Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Beginner Gardening Advice

VIEWS: 34 PAGES: 24

Beginner Gardening Advice

More Info
									Advice for Beginning Gardeners
editor:  Doug Green
isbn 978­1­897395­07­3 


Copyright Doug Green


You may freely share this book with friends, neighbors or family ­whether they are beginner gardeners 
or not.  
However, you may not charge for this ebook nor use or modify it in any way in any format without the 
written permission of Doug Green
Introduction:



                                  I write a newsletter that goes out to a wide range of gardeners ­ from 
                                  the very beginner who has to be told "green side up" to the more 
                                  advanced gardener looking for some good tips.
                                  One of the things my readers have taught me over the years is that 
                                  they ­ as a group ­ have an incredible wealth of gardening experience 
                                  and advice to teach me (and boy do these folks share) :­)
                                  So when I had a question that pretty much said ­ "I've just bought 
                                  this land and want to garden ­ but know nothing about it all ­ where 
                                  do I start?  Tell me everything I need to know."   I thought I'd pass 
                                  along the task to my readers.


                                  I asked them to write and give me their best bit of gardening advice. 
                                  Tell other beginners what you wished somebody had told you.


And they did.


What you're reading right now are the collected words (in their own words) of readers sharing their 
tips with beginner gardeners.


You folks are all awesome! 


I didn't organize these in any order other than the order they arrived in my mailbox.  I rather liked the 
serendipity of that.  I hope you do too.


Doug
p.s.  you can subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/gardeningnewsletter.html
Re: my advice for new gardeners……


        After 40+ years of gardening in 6 different gardens and a lot of trial and error, we recently 
moved in to a new house which was surrounded by mud i.e. a blank canvas for a garden. We had lots 
of visions of paradise but despite our previous experience we decided to hire a garden design 
consultant to help us pull together the overall landscape and guide us towards some order of 
proceeding. 
      We were a little concerned about being directed toward a “cliché” and a design that did not 
conform to our ideas. Sure enough many of her suggestions were quite different from what we’d 
                                   envisioned so it took us a little while to get our heads around it. 
                                   For $300.00 + travel expenses, we got a 3 hour consultation, an 
                                   audio tape of our discussion, including all her suggestions and 
                                   the underlying rational , and a sketch. The more we considered 
                                   the plan the more sense it made to us and we realized that her 
                                   experienced eye and objective viewpoint were exactly what we 
                                   needed to proceed with our landscaping projects in a logical and 
                                   workable order, at our own pace. 
                                      It has given us a tremendous boost of confidence to have a clear 
                                      overall concept and a framework to define our efforts. When we 
                                      had sod installed we knew exactly where we did and did not want 
                                      it. We have had decking and a walkway installed that we are 
                                      thrilled with (without her guidance we’d still be dithering and 
                                      second guessing ourselves) and already getting lots of 
                                      compliments on. Now we know exactly where all the plants we 
                                      managed to bring with us will go as time and energy permit. 
                                        When I can’t stay away from the nursery I am much more 
                                        focused and restrained about what I actually buy. Just by gaining 
a sense of direction and long­term focus we figure she has already saved us far more than her fee and 
a great deal of angst. I’m sure there must be gardening coaches in other areas that work on a fee for 
service basis. We’re free to set our own timetable,hire our own contractors, make our own purchases 
etc. and call for clarification and follow­up advice. 
       We also were given a very useful booklet of“tips” and local resources. This was the single 
most beneficial investment we made in our quest for where to start and where we are going withour 
garden. I highly recommend looking for someone like Janette who sees the big picture, especially, for 
someone like myself, who tends to get bogged down with detail or impassioned by individual plants 
and “vignettes” yet overwhelmed by trying to achieve a cohesive; overall effective landscape.


