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									CAREER
RESOURCE CENTER




A GUIDE TO
RÉSUMÉ WRITING
Prepared for School of Management students by:
The Frank L. Ciminelli Family
Career Resource Center
308 Alfiero Center
(716) 645-3232
mgt.buffalo.edu/career
                                                                                                                                   A Guide To Resume Writing




TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Questions ................................................................................................................................... 3

Tips to Make Your Résumé Effective ....................................................................................................... 4

Building Your Résumé.............................................................................................................................. 4

CRC Résumé Templates ......................................................................................................................... 4

Sections ................................................................................................................................................... 5

           Personal Information..................................................................................................................... 5

           Objective ...................................................................................................................................... 5

           Education ..................................................................................................................................... 6

           Experience ................................................................................................................................... 6
                  Focus on skills ............................................................................................................... ...7
                  Show the results................................................................................................................ 8
                  Explain the purpose ....................................................................................................... ...8
                  Add Depth………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
                  Add Breadth……………………………………………………………………………………… 9
                  Expanding your bullet points…………………………………………………………………….9
                  Experience Section Format…………………………………………………………………….. 9

           Internships ................................................................................................................................. 9

           Activities/Affiliations……………………………………………………………………………………..                                                                                        9

           Computer Skills ............................................................................................................................ 10

           Awards and Honors ...................................................................................................................... 10

Overall Appearance………………………………………………………………………………………………11

Sample Chronological Resume....................................................................................................................12

Appendix 1: Identify your accomplishments, not your responsibilities ..................................................... .13

Appendix 2: Electronic and Scannable résumés……………………………………………………………… 14

Appendix 3: Sample Scannable résumé………………………………………………………………………..15

Appendix 4: Action Verbs………………………………………………………………………………………...16




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GENERAL QUESTIONS
What is a résumé?
  A résumé is a document that highlights information about you. It is basically a picture of you and your
  qualifications. Primarily used when seeking employment, it is important that the information highlighted in the
  résumé be complete, accurate, and pertinent to the position that you are seeking. Finally, the résumé that you
  create should be an expression of you, what you know, and what you can offer an employer.

    Regardless of concentration, background, or job objective, the résumé is one of the most important tools in the job
    search. It is a snapshot of you and your abilities, and is often the first impression that you will make on a potential
    employer. Therefore, it is crucial that you invest significant time and effort to prepare a thorough and outstanding
    résumé.

Why do I need to write a résumé?
  It is important that you keep in mind the purpose of the résumé: To get an interview.

    The résumé by itself will not get you a position in a company, but it can get you to the interview stage of the hiring
    process. It is wise to invest a lot of time to make the résumé complete. Additional effort up front will both better
    your résumé, and make you more conscious of the things you will need to discuss in the interview.

    It is important to understand that you will probably not be present to further explain the content of your résumé to
    the reader. It is essential that you make the résumé not only complete, but very clear. If possible, you should
    target the résumé for a specific job opportunity or at least a specific functional area.

What is the best way to develop a résumé?
  There is no right or wrong way to develop a résumé. There is no governing body declaring any standards. So the
  content and the layout of the résumé are completely up to you. There are, however, more and less effective ways
  of going about it. At the Career Resource Center, we have done a significant amount of research on résumés and
  have talked with a number of recruiters to assure that the “Building Your Résumé” portion of this handout is very
  effective for most situations.


What if I have other questions or need additional help?
  Once you have started to generate at least a first draft, the staff in the Career Resource Center will be happy to
  assist you. Do not expect us to write your résumé for you because that defeats the purpose and keeps you from
  preparing yourself for the further stages in the job search process. However, there are a number of books
  available in the Career Resource Center and in your local libraries on résumé writing. Additionally, you can
  contact your professors, your friends, and your family. It is good to get multiple perspectives so you explore all
  options, but keep in mind that CRC résumé advice is often the most objective, as it represents more than a single
  opinion or subjective viewpoint and, as such, is the most relevant across many different business job search
  situations.
    Résumé Do’s and Don’t’s
        Do’s
                  Do try to fit your résumé on one page
                  Do leave an appropriate amount of margin space (½ – 1 inch is good, no less than ½ inch)
                  Do use positive action verbs to highlight your skills
                  Do use the present tense for current activities and the past tense for previous experiences
                  Do place relevant items in the most prominent areas of your résumé
                  Do proofread your résumé for spelling, punctuation, grammatical, and typographical errors
                  Do make sure your résumé is neatly typed and letter perfect
                  Do be honest and accurate in the facts you give on your résumé
                  Do be Positive!
                  Do tailor the bullet statements to show skills and results, not just tasks
        Don’t’s
                  Do NOT write RÉSUMÉ on top of the page
                  Do NOT use “I,” “Me,”, “My”, “Our” or any abbreviations!
                  Do NOT date the résumé, attach advertisements, or list salary requirements
                  Do NOT leave out volunteer or other experiences where you have demonstrated relevant skills
                  Do NOT give any false information                 5
                  Do NOT include reasons for changing jobs
                                                                                                      A Guide To Resume Writing




