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The Cricket Chronicles

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					The Cricket Chronicles

             An Interdisciplinary Study

 Science & Literacy for Second and Third Graders




                      By

    Catherine E. Matthews

           Ann M. Duffy
          With Contributions from Students

   at the University of North Carolina @ Greensboro




                                                      1
                                     About The Authors


     Dr. Catherine E. Matthews is an associate professor in the Department of Curriculum and

Instruction at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Greensboro North Carolina. Dr.

Matthews is a K-12 science educator. Her special interests are natural history and environmental

education. She has published articles for teachers in Science & Children, Science Scope, The Science

Teacher and Science Activities. She has also published research articles on culturally relevant science

and gender and science.



     Dr. Ann Duffy is an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the

University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Greensboro North Carolina. She is a former elementary

school classroom teacher and reading specialist. Her research interests include the literacy

environments of struggling readers and reading teacher education. She has published articles and

chapters in The Reading Teacher, Reading Research Quarterly, Reading Research and Instruction,

and The Handbook of Reading Research.




                                                                                                          2
     Special Thanks (to be completed)
     • To the many University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) students who sometimes

enthusiastically and sometimes reluctantly completed the assignment to write an animal project book.

Eight students in two teams prepared books based on cricket investigations. We give them a special

note of thanks for this project.

     Caboodles of Crickets, 2000, written for 5th graders

     Emilie Weaver, Sherri Turner, Kim Mitchell, Kristin LaVigne & Jill Crews

     The Cricket Chronicle ,1998(?), written for 1st graders

     Angie White, Angela Johnston & Jennifer Wirt

     • To the many UNCG students who shared animal project book materials with K-5 students in

Guilford County NC schools

     • To the UNCG students on Dr. Matthews‘ 1998-2000 Environmental Education PDS team who

shared these materials with teachers at the NCSTA convention

     • To the many North Carolina elementary school teachers who by their enthusiasm for these

materials pushed us to get these into print

     • To the author of The Pillbug Project for writing a guide that would inspire the animal project

book and that, more importantly, provide a model for scientific investigation and exploration of

common but fascinating organisms for children and adults to explore, and for encouraging children to

read to find out, to write about what they discovered and to enjoy the wonders of nature




                                                                                                        3
UNCG Students who wrote and shared Animal Project Books (to be completed)

      2000

      Fiddler Crab Flurries: Alicia Staley, Donna Moser, Amanda White & Emily Crowder
      Caboodles of Crickets: Jill Crews, Emilie Weaver, Krsitin LaVigne, Kim Mitchell &
             Sherry Turner
      Magnificent Mealworms: Robin Alberty, Edith,
      Hamsters : David Needham, Angela Stevens, Erica Alvarez,
      Guinea Pigs Adventure: Stacy Elkins, Kristen Dooley, Parrish,
      Siamese Fighting Fish: Brooke Clarke, Christy Nesbit, Erika Hogue, Greg Fox

      1998
      The Betta Beat: Shannon Burge, Jennifer Murphy, Sara Mabe,
      Sea Monkey Shenanigans: Susannah Thompson, Kristin Phaup,
      Anole: Patricia Burkhart, Michelle McGovern, Terra Chamberlain, Alison Burroughs
      The Swordtail Saga: Christy Freeman, Amy Brown,
      Ladybug Learning : Holly Tebow, Danielle Dill, Lynn P,
      Snail: Susan Laney
      Hamsters: Lana Vaughn, Michelle, Lisa Lee &
      Hermit Crabs: Sharita Mathis, Cassandra Yellock,

      Summer School Classes 1999
      Hermit Crabs: Bill Spagnardi, Molly ,



      1998

      Aphid Adventures: Christopher Miller,

      Crayfish Connections: Sue Leger

      1997




                                                                                          4
Table of Contents
Preface

Introduction

Components of The Cricket Chronicles

Science Education Standards meet The Cricket Chronicles

IRA/NCTE Standards for English Language Arts

Collecting and/or Purchasing Crickets

Cricket Fact Sheets

          Cricket Habitat Facts

          Cricket Anatomy & Physiology Facts

Preparing for The Cricket Chronicles



Day 1            Finding Crickets                     (Student Activity Sheet #1)

Today we will search the schoolyard to determine where crickets live and to collect crickets for

this project.

Day 2            Creating Cricket Habitats            (Student Activity Sheet #2)

We will create classroom habitats for our crickets.

Day 3            Reading about Crickets               (Student Activity Sheet #3)

Today we will read several books about crickets and complete KWLS charts.

Day 4            Cricket Habitat Preferences          (Student Activity Sheet #4)

We will test and change our habitats to fit the needs (and preferences) of crickets.

Day 5            Comparing Crickets and Kids          (Student Activity Sheet #5)

Today we will compare and contrast crickets and ourselves.



                                                                                                   5
Day 6          Naming Crickets and Kids (Student Activity Sheet #6)

We will learn about the scientific names of living organisms.

Day 7 Reading more about Crickets (Student Activity Sheets #7A, 7B & 7C)

What are the parts of a story called? How are story parts like body parts?

We will read a story about crickets.

Day 8          Examining Stories about Crickets (Student Activity Sheet #8)

We will read ―Christopher Cricket: Safe at Home."

We will learn vocabulary words related to crickets.

Day 9           Examining Crickets                    (Student Activity Sheet #9)

What does your cricket look like? What are the names of its body parts?

Day 10         Constructing Models of Crickets (Student Activity Sheet #10)

Today we will build a model of a cricket to help us learn more about its body parts.

Day 11         Feeding Crickets         (Student Activity Sheets #11A, 11B & 11C)

What type of food does your cricket prefer?

We will read ―Christopher Cricket: Lost in the Cafeteria."

Day 12         Chirping Crickets        (Student Activity Sheets #12A, 12B & 12C)

How do crickets chirp? Why do crickets chirp? When do crickets chirp?

Today we will investigate how temperature and light affect crickets‘ chirping.

We will also read ―Christopher Cricket: Lost at School."

Day 13         Lifestyles of Crickets       (Student Activity Sheets #13A & 13B)

Today we will find out if our crickets prefer living with other crickets to living alone.




                                                                                            6
Day 14         Jumping Crickets              (Student Activity Sheet #14A & 14B)

Can you jump as far as your cricket can jump?

You will be using your math skills to graph and average the results of our classmates‘ jumps.

We will also read ―Christopher Cricket: Going Home.‖

Day 15         If I were a cricket…          (Student Activity Sheet #15)

Today we will experience life through the eyes of a cricket.

Day 16         Cricket Life Cycles           (Student Activity Sheet #16)

Over several months we will study the life cycle of crickets and discover that crickets undergo

incomplete metamorphosis as they change from eggs to nymphs to adult crickets.

Day 17         Crickets in other Countries (Student Activity Sheet #17)

Day 18         Cricket Conference: A Scientific Symposium

(Student Activity Sheet #18)

We will make scientific reports and share them with the other students in our class.



More Activities to do with Crickets

Resources Used




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Preface
       The Cricket Chronicles has been designed for use in second- and third- grade classrooms.

Through the activities in this book, students will investigate the natural habitats, anatomy, life style,

food choices and climate preferences of crickets. They will experience science as learning and doing by

conducting activities with living organisms in their natural environments. Students will also be reading

and writing throughout this project. They will be exposed to a variety of reading and writing strategies

and activities, including writing poetry, journal entries, using graphic organizers, creating short stories,

comparing different texts and summarizing what they have learned. The purpose of The Cricket

Chronicles is to encourage students to conduct investigations to find answers to their questions about

crickets, to read to give them the background knowledge they need to understand more about crickets ,

to conduct additional activities to broaden their scope of knowledge, to read more and write about their

learning adventures to help them better understand, and to share these understandings with others.




                                                                                                               8
       Introduction

         The Cricket Chronicles was designed for busy teachers like you! With limited preparation time

and minimal equipment and resources, a vast amount of learning will take place in your classroom. If

you are a strong believer in hands-on activities and student interaction, you can create a classroom that

will be a door to students' further learning and success.

       Many students find textbook Science difficult and boring. The Cricket Chronicles has been

designed to help students learn science in a fun and exciting way. Science is, after all, a process in

which students should be able to explore the world around them. We believe the best way of exploring

your world is by using your senses of touch, smell, sight, sound, and sometimes taste. Many of the

activities in this project book have been designed to use one or more of your senses. Where appropriate,

the symbols of an ear, mouth, hand, nose, or eye are located on Student Activity Sheets in order to help

you know which experiments cater to which of the five senses. NOTE: TO BE COMPLETED --these

symbols are not appropriate now for this work but we do suggest that icons be developed that will help

teachers and students locate information and categorize it more quickly.

       Each lesson in The Cricket Chronicles follows a logical pattern in teaching and we suggest that

 you teach all of the lessons in the book. The Cricket Chronicles will be successful if your students use

 knowledge learned through experimenting, discussing, reading and writing to begin to direct their own

 learning.




                                                                                                            9
Components of The Cricket Chronicles
      There are three components in each day‘s activities in The Cricket Chronicles: a) Student

Activity Sheets, b) Teacher Tells (information that you will share directly with your students to

help facilitate instruction), and c) Teacher Materials (background information and information

critical for lesson preparation). Each day‘s activities begin with the Student Activity Pages since

what students do, questions students ask, and contributions students make should drive the

instruction in this project. The Student Activity Sheets are followed by Teacher Tells and

Teacher Materials sections.

        Teacher Tells pages are designed to give information on the activity and ways of

organizing student groups and materials. Some possible questions may be included to help you

open or close the lesson. Teacher Tells may be used to guide your thinking and make the lesson

flow smoothly. The Teacher Tells are written so that you, the teacher, may choose to read some

selections directly from the book. This material also serves as an introduction to each day‘s

lesson. The information contained in each Teacher Tell is vital to each lesson.

        The lessons in this book are designed to accommodate the learning needs of students in

today's diverse classrooms. For students for whom English is a second or other language

(ESOL), you may want to consider asking these students to complete reading and writing

assignments with a partner. You could also encourage these students to share words from their

first language relevant to the vocabulary of the lesson (e.g., the Spanish word for "cricket"). For

struggling readers and writers, the lessons are designed to scaffold learning experiences through

differentiated instruction. These students may be motivated by high-interest, visually-rich

science materials. For example, you will be providing books for students to read on a variety of

reading levels and you will be supporting students' writing experiences. Advanced learners can


                                                                                                      10
be encouraged to research additional information about the lesson topic. As applicable, we will

be providing other ways for you to differentiate instruction throughout the lessons.

         An important part of The Cricket Chronicles is the fictional story of Christopher Cricket

and his adventures. This story is included in four separate days throughout this book. This first

story section has been designed to help lead students into understanding what crickets are and

some important facts about their habitat and anatomy. The other three parts of the story are in the

form of additions to selected lesson plans. Each Christopher Cricket installment is designed to

accompany the investigation in the lesson for which it is an extension. These stories have been

included in The Cricket Chronicles in order to spark students‘ interests and to allow them to see

life through the eyes of a cricket.

         The Student Activity Sheets can be used as assessment tools. They have been designed

to aid students in recording their observations. Both the Student Activity Sheets and the

Christopher Cricket story have been designed for use in a student learning log. A learning log can

be made by creating construction paper covers and stapling paper inside the covers. Included

within the construction paper covers should be lined and unlined paper, copies of the Student

Activity Sheets and the Christopher Cricket story. The learning log will be used with almost

every lesson. Students will be asked to record predictions and thoughts, write stories and poems,

and create webs and charts within their learning logs. We recommend that you encourage

students to add additional comments and questions to their learning logs throughout the project.

         We believe that reading and writing go hand-in-hand and mesh well with inquiry-based

science lessons. Below is a list of language arts strategies that The Cricket Chronicles will

incorporate:

       KWLS chart




                                                                                                      11
   Predictions

   Answering questions

   Reading various texts from different authors

   Story-grammar lessons

   Vocabulary strategies

   Diagram reading

   Graphic organizers

   Comparing/contrasting texts

   Poetry




                                                   12
     Ties to the National Science Education Standards (1996)
     The National Science Education Standards were designed to establish a foundation for learning

that leads to successful achievement of our national goal in science education: scientific literacy for all

students. The Standards outline what students need to know, understand and be able to do to be

scientifically literate at different grade levels. These are called the content standards. The Standards

also delineate what science teachers should know, do and teach. These Standards are called the

science teaching standards.

     The Cricket Chronicles incorporates the content standards for grades K-4 of the National Science

Education Standards. A hallmark of the Standards is that inquiry is central to science learning and that

science is an active process. Learning science is something students do. Students describe organisms,

ask questions, construct explanations, test those explanations and communicate their ideas to others.

The Standards includes a mini-unit on earthworms for third graders as an example of the kind of

science teaching/learning advocated. According to the Standards, students in grades K-4 should

study organisms: their characteristics, their life cycles and their environments. The Cricket Chronicles

is a perfect match!

