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					                                   Program Report
      Bachelor of Science in Education with emphasis in Instrumental or Vocal Music

                               Missouri Western State University



Description of Certification Program
Type of Degree and Location of Course work

Missouri Western State University offers stand alone teacher certification in K-12 Music
Education in two areas, Instrumental Music and Vocal Music. We offer undergraduate degrees
in music education at this time. Undergraduate students who wish to become music educators
must declare a major of Bachelor of Science in Education with an emphasis in one or both of the
areas above. Content studies for BSE in Music are located in the Department of Music within
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. They must fulfill the university core requirements, the
content area requirements, the education department requirements and all state requirements.
The Music Department is also fully accredited by the National Associations of Schools of Music.
This accreditation body and their expectations require that our content area is on par with or
exceeds other major music schools’ curricula across the nation. Further description of the
process and the outcome of our most recent renewal of NASM approval are presented later in
Appendix A.

The teacher certification gained from completion of degree requirements at MWSU is Missouri
K-12 Instrumental Music or K-12 Vocal Music. Some students do take additional required
content courses enabling them to be certified in both instrumental and vocal areas. Because of
our proximity to surrounding states, many of our graduates teach outside of Missouri boundaries
and have minimal course work to complete in order to meet those states’ requirements for full
certification.

All music content courses are offered through the Music Department. All general courses are
offered on our campus and the education courses are offered through our Education Department.
The nature of our discipline area dictates that student teachers (senior experience candidates) be
supervised by music faculty members. Jeffrey Hinton supervises instrumental music education
placements. Frank Thomas supervises vocal music education placements. Karen Jenson
supervises elementary music student teaching placements.

Requirements for Degree

We require that students complete the curriculum listed on the following major forms. We also
require that students make a grade of C or better in all music content courses required to fulfill
the BSE in Music degree requirements leading to certification.
The requirements for the music education degrees are included in the following Major forms.
Instrumental Music Education Major Form (Content area)

Total number of required hours for this degree-                      Music Content Courses                         65 Hours
                                                                     Education Prof. Sequence                      27 Hours
                                                                     General Education Courses                     42-46 Hours

                                              Total                                                                134-138 Hours

The total number of hours in this degree slightly exceeds the recommended maximum number as
set forth by our campus curriculum committee. The Music Department finds this necessary in
order to meet the requirements of NASM and more importantly, adequately prepare our students
for their chosen profession. All courses and credit requirements are approved by the Missouri
Western Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.


               D                B.S.E. — Music                                               12D
           e         Major:                                                 Music
           g Concentration:                                           Instrumental
                     Minor:
           r    Catalog Year:                                  Expires: 2013-2014
           e 2007-2008
           e Advisor                                   Department __________________
            _____________
           / _________Student’s Signature                                 ______ Date ___________

           P           Advisor’s Signature                                 ______ Date ___________

           r           EDU Advisor’s Signature_________________________ Date____________

           o           Chairperson’s Signature                             ______ Date___________

           g            Registrar’s Signature                             _____ Date___________
           r                            DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
           a                              Check when the requirement is completed.
                                  ____1. A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation
           m                                 (including 60 from a senior college).
           :            ____2. A minimum of 30 credits must be earned in upper level courses. Lower
                           division transfer courses accepted as meeting upper division departmental
                           course requirements cannot be used to fulfill this requirement. Thirty (30) of
                                  the last 45 credits of course work must be earned at MWSU.
                         ____3. Participation in departmental and campus wide assessment efforts is required.
                                 Contact the Academic and Student Affairs Office for more information.
                        ____ 4. Complete department’s Concert/Recital attendance requirement (six semesters).
                                            ____ 5. Complete the requirements below.

                       MAJOR REQUIREMENTS                                                  (65 Credits)
                                           CORE                                           Credit                Grade
                 MUS101                      Perspectives in Music                          3
                 MUS117                     Theory and Analysis 1                           3
                 MUS118                         Aural Training 1                            1
                 MUS206                     Keyboard Proficiency 1                          2
                 MUS210                    Introduction to Computer                         2
                                                Applications
                 MUS217                     Theory and Analysis 2                           3
                 MUS218                         Aural Training 2                            1
                 MUS310              History of Music: Ancient to Baroque                   3
                 MUS311              History of Music: Classical to Modern                  3
                 MUS320                 Elementary Music Methods and                        3
                                                 Materials
                 MUS336                  Fundamentals of Conducting                         2
                MUS355                     Theory and Analysis 3                          3
                MUS356                        Aural Training 3                            1
                MUS357                     Theory and Analysis 4                          3
                MUS358                        Aural Training 4                            1
                MUS490/1                       Senior Recital                             1
                MUSxxx               Applied Music-Major Instrument                       7
                MUSxxx                 Ensembles (5 credits in Major                      6
                                              Ensembles/
                                     2 credits in Chamber Ensembles)
                                        TOTAL                                            49
                                              INSTRUMENTAL EMPHASIS
                 MUS109                   Functional Voice Class                          1
                 MUS211              Low Brass Methods & Materials                        1
                 MUS212             High Brass Methods & Materials                        1
                 MUS307             Percussion Methods & Materials                        2
                 MUS308                 String Methods & Materials                        2
                 MUS325                Marching Band Techniques                           1
                 MUS326                Instrument Care and Repair                         1
                 MUS353             Single Reed Methods & Materials                       1
                 MUS354            Double Reed Methods & Materials                        1
                 MUS442            Advanced Instrumental Conducting                       2
                                      Middle & High School Instrum.
                 MUS468                                                                   3
                                                Methods
                                        TOTAL                                            16
                                              PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE
                 EDU202                  Introduction to Education                        3
                 EDU203                 Participation in Teaching I                       1
                 EDU303                  Experience in Teaching II                        3
                 EDU304                   Psychology in Teaching                          4
                 EDU311             Secondary Reading Techniques                          2
                 EDU315             Psych. and Ed. of the Exceptional                     2
                                                 Student
                 EDU404              Seminar in Sec. Ed. and Human                        3
                                                Relations
                 EDU409              Secondary Student Teaching III                       9
                                        TOTAL                                            27
                                      PSY101 is a prerequisite for several EDU courses.
                           To be certified to teach in the state of Missouri, students must complete:
                           A. BIO101 (or equivalent)        B. GOV101          C. HIS140 or 150




Vocal Music Education Major Form (Content Area)

 Total number of required hours for this degree-                  Music Content Courses                 64 Hours
                                                                  Education Prof. Sequence              27 Hours
                                                                  General Education Courses             42-46 Hours

                                            Total                                                       133-137 Hours


     The total number of hours in this degree slightly exceeds the recommended maximum
     number of hours as set forth by our campus. The Music Department finds this necessary in
     order to meet the requirements of NASM and more importantly, adequately prepare our
     students for their chosen profession. All courses and credit requirements are approved by
     the Missouri Western Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.


                 Degree/Progra                                B.S.E. — Music                            12E
                 mmm:
    Major:                                              Music
Concentration:                                  Vocal (Applied Voice)
    Minor:
Catalog Year: 2007-2008                                  Expires: 2013-2014
Advisor ______________________                       Department ___________________
     Student’s Signature                                 ________ Date _________
     Advisor’s Signature                                  _______ Date __________
     Chairperson’s Signature___________________________ Date___________
     EDU Advisor’s Signature___________________________ Date___________
     Registrar’s Signature                               ________ Date __________

                       DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
                          Check when the requirement is completed.
                 ____1. A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation
                              (including 60 from a senior college).
      ____2. A minimum of 30 credits must be earned in upper level courses. Lower
        division transfer courses accepted as meeting upper division departmental
               course requirements cannot be used to fulfill this requirement.
         Thirty (30) of the last 45 credits of course work must be earned at MWSU.
     ____3. Participation in departmental and campus wide assessment efforts is required.
             Contact the Academic and Student Affairs Office for more information.
        ____ 4. Complete department’s Concert/Recital attendance requirements
                                        (six semesters).
                          ____ 5. Complete the requirements below.
    MAJOR REQUIREMENTS                                                (64 Credits)
                        CORE                                          Credit                Grade
MUS101                    Perspectives in Music                          3
MUS117                   Theory and Analysis 1                           3
MUS118                       Aural Training 1                            1
MUS206                   Keyboard Proficiency 1                          2
MUS210                  Introduction to Computer                         2
                               Applications
MUS217                   Theory and Analysis 2                           3
MUS218                       Aural Training 2                            1
MUS310                 History of Music: Ancient to                      3
                                 Baroque
MUS311                History of Music: Classical to                     3
                                  Modern
MUS320               Elementary Music Methods and                        3
                                 Materials
MUS336               Fundamentals of Conducting                          2
MUS355                   Theory and Analysis 3                           3
MUS356                       Aural Training 3                            1
MUS357                   Theory and Analysis 4                           3
MUS358                       Aural Training 4                            1
MUS490/                       Senior Recital                             1
  1
MUSxxx              Applied Music-Major Instrument    7
MUSxxx                Ensembles (5 credits in Major   6
                                Ensembles/
                    2 credits in Chamber Ensembles)
                                  TOTAL              49
                   VOCAL (APPLIED VOICE) CONCENTRATION
MUS111                  Functional Instrumental       1
                                Techniques
MUS201                Foundations in Vocal/Choral     2
                                  Tech. I
MUS208                   Keyboard Proficiency II      2
MUS301                Foundations in Vocal/Choral     2
                                  Tech. II
MUS328                      Choral Literature         2
MUS334               Pedagogical Practice: Voice      2
                       MUS441                 Advanced Choral Conducting                           2
                       MUS467                 Middle & High School Choral                          2
                                                         Methods
                                               TOTAL                                              15
                                                    PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE
                       EDU202                        Introduction to Education                              3
                       EDU203                       Participation in Teaching I                             1
                       EDU303                        Experience in Teaching II                              3
                       EDU304                         Psychology in Teaching                                4
                       EDU311                    Secondary Reading Techniques                               2
                       EDU315                Psych. and Ed. of the Exceptional Student                      2
                       EDU404                Seminar in Sec. Ed. and Human Relations                        3
                       EDU409                    Secondary Student Teaching III                             9
                                                    TOTAL                                                  27
                                          PSY101 is a prerequisite for several EDU courses.
                                   To be certified to teach in the state of Missouri, students must complete:
                                   A. BIO101 (or equivalent)           B. GOV101           C. HIS140 or 150




Both Instrumental and Vocal Music Education content areas share the same general education
requirements listed below:

MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY
Major - Minor Declaration
Four Year Program
Student Name________________________________________________

Address_____________________________________________________
              Street                              City        State       ZIP
Telephone_______________________________ID#_________________


☞Students are expected to read the regulations and policies in both the University Catalog and Student Handbook and to
conform to them. The student, not the University or a member of the faculty or staff, is primarily responsible for knowing t he
regulations and policies, and for meeting the requirements for a degree or certificate.

PREPARATORY COURSES (Do not count towards General Studies. RDG095, MAT090/095 or equivalent do not count toward
graduation requirements.)
Based on placement criteria.                                  Credits                 Grade
MAT090 or equivalent                                              3                 _____
MAT095 or equivalent                                              3                 _____
ENG100                                                            3                 _____
RDG095                                                            3                 _____

GENERAL STUDIES                                                           (42-46 Credits)
CATEGORY ONE: BASIC SKILLS (12-14 credits)
1. MAT110 or any higher level mathematics course of
   3 or more credits (excluding MAT127 and 132)                   3/4/5             _____
2. ENG104 and 108 or                                              6                 _____
   ENG112                                                                           _____
3. COM104                                                          3                _____

CATEGORY TWO: NATURAL SCIENCES (8-10 credits)
Minimum of 8 credits from TWO of the following groups.
1. BIO101 or 105                                                  5                 _____
2.   CHE101(4) or 104(5) or 111(5)                              4/5              _____
3.   ESC111                                                     4                _____
4.   PHY101(4) or 107(4) or 110(4) or 210(5)                     4/5             _____
5.   PHY104                                                      4               _____

CATEGORY THREE: SOCIAL SCIENCES (9 credits)
Minimum of 9 credits with at least one course from each of the two following groups.
1. ECO101or 260 or 261or GEO100 or PSY101
   or SOC110 or 120                                             3                _____
2. HIS140 or 150 or GOV101                                      3                _____
3. Additional course from group 1 or 2                          3                _____

CATEGORY FOUR: HUMANITIES (9 credits)
One course each from three of the following four groups. Music degree programs have a restricted Humanities category. Please
read carefully.
1. HIS100 or 110 or 130 or HUM 203 or 204 or 205*             3                  _____
2. ENG 210 or 220 or PHL210 or 230 or HUM250*                 3                  _____
3. ART100 or MUS 101 or THR113*                               3                  _____
   *Music majors must take one of the following: HUM203 or 204 or 205
     or ENG210 or ART100 or THR113 for NASM accreditation
4. FRE/GER/SPA102 or any higher level 3-credit
   language course                                             3                  _____

CATEGORY FIVE: PHYSICAL HEALTH (4 credits)
1. PED101                                                       3                _____
2. MIL105 or any PE lifetime sports activity class              1                _____

LAS AREAS OF FOCUS                                             Course ID
1.   LAS Writing Intensive                                                       ______
2.   LAS Computer Literacy                                                       ______
3.   LAS Ethics                                                                  ______
4.   LAS International/Intercultural                                             ______
TR beside grade denotes that transfer work fulfills course requirements.


Degree Duration

It is possible to complete this undergraduate degree in four years. Students who have done so
have taken full loads of general education courses in all summers. The majority of our music
education degree seekers plan for 5 years (10 semesters) to complete this degree with the final
semester being their senior experience (student teaching). This time frame is comparable to the
vast majority of peer universities offering these degrees.

Program Population

Current Population

There are currently over 50 students who have declared within the music department that music
education as their major area. This approximate number is based on those who intend to enter
the professional education course sequence. They are considered pre-majors in music education
until they have passed the C-Base test and can then be accepted into the Education Department
sequence. It is necessary for our students to work from the major form included on the previous
pages from their second semester in order to sequence the content courses in the music content
area in a timely manner. Of those students who have declared a pre-major in music education,
roughly 60% are in the instrumental area and 40% are in the vocal. Students are not considered
full-fledged music education majors until they have met the requirements to enter the education
department professional sequence of courses.

Graduates since 2001

We have graduated 48 music educators since our last accreditation visit. The students and their
emphasis areas are listed chronologically in the section dealing with ―Characteristics of
Candidates‖ on page 36.


History of MWSU Music Teacher Certification

The first graduates certified to teach music from Missouri Western matriculated in 1970. There
have been over 155 graduates who gained music education degrees from this program since that
time. Missouri Western has always followed the guidelines set forth by the state to ensure that
this program was in compliance. We value this degree as it provides schools in this region and
throughout the Midwest with well-educated and caring music teachers.

Certification Program’s Integration of the Unit’s Conceptual Framework

The concepts being used by the education department are an integral part of our music education
system. Each of the four phases is well defined and offers our students an excellent opportunity
to develop and explore.
         “Becoming a Teacher Leader: Taking Responsibility for Student Learning”




       Phase I - Awareness

       This phase actually begins with our students as they arrive at Missouri Western.
       Because of our extensive requirements for content courses, it is crucial that they begin
       the music course sequence in their freshman year. We are constantly talking with and
       advising our students to be aware of how their studies here will lead them to ―the other
       side of the podium‖ as they get ready to teach. The EDU 202 and 203 courses are timely
       in that students who realize they do not want to teach music can still change their major
       to another area of music and not have wasted time and funds on courses they didn’t need.
       Phase II – Developing Theoretical Knowledge

       During this phase, music students often are challenged to join the unique qualities of
       being a music teacher and the methods that are presented by our music faculty with
       the expectations and practices that are covered in the education sequence of courses.
       It is not always simple to realize the commonalities of the two sides of a coin, but it is
       still the same coin that is not complete unless both sides are present. We ask
       students during this phase to be creative in their work to make the unique practices
       of music educators fit into the realm of ―normal‖ classroom teachers. Rehearsal
       outlines must be developed as lesson plans, performances must be included as group
       tests, etc.

       Phase III - Investigation

       This is a very important phase for our future music teachers. It is during this phase
       that our students learn the process and importance of integration of the arts
       programs into the overall systems of our schools. During this phase, music students
       become much more aware of the ―crossing over‖ from being a student of music to
       being a teacher of music. We find that those who are very passionate about music
       get very excited during this phase. We also find that those who are not as passionate
       about their involvement in music become very serious and introspective. This
       searching process is invaluable as they figure out who they are and why they wanted
       to become educators in the first place.

       Phase IV - Finding Voice

       Student teaching occurs during this phase and it is wonderful to see the growth that
       takes place in our students as they become responsible for their own students’
       attainment. During this phase, they must think as a teacher, prepare as a teacher and be
       responsible for what, how and why they are teaching. We are careful to place our student
       teachers with programs that have demographic differences with the one they experienced
       in high school. If a student is from a background centered on marching band, we will
       place them in a concert band centered program. If a student comes from a small choir
       program, they will be placed in a large school where there are more offerings and depths
       in the program. We are very careful to place our students in school to work with
       cooperating teachers who have strengths in areas where we perceive our students to have
       possible concerns. This phase has been very important to our students as they are often
       offered positions in the district where they had their senior, student teaching experience.