       Liz, Colborne, ON
Hi Doug,
I am a fairly new gardener, and here are the basic mistakes I made:


1. Always prepare the soil really well before planting. Don't just dig a hole in the existing soil and 
throw in the plants.
2. Remove weeds, don't just dig them under, because they come back like Freddy Krueger.
3. Don't plant seedlings too close together. They get much wider!
4. Anticipate your shade. Sunny spots in early spring disappear once the trees leaf out fully.
5. Keep an eye on vines. They will happily escape the trellis and wind around the roses.
6. Water hanging baskets everyday without fail
Hope that helps!


Sara
Here my advice   
When I started gardening I went to the Public 
Gardens in Halifax and talked to the gardeners. 
A tour in the spring helps because the tour 
guide identifies the different trees, shrubs, 
perennials and roses as well as gives you a 
brochure with the names of the plants, trees and 
shrubs and where they are. 
         Then I visit as much as possible and 
observe the height, color, blooming season, etc. 
Here you can also get seeds from the gardeners 
in the fall if you visit their greenhouses at the 
right time (they will tell you when the seeds 
will be available.  I find that with the gardens 
being in my zone and the gardeners so readily 
available to answer my questions on care of the 
plants, harmful insects that have invaded the 
area it is the surest way I know of 
accomplishing a great garden.
       Christine, Halifax, NS




       My advice after many years of moving and starting anew....stick with annuals and do loads of 
containers to lift your spirits including veggies!
        A patio pot filled with herbs is a sight to behold and managable. Once you get the picture of 
your garden through your thoughts, reading and dreaming...go full steam ahead with compost,trees, 
shrubs and perennials. (depending on your energy level)
     About weeds....this time of year I'm enjoying them. Too hot here for us "old Yankees" from 
New England to do much but water. They'll be plenty to do once our heat wave breaks.
Advice to beginning gardeners:
       NEVER spray weed killer on your garden to kill the clover in the early spring.... Doug's last 
question was why do weeds grow faster than flowers.
        In my garden, the clover is always the first to show up and is knee high by time the flowers 
begin to pop up.  My first year, I tried to kill the weeds with a weed killer...VERY careful to avoid the 
flowers that had already arrived by putting buckets over them for protection.
       Unfortunately, I didn't know where the butterfly plants and other later arriving perennials were 
from the previous owners plantings....Killed 20 years worth of fragrant flowers that were VERY 
expensive to replace....still learning. 




My best advice: let a plant grow for a full year before deciding whether you like it or not.  I moved 3 
years ago and hated a plant, cut it to the ground, only to find out the following spring it was a 
beautiful spring flowering shrub. I have learned that patience never hurts, if you still don't like it next 
year, then take it out, but look at it in all 4 seasons to see what it does. 
        Love your newsletter, I learn something every week, often you answer my questions before I 
get around to asking them. Keep up the good work!
Cherry, Colorado Springs
So, new gardeners… I so agree that they have to start small. 


       Trees first as you said since they need growth time. I would suggest getting larger trees so that 
you don’t have to wait 20 years to see a mature specimen in the yard. 
          Then, the focus should go on the foundation. Start with the entrance and work around the 
house. 
       One thing new gardeners tend to do is put in too many small plants that eventually spread out 
and look overgrown. Read the planting instructions carefully. Though they may look lonely when all 
                                             that mulch is between them, you have to remember that 
                                             they will grow to fill in that space. 
                                                      Soil is one of the most important things a gardener 
                                                needs to begin with. You can buy great plants only to 
                                                find you are watering daily to keep them from drying 
                                                out, or you are seeing them turn yellow from lack of 
                                                organic matter. You pointed that out, and I know this to 
                                                be true from years of gardening. If the soil around the 
                                                house foundation is poor, dig it out and backfill it with a 
                                                mixture of topsoil and organic matter. 
                                                      Mulch deep to avoid evaporative dehydration. The 
                                                only exception to this rule is around woody plants 
                                                especially trees. 
                                                      One thing I learned the wrong way was to not buy 
                                                plants on a whim, then try to fit them in. This is when 
                                                the garden starts getting cluttered and does not follow 
                                                the rules of shape, texture, and color. I have done this 
                                                and I ended up having to build new beds just to dig up 
                                                things that did not go together, rearrange them, and 
hope they survived the transition. 
       I would suggest buying a good landscape design book and see how to put these rules to use. I 
also agree that the hardscape has got to come first. Put in walks, patios and decks so that the 
landscaping can surround it and you don’t have to dig up plants to put in these areas. Hope this helps 
anyone.
Loyal reader
Joann
       My advice for a new gardener is to start small and grow what you really, really like first.




