on the community are discussed in
     Section 3.2.8.


                         Figure 5: Per Capita Personal Income 2000-2005


                        Per Capita Personal Income, 2000-2005

            $30,000

            $25,000

                                                                                    Socorro County
            $20,000
                                                                                    New Mexico

            $15,000

            $10,000
                      2000 r/ 2001 r/ 2002 r/ 2003 r/ 2004 r/ 2005 p/
                                             Year


                                      r/: Revised; p/: Preliminary
                       Source Figures 4: http://www.unm.edu/~bber/econ/co-pci.xls




                                                                                             20
               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

               Figure 6: Annual Average Wage/Salary Per Job Socorro County 2000-2005


                              Annual Average Wage/Salary Per Job

                $35,000

                $30,000
                                                                                         Socorro Co.
                $25,000
                                                                                         New Mexico

                $20,000

                $15,000
                              2000     2001      2002     2003 r/ 2004 r/ 2005 p/
                                                      Year


                                              r/: Revised; p/: Preliminary
                            Source Figure 5: http://www.unm.edu/~bber/econ/co-wag.xls

     For the residents of Alamo, the income level is even lower (see Table 5). This is in
     part due to Socorro being 57 miles away and a very limited number of employment
     opportunities on the reservation.


                          Table 5: 1999 Income for Alamo Reservation Residents
                        Income in 1999                           Number      Percent (%)
                        Households                                    511             100
                        Median household income                   $19,306              (X)
                        Families                                      442             100
                        Median family income                      $18,646              (X)
                        Per capita income                          $6,528              (X)
                        Median earnings:
                        Male full-time, year-round                $25,000               (X)
                        Female full-time, year-round              $26,875               (X)
                        Poverty Status in 1999
                        Families in poverty                            236           53.4
                        Persons in poverty                           1,205           55.7
        Source: http://alamo.nndes.org/cms/kunde/rts/alamonndesorg/docs/429411100-09-29-2004-08-31-33o.pdf

3.2.7 Income Inequality
     According to the simple income inequality index (provided by Thomas Scharmen,
     Region 1 & 3 Epidemiologist for New Mexico), the families in the richest quintile in
     Socorro County earn 18.3 times more than the families in the poorest quintile in
     Socorro County. Hence, 20% of the families making the most in Socorro County
     make 18.3 times more than 20% of the families making the least.




                                                                                                  21
               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

3.2.8 Poverty
     Socorro County’s poverty level is significantly higher than that of New Mexico
     (Table 6). According to the US Census Income and Poverty 2004 estimate model,
     23.6% of county residents of all ages live in poverty, including 33.9% of children
     under the age of 18.
                    Table 6: Estimated Number of Percent and People in Poverty, 2004
                            All People in Poverty (2004)                          Children ages 0-17 in Poverty (2004)
                                    90% Confidence Interval of                                90% Confidence Interval of
                                             Estimate                                                   Estimate
                       Percent                                                   Percent
                                       Lower          Upper                                      Lower           Upper
                                       Bound          Bound                                     Bound            Bound
        New
                         16.7                  16               18                23.8            22             26
       Mexico
       Socorro
                         23.6                  18               29                33.9            25             43
         Co.
              Source: http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/PovertyRates/PovListpct.asp?ST=NM&view=Percent


     According to the United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research
     Service, New Mexico’s unemployment rate has decreased .9% from 1998 to 2005,
     while Socorro County’s unemployment rate decreased by 1.8%, twice that of the
     state’s during the same period. With a median household income of $26,622, it falls
     below the state’s median household income of $37,838.
     For the families on the Alamo Reservation, the numbers are significantly worse.
     They report 53.4% of families live in poverty and 55.7% of individuals.

                                   Table 7: Alamo Reservation Poverty Level




        Source: http://alamo.nndes.org/cms/kunde/rts/alamonndesorg/docs/429411100-09-29-2004-08-31-33o.pdf


                          Table 8: Socorro County Food Stamps and TANF Cases

                                           Food Stamps Cases            TANF Cash Assistance Cases
                                         Dec     Dec % change             Dec     Dec % change
                                        2005    2006 Year                2005    2006 Year
                      Socorro           1211        1167         -3.6     214        201        -6.1
                      Catron             124        133          7.3       20         16       -20.0
                      Navajo             292        301          3.1         6           2     -66.7
                                Source: http://www.hsd.state.nm.us/isd/files/MSR1-2007.pdf


     With the lower level of per capita income, as discussed above, Socorro County
     residents do have income inequality with the rest of New Mexico residents.
     According to the New Mexico Health Policy Commission 2007 Quick Facts, as of


                                                                                                     22
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     October 2006, 13.96% of Socorro County residents are enrolled in Part A and/or Part
     B Medicare. As of June 2006, 25.52% residents of Socorro County were enrolled in
     Medicaid and 59.61% of children under 21 were enrolled. The Socorro County New
     Mexico Human Services Department, Income Support Division, services Socorro
     County, Catron County and the Alamo Navajo Reservation. Table 8, above, provides
     information on Food Stamps and TANF Cash Assistance Cases for Socorro County.
     In September 2007, Socorro County is ranked third in New Mexico for residents
     receiving Food Stamps, with a rate of 19.3%. Socorro County also ranked 10th in
     New Mexico for TANF recipients, with a rate of 2.4%. It is also important to note
     that the lack of Alamo TANF cases is due to the Navajo Nation administering their
     own program, whose numbers are not included here.
3.2.9 Education
3.2.9.1 National Rating
     According to the findings of the Education State Rankings in 2006-2007, New
     Mexico is ranked number 43; moving up seven spots from the last ranking, of 50,
     from 2002 to 2004. This ranking is based on a survey done by Morgan Quitno Press
     of the public school systems in all 50 states, with number one being the highest score.
     States were graded on a variety of factors based on how they compare to the national
     average. These included such positive attributes as per-pupil expenditures, public
     high school graduation rates, average class size, student reading and math
     proficiency, and pupil-teacher ratios. States received negative points for high dropout
     rates and physical violence.
3.2.9.2 Graduation Rates
     According to the Department of Education website, the Socorro Consolidated School
     District served 126 seniors during the 2004-2005 school year, 96.0% graduated. Of
     those graduates, 59.3% enrolled in two and four year institutions. In 2005-2006 the
     Magdalena School District served 444 students. Of the 29 seniors enrolled during the
     2004-2005 school year, 100% graduated. According to the 2000 US Census, the
     Alamo Navajo Community School served 193 high school students. Of the seniors,
     39% graduated, with a significant number of residents who have dropped out of
     school. This could be a contributing factor to the increased poverty level.
3.2.9.3 Dropout Rate

                       Table 9: Socorro County 2004-2005 School District Dropout Rates

                         Membership         Dropouts                        Membership        Dropouts
                         Grade 7 & 8       Grade 7 & 8      Grade 7 & 8     Grade 9-12       Grade 9-12       Grade 9-12
                          Combined          Combined        Dropout Rate     Combined        Combined         Dropout Rate
          Socorro
        Consolidated
          Schools            951               17              1.80%            616                 16           2.60%
         Magdalena
         Municipal
          School
          District           191                2              1.00%            121                 2            1.70%
         New Mexico        150,125            5488             3.70%           98182            4955             5.00%
                       Source: http://www.ped.state.nm.us/div/ais/data/dl/04-05-DropoutReport.pdf




                                                                                                         23
                    SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     The reported dropout rates for Socorro County are lower than the New Mexico State
     Average. No information is available as to the factors explaining this outcome.
3.2.10       Languages spoken
     According to Social Science Data Analysis Network, in 2000, in Socorro County
     14.5% of persons older than 5 years spoke English less than ―Very Well.‖*** This
     percentage is considerably higher than the U.S. rate of 8.1% and the New Mexico rate
     of 11.9%. A SCOPE Community Partner, Literacy Volunteers of America, provides
     ESL (English as a Second Language) tutoring to community residents.
                                       Table 10: Languages Spoken Socorro County
                                                                                  1990 % 2000 %
                                                 Only English                     54.2     57.7

                                                 Spanish                          34.6     32.2

                                                 Other Indo-European*             1.2      1.3

                                                 Asian Language**                 1.3      .7

                                                 Other                            8.7      8.1




     *"Other Indo-European" excludes English and Spanish. "Indo-European" is not synonymous with "European." French, German,
     Hindi, and Persian are all classified as Indo-European. Hungarian, on the other hand, is lumped into "Other Language."
     ** "Asian Language" includes languages indigenous to Asia and Pacific islands areas that are not also Indo-European languages.
     Chinese, Japanese, Telugu, and Hawaiian are all classified here.
     ***Ability to speak English "very well" is based on the self-assessment of those responding to Census questions, not on a test of
     language ability.

                              Source: http://www.censusscope.org/us/s35/c53/chart_language.html


                    Table 11: Socorro County Population speaking English less than "very well"
                                   Language Spoken at home                          1990          2000
                                                                                    number        number
                                   Spanish                                          1,198         1,439

                                   Other Indo-European*                             59            12

                                   Asian Language**                                 81            47

                                   Other Language                                   859           952

                                   Total Population Age 5+                          13,587        16,854




     *"Other Indo-European" excludes English and Spanish. "Indo-European" is not synonymous with "European." French, German,
     Hindi, and Persian are all classified as Indo-European. Hungarian, on the other hand, is lumped into "Other Language."
     ** "Asian Language" includes languages indigenous to Asia and Pacific islands areas that are not also Indo-European languages.
     Chinese, Japanese, Telugu, and Hawaiian are all classified here.
     ***Ability to speak English "very well" is based on the self-assessment of those responding to Census questions, not on a test of
     language ability.

         Source: Social Science Data Network Website, based on 1990 and 2000 Census data. http://www.censusscope.org/




                                                                                                                       24
                SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

3.2.11     Employment and Industry
  Socorro County had an unemployment rate of 3.5% in September 2006 according to the
  New Mexico Department of Labor. In the New Mexico Department of Labor quarterly
  report for the second quarter of 2006, the economy of Socorro County is largely based on
  accommodation and food service jobs. There are many opportunities in the
  accommodation and food services industry with 29 restaurant options and 13
  hotels/motels, two of which were opened in 2007 in Socorro County.
                     Table 12: US Census 2003 Business Quickfacts Socorro County
         Business QuickFacts                                                   Socorro County          New Mexico
         Private nonfarm establishments, 2003                                               267              43,568
         Private nonfarm employment, 2003                                                 2,697             571,381
         Private nonfarm employment, percent change 2000-2003                             5.7%                4.0%
         Nonemployer establishments, 2003                                                   818             107,751
         Manufacturers shipments, 2002 ($1000)                                               NA          10,168,130
         Retail sales, 2002 ($1000)                                                      76,722          18,328,637
         Retail sales per capita, 2002                                                   $4,270              $9,880
         Minority-owned firms, percent of total, 1997                                    28.4%               28.5%
         Women-owned firms, percent of total, 1997                                       22.3%               29.4%
         Housing units authorized by building permits, 2004                                   4              12,555
         Federal spending, 2004 ($1000)                                                 172,182          19,863,967
                           Source: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/35/35053.html


                  Table 13: New Mexico Department of Labor Employment 2006 Quarter 1
                                                                                                   New Mexico
                                                            Socorro (Avg:Selected    New Mexico
                QWI Quick Facts              Socorro (Q1)                                         (Avg:Selected
                                                               + 3 Prior qtrs)          (Q1)
                                                                                                  + 3 Prior qtrs)
         Total_Employment                         5,029                   5,026      753,330        749,633
         Net_Job_Flows                             -388                    -115       -55,144        -11,782
         Job_Creation                               284                     253        50,583         52,344
         New_Hires                                  722                     826      157,016        165,684
         Separations                              1,384                   1,130      247,157        210,159
         Turnover                               15.30%                  11.40%        16.90%         14.00%
         Avg_Monthly_Earnings                 $2,572.00               $2,853.50     $2,890.00      $2,900.00
         Avg_New_Hire_Earnings                $1,494.00               $1,665.75     $1,978.00      $1,905.50
                                  Source: http://www.dol.state.nm.us/lehd/newmexico.html

     From Table 13, there were not a significant number of jobs created in the first quarter
     of 2006. Those that were created had a higher percentage of turnover for the general
     workforce.




                                                                                                     25
                   SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

           Table 14: New Mexico Department of Labor Socorro County 2006 Quarter 2 Employment

           2nd Qtr. 2006 (April,May,June) Quarterly Census of Employment And Wages Sector (2 digit) data for
                                         Socorro County , Aggregate of all types
                                                                                                        Averag
         NAIC                                                Emp.     Emp.       Emp.
                                              Average                                   Average            e
          S              Industry                             Mont    Month      Month
                                           Establishments                              Employment       Weekly
         Code                                                  h1        2         3
                                                                                                         Wage
                Agriculture, Forestry,
          11    Fishing & Hunting                 11          118      126        125     123            $454
           21     Mining                                 ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
           22     Utilities                              ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
           23     Construction                           30    112    113      122         116          $433
           31     Manufacturing                          14    174    173      171         173          $595
           42     Wholesale Trade                        ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
           44     Retail Trade                           41    509    524      518         517          $375
                  Transportation and
           48     Warehousing                            10    157    151      153         154          $539
           51     Information                            8     49      51       49          50          $431
           52     Finance and Insurance                  11    118    118      111         116          $465
                  Real Estate and Rental
           53     and Leasing                            11    38      38       40          39          $323
                  Professional and
           54     Technical Services                     33    478    477      471         475          $903
                  Management of
                  Companies and
           55     Enterprises                            ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
                  Administrative and Waste
           56     Services                               ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
           61     Educational Services                   ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
                  Health Care and Social
           62     Assistance                             33    563    560      574         566          $593
                  Arts, Entertainment, and
           71     Recreation                             ***   ***     ***      ***         ***          ***
                  Accommodation and
           72     Food Services                          36    622    612      621         618          $209
                  Other Services, Ex.
           81     Public Admin                           17    44      47       46          46          $389
           92     Public Administration                  37    487    488      499         491          $864
         Note: Asterisks indicate non-disclosable data
                                                          Source:
     http://laser.state.nm.us/analyzer/ind202.asp?SuperSector=&detailtype=detailrecord&cat=IND&session=IND202&
     subsession=99&geo=3504000053&areaname=Socorro+County++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
     ++++++++++&tableused=INDUSTRY&defaultcode=&rollgeo=&roll=False&time=20060202&currsubsessavail=
     &sgltime=0&siclevel=3&templvl=2&naicslvl=3&detaillvl=&searchtype=NAICS&naicscode=72,%2056,%2011,
     %2071,%2023,%2061,%2052,%2062,%2051,%2055,%2031,%2021,%2081,%2054,%2092,%2053,%2044,%2048
                                                      ,%2022,%2042

3.2.12      Other
3.2.12.1 Homelessness
     Homeless people in New Mexico include families with children, people who are
     working at low-wage or part-time jobs, people suffering from mental illness, those
     with substance abuse problems, migrant workers, runaway or throwaway teens,
     victims of domestic violence, disabled people, and veterans. Some of the factors
     contributing to homelessness are major illnesses and disabilities, domestic violence,
     mental illness and addictions.



                                                                                                  26
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     While the number of homeless persons in Socorro County is not currently available,
     homelessness is recognized as an increasing problem in our county. A statewide
     coalition on homelessness has been created and it is hoped that local statistics will be
     available in the future as well as state and county plans for acting in response to the
     suffering of those without adequate and safe shelter. As of 2001 various churches and
     Puerto Seguro offer some relief to the homeless in Socorro County. In 2002, Puerto
     Seguro helped 73 local single individuals, 44 transients, 1 battered family, 2 house
     fire families, 29 veterans, and 76 other local families, including 150 children. The
     first half of 2007 Puerto Seguro had 505 clients, 26 were children. They serviced 52
     homeless and 36 transients. With over 2500 client visits, Puerto Seguro served over
     2000 hot meals, clients took over 650 showers and did over 400 loads of laundry.
 3.2.12.2 Hunger
     New Mexico ranks among the seven highest in food insecurity and hunger according
     to October 31, 2005 government figures from Brandeis University.
     The study, Household Food Security in the United States, 2004, was conducted by the
     university's Center on Hunger and Poverty at the Heller Graduate School. The study
     revealed that 15.8% of New Mexicans are food insecure, which means households
     that do not have enough to eat, or don't know where their next meal will come from.
     This is up from 15.1% three years ago when the first study was conducted. The rate
     of actual hunger, or lack of food, resulting from food insecurity is 4.9% state
     residents experiencing hunger each year.
     While there are no County statistics available for hunger, Socorro County’s
     significantly higher poverty level indicates that the rate of hunger may be greater than
     the state rate. The local food pantry, Socorro Storehouse, does not currently collect
     data, but they are working on implementing a system soon. According to the Data
     Collection and Reporting Bureau, 45.5% of students in the Socorro Consolidated
     School District received free lunches during the 2005-2006 school year and 8.9%
     received price reduced lunches.
3.3 Community Assets and Wellness
     Socorro County has a diverse mix of towns with one major city and one major
     village. The small towns with populations of several hundred have little community
     infrastructure and few assets.
3.3.1 Physical
     The City of Socorro maintains a city gym and activities facility and several city parks
     with playgrounds. Clark Field contains public walking/running tracks, both paved
     and cement trails, a skate park and a covered pavilion with picnic tables and cook out
     grills. Sedillo Park is the largest and is situated across from Parkview Elementary
     School and the Boys and Girls Club. It also has a covered pavilion with picnic tables
     and cook out grills; has Soccer fields and Baseball Diamonds, and is situated adjacent
     to the public swimming pool and tennis courts which were renovated between
     Spring 2007 and Spring 2008.
     New Mexico Tech University also maintains athletic fields, a pool and gym to which
     Socorro residents may have access for minimal fees.