     The Cricket Chronicles was designed to boost students‘ learning through exploration of the

world around them, hands-on investigations, and evaluation of the materials completed in this project.

The Standards advocate for inquiry based science study at all grade levels and the use of this book in

the classroom insures that students have some exposure to inquiry-based standards. This book will

meet the interests, knowledge, understanding, abilities and experiences of students. Teachers will

focus on and support students‘ inquiries in this project. Students will be involved in ongoing

discussions about scientific ideas as they complete the suggested activities and investigations in this

book. In this book, students should be given ample and multiple opportunities to ask and answer their



                                                                                                              13
own questions about crickets as teachers assist students, giving advice as needed. According to the

Standards, teachers should engage in ongoing assessment of their teaching and of students‘ learning.

Teachers should use multiple methods and systematically gather data about student understanding and

ability. Throughout The Cricket Chronicles, assessment takes the form of visual (students

presentations and group work), auditory (accurately answering evaluative questions), and kinesthetic

(observing hands-on activities) activities.

      In addition to meeting the science content standards, teachers are able to meet the science

teaching standards advocated in the National Science Education Standards. These teaching standards

include the guidance that teachers should nurture collaboration among students.

      The purpose of The Cricket Chronicles is to answer students‘ inquiries about a common insect

found in the world around them. According to the Standards, science teachers should guide and

facilitate learning. In The Cricket Chronicles, teachers focus and support inquiries while interacting

with students. Periodically, throughout the project, students will present their data to their peers and

devise a way to chart the results of their class as a whole giving teachers an opportunity to orchestrate

discourse among students about scientific ideas as advocated in the Standards.

      Also, according to the Standards, science teachers should develop communities of science

learners that reflect the intellectual rigor of scientific inquiry and the attitudes and social values

conducive to science learning. Teachers should display and demand respect for the diverse ideas,

skills, and experiences of all students. Through the process of group work in The Cricket Chronicles

students will increase their knowledge of crickets, specifically but biology, ecology, animal behavior

and entomology generally. Teaching The Cricket Chronicles will ensure that both teachers and

students are engaged in Standards-appropriate science study.




                                                                                                            14
15
   IRA (International Reading Association) /NCTE
(National Council of Teachers of English) Standards for
English Language Arts
     The vision of the IRA/NCTE standards is that each student be provided with opportunities and

resources to develop proficient language arts and reading skills. The Cricket Chronicles contains tools

and ideas that will enable students to make this vision a reality.

     Here is how the IRA/NCTE standards are supplemented through the material in The Cricket

Chronicles:

             Content Standard 3: ―Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret

evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other

readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification

strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence

structure, context, graphics).‖ Learning logs, semantic maps, KWLS charts, and word-search puzzles

will assist students in comprehension, vocabulary and interpretation of information within The Cricket

Chronicles.

             Content Standard 5: ―Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use

different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety

of purposes.‖ In one lesson, students will use a graphic organizer to assist them in writing a summary

about their observations. In another lesson, they write poems about crickets. In other lessons, students

will write their responses to prompts in their learning logs.

             Content Standard 11: ―Students participate as knowledgeable reflective, creative, and

critical members of a variety of literacy communities.‖ Throughout The Cricket Chronicles, students

will reflect in their learning logs, participate in group and whole class discussion, and create stories



                                                                                                           16
and poems. They will be encouraged to think critically about what they read, comparing it to what they

have observed in experiments.




                                                                                                         17
     Collecting or Purchasing Crickets
     The very best idea for obtaining crickets is to simply collect crickets from your school grounds.

Better yet, have your students collect their own crickets and then set up cricket habitats as a part of this

project. Crickets can be found outside year round. You may have to do a little bit of local research to

find crickets when you are ready to do this project. If you have never collected crickets before and

you aren‘t sure about where or how to find them, call your local agricultural extension agent. Anyone

with a background in entomology should be able to help and offer suggestions for collecting crickets

in your area of the country. Another organization that may be able to assist is your local pest control

company as crickets are often considered pests. If a university or community college is located nearby

a faculty member in biology would probably be able to offer cricket collecting suggestions.

     You can collect crickets with your hands or by using a simple sweep net. Using the net would

allow you to introduce students to simple scientific equipment that is used by entomologists in their

field work. If you decide to collect crickets with sweep nets simple instructions for making

inexpensive nets are included in the book in the section entitled Simple Scientific Equipment (to be

completed).

     If you decide not to collect your own crickets, crickets can be purchased from local pet, bait

shops or scientific supply companies.




                                                                                                               18
      Cricket Fact Sheets
      The Cricket fact sheet was designed for your background knowledge and use only. It gives you

background information that you may need in order to assist your students in answering their

questions. We suggest that you allow the students to discover these facts through their own learning

and the experiments in this project. You may want to add to these sheets of facts as you and your

students discover more information about the crickets you study.




      Habitat Facts
             There are over 17,000 species of crickets found around the world.

             Crickets are found in fields, pastures, lawns, roadsides, and woods.

             House crickets normally live outdoors.

             The house cricket was not originally found in the US. It was accidentally brought over

by early settlers on ships.

             The Latin name for House Crickets is Acheta domestica.

             House crickets prefer warm weather and will move indoors when it gets cold outside.

They begin to move inside in late summer or early fall when the temperature is between 60 and 70

degrees Fahrenheit.

             House crickets feed on silk, woolens, nylon, rayon, and wood.

             They will eat grasses, green leaves, and pieces of fruit, meat, breakfast cereal and dog

biscuits.

             Lettuce leaves will provide moisture and are a good source of food for crickets.

             Wheat bran gives them some roughage.




                                                                                                         19
            If they have an adequate supply of protein they will be less likely to fight. Foods such as

meat, cereal, and dog biscuits are a good source of protein for crickets.




        Anatomy and Physiology Facts
            Crickets are insects. Insects are small, usually winged, invertebrates having three pairs of

legs.

            Crickets are insects that belong to the order Orthoptera. Orthoptera means, ―straight

winged‖. There are about 30 different orders of insects.

            A cricket‘s body, like all insect bodies, consists of a head, a thorax and an abdomen. The

head is the smallest of the three body parts of a cricket and is located on the front end of the cricket.

The middle part of the cricket is called the thorax and this is where three pairs of legs and two pairs of

wings (in the adults) are joined to the body. The largest body part of the cricket, found at the back end

of the organism, is called the abdomen.

            Crickets‘ bodies are made of a hard material called chitin. Crickets, like all insects, have

a hard outer skin or skeleton called an exoskeleton. They do not have an inside skeleton (vertebrate

and other bones made of calcium) like humans have. Crickets and all insects are invertebrates. We

are vertebrates. We have backbones, crickets have hard outer skeletons.

            Adult Crickets range in size from (1.9 – 2.2 cm) 3/4 to 7/8 inches long.

            Their body color is a light yellowish brown with three dark bands on their head.

            They have 5 eyes, though only the big compound eyes that are located on either side of

the head can be seen without instrumentation. There is one other eye on the front of the head in

between the two compound eyes and a small eye on either side of their head behind the compound

eyes.


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               Their ears are located on the lower part of their forelegs.

               They have 6 legs, 3 located on either side of the thorax. The two pairs of front legs are

used only for walking. Their huge back legs contain the muscles that enable them to push themselves

through the air to leap.

               They taste their food with palpi, which are organs located on the side of their mouths.

               The abdomens consist of 10 rings of hard armor. This armor enables the cricket to bend

its abdomen, which also protects its inner body.

               Egg and sperm cells are produced in the abdomen of female and male crickets,

respectively.

               Each female can lay an average of 728 eggs each time she mates. Eggs contain immature

nymphs that are wingless. It takes 60 days for the nymphs to become adults.

               Females lay their eggs by using stalk-like or sword-like organs called ovipositors. The

ovipositor protrudes from the end of her abdomen. Eggs are laid singularly in crevices or sand.

               Breathing holes called spiracles are located on the thorax and abdomen.

               The cricket will ―molt‖ (shed its skin) by its skin split down the back. The new skin is

soft until it dries and hardens into a new exoskeleton. As crickets continue to grow they shed their

skins as many as four more times. At the last molt, the wings are released from the pads where they

have been developing.

               Only adult males chirp because they are the only crickets that have a main vein.

               Males have ridges on their main vein of the wing covers where a hard spot is located at

the end of the vein. To produce a chirping sound a male will raise his two wings and rub them against

one another so that the hard spots rub against the opposite wing.

               Young cricket nymphs are wingless and cannot produce chirping sounds.



                                                                                                            21
      Preparing for The Cricket Chronicles
      The most important thing to do to begin this project is to make sure that enough crickets can be

found near your school so that each child or group of children can find several crickets within a few

minutes of searching. Crickets will probably be found in dark, grassy areas around your school. If

you cannot find crickets then you can purchase them at pet shops, bait and tackle stores, on the

Internet and through mail order catalogues.

      It is also important that you have an adequate amount of time to complete the entire project. The

Cricket Chronicles has been designed to be used over a period of several months with approximately

18 full days of science and literacy instruction for approximately 1 hour to 1 1/2 hours each day. A

few helpful hints in setting up a habitat that will allow your crickets to survive and thrive:

      1. A large clear container (aquarium size, preferably plastic) with wire mesh or screen covering

acting as a lid so that the crickets will not be able to escape.

      2. Room temperature (about 75-85 degrees Fahrenheit) is critical.

      3. Make sure that the crickets get at least 16 hours of daylight and 8 hours without light. Make

sure not to place their cage in direct sunlight. The artificial light in your classroom or the sunlight that

shines through your classroom windows will be sufficient.

      4. Water should be made available in a small bowl. The top to a gallon milk bottle makes a

wonderful bowl. Fill the bowl or top with cotton balls, a clean sponge, or pieces of wool that have

been soaked in water. This cotton should be changed as it dries out or gets dirty, probably daily.

      5. The crickets need to have fresh food such as, greens, protein and wheat bran, daily.

      Today will require no materials other than this book and the student learning logs. Before

beginning this project create a learning log for each child. Make a copy of the Student Activity Sheets

for each activity throughout this book. Also make copies of the student diagrams and the Christopher


                                                                                                               22
Cricket stories. Staple all of these pages along with some plain white paper and some lined paper in

between two sheets of construction paper. This booklet will serve as the students‘ learning log in

which they will be recording observations throughout the activities in The Cricket Chronicles.




                                                                                                       23
Student Activity Sheet #1                                   Finding Crickets

Materials for each team of explorers
Zipper-type plastic baggies
Plastic Containers
Pencils


What to do
Provide students with a rough map of the school grounds. Assign specific areas of the school
grounds to specific teams. Have students mark habitats or areas where they find crickets on their
maps.


1. Go outside and collect crickets. Mark habitats or areas where you find crickets on your map.


2. Describe the habitats or areas in which you found your crickets on the lines below.




______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                    24
Draw a picture of the area or habitat where you found your crickets .




List the habitat needs of your crickets based on where you found crickets today. A place where

animals or plants live is called their habitat.




                                                                                                 25
                                                                    First Day
                                                                    Finding Crickets
     Teacher Tell
     Today we are going outside to look for crickets for our project. First I am going to divide you

into groups. You will be working in these groups everyday for the next several weeks (divide students

into heterogeneous groups of four). Now I am going to give each group a plastic baggie. You will

need to take this baggie, your pencil, and your learning log outside with you for today‘s project. Each

of you will need to make notes in your learning log about the places where you find your crickets.

You will write down what you learn about crickets in this log. You need to pay special attention to

how the area or habitat looks where you find your crickets. You will create a habitat for your crickets

when we get back into the classroom. Your crickets will thrive best if their new indoor home looks as

much like their outdoor home as possible.

     Now we will go outside and begin our search near the flowerbed (or another area around your

school) where you are likely to find crickets. You might be able to find crickets under rocks or logs.

When you turn over a rock, log or other object, be sure to pull it toward you (see illustration for

demonstration). There may be other creatures under that object that you don‘t want to jump out at

you. Once you have looked under the object, be sure to put it back the way you found it. We would

not want to disturb the home of organisms that may be living under that object.

     When you find a cricket, quickly cup your hand over it to keep it from jumping away. Gently

scoop up and hold the cricket in your cupped hands. Then, place it in the baggie for now. Make sure

that there is air in the bag and seal it (blow air into a baggie to demonstrate this for your students). See

if you can find at least eight crickets (two crickets per person) for your group. Put all of your group‘s

crickets in the same bag until we get back into the classroom. After you have found your crickets, you




                                                                                                               26
need to observe the area in which you found your crickets and record those observations in your

learning log. After everyone has found their crickets we will return to the classroom and create a

habitat for our crickets.

      Good scientists describe what they see very carefully. You will need to describe what you see

when you find your crickets. Good writers know how to use words that can describe their

observations, or what they see, very clearly. We are going to practice writing very clearly and

carefully. I want each of you to spend the next two minutes writing down everything that you see,

hear, and smell in our classroom as carefully as you can. Ready? Go! (Write with your students for

two minutes). Now, let me share you one of the things that I wrote down. I wrote down, "clean".