Outside Organizations That Effect Our Program

Our music education majors fulfill curriculum requirements designed by our Education
Department and State in conjunction with content requirements in the Music Department. The
Music Department’s curriculum is greatly affected by the review and requirements of our
program by the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). We are also in a state of
constant awareness in regard to the developments in music education as reported and
communicated to us by Music Educators National Conference (MENC), Missouri Music
Educators Association (MMEA), Kansas Music Educators Association (KMEA), the American
Association of Choral Directors (ACDA), Missouri Bandmasters Association (MBA), Iowa
Bandmasters Association (IBA), the Midwest Band and Orchestra International Clinic, the
International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE), the International Trumpet Guild (ITG) and
the Percussive Arts Society (PAS), the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA), Music
Teachers National Association (MTNA) and many other local groups promoting the teaching of
music.

Each of these large organizations is dedicated to the betterment of music education. Each of
these large organizations is based on the quality of teaching of music at all levels and age groups
in our schools. MMEA, MENC and NASM are our chief music education lobbying bodies at the
national and state levels. Our faculty members are involved in these organizations as members,
committee members, presenters and officers.

We also expect our students to be involved in organizations. Music education majors are
expected to be members of the Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (CMENC).
Here they learn to understand that education as it applies to music is a global concern and they
begin to understand the importance of further development of their knowledge after college.
Membership in this organization also helps them understand the process of change and progress.
Members of CMENC are also expected to attend the annual MMEA meeting where over 3000
Missouri Music Educators of all ages and levels of education come together to share ideas and
practices.

Our chapter of CMENC is currently led by, full-time faculty member, Bob Long. Mr. Long is
well qualified to lead this group because of his outstanding experience as a quality public school
music educator in West Des Moines, Iowa before coming to MWSU in 2004. The group is
consistently exposed to guest speakers, performers and officers of the above mentioned
organizations to gain first hand knowledge of current topics and practices they will be facing as
music educators.

Advisory body structure, membership and authority

Three music faculty members are active members of the Education Leadership Team. Their
involvement is crucial as many traits of effective music education to not translate easily to
common practices of classroom teachers who are successful in areas other than music or art. Jeff
Hinton, Director of Bands, Karen Jensen, Elementary Music Education adjunct professor and
Frank Thomas, Director of Chorale Activities are the music liaisons to the education department.
These three professors supervise music education students during their senior experience and are
active in advising music education students from their arrival at MWSU.

Below is the structure of the teacher education unit at MWSU.

The teacher education unit at Missouri Western is led by the Chair of the Teacher Education
Department, Dr. Richard Porr. The unit works collaboratively to design, deliver and effectively
manage all programs. The unit promotes or advertises its program through university
publications (catalog, course schedules, program brochures) and marketing efforts (newspaper
ads and articles, billboards, web pages and mailings. The following chart represents the
organizational structure of the unit:

                               Table 46 Unit Governance Chart




Departments are responsible for their own majors’ advisement and coordination of their major
courses. The appropriate academic dean, department chairs, and methods instructors that oversee
programs that lead to teacher certification are members of the Education Leadership Team
(ELT) that coordinates the ―Professional Sequence‖ of education courses that provide the
knowledge, skills, leadership dispositions, professional behaviors, commitment to diversity, and
integration of technology that meet unit assessments of quality. The Chair of the Teacher
Education Department is the Chair of the Educational Leadership Team, Dr. Richard Porr.

Decisions regarding matters such as assignment of faculty to teach courses related exclusively to
teacher education or supervising in-school experiences requires concurrent approval of the
education chairperson and the chair of the department where the faculty member is housed. For
example, the Chairperson of the Department of History, Philosophy and Geography recently
collaborated with the Chairperson of the Department of Education to determine the assignment
of faculty to teach a methods course. Collaboration such as this is critical for the success of the
educational unit and students in teacher education majors.
Recent Revisions to our Program

Music Revisions since 2001

The music content area of our program has undergone many changes in recent years. We are
constantly adding to and modifying our curriculum on order to better prepare our students for
success in their chosen career. We understand that keeping our students informed means that our
faculty must stay current with public and private schools’ issues and practices. Here are some of
the changes that we have implemented. These changes were approved by the Missouri Western
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the Missouri Department of Higher Education if
warranted.

Fall 2007      The music theory sequence was redesigned in order to better recognize students
       who did well in areas within the overall course. Music theory was a 6 semester course
       sequence that included aural skills, written theory, arranging, composition and
       conducting. After close inspection, we found that while our students were passing the
       courses, they had little delineation of the components of the whole. Music theory is now
       a 4 semester sequence with separate courses in arranging, composition, conducting and
       aural skills. This is a more traditional approach which allows students to focus on areas
       which might be weak without having to retake an entire course filled with areas where
       their work was strong. The fall 2007 freshman class was the first to enter into this new
       program.

Fall 2006      Woodwind and Brass methods courses were expanded from one semester each to
       two semesters each. We asked our recent graduates for suggestions for improvement for
       our program and the vast majority stated that they felt that they needed more time to
       become proficient on the instruments that was not their major instrument as a student.
       Without adding more hours to the degree, we were able double the time our students have
       in order to gain deeper understanding and mastery on the woodwind and brass
       instruments.

Other changes to program since 2000

       A course was added for instrumental music education majors dealing with the repair and
       maintenance of instruments. Again, students needed to know more about the instruments
       they were not familiar with.

       A course was added to give an overview of the wind, percussion and string instruments to
       students majoring in vocal music. This was necessary in order to prepare vocal students
       for the chance that they may find that a portion of a school’s job description could
       include both vocal and instrumental duties. It is also an attempt to address the needs
       exposed by having a common music certification for teachers.

       A course offering vocal techniques was added for instrumental music education majors in
       order to prepare them for a teaching position that could include and element of vocal
       music. This course is required early in their studies at Missouri Western as we believe
       that a solid background in singing is essential to performing well on an instrument.

Education Revisions since 2000

Since the NCATE/DESE accreditation visit in 2000, the teacher education unit at Missouri
Western State University has undergone several changes including:

      Granted university status and name change from Missouri Western State College to
       Missouri Western State University (2005)
      Conceptual framework development/revisions to ―Becoming a Teacher Leader: Taking
       Responsibility for Student Learning.‖ (Conceptual Framework)
      Institutional technology changes to SCT Banner system
      Development of an electronic assessment system - Education Performance System (EPS)
       (NCATE STD 2)
      Elementary Education course offerings extended to Kansas City Northland to collaborate
       with Metropolitan Community College and to increase diverse experiences for our
       candidates (NCATE STD 4)
      Developed and received approval for an ESOL add-on certification program (NCATE
       STD 4)
      Established the Aschermann-Tanner Minority Teaching Scholarship (NCATE STD 4)
      Developed partnerships with community programs to address diversity issues (Peace
       Unlimited, Mid-City Excellence) (NCATE STD 4)
      Added a required Multicultural Education course (EDU 308) (NCATE STD 4)
      Developed a resource room dedicated to candidate resources (Murphy 111 E) (NCATE
       STD 6)
      Established a TeacherLeader blog to help candidates apply dispositions and sensitivity to
       diversity (http://teacherleader.blogspot.com) (NCATE STD 1, NCATE STD 4)
      Development/defining of Candidate Dispositions based on the literature of Daniel
       Goleman (NCATE STD 1)
      Development of strategies and instruments to assess dispositions (NCATE STD 1)
      Revision of entrance examination scores on the C-BASE from 265 to 235 within a pilot
       program to inform changes to admission requirements (NCATE STD 4)
      Adopted an up-or-out tenure system organized around teaching, scholarship, and service
       (NCATE STD 5)
      Creation of Education Leadership Team and Teacher Education Advisory Board
       (NCATE STD 5)
General Education Revisions since 2000

The general education courses prescribed by MWSU’S Liberal Arts mission have not
experienced changes since our last accreditation visit.

National Recognition from a Specialty Association

As mentioned at the onset of this report, the Missouri Western State University Department of
Music is fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. Our most recent
review was completed in 2004 and our department was granted unconditional approval as we
were voted to continue ―in good standing‖. We are scheduled to renew this approval with
NASM in 2013.

Included in this report is the final application and the documentation of our NASM recognition
(Appendix A).


Certification Program Requirements
Admissions Process and Requirements

Students wishing to declare a major in Instrumental or Vocal Music Education must perform an
audition to gain access to the performance groups. Performance in these groups is a required
element of the degree. The three large ensembles requiring an audition are Band (MUS145 or
MUS347), Concert Chorale (MUS338) and Orchestra (MUS346).

Once students are accepted to be a member of one or more of these groups, they can enroll in
first semester music courses with the intent of becoming a music education major after
satisfactorily completing the following three fundamental courses. Those fundamental courses
are Music Theory I (MUS119), Aural Skills I (MUS118) and Basic Keyboard Skills (MUS106).
At the completion of these courses, the student may declare a pre-major in music education and
begin the sequence of courses outlined in our Music Student Handbook (Appendix B). At the
completion of passing the C-Base test, those meeting the GPA requirement of 2.5 or better may
enter the education professional sequence as recognized music education majors.

Description of Required Courses

Included are all course descriptions from the music area catalog so that the overall program and
the diversity of our offerings can be realized. We are confident that the many emphasis areas
within our department and the way in which the students overlap from area to area makes our
graduates more aware of the total music field. An awareness which exceeds knowledge of their
lone discipline. This is valuable to music educators because they need this exposure in order to
help secondary students be aware of possible professions in music.
Music Content Course Descriptions (from current course catalog)
(Music Education required courses are highlighted in purple.)


All Music Education Courses are offered in the day, Monday through Friday. Some ensembles
rehearse in the evenings (i.e. Community Chorus and Orchestra) and all ensembles have a varied
concert schedule of weekday evenings and weekends.

In order to populate classes adequately, some classes are offered once a year, either in the spring
or fall while others are offered every other year. Instrumental methods courses (brass,
woodwind, percussion and strings) are offered every third year. Specifics are noted in the
catalog descriptions.

Missouri Western’s only summer music offerings are private study on major instruments at this
time. This is an area longing for development.
Department of Music
Dr. F. Matt Gilmour, Chairperson    gilmour@missouriwestern.edu271-4420
http://www.missouriwestern.edu/Music/


The Department of Music provides a curriculum for the training of musicians and music
educators. It is primarily concerned with improving the skills and disciplining the talents of
music majors. The department also offers courses and activities for all college students to
enhance their appreciation and understanding of music. Students are encouraged to broaden their
contact with music by attending the many cultural programs in St. Joseph and area concert halls
and by participating in programs by student musicians. The Department of Music is an
accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

All music major degree programs have a concert/recital attendance applied learning activity
requirement. To complete the degree, the student must attend 12 approved performances each
semester for a total of 6 semesters. This is in addition to all coursework for any music major
degree. Attendance requirements and an approved listing of concerts/recitals are provided at the
beginning of each regular semester.

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The BA requires at least 12 credits in a single foreign language.

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the 200-level ―Applied Music-Major
Instrument‖ requirements for graduation.

Major in Music
Core Requirements                                                          Credits
MUS101 Perspectives in Music                                               3
MUS 117      Theory and Analysis 1                                         3
MUS118 Aural Training 1                                                    1
MUS206 Keyboard Proficiency 1                                              2
MUS210 Introduction to Computer Applications                               2
MUS217 Theory and Analysis 2                                               3
MUS218 Aural Training 2                                                    1
MUS310 History of Music: Ancient to Baroque                                3
MUS311 History of Music: Classical to Modern                               3
MUS336 Fundamentals of Conducting                                          2
MUS355 Theory and Analysis 3                                               3
MUS356 Aural Training 3                                                    1
MUS357 Theory and Analysis 4                                               3
MUS358 Aural Training 4                                                    1
MUS490/1 Senior Recital                                                    1
MUSxxx Ensembles                                                         4
MUSxxx Applied Music-Major Instrument                                    8
MUSxxx Music Electives (any music courses except                         6

   Applied Music - Major Instrument, and Music Ensembles)
   TOTAL                                                                 50

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete 4 credits in 300-level "Applied
Music-Major Instrument" requirements for graduation.

MAJOR IN MUSIC
Missouri Western offers two options for the B.S.: the Business Emphasis Program and the Music
Technology Emphasis Program. Both options require a core of 63 credits in music courses plus
15 credits in the area of emphasis.

Core Requirements                                                        Credits
MUS101       Perspectives in Music                                       3
MUS117 Theory and Analysis 1                                             3
MUS118 Aural Training 1                                                  1
MUS206 Keyboard Proficiency 1                                            2
MUS217 Theory and Analysis 2                                             3
MUS218 Aural Training 2                                                  1
MUS310 History of Music: Ancient to Baroque                              3
MUS311 History of Music: Classical to Modern                             3
MUS324 Electronics for Music Applications                                3
MUS327 Commercial Music Seminar                                          3
MUS336 Fundamentals of Conducting                                        2
MUS355 Theory and Analysis 3                                             3
MUS356 Aural Training 3                                                  1
MUS357 Theory and Analysis 4                                             3
MUS358 Aural Training 4                                                  1
MUS440 Commercial Music Practicum                                        4
MUS490/1     Senior Recital                                              1
MUS495 Senior Portfolio                                                  1
MUSxxx Ensembles                                                         4
MUSxxx Applied Music-Major Instrument                                    8
MUSxxx Music Electives (any music courses except                         6
   Applied Music-Major Instrument, and Music Ensembles
   TOTAL                                                                 50

BUSINESS EMPHASIS PROGRAM
In addition to the core, the following courses are required:
ACC201 Introduction to Financial Accounting                                3
ECO261 Principles of Microeconomics                                        3
GBA211 Business Law                                                        3
MGT301Management of Organizations                                          3
MKT301Principles of Marketing                                              3
  TOTAL                                                                    15

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY EMPHASIS PROGRAM
In addition to the core, the following courses are required:
MUS106 Music Applications for Computers                                    3
MUS107 Advanced Music Computing                                            3
MUS230 Music and Multimedia                                                3
MUS240 Sound Synthesis                                                     3
MUS 250         Recording Techniques                                       3
    TOTAL                                                                  15

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Major in Music

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree must participate in one major
ensemble each semester with the exception of the student teaching semester. Candidates for the
Bachelor of Science in Education degree must complete 4 credits in 300-level ―Applied Music-
Major Instrument‖ requirements for graduation.

Missouri Western offers two options in the B.S.E. major in Music leading to K-12 vocal or
instrumental teaching certification in Missouri. Both the Vocal Emphasis and Instrumental
Emphasis require 64 - 66 credits in music courses, including the following core of classes:

Core Courses                                                               Credits
MUS101 Perspectives in Music                                               3
MUS117 Theory and Analysis 1                                               3
MUS118 Aural Training 1                                                    1
MUS206 Keyboard Proficiency I                                              2
MUS210 Introduction to Computer Applications                               2
MUS217 Theory and Analysis 2                                               3
MUS218 Aural Training 2                                                    1
MUS310 History of Music: Ancient to Baroque                                3
MUS311 History of Music: Classical to Modern                               3
MUS320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials                              3
MUS336 Fundamentals of Conducting                                          2
MUS355 Theory and Analysis 3                                               3
MUS356 Aural Training 3                                               1
MUS357 Theory and Analysis 4                                          3
MUS358 Aural Training 4                                               1
MUS490/1      Senior Recital                                          1
MUSxxx Applied Music-Major Instrument                                 7
MUSxxx Ensembles (5 credits in Major Ensembles/
  2 credits in Chamber Ensembles)                                     7
  TOTAL                                                               49

Vocal Emphasis

In addition to the core, the following courses are required:
                                                                      Credits
MUS111         Functional Instrumental Techniques                     1
MUS201     Foundations in Vocal/Choral Techniques 1                   2
MUS208                     Keyboard Proficiency II                    2
MUS301 Foundations in Vocal/Choral Techniques 2                       2
MUS328                           Choral Literature                    2
MUS441               Advanced Choral Conducting                       2
MUS467     Middle & High School Choral Methods                        2
  TOTAL                                                               13

Applied voice concentration: Restricted electives are MUS 334, 2 credits.

Applied piano or organ concentration: Restricted electives are MUS 331, 2 credits; Applied
Voice Major Instrument, 2 credits (two semesters in MUS 289).

Vocal Emphasis majors will be assigned to a middle or high school instrumental program for
EDU 203, to an elementary, middle or high school vocal program for EDU 303, and to a middle
or high school vocal program for EDU 409. If the student has elected the Elementary Music
Emphasis by taking MUS 321 and MUS 322, an assignment to elementary music for EDU 409
may be chosen. The music prerequisite(s) for EDU 203 is MUS 320; for EDU 303 are MUS 208
and MUS 441; and for EDU 409 is MUS 467.

