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SVP Practical Details 2009

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 5

									                                        Sangro
Valley
Project

                                  2009
Field
School
Practical
Details

                                        9
July
–
5
August
2009

                                            <www.sangro.org>



Arriving
on
Thursday
July
9th

You
are
responsible
for
making
your
own
way
to
Pescara
on
Thursday
July
9th.
There
will
be
a
fleet
of

excavation
cars
picking
up
students
at
both
the
Pescara
airport
and
train
station
on
that
day.
Pescara
is

the
closest
public
transportation
arrival
point
to
Tornareccio,
the
field
school’s
headquarters
(a
one

hour
drive
from
Pescara).



Many
of
the
British
students
will
be
arriving
on
the
Ryanair
flight
from
London
scheduled
to
arrive
at

noon
on
July
9th.

If
you
are
coming
by
train
to
Pescara,
please
plan
to
arrive
around
midday
as
well
so

that
we
can
collect
you
all
at
the
same
time.

Please
note
that
the
train
from
Rome
to
Pescara
takes

about
3‐4
hours.

At
the
very
least,
please
do
not
arrive
in
Pescara
any
later
than
4
pm
so
that
you
–

and
the
driver
(!)
–
can
be
in
Tornareccio
in
time
for
project’s
first
dinner
at
7
pm.



It
is
very
important
that
you
let
us
know
how
you
are
arriving
so
that
we
can
organize
the

transportation
fleet
appropriately.



Departure
on
August
5th

The
field
school
ends
on
Wed
August
5th.

That
morning
we
will
take
everyone
to
Pescara
to
head

out
on
the
train
or
plane.

If
you
are
planning
to
fly
directly
to
the
United
States
from
Rome,
do
not

book
a
flight
any
earlier
than
August
6th,
since
you
will
not
get
to
Rome
until
the
later
afternoon
on

the
5th.



We
strongly
recommend
that
you
make
a
booking
for
a
room
in
Rome
BEFORE
you
arrive
for
the

field
school
as
August
is
a
busy
tourist
time.

The
Stargate
Hostel
near
the
Termini
Station
in
Rome

is
recommended
by
previous
field
school
participants.

It
is
listed
on
most
hotel/hostel
booking

websites.



Phone
and
contact
information
(please
note
that
Italy
is
6
hours
ahead
of
EST)

If
you
need
to
contact
us
in
Italy,
use
Susan
Kane’s
Italian
cell
phone
+338
801
3299
or
American
cell

phone:
(440)
506
3681
or
the
excavation
flat
telephone:
+0872
868
021.



Phone
cards
are
available
for
purchase
in
the
newsstand
at
the
airport
for
use
in
public
phones

(some
may
also
take
credit
cards).

Increasingly,
people
are
buying
cheap
cell
phones
with
pay
as

you
go
cards
to
use
while
in
Italy.

Some
American
cell
phone
companies
also
offer
international

roaming.



There
is
a
phone
number
(to
take
incoming
calls
only
during
mealtimes)
at
the
Scuola
Elementare:

011
(from
States)
or
00
(from
Europe)
+
39
0872
868
759



To
avoid
interrupting
work
and
official
excavation
calls,
get
friends/family
to
call
only
in
the
evenings,

between
7:00
and
9:00
pm
local
time.
Phone
calls
to
England/USA
can
be
made
from
the
phone
box
in

the
village;
phone
cards
(schede)
can
be
bought
at
the
tabaccaio
(tobacconists)
in
the
village;
or
you

can
call
from
the
metered
phone
in
the
back
of
Bar
Sport
(pay
afterwards
for
the
number
of
units

(scatti)
you
have
used).