Does that really give me a lot of information about our classroom? No! Let's see if we can think of a

way to describe the classroom a little more clearly. If I wrote that "our classroom has no paper on the

floor, has desks that are arranged in rows, and has a chalkboard that was just erased," does that tell you

what I mean by clean? Yes, it does. When we observe something, we need to write so clearly that the

person who reads our writing can almost "see" the place we are describing. Have any of you ever read

the book, The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry? In the introduction of the book, the author writes

about the Amazon rain forest so clearly that I can almost see it:

      In the Amazon rain forest it is always hot, and in that heat everything grows, and grows, and

        grows. The tops of the trees in the rain forest are called the canopy. The canopy is a sunny

        place that touches the sky. The animals that live there like lots of light. Colorful parrots fly

        from tree to tree. Monkeys leap from branch to branch. The bottom of the rain forest in called

        the understory. The animals that live in the understory like darkness. There, silent snakes curl

        around hanging vines. Graceful jaguars watch and wait. And in this steamy environment the




                                                                                                             27
        great Kapok tree shoots up through the forest and emerges above the canopy (Cherry, 1990, p.

        4).

      After you have found your crickets, you will need to observe the area in which you found your

crickets very carefully and record those observations in your learning log. Try to describe your area so

clearly that someone who reads your writing could almost "see" the place you described, like author

Lynne Cherry does. After everyone has found their crickets we will return to the classroom and create

a habitat for our crickets.

      To accommodate all learners, linguistically diverse students and struggling writers may choose

to draw a picture of the environment in addition to writing about it. Advanced readers and writers

could be encouraged to write about the habitats of other animals.




      Teacher Material
      For the first day of this project, you will need a minimal amount of materials. Today, students

will be going outside to look for crickets. This is going to be a very exciting experience for the

students so be prepared. Some students may not know exactly what a cricket looks like, so have

pictures and/or live crickets to show them before going outside. You may choose to use the pictures in

this book. Before taking the students outside be sure to divide your class into groups of four. These

are the groups that students will be working in for the next several months to complete all of the

activities in this book.

      It is best to complete this activity on a warm day. The best days are in late summer to early fall.

Crickets can be found most often on cloudy days or in the late afternoon. Students can follow the

sounds of crickets chirping to find them. Crickets will fall silent when they hear you nearby, but if

you stand still and wait a minute or two they will start to chirp again. However, since only the male



                                                                                                            28
crickets chirp, encourage some students to look for female crickets. The long tube like organ that

protrudes from their abdomen can help to identify females. This organ is called an ovipositor (refer to

picture on page xx).

     Crickets can be found in many places. A good place to start at school would be in a flower or

shrub garden. Crickets like to hide under the edges of things. Look under rocks, old logs, dead piles

of grass, in tall patches of grass or piles of mulch. When turning things over to look for the crickets,

caution students to use proper ‗rock turning‘ procedures. Make sure that students understand how to

pull the object toward them to look under it (see illustration below).




     There may be creatures under objects that you do not want to jump out at you. Be sure the

students know to place the item back in its original position when they are done looking under it. This

will help to preserve the habitat of organisms that live under various objects.

     While outside, have the students observe the habitat in which they find their crickets. They

should be able to recreate this habitat once in the classroom. Students should record their observations

in their learning log on the Student Activity Sheet for this lesson. Gallon size plastic zip baggies work

well for collecting specimens in the field. Sealing them with the air still inside will give the crickets




                                                                                                            29
enough air until they are placed in their indoor habitats. (WILL INCLUDE A SECTION ON ETHICS,

TO BE COMPLETED).




                                                                                                30
     Student Activity Sheet #2                              Creating Cricket Habitats

     Materials for each team of investigators
            Crickets
     •       Aquarium type containers (preferably plastic) with air holes for indoor habitats – one for
             each group
            Dirt for bottom of cricket cages
            Lettuce to give crickets moisture
            Sliced or diced fruit pieces or pieces of cereal for cricket food


     What to do
     Use your habitat notes from your learning log. Draw a picture of the habitat in the space below
that you would like to create. When you have finished your drawing ask your teacher to approve your
plan for your cricket habitat. After your plan has been approved you may gather the materials with
your group members and create a habitat for your team‘s crickets. When your habitat is complete,
transfer your crickets to their new home. Draw a picture of your habitat below or take a picture with a
digital camera and print it out and paste it below in your learning log.




                                                                                                          31
                                                              Second Day
                                                              Creating Cricket Habitats
     Teacher Tell
      Today we are going to create a habitat for your crickets. One person from each group needs to

get a plastic container. Another person should fill the bottom of that container with dirt. The third

person should put some lettuce and food in the bottom of the container. The fourth person needs to

add the crickets to the habitat. If you would like to, your group may add an egg carton to your habitat

to give the crickets a place to hide




     Teacher Material
     Once back in the classroom, have students create a habitat in one of the aquarium-size containers

that you have provided. The only things that students need to include in their environments today will

be dirt on the bottom, food (such as cereal) and water in a small container or milk jug top (the moisture

will stay in the environment longer if you put a cotton ball in the dish). Crickets also like to have

places to hide so you may want to allow the students to include some egg cartons in their habitat.

Below is a picture of what your habitat may look like.




                                                                                                            32
Student Activity Sheet #3                         Reading About Crickets

      Materials for each team of readers
      Books about Crickets, Pencil
      KWLS chart
      Learning Log

      What to do
      Write down the names of the students who are in your "cricket chronicles" team. Write down the
      title of the book that your teacher assigns to your group. Then complete the KWLS chart below
      for your book.

      Names of Group Members:

      Title of Cricket Book:

 K--What we                W--What we                 L--What we                 S--What we

 KNOW about                WANT to learn              LEARNED about               STILL need to

 crickets                  about crickets             crickets                   learn about crickets




                                                                                                        33
                                                                    Third Day
                                                                    Reading about Crickets

     Teacher Tell
     After the students have finished creating their cricket habitats they will read a book with their

group and present some of the important information that they discover to the class. Explain to the

students that one thing that good readers do before they read is to think about what they already know

on the topic about which they will be reading. They then use this information to help them read. One

way that they can use what they already know about a topic to help them in their reading is to use a

"KWLS" (Carr & Ogle, 1987) chart. Make a transparency of this chart to use as a model for students.

Explain that the K stands for what you already KNOW about a topic, the W stands for what you

WANT to learn about a topic, that the L stands for what you LEARNED about a topic, and that the S

stands for what you STILL want to learn about a topic. Explain to the students that they are going to

use what they already know about crickets and the questions that they have about crickets to help them

read books about crickets. Have students remain in their heterogeneous cricket collecting groups.

Give each group a KWLS chart and assign one student to be the Writer for the group. One of your

advanced learners would be a good choice for Writer. Ask each student in the group to tell the Writer

in the group one thing that he or she knows about crickets. The Writer needs to write this information

under the K in the KWLS chart. Next, ask each student to tell the Writer one thing that he or she

WANTS to know about crickets. The Writer needs to write this information down under the W in the

KWLS chart. After all of the groups have finished, give each group of students a cricket book (see list

of nonfiction cricket books on pp. XXXX, TO BE COMPLETED). As you are assigning these books

to groups, introduce these books to students by talking about each one briefly. Explain to students that

all of these books will be available for them to read throughout the unit of study, but that they will read


                                                                                                              34
only one of these books today with their group members. Tell the students that good readers use what

they already know about a topic and what they want to know to help them read. Ask the students to

listen carefully to the Reader to see if any of the information that they thought they knew about

crickets was in the book, to see if what they wanted to learn about crickets was answered in the book,

and to see if they learned any new and interesting information about crickets. Assign one of the

students in the group to be the Reader, with the other students serving as listeners. After the Reader

has finished, instruct each student in the group to tell the Writer one thing that that he/she learned

about crickets from reading the book. The Writer will record this information under the L (learned)

column. Finally, instruct the students to tell the writer one thing that they STILL want to learn about

crickets under the S column if they have questions about crickets that have not yet been answered.

After all group of students have finished, ask one person from each group, the Reporter, to share with

the whole class what their group learned. You many want to compile this information into a class

KWLS chart and refer to this information throughout the unit. Explain to the students that they need

to think about what they already know and what they want to know before they read, and that they can

use this information to help them when they read any book. Continue by telling students that we don't

always find out all of the information that we want by reading one book, so we need to read many

books to find out answers to our questions. Remind students that they can read other books about

crickets in their free time. You may want to encourage your advanced readers and writers to be the

students to read the book to the group and to record the group's answers.




     Teacher Material


                                                                                                          35
     There are many books, both fiction and non-fiction, written about crickets. Provide several

books for students to read. Assign each group a book to read. Give the students enough time to

thoroughly read and summarize the book they chose to read. When all the groups have finished, allow

them to share with the class two or three things that they learned about crickets from reading their

book. While each group presents their information, have the rest of your students record at least two

things that they found interesting from their classmates‘ presentations on their Student Activity Sheet.

     On page XX, you will find a list of children‘s literature books about crickets. You may choose

to have some of these available to your students throughout the next two weeks. We recommend that

you read the books you are providing prior to this lesson. This information will help you to answer

any questions that may arise during the students reading. It will also enable you to ensure appropriate

texts for each of your groups of students.




                                                                                                           36
                      Cricket Books for Classroom Use


Title                  Author(s)                        Synopsis

Bugs              Nancy Parker      Information book about many insects.

                                    Illustrations showing how insects grow and their

                                    growth stages.

The Insect        Monica Russo      Divides insect groups into the season they might

Almanac                             be found. Very nice illustrations. Details about

                                    cricket sounds.

Grasshoppers      Dorothy Childs    Lost of information about crickets. Includes a

and Crickets      Hogner            section about the cricket culture in China.

Catch a Cricket   Carla Stevens     Simple book about the capture and care of

                                    crickets. Includes other insects.

Incredible        D.J. Arneson      Detailed book about insects Each page includes

Insects                             a specific insect (including the cricket) with

                                    wonderful color photographs.

The Very Quiet    Eric Carle        Short story about a cricket who is born not

Cricket                             chirping.

A Pocketful of    Rebecca Caudill   Wonderful story about a boy who finds a cricket

Cricket                             and takes it to school. Several cricket facts are

                                    included.




                                                                                        37
Chester Cricket   George Seldon         Chester Cricket finds himself in all kinds of

Series                                  situations. Books contain a lot of factual

                                        information.

Chirping          Melvin Berger         Simple book that provides information on

Crickets :                              cricket chirping, catching crickets, and

Stage 2                                 observing crickets.

Cricketology      Michael Elsohn Ross   Information book filled with interesting facts.

(Backyard

Buddies)

Crickets and      Elaine Pascoe         Contains lots of background material on crickets

Grasshoppers                            and grasshoppers.

(Nature Close-

Up)

"Leave That       Barbara Anne Porte    Alan Lee wants a cricket as a pet. When he

Cricket Be,                             finally finds the cricket, it cricket will not chirp

Alan Lee"                               for Alan. Brings Chinese culture into the study

                                        of crickets.




                                                                                               38
Student Activity Sheet #4                           Cricket Habitat Preferences
Materials for each team of scientists
Clear container
Dry sand
Wet sand
Soil
Leaves and grass
8 Crickets from your habitat
Pencil

What to do

        Answer the first two questions below. Then, get together with your teammates. Put dry
sand in one corner of your container. Put wet sand in another corner of your container. Put, soil
and the leaves & grass mixture each into the two remaining corners of your container. Collect
eight crickets from your habitat and put them into your container. Wait for a day to begin to
make your observations. Then, observe your container of crickets four times for 5 minutes each
at the beginning of the hours noted on the recording chart. Then, answer the last four questions
about your experiment.

1.What type of habitat do you think your cricket will prefer?

______________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2.Why would you prefer that habitat if you were a cricket?

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                    39
                    Dry            Wet Sand                      Soil   Leaves/Grass

                    Sand

 9 AM




1 11 AM




 1 PM




  3 PM




    3. In which habitat(s) did you find most of your crickets?

    ______________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    4.How many crickets did you find in that area?

    ______________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________



                                                                                       40
5. Why do you think that was their preferred area?

___________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________



6. Did your crickets make the choices that you thought they would? What really happened?

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                           41
                                                        Fourth Day
                                                        Cricket Habitat Preferences
     Teacher Tell
     We created a habitat for our crickets based on your observations about the areas where crickets

lived outside on the school grounds. Today, we are going to investigate the types of habitat substrates

that crickets prefer. We will see if they prefer dry sand, damp sand, loose soil, or grass and leaves as a

substrate. After we find out which habitat crickets prefer, each of you will construct a more suitable

habitat for your crickets.