                                                                                   27
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     The majority of streets are paved within the city and most main roads have sidewalks
     and pedestrian crosswalks with access for the disabled.
     The City of Socorro and the surrounding areas are enjoyed by mountain bikers,
     runners, astronomers, hikers, campers, rock climbers, birders, geologists, rock
     hounds, and photographers as they partake in the recreational opportunities presented
     in the county. Socorro County has many wildlife areas that include the Sevilleta
     National Wildlife Refuge, Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge and the Cibola
     National Forest. Socorro County is also home to the Trinity Site where the first
     Atomic Bomb experiments were conducted during WWII and the Very Large Array
     (VLA), the world’s largest array of radio telescopes monitoring outer space.
3.3.2 Education
3.3.2.1 School Districts
     Socorro County has three school districts, Socorro Consolidated, Magdalena
     Municipal and Alamo Navajo Community Schools. The Veguita area at the north
     central area of the county is served by the Belen School District in Valencia County.
     The following are Socorro Consolidated School District schools, their grade levels
     and New Mexico Department of Education ratings as of 2006.
           Cottonwood Valley Charter                 K-8    Meets Standards
           Midway Elementary                         K-5    Meets Standards
           Parkview Elementary                       K-3    Probationary
           San Antonio Elementary                    K-5    Meets Standards
           Zimmerly Elementary                       4-5    School Improvement I
           R.S. Sarracino Middle School              6-8    School Improvement I
           Socorro High School                       9-12   School Improvement II
           Aim High Alternative School               9-12   Meets Standards
     The Socorro Consolidated School District serves the City of Socorro and outlying
     areas of Lemitar, Luis Lopez, Polvedera, and San Antonio. According to the
     Department of Education website, the Socorro Consolidated School District served
     2,013 students in the 2005-2006 school year and averaged 14.2 students per teacher.
     However, anecdotal reports indicate there may be, in some cases, in excess of 20
     children per teacher. The state average is 15.0 students per teacher.
     The following are Magdalena Municipal School District schools, their grade levels
     and New Mexico Department of Education ratings for 2006:
           Magdalena Elementary School       Pre-K-5        Restructuring II
           Magdalena Middle School           6-8            School Improvement I
           Magdalena High School             9-12           Meets Standards
     According to the Department of Education website, in the 2005-2006 school year,
     Magdalena Municipal School District averaged 10.5 students per teacher compared to


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                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     the state average of 15.0. In 2005-2006 the Magdalena School District served 444
     students.


                              Table 15: Alamo Community School Profile, 2000




         Source: http://alamo.nndes.org/cms/kunde/rts/alamonndesorg/docs/429411100-09-29-2004-08-31-33o.pdf

     Alamo has one K-12 nonpublic school, Alamo Navajo Community School. Data for
     the school is outlined in Table 15.
3.3.2.2 Preschool
     Even Start and Socorro Cooperative Nursery School provide preschool services in the
     City of Socorro. Head start provides services to the City of Socorro and Veguita. See
     Section 5.1.4.8 for more details.
3.3.2.3 Home schooled
     According to the New Mexico Public Education Department, Table 16 shows the
     number of home schooled students reported for the 1995 to 2005 school years.
     Socorro has stayed the same. However, Magdalena has shown a significant drop in
     home schooled students.
                             Table 16: Socorro County Home Schooled Students

                    94-95    95-96     96-97    97-98    98-99     99-00    00-01     01-02     02-03    03-04    04-05
    Socorro             56       35       49        49       51        51       54       59        42       41       65
    Magdalena           21       19       18        12       12        15       18       19         7         5       2
    New Mexico        5337     6174     6666     6642      6083     6732      5858     6487      5669     6243     5582
                        Source: http://www.ped.state.nm.us/div/ais/data/fs/20/home.school.PDF

3.3.2.4 Post-Secondary Education
     The following offer post-secondary education in Socorro County:
     •   New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
     •   New Mexico Tech Community College
     •   Eastern New Mexico U/Tech Prep


                                                                                                    29
                                               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

       •                      UNM-Socorro Campus
  3.3.2.5 Libraries
       The Socorro Public Library and New Mexico Tech Library are open to the public for
       leisure and research. Computers are available for internet use and creating or
       working on school or work documents. Meeting rooms are also available for private
       groups or public events. A public library is also available for residents in the Village
       of Magdalena.
  3.3.3 Social/Arts
       For City of Socorro and Village of Magdalena residents, ample social activities are
       available. One movie theater operates in the City of Socorro showing first run
       movies. Both towns offer local, live theatre productions on regular basis. The civic
       organizations are listed in the Socorro Resource Guide, see Appendix C. However,
       for the rural residents, there are fewer opportunities for entertainment.
  3.3.4 Individuals
       Socorro County embraces its history and noted community leaders are honored in a
       variety of styles. The naming of local events and local modern edifices are used to
       pay tribute to notable citizens. The Socorro Historical Society has a large collection
       of archival historical documents and photos, many of which are on display around
       Socorro County.
  3.3.5 Other
       There is a wide offering of faiths throughout Socorro County as over 25 different
       churches are available for residents to choose from. Twenty are located in the City of
       Socorro. There are two in Peralta and in Magdalena and one in Veguita and in
       Polvadera. Many offer services several times a week and welcome visitors.
 3.4 Interpretation of the information in the Community Description
      section
       Narratives and interpretation of the data presented occurs in each section to assist the
       reader as they see the information.

4 Community Health Status
 4.1 Maternal child health indicators
  4.1.1 Total Births
                                                Figure 7: Socorro County and New Mexico Crude Birth Rates 2000-2005

                                                        Socorro Co. & NM Crude Birth Rates, 2000-2005

                                        16.0
           Births per 1000 population




                                                                                                 14.6
                                                                                                               NM Crude
                                               15.0     14.8     14.9     14.8     14.9          14.4
                                        14.0                                                                   Birth Rates

                                        12.0

                                        10.0                                                                   Socorro
                                                                            8.7      8.6                       Co.Crude
                                         8.0      7.5      7.7      7.5                                        Birth Rates

                                         6.0
                                                 2000     2001     2002     2003     2004     2005




      Sources: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics, NCHS Population Estimates 2000-03; UNM BBER, 2004, 2005


                                                                                                                      30
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     Figure 7 shows that from 2000 to 2004, the crude birth rates for Socorro County were
     nearly half of the crude birth rates for New Mexico. However, crude birth rates for
     Socorro County increased significantly from 2004 to 2005.
4.1.2 Births by Age
          Table 17: Socorro County Resident Live Births by Age of Mother, 1995 and 2005
                                Socorro County Resident Births
                                 by Age of Mother, 1995 and
                                            2005
                               Age             1995      2005
                               15-19             69         52
                               20-24             79         82
                               25-29             47         67
                               30-34             37         36
                               35-39             16         20
                               40-44              3           5
                                 Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics

     Table 17 and Table 18 show that Socorro County prevention, education and
     intervention programs relating to teen pregnancy have significantly impacted the rate
     of women in the age group of 15-24. See Section 4.1.5 for a detailed discussion on
     teen births and the impact on the community.

           Table 18: Socorro County Resident Live Births to Mothers <20 Years of Age, 2005


                 2005 Socorro County Resident Births to Mothers Under 20 Years of Age


                     Age            2005 Births       2005 Female Population Birth Rates
                     14                   1                      141                7.1
                     15                   2                      158               12.7
                     16                   6                      142               42.1
                     17                  10                      151               66.2
                     18                  15                      145               103.3
                     19                  19                      184               103.4
                    Total                53                      922               57.5


                     Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics, 2005; UNM BBER, 2005




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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.1.3 Low birth weight
                    Table 19: Socorro County Percent Low Birth Weights, 2000 - 2005
                          Percent Socorro Co. Low Birth Weight (<2500 gm.)
                                             2000-2005
                                                                           Year

                                                            2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
                  % NM Low Birthweight                       8.0 7.9 8.0 8.4 8.2 8.5
                  % Socorro Co. Low Birthweight              10.0 8.3 4.3 6.0 8.4 12.4
      Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics, 2000-2005; NCHS Population Estimates 2000-03; UNM BBER,
                                                      2004, 2005

     During a six year period, Socorro County had a higher percent of low birth weight
     babies than New Mexico except in 2002 and 2003. This is most likely because many
     women do not have insurance to cover the costs of prenatal care. A set of twins can
     also change this number drastically. Low birth weight (LBW) is defined as an infant
     weight of less than 2,500 grams (5.5 lbs) at the time of delivery. Birth weight is one
     of the most important factors in determining the survival and health of an infant. Low
     birth weight is a public health problem since infants born with LBW have increased
     infant mortality, morbidity, incidence of learning disabilities, and medical costs.
     It’s estimated that 35% of the total nationwide health care costs for infants during the
     first year of life are spent on LBW infants, approximately 7% of the births. Although
     survival among LBW infants has improved considerably in recent years, those that
     survive often have long-term health and developmental problems. The long-term
     prognosis for LBW children depends greatly on the severity of their initial condition,
     as well as the medical services provided shortly after birth. Children with LBW are
     more likely than children with normal birth weight to have attention disorders,
     developmental impairments, breathing problems (e.g., asthma), and learning
     disabilities. All categories of LBW children are more likely to be enrolled in special
     education classes than normal birth weight children, and half of all children who were
     very LBW are enrolled in special education classes.
4.1.4 High birth weight
                      Table 20: Socorro County Percent High Birthweight, 1994-2005

                        Percent Socorro Co. High Birth Weight (>4000gm.),
                                           1994 - 2005
                      1994-1996   1997-1999     2000-2002     2004    2005
                        3.30%        4.50%         4.90%    6.50% 4.90%
                              Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics,1994-2005.

     From the table above, Socorro County has had a steady percentage of high birth
     weight babies.




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                                                SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.1.5 Births to teens
                                         Figure 8: Socorro County Resident Live Births to Mothers Age 15-17, 2000 - 2005

                                                  Birth Rates for Socorro Co. & NM 15-17 y.o. Females,
                                                                        2000-2005


           Births per 1000 females 15-17 y.o.
                                           45
                                                                                            41.7
                                                               40.3                                                 NM Teen Birth
                                           40           39.7                                                 39.9   Rates (15-17
                                                                                                                    y.o.females)
                                                                  38.0      37.3                   37.4
                                                                                      36.1                   35.7
                                           35                                                                       Socorro Co.Teen
                                                 32.8                                                               Birth Rates (15-
                                                                                                                    17y.o. females)

                                           30                                        31.4
                                                                           28.5
                                           25
                                                   2000        2001      2002      2003      2004         2005



       Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics,2000-2005; NCHS Population Estimates 2000-03; UNM BBER,
                                                      2004, 2005.

     Figure 8 shows the variability in the younger teen birth rate in Socorro County
     compared to the steady decrease in the New Mexico state rate over six years.
     According to the 2003 NM DOH publication, The Economic Impact of Teenage
     Childbearing in New Mexico, forming a family as a teenager has a large negative
     impact on one’s own earnings and those of the spouses, if married, compared to
     women who delay childbirth. These families receive considerably more public
     assistance compared to older parents. Published research reveals that nearly all this
     negative impact is due to factors other than childbirth, that describe the socio-
     economic conditions that lead teenage women to get pregnant and form families. The
     gross difference between the economic outcome for households headed by teenage
     parents and those headed by women who delay childbirth until age 20 or 21 is
     estimated at $75,000 to $200,000 less over a lifetime.
     Public assistance to families formed by teenagers in New Mexico creates a gross
     burden to taxpayers of nearly $524 - $651 million dollars annually over the burden
     created by families formed by women who delay childbirth. Taxpayers could avoid
     about one-third of this burden if teenage women delayed childbirth, but the influence
     of all the underlying socio-economic factors must be offset to realize the full tax
     savings measured. The majority of tax savings would go to New Mexico taxpayers.
     While the teenage parents and taxpayers are important constituents to identify
     separately in the analysis, the overall impact of families formed by teenagers falls on
     society as a whole. The gross gain in economic well-being if teenagers were to delay
     parenting until at least age 20 or 21 is over $500 million annually. Reducing teenage
     childbirth in New Mexico to zero, but not addressing the underlying socio-economic
     factors related to teenage pregnancy and childbirth would realize an annual gain to
     society of $216 million. The majority of these gains would accrue to New Mexico
     residents.



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           SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

Parenting is always a challenging task and requires community support in many
forms. Teen mothers and their children often face the challenges of limited access to
education, jobs, safe housing and childcare. While there are County programs to
support the health, well-being and development of teen mothers and their children,
the need for further support and prevention remains high. Healthy Family Initiative
and New Mexico GRADS are active in Socorro and have implemented several
strategies, including a very effective risk avoidance program, to reduce the teen
pregnancy rate.
According to the Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey (YRRS), administered to Socorro
County high school students in the fall of 2003 and 2005:
   Respondents were asked how old they were when they had sexual intercourse the
   first time. Their responses are as follows:
                                         2003           2005
       •    Never                        52.2%          55.1%
       •    11 years or younger          10.2%          7.8%
       •    12 years old                 3.9%           2.4%
       •    13 years old                 6.5%           5.0%
       •    14 years old                 10.2%          10.7%
       •    15 years old                 7.2%           9.7%
       •    16 years old                 7.4%           5.5%
       •    17 years or older            2.2%           3.8%
   This shows that almost 3% of Socorro County students have not had sexual
   intercourse in 2005 than in 2003. Only three age groups, 14, 15, and 17 year olds,
   had increased their sexual activity.
The report also indicated that 11.3% of the YRRS respondents said they had had
sexual intercourse with 2 or more people in the 12 months preceding the survey;
showing a decrease of 1.5% from the 2003 YRRS results. Further breaking down the
question, 3.6% indicated that they had had sexual intercourse with 5 or more people
in the 12 months preceding the survey; showing a decrease of 7.0% from the 2003
YRRS results.
The YRRS asked which method the respondent or their partner used to prevent
pregnancy the last time they had sexual intercourse. Respondents replied 6.5% ―No
Method‖ and 4.1% ―Not Sure;‖ showing a 6.2% decrease and 0.9% increase,
respectively, from 2003 to 2005.
While some teen parents may not view adolescent pregnancy as an interruption to
health, data is abundant to support the concerns of national and global communities
regarding teen pregnancy. Teen mothers have more limited opportunities for
education and employment, which increases the probability that they and their
children will live in poverty. The need for information regarding puberty, disease
prevention, and general sexual health, and for older adolescents, knowledge of and


                                                                            34
                                              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     access to contraceptive methods for those choosing to become sexually active
     remains high. Based on the data and anecdotal evidence, the SCOPE Council has
     name Teen Pregnancy as one of their priorities.
4.1.6 Births to single mothers
                                       Figure 9: Socorro County Percent Resident Live Births to Single Mothers, 2000 - 2004

                                                             Percent of Births to Single Mothers in Socorro Co.& NM, 2000-2004




                                        60
                                                                  59.6
                                               59.1
                                       57.5                                                                                            % NM
                                                                                                      58.1                             Births to
        Percent of all County Births




                                                                                                                                       Single
                                                                                                                                       Mothers
                                        55
                                                                                     55

                                       52.5
                                                                                                                    52.5               %
                                                                                                                                       Socorro
                                        50                                                                                             Co.
                                                                                                                           49.1        Births to
                                                                                                          48.5                         Single
                                                                                                                                       Mothers
                                       47.5                                               46.9
                                                                         46.3
                                                      45.6

                                        45
                                                  2000                2001             2002              2003              2004




                                 Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics, NCHS Population Estimates 2000-03 UNM BBER, 2004



     Figure 9 indicated that the percent of births to single mothers in Socorro County have
     decreased over five years, while the percent of births to single mothers in New
     Mexico are slowly rising.
     According to the Heritage Foundation website, the elevated health risks of children in
     single-parent homes, relative to children in intact families, can be attributed to
     elevated poverty rates in such households; the child poverty rate in such homes is
     more than five times the rate for children in two-parent families. Yet, even after
     adjusting for poverty and race, children who live with single mothers have
     approximately 50 percent greater likelihood of having poor/fair health status than
     children living in two-parent families.
     According to Kids Count, poor children are more likely to grow up to become teen or
     single parents, and teen or single parents are more likely to raise their own children in
     poverty. Socorro County’s high percentage of births to single parents is both one of
     the causes of, and one of the effects of the County’s high poverty rate.
4.1.7 Prenatal care level
     The table below indicates that more Socorro County women than New Mexico
     women get early prenatal care and fewer get late prenatal care than New Mexico
     women.




