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									       U N IV ER S I T Y O F WAS H IN GT O N




               DRAFT
I N F O R M AT I O N S E RV I C E S
          S T R AT E G Y
        APPENDICES

       WORKING DRAFT 2/4/02
                                                TABLE OF CONTENTS

Appendix I. Implementation Activities ......................................... 7
A. User...........................................................................................................................................................................8
                       User-Centered Design and Accessibility ..............................................................................................8
B. Web .........................................................................................................................................................................10
C. Authenticate...........................................................................................................................................................11
D. Authorize ...............................................................................................................................................................12
E. Personalize .............................................................................................................................................................13
F. Services and Content ............................................................................................................................................14
1. Communication Tools.........................................................................................................................................15
2. Information Resources ........................................................................................................................................16
                 a) Knowledge ..........................................................................................................................................16
                       Enriching Learning ..........................................................................................................................16
                       Future Challenges.............................................................................................................................17
                 b) Management ......................................................................................................................................18
3. Transaction Services..............................................................................................................................................19
                 a) People ................................................................................................................................................20
                 b) Money................................................................................................................................................21
                 c) Facilities.............................................................................................................................................22
                 d) Teaching and Learning ......................................................................................................................23
                 e) Research and Scholarship....................................................................................................................24
                 f) Health Care .......................................................................................................................................25
G. Architecture and Infrastructure .........................................................................................................................26
1. Computing ..............................................................................................................................................................26
2. Networking and Wireplant...................................................................................................................................28
                       Cable Infrastructure Replacement......................................................................................................28
                       Campus Network Backbone Upgrades .............................................................................................29
                       Internet Upgrades Needed.................................................................................................................29
                       Wireless Technology ..........................................................................................................................29
Appendix II. Project Descriptions of Implementation Activities31
            Implementation Activities Tables............................................................................................................31
A. User Views .............................................................................................................................................................35
B. Web Activities........................................................................................................................................................36
                       EVP Web Page Architecture Project Charter........................................................................36
                       Accessible Web Design ..........................................................................................................37
C. Authenticate Activities........................................................................................................................................38
                       No clear-text passwords (Secure Services) ............................................................................38
                       Dept. services with UW NetID software, (Web Authentication Services for UW
                         Departments).....................................................................................................................39
                       Get UW NetID........................................................................................................................40
                       Password Protection Software (Secure Services) ..................................................................41
                       Cross Institutional Authentication—Shibboleth.....................................................................42
D. Authorize Activities ............................................................................................................................................44
                       Person Registry......................................................................................................................44
                       Integrated Authorization Project—ASTRA (Access to Systems, Tools, Resources, and
                          Applications) .....................................................................................................................45
                       Group Registry (LDAP Authorization) ..................................................................................46
                      Workflow Management ..........................................................................................................47
                      Integrated Audit Database.....................................................................................................48
E. Personalize Activities ..........................................................................................................................................50
                      Additional User Views and Content.......................................................................................50
                      MyWork..................................................................................................................................51
                      Interface improvements..........................................................................................................52
F. Services and Content, Communications Tools Activities .............................................................................54
                      WebPine.................................................................................................................................54
                      Personal Calendar.................................................................................................................55
                      UW Online Technology News (OnTechNews) .......................................................................55
                      Community Building Tools ....................................................................................................56
                      Personal Calendar (Events System)......................................................................................58
                      Affiliate Email ........................................................................................................................59
                      Alumni Directory Services .....................................................................................................60
                      Alumni Career Connections...................................................................................................61
                      Import/Export External Calendar Information ......................................................................62
                      Integrated Personal Calendar and Events.............................................................................63
G. Services and Content, Information Resources—Knowledge Activities ....................................................65
                      Digital Media Asset Management System..............................................................................65
H. Services and Content, Information Resources—Management Activities..................................................67
                      University Strategic Analysis Group (USAG)........................................................................67
                      Data Warehousing Initiative: Human Resources, Student, and Financial ...........................68
                      Data Warehousing Initiative: Grant & Contract and Alumni Development.........................69
I. Transaction Services—People Activities...........................................................................................................72
                      Employee Self-Services (ESS) Update ...................................................................................72
                      Online Personnel Actions ......................................................................................................73
                      Medical Center HR System Enhancement..............................................................................74
                      Managed Kiosk ......................................................................................................................76
                      Online Work Leave Record....................................................................................................77
                      Integrated recruiting/hiring ...................................................................................................78
J. Transaction Services—Money Activities...........................................................................................................80
                      UW Web Credit Card Project ................................................................................................80
                      E-Procurement Project ..........................................................................................................81
                      Grant and Contract Initiative: Grant & Contract Protocol Development............................83
                      Travel System.........................................................................................................................85
                      University Budgeting System .................................................................................................86
                      Grant & Contract Accounts Receivable System.....................................................................87
K. Transaction Services—Facilities Activities......................................................................................................89
L. Transaction Services—Teaching and Learning Activities .............................................................................90
                      MyClass .................................................................................................................................90
                      Student Personal Services......................................................................................................91
                      Catalyst SimpleSite Tool ........................................................................................................93
                      Undergraduate Admissions....................................................................................................94
                      Educational Outreach Systems ..............................................................................................95
                      Catalyst Portfolio Tool ..........................................................................................................96
                      Student Learning Outcomes Project ......................................................................................97
                      Online Gradebook..................................................................................................................98
                      Open Knowledge Initiative ....................................................................................................99
M. Transaction Services—Research and Scholarship Activities .....................................................................101
                      Grant and Contract Guide ...................................................................................................101
                      Grant and Contract Proposal Development ........................................................................102
                      Grant and Contract Administrative Systems........................................................................103
N. Transaction Services—Health Care Activities..............................................................................................106
O. Architecture and Infrastructure—Computing Activities............................................................................107
                      Video/Audio Streaming Services..........................................................................................107
P. Architecture and Infrastructure—Networking & Wireplant Activities.....................................................109
                      Campus Backbone Upgrade (Formerly 10/100 Megabits Switched)...................................109
                      Wireless Network Pilot Project............................................................................................110
                      Campus Wireplant Upgrade ................................................................................................111
                      Building Network Upgrade (formerly Gigabit Ethernet) .....................................................113
                      Wireless University ..............................................................................................................114
APPENDIX III. About This Report..........................................116
A. Contributors .......................................................................................................................................................116
B. References ...........................................................................................................................................................117
C. Development and Review Process .................................................................................................................118
APPENDIX IV. —Technical Information ...............................119
6   1/10/06   ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
             APPENDIX I. IMPLEMENTATION
                     ACTIVITIES
                           The next sections offer a step-by-step view of the University’s plans for
                       building the next-generation infrastructure described in the Conceptual
                       Framework. The sections follow the same organizational approach used in the
                       Conceptual Framework by presenting each technology component separately.

                           The sections begin with an overview of significant accomplishments in
                       each area, current status, and major work ahead. Each section ends with a list
                       of specific projects and activities sorted by their status: recent
                       accomplishments, current activities, planned activities, or future possibilities. A
detailed description of most activities is available in Appendix II.