     I would like each of you to get into the groups that you were in yesterday. I am going to give

each group a small container. I would like for you to take your container to the table and place dry

sand in one corner, damp sand in another corner, loose soil in the third corner and the grass and leaves

in the fourth corner, like this (demonstrate, see picture below). One person from your group will now

need to put eight crickets into your container. Tomorrow, each of you will need to make observations

about which areas your crickets choose. You will observe your crickets 4 times throughout the day.

We will observe the crickets for 5 minutes each time. You will then record your observations on your

Student Activity Sheet. After you have made all of your observations you need to return your crickets

to their original homes. You will then answer the last four questions on your Student Activity Sheet.




                                                                                                             42
     Teacher Material
     This is a day for students to practice their observing and hypothesizing skills. Students will work

in their groups to determine which habitats their crickets prefer. Before beginning the activity, you will

need to write the following two questions on the board. 1) What type of habitat do you think a cricket

will prefer? 2) Why would you prefer that habitat if you were a cricket? Have the students write the

answers to these questions in their learning logs on the Student Activity Sheet for today‘s lesson.

After the students have answered the questions they will need to get into their groups.

     Your students will be working with dry sand, damp sand, loose soil, and a mixture of grass and

leaves. You will need to have these materials on a table for the students to use. You will also need to

have one empty container with top or several large pieces of screen and rubber bands to cover the

containers so that the crickets will not jump out. Each group needs to have a container and lid. In this

container they will place each of the 4 substrates at the bottom of the container as shown in the picture.




     Students will add crickets to this newly developed habitat and record their observations about

which material(s) the crickets prefer. As a part of this project, the students will need to be given 4

times in which they will be able to observe their crickets. At these times they will need to record their




                                                                                                             43
observations. After all four observations have been made have students answer the last four questions

on their Student Activity Sheets.

     Teacher Materials

            4 containers (preferably plastic) with lids or screen covering

            Dry sand – can be found outside in your schoolyard

            Damp sand – add water to some of your dry sand

            Loose soil – can use potting soil found at any flower store

     •       Mixture of leaves and grass – collect leaves and grass from outside and put into one

             container. Shake up container so that the leaves and grass mix.

            Learning logs




                                                                                                        44
Student Activity Sheet #5 Comparing Cricket & Kids

Materials for each team of scientists
Cricket in insect box
Pencil



What to do

Look closely at your cricket. Draw a picture of your cricket below on the left side of the line.
Make sure you label all of its body parts that you know already. Draw a picture of yourself
below on the right side of the line. Label your body parts. Include the following body parts:
head, legs, arms, eyes, nose, feet, lungs and ears. On a piece of lined paper in your learning log,
write a paragraph comparing the similarities and differences between your body and your
cricket‘s body.



                  My Cricket                                                 Me




                                                                                                      45
                                                           Fifth Day
                                                           Comparing Crickets and Kids
     Teacher Tell
     Carefully look at the cricket in your insect box. I would like for you to draw a picture of your

cricket on the left-hand side of the paper and a picture of yourself on the right-hand side of the paper

in your learning log. Be sure to label all of the body parts on the pictures of your cricket and on the

picture of you. After you have completed both pictures and you have all of the body parts labeled, I

would like for you to write a paragraph comparing yourself to the cricket. Include information about

the body parts that you have that are the same as your cricket and information about body parts that are

different. After students have finished drawing and writing, have them discuss the following questions:

     1.      Do crickets have eyes?

     2.       How many eyes do you see?

     3.      Do crickets have ears?

     4.      Where are their ears located?

     5.      How many legs do crickets have?

     6.      How many legs and arms do you have?

     7.      How do you know if your cricket is a male (boy) or a female (girl)?

Do not give students any information that they do not know already. Later in this project students will

learn vocabulary for cricket body parts and they will take a closer look at cricket anatomy.




                                                                                                           46
       Teacher Materials

   4 small clear plastic containers (insect boxes work best; containers should be slightly bigger than the
    crickets to limit their movements and therefore make observations easier)
   4 (or more) magnifying glasses
   Learning logs
   Construction paper (different colors)
   Scissors
   Glue
   Pen or pencil




                                                                                                              47
Student Activity Sheet #6                          Naming Crickets & Kids

Write your full name:

Do you have the same name as one of your parents, grandparents, brothers or sisters? If
so, which one?



List the name of one or more of your relatives who has one of the same names that you
have:



What is the origin of your name? Is it English, Irish, Spanish, African or do you know?



Do all people in our country have three names? Do you know someone with two names
or four names?



(TO BE COMPLETED)




                                                                                          48
                                                                  Sixth Day
                                                                  Naming Crickets & Kids
      Teacher Tell

A Name’s a Name or Not: Cricket Taxonomy Lesson

      Crickets are insects. They have 3 body parts (head, thorax and abdomen) and 3 pairs of jointed

 legs. They belong to the

      Kingdom- Animals

              Phylum—Arthoropods

                     Class-Insects

                             Order-Orthoptera

                                     Family

                                              Genus- Acheta

                                                    Species- domestica



      Some scientists called taxonomists specialize in naming organisms. Names are important to both

 crickets and kids because names usually give some indication of relationships. Some people have

 names like that too. For example, in your class are their students who have Jr. at the end of their

 names or II or III? Are there students who have the same names as parents, or the same last names?

 Naming conventions vary of course between crickets and kids but there are patterns none the less. All

 animal names including the scientific names for all kinds of crickets are in a language called Latin.

 No one speaks Latin anymore but scientists use it often to refer to organisms by name.




                                                                                                         49
Student Activity Sheet #7                        Reading more about Crickets
           Listen to the story that your teacher reads aloud. As your teacher reads the story, write

    down the answers you hear.



    Title Of Book:



    Setting:




    Problem:




    Main Events:




    Solution:




    Ending:




                                                                                                       50
                                                             Seventh Day
                                                             Reading more about Crickets
         Teacher Tell
         Yesterday we looked closely at the anatomy of our crickets. Anatomy is the structure of an

organism‘s body. Today we will be looking at the parts of a story. Stories have different parts, just

like crickets. We call the parts of a story the story structure. Before we look at the parts of a cricket,

we are going to look at the parts of a story about a cricket. Most good stories have different parts in

them: a setting that tells where the story happened, who the story was about and when the story

happened; a problem that one of the characters in the story had; the events that tell what happens in the

story; how the character solved the problem, which is called the solution; and how the story ends.

Today I am going to read you the book, Cricket Boy, which is a Chinese folk tale retold by Feenie

Ziner. As I read, I want you to listen for the parts of the story that we just discussed. (Read the book

to students). Now that we have finished reading the book, let's see if we can figure out the parts of the

story.

         TITLE OF BOOK:

         SETTING:

         PROBLEM:

         MAIN EVENTS:

         SOLUTION:

         ENDING:




                                                                                                             51
Student Activity Sheet #8A
Examining Stories about Crickets Cricket Vocabulary

   Materials for each scientist
   Story ―Christopher Cricket: Safe at home‖
   Pencil

   What to do
   Read the story ―Christopher Cricket: Safe at home‖. Then, match the words below to their
   definitions.




  1. Molted                     A. Long tube-type body part that extends from the end of a female

  2. Invertebrate               B. Middle part of the body

  3. Ovipositor                 C. Last part of the body

  4. Compound Eye               D. First part of the body, contains the crickets‘ eyes

  5. Insect                     E. Baby cricket with no wings

  6. Nymph                      F. Shedding skin that gives crickets room to grow

  7. Thorax                     G. Hard outer covering

  8. Exoskeleton                H. Only eyes that can be seen, largest of cricket‘s five eyes

  9. Head                       I. Small, usually winged invertebrates

  10. Abdomen                   J. Animal that does not have a backbone




                                                                                                    52
Student Activity Sheet #8B

Examining Stories about Crickets

Materials for each scientist
Story ―Christopher Cricket: Safe at Home‖
Pencil

What to do
Find the following vocabulary words in the word-find puzzle.


Vocabulary Words

Head
                            H    E   A      D   Q   W   C      G   F   T   Y   O
Abdomen                     R    I   Y      U   O   L   E      B   Z   I   D   P
                            W    M   G      N   V   J   T      T   V   N   M   X
Thorax
                            C    O   B      A   I   Q   A      I   J   S   F   D
Ovipositor                  K    L   E      K   P   T   R      H   L   E   W   T
                            P    T   U      Y   O   M   B      G   K   C   I   H
Nymph                       C    E   X      O   S   K   E      L   E   T   O   N
Molted                      S    D   Q      Z   I   J   T      C   B   R   Y   L
                            L    P   T      C   T   Z   R      O   I   M   F   J
Exoskeleton                 N    R   D      F   O   N   E      K   P   H   R   N
Compound Eye                H    E   J      L   R   S   V      H   N   T   Q   O
                            C    O   M      P   O   U   N      D   E   Y   E   S
Insect                      I    N   C      O   T   R   I      S   F   G   B   M
Invertebrate
                            V    Y   J      R   D   A   D      R   Y   L   O   I
                            L    I   P      F   S   B   N      W   A   Q   X   B
                            U    R   T      H   O   R   A      X   J   H   U   K




                                                                                   53
         The Adventures of Christopher Cricket: Safe at Home
     Mr. Cricket was very lonely one night. He was sitting next to a dandelion outside of a little

boy‘s house, named Erick. Erick is a young boy in the fifth grade at Hilltop Elementary School. It was

a Saturday night and Mr. Cricket was lonely. He started to sing a lovely song by rubbing his wings

together. This harmonious song attracted Mrs. Cricket to his side of the garden. After Mr. and Mrs.

Cricket got married, Mrs. Cricket put her long ovipositor into a crack in the sidewalk and laid close to

700 eggs. An ovipositor is a long tube type body part that extends from the abdomen, or back of

female cricket‘s body. Eggs travel through this tube and are laid in small tight places. The next spring

a bunch of baby crickets were hatched from the eggs Mrs. Cricket had laid in the fall.

      There was one particular cricket that was my favorite. This cricket was named Christopher.

When Christopher first hatched he had no wings on his thorax, which is the middle part of his body.

He was called a nymph. As Christopher grew he molted his skin and grew wings. Molted means to

shed his skin in order to have room to grow. Once Christopher grew his wings he was an adult cricket.

He was a handsome cricket with a brownish-black exoskeleton. An exoskeleton is another word for a

hard outer covering. He has a total of five eyes but only his big compound eyes can be seen on his

head. He has two wings, which allow him to sing and attract females. His wings have ridges on them

that meet and rub together to make chirps. Christopher is only able to sing because he is a male. If he

were a female, he would not be able to sing songs. Christopher has six legs, which makes him an

Insect. Insects are small, usually winged, invertebrates having three pairs of legs. An invertebrate is

an animal that does not contain a backbone.

             One day Erick was late for school and had forgotten to tie his shoes. His shoelaces were

flying all around and I was sure that he was going to trip on them. Sure enough, he stepped on one of

his shoelaces and fell flat on his face. BAM!!!! Christopher wanted to know if Erick was OK. He


                                                                                                           54
hoped over to Eric as he was lying on the sidewalk. Just as Christopher got to him, Erick stood up.

Christopher saw that Erick was crying. He wanted to follow Erick to school to make sure that he was

going to be OK. He could not keep up with Erick, so Christopher latched onto one of Erick‘s

shoelaces and hitched a ride to school.

             When Erick got to school, he had stopped crying. Christopher jumped off his shoelace

and asked Erick if he was OK. Erick did not respond which made Christopher upset. Erick walked

away and went into a classroom. Christopher could not catch up and lost Erick in the huge school.

Christopher wanted to go home because he saw that Erick was OK. He was really scared of the

atmosphere surrounding him. He started jumping out of the school but the door shut in his face. He

was trapped! What is Christopher going to do?




                                                                                                      55
      Teacher Tell
     Have your students turn to the Christopher Cricket story. You will need to read the first part of

the Christopher Cricket story to your class. Before reading the story tell your class that today they are

going to learn some of the vocabulary about crickets that we will be using in our studies. We are

going to play a game called Possible Sentences (Moore & Moore, 1986) with some of the words that

we will be discussing. I am going to write each of the fourteen vocabulary words on the board:

     Ovipositor                      Abdomen

     Thorax                          Nymph

     Molted                          Exoskeleton

     Compound eyes                   Head

     Insect                          Invertebrate

     Cerci                           Palpi

     Spiracles                       Antennae



     Do any of you know what all of these words mean? I hope not, because you are not supposed to

know all of the meanings of these words yet! One thing that good readers do is to make a guess about

what a word means if you are not sure of its definition. That is what you are going to do today. What

I want you to do is to work with a partner to see if you can write three sentences that include seven of

the fourteen words on our vocabulary list. If you don't know what these words mean, that is OK! That

is why we call this game Possible Sentences. Each of you needs to write down your sentences. After

students have finished, let a few pairs share their sentences.