There
is
a
telephone
with
an
answering
machine
in
the
excavation
flat
in
Tornareccio
FOR

EMERGENCY
INCOMING
CALLS
ONLY:
011
39
0872
868
021



Postal
Address:
c/o
Gruppo
Archeologico
Anglo‐Americano,
Via
del
Carmine
83,
66046
Tornareccio

(CH),
Italy



NB:
the
postal
service
in
Italy,
especially
rural
Italy,
can
be
highly
random,
and
may
be
either
very

expeditious,
or
arrive
a
long
time
after
you
have
left
Tornareccio;
the
latter
is
more
likely
[so
don’t

expect
important
letters
not
posted
express
to
reach
you
on
time].



Domestic
Arrangements

You
will
be
sleeping
in
the
Scuola
Media
(Middle
School)
in
Tornareccio.
This
is
a
dormitory‐style

sleeping
arrangement,
with
the
use
of
the
school
gymnasium
showers
and
bathrooms.
Living
in
these

conditions
can
be
somewhat
cramped,
and
consideration
for
your
colleagues
is
essential.

Meals
will
be
taken
at
Scuola
Elementare.



Laundry
is
mainly
handwashing.
There
is
also
a
commercial
lavanderia
(dry
cleaners)
on
the
main

street.



It
is
important
to
treat
the
School,
its
fittings
and
fixtures,
with
respect.
Goodwill
is
vital.
We
have

worked
very
hard
to
keep
relations
between
the
Project
and
the
village
cordial
—
a
thoughtless

incident
could
wreck
all
our
hard
work,
and
put
us
back
to
square
one.
We
should
therefore
keep
the

school
clean
at
all
times;
in
addition
germs
breed
with
alarming
rapidity
in
the
heat
of
summer,
and

hygiene
in
the
kitchen
is
a
number
one
priority.

It
takes
a
bit
of
effort
to
get
people
to
keep
the
place

clean
and
everyone
needs
to
pitch
in.



Food,
and
subsistence
generally,
will
be
supplied
by
the
Project.
We
will
be
self‐catering
for
the
most

part,
with
some
restaurant
trips.
Sam
Carrier,
our
Catering
Manager
will
organise
a
rota,
which
will

involve
everyone
in
their
fair
share
of
providing
him
with
as
much
assistance
as
possible
in
shopping,

cooking,
washing
up
and
cleaning.
There
are
several
grocers,
a
greengrocers,
two
bakers,
and
two
or

three
general
shops
(such
as
a
stationers),
and
a
Post
Office.
There
is
a
cash
machine
[aka
the
Bank],

which
has
been
known
to
work.
Do
not
expect
to
be
able
to
buy
things
commonly
available
in
the

USA/UK
in
Tornareccio,
or
even
in
nearby
towns
like
Atessa.
Bring
your
own
supplies
of
needed

medicines
or
personal
items.



The
village
is
a
small,
friendly,
but
essentially
a
conservative
place.
We
enjoy
good
relations
with
most

of
the
important
figures
in
the
village
but
we
need
always
to
be
polite
and
thoughtful.
This
means,
for

example,
no
raves
at
3
am
in
the
School
car
park.
There
are
several
bars
in
the
village,
including
the

Bar
Sport
and
Pietra
Viva
bar
(the
latter
often
has
an
evening
disco
on
weekends
and
the
best
ice

cream
in
town).
You
may
well
find
that
you
know
this
part
of
the
village
better
than
the
trenches
by
the

time
you
leave.
Italians
can
be
friendly,
but
remember
that
most
Italian
communities
need
to
know

groups
like
ours
for
a
decade
before
a
really
relaxed
relationship
begins.
Nonetheless,
do
try
to
talk
to

the
locals
a
bit,
and
not
just
to
each
other.



The
only
rules
on
this
excavation
are
the
rules
of
archaeology;
of
common
courtesy,
which
we
all

expect
regarding
our
own
comfort
and
safety;
and
of
politeness
to
the
local
community.
The
Project

will
take
an
extraordinarily
dim
view
of
anyone
who
through
their
own
selfishness,
thoughtlessness
or

rudeness,
damages
the
cohesion
of
the
group,
or
the
goodwill
of
the
people
of
Tornareccio,
who
make

significant
adjustments
to
their
lives
every
summer
for
us
foreigners.