     These sections highlight only the major projects and activities in each area: those that have broad
impacts across units and departments. There are numerous other efforts underway that cannot be
included here and much more work to be completed than can be described in these sections.

     The activities described in this section represent the University’s current understanding of the
best way to proceed. These are open to discussion, revision, and change as the University considers
its technology directions and options and as it determines what will work best for the future.




7            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                                            A. USER

                        When the MyUW portal, http://myuw.washington.edu/, was launched in
                    the spring of 2000, it marked a major milestone in the University’s efforts to
                    provide personalized, Web-based information and services to all of its
                    constituents.

                        Today, nearly 70,000 people regularly log on to MyUW to take advantage of
                    the personalized, interactive information and services it provides. Extending
                    these services to the millions of people associated with this University is an
                    enormous undertaking and will involve many challenges.

     The University already is making progress toward meeting this goal. Just a year after MyUW was
initiated, some 35,000 students were enjoying a full range of personalized information and services
through MyUW. Today, educational outreach students can sign up for a UW NetID and use MyUW
services. Faculty and staff can view their earnings and benefits information through the Employee
Self-Service section of MyUW. Teaching faculty and teaching assistants can see their class schedules
and link to MyClass, which provides a number of Catalyst Web and community building tools. In
addition, recent alumni with UW NetIDs can use the University’s email and email forwarding
services.

    To meet the University’s future goals, many additional constituent groups will need to be given
access to MyUW. The University currently is working to provide access for parents, researchers,
patients, referring physicians, and student applicants.

    A major challenge in accomplishing this is finding a way to distribute UW NetIDs and
passwords to large groups, while ensuring that they actually are being delivered to the correct people.
The University also needs to identify a secure way to provide passwords to these people.


    User-Centered Design and Accessibility
     In conjunction with the MyUW effort, there is a strong emphasis on user-centered design for
new products and services. From the time a new product is conceived, and throughout its lifecycle,
users' needs and perspectives are taken into account. The goal is to make new technology work
effectively for all users. The USER project is one example of this. Users are involved in determining
which products to build and how they will work, and users evaluate how well these products address
their needs.

    Computing & Communications has created a usability lab to evaluate the user experience with
prototype designs. Several existing Web-based interfaces, including MyUW, have gone through
usability testing to identify ways to improve the user experience. See
http://depts.washington.edu/cac/usable/

     C&C also has established an Application Integration Team (AIT) that, among other efforts, is
working with developers to determine when and how to involve users at all stages of development.
Methods being considered include observing students, faculty, and staff in their work environments,
talking with individuals and small groups, holding focus sessions, analyzing user interactions with
existing interfaces, conducting surveys, and learning more about the user population.



8           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
    User participation is not limited to services and projects related to MyUW. C&C recognizes the
importance of involving users in the design, prototype, and testing of new applications and services
to ensure that services and products are meeting users’ needs.

    In addition, the University has a long tradition of providing access, equal opportunity, and
reasonable accommodation to its services, programs, activities, education, and employment for
individuals with disabilities. The Web should not be the exception to this policy. A Web site has
been established to help Web developers determine why and how to make their pages accessible. See
http://www.washington.edu/computing/accessible/index.html

    Below is a list of different constituent views for MyUW that are already available, currently being
developed, planned for the near term, or future possibilities:


User Views
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities               Planned Activities               Future Possibilities

    •    Teaching faculty        •    Educational Outreach        •    Prospective                 •    All others
    •    Students                     students                         employees
    •    Employees               •    Alumni                      •    Prospective students
                                 •    Employees                   •    Parents
                                 •    Research faculty            •    Friends and donors
                                 •    Library patrons             •    Patients
                                 •    Contractors and             •    Neighborhood and
                                      vendors                          community groups
                                                                  •    Referring physicians
                                                                  •    Sports fans




9             1/10/06                 ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                                                   B. WEB

                             The University's main Web site, http://www.washington.edu, has 170,000
                         pages, 800,000 files, and is accessed over 15 million times per month. These
                         numbers are continuing to increase as the site expands and as the electronic
                         word replaces the paper one. The site is under continual design review and
                         constantly is being enhanced to reflect new University themes such as
                         "Learning on the Leading Edge" and to take advantage of technological
                         improvements. The goal is for the main Web site to reflect the dynamic and
                         diverse nature of the University, to show the exciting activities that are
                         happening here, to reach out to new constituents, and to welcome potential
                         students, employees, and donors.

    Looking into the future, the University's main Web site will continue to provide a rich and
valuable array of resources to the University community and external audiences. It also will provide
important information for MyUW and the interactive services it offers. Work to improve the site is
ongoing, including efforts to make information even more accessible and oriented towards users'
needs. For example, a new home page recently was introduced that includes a new look, more news,
and quick links to popular services. The new home page design reflects the UW’s overall
communications strategy.

     In addition to the mains site, the University offers MyUW to many of its constituents. More
information about the status and future development of MyUW can be found under User and
Personalize in this section of the report.

     The University also provides a variety of Web servers to its constituents to enable groups and
individuals to create and publish their own home pages. Web servers are made available to faculty,
students, and staff for individual home pages, publications, and courses, and to departments for
departmental Web sites. These Web servers continually are being upgraded with new technologies,
such as streaming audio and video, which enable constituents to publish more sophisticated and
interesting pages.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Web Activities
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities             Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

                            •    EVP Web charter (p. 36)   •    Accessible Web design
                                                                (p. 37)




10            1/10/06                  ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
C. AUTHENTICATE

                                   The University has taken significant steps toward establishing the UW
                               NetID as the only identification that users need to access University resources
                               over their lifetime.

                                   The Web Access System (WAS) server software, known in the past as
                               "Pubcookie," has been operating in a limited capacity for several years and
                               now is being shared with more users around the campus (including Capital
                               Projects, UWired, and the Libraries) and throughout the Internet2 community.

                           The WAS software enables a server to authenticate users with a UW
NetID. It also sets authentication cookies in a user’s Internet browser, allowing that person to log on
only once with their UW NetID to access Web-based services on any server using WAS software.

    An important recent breakthrough is a decision by the University Medical Center to adopt the
UW NetID as its single user identification. This commits a large and important segment of the
University’s population to a single ID, and it opens up the opportunity for those people easily to
access other University services.

     Also notable is a new process called "Get UW NetID," which enables new employees to be
assigned a UW NetID immediately after they are hired, giving them access to email and other
services before they start work.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Authenticate Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities              Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

     •   Single sign on with           •    Dept. services with        •    Secure ID                 •    Public key
         UW NetID                           UW NetID                        infrastructure for             infrastructure
     •   No clear-text                      software (p. 39)                medical centers           •    Smart card or
         passwords (Secure             •    Get UW NetID               •    Expanded password              biometric ID
         services) (p. 38)                  (p. 40)                         renewal                   •    Cross-institutional
                                       •    Password protection                                            authentication
                                            software (Secure                                               (p. 42)
                                            services) (p. 41)




11             1/10/06                       ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                                             D. AUTHORIZE

                             The University has started to develop a Web-based authorization system that
                        will give University constituents quick and easy access to the resources they are
                        permitted to use and will give staff a simple process to authorize access for users.