       To respond to the reader who'd just purchased some property that was mostly gravel, I agree 
with your advice: have at least a germ of an idea before you dig in. 
        Soil is a good start; so is zone issues, being aware of available light, and knowing what kind of 
wild life (if any) the property supports. 
       I moved in with my significant other and tried to grow a variety of plants with which I'd grown 
up. Coastal southern California is Zone 9 with loads of year­round sun. Northern California is Zone 7 
with winter snow, not to mention the fact that the soil on our NorCal property was acidic red clay, and 
surrounded by pines, firs, and black oaks. This was not conducive to veggies, fruit trees, or flowers. 
It took me a couple of years, but by the time we moved from that home to another in Zone 5 (with lots 
of light, but lots of clay and rocks), I had a beautiful shade garden with hostas, ferns, heuchera, 
tiarella, foxgloves, heather, Japanese maples, and masses and masses of spring daffodils. 
       I'm having to learn all over how to garden in a shorter season but with hot sun instead of cool 
shade. Still, with my first real vegetable garden that I'm currently harvesting, and even an honest to 
goodness watermelon growing on the vine, I'm really loving it!
       Thanks, Doug, for all your gardening help.
Pat (formerly from the Sierra Nevadas in CA, now in NE Washington State)
        Dear Doug, I really enjoy your newsletter, and wish to pass on something I found out by 
accident..in previous years, when starting seed, I had to contend with the whiteflies and damping off; 
this past year, I never was bothered , and put it down to using weak chamomile tea solution to water 
the seedlings! 
       No whiteflies and no damping off! I also used cinnamon powder if I thought some seedlings 
were getting too wet. Will try this again next seeding season! Keep up the good work! 
       Mary.




Hello Doug


       My advice for beginning gardeners is " start small and build over time". Too many things 
going at the same time can be overwhelming.
       My first vegetable garden was a good example. It was huge and had so much stuff planted that 
eventually I just lost control of it and weeds took over everything. It is better to plant 6 tomato plants, 
some lettuce and green onions and eventually have a salad than end with nothing.


       Hugs to you and your readers 
       Heather from Ontario




        Hi Doug:  I have a tip for growing carrots. How I hate those tiny seeds. I make a trench in my 
row, take a salt/pepper shaker, put the seeds in and shake them down the trench. Then, I take my 
watering can and water them. This way, they don't get planted too deep, just enough soil get on them 
and they grow great. I got this tip from my neighbour a couple of years ago.
Hi Doug


        My name is Robyn and I live in Sydney, Australia. I really enjoy reading your newsletter, thank 
you for sharing your expertise and in turn I would like to respond to the lady asking about where to 
begin with her garden design. I'm a fairly experienced gardener now but I clearly remember the day I 
didn't know where to start.