TIPS TO MAKE YOUR RÉSUMÉ EFFECTIVE
1. Write your résumé to “get the interview” not to “get the job.”
      Don’t try to include everything you’ve ever done; incorporate only relevant information.
      Create multiple résumés when necessary. If you have more than one concentration or desired field, it may be
      necessary to stress different things for different applications.
2. Keep the employer’s perspective in mind.
      Recruiters are very busy. Based on surveys of recruiters, during the first round of review, each résumé is
      looked at for only about 40 seconds. If the first glance does not grab their attention, you will not get the
      interview.
      Your résumé should be neat, organized, pleasing to the eye, and error-free.
      Emphasize your skills and achievements. The recruiter is hiring someone to help them make money. If they
      can see how you will be an asset, and how you are more qualified than your competitor, you will be more likely
      to get an interview.
3. Show your résumé to more than one person to gain multiple perspectives.
        Career Resource Center – résumé critique service and individual appointments
        Knowledgeable friends and family
        Trusted faculty members
        Be careful in sharing your résumé with alumni, mentors or other professionals. You may want to talk with these
        contacts later for job search. In these cases, you should be "fine-tuning" instead of showing your "first draft".
        Again, keep in mind that CRC résumé advice is often the most objective across various job search contexts.

BUILDING YOUR RÉSUMÉ
General Notes
   Both the content and the appearance of the résumé are important. One without the other is generally ineffective.
   People who focus on the appearance prior to fully developing the content usually find that they limit themselves to
   the confines of the paper, resulting in a less effective résumé. Generally, people find that they produce a higher
   quality product when they start by focusing on attaining complete content, and work with formatting only after the
   content is complete.

    When starting your résumé, it may be a good idea to simply sit down with a pen and paper to first develop the
    content. Only use a computer when you feel that you have generated complete and accurate information. This
    will prevent you from worrying about superficial things such as font sizes and spacing in the early stages of
    development.

    After developing the content of your résumé using pen and paper, go to the online Career Resource Center
    Résumé Templates to format your résumé. The CRC Résumé Templates have been customized specifically for
    UB School of Management students and help create a résumé with an easy-to-read format and professional layout
    attractive to top recruiters.



                                  CRC résumé templates for students

                                  mgt.buffalo.edu/home/career/students/prep/tools/correspondence/resume

                                  Note: The Career Resource Center requires students to use these customized
                                  résumé templates and does not recommend use of any other résumé
                                  templates

This information focuses on a hard copy paper résumé. For information on electronic and scannable résumés, see Appendix 2
and Appendix 3. We have included information on both the content and the formatting for each section. Because complete content
is so critical, only address the “Format” portions after you have addressed the “Content” portion for all section

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SECTIONS TO INCLUDE

Personal Information
Content:
   It is necessary to include all of the information that an employer would need to contact you. This includes your
   mailing address (both home and school if applicable), home telephone, and email. Only list one email address.
Format:
      There are a number of different formats that you can use to present this information. Be sure to make your name
      stand out either by separating it from the other information, or altering the font or the font size. Make sure the
      mailing and phone information is easy to locate. This section is almost always found at the very top of the résumé.
Objective
Content:
      This is a statement of your career objective. Write a strong and positive statement of your career and job objective,
      focusing on your strengths and how you can add value to a potential employer. When creating your objective, use
      clear and concise language. Try to avoid writing an objective that states the obvious, or is too general. There are
      three different ways to structure the objective, and there are pros and cons to each:

      1. Keep the statement fairly general. The positive is that this allows more latitude when the recruiter is
         reviewing your résumé, and keeps more options open. The negative is that the recruiter may feel that you are
         not specific enough, indicating that you lack direction. If you are posting your résumé on websites where a
         variety of employers (in different industries) could view it, we recommend keeping your objective general.
      2. Make the statement very targeted. The positive is that the recruiter sees that you know exactly what you
         want to do. The negative is that you may forgo some opportunities, as you will seem focused on only the
         specific thing listed. Additionally, this résumé might get passed to other departments in the company.
      3. Include no objective at all. It is completely acceptable to eliminate the objective if you are not sure what
         you want to do, but understand that a recruiter who is looking for this section may not be able to infer where
         your interests lie based on your experience and education. There are two other reasons to exclude an
         objective: if your résumé itself is extremely focused so your objective is obvious, or if you do not have enough
         room and your résumé is being accompanied by a cover letter.