Instrumental Emphasis
In addition to the core, the following courses are required:
                                                                      Credits
MUS109 Functional Voice Class                                         1
MUS211 Low Brass Methods & Materials                                  1
MUS212 High Brass Methods & Materials                                 1
MUS307 Percussion Methods & Materials                                 2
MUS308 String Methods & Materials                                     2
MUS325 Marching Band Materials                                        1
MUS326 Instrument Care & Repair                                           1
MUS353 Single Reed Methods & Materials                                    1
MUS354 Double Reed Methods & Materials                                    1
MUS442 Advanced Instrumental Conducting                                   2
MUS468 Middle & High School Instrumental Methods                          3
  TOTAL                                                                   16

Instrumental Emphasis majors will be assigned to an elementary, middle, or high school vocal
program for EDU 203 and to a middle or high school instrumental program for EDU 303 and
EDU 409. As part of the EDU 303 and EDU 409, students will be required to have experiences
in teaching beginning instrumental students individually and in small/large groups. The music
prerequisite(s) for EDU 203 is MUS 320; for EDU 303 are MUS 206 and MUS 442; and for
EDU 409 is MUS 468. The student in each emphasis area should make every effort to be
involved in as many different teaching levels as is possible.

ADDITIONAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
For all music degree programs, General Studies, Category Four - Humanities is restricted as
follows. The student must take:

1. HUM 203 or HUM 204 or HUM 205 or
2. ENG 210
3. MUS 101
   Plus one additional course from:
4. FRE 102, GER 102, SPA 102 or higher (required for BA Music Majors) or a               course
from the line (1 or 2 above) not chosen for the restriction.
   Line 1 options: HIS 100, HIS 110, HIS 130, HUM 203, HUM 204, HUM 205
   Line 2 options: ENG 210, ENG 220, PHL 210, PHL 230, HUM 250
MINORS
Music
The music minor program has a concert/recital attendance applied learning activity requirement.
To complete the minor degree, the student must attend 12 approved performances each semester
for a total of 2 semesters. This is in addition to all coursework for the music minor degree.
Attendance requirements and an approved listing of concerts/recitals are provided at the
beginning of each regular semester.

Requirements                                                                 Credits
MUS101      Perspectives in Music                                            3
MUS117      Theory and Analysis 1                                            3
MUS118      Aural Training 1                                                 1
MUS168      Applied Piano                                                    2
MUS217      Theory and Analysis 2                                            3
MUS218      Aural Training 2                                                 1
MUSxxx Applied Music - Major Instrument                                      4
MUSxxx      Music Electives (any music courses except: Applied
  Music-Major instrument, and Music Ensembles)                               6
MUSxxx Music Ensembles (four semester minimum)                               4
  TOTAL                                                                      27

Musical Theatre
Requirements                                                                 Credits
THR126      Stage Movement                                                   2
THR140      Production Participation (Musical Theatre)                       3
THR228      Acting I                                                         3
THR229      Stage Makeup                                                     1
THR326      Techniques of Musical Theatre Performance                        3
THR338      Directing                                                        3
THR275      Script Analysis                                                  3
THR280      Scenography                                                      3
THRxxx      Approved Elective                                                3
  TOTAL                                                                      24

CERTIFICATION

Elementary Music Education
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education Vocal degree may receive an Emphasis in
Elementary Music Education by electing MUS 321 Orff, Kodály, and Laben and MUS 322
General Music Activities (total of 4 credits). This emphasis is for those students desiring to teach
at the elementary school level.
Solo Performance
All degree candidates in music may elect a solo performance program in their major applied area
with Department of Music permission. This emphasis requires MUS 390 Junior Recital and
MUS 491 Senior Recital.

Additional Teaching Certification
The department strongly recommends additional teaching certification for all BSE music majors.

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a Vocal Emphasis may achieve
state instrumental certification with the following courses:
               Credits
MUS211         Brass Methods & Materials                                 1
MUS212         High Brass Methods & Materials                            1
MUS307         Percussion Methods & Materials                            2
MUS308         String Methods & Materials                                2
MUS353         Single Reed Methods & Materials                           1
MUS354         Double Reed Methods & Materials                           1
MUS442         Advanced Instrumental Conducting                          2
MUS468         Middle & High School Instrumental Methods                 3
MUSxxx Applied Music (instrumental)                                      2
MUSxxx Ensembles (instrumental)                                          2
    TOTAL                                                                17

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree with an Instrumental Emphasis may
achieve state vocal certification with the following courses:
                                                                         Credits
MUS201         Foundations in Vocal/Choral Techniques 1                  2
MUS301         Foundations in Vocal/Choral Techniques 2                  2
MUS328         Choral Literature                                         2
MUS441         Advanced Choral Conducting                                2
MUS467         Middle & High School Choral Methods                       2
MUSxxx Applied Music (voice)                                             4
MUSxxx Music Ensembles (vocal)                                           2
   TOTAL                                                                 16

Semester Designation
     F -- the course is offered in the fall semester
     Sp -- the course is offered in the spring semester
     Su -- the course is offered in the summer semester
     DD -- the course is offered at the discretion of the department
MUSIC COURSES
Waiving of any course prerequisites requires prior departmental authorization.

MUS 101 Perspectives in Music (3) F, Sp, Su. Music materials, forms, historical-social
development of composers and compositions. Various themes may be pursued; however, this
course may not be repeated for credit.

MUS 103 Fundamentals of Music (2) (DD). Materials of music through triads and simple
double and triple rhythm; includes music reading/aural recognition. Meets three hours per week.

MUS 106 Basic Keyboard Skills I (2) F. Keyboard orientation; intervallic reading; I, V chord
structures and harmonization. No piano background required.

MUS 108 Basic Keyboard Skills II (2) Sp. Primary chord structures and harmonization,
simple accompaniment patterns, reading skills, scale structures. Prerequisite: MUS 106 or
departmental approval.

MUS 117 Theory and Analysis 1 (3) F. Study of notation of pitch and rhythm, meter, major
and minor scales, modes, intervals, triads, seventh chords, two-part composition and
melodic/rhythmic embellishment, beginning arranging and transposition.

MUS 118 Aural Training 1 (1) F. This course sequence is designed to develop the practical
skills of the music major through sight-singing, dictation, improvisation, composition, and to
integrate theoretical concepts (the Theory and Analysis sequence) with various styles of music.
Content includes pitch and rhythm, scales and modes, meters, intervals, triads and seventh
chords, and embellishment. Meets 2 days a week.

MUS 206 Keyboard Proficiency I (2) F. Keyboard harmony, harmonization of folk melodies,
sight-reading, scale structure, transposition, simple accompaniment, elementary repertoire;
completion of proficiency examination for instrumental majors. Prerequisite: MUS 108 and 119
or departmental approval.

MUS 208 Keyboard Proficiency II (2) Sp. Advanced harmonic progressions, intermediate-
level accompaniments, transposition of simple accompaniment, open-score reading, intermediate
repertoire, scale and arpeggio techniques; completion of proficiency examination for B.S.E.-
Vocal Emphasis majors. Prerequisite: MUS 206 or departmental approval.

MUS 209 Synthesizer Techniques (2) (DD). Techniques of playing various presets, editing
instrument presets and sound design, MIDI performance, and chord voicing. Prerequisite: MUS
206 or permission of instructor.

MUS 210 Introduction to Computer Music Applications (1-2) Sp (DD). A seminar
course designed to introduce the student to the hardware/software applications available in the
Art/Music Computer Laboratory. LAS Computer Literacy.
MUS 217 Theory and Analysis 2 (3) S. Study of voice leading, melody harmonization,
figured-bass, phrases, cadences, harmonic expansion, periods, sequences, secondary dominants,
motive analysis, fugue and arranging and composition projects. Prerequisite: MUS 117.

MUS 218 Aural Training 2 (1) Sp. A continuation of MUS 118. Content includes
dominant/tonic phrase model, embellishment, chordal expansion and variations, other cadences,
sequence patterns, secondary dominants, and motive development. Includes improvisation and
composition. Meets 2 days a week. Prerequisites: MUS 117 and MUS 118.

MUS 240 Chamber Music Performance: Brass (1-2) F, Sp. Study through performance in
musical literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music with brass
instruments. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 241 Chamber Music Performance: Keyboard (1-2) F, Sp. Study through performance
in musical literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music with keyboard
instruments. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 242 Chamber Music Performance: Percussion (1-2) F, Sp. Study through
performance in musical literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music
with percussion instruments. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 243 Chamber Music Performance: Strings (1-2) F, Sp. Study through performance in
musical literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music with string
instruments. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 244 Chamber Music Performance: Voice (1-2) F, Sp. Study through performance in
musical literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music with voice. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 245 Chamber Music Performance: Woodwinds (1-2) F, Sp. Study through
performance in musical literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music
with woodwind instruments. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 250 Introduction to Research Methods in Music (1-2) (DD). Introduction to basic
research methods in music. Individual and team projects involving methods for solving music-
related research problems. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

MUS 303 Commercial Harmony (2) (DD). Western tertian harmonic language and Afro-
American/Latin-American rhythmic structures as applied to commercial music. Prerequisite:
MUS XXX or departmental approval. LAS International/Intercultural.

MUS 310 History of Music: Ancient to Baroque (3) F. Musical styles and techniques, from
ancient music to Baroque. Prerequisite: MUS 101, 329. LAS Writing; International/Intercultural.

MUS 311 History of Music: Classical to Modern (3) Sp. Musical styles and techniques,
from classical to modern. Prerequisite: MUS 101, 329. LAS Writing; International/Intercultural.

MUS 312 Topics in Music Literature: Chamber (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research in
music literature and performance practices as they relate to chamber music. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 313 Topics in Music Literature: Choral (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research in music
literature and performance practices as they relate to choral music. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 314 Topics in Music Literature: Piano (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research in music
literature and performance practices as they relate to piano music. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 315 Topics in Music Literature: Organ (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research in music
literature and performance practices as they relate to organ music. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 316 Topics in Music Literature: Percussion (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research in
music literature and performance practices as they relate to percussion music. May be repeated
for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 317 Topics in Music Literature: Solo Instrument (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research
in music literature and performance practices as they relate to solo instrument music. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 318 Topics in Music Literature: Solo Voice (1-2) F, Sp. Study through research in
music literature and performance practices as they relate to solo vocal music. May be repeated
for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 319 Musicianship 3 (3) F. Study of modulation and secondary dominant harmony
including historical overview, binary and ternary forms. Includes beginning arranging, computer
music notation, and music reading/aural training. Meets four hours per week. Prerequisite: MUS
219.

MUS 324 Electronics for Music Applications (3) F. A study of the fundamentals of sound
and acoustics and electric audio: loud speakers, amplifiers, microphones, cabes, mixing consoles
and signal processors, electronic instruments, MIDI and computer integration, sound recording
and basic equipment maintenance. Meets four hours per week. Prerequisite: MUS 219.

MUS 327 Commercial Music Seminar (3) Sp. Problems in Commercial Music, including
recording techniques, contracts, bookings, and agents, taxes, union membership, promotional
materials and marketing techniques, rehearsal techniques, repertoire development, personnel and
interpersonal relations, song writing and publishing. Prerequisite: MUS 209 and 303. LAS
Ethics, Writing.

MUS 329 Musicianship 4 (3) Sp. Study of the polyphonic techniques and music analysis of
the Renaissance and Baroque. Includes intermediate arranging, computer music sequencing, and
music reading/aural training. Meets four hours per week. Prerequisite: MUS 319.

MUS 336 Fundamentals of Conducting (2) Sp. Basic conducting techniques: patterns,
dynamics, attacks, releases, cueing, various styles and tempos, independence of hands and
gestures, terminology, score exposure and preparation. Prerequisite: MUS 319.

MUS 355 Theory and Analysis 3 (3) F. Study of modulation, modal mixtures, chromatic
harmony, binary/ternary forms, song forms, rondo, variations, sonata form, arranging,
composition, and computer applications projects. Prerequisite: MUS 217.

MUS 356 Aural Training 3 (1) F. A continuation of MUS 218. Content includes secondary
dominants, modulation, modal mixture, altered chords, N6th and augmented 6th chords,
chromaticism, formal analysis, and asymmetrical meters. Includes improvisation and
composition. Meets 2 days a week. Prerequisite: MUS 217 and 218.

MUS 357 Theory and Analysis 4 (3) S. Music of the 20th and 21st centuries, other scales,
pitch-class set analysis, serialism, rhythm and metric development, formal developments and
analysis, arranging, composition and computer applications projects. Prerequisite: MUS 355.

MUS 358 Aural Training 4 (1) Sp. A continuation of MUS 356. Content includes modes,
other scale types, pitch-class sets, serialism, changing meter, polymeter, asymmetric meters, and
ametric rhythm. Includes improvisation and composition. Meets 2 days a week. Prerequisites:
MUS 355 and 356.

MUS 406 Composition (1-2) F, Sp. Private lessons in composition. Half-hour weekly lessons
for each credit. The special fee for applied music is assessed for this course. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 410 Topics in Computer Music Applications (1-2) F, Sp, Su (DD). An advanced
seminar course designed to study selected topics in the field of computers and music. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MUS 210 or departmental approval required.

MUS 419 Musicianship 5 (3) F. Study of chromatic harmony, variation technique, sonata and
rondo forms and music analysis. Advanced choral arranging. Includes music sequencing,
recorder and guitar performance and conducting experiences. Includes music reading/aural
training. Meets five hours per week. Prerequisite: MUS 329. LAS Computer Literacy.

MUS 429 Musicianship 6 (3) Sp. Study of chromatic and extended harmony with an historic
overview including jazz and popular music. Study of contemporary compositional techniques.
Advanced instrumental arranging. Includes music sequencing and conducting experiences.
Includes music reading/aural training. Meets four hours per week. Prerequisite: MUS 419. LAS
Computer Literacy.

MUS 440 Commercial Music Practicum (4) F, Sp, Su. Final experience for those with
Business/Recording emphasis. Part-time off-campus experiences with cooperating professional
in the area of student’s choice (business or recording) for a minimum of 10 hours per week.
Student’s activity and progress is observed by a member of the commercial music faculty.
Prerequisite: MUS 327.

MUS 441 Advanced Choral Conducting (2) (DD). A study of problems of choral
conducting. Includes the study of conducting gestures that facilitate entrances and releases,
compound and changing meters and other interpretive indications. Includes score study and
effective rehearsal techniques. Prerequisite: MUS 336.

MUS 442 Advanced Instrumental Conducting (2) (DD). Advanced conducting techniques:
patterns, cuing, styles, score preparation, rehearsal and performance techniques, problem solving
experiences. Prerequisite: MUS 336.

MUS 450 Independent Research/Project (1-5) F, Sp. Investigation of a research problem,
project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite: Completion of the major-minor
declaration in music, minimum 2.5 GPA in the major field, and departmental approval.

MUS 495 Senior Portfolio (1) F, Sp. A course for graduating seniors which consists of a final
approved cumulative degree program project and the preparation of a professional portfolio and
career preparation. This course must be taken during one of the last two semesters prior to
graduation.

MUSIC ENSEMBLE COURSES
Waiving of any course prerequisites requires prior departmental authorization.

Except for Commercial Music degree students, all students participating in instrumental
ensembles during the fall semester must take MUS 145 concurrently. Students participating in
instrumental ensembles in the spring semester must have been enrolled in MUS 145 the previous
fall semester. This policy does not pertain to membership in MUS 346 or pianists/guitarists in
MUS 344.

Students participating in vocal ensembles must be concurrently enrolled in
MUS 140 or MUS 338.

Ensembles may be repeated for credit.

Major Ensembles
MUS 140 Community Chorus (1) F, Sp. Group singing of various styles of music literature.
Two hours per week.

MUS 145 Marching Band (1) F. Performance of marching maneuvers. Six hours per week.
May be repeated for credit. Rehearsals commence about one week before beginning of semester.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 146 Concert Band (1) Sp. Basic concert band literature with public performance;
laboratory for conducting and arranging students; experience on secondary instruments. Three
hours per week.

MUS 338 Concert Chorale (1) F, Sp. Select ensemble, emphasizing performance of sacred
and secular choral music. Four hours per week. Students are financially responsible for
appropriate concert dress.

MUS 346 Orchestra (1) F, Sp. Performance of selected standard orchestral literature. Three
hours per week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 347 Wind Ensemble (1) F, Sp. Select ensemble emphasizing musicianship, playing
skills, representative literature, and public performance. Four hours per week. Prerequisite:
departmental approval.

MUS 352 Commercial Music Ensemble (1) (DD). Performance group(s) dedicated to
commercial music techniques. Each semester will be devoted to a specific type of commercial
music (country, rock, jazz, mixed dance styles) and the ensemble will explore the various styles
encountered within each type. May be repeated for credit.

Chamber Ensembles
Waiving of any course prerequisites requires prior departmental authorization.

MUS 339 Chamber Singers (1) Sp. Vocal chamber music performance. Three hours per
week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 340 Renaissance Singers (1) F. Vocal chamber music performance. Three hours per
week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 341 Swing Choir (1) (DD). Performance of popular music with choreography. Three
hours per week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 343 Brass Ensemble (1) (DD). Chamber music performance. Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 344 Jazz Ensemble (1) F, Sp. Select ensemble for public performance. Three hours per
week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 345 Percussion Ensemble (1) F, Sp. Performance of major percussion ensemble
literature. Required of all percussion majors. Three hours per week. Prerequisite: departmental
approval.