                                                                                                                                  35
                SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                      Table 21: Socorro County Adequacy of Prenatal Care 2000-2004
                                  Percent Prenatal Care Levels, 2000-2004
                                   2000          2001           2002                  2003            2004
                                                             Hi
        Socorro Co.                 56.5          57.1           59.7                  57.6           55.9
        New Mexico                  51.4          52.3           51.6                    51           49.6
                                                            Mid
        Socorro Co.                 26.4          32.5           29.4                  25.8           29.1
        New Mexico                  29.6          30.2           30.6                  30.7             30
                                                           Lo/No
        Socorro Co.                 11.9           9.6            9.5                  11.1            7.7
        New Mexico                  13.1          11.3           12.1                  12.5           10.7
       Source: NM Vital Records & Health Statistics, 2000-2004; NCHS Population Estimates 2000-03; UNM BBER,
                                                          2004

4.1.8 Infant mortality
                         Table 22: Socorro County Resident Infant Deaths, 2000-2005
           Resident Infant Deaths, Neonatal, and Postneonatal Mortality Rates, 2000-2005
                             2000-2004                 2005 2000-2004       2000-2004
                                 Total Infant        Total Infant          Neonatal         Postneonatal
                                 Deaths              Deaths                (Under 28        (28 Days to
                                 (Under 1 Year)      (Under 1 Year)        Days)            Under 1 Year)
         Socorro County                    1.90%               7.52%           1.90%                0.00%
         New Mexico                        6.10%               6.21%           3.80%                2.40%
                           Source: http://www.health.state.nm.us/pdf/2004AnnualReport.pdf

      Socorro County has a lower infant mortality rate than New Mexico, which can be
      due, in part, to the higher rate of prenatal care for Socorro County women than New
      Mexican women, Section 4.1.7.
4.2 Mortality – General
4.2.1 Total Deaths
      According to the 2005 Vital Statistics Summary from the Bureau of Vital Records and
      Health Statistics there were 156 deaths in Socorro County and 14,866 deaths in New
      Mexico (See Table 23). Figure 11 indicates that there is a higher death rate for
      Socorro County than for New Mexico as a whole.
      In addition, there is also a higher population of uninsured or underinsured residents in
      New Mexico that could contribute to either a lack of detection of medical problems or
      a diagnosis during a later stage of the disease increasing the chance of a fatality.
      Finally, according to the Centers for Disease Control, cancer rates are significantly
      higher for Native Americans. This should be of concern for Socorro County as it
      does have a significant Native American population.




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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                                       Figure 10: Age-Adjusted Death Rates, 2000 - 2004

                                                         Age-Adjusted Death Rates, 2000 - 2004

                                                1000




                    Deaths/100,000 Population
                                                950
                                                900
                                                                                                            Socorro Co.
                                                850
                                                                                                            New Mexico
                                                800

                                                750
                                                700
                                                        2000     2001     2002      2003     2004
                                                                           Year


                                                 Source: New Mexico Selected Health Statistics Annual Report: 2004

4.2.2 General Mortality or Death Rate
     Chronic diseases (diseases of the heart, malignant neoplasms, chronic lower
     respiratory diseases, cerebro-vascular diseases, and influenza and pneumonia)
     account for the top five leading causes of death. The death rate is higher than the
     birth rate for Socorro County. With a relatively stable overall population, any
     population growth would be due to the migration of people from outside the county.
4.2.3 Deaths by Gender
                                                 Table 23: Socorro County Number of Deaths by Sex, 2005
                                                                 Number of Deaths, 2005
                                                                         Males Females Total
                                                        Socorro
                                                        County              81        75      156
                                                        New Mexico        7824      7042 14866
       Source: Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, http://www.health.state.nm.us/pdf/05_monograph.pdf

     Roughly 52% of the deaths in Socorro County in 2005 were males and 48% were
     females. However, throughout New Mexico, 44% of the deaths were male and 56%
     were females. This is an 8% difference between Socorro County and New Mexico.
4.2.4 Deaths by Age Group
     Not reporting at this time.




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             SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.2.5 Deaths by Race/Ethnicity
       Table 24: Cancer Morality Among Non-Hispanic White Males Number and Incidence Rate,
                                      1995-2004 Aggregated
                Cancer Mortality Among Non-Hispanic White Males Number and Incidence
                                        Rate, 1995-2004 Aggregate
                                                      Socorro County         New Mexico
                                Site                 Number Rate          Number Rate
                All Cancers                                 77 216.8          9858 218.2
                Prostate                                     6     20.9       1243    30.2
                Lung and Bronchus                           20     52.4       2799      60
                Colon and Rectum                            11     29.2         920   20.3
                Urinary Bladder                              3      7.5         303    6.9
                Myeloma                                      0      -           194    4.2
                Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                         6     17.4         394    8.7
                Leukemia                                     4     12.4         446   10.1
                Kidney and Renal Pelvis                      3     10.3         277      6
                Pancreas                                     4     13.2         500   10.7
                Stomach                                      0      -           199    4.4
                Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct             0      -           266    5.8
                Esophagus                                    1      2.2         349    7.4
                Brain and Other Nervous System               1      2.7         271    5.9
                         Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director


       Table 25: Cancer Mortality Among Hispanic Males Number and Incidence Rate, 1995-2004
                                            Aggregated
                    Cancer Mortality Among Hispanic Males Number and Incidence Rate
                                             1995-2004 Aggregate
                                                      Socorro County         New Mexico
                                 Site                 Number Rate         Number Rate
                  All Cancers                               65 238.5          4224 203.4
                  Prostate                                  14     59.6         519   29.9
                  Lung and Bronchus                         15     51.6         855   41.5
                  Colon and Rectum                          12     41.9         508   24.6
                  Urinary Bladder                            1      2.7          81    4.5
                  Myeloma                                    0      -            95    -
                  Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                       0      -           155    7.1
                  Leukemia                                   3     11.4         160    6.7
                  Kidney and Renal Pelvis                    0      -           140    6.2
                  Pancreas                                   2        8         257   12.1
                  Stomach                                    3    12.2          249      12
                  Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct           6    20.1          279   12.4
                  Esophagus                                  2      7.6         115    5.3
                  Brain and Other Nervous System             1      2.7         108    4.3
                         Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director




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        SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

Table 26: Cancer Mortality Among Non-Hispanic White Females Number and Incidence Rate,
                                 1995-2004 Aggregated
         Cancer Mortality Among Non-Hispanic White Females Number and Incidence
                                Rate, 1995-2004 Aggregate
                                                  Socorro County          New Mexico
                         Site                    Number      Rate        Number    Rate
         All Cancers                                    65   157.1         8887     153
         Breast                                         12          30     1502    26.7
         Lung and Bronchus                              19     45.2        2174    37.3
         Colon and Rectum                                5     12.2         851    14.2
         Uterus                                          5     12.5         198     3.4
         Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                            2      4.8         360     6.1
         Ovary                                           0      -           491     8.5
         Leukemia                                        1      2.4         303     5.3
         Pancreas                                        2      4.7         507     8.5
         Cervix Uteri                                    1      3.6         109         2
         Kidney and Renal Pelvis                         2      4.9         136     2.3
         Stomach                                         0      -           125     2.1
         Brain and Other Nervous System                  0      -           204     3.8
         Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct               2      4.6         181      3.1
                    Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director
 Table 27: Cancer Mortality Among Hispanic Females Number and Incidence Rate, 1995-2004
                                      Aggregated
            Cancer Mortality Among Hispanic Females Number and Incidence Rate
                                   1995-2004 Aggregate
                                                  Socorro County           New Mexico
                          Site                   Number      Rate        Number    Rate
         All Cancers                                    55    151.6         3718   137.7
         Breast                                         12     34.7          604    21.4
         Lung and Bronchus                               9     25.8          541    20.5
         Colon and Rectum                                5     13.3          402    15.2
         Uterus                                          2      6.3           96       3.5
         Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                            3      8.7          134          5
         Ovary                                           2      5.2          200       7.3
         Leukemia                                        2      4.5          124       4.4
         Pancreas                                        2      5.2          251       9.6
         Cervix Uteri                                    0      -             92       3.2
         Kidney and Renal Pelvis                         0      -            102       3.8
         Stomach                                         2           5       176       6.7
         Brain and Other Nervous System                  1      2.5           76       2.6
         Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct               1       3.2        152         5.8
                    Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director

Table 24 and Table 25 show the cancer morality rates among men in Socorro County
and New Mexico. Tables 26 and 27 show the cancer morality rates among women in
Socorro County and New Mexico. Lung and bronchus cancer accounts for the
highest morality rate for both non-Hispanic white males and Hispanic males of
Socorro County. While lung and bronchus cancer accounts for the highest morality



                                                                                              39
               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

      rate for non-Hispanic white females in Socorro County, breast cancer mortality rates
      are highest for Socorro County Hispanic females.
4.3 Leading Causes of Death
                                   Table 28: Leading Causes of Death, 2005
                                 Leading Causes of Death, Numbers of Deaths, 2005
                                                     New Mexico     Socorro County
                           Diseases of heart                 3376                  32
                           Malignant neoplasms               3145                  36
                           Accidents (unintentional
                           injuries)                         1192                  18
                           Chronic lower respiratory
                           diseases                           866                   6
                           Cerebro-vascular
                           disease                            625                   7
                           Diabetes                           623                   5
                           Influenza & pneumonia              351                   1
                           Alzheimer's disease                345                   6
                           Intentional self-harm
                           (suicide)                          341                   2
                           Chronic liver disease &
                           cirrhosis                          286                   4
                           Nephritis, nephrotic
                           syndrome & nephrosis               248                   1
                           Essential (primary)
                           hypertension &
                           hypertensive disease               169                   4
                           Parkinson's disease                153                   3
                           Assault (homicide)                 151                   1
                           Septicemia                         130                   2
                           Total Deaths                     14866                 156
                 Source: 2005 Vital Statistics Summary, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics;
                                http://www.health.state.nm.us/pdf/05_monograph.pdf

      Tables 28 show disease of the heart, malignant neoplasms, and accidents
      (unintentional injuries) were the top three causes of death in Socorro County for
      2005. This is the same as in 2004.
4.4 Chronic Disease Indicators
4.4.1 Years of Potential Life Lost (YPLL)
      Not reporting at this time.
4.4.2 Heart Disease
      According to Table 29, Socorro County had 32 deaths caused by heart disease in
      2005. The rate for Socorro County is much higher that for the State.
                      Table 29: Number and Rate of Death from Heart Diseases, 2005
                                 Number and Rate of Death from Heart
                                           Diseases, 2005
                                                         Number Rate
                                             Males            17 224.2
                                 Socorro
                                  County     Females          15 169.9
                                             Total            32 202.8
                                             Males          1788     218
                                New Mexico   Females        1588 143.2
                                             Total          3376 176.8
                         Source: New Mexico Selected Health Statistics Annual Report, 2005



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              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.4.3 Cancer (Malignant Neoplasms)
      Table 30: Cancer Among Non-Hispanic White Males Number and Incidence Rate, 1995 -2004
                                           Aggregate
                Cancer Among Non-Hispanic White Males Number and Incidence Rate,
                                     1995-2004 Aggregate
                                                      Socorro County         New Mexico
                                Site                 Number     Rate       Number       Rate
              All Cancers                                 194    503.7      25360       537.8
              Prostate                                     59    148.3       7994       164.3
              Lung and Bronchus                            30     78.5       3370          71
              Colon and Rectum                             22     53.1       2461        52.4
              Urinary Bladder                              14     35.1       1630          35
              Melanoma                                     11     27.2       1518        33.2
              Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                          8     25.7         946       20.5
              Leukemia                                      9     27.7         872       19.3
              Oral Cavity and Pharynx                       6     14.7         850       17.7
              Kidney and Renal Pelvis                       5     13.1         671       14.1
              Pancreas                                      3     10.3         547       11.5
              Stomach                                       1       4.8        330        7.2
              Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct              2      5.1        283              6
                         Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director


      Table 31: Cancer Among Hispanic Males Number and Incidence Rate, 1995 -2004 Aggregate
                 Cancer Incidence Among Hispanic Males Number and Incidence Rate
                                      1995-2004 Aggregate
                                                      Socorro County         New Mexico
                                Site                 Number     Rate       Number       Rate
              All Cancers                                 126    416.7       9931       432.3
              Prostate                                     47    155.2       3048       137.2
              Lung and Bronchus                            16     57.3       1009        47.7
              Colon and Rectum                             19     59.6       1207          54
              Urinary Bladder                               4     15.7         376         18
              Melanoma                                      1       2.4         82        3.2
              Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                          2       5.3        369       14.9
              Leukemia                                      4       15         298       11.2
              Oral Cavity and Pharynx                       5     16.3         268       10.9
              Kidney and Renal Pelvis                       1       2.7        446       18.1
              Pancreas                                      2          8       281       12.9
              Stomach                                       2       7.7        347       15.8
              Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct              4     11.5        257        14.8
                         Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director

     Table 30 and Table 31 show that prostate cancer is the leading cancer diagnosed for
     both non-Hispanic White and Hispanic males in Socorro County during the period
     1995-2004. To address this issue, the Prostate Health and Awareness Group held the
     first prostate health fair in the City of Socorro in early Spring 2005. They also attend
     community events such as the Family Funfest to provide information and awareness.



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        SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

Table 32: Cancer Among Non-Hispanic White Females Number and Incidence Rate, 1995 -2004
                                     Aggregate
                   Cancer Among Non-Hispanic White Females Number and
                           Incidence Rate, 1995-2004 Aggregate
                                            Socorro County          New Mexico
                            Site           Number      Rate       Number    Rate
               All Cancers                      146     356.3       22644    414.4
               Breast                            43     102.4        7448        137
               Lung and Bronchus                 17      41.2        2710         47
               Colon and Rectum                  13      31.1        2183     37.6
               Melanoma                            5     14.2        1071     21.9
               Uterus                            12      27.1        1187     21.4
               Thyroid                           13       33          727     15.9
               Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                7     16.7         847     15.3
               Ovary                               2      5.8         756     13.9
               Leukemia                            4     10.5         600     11.3
               Urinary Bladder                     5      13          570        9.8
               Pancreas                            1      2.4         512        8.7
               Cervix Uteri                        3          8       386        8.2
               Kidney and Renal Pelvis           3       7.2        371        6.7
               Stomach                           2       4.7        182        3.2
                  Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director


Table 33: Cancer Among Hispanic Females Number and Incidence Rate, 1995 -2004 Aggregate
                Cancer Among Hispanic Females Number and Incidence Rate,
                                 1995-2004 Aggregate
                                           Socorro County           New Mexico
                          Site            Number       Rate       Number    Rate
              All Cancers                      108     295.4        8700    303.7
              Breast                            29        81        2702     92.6
              Lung and Bronchus                 10      27.6         641     23.9
              Colon and Rectum                    6     14.3         926     34.1
              Melanoma                            1           3      140      4.5
              Uterus                              6     16.6         445     15.3
              Thyroid                             6     16.7         403     12.6
              Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma                4     10.7         294     10.5
              Ovary                               3      7.6         324     11.2
              Leukemia                            2      5.8         225      7.2
              Urinary Bladder                     1           3      129      4.9
              Pancreas                            2      5.2         266      9.9
              Cervix Uteri                        6     16.2         317     10.1
              Kidney and Renal Pelvis             4     11.6         282         10
              Stomach                           2         5        243         9
                  Source: New Mexico Tumor Registry, Charles Wiggins, Director




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              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     Table 32 and 33 show that breast cancer is the leading cancer diagnosis for both non-
     Hispanic white and Hispanic females in Socorro County. An active breast cancer
     awareness program is not available in Socorro County.
     The county does have an active American Cancer Society that holds community
     events regarding cancer awareness and prevention. In the early summer, the group
     has an annual Relay for Life event which typically raises about $20,000 and involves
     community members from a diverse background.
4.4.4 Stroke (Cerebrovascular Diseases)
     In 2004 Cerebrovascular disease was the sixth leading cause of death in Socorro
     County, however, in 2005 stroke was ranked as the fourth leading cause of death.
4.4.5 Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
     According to the MedicineNet website, ―chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
     (COPD) is comprised primarily of two related diseases - chronic bronchitis and
     emphysema. In both diseases, there is chronic obstruction of the flow of air through
     the airways and out of the lungs, and the obstruction generally is permanent and
     progressive over time.‖ In 2005, chronic lower respiratory disease ranked fourth in
     the leading causes of death in Socorro County. See Sections 4.4.3, 4.4.8 and 4.6.4 for
     more regarding causes and influences of COPD for Socorro County residents.
4.4.6 Diabetes
     Table 29 shows that diabetes was the fourth leading cause of death in 2004 and the
     seventh in 2005 for Socorro County. Both obesity and diabetes are becoming
     significant health problems, not just in Socorro County, but nationwide. Obesity is a
     risk factor for diabetes as well as many other health issues. In 2004, the CDC
     (http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/scientific.htm#diabetes) estimates that, given current
     trends, just over 52% of all Hispanic females born in 2000 will develop diabetes at
     some point in their lives. This is an estimate of significant concern, given the
     County’s large Hispanic population. The CDC estimates for males and females are as
     follows:
     •   Males – 1 in 3 chance
     •   Females – 2 in 5 chance
     The 2003 NM DOH Socorro County Health Profile lists at least 9.5% of the adult
     population with Diabetes. The 2003 Selected Health Behaviors and Conditions of
     New Mexicans report a 9.7% diagnosed response rate for Diabetes. Currently there
     are two diabetic educators for the county.
     According to YRRS data, Socorro County students reported:
                                                     2001           2003           2005
            Not adequate or no physical activity    50.5%          58.1%          48.2%
            Overweight or obese                     18.7%          24.1%          23.1%
     Both are under the New Mexico students as a whole for 2005, 51.5% and 26.6%
     respectively.



