Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

The Corner Reflector

VIEWS: 160 PAGES: 7

									                                      A Very Inexpensive Antenna 

        This note is due to me opening my mouth on EVDOForums and asking if anyone wanted to see 
my “$.01 antenna 10 dB gain antenna” .   I make no claims as to the suitability, legality, application or 
anything else about this antenna for any purpose whatsoever. I'm only trying to raise awareness of how 
easy it is to achieve reasonable amounts of directivity and gain at VHF and above with simple 
materials.

There seems to be a lot of talk about antennas on EVDOForums. This is a good thing since antennas 
are vital to both transmit and receive and also because, in my opinion, antennas are fun. While  there is 
a lot of press about “omni” antennas – generally small co­linear arrays yielding 0­5 dBd (dB relative to 
a dipole) gain – and these antennas seem to sell for quite a lot of money, there are other ways to get 
more gain very cheaply. Admittedly, the antenna I'm showing has directivity in azimuth as well as in 
elevation. The omnis have gain only in elevation, they're omni­directional in azimuth. This means that 
to make it work properly you must point the antenna I'm showing you here  in the desired direction. Let 
me say that again more loudly...  To make it work properly you must point it in the desired 
direction.  If you don't do this, it will work WORSE than an antenna of lesser gain. This is because 
gain is just the attribute of putting energy that might have otherwise gone in all directions equally, into 
some area(s) more than others. A flashlight (the old kind, not the new LED type) has gain because the 
shiny reflector behind the lamp causes the light from the lamp  that hits it to reflect in more or less the 
same direction. If you take the reflector away, you still have the same light but it doesn't look as bright 
as the flashlight did when pointed in your eyes. It has gain and directivity because the light all goes 
more­or­less goes in the same direction.

This is the essence of a reflector antenna. Perhaps the simplest one is just a mirror – a conductive sheet 
– a quarter or so wavelength back from a dipole antenna.  In fact, a dipole plus reflector can have 
several dB more gain than a dipole alone and is a very worthwhile antenna.  


                                       The Corner Reflector

The antenna I'm showing here is sort of “one step up” from a dipole­plus­sheet­reflector. It's a corner 
reflector. For a nice readable treatment of it see:  Antennas by John Kraus, Mcgraw Hill Electrical and 
Electronic Engineering Series, 1950, pp 328­336.  There is also a more recent revision which I think 
has the same information. Description of the corner reflector comes just before beginning treatment of 
parabolic reflectors which are perhaps more widely known.

Here is a picture of a corner reflector for the PCS (1900 Mhz) band. It is made from double clad PC 
board material and brass tubing (for the balun). It is fed with a short length of semi­rigid coax cable 
and an SMA connector. The black cable is an adapter so that I can connect it to a Treo 700P PDA. This 
antenna has been measured to operate very close to what theory predicts – about 10 dBi.
Directivity and Gain

Antenna gain is seen expressed as dBi, dB with respect to isotropic and dBd, db with respect to a 
dipole. Since an ideal dipole has a gain of about 2.1 dBi, it is important to note what reference is being 
used, isotropic or dipole, when gain is discussed. An isotropic antenna is a theoretical antenna only, it 
isn't possible to construct, and is one that has equal radiation in all directions – rather like the sun. Any 
realizable antenna actually has some directivity and gain.

Directivity is a measure of the directionality of an antenna, irrespective of any losses in the antenna 
itself. For most antennas, gain is almost identical to directivity and is the number of most interest.




                        10 dBi PCS­band Corner Reflector made from PC Board.

The corner reflector I'm showing how to build  uses a 90 degree corner. Making one with a different 
angle can actually result in slightly more gain but  scrap cardboard boxes tend to have 90 degree 
corners. 

The raw materials for the antenna are a box with adjacent sides at least a wavelength at the lowest 
frequency of interest and some aluminum foil to cover it. They're shown in the next photo.




                           Raw Materials for Inexpensive Corner Reflector



Building the Corner Reflector

To start with, cut the box as shown above leaving enough of the sides as described above.  The box I 
used is bigger than necessary if your use is only for 850 MHz or higher.

Next cover the sides with aluminum foil. You can either wrap them around the front edge or tape them 
down, as you prefer. Just get the foil close to the sides and nicely covering them.

Once the foil is on, Use a measure to find the points that are 2” out from the corner (for PCS use) and 
4.5” out from the corner (for 850 MHz use).  These dimensions aren't very critical so don't worry about 
the last 1/8”, just get close.  Mark these spots, as shown,  so you will know where to put your feed 
antenna/phone/modem.
                 Corner Reflector with Aluminum Foil and Dipole Placement Marking



Finally, put your phone/modem/antenna at the spot indicated for the band you are using.   Then make 
certain you know the direction of the cell site (or hot spot) of interest and you align the whole antenna 
(with radio/antenna) to point toward it. See the arrow marked “To Tower” in the picture above.  IF 
YOU DON'T DO THIS DON'T EXPECT THIS ANTENNA TO WORK FOR YOU. I know it sounds 
simple and I'm repeating myself but getting this whole thing positioned is the toughest part.

  The unity gain beamwidth of this antenna is about 70 degrees. This means that if you have more than 
35 degrees of error in pointing it will have negative gain (loss).
                              Trep 700P Properly Positioned for PCS 




If you are unsure if the feed antenna you have is a dipole, that is, if it may be a monopole with 
groundplane reflector provided by it's mounting, you may find that adding some aluminum foil below 
where the antenna sits will help performance somewhat. Below is a picture of a U720 USB modem 
with foil added.  
                     U720 Positioned for PCS Band with Additional Foil Under it.


                                           Performance
So, does it really work?  Yes.  Is this a viable continuous­use design?  Probably not.  I measure 
between 4 and 12 dB improvement using this compared to the PDA or U720 in the same location 
without it. As you already know if you have played with antennas for your cell phone or EVDO device, 
getting good measurements with user devices is pretty tough. For one thing, most of the RSSI (radio 
Signal Strength Indicator) displays are smoothed and seem to take 30 seconds or more to fully update 
after a change. Also, unless you have a very clean line­of­sight radio path to the tower, it's likely that 
signal strength is varying. If that wasn't enough, you may find that there is handoff or other exchanges 
going on that cause the tower your using to change!  All told, getting accurate measurements without 
some decent equipment is practically impossible.  However, the antenna really does work.
  
One last caution. As shown, with typical handsets and devices this antenna is vertically polarized. This 
is probably what you want. However, it is possible that other applications use a horizontally or 
circularly polarized signal.  While a corner reflector may be useful for horizontal polarization, you'll 
have to figure out how to mount everything turned 90 degrees.

Good luck and have fun.

N6gn
23 March 2007

								
To top