MUS 349 Chamber Winds (1) (DD). Select ensemble structured for advanced brass,
woodwind, and percussion students with minimum instrumentation; emphasizes original wind
literature. Two hours per week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUS 350 Woodwind Ensemble (1) (DD). Chamber music performance. Two hours per
week. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MUSIC PEDAGOGY COURSES
Waiving of any course prerequisites requires prior departmental authorization.

MUS 109 Functional Voice Class (1) F. This course is designed to provide the instrumental
music education major and the beginning non-music major with functional knowledge of the
vocal process and vocal performance experience. Meets two days a week.

MUS 111 Functional Instrumental Techniques (1) Sp. This course is designed to acquaint
the choral/vocal music education major with performance techniques of four families of
instruments: woodwinds, brasses, strings, and percussion. The class will explore the methods of
performance on the primary instruments of each family. Meets two hours per week.

MUS 201 Foundations in Vocal/Choral Techniques 1 (2) F. Provides a basic
understanding of good tone production, interpretation, musicianship, performance skills and
repertoire in solo vocal and choral music. The International Phonetic Alphabet, Italian
pronunciation and English diction will be emphasized.

MUS 211 Low Brass Methods and Materials (1) F. Class lessons to develop playing skills
and instructional methodology of the trombone, euphonium and tuba and techniques of teaching
these instruments. Meets 2 days a week.

MUS 212 High Brass Methods and Materials (1) S. Class lessons to develop playing skills
and instructional methodology of the trumpet and French horn and techniques of teaching these
instruments. Meets 2 days a week.

MUS 220 Music for the Elementary Classroom Teacher (3) F, Sp. Basic music for the
elementary education major incorporating music appreciation and use of music in the teaching of
basic skills. Prerequisite: EED 202, 203, ART 100. Elementary education majors may not take
the course until officially admitted to teacher education.

MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal/Choral Techniques 2 (2) Sp. Provides the basic tools of
singing in German and French with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite:
MUS 201.

MUS 307 Percussion Methods and Materials (2) Sp. Class lessons to develop playing skills
and instructional methodology of percussion instruments; techniques of teaching instrumental
groups. Meets three days a week.

MUS 308 String Methods and Materials (2)Sp. Class lessons to develop playing skills and
instructional methodology of string instruments; techniques of teaching instrumental groups.
Meets three days a week.
MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3) Sp. Overview of methods and
materials for teaching of music in grades K-6. For students majoring in music education.
Prerequisite: MUS 118 or EED 202, 203 and ability to read music.

MUS 321 Orff, Kodály, and Laben (2) (DD). Introduction to the educational processes
involved in teaching music K-8, using the contemporary methods of Orff, Kodály, and Laben.
Prerequisite: MUS 220 or 320. LAS International/Intercultural.

MUS 322 General Music Activities (2) (DD). Developing and sequencing music skills and
concepts in grades K-12 through increasing levels of cognitive abilities. Prerequisite: MUS 220
or 320.

MUS 325 Marching Band Techniques (1) F (odd-numbered years). Materials and ideas in
marching band techniques. Prerequisite: MUS 145.

MUS 326 Instrument Care and Repair (1) F (even-numbered years). Techniques and
experience in the repair of band and orchestra instruments; emphasizes practical and economical
use of materials, skill, and time. Prerequisite: Two of the following: MUS 211, 212, 307, 353,
354.

MUS 328 Choral Literature (2) Sp. A study of repertoire appropriate for choral literature
representing various levels of maturation and achievement (young adolescent through advanced
high school groups and both large and small ensembles). Includes stylistic trends, musical
characteristics and performance practices from Medieval to the Contemporary period.

MUS 330 Pedagogical Practices: Brass (1-2) F, Sp. Principles of teaching brass in the
independent music studio; content will be determined by student need. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval. LAS Ethics.

MUS 331 Pedagogical Practices: Keyboard (1-2) F, Sp. Principles of teaching keyboard in
the independent music studio; content will be determined by student need. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval. LAS Ethics.

MUS 332 Pedagogical Practices: Percussion (1-2) F, Sp. Principles of teaching percussion
in the independent music studio; content will be determined by student need. May be repeated
for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval. LAS Ethics.

MUS 333 Pedagogical Practices: Strings (1-2) F, Sp. Principles of teaching strings in the
independent music studio; content will be determined by student need. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval. LAS Ethics.

MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices: Voice (1-2) F, Sp. Principles of teaching voice in the
independent music studio; content will be determined by student need. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval. LAS Ethics.

MUS 335 Pedagogical Practices: Woodwinds (1-2) F, Sp. Principles of teaching
woodwinds in the independent music studio; content will be determined by student need. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: departmental approval. LAS Ethics.

MUS 353 Single Reed Methods and Materials (1) F. Class lessons to develop playing skills
and instructional methodology of the flute, clarinet and saxophone and techniques of teaching
these instruments. Meets 2 days a week.

MUS 354 Double Reed Methods and Materials (1) F. Class lessons to develop playing
skills and instructional methodology of the oboe and bassoon and techniques of teaching these
instruments. Meets 2 days a week.

MUS 467 Middle and High School Choral Methods (2) (DD). Problems and techniques of
teaching music in middle and senior high school, organization of vocal groups, general music
classes and evaluation materials. Prerequisite: MUS 441. LAS Ethics.

MUS 468 Middle and High School Instrumental Methods (3) F. This course is to prepare
instrumental music educators for all aspects of instrumental music education which deal directly
with the organizational and instructional strategies not dealt with in pedagogical courses aimed at
performance, theory, history, and conducting. Prerequisite: MUS 442. LAS Ethics.

APPLIED MUSIC COURSES
Waiving of any course prerequisites requires prior departmental authorization.

Applied Music-Secondary Instrument (1) F, Sp. For the music major studying a secondary
applied area and for the non-major; studies compatible with the student's training and
development. May be repeated for credit. Special fees for applied music are assessed for these
courses. Prerequisite: Appropriate applied music methods courses and/or departmental approval.

The following applied areas are available:
       MUS 150 Applied Euphonium
       MUS 151 Applied French Horn
       MUS 152 Applied Trombone
       MUS 153 Applied Trumpet
       MUS 154 Applied Tuba
       MUS 155 Applied Percussion
       MUS 156 Applied Cello
       MUS 157 Applied Double Bass
       MUS 158 Applied Guitar
       MUS 159 Applied Viola
       MUS 160 Applied Violin
       MUS   161   Applied Bassoon
       MUS   162   Applied Clarinet
       MUS   163   Applied Flute
       MUS   164   Applied Oboe
       MUS   165   Applied Saxophone
       MUS   167   Applied Organ
       MUS   168   Applied Piano
       MUS   169   Applied Voice

Applied Music-Major Instrument (1-2) F, Sp. For the music major; studies compatible with
the student's applied level. The specific level requirements are available from the appropriate
applied instructor or the Department of Music Office. May be repeated for credit. Special fees
for applied music are assessed for these courses. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

The following applied areas are available:
   MUS 170, 270, 370, 470 Applied Euphonium
   MUS 171, 271, 371, 471 Applied French Horn
   MUS 172, 272, 372, 472 Applied Trombone
   MUS 173, 273, 373, 473 Applied Trumpet
   MUS 174, 274, 374, 474 Applied Tuba
   MUS 175, 275, 375, 475 Applied Percussion
   MUS 176, 276, 376, 476 Applied Cello
   MUS 177, 277, 377, 477 Applied Double Bass
   MUS 178, 278, 378, 478 Applied Guitar
   MUS 179, 279, 379, 479 Applied Viola
   MUS 180, 280, 380, 480 Applied Violin
   MUS 181, 281, 381, 481 Applied Bassoon
   MUS 182, 282, 382, 482 Applied Clarinet
   MUS 183, 283, 383, 483 Applied Flute
   MUS 184, 284, 384, 484 Applied Oboe
   MUS 185, 285, 385, 485 Applied Saxophone
   MUS 187, 287, 387, 487 Applied Organ
   MUS 188, 288, 388, 488 Applied Piano
   MUS 189, 289, 389, 489 Applied Voice
MUS 390 Junior Recital (1) F, Sp, Su. For performance-emphasis majors only. A one-half-
hour recital required. Prerequisite: departmental approval. A special fee is assessed.

MUS 490 Senior Recital (1) F, Sp, Su. Minimum requirements for music majors in the
applied music-major instrument category. A one-half-hour recital required for graduation.
Prerequisite: departmental approval. A special fee is assessed.

MUS 491 Senior Recital (1) F, Sp, Su. For performance-emphasis majors in 400-level applied
music. A one-hour recital required for graduation. Prerequisite: departmental approval. A
special fee is assessed.

Music Content Course Electives Descriptions

Students have options of coursework to further their knowledge while completing the required
courses for the BSE in Music degree. The required courses for music education majors leave
little room for ―either/or‖ scenarios. Our students choose elective courses in addition to our strict
required course load.

One of the most often chosen options is that of entering the performance emphasis area. We
encourage this with all of our students, especially music education candidates, because we
believe that those who have attained high levels of performance proficiency will be more able to
impart a deeper and more insightful meaning of music to their future students. They will be able
to lead others to higher levels of performance and understanding.

Music Education students also chose to enhance their knowledge by opting to take additional
music technology courses from the music technology major field of study. This is also
encouraged because music teachers need to have a working knowledge of the recording and
amplification techniques which are driven by today’s ever expanding software developments in
this area.

Education Course Descriptions

The Professional Sequence of Courses for Secondary/K-12 Certification Candidates:
Course                                                              Credits
*EDU 202 Introduction to Education                                     3
*EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I                                   1
*EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II                                     3
*EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching                                        4
EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques                                   2
*EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Student           2
EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education & Human Relations               3
EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III                                 9
                                                                Total 27
*Required of All Certification Candidates
Course Descriptions with Links to Syllabi and Faculty Vita
Course Description with Semesters Credits & Semesters                  Course     Faculty Vita
                                                                       Syllabi
EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3) F, Sp. Basic introduction       EDU 202     Dr. Hendrix
to professional education; an on-campus exploratory course to aid
participants in deciding whether or not to become teachers. The       Day Only
course also provides the basic information and attitude
development necessary for successful teaching. Taken the same
semester and time as EDU 203. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108, or
112.
EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1) F, Sp. Laboratory             EDU 203      Dr. Bogle
course taken concurrently with EDU 202. During this off-campus                    (Placement)
experience, the participant serves as a teacher assistant. This       Day Only
exploratory course provides concrete exposure to teaching,
students, and the school. Graded pass/fail. Taken the same semester
and time as EDU 202
EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3) F, Sp. Continuation of          EDU 303      Dr. Bogle
the off-campus experiences in cooperating schools as teacher                      (Placement)
associates. To be taken concurrently with EDU 304 (and 375 for        Day Only
elementary). Prerequisite: EDU 203 and 310, 320, 330, 340, 360,
MAT 351, and MAT 352 and approved admission to the Teacher
Education Program OR Secondary and K-12: EDU 203, and
approved admission to the Teacher Education Program
(NOTE: Also called Junior Experience)
EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4) F, Sp. Psychological               EDU 304      Dr. Bogle
principles as applied to educational settings. To be taken                        Dr. Barmann
concurrently with EDU 303. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and EDU 203.           Day         Dr. Ellis
(Note: One section offered Web-based course each fall)                  and       Dr. Edwards
                                                                       Online
EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2) F, Sp. Techniques            EDU 311     Mr. Flowers
of teaching reading comprehension strategies to middle and high
school students. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108, or 11 2 and             Late
admission to the Education Department. Elementary teacher             Afternoon
candidates must have completed EDU 310 and 320.
EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child             EDU 315      Dr. Eicher
(2) F, Sp. This course is a survey of issues related to the                       Mrs. Robbins
identification and teaching of exceptional students. All state and      Late
federally defined categories of disability will be addressed by       Afternoon
definition, etiology, prevalence, school law, civil rights law and       and
curriculum and teaching issues. Topics will include curriculum and     Online
instruction modifications and adaptations as well as behavior
management and discipline. Prerequisites: EDU 202 and 203;
declared minors in Childhood Studies are exempt from EDU 303
and 304 as prerequisites.
(Note: One section offered online each spring and one section
offered during each spring intersession)
EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human                       EDU 404      Dr. Barmann
Relations (3) F, Sp. Philosophical, ethical, and legal problems                       Dr. Porr
related to secondary education instructional strategies, including     Day Only
classroom and laboratory experiences; considers interpersonal
relations as applied to teaching. To be taken concurrently with
EDU 409. Prerequisite: EDU 303 and EDU 304.
EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9) F, Sp. Full-time,           EDU 409        Dr. Bogle
off-campus teaching experiences working with students in an area                     (Placement)
secondary school and a mentor teacher. To be taken concurrently        Day Only
with EDU 404. Prerequisite: EDU 303, EDU 304, special methods
course in the major, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the major field of
study and approval from the major department; Must have passed
the Praxis II exam in the area of certification.

Options for Completing Requirements

Teacher education candidates seeking the traditional instrumental or vocal music certification
degree must complete the required courses as identified in the major forms or have the accepted
transfer equivalents, maintain the required grade point average, successfully complete the
PRAXIS II exam in the content area and meet all program and degree requirements as well as
those identified on the Checklist for Graduation. All certification only and alternative
certification candidates must have an existing degree in music, meet the same GPA standards,
complete major professional course work requirements, and passage of the PRAXIS II exam in
music (See the Program Report for Alternative Certification).

Advisement Process

Students who declare a major in music (regardless of concentration area) are assigned an advisor
who is a full-time professor or instructor in the Department of Music. Students are most often
assigned to be advised by their studio teacher. This faculty member spends the most one-on-one
time with the student which occurs during private music lessons. If the student studies privately
with a part time/adjunct faculty member, they will be assigned to the Director of Bands or the
Director of Chorale Activities. These professors also work closely with the students and
understand their needs. We feel these instructors have the best opportunity to know and
understand the students’ needs therefore they will be able to more positively lead the students in
the most productive and fiscally responsible direction. Students are advised with concern to
coming semesters’ schedules in advance of open, on-line enrollment. This is a shared
responsibility with the majority of the balance resting with the students to make an initial
appointment to cover the important issues of sequence and requirements.

As the student progresses through their first two years of course work in the general education
and music areas, they will be expected to complete the C-Base test. Upon satisfactorily
completing the C-Base, the students may apply for admission to the Education Department to
qualify to begin education course work while still completing music content courses and general
education courses. At the time of entry into the Education Department, they will also be given
invaluable advising as to the requirements of this Professional School entity from members of
the Education department faculty. Music faculty and Education Department faculty work very
closely in all phases of the process.

Our faculty advisors’ goal is to treat each student with respect and help them find the path to
success that best fits their personal goals and situations while keeping a realistic and timely
graduation date in focus.

Degree Checklist

The Music Department advisors use the major-minor declaration signed by the student, music
department advisor and education department advisor provided on pages 2-5 of this report.

As the student nears graduation, the following degree checklist is also completed and managed
through the Western Registrar’s Office.

            BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE CHECK LIST

 Student Name: ___________________ _____                      Graduation Semester            _______

Major: ________________________________________

Minor: ________________________________________

Date: __________________________________________

As of this date, the following deficiencies/questionable areas/potential problems exist. (If
checked, requirements have been fulfilled, or will be fulfilled based upon current registration
and/or preregistration.) If specific course deficiencies exist, they will be highlighted on an
attached copy of your Major/Minor Form.

APPROPRIATE MAJOR/MINOR FORM ON FILE ____________________________________________

GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS ______________________________________________
Teacher certification requires specific General Studies (see Major/Minor form)

MINIMUM 124 CREDIT HOURS_____________________________________________________
144 hours for 2 baccalaureate degrees,
same semester additional 20 hours for
second degree

COURSES NOT APPLICABLE TO GRADUATION _____________________________________
Maximum 64 Jr. College hours applicable to degree
Maximum 6 CED hours applicable to degree (100 level or above)
Maximum 30 hours non-traditional credit applicable to degree (Cones., CLEP, departmental,
military)
MINIMUM 2.00 MAJOR GPA _______________________________________________________

" C" or better in each course in major

MINIMUM 2.50 OVERALL GPA _____________________________________________________

30 HOURS UPPER-DIVISION (300/400 level) ___________________________________________

RESIDENCY HOURS: 30 OF THE LAST 45 AT MWSU _________________________________

(Must include senior student teaching)

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS __________________________________________________________

CONCENTRATION AREA _______________

LAS AREAS OF FOCUS -4 courses required for majors in these areas:
 (Art, English, French, Spanish, Music, Speech & Theatre)

OTHER NOTES         Students graduating will be required to participate
 in MAPP Exit Exam and/or departmental exit
 evaluations. Please consult with your advisor. Revised 07/IM7
Characteristics of Certification Program Candidates

Number of Music Education Candidates

                                 Music (Instrumental) K-12
 All Candidates admitted to the program completed the program and gained certification during
                                  the 2001-2007 time period.


