Thyroid Disorder by anamaulida

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 2

									<div class="KonaBody">
        <!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
        <p>Definition of Thyroid Disorders<br><br>The thyroid gland is a
butterfly-shaped organ located in the front of the neck, just over the
windpipe. It produces iodine-containing hormones which regulate the rate
at which body cells use energy and produce heat.<br><br>The growth and
development of all the body's tissues are dependent on the thyroid
gland's proper functioning. If the thyroid gland is either overactive or
underactive, it can create health problems.<br><br>Causes of Thyroid
Disorders<br><br>Your thyroid gland produces two main hormones, thyroxine
(T-4) and triiodothyronine (T-3), that influence every cell in your body.
They maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates,
help control your body temperature, influence your heart rate and help
regulate the production of protein. Your thyroid gland also produces
calcitonin, a hormone that regulates the amount of calcium in your
blood.<br><br>Thyroiditis is caused by an attack on the thyroid gland.
The attack causes inflammation (the body’s response to injury) and
damages the thyroid cells. Usually, the attack on the thyroid is from
antibodies made by the body’s immune system, but it can also be caused
by an infection or certain medications.<br><br>Symptoms And Clinical
Suspicion Of Thyroid Dysfunction<br><br>Thyroid Goitre, thyroid bruit,
fine tremor, weight loss, increased appetite, lid lag, sweating, heat
intolerance, family history, lethargy, weight gain, hoarseness, dry skin,
hair loss, cold intolerance, delayed reflex, constipation, short
stature.<br>Cardiovascular Recent myocardial infarction, chronic cardiac
failure, coronary artery disease, arrhythmias, pulse >90/min,
hypertension.<br><br>Kids with hypothyroidism tend to feel tired and not
have much energy. Their hearts might beat slower and they may feel cold
when the temperature of the room is comfortable for everyone else. Their
hair may become brittle and break off more easily, and their skin may be
dry and look pale and yellowish.<br><br>Elderly patients, particularly
those with toxic nodular goiter, may present atypically (apathetic or
masked hyperthyroidism) with symptoms more akin to depression or
dementia. Most do not have exophthalmos or tremor. Atrial fibrillation,
syncope, altered sensorium, heart failure, and weakness are more likely.
<br><br>Diagnosis of Thyroid Disorders<br><br>Measuring the blood levels
of hormones secreted by the thyroid gland, and the pituitary gland which
controls it, is the most common test for detecting thyroid gland
disorders.<br><br><br>To assess thyroid hormone levels and the function
of the thyroid, several tests are performed that measure the amount of
several thyroid and pituitary hormones in the blood. Other tests include
radioactive iodine uptake and thyroid scanning.<br><br>Treatment of
Thyroid Disorders<br><br>In hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone restores
metabolism to normal. Most people with hyperthyroidism ultimately take
thyroid hormone since the approach to treatment usually means shutting
off the natural levels of hormone. <br><br>In hypothyroidism, thyroid
hormone restores metabolism to normal. Most people with hyperthyroidism
ultimately take thyroid hormone since the approach to treatment usually
means shutting off the natural levels of hormone. Today's thyroid
medicine of choice is levothyroxine sodium. <br><br>Medication is also a
first-line option, but should typically not be used without behavioral
therapy. At this time there are only a few medications that are approved
for the treatment of ADHD. One class of drugs is called stimulants, and
they work to improve concentration and allow the child or adult to focus
on activities.</p>        <!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
        </div>

								
To top