It is important that you do not use the space for the objective to say “nothing.” For example, although the following statement
sounds nice, it really doesn’t say anything that isn’t already assumed by the reader.
      Seeking a responsible entry-level position in a progressive organization that provides career growth and professional
      development.

Likewise, a statement where you try to leave yourself open for all available positions can indicate a lack of career direction or
focus. For example, the following statement does not give the reader a good idea of what you would best be suited to do in
an organization.

      Seeking a management position in human resources, production, or marketing/sales.

If you include an “objective” or “summary,” state it in terms of what you can contribute to the company, not what you expect
from the company.

NO:       Objective: A position in employment services with increasing responsibilities where I can continue to expand my
          management, sales and recruiting talents.

YES:     Objective: A position in employment services where my proven management, sales, and recruiting talents can be
effectively utilized to improve operations and contribute to company goals.

Format: The “objective” or “summary” section, if included, generally appears directly beneath the personal information. A
simple sentence or two is adequate; a paragraph is neither necessary nor recommended.

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Education
Content:
   A new or recent graduate will likely wish to emphasize education. Placing this section near the top of the résumé
   will help to accomplish that. Be sure to include the following information:
          School - (use the official name: University at Buffalo OR University at Buffalo, The State University of New
          York).
          Do not include high school information. Once in college, only college information is necessary.
          Degree - (Bachelor of Science in Business Administration or BS in Business Administration; Bachelor of
          Science in Accounting or BS in Accounting; Master of Science in Accounting or MS in Accounting; Master of
          Business Administration or MBA, etc.)
          Degree Date – list the month and year of expected graduation (DO NOT list dates attended).
          Concentration or Option - (Marketing, Management Information Systems, Finance, Human Resources, etc.)
          Other Degrees – If you have another degree it should be listed in the same format as your UB education
          including, type of degree, major, degree date and concentration. Your most recent degree (UB) should be
          listed first.
          Other Education – If you attended another institution and did not receive a degree, you may include it if it is
          relevant and beneficial. (For example, a semester abroad at Oxford would likely add value, while a semester
          at a local community college may not, unless in a desired complementary skill area like MIS or IT). It should
          be formatted like your UB educational information, including dates attended instead of the graduation date.
          GPA – Include your cumulative grade point average (quality point average) if over a 3.0. If your cumulative
          GPA is not above a 3.0, it is acceptable to include your management GPA if that is over a 3.0. When
          presenting this information, be sure to indicate that it is on a 4.0 scale. Ex: 3.2/4.0 (The reason for this is that
          a number of schools in the U.S., and many in the UK, use a 5.0 scale, and while a 3.6 may be impressive on a
          4.0 scale, it will not have the same impact if compared to students who are on a 5.0 scale.)
          ** Some employers, in particular accounting firms, will screen résumés based on a candidate’s GPA. If you do
          not include it, a recruiter will assume it is a weak GPA.
Format:
   This section is generally the first section beneath the personal information and objective for recent graduates. It
   may be laid out in a number of ways, but the key considerations are:
          Make the most important information stand out. If you want to “sell” your major or concentration, bold it and/or
          possibly consider listing it first. However, if you feel that your degree or your school name will buy you more,
          then alter your format accordingly.
          Make it easy to read.
          Maintain consistent format. If you have multiple educational institutions to include, make sure they are laid out
          in the same way and list the most recent first.




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                                                                                                     A Guide To Resume Writing




Experience
Content:
    The “experience” section of your résumé is one of the most important. The reader will review this section to see
    whether you have skills necessary to do the job. Often, candidates focus too much on their job responsibilities and
    daily tasks rather than on their accomplishments and on the skills used or demonstrated on the job. This is valid,
    but not necessarily the best method. At the CRC, we have identified five methods that you can use to add
    effectiveness to the experience section of your résumé. These methods can be used both separately and in
    combination for each bullet.
Remember - there is no single right or wrong approach to presenting your experience. You simply should do whatever
most positively highlights your strengths and minimizes your weaknesses.
1. Focus on skills.

One of the most effective methods of expressing your experience is to focus on the skills that you applied at each
place of employment and what you accomplished with them. Be sure to focus on the business aspect of what you did.
Tasks are usually Job Specific. Skills are usually Job Transferable.