The
villagers
will
love
any
attempt
to
speak
the
language,
and
you
will
find
that
makes
your
stay
so

much
better.
In
fact,
you
will
find
it
essential
to
learn
some
Italian,
if
only
a
few
phrases.
Starting
to

learn
it
is
the
single
most
important
piece
of
preparation
for
this
trip.



The
best
books
are:

   M.
Valgmigli,
Living
Italian


   BBC
Boungiorno
Italia
or
Italissimo

   Teach
Yourself
Italian



A
pocket
English‐Italian
/
Italian‐English
dictionary
will
prove
very
helpful.



Another
useful
item
is
a
good
guidebook,
such
as
Lonely
Planet
Italy.



If
you
want
to
get
a
flavour
of
peasant
society
in
the
Apennines,
try:


    Eric
Newby,
Love
and
War
in
the
Apennines

    Carlo
Levi,
Christ
Stopped
at
Eboli

    Ann
Cornelisen,
Torregreca:
Life,
Death,
and
Miracles
in
a
Southern
Italian
Town

    Ann
Cornelisen,
Women
of
the
Shadows:
Wives
and
Mothers
of
Southern
Italy


    Roland
Sarti,
Long
Live
the
Strong:
A
History
of
Rural
Society
in
the
Apennine
Mountains



Modern
History

  Paul
Ginsborg,
History
of
Contemporary
Italy,
1943­1988

  Paul
Ginsborg,
Italy
and
its
Discontents:
Family,
Civil
Society,
State,
1980­2001



The
best
maps
of
Italy,
if
you
want
to
buy
one,
are
by
the
Touring
Club
Italiano
(TCI),
who
also
do
Red

Guides
(in
Italian)
to
the
regions
of
Italy
(try
also
The
Lonely
Planet
Guide
to
Italy
or
the
Let's
Go
or
the

Rough
Guides
for
this
part
of
the
world).





Packing

Important
Documents

   1.
Passport

   2.
Tickets

   3.
Proof
of
Insurance
documents

   4.
Money
(you
will
need
cash
only
for
discretionary
spending—your
food
and
basic
field
trip

   expenses
will
be
covered);
travellers
checks
or
credit
cards
(from
which
you
can
withdraw
money

   from
automated
tellers)
are
recommended.
{Note:
there
is
no
reason
to
believe
that
money,
cards

   or
personal
belongings
will
be
at
risk
of
theft
where
we
are
staying;
but
please
exercise
due
caution

   at
all
times.
Your
personal
possessions
and
financial
affairs
are
your
own
responsibility.]



Leisure
Materials

   1.
Reading
material
(books,
magazines,
newspapers)

   2.
Tapes
/
CDs

   3.
Walkman
/
personal
stereo

   4.
Swimwear

    5.
Pack
of
cards

    6.
Camera



Clothing

Bring
enough
to
last
you
three
weeks
with
a
minimum
of
washing
since
you
will
have
a
busy

schedule:
it
is
always
a
trade‐off
between
the
certainty
that
your
clothes
will
all
get
dirty
and
the

need
to
travel
light;
you
should
however
have
the
following:

   
1.
One
sheet
sleeping
bag
or
similar
(light
or
all‐season
normal
sleeping
bag)

   
2.
Pillow
case
(and
(inflatable)
pillow)

   
3.
Towel

   
4.
Swimwear

   
5.
One
sweater
or
jacket
(at
least;
the
evenings
can
get
cool)

   
6.