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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.4.7 Arthritis
      According to the New Mexico Department of Health Strategic Arthritis Plan 2000-
      2005, there were an estimated 2,510 cases of arthritis in Socorro County in 2000. It is
      estimated that by 2020 that number will have reached 3,668
      (http://www.arthritisnm.org/documents/arthritis_plan.pdf, p.4). The Centers for
      Disease Control (CDC) 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Selected Survey (BRFSS) for
      Socorro County asked adults if they had been diagnosed with arthritis and 19.3% said
      ―yes‖ with a 95% confidence rate. This seems to support the estimates listed in the
      NMDOH Arthritis Plan.
4.4.8 Asthma
      Table 34 indicates the average rate of asthma hospital discharges by age group. The
      American Lung Association reports that in 2002 Socorro County had 404 cases of
      pediatric asthma and 1,034 cases of adult asthma.
             Table 34: Rate of Asthma Hospital Discharges by Age Group, 1999-2003 Average

                         Rate of Asthma Hospital Discharges by Age Group,
                                       1999-2003 Average
                                 0-4     5 - 14   15 - 34    35 - 64    65+        All
                                 Years   Years    Years      Years      Years      Ages
                  Socorro
                  County          14.4     14.2        2.2        9.7          7    8.3
                  New Mexico      28.9     13.9        4.5        7.3       12.4    9.6
                                Source: 2006 Asthma Burden Report Revised

4.4.9 Disability
      There are several areas of disability for Socorro County residents and they vary
      among the diverse populations. The U.S. Census Bureau Quick Facts estimates 3,591
      disabled residents ages 5+ living in Socorro County
      (http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/35/35053.html). There are several agencies
      and services available to these populations: Socorro Mental Health Casa de
      Esperanza, Community Means All People, Tresco, Independent Living Resource
      Center, Workforce Connection of New Mexico, Presbyterian Heritage Program and
      the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. See Section 5.1 for some additional
      details. In particular though, employment has been one of the greatest challenges the
      disabled face in Socorro. Specifically, the challenges are:
            General stigma and discrimination
            Lack of work experience
            Limited job opportunities
            Lack of understanding of disability benefits and entitlements
            Lack of support from family and friends
4.4.10   Oral Health
      Socorro County is not a medically underserved area for dentists when considering the
      number of dentists per population density. However, it is known that all of the
      dentists practice within the City of Socorro, so rural residents have much further to


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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

      travel for treatment. Strides have been made in providing mobile services to Northern
      Socorro County. Since the need has been shown, the Blue Cross Blue Shield dental
      van has visited the Veguita area several times this year. No information is currently
      available on the numbers of children or adults who regularly visit the dentists.
4.4.11   Other
      Currently, there are several services available for mental and behavioral health. Such
      services may be attained through Socorro Mental Health, Terra Luna Counseling, and
      the Juvenile Probation and Parole Office (See Section 5.1.4.8).
4.5 Infectious Disease Indicators
4.5.1 Leading causes of infectious diseases
      Not reporting at this time.
4.5.2 Influenza
      Not reporting at this time.
4.5.3 Pneumonia
      Not reporting at this time.
4.5.4 Food-borne Infectious Diseases (Campylobacter, Salmonella, E.
      coli, Shigella)
      Table 35 shows the rate for Campylobacter infection in Socorro County is almost four
      times higher than that for New Mexico; the rate for Salmonella infection is almost
      two times higher than that for New Mexico. No Shigella cases were reported in
      Socorro County in 2005.
                         Table 35: Socorro County Food-borne Infectious Diseases, 2005
                                                 Socorro County                 New Mexico
                        Infectious Disease                 Rate per                    Rate per
                                             Number        100,000       Number        100,000
                                             of Cases population         of Cases population
                      Campylobacteriosis            10            54.4          358           13.8
                      Salmonnellosis                  4           21.8          251              13
                      Shigellosis                     0         -               137             7.1
               Source: New Mexico Department of Health: http://www.health.state.nm.us/epi/hdata.html

4.5.5 Hepatitis
      Overall, the rate of Hepatitis A is almost 7 times higher in Socorro County than for
      New Mexico and no cases of Acute Hepatitis B were reported in Socorro County for
      2005.
                              Table 36: Socorro County Hepatitis Rates, 2005

                                              Socorro County                New Mexico
                  Infectious Disease                 Rate per                    Rate per
                                          Number     100,000           Number    100,000
                                          of Cases population          of Cases population
                Hepatitis A                       2             10.9        28             1.5
                Acute Hepatitis B                 0         -               20               1
               Source: New Mexico Department of Health: http://www.health.state.nm.us/epi/hdata.html




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              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.5.6 Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
                                                      Table 37: Socorro County Pertussis Rates, 2005
                                                                Socorro County         New Mexico
                                               Infectious    Number Rate per        Number Rate per
                                                Disease      of        100,000      of      100,000
                                                             Cases     population   Cases   population
                                               Pertussis           1          5.4       196       10.2
              Source: New Mexico Department of Health: http://www.health.state.nm.us/epi/hdata.html


     From Table 37 the rate of Pertussis in Socorro County is half of that for New Mexico
     for 2005.
4.5.7 Tuberculosis
                                                Table 38: Socorro County Tuberculosis Cases by Rate, 2005

                                                             Tuberculosis Cases by Rate 2005
                                                               Population TB Cases       Case Rate
                                                 Socorro
                                                 County             19802               0              0
                                                 NM               1970982              39           1.98
                                                 USA            296410404           14093            4.8
        Source DOH website: http://www.health.state.nm.us/PHD/Infectious_Diseases/TB/2005TBcaserates.pdf



     From Table 38, in 2005 there were no reported cases of Tuberculosis in Socorro
     County. This can be due to an active effort by local employers to do TB testing as an
     employment screening and the lower population density in the county.
4.5.8 Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis
                                              Figure 11: Socorro County Chlamydia Infection Rates, 2000-2005

                                                       Chlamydia Rates, Socorro County, 2000-2005

                                                600
                  Cases /100,000 population




                                                500
                                                400                                                    USA
                                                300                                                    NM
                                                200                                                    Socorro Co.

                                                100
                                                  0
                                                      2000     2001   2002   2003   2004    2005
                                                                         Year


            Source: NM DOH: http://www.health.state.nm.us/std/pdf/ChlamydiaCasesAgeSexCounty.pdf




                                                                                                                     46
          SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

      Figure 12: Socorro County Cases of Chlamydia for Males and Females, 2000-2005

                                                         Cases of Chlamydia

                                45
                                40


        Number of Cases
                                35
                                30
                                25                                                                    Females
                                20                                                                    Males
                                15
                                10
                                 5
                                 0
                                       1999     2000     2001     2002     2003     2004   2005
                                                                Years


       Source: NM DOH: http://www.health.state.nm.us/std/pdf/ChlamydiaCasesAgeSexCounty.pdf

Figure 11 shows the rate of reported cases of Chlamydia per 100,000 population in
Socorro County, New Mexico and the United States from 2000-2005. In each year,
Socorro County had lower rates compared to New Mexico and the United States.
However, all three rates have increased from 1999 to 2005. Figure 12 shows the
number of male and female Chlamydia cases reported in Socorro County. The
number of female cases exceeds the number of male cases by nearly 5:1.
                                       Figure 13: Socorro County Rate of Gonorrhea, 2000-2005

                                                  Rate of Gonorrhea, 2000-2005

                                 140
                                 120
                 Rate/100,000




                                 100
                                                                                                  US
                                  80
                                                                                                  NM
                                  60
                                                                                                  Socorro Co.
                                  40
                                  20
                                   0
                                         2000     2001     2002     2003     2004     2005
                                                                Year


      Source: NM DOH: http://www.health.state.nm.us/std/pdf/GonorrheaCasesbyAgeSexCounty.pdf




                                                                                                           47
                     SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                       Figure 14: Socorro County Reported Gonorrhea Cases, 1999-2005

                                            Reported Cases of Gonorrhea, 1999-2005

                                   7




                 Number of Cases
                                   6
                                   5
                                   4                                                              Females
                                   3                                                              Males
                                   2
                                   1
                                   0
                                         1999   2000   2001    2002   2003    2004   2005
                                                               Year


                Source: NM DOH: http://www.health.state.nm.us/std/pdf/GonorrheaCasesbyAgeSexCounty.pdf


         Figure 13 shows the Gonorrhea infection rates in Socorro County, New Mexico and
         the United States from 2000-2005. In each year, Socorro County rates were well
         below those of New Mexico and the United States. While the rate is relatively steady
         for Socorro County, New Mexico’s rate is slowly rising and the United States’ is
         slowly decreasing. Figure 14 shows the number of male and female Gonorrhea cases
         reported in Socorro County. There have not been more than six female and two male
         cases of Gonorrhea reported per year in Socorro County in the last seven years.
         The information in Figures 11-14 may reflect a lower occurrence of STD screening
         combined with a generalized low condom use among sexually active teens, as
         reported on the 2003 and 2005 YRRS. Other explanations for the underreporting may
         include that diagnosis and treatment of infected Socorro County residents may occur
         outside the county or a lack of access to diagnosis and treatment services. According
         to the New Mexico Department of Health there have been no reported cases of
         Syphilis in Socorro County.
 4.5.9 Sexually Transmitted Diseases: HIV/AIDS
         According to the New Mexico HIV/AIDS Annual Report:2005
         (http://www.health.state.nm.us/epi/pdf/HIV_Annual_Surv_Report_2005.pdf) there
         were 20 new cases of HIV and 18 new cases of AIDS in the Southwest Region of
         New Mexico. This region includes Torrance, Catron, Socorro, Lincoln, Grant, Sierra,
         Hidalgo, Luna, Doña Ana and Otero County.
4.5.10      Other
         The Socorro County Commissioners passed an enhanced animal control ordinance in
         Spring 2005 to deal with a large population of dogs that had been interfering with
         pedestrian, cycling and motor traffic in the county. These incidents are of much
         greater threat than rabies as they contribute to unintentional injuries to both youths
         and adults.
         In 2004, two cases of West Nile Virus were reported to the Centers for Disease
         Control by Seminarians for Socorro County. Between 2003 and 2006, five Human



                                                                                                       48
               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

      West Nile cases were reported. In part, this can be attributed to a vigorous spraying
      of water habitats within the county to reduce the mosquito population.
4.6 Environmental Health Indicators
4.6.1 Safe streets, neighborhoods, parks
      The SCOPE Community Satisfaction Survey for 2007 revealed that 89.9% of Socorro
      County residents feel they live in a safe neighborhood and 54.3% feel the community
      has playgrounds that are safe, well lit and in good repair. Just under 70% feel there is
      not enough access for persons with disabilities, such as curb cuts, safe sidewalks, or
      audible traffic signals. This could be do to how the communities in the County are
      laid out. The City of Socorro is the only community with stop lights. The City of
      Socorro and Magdalena are the only communities that have sidewalks. Only 4.7% of
      Socorro County residents feel there are enough biking lanes in the streets for bike
      traffic and 13.6% felt there were enough biking paths in the community.
4.6.2 Food Safety
      Socorro County had one food inspector who covered both Socorro County and parts
      of Valencia County. He left the position in Spring 2005 and it is unknown if the
      replacement will reside in Socorro County. The 2005 New Mexico Department of
      Health Food-borne reports does show a large number of food-borne illnesses reported
      for the county (See Section 4.5.4).
4.6.3 Water Quality
                        Table 39: Socorro County Watersheds and Reported Issues

     Watershed                    Watershed Characterization Category

     Caballo                      Less Serious Water Quality Problems - Low Vulnerability

     Elephant Butte Reservoir More Serious Water Quality Problems - Low Vulnerability

     Jornada Del Muerto           Insufficient Data

     Plains Of San Agustin        Insufficient Data

     Rio Grande-Albuquerque More Serious Water Quality Problems - Low Vulnerability

     Rio Puerco                   More Serious Water Quality Problems - Low Vulnerability

     Rio Salado                   Insufficient Data

     Tularosa Valley              Insufficient Data

     Western Estancia             Insufficient Data
                        Source: http://www.scorecard.org/env-releases/water/watersheds-in-
                                   region.tcl?fips_county_code=35053&type=iwi

      According to the EPA Scorecard (www.scorecard.org), the Clean Water Act requires
      surface water quality to be high enough to support fish and wildlife populations,
      protect drinking water sources, and allow for human recreation. Nationwide, 36% of
      rivers and streams, 39% of lakes and reservoirs, and 38% of estuaries are not



                                                                                             49
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     supporting at least one of these uses. Many more waterways are either threatened by
     degradation, or lack the data required to assess their condition.
     Socorro County contains a portion of 9 watersheds: Caballo, Elephant Butte
     Reservoir, Jornada Del Muerto, Plains of San Augustin, Rio Grande, Rio Puerco, Rio
     Salado, Tularosa Valley and Western Estancia.
4.6.4 Air Quality (Indoor, Outdoor)
     The EPA Scorecard does not have an air monitoring station for Socorro County. No
     data is available showing Air Quality in Socorro to be poor. Recently, the 2007 New
     Mexico Legislative session passed the Clean Indoor Air Act, which takes effect on
     June 15, 2007. All but two restaurants have been smoke free since local City efforts
     in 2002.
4.6.5 Lead
     According to the EPA Scorecard (www.scorecard.org), the U.S. Centers for Disease
     Control (CDC) considers lead poisoning one of the foremost environmental health
     threats to children in the U.S. In 2004, almost a half million children - 2.2% of all
     pre-schoolers - have enough lead in their blood to reduce intelligence and attention
     span, cause learning disabilities, and permanently damage a child's brain and nervous
     system. Childhood lead poisoning is completely preventable. Most children are
     poisoned by lead in and around their home when they are exposed to harmful levels
     of lead-contaminated dust, deteriorated lead-based paint, and lead-contaminated soil.
     The two key risk factors linked to elevated blood lead levels in children are living in
     older housing and living in a low income household.