                            This system actually is comprised of several different components that will
                        need to work seamlessly together.

                         One component is a Person Registry that will recognize a user’s major
                   affiliations with the University, for example, employee, patient, alumni, or
                   student. The University is creating the integrated database and software systems
necessary to accomplish this broad identification service.

    The University also is beginning to develop another component that will recognizing a user’s
specific role within each group, for example, whether a student is an undergraduate, post graduate or
continuing education student. The system then will give that person access to the resources they are
permitted to use for each of his or her specific roles. This system, known as ASTRA (Access to
Systems, Tools, Resources, and Applications), also includes a new process that will make it easy for
University administrators and managers to authorize access to University systems.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Authorize Activities
Recent Accomplishments        Current Activities          Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

     •   Student UW                •    Person registry        •    Workflow
         NetIDs                         (p. 44)                     management (p. 47)
     •   Ed. Outreach              •    Integrated             •    Integrated audit
         student UW                     authorization               database (p. 48)
         NetIDs                         project (p. 45)
     •   Employee UW               •    Group registry
         NetIDs                         (LDAP
                                        Authorization)
                                        (p. 46)




12            1/10/06                    ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                                         E. PERSONALIZE

                             The University’s personal portal, MyUW, has gained widespread
                         acceptance among the University community since it made its debut in the
                         spring of 2000. MyUW currently has 70,000 regular users, and that number
                         could exceed one million once the University has achieved its vision of
                         offering all its constituents personalized services through the portal.

                            There is significantly more work to be done to reach that point. One
                       major challenge is to determine how to expand the University’s computing and
                       networking infrastructure to accommodate such a large number of users.
                       Another is to encourage every department, unit, college, and school to publish
material to MyUW. This participation is essential if MyUW is to offer users the full range of
University resources. It will require providing the tools and training necessary to make it easy to
publish to MyUW and to tailor information to specific groups.

    A third challenge is to expand MyUW’s capacity to deliver customized content. One way MyUW
does this is to offer a different view of information and services for each major constituent group,
such as MyWork for employees and MyClass for teaching faculty. MyUW currently has different
views for four constituent groups (students, teaching faculty, alumni, and employees), and new views
must be developed for additional constituency groups. New features also are being added, including a
personal calendar for students that will include schedules for classes and finals, events they express
an interest in, as well as personal dates and commitments that they want to enter.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Personalize Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities            Planned Activities         Future Possibilities

     •   35.000 MyUW              •    Additional user          •    MyWork (p. 51)
         student users                 views and content        •    Interface
     •   60,000 MyUW users             (p. 50)                       improvements
                                                                     (p. 52)




13            1/10/06                   ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                           F. SERVICES AND CONTENT

                          Since its inception, the array of services and resources offered through
                      MyUW has expanded rapidly. Today, students perform a host of transactions
                      online, including a new service that allows them to register for classes.
                      Employees view earnings and benefits information as well as update addresses
                      and other personal information. Faculty view class schedules and conveniently
                      access Catalyst tools to help them build course Web sites. All MyUW users
                      now have access to a personal calendar and can receive alerts about breaking
                      news that might impact their work or commute.

                          While this is a good start, it will take an enormous ongoing effort to
provide content and services that reflect the depth and diversity of this institution. For example:

        The effort of the USER projects to create new Web-based interfaces for the
        University’s core support systems needs to be expanded, and eventually include all
        of the core systems. This approach will make these systems more accessible and
        user friendly.

        Access to Web-based knowledge resources needs to be expanded, and new avenues
        and tools need to be created to enable more UW research and scholarship
        undertakings to be published electronically.

        Opportunities for students to manage their academic lives online and develop their
        own learning programs need to be enhanced. In addition, more work needs to be
        done to allow learning experiences to be tailored to individual learning styles.




14           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
1. COMMUNICATION TOOLS

     The University has been a pioneer in electronic communication technology for over a decade.
Particularly notable is UW's development of the IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) standard
that allows a user to access and manage email anytime and anyplace, using different computers and
email programs at different locations. IMAP has become the preeminent international standard for
enterprise-class email systems serving mobile knowledge workers in large, geographically dispersed
organizations.

     The University also developed Pine, one of the first email tools geared toward general users. Pine
is now used throughout the world and continues to be a primary email tool at the University. Other
email tools supported at the University include Outlook Express, Netscape Messenger, and PC Pine.

    The University recently developed WebPine, which allows users to access Pine on the Web
through MyUW. WebPine offers secure, encrypted email communication from any location where a
Web browser is available. This protects the privacy of email and opens up new possibilities for highly
confidential communications, such as those between doctors and patients.

     Person-to-person interaction is only one aspect of electronic communications. The University
also is developing a variety of tools to facilitate communication between groups and to help build
community. For example, Catalyst provides tools for creating learning communities centered on the
classroom. Additional tools are being developed by Catalyst and Computing & Communications to
provide interactive conferencing and content sharing over the Web.

     Another concept being considered is the development of community channels offered through
MyUW. Each community group would be provided with a channel that comes with a set of services,
such as an information page with announcements, threaded discussion groups, a membership roster,
chat rooms, a calendar of events, and possibly file sharing. Groups could add members automatically
to the channel or have them subscribe. All types of groups could use this service.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Communications Tools Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities            Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   WebPine (p. 54)          •    Publish/subscribe        •    Alumni career
     •   Personal calendar             management                    connections (p. 61)
         (p. 55)                  •    Affiliate email          •    Import/export
     •   UW Online                     (p. 59)                       external calendar
         Technology News          •    Alumni directory              information (p. 62)
         (OnTechNews)                  services (p. 60)         •    Integrated personal
         (p. 55)                                                     calendar/events
     •   Community                                                   (p. 63)
         building tools
         (p. 56)
     •   Events system
         (p. 58)




15             1/10/06                  ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
2. INFORMATION RESOURCES

     The next-generation infrastructure offers many opportunities to provide Web access to the
electronic information resources needed to support the University’s diverse community. Although
the volume of material available online is expanding rapidly, there are many unresolved issues
regarding how to manage it. These include how to archive the information, how to determine its
credibility and quality, and how to index it in such a way that people easily can find what they need.


A) KNOWLEDGE
    Information technology is bringing enormous change to the University’s core mission of
creating, managing, disseminating, and preserving knowledge.

     University Libraries play a critical role in fulfilling this mission by acquiring print-based and
electronic holdings, indexing material through print and automated catalogs, preserving knowledge,
and providing the expertise necessary to connect people with the knowledge they seek.

     In the last decade, the paradigm of introducing and distributing new knowledge and making it
accessible has undergone a significant transformation. The traditional approach has been to
introduce new knowledge through journals and other print media, distribute it through libraries, and
allow users to locate it through library catalogs, interlibrary loan services, and printed bibliographic
indices.

     Information technology now provides new opportunities for introducing, retrieving and
distributing knowledge, as well as for collaborative research, scholarship, and discovery. These
include powerful search engines, bibliographic databases, electronic journals, rich multimedia
information resources, dynamically updated databases of research findings, simulations, and remote
sensing.