    Guidelines for how to focus on skills:
        a. Identify the type of job you will be looking for, and think about the skills needed for that job.
           Examples of basic skills include: Communication, evaluation, assessment, problem solving, leadership,
           teamwork, time management, organization, self starting, marketing, development, money handling,
           consultation, implementation, training, etc.
        b. For each job you have had, start by listing all of the tasks that you did - everyday things, projects, whatever
           comes to mind. Be as complete as possible.
        c. Look at each task that you listed and try to identify the skills you had to employ to be able to accomplish that
           task. Another way to think about this is to imagine that you are leaving the job, and you need to describe the
           basic skills needed by a new employee who will be replacing you.
                 Always try to demonstrate how your skills can benefit your prospective employer (See Appendix 1).
                If you want to show that your skill contributed to a specific result, make sure there is a clear relation
                 between both. Illustrate how you used your particular skill to make things happen.
        d. Tailor the skills that you employed in your previous job so they are consistent with skills needed for a job
           you are looking for.
        e. Eliminate the redundancy across all the different jobs listed. If you have two areas where you have
           identified communication as one of the skills you used, decide which is the strongest representation of your
           communication skills, and either alter or eliminate the other reference. We strongly urge you to try and find
           a different “angle” or “twist” on the reference that could potentially be eliminated.
Example

Task: Critiquing résumés.
Skills involved: Assessing needs, evaluating options, communication, making recommendations.

The following is a task-oriented statement and tends to be less effective on a résumé.
         Critiqued students’ résumés.

On the other hand, a skills-oriented statement is much more effective and adds considerable value to your résumé.
Here are two examples of skills-oriented statements.
        Communicated with students to increase their marketability by offering multiple résumé layout options.
        Provided effective assistance to students in job search through the thoughtful evaluation of résumés.

Notice the action verb used to start these sentences relates to transferable skills you want to highlight.

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2. Show the results.

Spotlight your capabilities by selecting and expanding on specific achievements and showing the results of your work
where possible. (See Appendix 1.) When you illustrate a specific achievement, make sure it is clear how you
accomplished it. Show exactly what you did to make it happen.

Try to quantify the results. If you increased sales, try to show a percentage or dollar amount increase. Numbers
make it easier for the reader to visualize your abilities. If you do not have an exact amount you can estimate (but be
truthful).
Examples
      Reduced response time to customer inquiries by 50% through creation of a database containing product
      information.
      Increased sales by 36% in the designated area in the two-year period through more targeted prospecting.
      Generated $55,000 in revenues by developing and marketing new territory.


Notice the action verb used to start these sentences shows results a future employer would want from you. Also,
numbers which are more than 10 are written numerically and those less than 10 are written in words, like “two”. If you
are using a symbol, such as $ or % then it is acceptable to use numbers (instead of words) for those less than 10.
Using skills- and results-oriented statements are usually the most effective ways to convey an experience. However,
students with little experience or non-business experience often find it difficult to identify a sufficient number of work-
related skills and results that they achieved in their previous jobs. Those students can also use one of the following
recommendations to boost the experience section.

3. Explain the purpose

Some jobs do not require the application of complex skills or in-depth knowledge. Sometimes, it may be difficult to
identify the direct impact or results of your work. If this is the case, you may instead want to concentrate on explaining
the purpose of particular tasks. Mentioning an important purpose will help to add significance to less complex,
seemingly trivial activities.
Examples
        Update the bulletin board on a weekly basis to communicate job openings to more than 4000 School of
        Management students.
        Enter job postings accurately into an MS Access database to assist students in finding full-time jobs and
        internships.
Notice that describing the importance of a project makes an often mundane task seem more purposeful for the
organization’s success.

4. Add Depth

You can add depth to your statements by showing that you assisted in an important project. A different way to do so is
to illustrate that you reported directly to a highly-ranked manager. Show that you were the part of something that
resulted in a big impact or made a difference.

Examples
      Prepare important monthly reports of office telephone and fax activities for the Assistant Dean to be used in
      budget projections.
      Coordinate the outgoing mail for a $2,000,000 donation campaign aimed at providing essential non-profit
      funding.




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5. Add Breadth

Conveying volume, complexity, or variety of job activities will add breadth to your bullet points. Expand your
statements by showing that you dealt with different situations, people, or problems.

Examples
      Evaluate and edit more than 1000 résumés of undergraduate, graduate, and PhD students per year.
      Provided customer service to more than 100 shoppers daily by answering questions, locating merchandise,
      and demonstrating products.


6. Having trouble expanding your bullet points?

One of the common problems we encounter with students trying to enhance their résumé is that they don’t realize how
significant their experience has been. Ask yourself the following questions about each of your bullet points to help you
recognize your value and present it in a targeted and professional way.

        What was challenging about this task?
        What skill did you enhance by doing this task?
        What would have happened if you did this task poorly, or not at all?
        Why would a future employer find this task interesting or relevant to their opening?