     Now turn to the Christopher Cricket story in your learning log. While I read the story I would

like for you to follow along on your copy of the story. I want you to listen for some of the words that



                                                                                                            56
you used in your possible sentences.   After you finish reading, discuss the vocabulary from the story.

Now that we know what these words mean, I want you and your partner to rewrite your possible

sentences so that they make sense.

      Now, I would like for you to complete the first Student Activity Sheet by matching the words to

their definitions. If you need to you may look back in the story for the definitions. You may also

complete the word search. After you finish the matching and the word search I would like for you to

create your own story about what you think is going to happen to Christopher Cricket next. Please

illustrate your story.




                                                                                                          57
Student Activity Sheet # 9                                         Examining Crickets

      Materials for each team of scientists
      2 Cricket Anatomy Diagrams (female & male crickets)
      Crickets in habitat
      Magnifying glass
      Pencil
      Construction paper
      Scissors
      Glue


      What to do

      Look closely at your cricket with a magnifying glass or hands lens or use an insect box with a

 magnifying glass built into the top of the box. Use your student anatomy diagrams to help you find all

 the parts of your cricket. Work with your group to answer the questions below by filling in the graphic

 organizer on the next page.

      How many eyes does your cricket have?

      How many legs does your cricket have? How many are on each side of the cricket‘s body?

      Does your cricket have ears? Where are they?

      How does your cricket breathe?

      Does your cricket have wings? How many?

      How many antennae does your cricket have? Where are they?

      Does your cricket have an ovipositor? What sex does this mean your cricket is?

      If your cricket is a boy, can you see the groves on its wings?




                                                                                                           58
                                                 Yes, it‘s a girl
                                    Ovipositor
                Two      Antennae                           Eyes        5,2 compound



    Two pairs                                                     Female, no ridges
                        Wings        Crickets                 Gender
                                                                    (cannot sing)

           Spiracles                                                        6 in all
                          Breathe                            Legs
(on thorax & abdomen)
                                        Ears

                                      2 ON FORELEGS




                                                                                       59
                                                                          Ninth Day
                                                                          Examining Crickets
     Teacher Tell
     Just as we talked about the parts of a story yesterday, today we are going to talk about the parts

of a cricket! Earlier in this project we compared our bodies to cricket bodies. Each of you have those

comparison drawings in your learning logs. Now, we are going to practice reading an Anatomy

Diagram as we practice technical names for the different body parts of crickets. Review the body parts

on the student activity sheet and answer any questions that the students may have. Please get into your

groups. I am going to give each group a clear container and a magnifying glass. Carefully take one

cricket out of your habitat and put it in your clear container. Use the magnifying glass to look very

closely at all the body parts of your cricket. Use your Student Anatomy Diagram to help you find

where some of the body parts from the diagram are located on your cricket. While you are observing

your cricket, answer the questions on your Student Activity Sheet by completing the graphic

organizer.

     Teacher Material

     This will be this first day your students will have to look closely at a cricket‘s body and match

technical vocabulary terms to these body parts. You will need to take a close look at the anatomy

diagrams so that you will be prepared to teach this lesson. You will also need to be prepared to answer

any questions that your students may have. The students will work in their groups. Your students

should have copies of the Anatomy Diagrams in their learning logs. These diagrams will help your

students know what features to look for on their crickets and where to find them. Diagrams can be

very challenging for students. We suggest that you model, for your students, how you might read a




                                                                                                          60
diagram. You can do this very easily by simply ―thinking aloud‖. Give students a chance to help you

answer your questions. Some questions that may be helpful to you in ―thinking aloud‖ are:

     1. Where is the arrow pointing ?

     2. What do I notice about this body part?

     3. Can I describe this body part in my own words?

     4. Do I know what it is called?

     5. Does it make sense to call it that?

     6. How can I remember what this body part is called?

      You may find it helpful to the students if you write these questions on the board or a poster so

that they can refer to them as they go through all of the body parts on the diagram.

      You will need to give each group a small plastic container and a magnifying glass. While

looking at the crickets through the magnifying glasses, the students will need to fill out the graphic

organizer on their first Student Activity Sheet for this lesson. There are questions listed on the Student

Activity Sheet that may help your students complete the graphic organizer. Below is an example of a

graphic organizer so that you will know what it looks like and how it should be filled in.




                                                                                                             61
 • Each cricket has two of these. They are located on the head. They are used by the cricket to help feel

 its way around its environment.

 •Each cricket has two of these. They are located at the end of the abdomen. The 750 hairs on each of

 these help the cricket to move backwards.

 • Each cricket has two pairs of these. One pair has ridges and can create music. This music making is

 called stridulation.

• This is the middle section of a cricket‘s body. This is where the wings and legs join the body.

• This is the front section of a cricket‘s body. This section contains the eyes, palpi, and antennae.

• Each cricket has two of these located on either side of the head. Each one contains thousands of

lenses. Each cricket also has another one of these in between the two compound eyes and two more on

either side of the head behind the compound eyes, for a total of five. We can only see the two big ones

with our eyes.

• Each cricket has two of these. They are located on the front of the head on either side of the mouth.

They allow the cricket to taste food.

• One of these is located on the front of each front leg. They are similar to a human eardrum.

• This section is the back end of a cricket‘s body. This is largest part of a cricket.

• These are the breathing holes for the cricket. They are located on the thorax and the abdomen.

    Each cricket has six legs, three on each side of the cricket.

    Each cricket has two of these. They are located on the head. They are used by the cricket to help

     feel its way around the environment.

    Each cricket has two of these. They are located at the end of the abdomen. The 750 hairs on each

     of these help the cricket to move backwards.




                                                                                                            62
   Each cricket has two pairs of these. One pair has ridges and can create music. This music making

    is called stridulation.

   This is the middle section of a cricket‘s body. This is where the wings and legs join the body.

   This is the front section of a cricket‘s body. This section contains the eyes, palpi, and antennae.

   Each cricket has two of these located on either side of the head. Each one contains thousands of

    lenses. Each cricket also has another one of these in between the two compound eyes and two more

    on either side of the head behind the compound eyes, for a total of five. We can only see the two

    big ones with our eyes.

   Each cricket has two of these. They are located on the front of the head on either side of the mouth.

    They allow the cricket to taste food.

   One of these is located on the front of each front leg. They are similar to a human eardrum.

   This section is the back end of a cricket‘s body. This is largest part of a cricket.

   These are the breathing holes for the cricket. They are located on the thorax and the abdomen.

   Each cricket has six legs, three on each side of the cricket.

   Each female cricket has one located at the end of its abdomen. It is used to lay eggs deep in sand or

    crevasses in the ground.




                                                                                                            63
                          Student Anatomy Diagram (Male)




           4. Cercus(I)    3. Abdomen       2. Thorax    1. Head
                                                               12. Antennae
                                                                   11. Eye
5. Ovipositor                                                       10. Ear


                                                           9. Palpus(I)
                6. Legs      7. Spiracles     8. Wings




    WHITE OUT THE OVIPOSITOR ON THE MALE ANATOMY DIAGRAM.




                                                                              64
                          Student Activity Diagram (Female)




           4. Cercus(I)     3. Abdomen       2. Thorax    1. Head
                                                                12. Antennae
                                                                    11. Eye
5. Ovipositor                                                        10. Ear


                                                            9. Palpus(I)
                6. Legs       7. Spiracles     8. Wings




                                                                               65
 Student Activity Sheet #10 Constructing Models of Crickets

      Materials for each artist
      Pencil
      Construction paper cricket model
      Scissors
      Glue
      Brads


      What to do

      Today you will make a model cricket out of construction paper. First you will cut out all of the

 cricket body parts. Then you will need to label all of the body parts on your cricket. Then you can

 assemble your cricket with brads. When you are finished your teacher will help you find a place in

 the classroom to display your model. Include a nametag for your cricket (both its name and your

 name).

THIS ACTIVITY NEEDS TO INCLUDE CRICKET BODY PARTS TO CUT OUT AND

ASSEMBLE. ALSO, DIFFERENT KINDS OF CRICKET MODELS SHOULD BE

AVAILABLE SUCH AS HOUSE CRICKETS, FIELD CRICKETS, MOLE CRICKETS,

CAMEL BACK CRICKETS, ETC. THIS VARIETY OF SPECIES WILL TIE

THIS LESSON TO THE EARLIER LESSON ON NAMING CRICKETS AND

THE FOLLOWING LESSON ON CRICKETS IN OTHER COUNTRIES.




                                                                                                         66
                                            Tenth Day
                                            Constructing Models of Crickets

     Teacher Tell
     Today students will make a cricket out of construction paper. FIRST THEY WILL CHOOSE

THE TYPE OF CRICKET THAT THEY WOULD LIKE TO MAKE. THEN, THEY WILLNEED

TO CUT OUT THE PARTS OF THE CRICKET MODEL. They will need to label all of the parts of

their cricket. You may want review the body parts of crickets, especially those that are difficult to

see. These parts could be the spiracles (breathing holes located on abdomen and thorax), the ears

(located on the front legs), and the eyes (compound eyes, one on either side of head). After the

students have created their own crickets out of construction paper help them find a place in the

classroom to display their work.




                                                                                                        67
Student Activity Sheet #11A                                           Feeding Crickets

    Materials for each team of scientists

    Story ―Christopher Cricket: Lost in the Cafeteria‖

    Pencil

    What to do

             Read ―Christopher Cricket: Lost in the Cafeteria‖.

             Write a response to the following prompt. Answer it and give reasons why.

             ―If I were a cricket, my favorite food would be…‖

    _____________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                         68
Student Activity Sheet # 11B                                          Feeding Crickets

     Materials for each team of scientists
     Class Chart
     Pencil


     What to do
     Work with your teammates to answer the following questions. Fill in the chart below as your
teacher fills in the class chart.


                                      Your Groups’                       Class Answers

                                      Answers

  What foods do you
  think crickets like to
  eat?


  Why do you think
  they like those foods?



  Are there any foods
  that you would like to
  test to see if your
  cricket will eat it?

  If you were a cricket,
  what foods would you
  eat?




                                                                                                   69
Student Activity Sheet #11C                                      Feeding Crickets

Materials for each team of scientists
Clear empty container
Two different kinds of cricket food
1 cricket for each student
Pencil


What to do
Label one side of your container with an ―A‖ and the other side with a ―B.‖ Put one kind of
food in your container on side ―A‖ and another kind on side ―B.‖ Add your crickets to this
container. Make observations on what food your crickets choose. You will do this four times
for five minutes each. Write your observations in the chart below.




                                                                                              70
                              Food 1                 Food 2

First Hour




Second Hour




Third Hour




Fourth Hour




  Which food did your crickets prefer?

  __________________________________________________________________________

  __________________________________________________________________________




                                                                               71
How many of your crickets liked that food?

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________



Why do you think your crickets prefer that food?

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________




                                                                             72
                                                                    Eleventh Day
                                                                    Feeding Crickets
     Teacher Tell
     Today we will find out what foods your crickets like to eat by doing some experiments. We are

also going to read another part of the Christopher Cricket story. First I would like your help in

creating a story line. On this long piece of paper we are going to write what has happened to

Christopher so far. Can anyone tell me what happened to him first? (Continue asking students

questions about what has happened in the story. Record their answers on the story line).

     Pay close attention to the story as I read it. You are listening for the foods that Christopher

found and whether he liked them or not. These foods might prove to be ―clues‖ as to what kind of

foods real crickets eat. This information could be helpful when you do your experiments today so

you may want to take notes on a page of paper in your learning log (read the story). Now I would

like for you to complete the first Activity Sheet in your learning log for this lesson.

     I have drawn a chart on the board and I need each of your groups to help me fill in the answers.

Please get into your groups. In your learning logs record the answers your group decides on for each

of these questions: (a) What foods do you think crickets like to eat? (b) Why do you think they like

those foods? (c) Are there any foods that you would like to test and see if your cricket will eat it? (d)

If you were a cricket, what foods would you eat? Then, we will write your answers on the board

(allow the students a few minutes to fill in the answers in their learning logs).

     Now we will experiment with different foods to find out what our crickets like best. I need one

person from every group to come and get a marker, a spoon and a container from my desk. I have a

container of crickets that has been set aside for this experiment. The crickets are very hungry and

ready to eat. Before we let them eat, you must set up the experiment properly.




                                                                                                            73
      First, you need to take your container and split it into 2 sections. With the marker write an "A"

on one section and a "B" on the other. (You will need to demonstrate this as explained above). The

"A" and the "B" should be visible on the outside of the container. Second, I am going to pass out

two different foods to each group. For group 1, I am handing out lettuce and apples. Group 2, will

have oatmeal and frosted flakes. Group 3 will have bread and bread soaked in hot sauce. Be careful

group 3, that hot sauce might make them jump. Group 4, you will have carrots and celery. Once you

have the two different foods in front of you, place one food on section A and the other food on

section B.

      It is now time to see what foods your crickets like to eat. When I come to your table each of

you are going to take three crickets out of the container and place them in-between sections A and B.