            Year                         Admitted             Completed/Certified
            2001-2002                            3*                        3
            2002-2003                            6*                        6
            2003-2004                            1*                        1
            2004-2005                             4                        4
            2005-2006                             5                        5
            2006-2007                             5                        4
            Fall 2007                             1                        0
            TOTAL                                25                      23**
                     *University-wide switch to Banner System in 2004-2005—earlier system
                         did not keep databases by ―program tags‖—the Banner system is still
                         adjusting to previous data in Hewlett-Packard system.
                      **unable to calculate persistence to certification based on lack of
                         accuracy in early numbers




                                     Music (Vocal) K-12
 All Candidates admitted to the program completed the program and gained certification during
                                  the 2001-2007 time period.


            Year                         Admitted             Completed/Certified
            2001-2002                            1*                        1
            2002-2003                            5*                        5
            2003-2004                            2*                        2
            2004-2005                             2                        2
            2005-2006                             2                        2
            2006-2007                             3                        1
            Fall 2007                             2                        0
            TOTAL                                17                      13**
                     *University-wide switch to Banner System in 2004-2005—earlier system
                         did not keep databases by ―program tags‖—the Banner system is still
                         adjusting to previous data in Hewlett-Packard system.
                      **unable to calculate persistence to certification based on lack of
                         accuracy in early numbers
PLEASE NOTE

After viewing the above numbers, we feared the number of students reported was inaccurate
because of the campus computer system change. We researched our departmental records
back to 2001-2002 to define the actual numbers of students. They are listed on the following
pages.

The following list of students were admitted to and did complete the Music Education
degree program since 2001.
     I=Instrumental        IK=Instrumental/Keyboard       V=Vocal       V=Vocal/keyboard
       2001-2002

               Vance Baldwin        V                                   M(ale)
               Carol Blair          I                                   F(emale)
               Jonathan Bokay       V                                   M
               Julia Chaney         I/P                                 F
               Jeff Cowger          I      (non-traditional student)    M
               Ryan Cox             V                                   M
               Aaron Diestal        I                                   M
               Aaron Edwards        I                                   M
               Erica Strasser       V      (transfer student)           F
               Paul Weissenborn     I      (transfer student)           M

       2002-2003

               Asa Barnes           V      (minority student, Black)    M
               John Doney           I                                   M
               Jennifer Friend      I                                   F
               Bethany Reid         V                                   F
               Jeff Siasoco         I      (minority student, Hispanic) M
               Tracy Thomas         I                                   M
               Leah Tolbert         I                                   F

       2003-2004

               Shaun Agnew          V                                   M
               Emily Auxier         V                                   F
               Amy Dunlap           V                                   F
               Tyler Ives           V/I    (transfer student)           M
               Mary Jane Hulsey     I                                   F
               Mary Jo Lewis        V      (non-traditional student)    F

       2004-2005

               Jon Paul Bellamy     I      (minority student, Hispanic) M
       I=Instrumental         IK=Instrumental/Keyboard          V=Vocal        V=Vocal/keyboard

              Elizabeth Douglas       V/I     (non-traditional student)    F
              Andrew Douglas          I                                    M
              Chris Kehr              I                                    M
              Ellen Davis Rabetan     V                                    F
              Joseph Stone            I       (minority student, Nat. Am.) M

       2005-2006

              Erika Hidritch          I                                      F
              Jason Kikoler           I                                      M
              Erica Lipiec            I/K                                    F
              Jeremy Schneider        V                                      M
              Christopher Vieth       I                                      M

       2006-2007

              Jon Bailey              I                                      M
              Karla Buckminster       V                                      F
              Rachel Harrison         I                                      F
              Andrew Murphy           I                                      M
              Misty Raisbeck          I                                      F
              Andrea Stanton          I                                      F

       2007-2008

              Terri Barnett           V       (non-tradition student)        F
              Brian Burlingame        I                                      M
              Ian Derrickson          I                                      M
              Kimberly Evans          V                                      F
              Autumn Greear           V                                      F
              Daniel Kirk             I/K                                    M
              Chris McDonald          I                                      M

Please Note

In the actual list of students, above, who have completed the music education degree since 2001
you can see that:

       1) 86% of our students are traditional students entering college the fall after their high
              school graduation (Homegrown).
       2) 6% are transfer students who began college elsewhere.
       3) 8% are non-traditional students entering college after several years of being away
              from gaining a formal education.
Diversity of Music Education Students (including gender)

Our male to female ratio for those previously listed is very balanced. Of the 48 graduates, 26
were male (54%) and 22 were female (46%).

Instrumental Music Education students are not deep with ethnic diversity. We are an equal
opportunity institution and all of our music faculty members welcome all students regardless of
background, race, socio-economic status or any other issue of diversity. As an open door
institution we are bound to offer everyone who enters Missouri Western a quality education and
our faculty freely embraces this ideal. It is unfortunate that we don’t represent a higher number
of minority students. Our faculty would welcome racial diversity but minority students simply
don’t choose Missouri Western for Music Education degrees even though they are recruited to
attend our university in that capacity.

While our students are not racially diverse, they are diverse in many other areas. We have
students from urban and rural areas. We have students from all economic backgrounds. We
have traditional, transfer and non-traditional students.

To all of our students, regardless of any extra-musical considerations, we offer a curriculum that
is rich in cultural diversity. Western European, Eastern, Japanese, Korean, African, American,
South American, and Mid-eastern music of all types (jazz, symphonic, gospel, chant, rock, rap,
steel drums, etc.) are presented in our ensembles and musicology (history, theory and
musicianship) courses. We understand that the world of music is without boundaries and we
present curriculum that represents this understanding.

It should be noted that we do have a larger number of racially diverse students involved in our
music ensembles (band, choir, orchestra, jazz and percussion ensembles) who are not music
majors. For instance, nearly 10% of the members of the 2007 Marching Band were minority
students.

Entrance Test Scores

Most music students do pass the C-BASE test on the first attempt. The majority of those who do
not pass the first time do retake the test. Very few do not retake the test and therefore forfeit
their chance at gaining an education degree.

Please refer to Appendix C for these statistics.

Oral Communication verification

At Missouri Western, all students are required to successfully complete Oral Communication
(COM 104 – 3 credit hours) or its transfer equivalent. This course requires all students to
understand and demonstrate the ―principles of speech as applied in meaningful participation in
society.‖ As a result, all teacher education candidates (100%) graduating from Missouri Western
have an understanding of the complexities of effective oral communication and have practiced
improving their skills in oral communication.
Entrance Grade Point Average and Requirements

                               Music (Instrumental) K-12
                   Cumulative GPA—Content and Professional Education
                                    for Spring-Fall 2007
                N=6
               Cumulative GPA for Content Area             3.80
               Cumulative GPA for Professional Education   3.79

                                   Music (Vocal) K-12
                   Cumulative GPA—Content and Professional Education
                                    for Spring-Fall 2007
                N=1
               Cumulative GPA for Content Area             3.86
               Cumulative GPA for Professional Education   3.92

Entrance into the sequence of professional education courses requires a 2.5 GPA. Music
students are not allowed to make below a C in any content course and be permitted to continue in
the sequence. Although this option is not often needed, students have retaken courses to better
low grades in order to stay eligible for the program. Courses can only be taken two times at
Missouri Western.

It is obvious that the students at Missouri Western who seek a degree in music education are
students who take their academic and music performance studies very seriously. Grade point
averages also factor into students’ music service grants and stipends (scholarships) for
performing with the bands, choirs and orchestra. A student who is receiving financial aid from
the music department must also maintain a 2.5 GPA or better and be a full-time student carrying
a minimum of 12 hours in order to retain the financial assistance.

Course List
Music Course List

Here is the list of music courses required for the degree. All classes meet during the days in fall
and spring semesters. Only ensembles meet in the evenings. Specific times, semesters, etc. are
covered in the syllabi (Appendix A) and in the course descriptions.

We are proud that only six of the courses below are instructed by adjunct professors (noted as
―adj.‖) This is evidence that we take the courses we offer our future music educators very
seriously.

Course #       Name                                                  Instructor

MUS 101        Perspectives in Music                                 Various
MUS 109        Functional Voice                                      Benz
MUS 111        Functional Instrument Methods for Vocalist            Hinton
MUS 118       Aural Skills 1                                      Gray
MUS 119       Music Theory 1                                      Various
MUS 145       Marching Band                                       Hinton
MUS 201       Foundations in Vocal Technique 1                    Gray
MUS 206       Keyboard Proficiency                                Edwards
MUS 211       High Brass Methods                                  Molloy (adj.)
MUS 212       Low Brass Methods                                   Harrelson
MUS 218       Aural Skills 2                                      Gray
MUS 219       Music Theory 2                                      Various
MUS 285       Applied Instr. lessons (sample of applied music)    Various (including adj.)
MUS 289       Applied Vocal Music lessons                         Various
MUS 301       Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2                        Gray
MUS 307       Percussion Methods                                  Rogers
MUS 309       Musicianship 3                                      Gilmour
MUS 310       Music History 1                                     McMurray (adj.)
MUS 311       Music History 2                                     McMurray (adj.)
MUS 319       Musicianship 4                                      Gilmour/Fike (adj.)
MUS 320       Elementary Music Methods and Materials
MUS 325       Marching Band Techniques                            Hinton
MUS 326       Instrument Care and Repair                          Adj.
MUS 328       Choral Literature                                   Thomas
MUS 329       Music Theory 4                                      Gilmour
MUS 331       Keyboard Pedagogy                                   Edwards
MUS 334       Pedagogical Practices, Voice
MUS 336       Fundamental Conducting                              Thomas
MUS 338       Concert Chorale                                     Thomas
MUS 344       Jazz Ensemble                                       Long
MUS 353       Woodwind Methods (Single Reeds)                     Long
MUS 354       Woodwind Methods (Dbl Reed/Flute)                   Long
MUS 419       Musicianship 5                                      Various
MUS 429       Musicianship 6                                      Gilmour
MUS 441       Advanced Choral Conducting                          Thomas
MUS 442       Advanced Instrumental Conducting                    Hinton
MUS 467       Middle/High School Vocal Methods                    Thomas
MUS 468       Middle/High School Instrumental Methods             Hinton

Syllabi for the above courses are included in Appendix D of this report.

Brief Vitae/Biographies for the above instructors/professors are included in Appendix E of
this report.
Education Course List
Secondary and K-12 certification candidates complete the Professional Sequence of courses to
ensure integration into the unit conceptual framework of knowledge, skills, dispositions,
professional behaviors, a commitment to diversity, and integration of technology:
Summary of the Professional Sequence of Courses
The Professional Sequence of Courses for Secondary/K-12 Certification Candidates:
Course                                                              Credits
*EDU 202 Introduction to Education                                     3
*EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I                                   1
*EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II                                     3
*EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching                                        4
EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques                                   2
*EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Student           2
EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education & Human Relations               3
EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III                                 9
                                                                Total 27
*Required of All Certification Candidates
Course Descriptions with Links to Syllabi and Faculty Vita
Please note: This is the same listing that was presented in the previous section of course
descriptions (now course listings).
Course Description with Semesters Credits & Semesters                  Course    Faculty Vita
                                                                       Syllabi
EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3) F, Sp. Basic introduction       EDU 202    Dr. Hendrix
to professional education; an on-campus exploratory course to aid
participants in deciding whether or not to become teachers. The       Day Only
course also provides the basic information and attitude
development necessary for successful teaching. Taken the same
semester and time as EDU 203. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108, or
112.
EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1) F, Sp. Laboratory             EDU 203     Dr. Bogle
course taken concurrently with EDU 202. During this off-campus                   (Placement)
experience, the participant serves as a teacher assistant. This       Day Only
exploratory course provides concrete exposure to teaching,
students, and the school. Graded pass/fail. Taken the same semester
and time as EDU 202
EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3) F, Sp. Continuation of          EDU 303     Dr. Bogle
the off-campus experiences in cooperating schools as teacher                     (Placement)
associates. To be taken concurrently with EDU 304 (and 375 for        Day Only
elementary). Prerequisite: EDU 203 and 310, 320, 330, 340, 360,
MAT 351, and MAT 352 and approved admission to the Teacher
Education Program OR Secondary and K-12: EDU 203, and
approved admission to the Teacher Education Program
(NOTE: Also called Junior Experience)
EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4) F, Sp. Psychological              EDU 304      Dr. Bogle
principles as applied to educational settings. To be taken                       Dr. Barmann
concurrently with EDU 303. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and EDU 203.          Day         Dr. Ellis
(Note: One section offered Web-based course each fall)                 and       Dr. Edwards
                                                                      Online
EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2) F, Sp. Techniques           EDU 311     Mr. Flowers
of teaching reading comprehension strategies to middle and high
school students. Prerequisite: ENG 104 and 108, or 11 2 and            Late
admission to the Education Department. Elementary teacher            Afternoon
candidates must have completed EDU 310 and 320.
EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child            EDU 315      Dr. Eicher
(2) F, Sp. This course is a survey of issues related to the                      Mrs. Robbins
identification and teaching of exceptional students. All state and     Late
federally defined categories of disability will be addressed by      Afternoon
definition, etiology, prevalence, school law, civil rights law and      and
curriculum and teaching issues. Topics will include curriculum and    Online
instruction modifications and adaptations as well as behavior
management and discipline. Prerequisites: EDU 202 and 203;
declared minors in Childhood Studies are exempt from EDU 303
and 304 as prerequisites.
(Note: One section offered online each spring and one section
offered during each spring intersession)
EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human                     EDU 404     Dr. Barmann
Relations (3) F, Sp. Philosophical,                                                Dr. Porr
ethical, and legal problems related to secondary education           Day Only
instructional strategies, including classroom and laboratory
experiences; considers interpersonal relations as applied to
teaching. To be taken concurrently with EDU 409. Prerequisite:
EDU 303 and EDU 304.

EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9) F, Sp. Full-time,         EDU 409      Dr. Bogle
off-campus teaching experiences working with students in an area                 (Placement)
secondary school and a mentor teacher. To be taken concurrently      Day Only
with EDU 404. Prerequisite: EDU 303, EDU 304, special methods
course in the major, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the major field of
study and approval from the major department; Must have passed
the Praxis II exam in the area of certification.

Education Department Syllabi found in Appendix F.

Education Department Faculty vitae found in Appendix G.
Description of how certification program is meeting the Standards (Matrices)