                                                              My best advice is to start with one small 
                                                            step at a time, as you  already know since 
                                                            you mentioned it in the Gardening Fun 
                                                            section. Gardening was meant to be fun and 
                                                            you must have some initial successes so you 
                                                            don't become overwhelmed and either pack it 
                                                            in or hire some expensive contractor to do it 
                                                            for you. 
                                                               Only you can translate the vision in your 
                                                            mind into reality on the ground. Your design 
                                                            must be  flexible too as the needs of yourself 
                                                            and your family will change over time ­ so 
                                                            don't set anything in concrete, at least for the 
                                                            first 12 months. 
                                                             Of course the soil is the most important 
thing to attend to before anything else. I would suggest taking all the carpet out of the house and 
putting it on the ground outside then mulching it and letting the earthworms do their thing for a while. 
This is also a great way to get rid of vacuuming, mowing and weeding in one go, leaving more free 
time to observe your space, daydream about the design and to think about what to do next. 
        The first place to start planting is just  outside your back door with all the culinary herbs you 
regularly use in the kitchen, however, watering is the next main consideration after soil so unless 
there's a tap nearby better look at installing a water tank first to collect rainwater from the roof for 
your new garden. 
        When you can handle the aftercare [read: watering] of your herb garden and the plants are 
happily growing, work your way out from there and keep doing likewise until you reach the back 
fence. 
        I could go on and on Doug but I don't want to wear out my welcome and think you're far more 
qualified to do it while making it sound like fun.  I just love some of your amusing anecdotes.


With best regards from Down Under.
Hi Doug,
       I love what you said today about gardening being the slowest of the performing arts...that's a 
great way to think about it!
        My advice for a beginner would be to watch out for aggressive/invasive plants. It's tempting to 
put in something that "spreads easily" ­­ but it can be so hard to get it out once it gets bigger than you 
planned. 
       Also, don't make a hedge out of Chinese elm ­­ we moved into a home with a Chinese elm 
hedge and it got out of control a couple of times...we had to have professionals take it down and it 
grew back again (forget why we didn't have them do the stumps...). Anyhow, it's a tree, not a hedge!
        Best wishes, and many thanks for the good advice,
Alice




       You asked for beginner’s advice. After 30 years in Albuquerque, New Mexico, I still don’t have 
anything but beginner’s advice! Here are my pointers for the beginner:


1) Scope out the neighbors yards. You’ll see what has a chance of doing well and when it blooms. If 
you’re really dedicated to this method, you can take notes of when you see things being tended 
(pruned, fed, etc.) You may even get to learn from others’ mistakes! Free! And you might make 
friends in your new neighborhood.
2)Start your compost first. With compost, you rarely have “failure” but only faster or slower success.




      Learn from other peoples mistakes & NEVER NEVER use old hay as a mulch or in your 
compost.Even if it's Free, & perhaps more so if it's Free!!
        You'll get decades of WEEDS you've never had before.
       Hi Doug, I have a few things to add about starting a new garden.
1. Talk to other people in your neighbourhood, especially people with well established gardens and 
gardens that you like. Gardeners love to share and talk about their gardens.
2. Concentrate your efforts and your money on preparing your soil. Remember this is the bones or 
foundation. A house requires a good foundation so does a garden.
3. Join a horticultural or garden club. Now some do require something back from the members, like 
ours we like help in public gardens that we maintain usually only about an hour a week. But the pay 
back can be big, there is a wealth of information in these societies, members love to give other 
members plants usually for free, meetings have informative speakers and sometimes merchandise for 
sale, and ours have several master gardeners that are willing to answer questions and share their 
knowledge and you can make great friends. We also publish a newsletter with helpful information 
related to our area and conditions. Many societies have plant sales good time to pick up perennials and 
shrubs at a good price.
4. Don't over crowd your trees or perennials.
5. Mulch
6. Install an in ground watering system.
7. Get your books for a local library if possible. Once you have found the book/s that you like the most 
and most fitting for the future then buy it.
8: Plant plants/trees that are native to your area.
9. If you want to hire someone to do a design check out the local college there maybe students willing 
to do it for a smaller fee.
10. Consider putting containers around and in the garden.  This will provide interest but also provide 
some colour while waiting for perennials to grow
11. Buy good stock.
12. Large stones make good filler while you are waiting for things to fill in and add some interest.
13. Test the soil in several places
14. Pay attention to light at different times of the day
15. Take pictures
16. Keep a journal or log of what you planted and where.
17. Remember green is  a colour.
18. Your garden should reflect your personality
19. Go on garden walks and take your camera.
20. Finally ask lots of question
21. Sorry one last thing, remember you will not always have successes there may be a few failures. 
Just think of a failure as an opportunity to try something different.
Hi Doug,
         First of all, I simply enjoy your newsletters, blogs and all the good advice you've put out there 
for all of us to read and use if we want to. 
       I live in the Texas Panhandle and have been gardening for only 5 or 6 years now. Little did I 
know what I had been missing. It's wonderful, relaxing, a bit annoying at times, especially in times of 
severe weather or lack of any except heat and more heat.
        My best advice is to not go overboard on buying a lot of pretties at first. Set a budget for a 
garden and try your best to stick to it. It's hard and you betcha it's hard as the nurseries will do their 
best have you in there buying every pretty little flower, bulb, bush and vine they can. Plus all the 
necessities like, top soil, amendments, mulch, fertilizer, grass seed, and all the tools you need to put 
the stuff down. Take it easy at first. If you're like me, and I hope you're not, everything you plant will 
die for some reason or other. Take your time to learn the difference between annual and perennial. 
       Good luck and many happy hours gardening.