     Enriching Learning
     In addition, information technology is offering new ways to enrich the learning experience.
Electronic information resources are evolving beyond the text-based material that has proliferated
over the past decade, and they are integrating sound, video, music, and human interaction in new and
exciting ways. Simulations, animations, and virtual laboratories are giving students new methods for
understanding complex phenomena and allowing them to perform experiments previously beyond
their reach.

     The University is a national leader in this area with efforts such as:

         The ResearchChannel, which shares video content from leading research
         institutions

         KEXP, a radio station that uses cutting-edge Internet audio broadcasting and
         narrowcasting approaches

         The Open Knowledge Initiative, an MIT-led effort to create standard interfaces
         for teaching and learning software



16            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         The Arthritis Source, an interactive, multimedia information program that
         provides in-depth information on arthritis

         The Program for Educational Transformation through Technology
         (PETTT), an effort to identify and promote the most effective approaches to using
         technology to transform learning

    The University’s goal is to remain at the forefront of these developments and to provide the
technological environment necessary to take advantage of new innovations.


     Future Challenges
     Future challenges include:

         Ensuring that licensed information resources work with the University-wide
         authorization and authentication process

         Keeping pace with expanding resources and services in the marketplace, while
         ensuring their quality and credibility

         Working with national programs, researchers, and scholars to explore new
         approaches to publishing, accessing, archiving and indexing new knowledge as it is
         created within the community

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Knowledge Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities              Planned Activities            Future Possibilities

     •   Catalyst Web tool        •    Library electronic         •    Digital libraries
     •   E-book collection             reserves                   •    E-books
     •   Cascade                  •    Digital media asset
                                       management system
                                       (p. 65)




17             1/10/06                  ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
B) MANAGEMENT
    The University’s central support systems, which handle financial management, payroll, human
resources, student services, and more, make it extremely difficult to access or analyze key institutional
data vital for effective decision-making and the management of this institution. These systems are
focused on supporting current operations and do not offer an easy way to sort or analyze data, nor
do they keep the extended historical records necessary for tracking and analyzing trends. The
University’s plans for updating these systems are discussed in the Implementation Issues section of this
document under Modernizing Support Systems.

     These plans include using data warehousing techniques to make it easier to access institutional
data and to provide timely, accurate, and meaningful reports. “Data warehousing” is the term for a
series of techniques used to integrate data from multiple sources and to make it easy to access and
analyze.

     Several data warehousing efforts are underway. The University Statistical Analysis Group has
developed a pioneering effort to provide information critical to managing the University’s academic
enterprise, such as tracking time-to-degree and bottleneck courses. This effort has required many
different groups to cooperate in sharing information and agreeing on definitions of terms.

     Another such effort is the Data Warehousing Initiative, which will make it easier to access and
analyze institutional data related to University support services such as human resources, payroll,
financial management, and student services. This effort is supported through the University
Initiatives Fund.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Management Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities            Planned Activities            Future Possibilities

     •   University statistical        •    Data warehousing:        •    Data warehousing:
         analysis group                     HR, student,                  grant & contract,
         (p. 67)                            financial (p. 68)             alumni (p. 69)




18              1/10/06                      ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
3. TRANSACTION SERVICES

    The ability to complete an increasing number of transactions over the Internet is setting new
expectations for instant, around-the-clock service. People are going online to pay bills, do their
banking, make vacation reservations, and buy everything from computers to cars.

    Providing a wide array of transactional services at the University is not only essential to meeting
these new demands but also to increasing the efficiency of faculty and staff.

     Many of the transaction services used by staff are provided by the central support systems that
handle payroll, financial management, and student services. These systems offer transactional services
that are cumbersome and technologically antiquated. This issue is discussed in further detail in the
Implementation Issues section of this document, under Modernizing Support Systems.

    The University currently is addressing these inefficiencies through a number of initiatives
sponsored by the University Services Renewal (USER) project. These initiatives involve rethinking
current business practices to make them more efficient and then using Web-based approaches to
support those improvements. While good progress has been made in these areas, much more
remains to be accomplished.

   A growing number of transactional services also is being offered through MyUW. Many will be
mentioned in the following section. Expanding these offerings will become increasingly important as
demand for these services rises.

     In addition, in order for the University to provide a full range of resources, it will be important
for individual departments, units, colleges, and schools to offer their services through MyUW and to
develop those services so that they integrate with the authorization and authentication processes.
This will allow departments and units to take advantage of the University-wide infrastructure that is
being developed.




19           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
A) PEOPLE
     The University’s vision is to develop the technology tools and resources necessary to enhance
this institution’s ability to recruit, hire, and retain the best employees, to streamline human resources
management, and to provide employees with quick and easy access to the information and services
they need related to their employment.

     The University has taken important steps toward this goal, including several major efforts
connected with the University Services Renewal (USER) project. One of the first achievements under
the USER project was to streamline the process for changing the sources of funding for a particular
staff position.

    A recent major accomplishment is the introduction of the new Online Payroll Update System
(OPUS). This system makes the time consuming process of updating the University’s payroll records
quick and easy. Under the new system, updates are made instantly by filling out a form on the Web,
and the appropriate authorities are notified automatically.

     Two other significant activities include Early Email, which enables departments to establish
email accounts for new employees before they start their jobs, and Employee Self-Service, which
provides earnings and benefits information online to current employees and allows them to update
their addresses and emergency contact information. More work is underway. For example, Employee
Self-Service will expand to offer additional features including annual and sick leave information for
individual employees. Improved job posting and recruitment approaches also are being developed.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


People Activities
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities             Planned Activities            Future Possibilities

     •   Employee early          •    Medical centers HR        •    Online work-leave        •    Integrated employee
         email                        system                         record (p. 77)                lifecycle
     •   Employee self-               enhancement               •    Integrated
         service                      (p. 74)                        recruiting/hiring
     •   Employee self-          •    Managed kiosk                  (p. 78)
         service update               (p. 76)
         (p. 72)
     •   Online personnel
         actions (p. 73)




20             1/10/06                 ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
B) MONEY
    Under the University’s vision, constituents will be able to complete all of their institutional
financial transactions online through MyUW, whether they’re paying tuition, settling a medical bill,
purchasing office supplies, or managing or reporting on a budget.

     Although the University is just beginning to build toward this vision, there are many important
activities in progress. The University is working on a system that will make it possible for students
and parents to pay for tuition online with a credit card. Another project will enable employees to
select and buy supplies and equipment online from University Stores and from University
contractors. In the future, departments and units also will be able to sell goods and services online.