Close the lid and place the container in a quiet spot at the side of the room. After 5 minutes we will

check your containers. Count how many crickets are on each side and write your results on your

Student Activity Sheet. You will need to make a total of 4 observations every 10 minutes. You will

continue to fill out your Student Activity Sheet in between the observations and during the

observations. When you are finished with your observations return the crickets to their original

habitat.

      *Sometimes the crickets do not do what you expect. Be aware of this during your experiment

and this should be included in your observations.




                                                                                                          74
     Teacher Material
     Today the students will be finding out what kind of foods crickets prefer. This will be

accomplished by watching which food the cricket eats (or goes to) more during the observation times.

Before the experiment you may want to read the continuation of the Christopher Cricket story that

has been included in this lesson. The story talks about crickets and food in an exciting way that will

peak students interests and prepare them for today‘s lesson. Before reading the story create a story

line with your class. Ask students what has happened in the story so far. Record their answers on a

story line which is similar to a timeline where each part of the story is written on a piece of paper in

the order in which it happened. Keep today‘s story line for future use.

     Before reading the story alert your students to pay attention to the foods Christopher encounters

in the story. They may be helpful to the students in their experiments today. Read the story to your

class. After reading the story have students write the following prompt in their learning logs (if I

were a cricket my favorite food would be…). Then create a chart on the board. The following

questions should be included in the chart:

     1. What foods do you think crickets like to eat?

     2. Why do you think they like those foods?

     3. Are there any foods that you would like to see if your crickets eat?

     4. If you were a cricket, what foods would you eat?

     Allow the students to work in their groups to answer the above questions by filling in the chart

on the Student Activity Sheet for this lesson. Have one student from each group write their group‘s

answer to each question on the chart. After the experiment, revisit the chart. Cross out the seemingly

incorrect answers to question one and circle the observed correct ones.




                                                                                                           75
     To begin the experiment you will need to get the students into their groups. Each group should

receive one container with a lid, a spoon, marker, and two different foods to test. The foods need to

be prepared (cut up or divided) before the students begin to experiment.

     Before the experiment the crickets that will be used need to be separated into an empty

container. These crickets will need to be in that container for at least 15 minutes in order for them to

grow hungry. There needs to be one cricket placed aside for each student. You will need to do this 15

minutes prior to the activity. Another set up procedure will be for you to make sure that the portion

and the size of each food is approximately the same as the others. The size of the portion does not

matter as long as it will fit into the container with the lid on and allows the crickets room to move




around on top of it. Place each food on a separate paper plate so that it will be easier to hand out to

the students. They will need to label their containers with an A on one side and a B on the other as

shown below.

     There should be 4 groups of students. Each group will receive one container with two different

foods in each container. The groups should be as follows:

     1.      container with one side of lettuce and one side of apple

     2.      container with one side of oatmeal and one side of cereal (frosted flakes)

     3.      container with one side of bread and one side of bread soaked in hot sauce

     4.      container with one side of carrots and one side of celery

     If the students have different ideas about what kinds of food crickets might like, allow them to

explore their curiosity by experimenting with different foods. You may want to be prepared and have


                                                                                                           76
several different kinds of food on hand in case the students want to experiment. Some foods may be

difficult for you to find at certain times of the year. You may change the foods in this experiment to

suit your needs. Crickets usually like fruits, vegetables, oats and breadcrumbs. However, they are not

picky eaters and will eat almost anything.

     When the experiments are set up at each table, the children will place the crickets into their

containers and observe for 5 minutes and then record their observations on their Student Activity

Sheet. They will make a total of 4 observations that will occur every 10 minutes until the 4

observations have been recorded.




     Materials
            Lettuce
            Apples
            Oatmeal
            Bread
            Hot sauce
            Carrot
            Celery
            Cereal
            4 containers with lids or screen covering (preferably plastic)
            4 markers
            4 spoons
            8 paper plates
            Learning logs




                                                                                                         77
The Adventures of Christopher Cricket: Lost in the Cafeteria
     When we left Christopher, he was trapped in the school. He was very confused and lost. What

should he do now? Where should he go? Christopher smelled a curious aroma that was coming from

a room down the hall. He started jumping his way towards this big room at the end of the hall. He

heard a loud RRRRIIIIINNNNGGGG!!!! All of a sudden there were millions of feet that Christopher

had to dodge. He kept jumping from side to side in order to avoid being squashed. His goal was to

make it to the big room at the end of the hall. He thought that it might be a way outside to return to

his home sweet home. He escaped the busy students by jumping to the side of the hall. After about

five minutes, he thought that the coast was clear. He saw a shadow above him that slammed and

caught his leg. He realized a student‘s book had fallen on him. His leg was caught in the pages of

this book. The little girl that dropped this book did not see Christopher. She picked up her book and

walked to the Cafeteria. The next thing Christopher knew he was caught in the book and hanging on

with all six of his legs for dear life. He managed to make it to a huge place that was loud and noisy

by holding onto the book. Christopher let go and landed in a bowl of fruit. He was in heaven until

the lunch lady saw him in the fruit bowl. She screamed and startled Christopher. He jumped out of

the fruit and into the mashed potatoes to get away from this shrill scream which he heard through the

small ear on his two front legs. The lunch lady still kept her eyes on him, even though he thought he

escaped. Next thing Christopher knew, a huge spoon was coming towards him. He then jumped out

of the mashed potatoes right into the bread bowl. He was safe here for a minute or two before the roll

he was sitting on was placed on a students lunch plate. The student screamed once she knew there

was a cricket on her plate. Christopher jumped off of her tray and made a mad dash for the big wide

open doors. RRRRRIIIIINNNNNNGGGGGG!!!!! Christopher was startled again by this loud noise.

Again feet started coming toward him. What is he going to do?


                                                                                                         78
Student Activity Sheet #12A                                Chirping Crickets

      Materials for each team of scientists
      Habitat with crickets in it
      Watch or clock
      Station (will be assigned by teacher)
      Pencil


      What to do
      Place your cricket habitat at the station that your teacher has assigned to your group.
            Be very quiet. When your crickets start to chirp the timekeeper needs to start their
      stopwatch.


      Everyone else needs to count how many chirps you hear in one minute. Record the data

 (number of chirps) here:____________________




                                                                                                   79
      Begin to fill in the chart below by recording the data you collected from one of the four stations.

Fill in the rest of the chart as your teacher fills in the class chart.



              Station Description                           Temperature             Average # of

                                                                                    Chirps

     Bright, warm environment

       (Windowsill with heating pad)




       Bright, room temperature

       environment

       (Windowsill without heating

       pad)



     Dark, warm environment

     (Closet with heating pad)



       Dark, room temperature

       environment

       (Closet without heating pad)




                                                                                                            80
     Student Activity Sheet # 12B                             Chirping Crickets

     Reading about Cricket Chirps

     Materials for each team of scientists
     ―The Very Quiet Cricket‖ story
     Pencil
     Venn Diagram


     What to do
            Read ―The Very Quiet Cricket‖. Fill in the Venn Diagram on the next page. Write a
paragraph comparing real crickets to the cricket in the story.




_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                81
Venn Diagram on Chirping Crickets




       Real Crickets        Cricket in Story




                                               82
                                                                  Day 12
                                                                  Chirping Crickets
     Teacher Tell
     Today we are going to conduct some experiments to find out what makes crickets chirp. First I

would like you to help me to add to our story line. Can anyone tell me what happened to Christopher

Cricket last time we read about him? (Add students‘ answers to the story line). Now I am going to

read the next part of the Christopher Cricket story. Follow along in your learning log while I read the

story. Be sure to pay close attention to what happens to Christopher in the story today. Some of these

things might be useful during our experimenting today.

     Now we are ready to experiment. We will use our math skills to collect, graph and average data

during our experiment today. In order to collect your data we will be using thermometers to take the

temperature readings of the habitats where your crickets are located. Does everyone know how to use

a thermometer? By show of hands, how many do not know the correct way to handle and use a

thermometer? (If any students are unsure then this is where you will need to explain how to use a

thermometer. Start by showing the student that one end (the end with the silver metal covering) is the

end where the temperature is measured. Show them that there are numbers up the side of the

thermometer that tell us what the temperature is. Show them how to read the number closest to the top

of the red line. Let them know that this is the number we will be using in our experiment. Also

remind students of how important it is that they alert you if their thermometer happens to break).

     Now that you know the proper way to use a thermometer please get into the groups that you

worked in last week. When you are in your groups, put your cricket habitat in the middle of the table

so that everyone can see. I am now going to hand out a thermometer to each group that I want you to




                                                                                                          83
place in your habitat. The proper way to place the thermometer in the habitat is to take the tip that

does not contain the metal end and place it into the dirt (see diagram below).




     Once the thermometer has been placed in your habitat I will assign you a place to take your

habitat. Group number 1, take your habitat to the windowsill and place it on the heating pad. Group

number 2, take your habitat and place it on the windowsill that does not have the heating pad on it.

Group number 3, take your habitat to the closet and place it on the heating pad. Group number 4; take

your habitat to the other closet without the heating pad.

     You need to sit near your habitats very quietly, remember crickets do not like to make noise if

they know you are nearby. One person will need to keep time on their watch or on the clock. When

your cricket starts to chirp (if all is quiet this should not take more than a few minutes, however the

crickets that are in the daylight will most likely not make a sound) the timekeeper will need to say

―go.‖ Everyone else in the group needs to count, on their own, how many chirps they hear in one

minute. After one minute the time keeper will say ―stop.‖ It is acceptable for everyone in your group

to have counted a different amount of chirps. Write down the number of chirps you heard in one

minute on your Student Activity Sheet. You also need to record the temperature of your habitat in the

chart on the Student Activity Sheet.

     At your tables, I would like you to average all of the people in your group‘s results. Do this by

adding up all of the number of chirps and then divide that number by the number of people in your

group. Group number 1, tell me what your average chirp and temperature was for a bright, warm




                                                                                                          84
environment (write the number in the chart on the board and make sure that your students are

recording this number in the chart on their Student Activity Sheet). Group number 2, tell me what your

average chirp and temperature was for a bright place at room temperature (write the number in the

chart on the board and make sure that your students are recording this number in the chart on their

Student Activity Sheet). Group number 3, tell me what your average chirp and temperature was for a

dark, warm environment (write the number in the chart on the board and make sure that your students

are recording this number in the chart on their Student Activity Sheet). Group number 4, tell me what

your average chirp and temperature was for a dark, room temperature environment (write the number

in the chart on the board and make sure that your students are recording this number in the chart on

their Student Activity Sheet).

     Now that all of our averaged results are on the chalkboard, we will graph our data (you may

graph this however you choose to).

     Now I would like to read a book to you. Listen carefully as I read this book because I would like

for you to fill in a Venn Diagram comparing the cricket in the story to your cricket. One thing that

good readers do is to think of how what they are reading connects to what they know about the outside

world (Harvey & Goudvis, 1999). Now that you know a lot of information about crickets, I want you

to connect what you hear in the book I am going to read to you to the information that you know about

crickets. Read story and then have students fill in the Venn Diagram on their Student Activity Sheet

after you have discussed similarities and differences with your students.




                                                                                                         85
     Teacher Material
     Today students will use graphing, averaging and recording data as a self-assessment. Before

beginning the experiment ask the students to recall what has happened to Christopher Cricket the past

two times we read about him. Add to your story line and then read the Christopher Cricket story that

has been included in this lesson. After doing this you are ready to experiment. You will need to

divide your students into the cooperative groups that they have been working in for the past week or

two. After dividing the students you should have 4 groups. Students will be using a thermometer

during this experiment. If the children are not familiar with a thermometer then you, as the teacher,

will need to explain to them how to use it. Show students how to read the temperature by looking at

the number closest to the top of the red line. It is also very important for you to show students how to

properly handle the thermometer. Alert the students that should the thermometer break, they need to

move away and let you know immediately that it broke.

     Questions that may be asked before the lesson:

     1.      Why do you think crickets chirp?

     2.      Do you think that temperature or light has anything to do with the fact that crickets chirp?

     3.      Do all crickets chirp?



     To set up this experiment you will need 4 stations that fit the following criteria:

     1.      Heating pad in a dark environment. (in a closet)

     2.      Room temperature in a dark environment (in a closet)

     3.      Heating pad in a lighted environment (on a windowsill)

     4.      Room temperature in a lighted environment (on a windowsill)




                                                                                                            86
     Once the stations have been set up, the groups of students will be assigned a station where they

will put their cricket habitat. One student will need to be the timekeeper. When the crickets start to

chirp the timekeeper will need to start keeping time. The rest of the group needs to count how many

times they hear the crickets chirp during the one minute observation. When one minute is up the

timekeeper will need to alert the rest of the group to stop counting. Each student in the group will,

more than likely, have counted a different number of chirps, which is good information. You will

want the groups to take an average of all of the chirps they counted and record that number in the chart

on the Student Activity Sheet for this lesson. The students also need to record the temperature of their

habitat in the chart on the Student Activity Sheet.