        My suggestion is to join a garden club ­ they will receive local, knowledgeable advice, and the 
plant sales and sharing are great!
Hi Doug, I really appreciate receiving your letter!


       My first advice to a beginner is: gardening rhymes with weeding!   haha jardinage rime avec 
désherbage.
        A beginner sometimes is discouraged with the weeding specially the first years. But the best 
thing to do to have a great garden is weeding: the plants are at their best advantage when cleared of 
weeds. 


        First, you see them better aha! Then, they have the space they need to grow. When you water 
and feed them, they get the profit, not the weeds! For a beginner, no need to have a large garden 
crowded with plants: a small well­kept one will be more enjoyable and great to look at! And I would 
add that with time, if the passion grows, the garden will grow too. The older part will settle, the plants 
will take all the place and less weeds will spread. Then, one can think of enlarging the garden.


       And how to deal with weeds: plant creeping plants in front and around. Sedums, ajuga, 
lysimachia, etc... the become dense and no weed can grow!
       Thanks for the fun,
       Andrée




       Beginner gardening advice: New plants need more water than you think they do! Particularly if 
                                     your soil is not perfect.
       I was in her shoes few years ago when I started to love gardening. The best thing is to start 
with the large objects like deck, trees, fence and so on.  Then the location of the pond and what will be 
planted around it to make it look pretty.
        With this design, she will end up with shady area and sunny ones. The shady area will require 
different plants then the sunny one. I think this will be enough work for this year.
       Next year she can try to familiarize herself with large shrubs and flowering ones and which 
one goes where depending on the mature size of the shrub.
         When finished with shrubs, she can fill in the empty space with perennials, tall and short one. 
the tall in the back and the short close to the border.
       Depending on the beds, it should take her few years to fill them up.  
       Gardening work never ends




                                                 For Beginners.

                                                     First and most importantly is knowing your 
                                                 topography, or type of soil.  I live in a heavy clay soil, 
                                                 so I add humus, peak moss and potting soil. It seems 
                                                 to not only add nutrients, but also great drainage.

                                                     Make sure you know what types of soil your 
                                                 plants need, and group or companion them together if 
                                                 possible.

                                                     Some may need more acidic soil, some may need 
                                                 less. Companion planting also cuts down on pest in 
                                                 your garden. 

                                                     Ellen
Here's my gardening advice:

       UTILIZE your local composting / recycling center !!!!! They are usually sources of FREE 
ALL­YOU­CAN­HAUL compost and mulch.  Some folks discourage it because of the chance of 
bringing in bugs or disease, but if you have a lot of garden beds, as I do, buying enough soil and 
mulch can be astronomical. My new raised veg garden beds are entirely full of compost, and my veg 
garden is great ! despite our severe drought this summer. I've had no increase in diseases. And 

        START YOUR OWN compost pile ! Its not nearly as difficult as it sounds... I just have a 
hardware cloth circle placed in an out­of­sight location, and throw all of our garden and kitchen 
scraps, except for meat & protein products in it, year round.  I don't ever take time to turn it or layer it 
or water it.... it takes longer to break down this way, but each summer I get several wheelbarrow loads 
of beautiful " black gold".