TEACHER EDUCATION STANDARDS
1. Knowledge of Subject Matter
     All Music Courses listed in Course List
     EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
     EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
     EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
2. Human Development and Learning
     MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
     MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
     MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2
     MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
     MUS 308 String Methods (1)
     MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
     MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
     MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
     MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
     MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
     MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
     MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
     MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
     EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
     EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
     EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
     EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
     EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
     EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
3. Adapting Instruction
     MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
     MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
     MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2
     MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
     MUS 308 String Methods (1)
     MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
     MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
     MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
     MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
     MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
     MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
     MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
     MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
     EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
     EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)
     EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
     EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
        EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
        EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
        EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
        EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
4.   Planning, Implementing, Eval. Curriculum
        MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
        MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
        MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
        MUS 308 String Methods (1)
        MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
        MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
        MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
        MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
        MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
        MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
        MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
        MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
        EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
        EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
        EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
        EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
        EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
        EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
5.   Multiple Instructional Strategies
        MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
        MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
        MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
        MUS 308 String Methods (1)
        MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
        MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
        MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
        MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
        MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
        MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
        MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
        MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
        EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
        EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
        EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
        EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
        EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
        EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
6.   Classroom Motivation & Management
        MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
        MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
        MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
       MUS 308 String Methods (1)
       MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
       MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
       MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
       MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
       MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
       MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
       MUS 441 Advanced Choral Conducting
       MUS 442 Advanced Instrumental Conducting
       MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
       MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
       EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
       EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
7.   Communication Skills
       MUS 201 Foundations in Vocal Technique 1
       MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
       MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
       MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
       MUS 308 String Methods (1)
       MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
       MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
       MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
       MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
       MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
       MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
       MUS 441 Advanced Choral Conducting
       MUS 442 Advanced Instrumental Conducting
       MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
       MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
       EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
       EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
       EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
       EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
8.   Assessment of Student Learning
       MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
       MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
       MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
       MUS 308 String Methods (1)
       MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
       MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
       MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
       MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
      MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
      MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
      MUS 441 Advanced Choral Conducting
      MUS 442 Advanced Instrumental Conducting
      MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
      MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
      EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
      EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
9. Reflective Practitioner
      MUS 201 Foundations in Vocal Technique 1
      MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
      MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
      MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
      MUS 308 String Methods (1)
      MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
      MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
      MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
      MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
      MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
      MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
      MUS 441 Advanced Choral Conducting
      MUS 442 Advanced Instrumental Conducting
      MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
      MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
      EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)
      EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
      EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
10. Partnerships
      EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
11. Technology in Teaching & Learning
      MUS 211 High Brass Methods (1)
      MUS 212 Low Brass Methods (1)MUS 301 Foundations in Vocal Tech. 2 (2)
      MUS 307 Percussion Methods (2)
      MUS 308 String Methods (1)
      MUS 309 Musicianship 3 (3)
      MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
      MUS 334 Pedagogical Practices, Voice
      MUS 336 Fundamental Conducting (2)
      MUS 353 Woodwind Methods (single reed) (1)
      MUS 354 Woodwind Methods (dbl reed, flute) (1)
      MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
      MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
      EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
12. Foundations of Education, Ethics, Law
      MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
      MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
      EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
      EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
      EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
      EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
DESE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
I. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
A. A baccalaureate degree from a college or university having a teacher education program
approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education;
B. Must have recommendation of designated official for teacher education in the college or
university;
C. Must have a grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale overall and in the major area of study;
D. Must complete the content knowledge or specialty area test designated by the State Board of
Education with a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score. If no content
knowledge or specialty area test is designated for the area of concentration, completion of the
Principles of Learning and Teaching: Grades 9-12 test is required with a score equal to or greater
than the Missouri qualifying score;
E. Completion of professional requirements as determined by the recommending college or
university, which may exceed these minimum requirements; and
F. Individuals who completed their teacher education program outside of the United States shall
provide documentation of completion of course work in the following:
1. English Composition, two (2) courses, each a minimum of two (2) semester hours;
        ENG 104 College Writing and Rhetoric (3) AND
        ENG 108 College Writing and Research (3)
2. U.S. History, three (3) semester hours; and
        HIS 140 American History to 1865 (3) OR
        HIS 150 American History since 1865 (3)
3. U.S. Government, three (3) semester hours.
        GOV 101 American National Government (3)
II PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS
A. Foundations for Teaching (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester hours):
1. The Pupil/Society--A minimum of six (6) semester hours with knowledge acquired
and competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution
in the following content areas:
       a. Adolescent Growth and Development (Physical-Mental-Social);
              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
       b. Adolescent Behavior Management Techniques;
              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
       c. Psychology of Learning (must include adolescent learning);
              EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
       d. Adolescent Interaction with Others; and
              EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
              EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
              EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
       e. *Psychology and/or Education of the Exceptional Child (including the Gifted); and
                EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
2. The School/Society--A minimum of two (2) semester hours with knowledge
acquired and competency developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation
institution in the following content areas, including multi-cultural aspects:
       a. Legal Foundations of Education;
                EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
                EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
       b. Historical Foundations of Education;
                EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
       c. Philosophical Foundations of Education; and
                EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
       d. Sociological Foundations of Education; and
                EDU 202 Introduction to Education (3)
B. Secondary Methods and Techniques (Minimum requirement of eight (8) semester hours):
A minimum of eight (8) semester hours with knowledge acquired and competency
developed to the satisfaction of the teacher preparation institution in the following
content areas:
1. *Basic Reading Techniques for Secondary Teachers;
         EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
2. Instructional Strategies for Secondary Teachers;
         EDU 311 Secondary Reading Techniques (2)
         EDU 315 Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child (2)
         EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
         EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
         EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
         EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
3. *Curriculum, Methods, and Techniques in each subject area specialty;
         MUS 320 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (3)
         MUS 467 Middle/High School Vocal Methods (3)
         MUS 468 Middle/High School Instrumental Methods (3)
4. Measurement and Evaluation; and
         EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
         EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching (4)
         EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
5. Microcomputer Applications in Education; and
         EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and Human Relations (3)
C. Clinical Experiences (Minimum requirement of ten (10) semester hours):
Certification in grades 9-12 should include clinical experience at the secondary level.
A minimum of two (2) semester hours prior to student teaching**
         EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I (1)
         EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
And a minimum of eight (8) semester hours of student teaching in grades 9-12 is required,
         EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III (9)
except that K-9 or K-12 certification must also include K-6 experience in
student teaching.
         EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II (3)
 A fully certificated elementary or middle school teacher with two (2)
 or more years of elementary or middle school teaching may satisfy this requirement
 with the completion of a two (2) or more semester hour practicum at the secondary level.

 III. SUBJECT MATTER REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION AREA
 BEGINNING TEACHER COMPETENCIES
 Music Education degree seekers meet all DESE requirements within the coursework of Missouri Western’s
 degree. Specific courses addressing these competencies and standards are listed in Appendix H.
Description of Field Experiences
Type
In teacher education programs at Missouri Western, teacher candidates have staged, increasingly
challenging field and clinical placements with distinct entrance and exit criteria. These
experience are staged across the four phases and include observations, limited teaching and full
teaching opportunities. In each instance, the field or clinical experience is also linked to on-
campus coursework that supports, reinforces and extends the learning in both settings. That
linkage includes:
           On-Campus Course                          In-School Field or Clinical Experience
EDU 202 Introduction to Education                  EDU 203 Participation in Teaching I
EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching                     EDU 303 Experience in Teaching II
EDU 403 Seminar in Elementary Education            EDU 408 Elementary Student Teaching III
and Human Relations
EDU 404 Seminar in Secondary Education and         EDU 409 Secondary Student Teaching III
Human Relations

Observation

At the Phase I – Awareness (EDU 203 – Participation in Teaching I) level, candidates are placed
in title I schools with specific observation/participation guidelines for their experience. They are
expected to complete at least 30 observation hours over an eight week period.

Practicum

There are no formal practicum experiences in secondary programs.

Student Teaching

The culminating clinical experience for all program candidates is the student teaching clinical
experience. Candidates must meet all program requirements of GPA, content and pedagogical
coursework and passage of the PRAXIS II exam in their content area to apply for student
teaching. Candidates are regularly observed by, both the school clinical faculty (cooperating
teacher) and the university supervisor. Candidates receive written feedback from each
observation and have a mid-term and final evaluation completed jointly by the cooperating
teacher and university supervisor. The following table identifies the phase, course, number of
hours/weeks required and the total number of hours required for each field or clinical placement.


                      Table Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program

Phase                         Course        Number of          Number of         Total Number of
                                            hours per          weeks per              hours
                                              week              semester
I - Awareness                EDU 203-          4                   8                32 (30 hours
                           Participation                                             minimum)
                           in Teaching I
III - Investigation          EDU 303-            5                  12                   60
                           Experience in
                            Teaching II
IV – Finding Voice         EDU 408/409          40                  12                  480
                           Experience in
                            Teaching III

All Phase I EDU 203 – Participation in Teaching I candidates and all Phase III EDU 303
Experience in Teaching II candidates are placed in the St. Joseph School District in primarily
Title I schools. Candidates meeting eligibility requirements for Phase IV EDU 408/409
Experience in Teaching III apply for the experience and identify a choice of school districts for
placement. Actual placement arrangements are administered by the MWSU Coordinator of
Clinical Placement to assure that all program and district requirements are met. There are no
internships within the program.

At the completion of the student teaching semester/experience, candidates are asked to evaluate
the overall teacher education program and the quality of the supervision provided by the
university supervisor.

Impact on K-12 student achievement
The Phase III (EDU 303) field experience requires all candidates to develop, teach and reflect
upon a unit of instruction. This unit is reviewed and approved prior to instruction by the EDU
304 Psychology in Teaching faculty, the school-based clinical faculty (cooperating teacher) and
the university supervisor. As the unit is implemented, candidates receive ongoing feedback from
the school and university supervisors through observation records and regular feedback. All
teaching units must have an assessment component that aligns with the learning goals of the
classroom and is developmentally and instructionally appropriate. The assessment instrument
within the unit must document student learning. Data from the Phase III units includes candidate
performance in teaching and student work samples documenting student learning. Further, this
component is required of all candidates for inclusion in their EDU 403/404 seminar portfolios.
Portfolio data (Table below) reveal that Western teacher candidates are consistently focused on
student learning and able to improve those learning outcomes. This culminates in the candidate
portfolio synthesis paper in which the overall learning from the P-12 student assessments is
summarized and analyzed by the candidates.


                 Table Candidate Impact on Student Learning Sp/Fall 2007
                         Portfolio Synthesis Paper Results N=110
                  Advanced        Proficient       Basic      Below Basic               Total
Synthesis          11 10%         64 59%         31 28%          4 3%                    110
Paper                                                                                   100%

Reference Unit’s handbook and other documents received by candidates
Students majoring in music receive the Music Department Handbook during a department-wide
meeting for music majors held during the first week of each fall semester. Included in this
handbook are guidelines, sample schedules, performance expectations, grade point requirements
and much more. You may view this handbook in Appendix B.

Unit support in the form of handbooks and other documentation is provided by the Teacher
Education Handbook (with embedded guidance and support for student teachers) and web
support for Cooperating Teachers (school-based) and University Supervisors. In addition, field
and clinical placement applications, explanations, scoring guides and other documentation are
available from the Director of Placement’s web site.


Diverse Classrooms
Description of how candidates are being prepared to perform successfully in diverse
classrooms
The unit’s commitment to diversity is embedded in the conceptual framework, coursework and
key assessments and field and clinical experiences. Our candidates understand that the
conceptual framework description of ―taking responsibility for student learning‖ is the core
principle guiding their program experience. Candidates are required to examine the geographic
and cultural environment of the region to better understand the needs and strengths of the area.
Further candidates are asked to examine the world cultural and historical influences on the
development of the content for their discipline. All candidates are required to take coursework to
support a positive learning environment for students with disabilities (EDU 315). All methods
courses address the respect for gender and cultural differences in learning situations. Candidates
receive regular feedback on their performance related to supporting the diverse learning needs of
today’s students and classrooms. Finally all candidates study the work of Ruby Payne, A
Framework for Understanding Poverty, in understanding the impact of poverty on students
and their families. (picture link)

Diversity proficiencies in the MWSU teacher education unit come from our commitment to
diversity and are organized to align with the developmental phases of the conceptual framework
as follows:
                             Table Unit Diversity Proficiencies
                                Unit Diversity Proficiencies
          Proficiency One               Gain awareness of six ―isms‖ (racism, sexism, socio-
       (Phase I) “Awareness”            economic ―classism,‖ ―ableism,‖ ethnocentrism, and
                                        heterosexism) as well as issues pertaining to education
                                        regarding race, class, ability, gender, sexual
                                        orientation, ethnicity, and religions
          Proficiency Two               Develop theoretical knowledge of human
 (Phase II) “Developing Theoretical     relationships, prejudice, cultural bias, and strategies
             Knowledge”                 to promote pluralism and diversity
         Proficiency Three              Adapt instruction to accommodate the needs of all
     (Phase III) “Investigation”        students
          Proficiency Four              Demonstrate sensitivity to issues pertaining to
    (Phase IV) “Finding Voice”          cultures and diversity

In Phase I (EDU 202/203), the candidate demonstrates awareness of six ―isms‖ (racism, sexism,
socio-economic ―classism,‖ ― ableism,‖ ethnocentrism, and heterosexism) as well as issues
pertaining to education regarding race, class, ability, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and
religions. All education candidates must take EDU 202/203 or its transfer equivalent. In Phase II
(the methods classes), the candidate develops theoretical knowledge of human relationships, is
able to recognize situations of prejudice and cultural bias, and develops strategies to promote
pluralism and diversity. All elementary education candidates are required to take Multicultural
Education (EDU 308). This course is also open to, but not required of, secondary candidates
since they must take courses within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences focus areas
(writing, computer literacy, ethics and international/intercultural). The International/Intercultural
courses present a significant recognition, awareness, and understanding of cultural and
international diversity. In addition, all unit candidates are required to take EDU 315 (Psychology
and Education of the Exceptional Child). Further, in EDU 340, Social Studies Methods, required
of all elementary candidates, the signature assignment is an Oral History Project in which
candidates must conduct an oral history interview about a historically significant topic with
someone who is of a different culture. Candidates frequently write in their reports that they
enjoyed the assignment and the opportunity to discover and recognize different cultures. In Phase
III (EDU 303/304) and Phase IV (EDU 403/408 and 404/409), all candidates adapt instruction to
accommodate the needs of all students, and the candidates must demonstrate sensitivity to issues
pertaining to cultures and diversity. Perhaps most importantly, unit candidates are challenged to
explore the history of the content they are teaching to identify cultures and individuals who
discovered new information such as in the arts, literature and humanities. They are challenged to
show how individuals and cultures contribute to the knowledge base being studied.

At Missouri Western, teacher candidates gain awareness of the importance of diversity in
teaching and learning and the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to adapt instruction and/or
services for diverse populations in all of the phases. Unit candidates develop proficiencies related
to diversity in several courses and experiences including EDU 315, EDU 303 EDU 304, EDU
403/404 and EDU 408/409. Course assessments require candidates to recognize and support
learning experiences that honor the uniqueness of all students. Further, all teacher candidates
read, discuss and apply concepts from the required Ruby Payne text (introduced in EDU
202/203, discussed in EDU 303/304 and practiced in EDU 403/404), A Framework for
Understanding Poverty.

Classroom Diversity Statement from Frank Thomas, Director of Choral Activities
“Choosing diverse choral literature in my programming both at the university and in the
community choral ensembles has long been a tradition. Literature from several countries and
ethnic backgrounds is part of most programs unless the focus is a specific era or composer, i.e.
Mostly Mozart, Basically Bach. Every year, I attend several choral reading sessions and receive
numerous new issues from various publishing companies and I seek to use the very best in choral
literature and the newest editions, composers and publications which makes programming
interesting, relevant and comprehensive.
In MUS 328, Choral Literature, students will be able to select quality literature with these
considerations: Sociological and cultural appeal, location, socioeconomic level, race, religion,
musical background, and education level, become a creative planner familiar with principles of
programming that takes into account the varying types of schools, cities, regions or
neighborhoods where one might teach.
MUS 467, Middle & High School Choral Methods.
Students plan and teach lessons designed to meet the various levels of maturation and
achievement (young adolescent through advanced high school groups). They are also expected
to identify and recognize characteristics and ranges of the voice in its various maturation levels
as well as characteristics of multicultural music.”
 Description of Certification Program Assessment
 Performance Benchmarks – used to promote and advise candidates throughout the
 program
 The table below communicates the unit’s assessment checkpoints for movement among the four
 phases of the program. The connected Phase I courses (EDU 202 and 203) are the first courses in
 the Professional Sequence of courses that lead to certification but are also survey courses that do
 not require students to be formally admitted to the teacher education program. Formal admission
 comes at the end of Phase I, after successful completion of EDU 202 and 203, and after having
 met the additional requirements of writing courses ENG 204 and 208, a gpa of 2.5 or greater, a
 successful background check, and either a passing score of 235 on the C-Base with an ACT of 22
 or less than a 22 ACT and C-Base scores of 265 or above. Entrance to Phase III field experiences
 and Phase IV clinical practice are checkpoints at which background checks must be updated and
 the gpa must be 2.5 or greater. Additionally, admittance into Phase IV clinical practice must be
 approved by the chairperson of the candidate’s secondary or K-12 department and accompany a
 passed Praxis II exam in the area of certification. Completion of Phase IV initiates the process
 for recommendation for certification.


              Table Unit Assessment System: Transition Points for the Assessments
Initial Teacher     Admission     Entry to    Exit from Program
Education                         clinical     clinical completion After program completion
Programs                          practice     practice
All programs         End of      Beginning    End of   End of End of Phase IV—final
                     Phase I    of Phase III Phase IV Phase IV evaluation of entire program,
                                                               graduate and employer surveys


 Entrance assessment(s)
 Formal admission comes at the end of Phase I, after successful completion of EDU 202 and 203,
 and after having met the additional requirements of writing courses ENG 204 and 208, a gpa of
 2.5 or greater, a successful background check, and either a passing score of 235 on the C-Base
 with an ACT of 22 or less than a 22 ACT and C-Base scores of 265 or above.


 Content assessment(s)
 Students wishing to declare a major in Instrumental or Vocal Music Education must perform an
 audition to gain access to the performance groups. Performance in these groups is a required
 element of the degree. The three large ensembles requiring an audition are Band (MUS145 or
 MUS347), Concert Chorale (MUS338) and Orchestra (MUS346).

 Once students are accepted to be a member of one or more of these groups, they can enroll in
 first semester music courses with the intent of becoming a music education major after
 satisfactorily completing the following three fundamental courses. Those fundamental courses
 are Music Theory I (MUS119), Aural Skills I (MUS118) and Basic Keyboard Skills (MUS106).
At the completion of these courses, the student may declare a pre-major in music education and
begin the sequence of courses outlined in our Music Student Handbook. At the completion of
passing the C-Base test, those meeting the GPA requirement of 2.5 or better may enter the
education professional sequence as recognized music education majors.

Pedagogy assessment(s) – Standard 1.2 or 1.3 or 1.4 or 1.5
Individual courses in Phase II – Developing Theoretical Knowledge, Phase III – Investigation
and Phase IV – Finding Voice (See program reports) contain key assessments such as lesson
plans, unit plans, lesson demonstrations and portfolios to develop and document candidate
pedagogical content knowledge. For example, candidate portfolios compiled in EDU 403/404
reveal that unit candidates are well prepared to provide instruction that is clear and meaningful to
students. Candidates can utilize instructional technology appropriately and effectively to engage
student interest and facilitate learning. Finally, candidates demonstrate their pedagogical content
knowledge through actual teaching. The Phase IV clinical experience (student teaching)
evaluation form and the certification/professional portfolio through MWSU/MOSTEP/INTASC
standards 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 document candidate pedagogical content knowledge. The table
below presents the assessment results for pedagogical content knowledge of candidates for
spring and fall semesters 2007.