        Figure 15: Socorro County Percent of Children Tested with Blood Lead Levels 1994-2000




                       Source: 2003 New Mexico Socorro County Health Profile – NM DOH.
                http://dohewbs2.health.state.nm.us/VitalRec/County%20Profiles/SocorroProfile.pdf


     According to the NM Department of Health 2003 Socorro County Profile, 22.1% of
     houses in Socorro County were built prior to 1950. According to the EPA Scorecard,
     Socorro County ranks 14th in New Mexico for the number of households with
     potential lead hazards having 340 homes at risk.
     The NM DOH 2003 Socorro County Health Profile lists six children testing positive
     for high blood levels and one in 2002 out of approximately the 5.2% of children



                                                                                                   50
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     tested. With a serious decline in testing and screening no conclusions can be drawn if
     elevated blood lead levels are of significant health concern.
4.6.6 Other
4.6.6.1 Environmental Health Forum
     An Environmental Health Forum was publicly advertised and held on February 19,
     2004 in the City of Socorro Council Chambers. Twenty Socorro County residents
     attended the Forum. Zip codes represented were; 87801, 87828, and 87832.
     The attendees were given a written survey to complete prior to discussion. The
     survey asked attendees to ―Check which of the listed environmental factors are most
     important to you.‖ Below are the six issues that received the most checkmarks.
          Issue                                                 Number of checks
          Alcohol and Drug Abuse                                        14
          Drought                                                       11
          Disease (rabies, plague, west nile)                           10
          Radiological materials                                        10
          Domestic Violence                                             10
          Poverty                                                       10
     After completion of the written survey, the attendees brainstormed factors that affect
     Environmental Health in Socorro County. They were then given five votes each and
     asked to choose the most important factors. The top five issues are as follows:
     Trash/Debris – This includes trash and litter on public and private property, trash
     burning, lack of community recycling program, abandoned and inoperative cars, tire
     and other hazardous materials disposal, and landfill issues, such as sanitation,
     unsightliness and cost.
     Poverty/Culture of Poverty - "The culture of poverty" refers to the behaviors and
     beliefs often held by people living in generational poverty. Generational poverty
     refers to a situation of poverty that a family lives continually in this state, as opposed
     to the "situational" poverty experienced by newly arrived immigrants or refugees, or
     families going through a life change like divorce. Note: Attendees expressed their
     belief that poverty/culture of poverty is related and may be the root cause of some of
     the other environmental health issues, such as litter and illicit drugs.
     Explosions – This includes concerns about EMRTC (Energetic Materials Research
     and Testing Center) and White Sands explosives testing, including planned ―Bunker
     Buster‖ testing using Cesium, shock and vibration, spent uranium cleanup and
     follow-up, and possible radiological and/or chemical pollution of air and ground.
     Drugs – This includes concerns about Meth labs and availability of illegal or illicit
     drugs.
     Pesticides/Herbicides – This includes concerns about crop dusters, pesticide and
     herbicide overuse, and effect on air and water quality. Note: Attendees expressed a


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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

      desire for creative solutions to insect/invasive plant control, i.e. bats, birds and fish
      for mosquito control.
      The same written survey was also completed by 50 attendees at the Alamo Adult Find
      on April 21, 2004. The survey asked attendees to ―Check which of the listed
      environmental factors are most important to you.‖ Below are the six issues that
      received the most checkmarks. Area codes represented were; 87825, 87801, and
      87823.
              Issue                                                       Number of checks
              Alcohol and Drug Abuse                                              35
              Cigarette Smoke                                                     31
              Violence and Crime                                                  29
              Smoke from burning (Wood, trash, weeds)                             26
              Suicide                                                             25
              Animals (Rodents, snakes, coyotes)                                  25
 4.6.6.2 Housing
      According to the 2000 US Census, there are 7,808 housing units in Socorro County.
      Of those, 35.8% are mobile homes. The homeownership rate of 71.1% is comparable
      to the New Mexico rate of 70.0%. The comparable rate of homeownership may be
      due to the stability of the population, in that 94.5% of the 2000 population is native to
      Socorro County.
          •       2.7% lack complete plumbing facilities
          •       2.1% lack complete kitchen facilities
          •       9.6% lack telephone service
      The number of new housing units authorized by building permits in 2000 was only 8
      in Socorro County.
4.7 Injury, Violence, Substance Abuse Indicators
4.7.1 Violent Deaths (homicides, suicides, workplace, firearm-related,
      etc.)
 4.7.1.1 Homicide
      New Mexico has a high rate of homicide deaths. In 1999-2001 the State’s age
      adjusted homicide rate was 8.5 per 100,000 population, considerably higher than the
      national rate of 5.9. For the same time period, Socorro County had a lower rate of
      homicide than the state as a whole. During the period of 1999-2001, the County’s
      age adjusted homicide rate was 7.6. In 2005, Table 30, indicates that homicide was
      the 13th leading cause of death in Socorro County with one homicide in 2005.
 4.7.1.2 Suicide
      In terms of deaths, suicide is a worse problem than homicide in both New Mexico and
      Socorro County. Table 29 indicates that Socorro County had six suicides in 2004



                                                                                       52
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     making it the 5th leading cause of death that year and Table 30 indicates two suicides
     in 2005 making it the 10th leading cause of death in Socorro County that year.
     According to the 2005 YRRS, Socorro County high school students responded that
     during the 12 months preceding the survey:
          •     20.2% seriously considered attempting suicide.
          •     16.9% made a plan about how they would commit suicide.
          •     6.4% attempted suicide at least one time.
     The first two percentages are above the State’s by just over 1%. However, the
     attempted suicide rate is 6% under the State’s percentage.
4.7.1.3 Weapons, Violence and Youth
     According to the 2005 YRRS, Socorro County high school students responded that:
        Alarmingly, 71.4% could get a firearm from their home.
        During the 30 days preceding the survey:
                •         34.5% of respondents had carried a weapon such as a gun, knife, or
                          club.
                •         18.6% of respondents had carried a gun.
                •         8.5% of respondents had carried a weapon on school property.
        During the 30 days preceding the survey:
                •         5.1% of respondents did not go to school on at least one occasion
                          because they felt they would unsafe at school or on the way to or
                          from school.
     The responses indicate higher rates than were reported in 2001 and 2003 YRRS, but
     cannot be used to predict trends. One causal relationship for increased gun use might
     be the increased threat of terrorist attacks following those of September, 2001.
4.7.2 Abuse/neglect or violence (child, elderly, domestic violence)
4.7.2.1 Child Abuse
     In the first quarter of 2008 there were 24 substantiated cases of child abuse/neglect in
     Socorro County. Eight were physical abuse and one was sexual abuse. A
     substantiated case means that through the course of the investigation, the social
     worker determined that the child(ren) who is the subject of the report has been
     determined to have been the victim of abuse and/or neglect. In other words the
     allegations are true. An unsubstantiated investigation indicates that the investigator
     was unable to determine that the allegation(s) was true.
                          Table 40: Child Maltreatment Cases, Quarter 1 SFY 08
                               Child Maltreatment Cases, Quarter 1 SFY 08
                                        Substantiated Unsubstantiated Total
                          Socorro Co.              24                85   109
                          New Mexico            2346               7757 10103
                    Source: http://www.cyfd.org/psprofiles/Region5_Q1_08_%20PS_Cty_Prof.pdf



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            SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.7.2.2 Elder Abuse
                            Table 41: Socorro County Adult Abuse Cases 2002




                       Source: 2003 New Mexico Socorro County Health Profile – NM DOH.
                http://dohewbs2.health.state.nm.us/VitalRec/County%20Profiles/SocorroProfile.pdf
    In 2000 there were 11 substantiated cases of adult abuse/neglect/exploitation in
    Socorro County (2002 Socorro County Health Profile, NM DOH). In 2002 there
    were 17 substantiated cases (2003 Socorro County Health Profile, NM DOH). No
    new data is available.
4.7.2.3 Domestic Violence
    The Socorro County data collected in the Incidence and Nature of Domestic Violence
    In New Mexico VI: An Analysis of 2005 Data From The New Mexico Interpersonal
    Violence Data Central Repository was based on reports from the Socorro City Police
    Department, Socorro County Sheriff Department and El Puente del Socorro. Table
    42 indicates a steady rate of domestic violence for both Socorro County and New
    Mexico. In 2005, Socorro County ranked 8th in New Mexico for Domestic Violence.

               Table 42: Socorro County Domestic Violence Rates per 1000, 2001-2005
                         Domestic Violence Rates Per 1000, 2001-2005
                                         2001    2002     2003      2004     2005
              Socorro County              10.4    10.1      9.9      5.7*     13.1
              New Mexico                  15.5    15.8     14.7      15.3     15.6
             *Incomplete reporting
                Source: Incidence and Nature of Domestic Violence In New Mexico VI, July 2006




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           SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

Figure 16: Percent Socorro County Domestic Violence Cases Involving Alcohol/Drug Use,
                                        2001-2005
                                 Percent Domestic Violence Cases Involving
                                       Alcohol/Drug Use, 2001-2005

                          60
                          50

            Percent (%)   40
                                                                                           Socorro County
                          30
                                                                                           New Mexico
                          20

                          10

                           0
                                 2001      2002      2003      2004       2005


     Note: The Socorro County Sheriff’s Office and Socorro Police Department did not report alcohol/drug data in 2005.
                          Source: Incidence and Nature of Domestic Violence In New Mexico VI, July 2006


Between 2001 and 2005 40-60% of domestic violence cases in Socorro County
involved alcohol and/or drug use. This is higher than the 25-35% of New Mexico
domestic violence cases.
Table 43: Percent Socorro County Domestic Violence Cases Involving Weapons Use, 2001-2005
              Percent Domestic Violence Cases Involving Weapons Use,
                                     2001-2005
                                    2001     2002     2003     2004   2005
         Socorro County                16      11*     12*       17       **
         New Mexico                    36       36      38       39      38
      * No data from Socorro County Sheriff’s Office     **No data from Socorro Police Department
             Source: Incidence and Nature of Domestic Violence In New Mexico VI, July 2006


      Table 44: Percent Socorro County Domestic Violence Cases With Injury, 2001-2005
                     Percent Domestic Violence Cases With Injury,
                                      2001-2005
                                     2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
                                                                     36*
              Socorro County           74     60*     78*     91       **
              New Mexico               31      27      26     32      28
      * No data from Socorro County Sheriff’s Office     **No data from Socorro Police Department
             Source: Incidence and Nature of Domestic Violence In New Mexico VI, July 2006


Although there is not complete data between 2001 and 2005 regarding the percent of
domestic violence cases involving weapons use, the years with complete data indicate
that it is much lower in Socorro County than in all of New Mexico (See Table 43).
However, from Table 44, even though there was no data reported by the Socorro
County Sheriff’s Office or Socorro Police Department for many of the years, the
percent of domestic violence cases with injury for Socorro County is much higher
than for New Mexico.




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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

4.7.3 Unintentional injury
      According to Tables 29 and 30, unintentional injuries were the 3rd leading cause of
      death for 2004 and 2005 (See Section 4.3).
4.7.4 Substance Abuse
4.7.4.1 Alcohol
      The 2005 YRRS data for Socorro County shows:
             45% of youth reported having their first drink before the age of 13
             68.3% of students who drink usually drink at home or another person’s home
      New Mexico ranks as one of the leading states for per capita alcohol consumption and
      is also one of the leading states for alcohol-related problems such as alcohol-involved
      fatal crashes, cirrhosis, and alcohol-related deaths. Table 45 indicates that only 21 of
      the 79 people in alcohol-involved crashes in Socorro County in 2004, or less than
      27%, were sober. This suggests that only four of the 17 Socorro County teen auto
      crash victims were sober.


                            Table 45: Victims of Alcohol-involved Crashes, 2004
                             Victims of Alcohol-involved Crashes, 2004
                                                    People in Crashes
                                            Total      Sober      Under 18
                           Socorro
                           County                 79         21            17
                           New Mexico           7776       2991         1762
                                Source: Driving While Impaired New Mexico, 2004

      From Table 46, there were 111 DWI convictions in Socorro County in 2004 with a
      DWI conviction rate of 9.7convictions per 1,000 licensed drivers, which was
      comparable to New Mexico’s. The Socorro County DWI Program completes an
      Alcohol and Drug Evaluation on each individual that is convicted of a DWI in
      Socorro County; the results show that 75% of these individuals need some sort of
      treatment for alcohol and/or drug abuse.


                       Table 46: Alcohol-involved Crashes and DWI Convictions, 2004

               Socorro County and NM Alcohol-involved Crashes and DWI Convictions, 2004
                       Crashes                                              Rates
                       % of              % of                                       Severe                    2004
             Alcohol   all     Alcohol   all      People    People       DWI        Alcohol    DWI          Licensed
             Fatal     Fatal   Injury    Injury    Killed   Injured    Conviction   Crashes    Conviction    Drivers
   Socorro
   County         4       33       12       11          4        23           111       1.4           9.7     11471
   New
   Mexico       176       40     1588         9      219      2576         12639        1.4           9.8   1289089
                                Source: Driving While Impaired New Mexico, 2004




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               SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

 4.7.4.2 Tobacco
      According to the Adults and Tobacco in New Mexico: 2005 Report, 25.8% of Socorro
      County residents smoke compared to the 22.3% of New Mexicans that smoke.
      According to the 2005 YRRS, Socorro County high school student responded in the
      following manner:
            26% reported they were less than twelve years of age when they smoked a
             whole cigarette for the first time.
      During the 30 days preceding the survey:
            68.6% reported they had tried cigarette smoking.
            15.2% reported they had used chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip.
            6.9% reported they had smoked cigarettes on school property.
            21.4% reported they currently smoked.
      Socorro County has three Tobacco Use, Prevention and Control (TUPAC) grant
      funded programs that deal extensively with Tobacco education, prevention and
      intervention. See 5.1.4.6 for more details.
 4.7.4.3 Illicit Drugs
      During 2000, New Mexico led the nation in drug-related death. The New Mexico
      drug death rate was twice as high as the national rate. According to the 2001, 2003
      and 2005 Socorro County YRRS, administered to Socorro County high school
      students in the fall of 2001, 2003, 2005, respectively:
                                                                      2001    2003    2005
            Had initiated marijuana use at twelve years or younger 25%       30%     18%
            Felt that community adults would think it was only ―a
             little bit wrong‖ or ―not wrong at all‖ ―for someone your
             age to use marijuana.‖                                   20%     41.1% NA
            Felt that it would be ―very easy‖ to get marijuana       48%     45.9% 52.9%
      Consistently since 2001, local students have felt it was ―very easy‖ to get marijuana,
      and local community assessments do indicate that illicit drugs are an issue for
      Socorro County. Based on the data and anecdotal evidence, the SCOPE Council has
      name Substance Abuse as one of their priorities.
4.8 Risk, Resiliency Indicators:
4.8.1 Youth Resiliency Factors
         According to the 2005 YRRS, Socorro County high school students reported that
         the following were ―pretty much true‖ or ―very true‖:
         •       81.7% reported they had a parent or other adult at home who was
                 interested in their school work.
         •       68.7% reported they had a parent or other adult who talks to the student
                 about his/her problems.

                                                                                    57
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

             •      70.9% reported they had a parent or other adult at home who listens to the
                    student when he/she has something to say.
             •      86.9% reported they had a parent or other adult at home who expects
                    him/her to follow the rules.
             •      85.7% reported they had a parent or other adult at home who believes that
                    the student will be a success.
             •      89.7% reported they had a parent or other adult at home who always wants
                    the student to do his/her best.
             •      77.2% reported they had a parent or other adult who knows where the
                    student is and who he/she is with.
             •      81.4% reported their family has clear rules about drug and alcohol use.
             •      82.4% reported their family has clear rules and standards for his/her
                    behavior.
         Although these percentages are high, there was an average drop of more than 6%
         between 2003 and 2005.
 4.9 Interpretation of Community Health Status Information
  From the data presented in this profile and the Socorro County Community Satisfaction
  Survey for 2007, the SCOPE council has identified four health and social categories to list as
  priorities: Teen Pregnancy, Substance Abuse, Fitness and Nutrition, and Access to
  Healthcare in Northern Socorro County. How these health priorities are being addressed will
  be detailed in the companion to this document: 2009 Socorro County Health Plan.