     In addition, the University is starting a major effort to improve institutional financial and budget
analysis and reporting. This effort, known as the Financial Desktop, is part of the University Services
Renewal (USER) project, and is supported by the University Initiatives Fund. The Financial Desktop
will provide faculty and staff responsible for managing University accounts with a Web-based toolkit
that will make it easy to access, analyze, and report on financial data. In addition, it will simplify the
process of completing financial transactions, such as transferring funds between budgets and
accounts.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Money Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities            Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   UW procurement              •    Selling goods and        •    Grant & contract           •    University
         card program                     services                      protocol                        budgeting system
     •   UW Web credit               •    Medical centers               development (p. 83)             (p. 86)
         card project (p. 80)             financial mgt.           •    Financial desktop          •    Grant & contract
                                          system                   •    Travel system                   accounts receivable
                                     •    E-Procurement                 (p. 85)                         system (p. 87)
                                          project (p. 81)




21              1/10/06                    ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
C) FACILITIES
    Information technology provides many opportunities to enhance the University’s ability to
manage space, facilities, construction projects, properties such as the metropolitan tract, and campus
grounds. While there is much that can be accomplished in this area, there are some important efforts
underway.

     For example, Facilities Services recently launched a new system that will help it manage its
workload and resources more efficiently, and the Capitol Projects office is working on new
accounting and project management systems and on making more capital projects information
available on the Web.

    Other potential initiatives include automated approaches to managing the University’s space
resources as well as enhancements that will improve scheduling of classrooms and other shared space
resources.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Facilities Activities
Recent Accomplishments         Current Activities          Planned Activities   Future Possibilities

     •   Facilities services        •    Capital Project
                                         services




22              1/10/06                   ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
D) TEACHING AND LEARNING
     Web-based transaction services offer new opportunities to enhance the educational experience
and provide students with the tools they need to be active, self-directed learners. In the future
students will be able to manage almost every aspect their academic lives online, including applying
for admission, selecting courses, and tracking their requirements for graduation.

     With faculty guidance, students will be able develop their own academic programs based upon
their level of mastery in a given subject and on their learning goals. In addition, the educational
experience will be customized to each student’s learning style. Students, and other constituents also
will be able to receive answers to specific questions online and to find tools that will help them take
advantage of Web-based learning opportunities.

     An essential part of this strategy is to create the technology foundation, tools, and resources that
will enable the University to achieve these goals and to realize the full potential of information
technology to enrich education.

    While we have just begun to explore the possibilities of these technologies, the University is a
national leader in this arena with many important efforts underway. Students now manage many
aspects of their academic lives through MyUW, and award-winning Catalyst tools help faculty use
technology to enhance learning both over the Web and in their classrooms. The University is
working to improve and expand both of these services.

    In addition, the University is exploring new approaches that will allow students to evaluate
courses and other learning experiences according to the specific kinds of learning objectives they
offer, such as analytical thinking, writing, foreign language, speaking, scientific principles, or
quantitative analysis. The University is developing Web-based pilot systems that will allow students to
examine every type of learning experience: courses, research projects, internships, international
learning, and service learning. The pilot system will enable students to analyze the courses they are
considering, as well as those they already have completed, giving them the ability to continuously
assess their learning programs.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Teaching and Learning Activities
Recent Accomplishments     Current Activities            Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

• Catalyst and Web tools   • Student personal services   • Online gradebook (p. 98)   • Open knowledge initiative
• MyClass (p. 90)            (p. 91)                                                    (p. 99)
                           • Catalyst SimpleSite tool    •
                             (p. 93)
                           • Undergraduate admissions
                             (p. 94)
                           • Educational Outreach
                             systems (p. 95)
                           • Catalyst Portfolio tool
                             (p. 96)
                           • Student learning outcomes
                             project (p. 97)




23              1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
E) RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP
    The University of Washington is one of the nation's leading research universities, consistently
ranking among the top five educational institutions in the country in receipt of federal research
funds. To remain competitive, the University must make it as easy as possible for researchers and
support staff to excel in research with the minimum of overhead and busywork. The Web and
Internet offer a number of opportunities to improve the process of finding research opportunities
and funding sources; developing, reviewing, and approving proposals; submitting proposals to grant
and contract sources; receiving award information; setting up and managing budgets; and closing out
awards.

     One major effort currently underway is the Grant and Contract Initiative, which is creating an
information management system that will enhance the ability of faculty and staff to procure and
administer research grants and contracts by streamlining proposal processing, providing convenient
and timely access to information about the status of proposals and awards and increasing the
efficiency of Grant and Contract Services. The initiative is part of the University Services Renewal
(USER) project and is supported through the University Initiatives Fund (UIF).

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Research and Scholarship Activities
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities           Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

     •   Grant & contract        •    Grant & contract        •    Grant & contract
         guide (p. 101)               proposal                     administrative
                                      development                  systems (p. 103)
                                      (p. 102)




24             1/10/06                 ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
F) HEALTH CARE
     The UW Academic Medical Center (UWAMC)—which includes Harborview Medical Center,
UW Medical Center, UW School of Medicine, UW Physicians Neighborhood Clinics, UW Physicians
and Children's Medical Group, and partnerships with the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance—participates
as an integral and critical part of the UW computing environment. The UWAMC shares many parts
of the central networking, authentication, and MyUW portal infrastructure, as well as approaches to
security management.

    UWAMC has a broad range of application development efforts underway. One is the Medical
Center HR system, included in the list of projects and activities in the People section. Another is a
patient care system that will enhance patient care by allowing care providers to access and manage
patient medical information electronically. A third is an ongoing effort to develop interactive patient
services over the Web. This will include functionality that will allow patients to ask specific health
care questions and receive multimedia answers from a database of certified medical information.
Other approaches are being developed that will help patients manage diseases such as diabetes and
arthritis.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Health Care Activities
Recent Accomplishments    Current Activities               Planned Activities        Future Possibilities

                               •    Clinical information        •    Patient self-
                                    system                           management




25            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
              G. ARCHITECTURE AND INFRASTRUCTURE

                         The architecture and infrastructure is the foundation for all of the services
                     described in this document and for many of the University’s most critical
                     operations. Of all the components of the Information Services Strategy, this area
                     presents some of the greatest challenges.

                           Over the past decade, the networking and computing infrastructure has
                      undergone a continuous, exponential growth in transaction volumes of all kinds,
                      from Web, to email, to video streaming. The unrelenting pace of technological
                      advances has demanded continuous change in all of the components that
                      underlie these technologies, including routers, servers, file servers, and software
of all kinds. In addition, the University’s increasing reliance on these technologies for essential
operations requires that these systems offer continuous, around-the-clock service uninterrupted by
disaster, security breaches, or technical difficulties.

     The following sections describe the current infrastructure and plans for expanding these services.


                                       1. COMPUTING

     The University has selected three major computing environments: UNIX, Microsoft, and
Unisys. Each is explained in more detail below. In general, the critical University data is kept in the
Unisys environment, which, like a bank vault, is secure and not readily accessible. The information
and services people need to do their jobs are delivered to them from the UNIX and Microsoft
environments, which are more open and user friendly. In addition, the University has invested in
technologies that enable information sharing and interactive transactions among these three
environments.

     By supporting these three technologies, the University has diversified its computing environment
to allow for maximum flexibility as technology evolves and changes. The University’s approach
reduces the risk of investing in dead-end technologies and provides a choice of computing
environments for applications and services. This enables the University to capitalize on the strengths
of each environment and makes it easier to collaborate with other institutions.