Table Candidates Pedagogical Content Knowledge – Spring/Fall 2007 Standards 2-8 N=110
     MWSU Standard 1         Advanced      Proficient     Basic        Below Basic         Total
                               [A]            [P]          [B]             [L]
2 Human Development          29    26%    79    72%       2    2%       0    0%        110
and Learning                                                                           100%
3 Adapting Instruction for   32           74    67%       4    4%       0    0%        110
Individual Needs             29%                                                       100%
4 Planning, Implementing     30           73    66%       7    6%       0    0%        110
and Evaluating the           28%                                                       100%
Curriculum
5 Multiple Instructional     29           76    69%       5    4%       0    0%        110
Strategies                   27%                                                       100%
6 Classroom Motivation       31           66    60%       12            1    1%        110
and Management               28%                        11%                            100%
Strategies
7 Communication Skills   33               72    66%       5    4%       0    0%        110
                         30%                                                           100%
8 Assessment of Learning 20               84    77%       5    4%       1    1%        110
                         18%                                                           100%
Summary Results             27%             68%               5%            <1%          100%


Field Placement Assessment(s)
Clinical experience evaluations are based upon the NCATE/MoSTEP/MWSU unit standards.
Work samples of P-12 student learning are kept to document the teacher candidates’ abilities to
work with a diverse group of candidates as seen in candidate portfolios. Prior to the student
teaching semester formal assessments occur during and at the end of each clinical experience.
Both mid-term and final evaluations are completed together by the cooperating teacher and
university supervisor, supported by numerous observations and conferences with candidates and
cooperating teachers. A candidate must pass those experiences at the target level of
―Proficient‖. A measure of a prospective teacher's general ability to demonstrate the knowledge
and skills associated with teaching is the ability to receive a grade of "C" or better in the major
education methods classes. An elementary candidate must successfully complete the methods
courses prior to admittance to Phase III. Secondary candidates have some flexibility in the
sequence coursework but generally must either complete any methods course either prior to or
concurrently with their field experience.

Attached to the MWSU lesson plan format that Phase III and Phase IV candidates are required
to use is a daily reflection page. Candidates write their daily reflections and share them with
their university supervisors. In addition, Phase III candidates must be concurrently enrolled in
EDU 304 Psychology in Teaching where regular discussion reflecting upon teaching experiences
occurs. All Phase III candidates are also required to design, implement, and evaluate a week-
long unit. After teaching the unit, candidates must complete a unit reflection. (Example Unit)




Graduate surveys – as they reflect MoSTEP
Surveys were sent to both graduates (387 surveys sent September 2007) and 124 employers
(December 2007) with a second survey request to employers (124 - January 2008). Graduate and
employer surveys indicate that unit candidates are able to provide pedagogically and
developmentally appropriate instruction to students. The unit identifies pedagogical content
knowledge as the knowledge represented in MWSU standards 2-8. Both the graduate and
employer surveys specifically address MWSU/INTASC/MoSTEP standards of human
development and learning (2), adapting instruction for individuals needs (3), planning,
implementing and evaluating the curriculum (4), multiple instructional strategies (5), classroom
motivation and management strategies (6), communication skills (7), and assessment of learning
(8). The 2007 graduate survey results for standards 2-8 are provided in the table that follows.
          Table Graduate Survey Results 2007 – Candidate Pedagogical Knowledge
                               – Unit Standards 2-8 N=72
INTASC/MoSTEP/         4-Well    3 – Little or 2 – Played 1 –        No       Total
MWSU Standards 2-8 Prepared no problems catch-up           Weak      Response
2 Human
Development and        26 – 36% 44 – 61%       0 – 0%      1 – 1% 1 – 1%      72 – 100%
Learning
3 Adapting Instruction
for Individual Needs   26 – 36% 38 – 52%       5 – 6%      1 – 1% 2 – 25      72 – 100%
4 Planning,
Implementing and       26 – 36% 41 – 56%       4 – 5%      0 – 0% 1 – 1%      72 – 100%
Evaluating the
Curriculum
5 Multiple
Instructional          31 – 43% 36 – 50%       2 – 2%      1 – 1% 2 – 2%      72 – 100%
Strategies
6 Classroom
Motivation and         24 – 33% 39 – 54%       7 – 9%      1 – 1% 1 - 1%      72 – 100%
Management
Strategies
7 Communication        33 – 45% 37 – 51%       1 -1%       0 – 0% 1 – 1%      72 – 100%
Skills
8 Assessment of
Learning               21 – 29% 47 – 65%       3 – 4%      0 – 0% 1 – 1%      72 – 100%
Summary Results        38%       56%           4%           .6%      1.4%     100%

Over 94 % of unit graduates rate their preparation in the areas of pedagogical content knowledge
as ―well-prepared‖ or ―having little or no problems.‖
Graduate survey results also indicate that graduates are consistently able to plan, implement
and evaluate instruction for students, work in partnership with families and other professionals
and meet professional standards for teachers. The following table provides data on unit standards
9-12.
                 Table Graduate Survey Results from Standards 9-12 N=72
Standard/Professional        Well        Little or     Played      Weak         No           Total
Behavior                   prepared         no        Catch-up               response
                                        problems
9 Reflective
Practitioner              30    42% 40 56%             0 0% 1 1% 1                 1%       72 100%
10 Partnerships           26    36%      43 60%        1 1% 1 1% 1                 1%       72 100%
11 Technology in
Teaching                  27    38%      33 46%       9 13% 2 3% 1                 1%       72 100%
12 Foundations of
Education, Ethics and 16        22%      48 67%       5    7% 2 3% 1               1%       72 100%
Law
Aggregated Percents          35%           57%           5%         2%          1%       100 100%
G. Employer surveys – as they reflect MoSTEP
Employers also rated unit candidates as primarily ―Advanced‖ or ―Proficient‖ as evidenced in
the 2007 employer survey results for INTASC/MoSTEP/MWSU Standards 2-8. As the unit
reviews the results, it is clear that candidates tend to rate themselves higher than employers yet
employers consistently rate our candidates as able to meet classroom needs.

          Table Employer Survey Results 2007 – Candidate Pedagogical Knowledge
                               – Unit Standards 2-8 N=37
INTASC/MoSTEP/        4           3            2 Basic       1     No       Total
MWSU Standards 2- Advanced Proficient                     Below Response
8                                                          Basic
2 Human
Development and       8 – 22%     26 – 70%     3 – 8%     0 – 0% 0 – 0%     37 100%
Learning
3 Adapting
Instruction for       11 – 30%    20 – 54%     6 – 16%    0 – 0% 0 – 0%     37 100%
Individual Needs
4 Planning,
Implementing and
Evaluating the        7 – 19%     26 – 70%     4 – 11%    0 - 0% 0 - 0%     37 100%
Curriculum
5 Multiple
Instructional         11 – 30%    20 – 54%     6 – 16%    0 – 0% 0 – 0%     37 100%
Strategies
6 Classroom
Motivation and        10 - 27% 20 – 54%        7 – 19%    0 – 0% 0 – 0%     37 100%
Management
Strategies
7 Communication
Skills                 5 – 14%    30 – 81%     2 – 5%     0 – 0% 0 – 0%     37 100%
8 Assessment of
Learning              5 – 14%     27 – 73%     4 – 11%    0 – 0 % 1 – 2%    37 100%
Summary Results        22%        65%          11%          0%     2%       100%

   Employer survey results identify unit graduates as Advanced – 22%, Proficient – 65% for
   87% total in those categories. Employers rated 11% of unit graduates as Basic. No
   employers rated unit graduates as Below Basic.
   Employer survey results indicate that graduates are advanced or proficient in meeting
   pedagogical and professional expectations. The table below provides employer survey results
   related to unit standards 9-12.
               Table Employer Survey Data Related to Candidate Professional
                           and Pedagogical Expectations N=37

Standard/Professional       Advanced   Proficient       Basic   Below      No       Total
Behavior                                                        Basic   response
9 Reflective Practitioner   9   24%    23   62%     4     11%   1 3%     0 0%      37 100%
10 Partnerships             8   22%    26   70%     3      8%   0 0%     0 0%      37 100%
11 Technology in            6   16%    30   81%     1      3%   0 0%     0 0%      37 100%
Teaching
12 Foundations of
Education, Ethics and       7   19%    29 78%       0      0%   1 3%    0   0%     37 100%
Law


Assessment Data
Cumulative GPA – Content and Professional Education
                               Music (Instrumental) K-12
                   Cumulative GPA—Content and Professional Education
                                   for Spring-Fall 2007
              N=6
           Cumulative GPA for Content Area                 3.80
           Cumulative GPA for Professional Education       3.79

                                   Music (Vocal) K-12
                   Cumulative GPA—Content and Professional Education
                                   for Spring-Fall 2007
              N=1
           Cumulative GPA for Content Area                 3.86
           Cumulative GPA for Professional Education       3.92



College Base - Instrumental – Also Found in Appendix I
C-BASE Summary Report For:
     Music K-12: Instrumental
                 Summary of Data Findings

  Teacher candidates in Instrumental Music K-12 continue to
 retake the C-BASE if they do not pass it on the first try.
  The success rate of passage on the C-BASE nearly doubles
 when re-takes are counted over the six-year report period.
  Recent years show all the teacher candidates passing on the
 first try.
C-BASE Summary Report For:
 Music K-12: Vocal

              Summary of Data Findings
  The majority of teacher candidates in Vocal Music K-12 do
 not retake the C-BASE if they do not pass it on the first try.
  The success rate of passage on the C-BASE increases to
 two-thirds when re-takes are taken.
  The subtests of social science and writing show consistently
 higher percentage of passage than the other three subtests.
Praxis Summary Report For:
 Music (Instrumental/Vocal) K-12
             Summary of Data Findings

  • While there is a 100% pass rate for program completers on
      the Praxis II, an analysis of the subtests show areas of
      strength and areas for improvement:
  • In only one year, did any subtest fall below the 50 th
      percentile in scores.
  • In 2002, the two subtests were subtest 4, music learning K-
      12, and subtest 5, professional practices.
  • The year, 2002, had less than 10 test takers, making
      statistical analysis of scores inappropriate for
      generalization.

          Plans for Program Improvements


  The music department is adjusting curriculum to
  include more world music experiences. This is more
  prevalent in larger schools with advanced degree
  offerings.
Pedagogy assessment(s) – Standard 1.2 or 1.3 or 1.4 or 1.5
Individual courses in Phase II – Developing Theoretical Knowledge, Phase III – Investigation
and Phase IV – Finding Voice (See program reports) contain key assessments such as lesson
plans, unit plans, lesson demonstrations and portfolios to develop and document candidate
pedagogical content knowledge. For example, candidate portfolios compiled in EDU 403/404
reveal that unit candidates are well prepared to provide instruction that is clear and meaningful to
students. Candidates can utilize instructional technology appropriately and effectively to engage
student interest and facilitate learning. Finally, candidates demonstrate their pedagogical content
knowledge through actual teaching. The Phase IV clinical experience (student teaching)
evaluation form and the certification/professional portfolio through MWSU/MOSTEP/INTASC
standards 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 document candidate pedagogical content knowledge. The table
below presents the assessment results for pedagogical content knowledge of candidates for
spring and fall semesters 2007.
Table Candidates Pedagogical Content Knowledge – Spring/Fall 2007 Standards 2-8 N=110
     MWSU Standard 1         Advanced      Proficient     Basic       Below Basic           Total
                               [A]            [P]          [B]            [L]
2 Human Development          29   26%     79    72%       2    2%       0     0%      110     100%
and Learning
3 Adapting Instruction for   32   29%     74    67%       4    4%       0    0%       110     100%
Individual Needs
4 Planning, Implementing     30   28%     73    66%       7    6%       0    0%       110     100%
and Evaluating the
Curriculum
5 Multiple Instructional     29   27%     76    69%       5    4%       0    0%       110     100%
Strategies
6 Classroom Motivation       31   28%     66    60%     12     11%      1    1%       110     100%
and Management
Strategies
7 Communication Skills       33  30%      72  66%         5     4%      0     0%      110 100%
8 Assessment of Learning     20  18%      84  77%         5     4%      1     1%      110 100%
Summary Results                27%          68%               5%            <1%         100%

Results from Surveys – Graduate and Employer
Please See Page 60


Impact on K-12 student learning
Please see Page 54
Technology
How and where Missouri Western candidates are taught to integrate technology into their
classrooms and teaching

Music Technology

In MUS 328, Choral Literature, assignments require the use of word processing and Power Point.
Students prepare a series of reports using Power Point and audio equipment to present those
reports.

In teaching voice, those students who do not have keyboard skills use the Smart Music program
as accompaniment to prepare solo repertoire for their private lessons.

Music students in the conducting classes are required to video record their class and rehearsal
projects to show proof of their progress and for final evaluation.

Marching Band Technique students are required to master fundamental skills of computer
assisted drill writing using Pyware.

Instrumental Methods students are exposed to current programs used to organize school music
programs in areas of inventory, grading, uniform checkout, fund raising, scheduling and much
more.

Jazz improvisation students use Band in A Box, Aebersold compact discs, Smart Music and
Finale composers notation program as accompaniment and notation devices for original music
and existing music.

All music students are required to complete the music theory course sequence which has a
technology component attached to each of the four levels of the course.

Technology statement from Bob Long, Director of Jazz and Woodwind Studies:

    We have introduced Smart Music technology into the Woodwinds methods courses. The
    implementation of this software is twofold. First it helps to track testing of the students in
    the class as they can perform playing tests at a computer station and e-mail the assessment
    to the instructor. Secondly, it gives the student a better understanding of how this
    technology can be integrated into their own classroom when they start teaching.

    We have also started using Smart Music with the jazz curriculum. Smart Music software
    allows the student the opportunity to work on their improvisatory skills at their pace. The
    student has an extensive library of literature to choose from, while the software allows the
    student to adjust the music for tempo and key as well as loop sections that need more
    attention. Also for jazz we are starting to discuss freeware and shareware that can also
    help facilitate their ear training and improvisational skills.
 Education Technology

 The teacher education program at Missouri Western requires the use of technology as an
 instructional tool to promote K-12 student learning. Various courses in a candidate’s program
 introduce and reinforce technology skills for use in the classroom. To ensure that candidates
 use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences, each candidate is evaluated at
 mid-term and on the final evaluation on their use of technology. This is specifically measured by
 Standard 11 on the evaluation instruments for Phase III and Phase IV. Assessment data in the
 table below reveals that unit candidates are effective at using instructional technology. In
 technology for teaching and learning, the top two areas show eighty-four (84%) of unit
 candidates perform at the top two performance levels with two percent (2%) at the below basic
 level.
                Table Candidate Knowledge in Technology (Sp/Fall 2007) N=110
                                       Advanced Proficient        Basic         Below Basic    Total
                                         [A]       [P]             [B]              [L]
    Standard#11 Technology in Teaching    44       63               3                0           110
              and Learning              (40%)    (57%)            (2%)             (0%)        (100%)


     At each phase candidates continue to develop their instructional technology skills and are
     required to demonstrate that knowledge and skill prior to student teaching. Key assessments
     include lesson plans, unit plans and the certification portfolio artifact of a web-based lesson.
     The following table documents candidate performance from their certification portfolios
     from Phase IV of Fall 2007at 95% advanced or proficient in technology.
            Table Candidate Performance in Technology Spring-Fall 2007
                              Portfolio Evaluation N=110
  MWSU Teacher Education Standard    Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic                        Total
                                                 [A]        [P]           [B]            [L]      110
Standard 11 Technology in Teaching and
Learning                                     8    7%    97 88%        3 3%           2    2%    110 100%

 Description of how university faculty use technology
 Music faculty members use many resources in technology.

 All music faculty members are adept at using the campus communication system of Goldlink and
 have access the many functions of Missouri Westerns Banner system and web site.

 The music department has its own web site with links to area music organizations, satellite
 organizations such as the Golden Griffon Guard and Flags Line, the Mystics Dance Team and
 Phi Mu Alpha fraternity.

 Music theory and composition instructors use the Finale music notation program.

 Marching Band drill is written using Pyware and Drill Quest drill design programs.
Smart Music accompaniment system is utilized in 7 of the applied music studios and is also used
by our jazz instructor.

All music classrooms are equipped with CD, DVD, video tape and other music and video
playback equipment. Instructors utilize this equipment daily.

All music classrooms are equipped with Macintosh computers which are also linked to the video
systems so that web navigation and file presentations are easily realized.

Our piano lab is linked from individual keyboards to the master keyboard for ease in monitoring
students’ performances during class piano.

Some music faculty have developed extensive web sites and music recording links. We suggest
Matt Edwards’ site as an example at: www.thomasmatthewedwards.com and Lee Harrelson’s
Fountain City Brass Band site at: www.fcbb.net .