     During the time that the students are recording their data, you will need to draw, on the board, a

chart and a graph to be filled in after the students have completed their data collecting. The chart

should look like the one on the Student Activity Sheet for this lesson. After the students have

completed their experimenting you will need to fill in each group‘s average in the chart. Have the

students fill in the chart on their Student Activity Sheet while you fill in the chart on the board. If you

choose to, you may complete a graph of the class averages for each station in the experiment. Have

the students create their own graph on a blank piece of paper in their learning logs while you create

one on the board.

     After completing the experiment, the chart and the graph you may choose to read the book ―The

Very Quiet Cricket‖ by Eric Carle to your class. When you finish the book have your students

complete the Venn Diagram on their Student Activity Sheet. Tell them to compare the cricket in the

book to a real cricket.




                                                                                                              87
Materials
   4 habitats (1 habitat from each group, these were created on Day 2)
   4 thermometers that read Fahrenheit
   2 heating pads
   A chalk board
   A yard stick
   Learning log




                                                                          88
The Adventures of Christopher Cricket: Lost at School
      Ring! Once again Christopher was bombarded by students' shuffling feet. In fear of his life,

 Christopher lunged into the nearest classroom. Now he was safe but he knew he had to get out of the

 school soon. If he didn‘t get out he would end up squished on the bottom of one of the students‘

 shoes. How would Christopher get home? Christopher thought about it. He got to the school by

 clinging to Eric‘s shoelace so Eric must know the way home. Christopher decided that the only way to

 get home was to find Eric. Christopher thought to himself, ―I will check every classroom until I find

 him!‖ He was determined to get home and see his family again.

      Christopher hopped to the first classroom he saw. No Eric. He hopped into another classroom.

 No Eric. Finally, Christopher reached the end of the hall. Only two classes remained. Eric had to be

 in one of them. Christopher jumped into one of the remaining classrooms but Eric was not in there.

 Christopher said, ―Eric has to be in the last classroom.‖ Extremely fatigued he hopped into the last

 classroom. It was too hard to see all the students‘ faces from the floor so he spotted a windowsill and

 decided to hop onto it. Christopher was looking for Eric when a bone chilling wind gusted past him.

 Crickets don‘t like cold weather so Christopher hopped along the windowsill away from the open

 window. To Christopher‘s dismay, Eric was no where to be found. Christopher decided to take a rest.

 He had been searching for Eric all day and was tired. He found a sunny spot on the windowsill. It

 was so warm and comfortable. Crickets love warm weather. The temperature was just right for

 Christopher so he began to chirp by rubbing his hind legs together. Remember, Christopher can sing

 because he is a male and only male crickets can chirp. Christopher‘s chirping caught the students‘

 attention. The kids spotted him and began to scream, ―It‘s a bug!‖ The yelling of the students startled

 Christopher. He thought they were going to hurt him so he jumped out of the open window and




                                                                                                           89
landed onto the dirt. Where was Christopher now? Where was Eric if he wasn‘t inside school? How

is Christopher going to find his way home?




                                                                                                  90
  Student Activity Sheet #13                                   Lifestyles of Crickets

  Materials for each team of scientists
  New habitat for six of your crickets
  Six paper baking cups
  Scissors
  Pencil

  What to do
  Cut a door for your cricket into the side of each paper baking cup. Place these cups in your new
  habitat. Space them out enough so that the crickets can walk in between them. Place six of your
  crickets into this new habitat and observe them for five minutes. After each of the three five
  minute observations record your data in the chart below. Does it matter if the six crickets are all
  males, all females, some of each, young and adult crickets?
          Write a paragraph on a blank piece of paper explaining what you observed. In your
  paragraph include whether you think crickets are social or solitary creatures based on your
  results from this experiment.


 Observation                 How Many Crickets Were Under Each Baking Cup?

 Time

 First 5 Minutes

(Morning)

 Second 5 Minutes

 (Before Lunch)

 Third 5 Minutes

 (Afternoon)




                                                                                                        91
The Adventures of Christopher Cricket: Going home
      When we left Christopher last time he had jumped out of a window and landed in the dirt.

 Christopher was lonely and scared. He did not know his way home and couldn‘t find Eric. He slowly

 hopped down the grass hill unaware of where he was going when all of the sudden he noticed a bunch

 of students near the football field. They seemed to be jumping like crickets. Christopher was very

 intrigued by this when he heard the coach yell, ―Good jump John! You jumped five feet.‖ The

 students were practicing their long jumps and measuring them. Christopher wanted to join in the

 jumping fun. He wondered how far he could jump. He hopped down closer to the students. He took

 a long leap but he didn‘t know how to measure with a ruler and the students hadn‘t noticed him.

 Christopher tried a couple more times to get the students attention but no one saw him. He was sad

 and ready to hop away when he noticed Eric. Eric was on the track! He had been there the whole time

 and Christopher hadn‘t noticed. Christopher shouted to himself, ―Yeah! I will be able to get home

 now.‖ He jumped over to Eric and grabbed onto one of his shoelaces. Then he heard the loud ring

 again! It was time to go home. This time Christopher wasn‘t scared of the shuffling feet because he

 was safe with Eric. Eric carried him home unknowingly. When Eric stopped Christopher jumped off

 and noticed his mom looking for him. She said, ―Where in the world have you been? I don‘t ever

 want you to run off like that again.‖ Christopher said, ― I‘m sorry , mom! I will never do anything

 like that again. I promise.‖




                                                                                                       92
                                                                  Thirteenth Day
                                                                  Lifestyles of Crickets

     Teacher Tell
     Today we will be conducting some experiments to find out whether crickets are social or solitary

creatures. What does social mean? (Explain to your students that social means to interact with others.

In this case social for our crickets would mean that more that one cricket is found under each bake

cup). What does solitary mean? (Explain to your students that solitary means to be alone. In this case

solitary for our crickets would mean that only one cricket is found under each bake cup). I would like

each of you to get into the groups that you worked in yesterday. I am going to give each group a new

habitat container. Make sure that you have food and water in one corner of your habitat. Now I am

going to pass out six paper bake cups and one pair of scissors to each group. I need each person to cut

a ―door‖ into one side of each bake cup (demonstrate this before allowing the students to do it, see

diagram below).




     Make sure that your door is big enough for a cricket to crawl through. Place each cup face down

in your new cricket habitat. Be sure to space them out so that the crickets can move around them

easily. Take six crickets from your original habitat and place them in your new habitat. Observe the




                                                                                                          93
 crickets for 5 minutes and record the data on your activity sheet. We will come back before lunch

 today and before we go home to make more observations. At the end of the day, allow students some

 time to present their findings, as a group, to the class. Also allow them to return their crickets back to

 their original homes.

Teacher Material
      In this activity, students will be working in their groups to determine whether crickets are social

 or solitary creatures. As the teacher, you will need to set up a separate habitat similar to the one that

 the crickets are living in. There needs to be one separate habitat for each group. This separate habitat

 should also contain food and water for the crickets. The students will create new ―houses‖ out of

 paper baking cups (cupcake holders). The students will need to observe their crickets three times

 throughout the day for five minutes each time and record their observations in the chart on their

 Student Activity Sheet. We suggest that you allow your students time to observe their crickets in the

 morning, after lunch, and just before they go home. After completion of the project, allow students to

 present, as a group, their results and observations to the entire class. At this point, you could have the

 class graph the results if you choose.

      Questions that may be asked before the lesson:

      1.      Do you think that crickets like to live together? Does more than one cricket dwell in one

 home or do they all have separate homes?

      2.      When you find crickets outside, do you find them in groups or alone?




                                                                                                              94
Materials
   Separate habitat container for each group
   Scissors
   Six Paper Bake Cups per group (all one color, preferably white)




                                                                      95
     Student Activity Sheet # 14A                                  Jumping Crickets

     (To be completed)
     Cool crickets by placing in a refrigerator. Gently measure the length of each leg with string and

markers. Begin measurement by finding the location where the leg attaches to the body on the thorax.

Fold the string along the bends in the legs and then mark the total length with a magic marker. Draw

this length on the paper.



     Front leg

     Middle Leg

     Back Leg

     Which leg is longest? How much longer? Why is this leg so long?

     Measure length of body of cricket from mouth to end of abdomen (if you have female be sure

and stop at abdomen and do not include length of the ovipositor)



     Body Length

     Now measure you

     Body Length (head to heels)

     Leg length from crotch to heel)

     Compare




                                                                                                         96
Student Activity Sheet #14B                                        Jumping Crickets
    Materials for each team of scientists
    Crickets, Meter Stick or Yardstick
    Chalk, Pencil

    What to do
        Go outside and, using the yardstick, measure how far you can jump. Try this twice and
   record your data in the chart below. Using the same yardstick, measure how far a cricket can
   jump. Try this twice and record your data in the chart below.


              Student Name               Length of First Jump         Length of Second Jump

            Student 1



            Student 2



            Student 3



            Student 4



            Cricket




                                                                                                  97
                                                                           Day 14
                                                                           Jumping Crickets
     Teacher Tell
     We are going to begin today‘s lesson by continuing our story line. Can anyone tell me what has

happened to Christopher Cricket so far? (Fill this information into the story line and continue until all

areas of the previous stories have been included). Now I would like to read the last part of the

Christopher Cricket story to you. Please follow along on your copy in your learning log (read story).

Now we need to finish our story line by adding what has happened in the story we just read. Can

someone tell me one thing that happened to Christopher Cricket today? (Finish story line).

     Now we are ready to begin our activity. For today‘s activity we will be going outside to see how

far a cricket can jump. We will also be examining how far you can jump. Each person will need to

take a pencil and your learning log and follow me outside.

     Now that we are outside I would like to demonstrate to you how to measure with this yardstick,

how far each of you can jump and how far a cricket can jump. May I have a volunteer? (Pick a

student to demonstrate how to measure a person‘s jumps, as explained above). Child‘s name, stand

with your feet together with your side facing the class. A partner will place the yardstick to the side of

(child‘s name), just like I am doing. Now (child‘s name), take a jump. (Measure the jump and tell the




                                                                                                             98
students the number you found. If the child jumped farther then the length of one yardstick show the

students how to move the yardstick forward and use their chalk to mark the spot.)

     Now that we have seen how to record a student‘s jump, lets see how to record a crickets jump.

(If you choose to ink the bottom of the cricket‘s feet, you will need to demonstrate this as well). I am

going to take a cricket from this habitat and hold it in my hand like this. Be careful not to squeeze

your cricket. Place the yardstick just like I did when (child‘s name) jumped. Kneel down and hold the

cricket above the ground a few inches. Open your hand and do not throw your cricket but gently move

the palm of your hand a little forward to allow the cricket to jump in the right direction. Once the

cricket has jumped, be sure to put your finger on the yardstick at the number where the cricket landed.

     Now I would like for you to break up into your groups. One person from each group will need to

come and get a yardstick and a piece of chalk. In your groups, each take turns jumping twice. Be sure

to record your data in the chart on your Student Activity Sheet. Once everyone has jumped twice and

measurements have been recorded, you will need to get a cricket. Measure how far your cricket can

jump and record that data in the chart as well. You need to do this twice.

     (After the measurements are taken outside, bring your class inside to graph and chart the results.)

One person from each group, please come and fill in your groups information in the chart on the

board. (As a class, graph the results. Look at the results and compare the jumping distance of a

cricket to that of a human.)




                                                                                                           99
     Teacher Material
     To begin today‘s lesson have students help you fill in the story line by recalling what has

happened to Christopher Cricket so far. Then read the last part of the Christopher Cricket story. After

you have read the last part of the Christopher Cricket story have your students help you finish the story

line. You are now ready to begin today‘s activity.

     For this activity students will be measuring how far crickets can jump. They will graph the

results and compare and contrast how far a student boy and girl can jump and how far a cricket can

jump. Students will work in their groups and help each other in recording the data. Before the

students arrive in class, have several crickets in a habitat ready to go outside.

     Take the students outside. Show the students how to record the lengths of the jumps by asking

one student to come to the front of the group. Have the student stand with their feet together. Place

the yardstick beside their feet as shown below.




     Have the student jump as far as they can and land without moving their feet. If the student jumps

further then the end of the yard stick, mark the end of the yard stick with chalk on the cement and

place the yard stick forward to continue measuring. At this point the students would record their

results. This is just a demonstration for the students so do not actually have them record these results.

When they get into their groups then they will need to record their data on the Student Activity Sheet

for this lesson. You will also need to demonstrate how to record the distance of a cricket‘s jump.