     The following provides more details about the University’s three computing environments:

         UNIX: The UNIX environment supports a wide variety of University services including
         email, general purpose computing, Web servers, and MyUW. This environment is widely
         used in academic computing and has been developed to support Internet standards.

         MICROSOFT: When the University Services Renewal (USER) project was first initiated
         in 1997, the University looked for a new computing environment to support new
         administrative functions. Microsoft architecture based on Microsoft NT, IIS, and SQL
         Server was selected. The Microsoft environment now supports both the new administrative
         systems and Web applications developed by USER projects as well as the University’s data
         warehousing efforts. This environment offers a mainstream competitive alternative to the
         UNIX platform, and it allows the University to take advantage of two leading marketplace
         alternatives.



26            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         UNISYS: The Unisys MCP hardware and software environment, also known as the
         University’s legacy system, supports the University’s core support systems including the
         student database, payroll system, financial accounting systems, and budgeting system, which
         handles grants and contracts and the state budget. The University has a long history of
         developing support systems on the Unisys platform, and Unisys continues to provide a high-
         quality, cost-effective computing environment. Some of the functionality in these systems is
         outdated and no longer adequately meets the institution’s needs. The University’s strategy
         for upgrading these systems is explained in the Implementation Issues section, under
         Modernizing Support Systems.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Computing Activities
Recent Accomplishments    Current Activities             Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

     •   Web hosting           •    Video/audio               •    Directory services
         services                   streaming services
                                    (p. 107)




27            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                      2. NETWORKING AND WIREPLANT

     No area has been more affected by the enormous growth in demand than networking.

     In the past decade, the University has gone from an environment with limited email use and few
transactional services to one with a full multimedia, interactive Web environment and numerous
transactional and communications services. This growth is likely to accelerate over the next decade,
as video streaming, interactive conferencing, and voice-over-Internet services reach their full
potential.

     The following section describes the evolution of the University’s networking infrastructure, and
it outlines the essential investments that will be necessary to carry this institution into the twenty-first
century.

     Only a little over a decade ago, the University had five separate networks that could not
communicate with one another and that supported different constituencies within the institution.
Since then, the University has worked hard to build a single, institution-wide, high-availability, high-
performance "network utility" based on Internet technologies and standards. Although moving to
this single networking approach was a controversial decision at the time, it has enabled the type of
collaboration within the University and with national peers that has been critical to the University’s
success.

    In addition, the University has avoided many common and costly networking mistakes by
concentrating on Ethernet and Internet technologies. For example, expensive Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM) network systems were in vogue for several years, but it now is clear that the
networking technologies adopted by the University have provided much better performance and
return-on-investment than would have been possible using ATM.

    The University also has saved money by leveraging the existing voice plant to provide wire for
data services and by making incremental capital improvements. While these strategies have sustained
the University for the past decade, they no longer are adequate. They cannot provide the physical
spaces, cable pathways, and communications cabling necessary to support the high bandwidth
required for experiential-based learning and research.


     Cable Infrastructure Replacement
     The UW now faces the urgent problem of replacing most of the cable and physical cable
distribution infrastructure in order to support the next generation of networked-based tools,
approaches, and programs.

    For example, of the more than150 buildings connected to the UW-Seattle campus network, only
20 have the type of wiring necessary to support Fast Ethernet, which operates at 100 Mbps, and has
been the standard Local Area Network technology for years. In addition, a growing number of
computers come factory-equipped with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, which operate at 1,000 Mbps and
require a more modern wireplant.

    There also is a need to provide adequate communication facilities and fiber-optic cabling
between the communication rooms in each building. Most University buildings use a system that



28            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
provides bandwidth that is shared by all of the communications facilities in the building. This
approach now is obsolete and has been replaced by another that provides dedicated bandwidth to
each communication room in a building. This new approach improves performance and makes the
system more manageable.


     Campus Network Backbone Upgrades
    The University also needs to upgrade its campus network backbone if it is to provide the
network capabilities necessary to support advanced collaborative teaching and learning tools. This
backbone consists of Internet routers and Gigabit Ethernet switches, the fiber optic cables linking
them, and the router centers housing them. In particular, the aging Cisco 5000 routers must be
replaced.

    Over the next few years, the 10-Gigabit Ethernet will become the standard technology for
enterprise backbones, Storage Area Networks, and even many Wide Area Networks. This shift will
be driven by the increasing demand for network capacity and the improved price-performance of the
new technology.


     Internet Upgrades Needed
    In the future, the University will continue to follow the Internet-oriented philosophy that has
served it well thus far, but even within Internet technologies, change is coming. The University plans
to support a number of new Internet capabilities. These include native multicast, a more efficient way
to distribute streaming media, and Differentiated Services, which allows some network traffic to be
marked more critical than others and expedited accordingly. In addition, the University needs to be
ready for migration from the current version of the Internet Protocol to the next-generation Internet
Protocol (IPv4 to IPv6) as it becomes more widely used.

    As the network becomes more critical to various institutional activities, making it as robust as
possible becomes an even more urgent priority. Protecting the network from both accidental and
intentional threats will require additional resources to support improved security and redundancy,
with a corresponding cost in space, equipment, and facilities services such as emergency power.


     Wireless Technology
     Demand for wireless networking is growing, and the University is working to provide the
infrastructure necessary to support it. Wireless technology offers great new opportunities for
communication. For example, it could give physicians access to clinical information from hand-held
devices. But if not handled correctly, wireless technology also could lead to great frustration.

    The risk is that individual departments will proceed independently and there will be no
coordinated approach. This will result in a balkanized patchwork of interfering wireless zones, with
decreased performance and reliability for everyone. This already is occurring.

     The University must provide a wireless LAN infrastructure that is well integrated with the
existing and evolving wired network. This requires that the University centrally coordinate the use of
RF spectrum for wireless networking and establish institution-wide guidelines for how independent
departmental installations can coexist with the University-wide wireless infrastructure.



29           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
    While wireless networking cannot supplant wired networking in the foreseeable future, it is
certain that a growing percentage of the University’s constituency will want to use it to supplement
traditional options. To provide the best possible service for them, the University must proceed in a
thoughtful and well-coordinated way.

     Below are recent accomplishments, current and planned activities, and possible future directions
in this area. A detailed project description is available in Appendix II if there is a page reference
below.


Networking and Wireplant Activities
Recent Accomplishments    Current Activities           Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

                               •    Campus backbone         •    Building network        •    Wireless University
                                    upgrade (p. 109)             upgrade (p. 113)             (p. 114)
                               •    Wireless pilot
                                    project (p. 110)
                               •    Campus wireplant
                                    upgrade (p. 111)




30            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
  APPENDIX II. PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS OF
      IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES

IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES TABLES
     The following is a listing of all project activities tables by category, with page references for the
activities included in Appendix II.