Education Faculty use of Technology
Many of the faculty have developed extensive web pages that support their teaching. Within
these web pages are discussion and lecture notes, power point presentations, as well as links to
outside resources important to the specific discipline. Examples include web sites for the
following: Dr. Bogle, Dr. Porr, Dr. Edwards. During the fall semester of 2007 five courses
utilized WebCT as the primary source of instruction. In these courses the syllabi, assignments,
assessments, grade reporting, and student communications were done via WebCT. During the
Spring semester of 2007 two internet courses were offered. All unit faculty are encouraged to
develop enhanced use of technology in their instruction. The university offers (through the
Instructional Media Center) an Online Pedagogy professional development program. Offered
twice per year, this five sessions/30 hour training supports faculty development of online
teaching. This course offers training in BlackBoard/WebCT and other software applications to
assist in the conversion of traditional courses into an online format or to develop new online
courses. Faculty are guided throughout the process to implement innovative methodologies
using group interaction, modeling, demonstrations, peer interaction and feedback as well as one-
on-one instruction. This has become the primary means of communicating with candidates.
Courses such as the Instructional Media and Technology course (EDU 331) and the elementary
and secondary seminar courses (EDU 403/404) have a WebQuest component. Classrooms are
SMART rooms with state-of-the-art technology capabilities enabling faculty to incorporate
technology into instruction. Finally, all unit faculty have and regularly use their university e-mail
account.
Education faculty narrative
While technology is infused in a variety of program courses, key assessments for the use of
technology are found in EDU 331 Instructional Media and Technology (required course for all
elementary education majors and open to all candidates), the individual methods courses within
the programs (Phase II), within the required field experiences in Phase III (EDU 303) and Phase
IV (EDU 403/404 and EDU 408/409). In addition to the computer literacy requirement in the
LAS general education program, a significant portion of the Seminar in Human Relations and
Secondary Teaching (EDU 404), required of all secondary candidates, is devoted to technology
with critical learning pieces consistent with those required at the elementary level (EDU 331).
Faculty
Collaboration and FORMAL communication between/among content and Professional
Education faculty
The teacher education unit at Missouri Western is led by the Chair of the Teacher Education
Department, Dr. Richard Porr. The unit works collaboratively to design, deliver and effectively
manage all programs. The unit promotes or advertises its program through university
publications (catalog, course schedules, program brochures) and marketing efforts (newspaper
ads and articles, billboards, web pages and mailings. The description, mission, and history of the
Education Leadership Team is available on the official ELT web site.
Education Faculty –
       Vitae for program faculty (full-, part-time, adjunct)
       Vitae and course information for Education faculty who teach Professional Sequence
       courses are available here.

       Demographic characteristics of faculty
          Dr. Richard Porr, raised in a black neighborhood, completed his dissertation focus on
           multiculturalism, specifically African-American experiences and experiences of
           desegregation in St. Joseph.
          Dr. Nancy Edwards taught in Detroit, MI during the riots and the burning of schools,
           and her heritage is Algonquin Susquehanna Native American.
          Mrs. Kit Blake served as a reading specialist for nine years at the elementary level in
           Saint Joseph, all in Title I schools.
          Dr. Debby Bogle served on a committee in Lawrence, KS –studying homelessness. In
           addition, her three children and ex-husband are Cherokees and members of the
           Cherokee Nation.
          Ms. Lisa Robbins is the co-president of the birth to three special education mandate
           for Missouri and has ten years of experience working with diverse student
           populations. In addition, she has published books about autism and (dis)ability, with
           one translated into several languages.
          Mr. Mike Flowers, former elementary principal and teacher, taught in many low-
           income schools where over 80% of the students were on free and reduced lunch
           programs, and many came from single-parent families. He became highly interested
           in Guided Reading and attended the Pacific Leaning training in Chicago working with
           Latino students. During his tenure with the St. Joseph School District, he worked
           with the E.S.L. teachers due to the number of Hispanic, Vietnamese and Cambodian
           students in his school. He opened his home to a student teacher from Japan and has
           housed visiting students from other foreign counties in ambassador programs. He is
                                                                                          th
           currently working with a small group of African American students in grades 7 &
     th
    8 with a ―Learning for Life‖ program based of role models, self-esteem, and
    character education.
   Dr. Susan Claflin taught for four years in Korea and five years in Japan, and she is the
    parent of a daughter who is Vietnamese by birth. She also co-founded a recruiting
    initiative to increase the numbers of ethnically diverse educators in the field of special
    education and early childhood education. She coordinated (four years) an online
    mentoring program in Topeka Middle Schools where 75% of the students
    participating were from minority backgrounds. In addition, she provided support to
    the campus child care center on diversity issues related to exceptionalities and
    culture. She has presented at the National Organization for Minority Educators
    (NAME) on the issue of recruiting minorities into the field of education: barriers and
    opportunities -- Project PRIME. She has been a member of Council for Exceptional
    Children for 25 years and a member of NAME for two years. Her research interest
    proposal is approved by OSEP and is A Survey of the Cultural Practices in Early
    Childhood Centers.
   Similarly, Dr. Michael Smith is involved with the banned book event Link each fall at
    MWSU, and the books tie in issues of diversity. Students are encouraged to take part
    and to attend this yearly event, and on average, there are at least 15 students present.
   Dr. Doug Eicher has worked in rural and urban schools for 25 years with diverse
    student populations and was the director of the special education program for the
    Lawrence, Kansas public schools. He also directed E.S.O.L. programs in Grand
    Island, Nebraska and Lawrence, Kansas. Currently, Doug is a faculty mentor for the
    freshmen dorm—which has a significant African American population.
   Likewise, Dr. Elizabeth Hendrix serves as a faculty mentor for two R.A.s in the
    freshmen dorm, and her mother was Cherokee as well. She is the offspring of biracial
    parents. In addition, she led a discussion and debate forum about “Ruby Payne,
    Poverty, and Education” with the English department at MWSU (fall 2007).
    Western unit candidates, students, faculty, and community were invited to attend.
    Teachers, as far away as Kansas City, came and earned professional development
    credit. As a teacher in inner-city schools, she has also served on the A.C.C.R. state
    board in Alabama and as the Central Region Coordinator of the Constitutional
    Reform Education Campaign. She gave speeches throughout the state on Alabama’s
    constitution—emphasizing the inequities that teachers, students, and the poor face in
    particular as well as the racist intent, language, and heritage of the document. In
    addition, Elizabeth served as the state public policy chair for the A.A.U.W. of
    Alabama and is still co-directing a grant from the national A.A.U.W. office to educate
    Alabama women about running for office and to encourage more Alabama women to
    run for elected office. She has presented her research at conferences such as The
    Patterson Research Conference. Now, she is working on a report,‖ The Economic
    Status of Women in Alabama‖, for the Alabama Women’s Initiative (AWL). As a
    graduate student, Elizabeth started a University of Alabama group (AL ARISE)
    which worked to educate the poorest citizens in Alabama about policies that continue
    to oppress them and to get better policies for the impoverished in the state through
    grassroots efforts. Last summer, she taught at the Alabama Math and Science Camp
    to serve the needs of underprivileged students in Greene County, Alabama.
           Demographically, Greene County has a majority of African Americans, and a
           majority of the students in her class were African American.


Documentation of program faculty’s involvement in the public schools and in the larger
“professional community”
Music faculty at Missouri Western are very active in the regions schools. All faculty are
requested to serve as adjudicators and guest conductors for music festivals which include the
MSHSAA and KSHSAA music festivals, jazz festivals, marching band festivals, all-district and
all-conference bands, orchestras, and choirs and individual middle school and high school
workshops. Our faculty members are also invited to give advice to public school programs as
they develop their curriculum. Faculty members also are very involved in program outreach.
For example, Lee Harrelson is the artistic director and founder of the Fountain City Brass Band.
All of our faculty continue to perform in various capacities with choirs, bands, orchestras,
churches and schools locally and regionally.
The Music Department is very active in the placement of our music student teachers. While the
education department places most students locally, we work to place our students with well
developed, experienced and successful band, choir and orchestra programs throughout the
region. It is common to place students in the greater Kansas City schools such as Liberty, Park
Hill, Lee’s Summit and Blue Springs. We also work with students to place them in a geographic
area where they desire to live so that they may begin networking in that area. One example of
this success is a student named Mike Downey. He wanted to locate in Indiana so we placed him
at Centerville High School in suburban Indianapolis. After graduation, he took a job in
Greenville, Indiana. This position was identified through his cooperating teachers during his
student teaching experience.
Missouri Western State University partners with the St. Joseph School District Central office
personnel, building administrators, and cooperating teachers as well as other area school districts
that place our candidates. The Western Teacher Education Advisory Board’s annual meeting
facilitates input and communication between the unit and its partners. The work of the unit,
university and public schools is seen as a collaborative endeavor, respecting the expertise of each
other.
An example of partner impact on the design, delivery and evaluation of the Unit’s field
experiences was the restructuring of EDU 375, Teaching Reading in the Elementary School.
Partners recommended and the unit responded by restructuring the course and requiring it to be
taken concurrently with EDU 303/304 by all elementary education majors.

At the request of several SJSD cooperating teachers and the result of a TEAB meeting
discussion, the Phase III unit was modified from a ten-day long unit to a five-day long unit,
and requirements were clarified. Feedback from cooperating teachers to the clinical supervisors
recommended that we remove the disposition artifacts from the field experience/supervisors
review to the EDU 304 journal assignment and Phase IV (EDU 403/404) seminar course
portfolios. All midterm and final evaluations for Phase III and Phase IV are done collaboratively
between the cooperating teacher and university supervisor. This has resulted in refinement and
streamlining of the evaluation document.
In the field experiences during Phase I, III, and IV, a specific course, closely linked to the field
experience, is taken concurrently by all education candidates. This curriculum arrangement
enables a collaborative effort between university supervisors and cooperating teachers, and the
course instructor. The course instructor presents theory and various aspects of pedagogy, which
is supported and evaluated by the field supervisors. The university supervisors consist of highly
qualified adjunct faculty and ALL full-time faculty members in the Department of Education as
well as unit content faculty. The university supervisor and the cooperating teacher form a
working relationship in which the two support the further development and evaluation of the
Western teacher candidate. There is a cooperative decision made on the final evaluation of the
candidate.

Clinical faculty members in the education department at Missouri Western State University are
involved in a variety of contemporary professional experiences as demonstrated by the following
examples:
         Dr. John Ellis (Elementary Education) and Dr. John Rushin (Biology) designed and
            conducted workshops for the St. Joseph School District middle school science
            teachers in 2007. The focus of these workshops was to bring additional inquiry
            teaching skills to the middle school science curriculum. On-site follow up has been
            provided throughout the 2007-2008 academic year.
         Dr. Elizabeth Hendrix taught fifth through seventh grade students at the Alabama
            Math and Science Camp in Greene County, Alabama in 2007.
         Dr. Doug Eicher has served as a superintendent of a rural public school in Nebraska
            from 2002-2005.
         Dr. Nancy Edwards provides educational support for the St. Joseph School District to
            prepare local elementary teachers and students for the state standardized test in
            mathematics. Dr. Edwards also provides math tutors for elementary and middle level
            students as part of the MAT 351 Mathematics Methods in the Elementary School
            course when requested.
Summary (e.g., a table) of program faculty’s scholarly activity
Unit faculty are engaged in ongoing and significant scholarship activities and must document
that activity annually. Table 44 presents summary data on unit faculty scholarship while specific
information on each faculty member is available in the Education Performance System.

Table 44 Scholarship/Creative Activities by Full-time Professional Education Faculty N=26
                       2001      2002        2003      2004      2005     2006      2007
Scholarship/Creative    52         50         62        61        56       74        57
     Activities

Process by which program evaluates teaching - - The evaluation of a faculty member is a
continuous process that involves the accumulation of relevant data and information that permits
intelligent judgments concerning a faculty member's performance. Evaluation procedures are
used in the annual review, in the midterm review, in the tenure review, in promotion reviews,
and in special reviews such as those for Board of Governors Distinguished Professor awards and
grants for professional leave and sabbatical. At the heart of an effective evaluation system lies
the requirement that a faculty member diligently seek self-improvement and that evaluators
responsibly interpret results and carefully support comments and recommendations.
Faculty performance is evaluated in three areas: teaching, scholarship/creative activity and
service. All unit faculty members, including tenured/nontenured and full-time/adjunct, are
evaluated by all candidates in every section of every course every semester. This evaluation
provides one measure of the faculty member’s performance and is especially useful for the
individual faculty member’s own self-reflection and development as a teacher. In addition to the
standard student evaluations, all supervisors of field and clinical experiences are evaluated by
candidates each semester.

Further, all faculty members prepare an annual self-evaluation document that is submitted to the
department chairperson. The self-evaluation documents the faculty member’s performance in
each of the following areas: teaching, scholarship/creative activity and service. The student
evaluation data are a required part of this annual self-evaluation. Some faculty use a variety of
peer review options for extending their evaluation data. The department chair reviews the self-
evaluation and completes a formal evaluation. This written evaluation is used in the annual
review interview in which the chairperson discusses strengths and concerns regarding the faculty
member’s performance during that year. The chairperson may provide recommendations and
expectations for improved performance for the next year. The formal evaluation document is
forwarded to the college dean for review and comment, on to the Provost for review and
comment and then a copy is returned to the faculty member.

Additional evaluations occur when the faculty member completes a mid-term tenure review
(third year), a tenure review (sixth year), an application for promotion, or an application for the
Governors Distinguished Professor award.

Involvement in beginning teacher assistance program The Missouri Western State University
Teacher Education unit has offered Beginning Teacher Assistance programs in a variety of
venues since 2001. For example, in 2001/2002, 2002-2003 unit faculty provided mentor teacher
training and beginning teacher assistance programs both on the Western campus and within area
school districts. In 2003-2004, 2004-2005, the unit offered in-district beginning teacher
assistance programs and coordinated the training and awarding of certificates through district
professional development committees. Further, since 2005, the teacher education program has
co-sponsored beginning teacher assistance programs with professional associations such as the
Missouri State Teachers Association and the Missouri National Education Association. Finally,
unit faculty have worked with area districts and program graduates to locate and promote
additional beginning teacher assistance programs through the Northwest Missouri Regional
Professional Development Center.

Description of training/orientation efforts for part-time faculty; information about how the
full-time faculty involve part-time faculty in the community of scholarship

The Music Department takes great care to involve our part-time (adjunct) faculty in all aspects of
our program. We currently have nearly 30 adjunct professors covering many important areas of
our program. Because of our proximity to Kansas City, we are able to employ outstanding
musicians and teachers to compliment our full-time faculty specialties. Our adjunct faculty
members are involved in area meetings (vocal/instrumental), recruiting duties, offering special
clinics and sessions to our students and providing area schools with their expertise. They also
   represent Missouri Western at many functions including MMEA, MBA, ACDA and professional
   musician venues throughout the country.
   Certification Program Resources
   Instructional Resources
   Current inventory of instruments, electronic and technologic equipment, music, specialty
   furniture and office equipment is valued at $150,000 to $200,000. There is disparity with the
   realization that the approximate replacement value of this inventory would cost over $2M. The
   vast majority of our equipment is outdated and worn out.
   Professional Resources
   Professional resources are abundant for music students at Missouri Western. We often invite
   guest speakers, clinicians, composers and performers to our campus to compliment and contrast
   musical and teaching styles with our own faculty. These ―outside‖ influences are important to
   our students and also serve as an informal means of faculty development.
   Fiscal resources
                                         MUSIC Program
                                             2007-2008
                               Student                             Total        # of
Department                     Labor         Operating   Travel    Budget      Faculty   Budget/faculty

Business                            $7,500    $32,118     $3,900     $43,518     21          $2,072.29
Criminal Justice/Legal
Studies                             $4,235    $16,638     $2,100     $22,973     10          $2,297.30
Education                           $5,299    $36,025     $2,300     $43,624     11          $3,965.82
Engineering Technology              $2,569    $16,193     $1,800     $20,562      7          $2,937.43
HPER                                $2,420    $31,000     $2,000     $35,420     11          $3,220.00
Military Science                    $5,181     $9,778       $700     $15,659      5          $3,131.80
Nursing                             $2,452    $25,007     $3,100     $30,559     15          $2,037.27




Art                                 $4,235    $16,316     $1,300     $21,851      5          $4,370.20
Biology                             $7,500    $18,687     $2,700     $28,887     15          $1,925.80
Chemistry                          $12,000    $14,262     $1,700     $27,962      8          $3,495.25
Com Studies/Theatre                 $3,690    $19,310     $2,100     $25,100     10          $2,510.00
CS/M/P                              $3,000    $23,284     $4,000     $30,284     20          $1,514.20
Economics                           $1,000     $8,410       $900     $10,310      4          $2,577.50
EFLJ                                $8,000    $33,714     $4,900     $46,614     24          $1,942.25
GSWS                                $1,500    $12,711     $1,700     $15,911      7          $2,273.00
HPG                                 $1,500    $13,235     $1,900     $16,635      9          $1,848.33
Music                               $5,054    $41,458     $2,300     $48,812     11          $4,437.45
Psychology                          $1,500    $11,498     $1,700     $14,698      8          $1,837.25
Even though we have a total budget that exceeds the other departments on this list, our funding is
not on par with other universities’ music departments of our size and scope We are seriously
lacking in funding for equipment replacement and update. An annual capital outlay budget
needs to be developed in order to allow the department to take a proactive stance on planning for
the future.

This list does not reflect the total budget for the department. In addition to the above list, we
have an annual touring budget of $20,000 that is used for outreach, recruiting and special
regional and national performances opportunities for our students. We also have scholarship
budget lines to help support music students who wish to study at Missouri Western State
University.

				
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