7. Experience Section Format
Information that is expected for each position is:

        Company Name
        Company Location – Include if relevant and if it adds value.
        Dates worked (Start – Finish; include month and year for each). It may be appropriate to list seasons
        (Summer 2006), especially if they were internships or short projects.
        Title. If you did not have a title or cannot locate the employer to verify your title, it is acceptable to create a
        realistic title. Sometimes you can amend the title slightly to highlight relevance. Example, if the company
        called you an “intern” and you performed market research then you can give yourself the title of “Market
        Research Intern”.
        Create your bullet points by starting with an action verb (See Appendix 4) and using one of the methods
        identified above, or a combination of these methods. List the bullet points in the order that a future employer
        would find most relevant for their opening.


Internships

  Approach this section the same way as the experience section. It can be incorporated into the
  experience section or developed as its own as you see fit.

Activities/Affiliations

Content
   Activities such as organizations and clubs (both in and outside of school), and sports or civic organizations can be
   used to show leadership, teamwork, involvement or other relevant and desirable characteristics. Information on
   outside activities also shows “well-roundedness.” This is particularly important for less experienced
   underclassmen for use in filling out their experience sections.
Format
   This can be a simple listing, or it can be developed similar to the employment section. At the very least, include
   the organization, position held, and dates of involvement. Expand on them if they will further demonstrate relevant
   and beneficial characteristics.
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Computer Skills

Content
   As we are all very dependent on technology, it is very important that computer skills be included on your résumé
   so employers understand your capabilities. Consider all of the programs you understand how to use and feel
   would be of value to an employer. Things that are commonly included are:
            General Office programs – Access, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Word, WordPerfect, Lotus, etc.
            Specialty Programs – Peachtree Accounting, Microsoft Dynamics, AutoCAD, etc.
            Operating Systems – Windows, DOS, OS2, etc.
            Programming Languages – Visual Basic, C++, J, J++, Java, Java Script, SQL, etc.
            Database tools – Oracle, SQL, Access
(Note: Avoid version/release numbers and outdated software and equipment, unless relevant to the position sought.)
Format
   A simple listing is acceptable. Depending on the overall number of inclusions, a separation technique, such as the
   bulleting above, may enhance readability. This section can appear virtually anywhere on a résumé. If the position
   you are seeking is not very technical in nature, or if you do not have many applications to include, this section may
   be near the bottom of the page. If you are applying for a position that is more technical, this may be listed directly
   beneath the education section, depending on the relevance of your experience.



Awards and Honors
Content
   Any time that you have excelled and been recognized by your superiors or peers, it shows that you have a high
   level of achievement, and it is a good idea to include this information on your résumé. Consider any awards you
   have received, such as Employee of the Month, Top Sales, Academic Scholarships, Sports Scholarships or
   Awards, and Civic Recognition (Eagle Scout, Good Neighbor, etc.) Do not include awards that date back a long
   time unless you feel they are particularly significant to your desired employment. Do not list awards or honors that
   are obviously from high school.

Format
   Awards and honors may be a separate section, or they may be nested in other sections. For example, scholarship
   information may be included in the education section, and employer recognition could be included in the work
   experience section. It is common to make these awards stand out by italicizing the information. If you choose to
   create a separate section for awards and honors, a simple reverse chronological listing is acceptable. Be sure to
   include the name of the award, the date received, and the organization through which it was received.


“References Available Upon Request”

    References are assumed to be available; therefore, it is not necessary to state this. Although it is acceptable to
    state this on the résumé, you should NOT include a listing of your references on your résumé. If you begin to run
    out of space on your résumé, eliminating this statement is one of the easiest ways to make more room,
    conversely, listing this point can help fill space on an empty résumé.

    The best way to handle references is to have them printed on matching bond paper, with the same header as your
    résumé, and to take them with you to the interview. Only provide them if they are requested, but have them ready.




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Overall Appearance
The general appearance of the employment résumé is very important to your job hunting campaign. Think of the
résumé as an extension of you. If it is neat, crisp, and well-organized, it will suggest to the employer that you are
someone who is careful and concerned about the quality of your work. A sloppy, disorganized résumé, conversely, will
create an unfavorable impression with prospective employers and greatly hinder, if not ruin, your employment efforts.
It is imperative, therefore, that you be attentive to the general appearance of your résumé document, and that you take
the necessary steps to make a favorable impression.


    1. Use a high quality bond paper (24 lb.) in either white or cream. Avoid trendy paper and dark colors.
    2. Use a clean, simple font and keep the font size between 10 pt. and 12 pt. These are the size
       recommendations for the most commonly used fonts:
                Arial 10 pt. - 12 pt.
                Calibri 11 pt. - 12 pt.
                Times New Roman 10.5 pt. - 12 pt.
    3. Carefully proofread and edit your résumé to ensure proper spelling, grammar, punctuation, and
       comprehension. (If necessary, seek help from a professional.)
    4. Make effective use of bolding and underlining to facilitate ease of reading and appropriate topical emphasis.
       Think before you bold or underline anything. If making it stand out will not benefit you, don’t do it. It is
       important that you do not overuse the different highlighting features.
    5. Make sure the final copy is neat, well-spaced, uncluttered and easy to read.
    6. Final printing should be done using a high quality laser printer.