Waterproof
/anorak

   
7.
Large
shady
hat
(cloth
or
straw—protects
from
UV
and
sunstroke)

   
8.
Sunglasses

   
9.
One
reasonably
smart
set
of
casual
clothes
(for
social
occasions
in
the
village)



General

   
1.
Torch
and
batteries

   
2.
If
you
need
/
would
like
any
comfort
foods
etc,
bring
them
with
you
(you
won't
get
them
in

   Tornareccio)

   
3.
Travel
wash
fluid



Laundry

Handwashing
is
the
order
of
the
day,
unless
you
wish
to
use
the
laundry
service
in
Tornareccio

where
your
clothes
to
be
washed
for
a
fee.

Laundromats
do
not
exist
in
this
rural
area.



Fieldwork
supplies

You
will
need
your
own:

    1.
Small
rucksack
or
daypack
for
taking
on
site

    2.
Water
bottle

    3.
Sturdy,
well‐broken
in
field
shoes

    4.
Gardening‐style
gloves
if
desired



Medical

Please
consult
with
your
doctor
about
your
vaccination
record
and
other
health
needs
while
you
are
in

Italy.

No
special
shots
are
necessary
for
our
area
of
Italy.

However,
you
should
have
an
up
to
date

tetanus
booster.



Bring
any
prescribed
medicines
which
you
take
or
may
have
to
take
with
you
–
Tornareccio
is
a

small
town
with
one
oversubscribed
doctor;
many
students
find
their
allergies
activate
on
the

excavation,
so
if
you
have
medicine
for
congestion
–
bring
it:
In
addition
to
any
prescription

medicines
which
you
will
need
(or
could
possibly
need)
while
on
the
project,
please
bring:

   1.
Sun
screen
(high
factor,
lots
of
it)

   2.
Salt/rehydration
tablets

   3.
Anti‐diarrhoea
product
(such
as
Imodium)

   4.
Insect
repellent
(vital
on
site);
there
are
some
good
brands
which
combine
repellant
with

   sunscreen)

   5.
Antiseptic
cream
and
band‐aids





Sangro
Survival
Guide

Take
care
in
the
heat
and
the
sun;
don't
overdo
it;
drink
lots;
sit
down
if
you
feel
faint,
and
always
tell

your
supervisor
if
you
feel
unwell—that
means
you
need
to
go
back
to
the
school
and
lie
down.

The
weather
in
the
summer
is
variable
–
it
can
range
from
very
pleasant,
sunny,
and
mild
(high
70s,

low
80s)
with
no
humidity
(the
site
is
at
850
meters
in
elevation)
to
rainy
and
cool
to
very
warm
(in

the
90s
but
fairly
dry).

There
are
not
a
lot
of
mosquitoes
due
to
the
elevation,
but
there
are
some.

Loose,
light
and
comfortable
clothing
(layered
to
take
on
and
off
according
to
the
temperature
and

sun)
to
wear
when
digging,
as
well
as
stout
shoes
and
a
big
hat
are
essential.
It
is
recommended
that

you
bring
long
trousers
for
working
on
site.
Bee‐keeping
outfits
or
Lawrence
of
Arabia
gear
are

deemed
excessive.



Acquachiara
can
be
a
bit
of
a
wild‐life
sanctuary.
There
many
snakes
and
scorpions
in
the
rocks;
be

careful
when
picking
up
rocks;
don't
go
charging
around
making
a
lot
of
noise,
as
that
frightens
snakes.

There
are
lots
of
hornets,
bees,
wasps,
etc
of
every
description,
which
will
be
harmless
(like
the
snakes

and
scorpions),
as
long
as
you
mind
your
business
and
let
them
mind
theirs.
Bites/stings
are
very
rare

occurrences.
The
real
nuisance
is
the
flies,
which
may
be
around
if
there's
no
wind,
and
the
occasional

horsefly.
Insect
repellent
is
very
useful
–
some
people
are
always
more
bothered
than
others
by
bites.

Long
sleeves
and
long
trousers
will
see
off
horseflies
(the
local
remedy
of
rubbing
onion
on
exposed

flesh
is
of
dubious
efficacy
–
trust
us!).




								
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