User Views
Recent Accomplishments         Current Activities              Planned Activities               Future Possibilities

     •   Teaching faculty           •    Educational                •    Prospective                 •     All others
     •   Students                        Outreach students               employees
     •   Employees                  •    Alumni                     •    Prospective
                                    •    Employees                       students
                                    •    Research faculty           •    Parents
                                    •    Library patrons            •    Friends and donors
                                    •    Contractors and            •    Patients
                                         vendors                    •    Neighborhood and
                                                                         community groups
                                                                    •    Referring physicians
                                                                    •    Sports fans



Web Activities
Recent Accomplishments         Current Activities              Planned Activities               Future Possibilities

                               •    EVP Web charter (p. 36)    •    Accessible Web design
                                                                    (p. 37)



Authenticate Activities
Recent Accomplishments         Current Activities              Planned Activities               Future Possibilities

     •   Single sign on with        •    Dept. services with        •    Secure ID                   •    Public key
         UW NetID                        UW NetID                        infrastructure for               infrastructure
     •   No clear-text                   software (p. 39)                medical centers             •    Smart card or
         passwords (Secure          •    Get UW NetID               •    Expanded password                biometric ID
         services) (p. 38)               (p. 40)                         renewal                     •    Cross-institutional
                                    •    Password protection                                              authentication
                                         software (Secure                                                 (p. 42)
                                         services) (p. 41)




31             1/10/06                    ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
Authorize Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   Student UW                    •    Person registry            •    Workflow
         NetIDs                             (p. 44)                         management (p. 47)
     •   Ed. Outreach                  •    Integrated                 •    Integrated audit
         student UW                         authorization                   database (p. 48)
         NetIDs                             project (p. 45)
     •   Employee UW                   •    Group registry
         NetIDs                             (LDAP
                                            Authorization)
                                            (p. 46)



Personalize Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   35.000 MyUW                   •    Additional user            •    MyWork (p. 51)
         student users                      views and content          •    Interface
     •   60,000 MyUW users                  (p. 50)                         improvements
                                                                            (p. 52)



Communications Tools Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   WebPine (p. 54)               •    Publish/subscribe          •    Alumni career
     •   Personal calendar                  management                      connections (p. 61)
         (p. 55)                       •    Affiliate email            •    Import/export
     •   UW Online                          (p. 59)                         external calendar
         Technology News               •    Alumni directory                information (p. 62)
         (OnTechNews)                       services (p. 60)           •    Integrated personal
         (p. 55)                                                            calendar/events
     •   Community                                                          (p. 63)
         building tools
         (p. 56)
     •   Events system
         (p. 58)



Knowledge Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   Catalyst Web tool             •    Library electronic         •    Digital libraries
     •   E-book collection                  reserves                   •    E-books
     •   Cascade                       •    Digital media asset
                                            management system
                                            (p. 65)



Management Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   University statistical        •    Data warehousing:          •    Data warehousing:
         analysis group                     HR, student,                    grant & contract,
         (p. 67)                            financial (p. 68)               alumni (p. 69)




32              1/10/06                      ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
People Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   Employee early              •    Medical centers HR         •    Online work-leave          •    Integrated employee
         email                            system                          record (p. 77)                  lifecycle
     •   Employee self-                   enhancement                •    Integrated
         service                          (p. 74)                         recruiting/hiring
     •   Employee self-              •    Managed kiosk                   (p. 78)
         service update                   (p. 76)
         (p. 72)
     •   Online personnel
         actions (p. 73)



Money Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   UW procurement              •    Selling goods and          •    Grant & contract           •    University
         card program                     services                        protocol                        budgeting system
     •   UW Web credit               •    Medical centers                 development (p. 83)             (p. 86)
         card project (p. 80)             financial mgt.             •    Financial desktop          •    Grant & contract
                                          system                     •    Travel system                   accounts receivable
                                     •    E-Procurement                   (p. 85)                         system (p. 87)
                                          project (p. 81)



Facilities Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   Facilities services         •     Capital Project
                                           services



Teaching and Learning Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   Catalyst and Web            •    Student personal           •    Online gradebook           •    Open knowledge
         tools                            services (p. 91)                (p. 98)                         initiative (p. 99)
     •   MyClass (p. 90)             •    Catalyst SimpleSite
                                          tool (p. 93)
                                     •    Undergraduate
                                          admissions (p. 94)
                                     •    Educational
                                          Outreach systems
                                          (p. 95)
                                     •    Catalyst Portfolio
                                          tool (p. 96)
                                     •    Student learning
                                          outcomes project
                                          (p. 97)



Research and Scholarship Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities              Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   Grant & contract            •    Grant & contract           •    Grant & contract
         guide (p. 101)                   proposal                        administrative
                                          development                     systems (p. 103)
                                          (p. 102)




33              1/10/06                    ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
Health Care Activities
Recent Accomplishments   Current Activities               Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

                              •    Clinical information        •    Patient self-
                                   system                           management



Computing Activities
Recent Accomplishments   Current Activities               Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

     •   Web hosting          •    Video/audio                 •    Directory services
         services                  streaming services
                                   (p. 107)




Networking and Wireplant Activities
Recent Accomplishments   Current Activities               Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

                              •    Campus backbone             •    Building network          •    Wireless University
                                   upgrade (p. 109)                 upgrade (p. 113)               (p. 114)
                              •    Wireless pilot
                                   project (p. 110)
                              •    Campus wireplant
                                   upgrade (p. 111)




34            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                                           A. USER VIEWS

User Views
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities            Planned Activities               Future Possibilities

     •   Teaching faculty        •    Educational              •    Prospective                 •    All others
     •   Students                     Outreach students             employees
     •   Employees               •    Alumni                   •    Prospective
                                 •    Employees                     students
                                 •    Research faculty         •    Parents
                                 •    Library patrons          •    Friends and donors
                                 •    Contractors and          •    Patients
                                      vendors                  •    Neighborhood and
                                                                    community groups
                                                               •    Referring physicians
                                                               •    Sports fans




35             1/10/06                 ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                                    B. WEB ACTIVITIES

Web Activities
Recent Accomplishments    Current Activities             Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

                          •    EVP Web charter (p. 36)   •    Accessible Web design
                                                              (p. 37)



EVP WEB PAGE ARCHITECTURE PROJECT CHARTER
CATEGORY
  Current activity.

WHAT
     Web pages for the business units reporting to the Executive Vice President are expected to be
task oriented, easy to navigate, and work in conjunction with one another. A project team is working
to establish how this is to be accomplished and to determine requirements and guidelines for the
page developers to follow. They will produce a redesigned Faculty/Staff Guide Web page that more
strongly reflects task orientation and provides access to the type of information currently contained
in the UW Yellow Pages.

WHY
     A set of Web pages that is task-oriented, has a common look, and is easy to navigate will make it
easier and faster for UW faculty and staff to get their work done.

WHO BENEFITS
    Faculty, staff, and students who use the EVP central service Web pages. For each requirement
and guideline we propose, we will explain how the standard is expected to help the user.

PROJECT STATUS
    Guidelines and requirements have been determined. Web developers have been consulted.
Finalized versions of the templates and documentation are being created.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   Executive Vice President; Weldon Ihrig

CONTACT
  Sandy Moy, Director
  University Computing Services, Computing & Communications
  sandy@cac.washington.edu

     Project Team: Jan Arntz-Richards, Capital Projects; Ginger Brower, C&C; Diane L Cooley,
     Financial Management; Leota Day, Business Services; Jessica Hammond, Business Services;
     Bruce F Miller, Human Resources; Eric Mosher, Business Services; Sandy Moy, C&C; Alexis
     Raphael, C&C; Susan L Smith, Capital Projects; Karen Zaugg, Facilities Services.