    Although some of this may seem like basic advice, a high percentage of résumés don’t meet these simple
    standards. Your extra effort can have substantial payoff for your job hunt.




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Example of chronological résumé
                                                                                                      A Guide To Resume Writing
                                            NICHOLAS D. ROBERTS
                  932 Hollings Road     Eden, New York 14054      (716) 992-0909     nroberts@buffalo.edu

OBJECTIVE        A position in corporate finance using proven problem-solving, analytical and interpersonal skills to
                 contribute to corporate goals.

EDUCATION        UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
                 Master of Business Administration, expected May 2011                  GPA: 3.8/4.0
                 Concentrations: Finance and Information Systems & E-Business

                 CANISIUS COLLEGE
                 Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, May 2005 GPA: 3.3/4.0
                 Concentration: Finance

EXPERIENCE       ADVANTAGE COMPANY, Williamsville, New York
                 Operations Manager/Analyst, 1/10 – 5/10
                    Helped to reduce company’s $1 million dollar account receivable to $400,000 in 18 months without a
                    significant reduction in sales volume
                    Negotiated a rate decrease with check guarantee vendor resulting in a $5,000 savings
                    Trained wholesale sales representatives in the check guarantee process which results in a 98% approval
                    rate for bad checks submitted for coverage
                    Reduced internal check float time from three days to one day
                    Evaluated credit for new accounts which helped reduce bad debt and days’ sales outstanding
                    Acted as relationship manager between the company and its sales representatives
                    Created database reports with the help of our MIS professionals to provide essential information for
                    operational analysis

                 PRAXAIR, INC, Tonawanda, New York
                 Corporate Audit, 9/05 – 8/09
                     Conducted year-end compliance audits of production facilities throughout the United States
                     Created an audit profile for the company’s Medigas division
                     Recognized relatively high telephone expenses for an expatriate officer and developed a solution to
                     minimize this expense with the help of the telecommunications department
                     Recognized areas for improvement and discussed alternative solutions with local management after
                     participating in a month long accounting and operational audit of plant facilities in China

                 M&T BANK, Buffalo, New York
                 Finance Intern, Summer 2004
                     Analyzed float operations of newly acquired bank for Assistant Vice President of Technology and Banking
                     Operations
                     Recommended how to minimize cost of combined float operations

COMPUTER         Proficient in Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint, Excel and Access), Microsoft Front Page,
SKILLS           Basic HTML, Dynamic HTML, Lotus Notes, Lotus Smart Suite
                 Familiar with Adobe Pagemaker, Visual Basic, Visual C++, JavaScript, Java

ACTIVITIES/      Vice President of the Graduate Management Association (GMA)
AFFILIATION      Webmaster for the National MBA Consortium and GMA web sites
                  S
                 Volunteer Practice Interviewer for the School of Management Career Resource Center
                 Member of Winning Team in the IBM Career Advantage Competition
                                                            14
                                                                                            A Guide To Resume Writing



APPENDIX 1
                  IDENTIFY YOUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS, NOT YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES



Examples of expressing your accomplishments and experience:



   Increased profits
   Increased sales
   Improved efficiency
   Reorganized
   Identified new markets
   Improved company’s competitive position
   Expanded markets
   Developed new products
   Improved existing products
   Increased value of corporate securities
   Trained others (include how many if number is significant)
   Improved morale
   Reduced inventory
   Decreased turnover
   Solved problems
   Improved financial reporting
   Improved management reporting
   Used cost-saving purchasing techniques
   Contributed new ideas
   Relieved supervisor (manager) of administrative details
   Reduced overdue accounts
   Accelerated collection period
   Reduced employee turnover / inefficiency
   Automated filing system




All of these examples can be summed up by three points. Show how you:



   Made the Company Money
   Saved the Company Money
   Saved the Company Time


By doing this, you can show a prospective employer how you can contribute to their organization.




                                                       15
                                                                                                          A Guide To Resume Writing



                                                         APPENDIX 2

                                           Electronic and Scannable Résumés

Employers are often inundated with résumés. To effectively manage a large candidate pool, many companies are now
utilizing Electronic Applicant Tracking Systems that use imaging technology to scan, organize, store and retrieve résumés in
an internal database. Résumés are scanned in as images and then "read" by OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software.
Screening is done by a keyword search. This handout is to help you prepare a "scannable friendly" résumé so that important
information including education, work experience, and computer skills can be extracted from the database. Not all scannable
technology is the same; however, the more you abide by these "rules," the more you decrease your chances for
misinterpretation and error, and increase your chances for "hits." Your résumé is then typically forwarded electronically to the
person with hiring authority.