       My suggestion is to be CERTAIN you know your soil make­up and build, amend and test again 
before any planting.
       E. L. H.




                                     I don't know if you have this one yet ­ instead of using the black 
                                     plastic in my perennial beds to hold back weeds, just use a bunch 
                                     of newspaper. If you wet it, it becomes real plyable and cuts back 
                                     the amount of shredded mulch (expensive) that you have to use. 
                                     Plus, I have found that earthworms love it.
        The best advice I would give a beginner is to find out from a more experienced gardener what 
grows well in your area and start with these plants.  The more success you have the more likely you'll 
be to stick with it.  Get yourself a good mentor!




       The most important activity for any gardener, beginner or not, is to heed advice about 
amending the soil. Read books or websites about composting and DO IT . The more compost added to 
the garden soil, the better, prettier, more fruitful your garden will be. Watch for sales on worthwhile 
garden amendments (Doug has lots of good information on what these are) and add as much as you 
can possibly afford.




         Something I learned the hard way was to label everything I plant with sturdy labels.  It's 
amazing what you forget from fall to spring. I use old metal venetian blind slats (the vinyl ones break) 
cut to size, marked with #2 pencil and with clear tape over that. So far they're still readable three years 
out. I learned this by weeding out by accident a few plants as they came in the following spring.
Here are a few items I hope the beginning gardener might find useful:

1. Do not rush out and spend a small fortune on various plants simply because they look 
attractive when on display in the nurseries.

2. Take time to assess your outdoor property's aspects, i.e. facing North, South, East or 
West.  Note how much shade or sunshine is a feature of your front and back yards.

3.Discover whether your soil is clay­based or fast­draining. Plants have requirements. They 
thrive where the amenities are suited to their temperaments.

4. Buy yourself a couple of really good gardening books ­ one devoted to Perennials, the 
other to Annuals, and enjoy salivating over the pictures and reading up on which "guests" 
you will invite to live with you in due
course. This is an interesting and rewarding thing to do during the winter months.

5. Write yourself a few simple notes concerning which plants are happiest in sun, shade, or 
half­and­half.   Also whether they prefer their feet in moist conditions, or can tolerate long 
periods of drought.  Then, do your best to supply these basic needs.

6. Get in the pleasurable habit of strolling around your gardens at least once a day after the 
planting season.  This is the opportunity to congratulate yourself on what is obviously thriving 
under your foster care, or is sending out distress signals which need interpreting, and 
perhaps moving the invalids to a more salubrious spot on your property.  According to an old, 
but very true, adage: "There is nothing better for a garden, than the shadow of the gardener."

7 Enjoy exchanging garden gossip with your neighbours, and taking on board their 
successes and failures.  Be glad to accept some of their 'free' thinnings in spring or fall, and 
likewise, share some well­rooted splittings of perennials from your own garden beds.

8.Above all, don't be a short­term caregiver.  Walks around your neighbourhood will soon 
show you who has been wildly enthusiastic at the beginning of a season, and then no longer 
bothered to check on how  the guests are faring as the novelty wears off. It's so sad to see a 
shade­and­water­loving hosta, which showed great potential on first arrival, soon yellowing 
and shrivelling under hot sun without shade, due to the ignorance of the home­owner.   And 
that's just one of the many mistakes I made in my rookie days.

        Plants are like people.  If loved and nurtured within the boundaries of your home, they 
will reward you with the same sort of satisfaction one gets from the attentive rearing of happy 
and successful children.