5 Health-related Services: Capacity, Access and Use
  (Utilization)
 5.1 Capacity: What services exist for whom
  5.1.1 Maternal Child Health (MCH)
   5.1.1.1 Access to Care
         According to the results of the 2001 MCH Needs Assessment conducted in Socorro
         County. In January of 2001, costs, insufficient number of MCH providers, and
         transportation were identified as major factors that affected accessibility to local
         MCH services. In the results of the Socorro County Community Satisfaction Survey
         for 2006, lack of access to needed dental care was ranked 8th, lack of access to needed
         health care was ranked 11th, and transportation needs was ranked 12th out of 21. The
         need for local pregnancy care services was ranked 20th. There are no gaps in locally
         available MCH physician specialties. As of August 2007, the Socorro Community
         Health Center has one physician on staff able to provide obstetric and gynecological
         care to County residents. There is also one practicing midwife in Socorro County.
         There is a severe physician shortage in Socorro County.
   5.1.1.2 Services and MCH plans
         Socorro County MCH, now known as Healthy Family Initiative (HFI), has
         historically filled the gap in helping to provide perinatal and case management care


                                                                                      58
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

     for uninsured persons ineligible for Medicaid using funding from New Mexico
     Department of Health. Currently, Socorro County HFI has received grant funding
     through the SCOPE Health Council fiscal year 2007 to continue their work.
5.1.1.3 County Funding
     In the past, Socorro County has provided $400.00 each for twelve pregnancies per
     year not covered by Medicaid or other insurance, a total of $4,800.00 per year.
     Between FY 05 and FY 07, Socorro County experienced fiscal crisis and could not
     provide any monies to MCH services for Medicaid ineligible clients. Funding for
     FY08 was requested in Spring 2007.
5.1.2 Dental Health
     Socorro County is not listed as an underserved area for dentistry. However, all four
     of the dentists in Socorro County practice in the City of Socorro. Only one accepts
     Medicaid.
5.1.3 Infrastructure
5.1.3.1 Public Safety
     a) Law Enforcement
     The Socorro Police Department has budgeted for 19 full-time patrol officers. Due to
     attrition and turnover, only 14 of these positions are staffed. According to Municipal
     Technical Advisory Service, the nationwide average for police staffing is 2.4 officers
     per 1000 population. Using this average, the minimum staffing level in the City of
     Socorro with a population of 8,877 should be 21 full time patrol officers.
     b) Fire and EMS
     The 2003 NM DOH Socorro County Health Profile lists the following Fire and EMS
     personnel (p.43)

                     Table 47: Socorro County Emergency Medical Services 2003




                       Source: 2003 New Mexico Socorro County Health Profile – NM DOH.
                http://dohewbs2.health.state.nm.us/VitalRec/County%20Profiles/SocorroProfile.pdf


                                                                                                   59
              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


     The City of Socorro has a full time Emergency Medical Service staff and residents in
     this area can easily reach a hospital in a medical emergency within the one hour
     critical window that increases the chance of survival during crisis. For residents
     beyond this city limit, the travel time to emergency care is significantly higher and
     could be considered a gap area.
5.1.3.2 Communication
     Socorro County has one radio station, KMXQ, and has clear reception for many
     Albuquerque stations. KMXQ has original local programming and a segment called
     ―Keeping You Informed‖ (KYI) for local organizations to discuss current events. It
     has a community information television channel available to cable viewers through
     Comcast. County newspapers include the Magdalena Mountain Mail and the El
     Defensor Chieftain, both published twice per week and available on the internet.
     Steppin' Out is an arts and events periodical. The New Mexico Tech campus
     produces a campus newsletter titled Scope, (not to be confused with Socorro County
     Options, Prevention and Education, SCOPE).
5.1.4 Health and Community Resources
5.1.4.1 Access to Health Care
     With a population density of 2.7 persons per square mile, Socorro County is classified
     as a frontier county by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration.
     Population density is an important determinant of the health status of populations and
     individuals for several interrelated reasons. Low population density results in longer
     distances and travel times and may limit access to certain services. The average travel
     time and mileage to a primary care provider in New Mexico was 14.5 minutes/6.6
     miles in urban Bernalillo County in contrast to 29.9minutes/25.2 miles in rural
     Socorro County.
     Exacerbating this is the virtual absence of public transportation in the County’s rural
     areas. Also in the rural areas of the County, adverse individual and family economic
     conditions further reduce access to medical services to those uninsured and unable to
     pay for these services.
5.1.4.2 Transportation
     Socorro County has no public transportation. However, the City of Socorro has
     started city public transportation. Currently, they have one operational van, and have
     purchased a second. The low population density makes travel to medical services
     difficult for many residents. The following are transportation providers, health care
     providers and community partners who provide limited transportation services to
     qualified members of the community:
        • Albuquerque Cab Company/Safe Ride New Mexico - Does not accept
          Medicaid. Fee in 2005 was $4.20 for the first mile and $2.00 per mile
          thereafter. Round trip to Albuquerque is approximately $330.00.
        • Socorro Taxi Service - Offers reduced fee transportation to clients with full
          coverage through Lovelace Health Systems and is considered Medicaid
          eligible. Transportation cost in 2005 was $1.59 per mile.


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              SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

        • Socorro Mental Health - Offers free transportation to its clients for in-house
          programs.
        • Socorro Senior Center - Offers free transportation to Socorro County senior
          citizens to dental appointments, doctor appointments, grocery shopping, and
          pharmacy pick up and Senior Center lunches or activities.
        • American Cancer Society - Offers rides to Albuquerque at no charge for cancer
          patients in need of treatment.
        • City of Socorro Van - Offers rides within city limit Monday through Friday
          from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Fee of $0.50 and $0.25 for seniors
          and Students is charged. 24-Hour notice is required.
        • Socorro General Hospital, Heritage Program for Senior Adults - offers wheel
          chair accessible van transportation for patient’s enrolled in their structured
          outpatient behavioral health program.
5.1.4.3 Licensed Health Professionals
     In 2005, Socorro County had the following licensed professionals:
        •       Medical doctors                       13
        •       Medical doctor residents              1
        •       Physician’s assistants                3
        •       Nurses (RN & LPN)                     81
        •       Certified Nurse Midwives              1
        •       Pharmacist                            6
        •       Dentists                              4
     Active Emergency Medical Services Personnel in 2003:
        •       First Responders                      15
        •       Dispatchers                           0
        •       Dispatcher Instructors                0
        •       EMTs -Basic                           30
        •       EMTs -Intermediate                    29
        •       EMTs -Paramedic                       3
     Note: There may be personnel with current active licenses at more than one level.
     The appendix contains a compilation of services conducted by the local American
     Cancer Society.
5.1.4.4 Medical Specialties
     The following is a list of medical specialists practicing in Socorro County in 2006.
     For all other specialty medical care needs, residents must travel outside Socorro
     County.


                                                                                  61
        Anesthesiology - 2                                    Optometry - 1
        Chiropractic - 1                                      Pediatrics - 2
        Emergency Medicine - 2                                Physical Therapy - 4
        Family Practice - 8                                   Podiatry - 2
        Gynecology - 1                                        Psychiatry (Adults) - 3
        Obstetrics - 3                                        Surgery - 1
5.1.4.5 Resource Directory
    See Appendix C
5.1.4.6 SCOPE Community Partners
    The following groups and organizations have joined together for the common goal of
    improving the health and welfare of the citizens of Socorro County:
    New Mexico Graduation, Reality and Dual-role Skills (NM GRADS)
    The Mission of the New Mexico GRADS System is to strengthen teenage families
    and reduce risk-taking behaviors among all served youth.
    NM GRADS began in 1989 as a self replicating, self sustaining drop-out recovery
    and recruitment program for teen parents. NM GRADS has grown into a
    comprehensive network, which serves 37 school districts across New Mexico,
    community and faith-based initiatives, and juvenile justice facilities, providing an
    array of services including:
    •   Provide funding to school districts for three years to establish school-based
        intervention programs for pregnant and parenting teens, which include case
        management.
    •   Pregnancy Prevention programs based on the 8 federal guidelines for abstinence
        education, which can be modified by districts to include more comprehensive
        birth control information depending on the district’s policy.
    •   Facilitation for Childcare Center set-up, continuing annual support, and CCC staff
        development at GRADS sites.
    •   Career Readiness programs for teen parents to facilitate career planning and
        attainment of national certification in non-traditional career paths as funding
        allows.
    •   GRADS Dads fatherhood programs in school, community, faith based and
        juvenile justice facility settings.
    •   Provide education to teens to promote Youth Leadership and Peer Mentoring to
        reduce risk-taking behaviors among youth and community wide.
    •   Teacher training for GRADS and Prevention teachers, and Fatherhood program
        Coordinator/Facilitators, as well as ongoing professional development for all
        components at least twice a year, which provide college credit.
    Performance Measures include:
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

         •   Improving the outcomes of high-risk pregnancies, decreasing low birth weight
             babies among teens served.
         •   Reducing out-of-wedlock births and repeat pregnancies among teens served.
         •   Encouraging the formation of and strengthen two-parent families of teens served.
         •   Providing on-site childcare to facilitate school attendance and graduation.
         •   Providing teen parents with career exploration activities to enhance employability,
             and provide opportunities for them to earn college credit and or certification in
             various high tech careers.
         •   Collaborating with UNM CAASA and the ARC of New Mexico (Advocates for
             Persons with Developmental Disabilities and Their Families) to develop regional
             trainings and resources to foster youth leadership and peer mentoring while
             reducing risk taking behaviors among youth.
         Literacy Volunteers of Socorro County
         Literacy Volunteers of Socorro County (LVSC) is a literacy provider that gives adults
         and their families the opportunity to acquire skills to be effective in their roles as
         members of their families, communities, and workplaces. They provide student-
         focused tutoring, one-to-one, or in small groups, at no charge to the student. Their
         mission is to change lives through literacy.
         They offer:
              • ESL (English as a second language)
              • Pre-GED
              • Basic reading tutoring
              • Vocational computer classes
              • Family literacy services
              • Citizenship Classes
         LVSC has 25 tutors and 108 student
              • A group of adults come from Tresco and Socorro Mental Health each
                Tuesday for tutoring.
              • LVSC has computer classes all year. Call our office to sign-up!
              • An LVSC volunteer has been going to Alamo each month to talk with parents
                about reading to their children, playing and singing with their children, and
                being involved in their children’s education. LVSC always gives free
                children’s books.
              • LVSC helped with the RIF (Reading is Fundamental)program in October.
              • Each year LVSC holds a community Christmas party through the Family
                Literacy Program.



March 31, 2008                                                                        63
                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

         Puerto Seguro, Inc.
         Offers homeless or nearly homeless people a safe place for a short time to clean up,
         wash and receive clothing, get something to eat, and receive linkage to many services
         in the area, such as help with housing, utilities, employment, rehabilitation
         counseling. Services are provided at no charge. In 2002, Puerto Seguro helped 73
         local single individuals, 44 transients, 1 battered family, 2 house fire families, 29
         veterans, and 76 other local families, including 150 children.
         Socorro County DWI Program
         Socorro County DWI Program – Non-profit Grant funded program which oversees
         99% of all DWI cases for Socorro County. This program has a strong focus on
         substance abuse treatment and prevention. Funding is provided for treatment and
         intervention to both Socorro Mental Health and Terra Luna Counseling. Prevention
         programs funded are Teen Court, JAVELIN, and ―Protecting You, Protecting Me‖
         which are implemented in Socorro and Magdalena School Districts. If you or any
         one you know has a substance abuse problem (i.e., alcohol, drugs, meth, etc.) we can
         provide resources and/or referrals to aid in recovery.
         Socorro General Hospital’s Healthy Family Initiative (Formally MCH)
         Socorro General Hospital HFI is committed to the health and well-being of families
         in Socorro County. Through community collaboration they are able to provide, both
         directly and indirectly, a variety of services.
            • Bilingual perinatal case management to Socorro County residents
            • Adolescent Risk Avoidance
            • Transportation services (Limited)
            • Parenting education and support through thirty six months
            • Low cost child safety seat education and seats
            • Tobacco Prevention Education and local classes
            • Statewide Youth Coalition Activities
            • Yearly Family Retreat
            • Sun Safety Education
            • Youth Advocacy
         HFI reported impact on Healthy Family Initiative in 2006 is as follows:
            • HFI case managed clients, 100% up-to-date on immunizations, 95% breastfed
              at least seven months, 100% enrolled under Medicaid, 85% of mothers
              contracepting, and Ages and Stages through 36 months.
            • Decreased teen birth rates since 2000 of 26.8%
            • Socorro County mothers have a higher level of prenatal care than mothers in
              other parts of state (PRAMS data)


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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

             • Over 144 clients and families served directly through bilingual case manager
             • Over 16,000 individuals impacted through HFI educational opportunities
             • Over 965 individuals impacted by transportation services
         Socorro General Hospital's HFI program has been working on teen pregnancy
         prevention since 1994 through a comprehensive community approach involving
         parents, students, schools, community, and faith community. The program emphasis
         is goal setting, healthy relationships, refusal skills, choices and consequences, and life
         promoting skills. Their program starts in the Second grade and are in 4th, 6th, 7th, 9th
         and 11th grades in Socorro, 2nd , 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th in Magdalena, 6th , 8th , & 11th in
         Alamo with reinforcing assemblies for all middle and high school students prior to
         prom and homecoming. Parents are the primary educators and HFI has programs to
         reach parents.
         Socorro Community Health Center
         The Socorro Community Health Center, operated by Presbyterian Medical Services
         (PMS) opened in the Fall of 2004. Detailed information is not available at this
         writing for the number of patients seen since opening or the impact on private health
         care providers.
         Socorro Mental Health, Inc. (SMH)
         Socorro Mental Health, Inc. (SMH) is the local community mental health center that
         serves residents of all of Socorro County. SMH is committed to promoting the
         emotional, social, intellectual, occupational, physical and spiritual wellbeing of
         individuals and families in this area. SMH has been established in this community
         since 1991 and continually seeks ways to improve services to community members.
         Their vision is ―Offering compassionate services for effective living and healthy
         families. The mission of SMH is to provide behavioral health services and to support
         community efforts leading to healthier lifestyles in a changing world.
         SMH provides the following services:
         •   Counseling
         •   Adult and children case management services
         •   Alcohol, drug and tobacco use prevention programs
         •   Mid-Level Family Preservation Services
         •   Casa de Esperanza day program for those adults in the community who have been
             identified with a chronic mental illness, such as major depression, schizophrenia
             and bi-polar disorder.
         •   Children’s Services includes not only individual and family counseling with
             assessment and medication management possibilities but also a very active
             Children Case Management Team that takes a family approach in assisting with
             the basic needs of children, to include housing, clothes, linkage with other social
             and medical services and school advocacy.


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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

         •   Children’s Respite Program where parents of children with a behavioral health
             diagnosis are given a chance to catch their breath while their children are
             provided with a caring adult who provides one-to-one and small group
             recreational programming over an extended time period, thus helping children
             develop long-term positive relationships with adults and other children in addition
             to the reprieve given to parents.
         •   Tobacco Use, Prevention and Control (TUPAC) Program at Socorro Mental
             Health focuses on four initiatives. It provides tobacco cessation services through
             classes, individual counseling, and pharmacotherapy to adults in Socorro County.
             It works to eliminate the tobacco disparity among the Alamo Navajo Reservation
             through educating about secondhand smoke, spit tobacco, and cessation at
             community events. It provides technical assistance for tobacco brief interventions
             to health care providers in Socorro County by providing training, materials,
             pharmacotherapy, and reimbursement. Lastly, it works to eliminate the tobacco
             disparity among the mentally ill and substance-abusing populations in Socorro
             County by providing education and cessation sessions to therapeutic groups
             meeting at Socorro Mental Health.
         •   Driving While Impaired Local Grant (DWILG) Program has expanded to include
             a more family-based treatment approach by providing a full six-month outpatient
             program of services for alcohol and drug dependent individuals. They have
             launched a Children of Alcoholics Group, where children of those adults enrolled
             in this program attend either a latency-age group or a pre-teen/teen group where
             they can begin to explore and understand the dynamics of the alcoholic family.
             Socorro Mental Health’s aim through this program is to help all the family,
             including the alcoholic parent, identify how the unhealthy survival skills
             necessary to survive in the alcoholic family always will present special challenges
             to their children’s future relationships in the areas of emotions, control,
             boundaries, intimacy, conflict and commitment.
         •   Children of Alcoholics Group
         •   Twenty-four hour response for those individuals calling into the local 911 line
             with a mental health emergency. In Fiscal Year 2003, SMH responded to
             approximately four hundred emergency calls.
         Throughout FY 2003, Socorro Mental Health provided ongoing support to several of
         the SCOPE committees. In addition to taking on the SCOPE grant as fiduciary agent
         and hiring and housing a new SCOPE Coordinator, SMH also sent consistent
         representation to the SCOPE Substance Abuse Core Team.
         As a treatment center, SMH admits over 140 new individuals every quarter.
         Socorro Storehouse
         Socorro Storehouse is a food pantry that:
         •   Provides food for over 60 families per week, on average
         •   Distributed over 150,000 pounds of food to clients in 2006


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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