Place the cricket in the palm of your hand and hold it a few inches above the ground at the beginning



                                                                                                            100
of the yardstick. The yardstick is placed exactly how it was when the student jumped. Explain to

students that you do not want to throw the cricket but that you need to move your palm forward so that

the cricket will jump in that direction. After the cricket jumps, then they would record that data on

the Student Activity Sheet as well. This is just an example of how to measure a crickets‘ jump, so do

not have the students record this amount. (You may want to try to ink the bottom of the cricket‘s feet

before they jump. This can be done by putting the cricket into a small container where the bottom is

covered with a thin layer of paint. We tried this with stamp ink and found that a very small amount of

ink actually got on the crickets‘ feet and that it was not enough to see where the cricket landed. When

we tried the paint it worked much better. Be aware, however, that crickets‘ feet are very small and

that the ink marks they leave on the ground when they jump are not very easy to see).

        When the students get into their groups, they will record their own data. Each student will need

to jump twice and record his or her data in the chart on the Student Activity Sheet. They will also

need to allow a cricket to jump twice and record that data in the chart on the Student Activity Sheet as

well.

        At the end of the activity, once returning to the classroom, you will need to draw a chart and a

graph on the board. Make sure that your chart looks like the chart on the Student Activity Sheet for

this lesson. Allow students to add their groups information to the chart. Graph all of this information

on a blank piece of paper, as a class.

        Questions that may be asked before the lesson:

        1.     Who will jump further, a cricket or a human?

        2.     Will they jump a little further, or a lot further?

        3.     Why would they jump further?




                                                                                                           101
Materials

   One cricket per group
   One yard stick per group
   One piece of chalk per group
   Learning logs




                                   102
Student Activity Sheet # 15   If I Were a Cricket…




                                                     103
                                                                        Fifteenth Day
                                                                        If I Were a Cricket…
     Teacher Tell
     Today we are going to examine a cricket‘s life more closely. We are going to begin by reading a

poem about crickets called, "House Crickets" (in Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices, by Paul

Fleischman). One half of the class will read the words written on the left side of the pages, and the

other half of the class will read the words that are written on the right side of the pages. Ready? First,

I will read the poem to you. Then, we will read the poem in groups.

     Now that you have read a poem about crickets, I would like for each of you to close your eyes

and imagine that you are a cricket. You have six legs and two antennae. Each of you has a set of

wings, and the boys can make beautiful music with their wings.

     Imagine you are hopping through the tall grass. You see a really yummy looking leaf so you hop

over to it. You do not have hands to grab the leaf so you must use your palpi to grab the food and

direct it into your mouth. While you are eating a shadow begins to cover you. You look up and see a

big bird. Remember things look bigger to you now that you are small. The bird starts coming toward

you. Quick, hide inside that fallen tree trunk! Whew, that was close. You are safe.

     Now I need for you to open your eyes. I would like for you to get into your groups. I am going

to give each group a marker and in a minute I will tell you where to go. Each of you will go to a

poster. I would like for you to read the question on the poster and discuss it with your group. Then

write your group‘s answers on the poster with the marker. Be sure to leave plenty of room for all the

groups to write some answers on the same poster under your group‘s answers. When I turn the lights

off we will switch posters. When you switch to a new poster you will need to read the question and the




                                                                                                             104
answers that the group before you put on the poster. Do not write any of the answers that have already

been used (now send each group to a different question).

     Teacher Material
     This day could be used as an assessment day. You will begin by having students build their

reading fluency by reading a poem called "House Crickets" (in Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices,

by Paul Fleischman). Either write this poem on chart paper for all students to see, or make an enlarged

copy of the poem and then convert it to a transparency. Today you will want to encourage students to

think about crickets through a cricket‘s point of view. The students will use what they have learned

through their experiments from the past few days to examine a cricket‘s world more closely. You will

need to write one question at the top of four pieces of poster size paper. Mount them in four different

corners of the room. The students will work in their groups on this project. Each group will start at

one of the posters. They will need to read the question and then write an answer on the poster paper.

Make sure the students understand that they need to leave room for each group to write on the paper.

It might be helpful to give each group a different color marker so that you know which group wrote

what answers. Allow at least five minutes for each group to answer each question. When the students

move to the next poster they will need to read the question and the previous group‘s answers so that

they do not repeat the same answers. Continue this until each group has answered each question.

     At the end of this activity you may want to have students write a story about themselves as a

cricket. This is a list of questions you could use for this activity, however, you may use your own

questions if you desire.

     1.      How do multiple legs help you survive? How might they be harmful to your survival?

     2.      How does an exoskeleton help you survive? How might it be harmful to your survival?

     3.      How do your antennae help you survive? How might they be harmful to your



                                                                                                          105
     survival?

4.   How do your wings help you survive? How might they be harmful to your survival?

5.   How might a cricket‘s life be different without birds?

6.   How might a bird‘s life be different without crickets?

7.   How might your life be different without crickets?




Materials
1.   4 poster size sheets of paper

2.   1 colored marker for each group




                                                                                       106
Student Activity Sheet #16                              Cricket Life Cycles

  Materials for each team of scientists
  Books
  Crickets in all three stages of metamorphosis (egg, nymph and adult)
  Pictures of crickets in all three stages of metamorphosis (egg, nymph and adult)
  Pencil
  Insect Boxes

  What to do

  Read about the stage of the cricket in the insect box and cricket picture that your teacher gave

  you. Be sure to look through lots of books!

  Use the questions below to help you write your report on the next page.

  1.     What does the cricket in the picture look like?

  2.     What are some of its most obvious features?

  3.     How many crickets in this life cycle stage are in your habitat?

  4.     What proportion (or part) of crickets in the wild are in this life cycle stage?

  5.     How long will this cricket live?

  6.     Where does a cricket in this stage live?




                                                                                                     107
                                                             Sixteenth Day
                                                             Cricket Life Cycles

 Teacher Tell

     I would like for you to get into your groups now. I am going to give each group a cricket in an

insect box and a picture of a cricket. Both the live cricket and the picture of the cricket are crickets in

a specific stage of life. I would like for you to use the real insect, the picture and these books to find

out as much as you can about the cricket‘s specific stage or cycle of life. It is important for you to

draw what your cricket looks like in the stage that you have. It is also important for you to think

about how many crickets in your habitat are in this stage, how many crickets in the wild are in this

stage, how long crickets stay in this stage, and where crickets live when they are in this stage. All of

these questions are listed on your Student Activity Sheet to help remind you about what you are

looking for today. You need to record your findings on your Student Activity Sheet.




     Teacher Material
     In order to prepare for this lesson you will need to locate live crickets in various stages of their

life cycles. You should be able to find crickets in your classroom habitats in all stages of their life

cycles after maintaining a cricket habitat in your classroom for several months. You will also need to

make copies of pictures of crickets in each stage of their life cycle. You should make copies of

pictures of an immature male cricket, an adult male cricket, an immature female cricket, an adult

female cricket and cricket eggs. You will also need to have several books available for your students

to use as research tools. A list of suggested books is on page xx (TO BE COMPLETED).




                                                                                                              108
     The students will need to work in their groups to look for information about one of the crickets

and cricket pictures. Each group should be given a different cricket picture to research. Tell the

students that it is important for them to find out as many things about that cricket stage as possible.

They should try to locate information that describes what the body of the cricket looks like, how

many of the crickets can be found in their classroom habitat, how many of the cricket in that stage

can be found in the wild, how long crickets live and how long they spend in the various stages of their

lives, We have found that most students tend to focus on the cricket body, which has obvious

differences from life stage to life stage. Encourage your students to search for additional interesting

information about the cricket in their picture. As they find information on that cricket stage, the

students need to record this information on their Student Activity Sheet for this lesson. When the

groups have finished researching their cricket stage (this should not take more than thirty minutes)

they will need to prepare a report to present to the class.




                                                                                                          109
Student Activity Sheet #17                           Crickets in other Countries
(TO BE COMPLETED)

     Materials for each team of linguists


     What to do



Crickets have a world-wide distribution.

Match the words for crickets with a country where that language is spoken.



Cricket             English                      USA

                    Spanish

                    French

                    Portugese

                    Japanese

                    Russian

                    Latin                        Among scientists




                                                                                   110
                                        Seventeenth Day
                                        Crickets in other Countries
Teacher Tell
(TO BE COMPLETED)

   Crickets live all over the world. There are house crickets and field crickets, mole crickets and

camel back crickets. In this activity students will match the word cricket in a number of different

languages with countries where that language is spoken by a large number of people.




                                                                                                      111
Student Activity Sheet #18
Cricket Conference: A Scientific Symposium


What we were trying to find out:




What we did to answer our question:




What our observations were:




What our observations tell us:




Summary:




                                             112
Student Activity Sheet # 18

Cricket Conference: A Scientific Symposium

(TO BE COMPLETED)

Materials for each team of scientists


What to do




                                             113
                               Day Eighteen
                               Cricket Conference: A Scientific Symposium
      Teacher Tell
      Today, for the last day of our project, we are going to hold a symposium. You will work in your

groups to discover some new and interesting facts about crickets. First I would like to tell you how

scientists prepare the reports they give to other scientists. Then you and your group will prepare a

report and share it with the class.

      Scientists are conducting experiments all the time all over the world. Some scientists work for

museums or colleges and universities, others work for their city, state or federal governments. They

work all the time, discovering new things or researching things they already found. But there is so

much information for scientists to discover that not any one scientist could know everything. That is

why scientists spend a lot of time writing reports and communicating with each other. They share

their reports with other scientists who are working on the same things they are.

      Now that we have worked on this project we have become very good cricket scientists. As

scientists, we are going to do some research today and write a report so that we can share it with the

other cricket scientists in this class.

      To prepare a report scientists have to first organize their information. Then they ask themselves

what they were trying to find out (in this case, as much information as possible about the cricket stage

in their picture). The scientists then have to explain to the other scientists how they found the answer

to their question. They share any facts or numbers that they found out and last they tell what their

results show them.




                                                                                                           114
Materials
 Books
 Copies of pictures on pages 81-84
 Learning logs




                                      115
     More Activities Using Crickets

     1.      Do crickets have a color preference?

     Create a separate cricket habitat that contains nothing but food and water. Put some large

colored blocks (children‘s wooden toy blocks work well) into the habitat. Observe which colored

block the crickets jump on most often.

     2.      What do people in other countries think about crickets?

     Locate several books or articles about other cultures and crickets. Allow students to look

through the materials and create a report or written paper on their discoveries. Some cultures to look

into are: Chinese, Native Americans, and Spanish cultures.

     3.      How are crickets harmful?

     Lots of people find crickets to be pests. They damage crops, especially in Africa, and their

singing tends to annoy some people. Have students‘ research some of the problems crickets can cause.

     4.      How long do crickets live?

     Examine the life cycle of a cricket. Share some pictures of crickets in different stages of life

with your class and discuss how each cricket moves from stage to stage until it becomes an adult.

Compare a crickets life cycle to that of a human.

     5.      What kinds of behaviors do crickets exhibit?

     There are several videos on cricket behavior. Check out one or more of the videos and share it

with your class. Have your students‘ record information about how crickets behave. You may want to

have your students observe their crickets and record their behavior.

     6.      What organisms prey on crickets?




                                                                                                         116
     Explore the food chain by examining what foods crickets eat and what organisms eat crickets.

Have your students create their own food web. You could also tie in what foods we eat and where

humans are on the food chain.

     7.      Does my cricket like to be near a wall, in a corner, or in an open area?

     Test whether crickets like to hide near walls, in corners, or in open areas. Allow the students to

experiment with this in an open classroom or in a large aquarium. The students should record their

findings and share them with the class.




                                                                                                          117
Resources Used in Creating This Book


Cole, Joanna, An Insects Body, New York: Morrow Jr Books, 1984.

Hogner, Dorothy, Grasshoppers and Crickets, New York: Thomas Crowell Co., 1960.

Johnson, Jenny, Children’s Guide to Insects and Spiders, New York: Simon Schuster Inc., 1996.

Johnston, Sylvia, Chirping Insects, Minneapolis: Lerner Publishing Co., 1986.

Macquitty, Miranda, Amazing Bugs, New York: DK Publishing Co., 1996.

Mound, Laurence, Insects, New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1990.

Parker, Nancy Winslow, Bugs, New York: Greenwillow Books, 1987.

Pascoe, Elaine, Crickets and Grasshoppers, Connecticut: Blackbirch Press, 1999

Russo, Monica, The Insect Almanac, New York: Sterling Publishing Co. Inc., 1992.

Stevens, Carla, Catch a Cricket, Ruth Tooze Collection Curriculum Materials, UNCG.

Tesar, Jenny, Our Living World: Insects, Connecticut: Blackbirch Press, 1993.

Time Life, Insect World, Virginia: Time Life Books, 1988.

Zim, Herbert, Insects, New York: Golden Press, 1956.




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Websites used:

http://www.phoenix.net/~kboyle1/CRICKETS.html

http://www.eNature.com

http://www.rainbowmealworms.com

http://www.flukerfarms.com

http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~UN6K-HSMT/English/ENGindex.html

http://www.eatbug.com/Crickets.html

http://www.c-com.net/~kboyle1Cencrick.html




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