Here endeth my few lessons.
       I have a few tips I think the main thing I would do over again is when shopping at the nursery 
DON'T BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS, when I went shopping for my first garden this year I 
ended up talking to this very young 20 year old kid who probalbly new more about gardening then I 
but was unwilling to share his information he just gave me the "look". 
       Everyone knows that "look" the one that makes you feel like an idiot for bothering them and 
asking them questions, strange I have a college dipolma and he indimidated me for my lack of 
knowledge, my gut told me to find someone else who would be willing to help but my pride just 
wanted to go home. 
       Be brave and don't let them make you feel stupid you will only pay in the long run when you 
go back to buy more flowers because you didn't ask the questions you wanted to in the first place. 
        My second little tip is don't plant too close together.  Whatever is listed on the stick thing in the 
plant leave extra room; you can always purchase smaller flowers as fillers later on but if your a fool 
like me you will plant everything to close together and now the plants are starting to die because they 
are to close together.  I have managed to kill two shrubs and I am working on Lilac bush (which make 
me cry I love that bush) now I have to do some re arranging that all my flowers have taken off and 
grown bigger then what I was told they would grow. I guess I should be proud of the fact that I have 
beaten the expectations that are labeled with each flower, it just adds a lot more work.

       Good luck and good growing
       Karrie




        Tips for new gardeners: Talk to your neighbors that do have gardens. They are a major source 
for local information. 
       Talk to your local greenhouse owners and people you meet there. 
       Find the nearest County Extension Service either by phone or the internet. A bounty of 
resources will be there.
      And if you are new to the area, take the Master Gardener course held by the extension agency. 
And best of all, just sow seed of plants you like, plant the plants that look great to you.  
       One way to learn what to grow is to try lots of different varieties, find the ones that do well, 
the ones that just die out and the ones you just don't like after they have grown. This is true of 
flowering plants and veggies. You will like some tomatoes and not others, same with cukes, beans etc. 
       Trial and Error is how all farmers and gardeners start.
       My best advice for beginning gardeners is "don't skimp on the soil preparation" ... it is 
tempting to start digging anywhere and then planting whatever.

       Good soil is a pleasure to garden in and your plants do so much better.  Especially perennials, 
because they will stay in place for several years!

       My second advice is to know what you are planting.  Look at the height, bloom time, sun vs. 
shade requirements.  I used to plant whatever caught my eye in the garden store, put it wherever I had 
room, only to discover that it didn't do very well because I had not thought out the details

        My last advice, is to "experiment" ... try new plants and new ideas and new combinations.




        Read all the gardening books you want, they're good entertainment. Remember, plants don't 
read.
        Dan



For beginners

        I started 3 years ago, building a perennial garden in very heavy clay. I thought if annually I 
added peat moss and fertilizer (I only started composting last year) I would end up with decent soil. 
So my number one advice is that is a lot less work to get the soil right before you start planting. This 
year I am in the process of digging up all the plants and getting the soil right.

        For another garden at work, there was crabgrass? (the grass with runners). Don't start planting 
until you get it all out. It might take a season or two, but make sure it's gone.

       Don't buy cheap plants at end of season sales if you don't know what they are. I planted 
catmint and I still seem to find some of it.

        If a plant is labelled as invasive, it is going to be worse then you think, as pretty as it might be.

       Speaking of invasive, if you like mint, make sure it is in an enclosed space or container. 
Otherwise it will get away from you. Same for raspberries. You can get raspberry bushed in the oddest 
places courtesy of birds or kids.
        Sandra
       Or, I wish I had paid attention more when I read the planting instructions.

       This is my first year of planting a garden.   I fell in love with Hybrid Tea Roses and 
Floribundas. In fact I fell in love so much I've literally run out of room for the poor things to grow. 
We live in a townhouse so are limited to the areas we can plant (no enlarging the garden area or 
adding rock gardens, etc.).