         •   Is an Emergency Food, Commodities & Senior Helpings Food Distribution Site
             open Thursdays from Noon – 2 PM
         •   Volunteer based, Storehouse relies on donations and financial support of the
             community
         •   Established in 2003 as a collaborative effort by local churches and concerned
             citizens
         •   Can purchase food from Roadrunner Food Bank at the cost of $0.18/lb.
         •   Located at 519 S. California, phone number 838-1500
         •   On-site director: Valerie Key Board Officers: Randall Westfall, Rosie Tripp,
             Nadine Ulibarri-Keller, Gloria Tacker
         Tobacco Use, Prevention and Control (TUPAC) at Socorro General Hospital
         In 2003, TUPAC at SGH accomplished the following:
         •   Spearheaded an educational initiative to support a proposed Clean Indoor Air
             Resolution in Socorro, brought the issue to the forefront in the city (1st Quarter
             Jul–Sep 02 and 2nd Quarter Oct–Dec 02)
         •   Developed, received TUPAC approval and arranged for distribution of New Mom
             Packets, including EPA’s Smoke Free, pledge cards (3rd Quarter Jan-Mar 03)
         •   Smoke Free Dining Guide for Socorro submitted, approved and disseminated.
         •   Advertisements in local papers recognized smoke free restaurants (3rd Quarter
             Jan-Mar 03)
         •   Spearheaded initiative for district-wide tobacco and smoke free policies on all
             school campuses (4th Quarter Mar-Jun 03)
         •   Assisted in the establishment of the community-based coalition named Clean
             Indoor Air for Socorro (CIA/FS)
         •   Presented complete prevention curriculum: 1734 contacts with elementary school
             students, 2490 contacts with middle school students in classrooms, and 888
             contacts in high school classrooms (1st through 4th Quarter Jul 02 – Jun 03)
         •   57 stories on the topic of eliminating exposure to ETS published in 2 local
             newspapers; and one statewide newspaper placed 14 counter-advertisements and
             10 articles on youth advocacy initiatives in the 2 local papers (1st through 4th
             Quarter: Jul 02 – Jun 03).
         •   Baseline questionnaire developed and administered as pre-post tests to 92 4th
             grade students. Students will be tested again in two years as sixth graders (1st
             Quarter Jul-Sep 02 and 4th Quarter Apr-Jun 03)
         •   Administered New Mexico Youth Tobacco Survey to 150 students in Socorro and
             Magdalena schools.
         •   Socorro merchant youth ID check completed for the sale of tobacco - 65% of the
             merchants were in full compliance (2nd Quarter Oct-Dec 02)


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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

         •   Third annual Family Retreat with 59 middle school students and their parents
             attending (4th Quarter Apr-Jun 03)
    5.1.4.7 Community nonprofit organizations
         El Puente
         Shelter for victims of domestic violence. No data available on the number of calls or
         program participants.
         GRADS
         See SCOPE Community Partners.
         Habitat for Humanity International, Inc
         Local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity. An International, nonprofit, ecumenical
         Christian ministry building simple, decent, affordable housing in partnership with
         people in need of adequate shelter. This organization is no longer active since Socorro
         County does not have the resources to sustain the unit with the needed resources of
         volunteers and money.
         Head Start
         The Head Start Program is free and made available to low-income families with
         children between the ages of three and five. At least 10% of enrollment is reserved for
         children with disabilities.
         Literacy Volunteers of Socorro County
         See SCOPE Community Partners.
         Puerto Seguro, Inc.
         See SCOPE Community Partners.
         Socorro County DWI Program
         See SCOPE Community Partners.
         Socorro Mental Health, Inc.
         See SCOPE Community Partners.
         Socorro Storehouse
         See SCOPE Community Partners.
         W.O.W – Women on Wellness.
         A non-profit organization sustained through monthly member dues. The focus of the
         members is to bring educational sessions on health topics to community members on
         a no fee basis. Programs were conducted in early 2005.




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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

    5.1.4.8 Public Health and Social Services
         Income Support Division
         Administers programs to benefit low income residents. Programs include: Food
         Stamps, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), General Assistance,
         Medicaid, Low Income Housing Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).
         Public Health Office
         New Mexico Department of Health office offering pregnancy testing and counseling,
         birth control information and services, AIDs prevention information and services,
         immunizations, family planning, STD testing, TB testing, and health education and
         wellness promotion.
         Families First
         Department of Health program that provides assistance with Medicaid application for
         children and pregnant women, care coordination services as determined by families
         (Salud Managed Care Organization), Ages and Stages Questionnaire (developmental
         screening for children), collaboration with other community resources and services,
         and home visits focused on prenatal wellness and child health
         WIC
         Department of Health program that helps pregnant women, new mothers, and young
         children eat well, learn about nutrition, and stay healthy. WIC provides the
         community with nutrition education, counseling, nutritious foods, and assistance with
         access to health care that is provided to low-income women, infants, and children
         through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program.
         Career Center
         New Mexico Department of Labor office that provides career counseling, job
         referrals, lists of State, Federal and Private jobs, Work Search Skills Workshop,
         Resource Center, WorkKeys Assessment, and Labor Market Information. It also
         offers the following Assistance Programs; Unemployment Insurance Claims,
         Customer Service Line, Work Experience, On-The-Job Training, Classroom Training,
         Alien Labor Certification, Apprenticeship Program, Federal Bonding, Migrant
         Seasonal Farm workers, TAA and NAFTA Programs, and Veteran Services.
         Juvenile Community Corrections (JCC)
         Referrals are made from the Juvenile Probation and Parole Office (JPPO) after
         adjudication. The referrals then are approved by the Local Selection Panel (LSP).
         The JCC Program offers extra supervision, which can go to the extent of electronic
         monitors. On average a client is in the JCC Program 5.5 months and includes three
         phases: Phase I lasts 60 days with clients checking three times a week, Phase II lasts
         45 days with clients checking in twice a month, and Phase III lasts 60 days with
         clients checking in once a month. Clients must make each check in and pass a drug
         test to move from each Phase of the program.




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                   SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

  5.2 Access: what influences access to services for different groups
      There are several factors that influence whether different populations access health care
      services. There is a large low income population in Socorro County. This affects
      whether they have health insurance and reliable transportation. Many of the residents in
      Northern Socorro County are illegal aliens and do not speak English, qualify for
      government benefits or have a steady job. Many Native American residents have to
      travel from the Alamo Reservation to Magdalena or Socorro to work. This requires
      reliable transportation, which many do not have. This also cuts into their income as gas
      prices keep rising and are at an all time high.
      There is a clinic on the Alamo Navajo Reservation that houses a dentist, optometrist,
      pharmacy, therapists, and physician. Some Native American residents travel to
      Magdalena to utilize the local medical clinic. Others travel to Socorro for the same
      services. Many residents in Northern Socorro County travel into Valencia and Bernalillo
      County for services. Within the City of Socorro many services are available; providers
      make referrals to specialists outside of the City when needed. When residents can
      feasibly make it to any service provider they receive the help that is needed
  5.3 Utilization: who utilizes these existing services
      A clear picture of utilization is not readily available. The local clinics and hospital
      collect client utilization data, however they have not made it available to us.

6 Health Disparities
  Currently, there is no county-specific data available for Socorro County regarding health
  disparities. The New Mexico Department of Health has published the Racial and Ethnic
  Health Disparities Report Card for New Mexico in August 2006. As the percent of races in
  Socorro County is similar to that of New Mexico, see Figure 4, this report card could be
  indicative of Socorro County. However, since there are many other differences between
  Socorro County and New Mexico, this is not recommended. A focused look at health
  disparities in Socorro County needs to be done to completely understand the impact is has on
  Socorro County residents.

7 Summary of Profile Highlights & Overall Interpretation
  7.1 What Issues Strongly Impact Health of County Population
   7.1.1 Mental Health
          According to the 1998 - 2000 BRFSS data 31.5% of Socorro County residents are in
          poor mental health (>= 5 days in the month preceding the survey of stress,
          depression, or problems with emotions). This is considerably greater than the New
          Mexico rate of 20.7%. The authors of the analysis also queried the Hospital Inpatient
          Discharge Database (HIDD) from 1996 to 2000, and found that psychoses accounted
          for 63% of all mental health-related hospital discharges of Socorro County residents.
          Neurosis accounted for 18% of all discharges, the majority of which were depressive
          neurosis. Between 1996 and 2000, the percentage of mental health discharges
          belonging to the psychoses category increased from 57% to 81%. At the same time,
          the percentage of neurosis discharges decreased from 17% in 1996 to 4% in 2000,
          although it increased to as high as 38% in 1997.

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                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

  7.2 Important health priorities in Socorro County
         In February 2007, the Executive Board of SCOPE met to review the data that has
         been updated and collected for this Health Profile. It was determined that the same
         priorities will continue as previously set, as community needs persist in these areas.
         March 2007, the Executive Board presented their findings to the SCOPE
         membership. The following were agreed to be the most serious health issues in
         Socorro County:
         •   Teen Pregnancy
         •   Nutrition and Fitness
         •   Substance Abuse
         •   Access to Health Care in Northern Socorro County
         Although not named as a health priority, domestic violence in Socorro County also
         needs to be addressed in this community.
  7.3 Explanation or discussion, from council’s perspective
      Socorro County is the third largest county in New Mexico which contains a diverse
      population with a unique set of characteristics and needs. The role of SCOPE is to
      identify gaps in services and work collaboratively among the council members to remove
      barriers to overcome these gaps. The council has a well defined listing of priorities,
      which are supported by a multitude of data sets and has the initial capacity to carry out
      programs to work the priorities identified. Assets of the council include a relatively
      stable base of core volunteers who are committed to carrying out the organization’s
      vision and mission and technical assistance from several New Mexico Department of
      Health employees.
      A key component to the success of the initial progress made by the council is continued
      funding from the State of New Mexico. Ongoing data gathering, monitoring of services,
      conducting community assessments and attending trainings or meetings requires a
      significant number of resources. Without continued funding, some of these services
      would need to be curtailed or eliminated because most of the community agency partners
      operate their respective programs solely on soft-money funding.




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                   SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


                                   References Cited

Alamo Chapter official website: http://alamo.nndes.org/default.asp?DomName=alamo.nndes.org.

American Lung Association (2004). Estimated Prevalence and Incidence of Lung Disease by
      Lung Association Territory. [Electronic Version].
      http://www.lungusa.org/atf/cf/%7B7A8D42C2-FCCA-4604-8ADE-
      7F5D5E762256%7D/ESTPREV2004.PDF

Brandeis News (October 31, 2005). Hunger in America rises by 43 percent in five years.
      [Electronic Version]
      http://my.brandeis.edu/news/item?news_item_id=104175&show_release_date=1

Bureau of Economic Analysis (2002). Bearfacts 1992-2002. Socorro County. [Electronic
      Version].
      http://www.bea.gov/bea/regional/bearfacts/action.cfm?fips=35053&areatype=35053&yea
      rin=2002

Division of Government Research UNM. Socorro Community Report 2002. [Electronic Version]
       http://www.unm.edu/~dgrint/dgr.html

Caponera, Betty. (July 2006) Incidence and Nature of Domestic Violence in New Mexico VI: An
   Analysis of 2005 Data From The New Mexico Interpersonal Violence Data Central
   Repository. State of New Mexico Department of Health, Injury, and Epidemiology Bureau,
   Office of Injury Prevention Through The New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs:
   New Mexico.

Children’s Defense Fund. http://www.childrensdefense.org/data/default.aspx

El Defensor Chieftain. (2005). Discover Socorro and Surrounding Areas.
       New Mexico: Socorro.

Environmental Protection Agency.
http://www.scorecard.org/community/index.tcl?zip_code=87801&set_community_zipcode_cook
ie_p=t

Maynard, R.A., (Ed.). (1996). Kids Having Kids: A Robin Hood Foundation Special Report on
      the Costs of Adolescent Childbearing, New York: Robin Hood Foundation.

MedicineNet (4 May 2007).
http://www.medicinenet.com/chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease_copd/article.htm

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion website.
       http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/giscvh/(dfemmp2epqbneh45vjw2rxau)/listings.aspx


March 31, 2008                                                                      72
                   SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


New Mexico Department of Health. Cancer Programs website.
     http://www.cancernm.org/ryr/

New Mexico Department of Health. (2003). The Economic Impact of Teenage Childbearing in
     New Mexico [Electronic Version].
     http://www.health.state.nm.us/phd/fp/economic_impact.htm

New Mexico Department of Health. Health Behaviors and Conditions, Socorro County,
     1998-2002 From the New Mexico Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).
     New Mexico: Santa Fe.

New Mexico Department of Health. Selected Health Behaviors and Conditions of New
     Mexicans Socorro County 2003. Results from the New Mexico Behavioral Risk Factor
     Surveillance System (BRFSS). New Mexico: Santa Fe.

New Mexico Department of Health. Strategic Arthritis Plan 2000-2005. [Electronic
     Version] New Mexico: Santa Fe. http://arthritisnm.org/documents/arthritis_plan.pdf

New Mexico Department of Health. (2005). Community Health Profile (CHP) Detailed
     Guidelines. New Mexico: Santa Fe.

New Mexico Department of Health, & New Mexico Public Education Department & UNM
     Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. (2004). 2003 New Mexico Youth
     Risk and Resiliency Survey (YRSS) County Level Results Socorro County.

New Mexico Department of Health, & New Mexico Public Education Department & UNM
     Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. (2004). 2003 New Mexico Youth
     Risk and Resiliency Survey (YRSS) School District Results Socorro Consolidated Schools.

New Mexico Department of Labor. (2004) Quarterly Census of Employment Socorro County. p
     24. [Electronic Version] http://www.dol.state.nm.us/pdf/tableb2004.PDF

New Mexico Department of Public Safety (2004). 2003 Annual Report . [Electronic Version]
     http://www.dps.nm.org/annual_report.pdf

New Mexico Department of Transportation (2004). Facts and Figures 2004. [Electronic
     Version] http://www.nmshtd.state.nm.us/upload/images/pdf/factsandfigures.pdf

New Mexico Health Policy Commission. The New Mexico Community Health Data - Interactive
     Maps. http://hpc.state.nm.us/website/

New Mexico Health Policy Commission (2007). 2007 Quick Facts. [Electronic Version]
     http://hpc.state.nm.us/QuickFacts/quickfacts2007.pdf



March 31, 2008                                                                    73
                    SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

New Mexico Public Education Department (2007). School District Report Card for 2005-2006
     School Year. [Electronic Version]
     http://164.64.166.16/doc_joomla/index.php?option=com_remository&Itemid=26&func=s
     tartdown&id=4017

Office of New Mexico Vital Records and Health Statistics. (2003). 2003 New Mexico County
       Health Profiles. [Electronic Version].
       http://dohewbs2.health.state.nm.us/VitalRec/County%20Profiles/SocorroProfile.pdf

Padilla JL, Mueller M, Baum S. Adults and Tobacco in New Mexico: 2005 Report. Chronic
        Disease Prevention and Control Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health,
        Albuquerque, NM, August 2005.

Social Science Data Network website: http://www.ssdan.net/

Socorro Chamber of Commerce. (2002). Socorro County Visitor’s Guide. New Mexico:
       Socorro.

Socorro Chamber of Commerce. (2004). Socorro County Area Information. [Electronic Source].
       http://www.socorro-nm.com/AreaInfo.htm

State Center for Health Statistics. (2004). New Mexico Selected Health Statistics Annual Report
       for 2002. Santa Fe, New Mexico: New Mexico Department of Health.

State of New Mexico Human Services Department (December 2006). Monthly Statistical
        Report. [Electronic Version] http://www.hsd.state.nm.us/isd/files/MSR1-2007.pdf


United States Census Bureau. (various). Socorro County Quickfacts. [Electronic Source]
       http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/35/35053.html.

UNM BBER. 2002 Analysis of Selected Indicators of Health and Well-being in Socorro County


United States Department of Agriculture (2005). Household Food Security in the United States,
       2004. [ Electronic Version] http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err11/err11.pdf


Voices for Children (2003). Bare Bones Budget. [Electronic Version]
       http://www.nmvoices.org/attachments/bbbfullreport.pdf




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                    SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


Appendix A: Explanation of Per Capita Income
Explanation of Difference in Per Capita Income Figures
Per Capita Personal Income (PCPI)
       • Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
       • Frequency: Annual for counties; quarterly for the states and the U.S.
       • Time series: 1929 forward for U.S. and states; 1969 forward for counties and MSAs
       • The sum of wage and salary disbursements and other labor income; proprietors' income
       with inventory and capital consumption adjustments; rental income of persons with
       capital consumption adjustment; personal dividend income; personal interest income; and
       transfer payments to persons, less personal contributions for social insurance. These
       measures include incomes of individuals, nonprofit institutions that primarily serve
       individuals, private noninsured welfare funds and private trust funds. Proprietors' income
       is treated in its entirety as received by individuals. Life insurance carriers and noninsured
       pension plans are not counted as persons, but their income and savings are credited to
       persons.
Per Capita Income
       • Source: U.S. Census Bureau
       • Frequency: Every 10 years
       • Time series: Every Census since 1790
       • Consists of cash and its equivalents received by individuals. It is the sum of the amounts
       reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest,
       dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social
       security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public
       assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor or disability pensions; and all other
       income. It excludes: capital gains, money received from the sale of property (unless the
       recipient was engaged in the business of selling such property); the value of income in
       kind from food stamps, public housing subsidies, medical care, employer contributions
       for individuals, withdrawal of bank deposits; money borrowed; tax refunds; exchange of
       money between relatives living in the same household; and gifts and lump-sum
       inheritances, insurance payments and other types of lump-sum receipts.
This information was excerpted from Per Capita Income Confusion for Counties, Carol O.
Rogers, Associate Director, Indiana Business Research Center, Kelley School of Business,
Indiana University




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                                     SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


Appendix B: Local American Cancer Society Medical Information
HOSPITAL NAME:                 Socorro General Hospital



ADDRESS:                       P.O. Box 1009 (West Highway 60),
                               Socorro, NM 87801


CONTACT NAME &                 Veronica Pound, Director of Nurses,
PHONE NUMBER                   (505) 835-1140


LOCATION IN                    Southwest side of Socorro
COMMUNITY (area,
town, city):


TYPE OF HOSPITAL               Private, not for profit, general acute
(i.e., Private for Profit,     care
State, University affiliate,
etc.)