Style
Avoid boldface, italicizing, script, shading, graphics, borders, and underlining. Use asterisks, not bullets. A scannable résumé
is clean with crisp characters so that the OCR can recognize every letter. When your résumé is being scanned, it is designed
to read text not graphics. Do not us horizontal lines or vertical lines. Computers will try to read lines and will blur them into
characters. Vertical lines may be confused with the letter "I." Omit parentheses and brackets around any telephone area
codes. Use 10-14 point common sans serif fonts such as Helvetica, or use clean popular serif fonts like Times New Roman
or Arial as a second choice. Avoid compressing spaces between letters. Use spaces between lines as little as possible. Use
a traditional reverse chronological résumé that avoids complex layouts tables or columns.

Substance
Your name should be the first text line. Avoid styles that list your contact information all on one line, such as "Joe Union, 123
Main Street, Schenectady, NY 12308, 845-388-6176". A keyword summary paragraph at the top of your résumé can identify
important relevant skills and qualifications.

Skill-focused nouns - With scannable résumés, computers search for descriptive nouns such as manager, assisted,
coordinated, and organized. Also, avoid slashes "design/develop." The more facts you include the more chances your skills
will match with available positions. Many scanning systems are programmed to understand standard abbreviations such as
BA, BS, MS, MBA, and PhD.

Maximize use of industry jargon and abbreviations. It is logical to assume recruiters will instruct the search engine dictionary
to pull up keywords specific to the job opening and field when trying to fill a position. Use specific buzzwords in your career
field such as LAN (Local Area Network), CAD (Computer Aided Design), Lotus, and Systems Integration. Include computer
software and hardware skills, degrees, majors, GPA, job titles, employers, accomplishments and honors. Think about the
essential characteristics required for the job: education, experience, and skills. The more buzzwords you have, the more
likely your résumé will get selected.

Printing and Paper
Always send a standard 8 ½" x 11" original, laser printed résumé, which produces a sharper image for the scanner. Never
use a nine-point dot matrix printer. Use a one-page format. If you have more than ten years experience consider using a
second page, but make sure your name is at the top on all pages. For best contrast between the ink and the paper, use black
ink on high quality white paper. Off-white or ivory paper is acceptable.

Sending and Packaging
Faxed or copied résumés are more difficult to read. If faxing is a must, set the fax machine on "fine mode," rather than on
"standard mode." Always use a paper clip; staples in your résumé may cause the pages to stick together. Do not fold your
résumé, because if a crease lands across a line of text, it will confuse the scanner. Mail your résumé in a large flat envelope,
ideally with a sheet of cardboard to keep it neat. If you are unsure whether the employer scans résumés, you can inquire or
consider sending two résumés that have small removable Post-It Notes, or in your accompanying cover letter. Indicate one is
a "Scannable Résumé" and the other is a "Hard Copy Résumé".




                                                                16
                                                                                                    A Guide To Resume Writing



                                                           APPENDIX 3
                                                Sample Scannable Résumé

JANE E. UNION
123 Winspear Ave.
Buffalo, NY 14215
716-388-1234
ju4@buffalo.edu

SUMMARY

Human resources and computer experience; strong organizational, interpersonal, interpersonal, analytical and problem
solving skills. Seeking employment in recruitment field.

EDUCATION

University of Buffalo, The State University of New York
BS in Business Administration, cum laude, June 2007.
GPA 3.5/4.0
Dean’s List 2004-2005

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE

Human Resources Intern, General Electric, Schenectady, NY
Winter Break 2006
*Organized and coordinated internship program in New York State region.
*Assisted manager with revision of COBRA benefits package system.
*Observed labor contract negotiation over salary and vacation issues.

Career Assistant, Career Resource Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
2005-2007
*Assisted Recruiting Coordinator with resume referral program.

Personnel Assistant, Springfield Medical Center, Springfield, MA
Summer 2005
*Screened applications for clerical positions in hospital.
*Assisted with application and interview process for hiring 40 new professionals.
*Developed brochure introducing programs offered by Personnel Office.

Vocational Counselor, Berkshire Center, Pittsfield, MA
Summer 2004
*Advised individuals on job hunting strategies.
*Presented to classes on: resume writing, filling out applications, and interviewing skills.

ACTIVITIES

Treasurer, Psychology Club, 2005-present
*Monitored annual budget for activities throughout term.

Fundraiser, Ronald McDonald House, 2002-2003
*Organized and developed campus-wide project raising $3,000 through one-day event.