      Actually I somewhat "guesstimated" the space the roses would need and having never grown 
them before,   I underestimated. 

        I now have Double Delight too close to Tropicana and Forty­Niner too close to John F. 
Kennedy along with poor Mr. Lincoln sharing space with a very pretty Knockout.  I also have 
Paradise in a container and it really should be in the ground but don't know where to put it.  Also have 
shrub roses alongside the garage and they're okay.  Part of my "underestimating" also involves 
Daylilies........those devils really take off and I'm now going to have to move some so my white 
(unknown) rose has room.  I wanted something different in the daylilies instead of the usual yellow or 
orange so I splurged on Catherine Woodbury, Joan Senior and about 8 other beautiful lilies.  Needless 
to say I got carried away and I haven't even mentioned the gorgeous red/yellow, white, and pink 
miniature roses planted in front of the Hybrids (blooms vary from 1" to 1­1/2").   Then I decided to 
plant some more perennials towards the back of the house and have Black­eyed Susans, tiny miniature 
roses in white, red and lilac, Coreopsis, hostas, a raspberry climber and annuals including cockscomb, 
hardy begonias, petunias, opal innocence, blue verbana, and other smaller type flowers (forgot the 
pretty pink phlox up front and the red miniature rose surrounded by annuals.

          It has been a real adventure and a lot of hard work but I've learned (the hard way) to put more 
thought into planning and spacing. You can always add more but it's awfully hard to have some 
beautiful roses and no place to put them (at least not in the sun).
 
I'll just have to wait until next year to see what survives a Chicago winter; supposedly Zone 5 but can 
get a lot colder ­ never can tell in this area.  

Regards,
Marion
Yorkville, IL 
Hi Doug:
         For first­time homeowners or those who have no gardening experience I think I'd recommend 
they offer to do a 2 week stint caring for a neighbour's gardens. Then they'll know if they like the feel 
of soil in their hands, if they have good or bad backs. People have no idea how time consuming a lot 
of flower beds can be. 

       Also for the baby boomers and those with old sports injuries, consider having all nice big 
cedar box type planters, so no more bending over.

       I designed and planted the flower gardens for a very expensive house past the floating bridge 
and the owners loved it.

       When I went back a month later I was stunned to find no weeding had ever been done. Neither 
of them found it fun.

       So the old saying goes "You won't know if you like something until you try it" works here.

       Regards
       Connie




        Tips for beginning gardeners:  Buy enough rubber weep­type soaker hose for your vegetable 
and flower gardens, so you won't have to move them until the next spring, when plantings may change. 
Buy quick connector sets, so each soaker has its own connector, and each regular water hose has one, 
too.  Just connect, and turn on the tap, ever so slightly.  

        We have a brass 4­gang bib connected to our only outdoor tap, so have a hose that goes to the 
back and one to the front, as well as one to water some containers nearby and fill the birdbath.  These 
tips will save water, time and tempers on those hot days.

       Shirley 
       Topeka, KS
       My advice? I bought an older house about 3 months ago. I want to make a WONDERFUL 
garden in my 1/2 acre of land, but for the first year I'm doing nothing. I want to see what I have to 
work with, meaning I want to see what is already blooming and when, I'm watching the draining 
patterns during and after rains, checking the micro climates and keeping track of what wildlife come 
and go. As I'm doing all this throughout the year, I'm also making and changing my garden plans so at 
the end of my year I'll know exactly what I want!




Dear Doug,
       My advice is without an explanation as to why. Since the advice is simple I'm sure you can 
explain the rationale if need be.
       This is for beginning gardeners. 
       When planting a tree don't dig down ­ dig around.
       Live as you are going to die tomorrow but garden as if you will live forever
       Your established plants need more water than you think they do.
 
       Hope it helps
       Joseph 
       Israel




Doug's Blog can be found at http://www.douggreensgarden.com
Gardening Newsletter can be found at http://www.simplegiftsfarm.com/gardeningnewsletter.html

								
To top