POPULATION SERVED              Socorro County (population about
(i.e., Does the hospital       15,000); yes; yes, but not primarily
provide indigent care,         (30% Medicare and 30% Medicaid)
does the hospital
primarily serve an older
population, etc.?)

Does the hospital have a       Hospital uses the Univ. of New
tumor registry?                Mexico Hospital tumor registry.

If yes, registrar’s name       Gloria Nieves, (505) 835-8750
and contact number:
CANCER SCREENING
(i.e., FOBT, PSA,
mammogram)

Breast Cancer:                 Yes X       No
Prostate Cancer:               Yes         No   X    (These are
Colorectal Cancer:             Yes         No   X      done in
Cervical Cancer:               Yes         No   X     the doctors’
Skin Cancer:                   Yes         No   X     offices.)


CANCER TREATMENT

Radiation Therapy:             Yes              No X
Chemotherapy:                  Yes              No X
Surgery:                       Yes              No X
Other:                         Yes              No

OTHER INFORMATION:                         —




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                                       SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

CANCER EDUCATION

Provide Literature:              Yes               No X
Seminars:                        Yes               No X
Awareness Campaigns:             Yes               No X
Other:                           Yes               No X

If yes, please obtain detailed
information for Part II
CANCER PATIENT
SUPPORT SERVICES

Support Groups:                  Yes X             No
Transportation:                  Yes               No X
Other Services:                  Yes               No X

If yes, please obtain detailed
information for Part II
CANCER RELATED
COLLABORATIONS

With ACS:                        Yes X             No
With State Health Dept.:         Yes X             No
With Other Hospital/Clinic:      Yes X             No
With Other Organization:         Yes               No X

If yes, please obtain detailed   (With ACS, offer facilities
information for Part II          for screenings at no cost)



NAME:                            Dr. Ravi Bhasker         Dr. Eileen Comstock    Dr. Juan Julio     Dr. Leslie Johnson
                                                                                 Hernandez-
                                                                                 Pombo
TYPE OF PRACTICE:                Family Practice          Family Practice        Surgeon (general   Pediatrics
                                                                                 surgery)
ADDRESS:                         200 Neel Ave. NW         1204 U.S. Highway      P.O. 1009,         1204 U.S. Highway
                                 Socorro, NM 87801        60, Socorro, NM        Socorro, NM        60, Socorro, NM
                                                          87801                  87801              87801

CONTACT NAME AND                 Dr. Ravi Bhasker         Dr. Eileen Comstock,   Dr. J. Hernandez   Dr. Leslie Johnson,
PHONE NUMBER:                    (505) 835-2940           (505) 835-0705         (505) 835-8364     (505) 835-0705
LOCATION IN                      200 Neel Ave. NW         SW of Socorro          U.S Highway 60     SW of Socorro
COMMUNITY                        Socorro, NM 87801                               West
DOES THE
PHYSICAN/CLINIC
OFFER ANY                        Yes X        No          Yes X        No        Yes X        No    Yes X        No
FREE/DISCOUNTED
CARE FOR INDIGENT
PATIENTS?
DOES THE PHYSICAN
OR CLINIC                        Yes          No X        Yes X        No        Yes        No X    Yes X        No
CURRENTLY HAVE A
RELATIONSHIP WITH                                         Part of the group of                      Part of the group of
ACS (i.e., refers patients,                               doctors serving on                        doctors serving on
volunteers, etc.)?                                        Socorro Unit Council                      Socorro Unit Council

If so, what is the nature of
the relationship?
OTHER INFORMATION                         —                        —               He is new in              —
                                                                                      town.




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                                   SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

 NAME:                       Dr. Beth Kirkhart   Dr. Robert Markwell     Dr. Norman Reid         Dr. Audrey Vega      Dr. Valerie Young


 TYPE OF PRACTICE:           Internal Medicine   Family Practice         Family Practice         Family Practice      Family Pediactrics

 ADDRESS:                    200 Neel Ave. NW    1204 U.S. Highway 60,   1204 U.S. Highway 60,   200 Neel Ave. NW     200 Neel Ave. NW
                             Socorro, NM 87801   Socorro, NM 87801       Socorro, NM 87801       Socorro, NM 87801    Socorro, NM 87801


 CONTACT NAME                Dr. Beth Kirkhart   Dr. Robert Markwell     Dr. Norman Reid         Dr. Audrey Vega      Dr. Valerie Young
 AND PHONE                   (505) 835-2940      (505) 835-0705          (505) 835-0705          (505) 835-2940       (505) 835-2940
 NUMBER:
 LOCATION IN                 200 Neel Ave. NW    SW of Socorro           SW of Socorro           200 Neel Ave. NW     200 Neel Ave. NW
 COMMUNITY                   Socorro, NM 87801                                                   Socorro, NM 87801    Socorro, NM 87801
 DOES THE
 PHYSICAN/CLINIC
 OFFER ANY                   Yes X        No     Yes X        No         Yes X        No         Yes X        No      Yes X        No
 FREE/DISCOUNTED
 CARE FOR INDIGENT
 PATIENTS?
 DOES THE PHYSICAN
 OR CLINIC                   Yes          No X   Yes X        No         Yes X        No         Yes           No X   Yes          No X
 CURRENTLY HAVE A
 RELATIONSHIP                                    Part of the group of    Part of the group of
 WITH ACS (i.e., refers                          doctors serving on      doctors serving on
 patients, volunteers,                           Socorro Unit Council    Socorro Unit Council
 etc.)?

 If so, what is the nature
 of the relationship?
 OTHER                                —                    —                        —                      —                   —
 INFORMATION




March 31, 2008                                                                                                                          78
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


Appendix C: Simplified SCOPE Resource Guide
.   Alphabetical Listing
                                                    B
                  A                       Beers, Duane H. D.M.D.
                                          200 Manzanares Ave
      Aces Personal Care Service         Socorro 835-3662
      838-4858
                                          Bhasker Medical Clinic
      Adult Basic Education              200 Neel, Socorro
      239 Garfield, Socorro               835-2940
      835-4125
                                           Birthright of Socorro
      Alamo Alcoholism Program           801B School of Mines Rd,
      854-2610                            Socorro
                                          P.O. Box 1531
      Alamo Baptist Church               800-550-4900
      Alamo Reservation                   835-4236
      854-2228
                                          Boys and Girls Club of
      Alamo Navajo HeadStart             Socorro
      Program                             105 Francisco de Avondo,
      854-2694                            Socorro
                                          P.O. Box 45
      Alamo Navajo Health Center         Socorro 838-4716
      Highway 169, Magdalena
      854-2626                            Bratzel, Ginger Dds Llc
                                          828 Highway 60, Socorro
      Alamo Navajo Schools               835-1851


                                                    C
      Highway 169, Alamo
      Reservation
      854-2635

      Alamo Senior Citizen Center        Casa Alegre
      Alamo Navajo Reservation            P.O. Box 1009, Socorro
      854-2664                            835-8367

      Ambercare Home Health and          Center for Hope Professional
      Hospice                             Counseling
      204 – B Neel, Socorro               703 Memory Lane, Socorro
      838-1503                            838-2620
      http//:www.ambercare.com
                                          Cheryle’s Therapeutic
                                          Massage
      American Legion Post 47
             th                           134 NM 408, Socorro
      200 N 5 St., Socorro
                                          835-3801
      835-0843
                                          Child Find
      Apostolic Grace United
                                          Socorro, 835-8949
      602 S California, Socorro
      864-1444




March 31, 2008                                                            79
                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                         El Puente Del Socorro
     Children, Youth and Families       610 Franklin, Socorro
     (CYFD)                              835-0928
     Child Welfare Services/Adult
     Protective Services                 Epiphany Episcopal Church
     104 6th St. SE, Socorro             908 Leroy Place, Socorro
     835-2716 To report abuse:           835-1818
     1-800-832-1321
                                         EvenStart Program
     Church of Jesus Christ of          239 Garfield, Socorro
     Latter Day Saints                   835-8949
     El Camino Real, Socorro
     835-0570                            Eye Associates of New Mexico
                                         801 California, Socorro
     Church on the Rock                 835-2980
     510 California, Socorro
     835-2769

     Community Action Program                      F
     303 California, Socorro
     835-0899                             Families First
                                         214 Neel, Socorro
     Cooperative Extension              835-0971
     214 Neel, Socorro
     835-0610                            Family Christian Center
                                         Highway 60 & Fowler, Socorro
                                         835-0185

                                         Family Fellowship Church
                 D                       703 Memory Lane, Socorro
                                         838-2620 or 835-2620

     Desert Herbals                     First Baptist Church of
     200 School of Mines Rd.,            Magdalena
     Socorro 835-4787                    Magdalena 854-2389

     Disabled American Veterans         First Baptist SBC
     200 N 5th St., Socorro              203 Spring, Socorro
     835-0843                            835-0041

     DWI Council                        First Presbyterian Church
     519 Hwy 85, Socorro                 304 McCutcheon Ave., Socorro
     838-2208                            835-0942



                 E
                                         Four H
                                         214 Neel, Socorro
                                         835-0610

     Eagles Club
     1111 N California, Socorro
     835-9952                                      G

March 31, 2008                                                           80
                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


     Gospel of Hope Holiness
     Mission
                                                      J
     706 10 St., Magdalena
     854-2924                              Jehovah’s Witnesses
                                           922 Ake Ave., Socorro
     Gwen’s Massage Therapy               838-2049
     722 N California, Socorro
     835-2777                              Juvenile Probation and Parole
                                           835-2121


                 H                                    K
     HeadStart Program
     239 Garfield, Socorro                 Kitchen Creations
     835-0008                              214 Neel, Socorro
                                           835-0610
     Heritage Program for Senior
     Adults                                Knights of Columbus
     107 Faulkner St., Socorro             517 Highway 60, Socorro
     835-8780                              835-1852



                                                      L
     Heritage Home Healthcare
     Services
     112 Manzanares Ave., Socorro
     838-4359
                                           La Leche League
     Hope Lutheran Church                 305 School of Mines Rd.,
     Across from Library on Leroy,         Socorro 838-3901
     Socorro 835-9648
                                           La Vida Felicidad
     Human Services Department            514 Park, Socorro
     Income Support Division               838-0515
     1014 N California, Socorro
     835-0342                              Lincare, Inc.
                                           115 N California, Socorro
                                           835-0859

                 I                         Literacy Volunteers of America
                                           408 Park St., Socorro
     Ideas for Cooking and                835-4659
     Nutrition
     214 Neel, Socorro                     Lucero, Marian T DDS
     835-0610                              824 US Hwy 60
                                           Socorro 835-2342
     Independent Living Resource

                                                      M
     Center
     120 Plaza, Socorro
     835-2486

     Islamic Center of Socorro            MADD
     1208 El Camino, Socorro               P.O. Box 1202, Socorro
     835-3217                        838-3900




March 31, 2008                                                               81
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                            New Mexico State University-
     Magdalena Area Medical               Socorro County Career Center
     Center                                239 Garfield, Socorro
     801 10th St., Magdalena               P.O. Box 1249
     854-3161                              835-4782

     Magdalena Community Church
     Magdalena 854-2364
                                                     O
     Magdalena
     Emergency – 911                      Oates, C Bonner DDS
     City Marshall 854-2493                210 Neel Ave N W
     Fire/Ambulance 854-2201               Socorro 835-1623
     Police        854-2293

     Magdalena Municipal Schools
     854-2241
                                                     P
     Magdalena Samaritan Center           Positive Outcome
      nd
     2 Street, Magdalena                   210 Garfield, Socorro
                                           838-1100
     854-2288

     Magdalena Senior Center              Public Health Office
                                           214 Neel, Socorro
     202 Spruce, Magdalena
     854-2589                              835-0971

     Masonic Lodge                        Puerto Seguro
                                           519 Hwy 85, Socorro
     912 Leroy Place, Socorro
                                           838-1025
     835-1601

     Maternal Child Health (MCH)
     1202 Highway 60 West,
     Socorro 835-8709
                                                 Q R
                 N                                   S
     New Mexico Department of             Saint Paul’s United Methodist
     Labor                                 Church
     109 Faulkner, Socorro                 1000 Goad, Socorro
     835-0067                              835-1372

     New Mexico GRADS                     San Miguel Church
     239 Garfield, Socorro                 403 El Camino Real, Socorro
     835-1785                              835-2891 or 835-1620

     New Mexico GRADS Dads                SCOPE Health Council
     239 Garfield, Socorro                 P.O. Box 696, Socorro
     835-1785                              835-2444

     New Mexico State Police              Society of Friends
     Emergency – 911                      94 Hope Farms Rd., Socorro
     Non-Emergency - 835-0741        835-0013




March 31, 2008                                                              82
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008

                                           Socorro Medical Associates
     Socorro Baptist Temple               1204 US Hwy 60, Socorro
     H & Fairground Rd., Socorro           835-0705 or 835-1140
     835-3306
                                           Socorro Mental Health (SMH)
     Socorro Church of Christ             1200 Highway 60 West,
     1001 El Camino Real, Socorro          Socorro 835-2444
     835-2272
                                            Socorro Parks and Recreation
      Socorro Civic Center/               – Finley Gym
     Swimming Pool                         202 McCutcheon Ave, Socorro
     1004 El Camino Real, Socorro          838-7537
     835-3091
                                           Socorro Police Department
     Socorro Community Health             Emergency – 911
     Center                                Non-Emergency - 835-1883
     1300 Enterprise, Socorro
     835-4444                              Socorro Public Library
                                           401 Park St., Socorro
     Socorro Consolidated Schools         835-1114
     700 Franklin, Socorro
     835-0300                              Socorro Senior Center
                                           1410 Ake Ave., Socorro
     Socorro Cooperative Nursery          835-2119
     School
     304 McCutcheon Ave., Socorro          Socorro Seventh-Day
     835-1336                              Adventist Church
                                           218 Garfield St., Socorro
     Socorro County Housing               440-9587
     835-0196
                                           Socorro Storehouse Food
     Socorro Fire Department              Pantry
     Emergency – 911                      519 HWY 85
     Non-Emergency - 835-3969              P.O. Box 688, Socorro
                                           854-2762
     Socorro Foster Grandparent
     and Senior Companion Program          Socorro Taxi Service
     1410 Ake Ave., Socorro                606 N California, Socorro
     838-4886                              835-4276

     Socorro General Hospital
     1202 Highway 60 West,
     Socorro 835-1140
                                                     T
     Socorro General Hospital             Teen Court
     Home Health Care/Hospice
                                           519 Highway 85, Socorro
     West Highway 60, Socorro              838-0911
     835-8343
                                           Tresco, Inc.
     Socorro Good Samaritan               211 Park, Socorro
     Village
                                     835-0204
     1203 Highway 60 West,
     Socorro 838-4141




March 31, 2008                                                              83
                  SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


      Trinity Christian Fellowship
      1403 El Camino Real, Socorro
      838-9000



                 U
                 V
      Veguitas Senior Center
      304 Las Nutrias, Veguitas
      861-2860

      Vista Montano Apartments
      301 Otero Ave., Socorro
      835-0500

      Vocational Rehabilitation
      508 N California, Socorro
      835-4243



               W
      Women, Infants and Children
      (WIC)
      214 Neel, Socorro
      835-0977

      Women’s Opportunities for
      Wellness (WOW)
      838-0104



XYZ




March 31, 2008                                               84
                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008


Appendix D: Community Satisfaction Survey




March 31, 2008                                              85
                 SCOPE Socorro County Health Profile 2008




March 31, 2008                                              86

				
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