Member, Crew Team, 2004-present

COMPUTER SKILLS
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, WordPerfect, Lotus, Page Maker, FrontPage, and HTML

                                                                 17
                                                                                              A Guide To Resume Writing



                                                  APPENDIX 4

                                               Action Words
Accelerated    Clarified        Determined      Finished         Mastered         Publicized         Sold
Accompanied    Classified       Developed       Focused          Matched          Published          Solicited
Accomplished   Cleared          Devised         Followed         Measured         Purchased          Solved
Accumulated    Closed           Diagnosed       Formed           Mediated         Pursued            Specified
Achieved       Coached          Directed        Formulated       Medicated        Qualified          Spoke
Acquired       Coded            Disapproved     Founded          Merchandised     Rated              Staffed
Acted          Collaborated     Disbursed       Gathered         Met              Reacted            Staged
Adapted        Collated         Discovered      Generated        Mobilized        Realized           Standardized
Addressed      Collected        Discussed       Governed         Modeled          Rearranged         Started
Adjusted       Combined         Dismantled      Graded           Moderated        Rebuilt            Stimulated
Administered   Commanded        Dispatched      Granted          Modified         Received           Stocked
Admitted       Commended        Dispensed       Graphed          Molded           Recognized         Streamlined
Adopted        Commissioned     Dispersed       Grouped          Monitored        Recommended        Strengthened
Advanced       Committed        Displayed       Handled          Motivated        Reconciled         Structured
Advertised     Communicated     Disproved       Headed           Moved            Recorded           Submitted
Advised        Compared         Dissolved       Hired            Named            Recruited          Succeeded
Advocated      Compiled         Distributed     Hosted           Navigated        Rectified          Suggested
Aided          Composed         Diversified     Identified       Negotiated       Redesigned         Summarized
Allocated      Compounded       Documented      Illustrated      Nominated        Reduced            Supervised
Allowed        Computed         Doubled         Implemented      Notified         Reevaluated        Supported
Analyzed       Conceived        Drafted         Improved         Observed         Referred           Surpassed
Answered       Concluded        Drew            Incorporated     Obtained         Refined            Tailored
Anticipated    Condensed        Earned          Increased        Opened           Reflected          Targeted
Applied        Conducted        Edited          Indexed          Operated         Registered         Taught
Appointed      Conferred        Educated        Indicated        Ordered          Reinforced         Terminated
Appraised      Conserved        Effected        Influenced       Organized        Relayed            Tested
Approved       Considered       Elected         Informed         Originated       Renegotiated       Trained
Arbitrated     Consolidated     Eliminated      Initiated        Outlined         Reorganized        Transferred
Arranged       Constructed      Employed        Inspected        Packaged         Replaced           Translated
Assembled      Consulted        Enabled         Inspired         Paid             Replied            United
Assessed       Contacted        Encouraged      Installed        Participated     Reported           Updated
Assigned       Contracted       Endorsed        Instituted       Perfected        Represented        Upgraded
Assisted       Contributed      Enforced        Instructed       Performed        Reproduced         Utilized
Assumed        Controlled       Engaged         Integrated       Persevered       Requested          Validated
Assured        Converted        Engineered      Interpreted      Persuaded        Researched         Verified
Attained       Convinced        Enlarged        Interviewed      Pinpointed       Reserved           Wrote
Attended       Cooperated       Enlisted        Introduced       Placed           Reshaped
Audited        Coordinated      Ensured         Invented         Planned          Resolved
Authored       Copied           Entered         Inventoried      Prepared         Responded
Authorized     Corrected        Established     Investigated     Prescribed       Restored
Awarded        Corresponded     Estimated       Invoiced         Presented        Restructured
Balanced       Counseled        Evaluated       Issued           Presided         Retrieved
Bargained      Created          Examined        Justified        Prevented        Revamped
Billed         Credited         Exceeded        Kept             Priced           Reviewed
Bought         Critiqued        Executed        Launched         Printed          Revised
Briefed        Decided          Expanded        Learned          Prioritized      Revitalized
Budgeted       Decreased        Expedited       Leased           Processed        Risked
Built          Defined          Experienced     Lectured         Procured         Routed
Calculated     Delegated        Experimented    Led              Produced         Saved
Canceled       Delivered        Explained       Listed           Programmed       Scheduled
Catalogued     Demonstrated     Explored        Litigated        Projected        Screened
Chaired        Deposited        Expressed       Loaded           Promoted         Secured
Changed        Described        Extended        Logged           Proofread        Selected
Charged        Designated       Extracted       Maintained       Proposed         Separated
Charted        Designed         Fabricated      Managed          Protected        Served
Checked        Detailed         Facilitated     Manipulated      Proved           Serviced
Cited          Detected         Familiarized    Marketed         Provided         Simplified
               Refer to the Glossary of Action Verbs for even more ideas and their definitions at:
                                                          18
                               http://mgt.buffalo.edu/files/career/ActionVerbs.pdf

								
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