36            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
ACCESSIBLE WEB DESIGN
WHAT
    The University of Washington seeks to provide access, equal opportunity, and reasonable
accommodation for individuals with disabilities in its services, programs, activities, education, and
employment. As the World Wide Web becomes an essential means by which we carry out our
mission of education, research, and service, our goal should be to implement information and
systems in this new technology such that they work effectively for all.

WHY
    This project helps people with disabilities access our electronic resources, and it puts the UW in
a better position to deliver its services as information technologies change and diversify in the future.

WHO BENEFITS
    Disabled persons or persons needing assistive technologies will benefit directly. In general, all
users will benefit from more consistent, standards-based designs and technologies.

PROJECT STATUS
    Initial research has been completed, and a Web site has been created to explain the methods and
principles of accessible design.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    The project is sponsored by C&C, the Equal Opportunity Office, the Adaptive Technology Lab,
the DO-IT Program, and the National Center on Accessible Information Technology in Education
(AccessIT).

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Making UW Web Sites Accessible to Everyone
http://www.washington.edu/computing/accessible/

CONTACT
     Rick Ells, Enterprise Webmaster, Technical Communications Group
     University Computing Services, Computing & Communications
     rells@cac.washington.edu




37           1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                               C. AUTHENTICATE ACTIVITIES

Authenticate Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities              Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

     •   Single sign on with         •    Dept. services with        •    Secure ID                 •    Public key
         UW NetID                         UW NetID                        infrastructure for             infrastructure
     •   No clear-text                    software (p. 39)                medical centers           •    Smart card or
         passwords (Secure           •    Get UW NetID               •    Expanded password              biometric ID
         services) (p. 38)                (p. 40)                         renewal                   •    Cross-institutional
                                     •    Password protection                                            authentication
                                          software (Secure                                               (p. 42)
                                          services) (p. 41)



NO CLEAR-TEXT PASSWORDS (SECURE SERVICES)
CATEGORY
     Recent Accomplishment

WHAT
    Secure Services focuses on eliminating the use of any clear-text passwords on the network for
accessing any Computing & Communications (C&C) computing systems. The term 'clear text'
applies to any data that is readily viewable or easily decoded if captured (simple ASCII, base64,
uuencode, etc.). The project scope includes both server configurations and client-side tools.

     Secure Services objectives are to:

         Promote use of secure methods to access online C&C services.

         Promote consistent use of secure protocols within C&C.

         Prevent the use of any 'clear-text passwords' on the network when accessing C&C
         systems.

         Minimize support issues and maximize ease of deployment.

WHY
    Allowing clear-text passwords to travel across the UW network is a security risk. Eliminating the
use of clear-text passwords to C&C servers will help reduce this risk.

WHO BENEFITS
     Faculty, staff, students, and affiliates who use C&C-provided central services will benefit.

PROJECT STATUS
    Phase 1 of this project was completed in June of 2001. Phase 1 eliminated the use of clear-text
passwords for telnet and email (POP and IMAP) access. Phase 2 will eliminate the use of clear text
passwords for FTP (File Transfer Protocol) and will be completed in Winter 2001.




38             1/10/06                     ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    Computing & Communications: Sandy Moy (Director of University Computing Services), Ed
Lightfoot (Director of Information Systems), and Terry Gray, (Director of Networks and Distributed
Computing).

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://depts.washington.edu/cac/project/securesvcs/

CONTACT
     Brad Greer, Senior Technology Engineer, Distributed Systems Engineering,
     Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
     brad@cac.washington.edu



DEPT. SERVICES WITH UW NETID SOFTWARE, (WEB AUTHENTICATION
SERVICES FOR UW DEPARTMENTS)
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The UW Web Authentication Service leverages centrally maintained UW NetIDs and passwords
to provide single sign-on authentication to Web servers across the University of Washington
network.

WHY
    In order to be granted access to restricted services and information on the Web, users need to
prove their identities by authenticating themselves to Web-based applications. Usually each user does
so by providing authentication credentials (e.g., login name, password, SecurID, etc.) to each
application. However, repeatedly entering these credentials via Web pages and dialog boxes is a
nuisance and also increases the likelihood that they may be intercepted or provided to illicit
applications. It is also onerous for users to keep track of multiple sets of credentials, one for each
application, simply because the applications do not share authentication mechanisms. Additionally
problematic is the redoubling of efforts by Web developers and server administrators to maintain
these login names and passwords and implement custom authentication mechanisms.

     The Web authentication service leverages the university's existing UW NetID and SecurID
infrastructure and provides an alternative to less secure, less integrated authentication mechanisms
for applications hosted on different Web servers.

WHO BENEFITS
     The Web authentication service consists of two main components:

         The Weblogin service (weblogin.washington.edu), home to the "UW NetID Login"
         page, where authentication credentials are entered and verified

         The Pubcookie software, for Apache and Microsoft IIS Web servers, which allows a
         Web server to authenticate users via the Weblogin service




39            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
     The Weblogin service benefits faculty, staff, students, and UW affiliates by allowing them to
become familiar with a single "UW NetID Login" page, with a recognizable URL address, where they
can safely enter their credentials. A Web browser that supports cookies and Secure Sockets Layer is
all they need to use this service.

    The pubcookie software benefits Web application developers and departmental Web server
administrators by providing a method for their users to authenticate, without additional
programming, any user with a UW NetID, provided that the pubcookie software has been installed
on their Web server. There are minimal requirements for Web applications and servers that want to
use pubcookie for authentication.

PROJECT STATUS
    We are currently distributing the software to UW departments and will continue to do so. We are
currently making changes to the pubcookie software, as needed. We are also in the process of
developing more documentation and improving our distribution process.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Ed Lightfoot, Director, Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     Lori Stevens, Assistant Director, Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing &
     Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     See the project Web site at: http://www.washington.edu/computing/pubcookie/

CONTACT
     Nathan Dors, Consultant, Client Services
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     dors@cac.washington.edu



GET UW NETID
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The first phase of this project, Early Mail, has been completed and is used to obtain UW NetIDs
for new employees on or before their first day of work.

    The purpose of the second phase (which is an extension of Early Email for all employees
needing a UW NetID) has been renamed "Get UW NetID," and it will expand this process of
obtaining a UW Net ID to all employees (not just new hires). It also may facilitate the password
renewal process.

WHY
     The initial business problem solved by Early Email is that new employees could not sign up for a
UW NetID until they were in the HEPPS database, which often could take up to two weeks after
they have started work. This application allows employees to sign up for email accounts prior to the
initial PAF entry into HEPPS. The use of a Personal Access Code (PAC) was also implemented with
this application.



40            1/10/06             ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
     The second phase is to implement this process for all UW employees needing a UW NetID.
Process and technical issues are also being researched to expand the functionality of this application
for all UW employees.

WHO BENEFITS
     Currently, new UW employees and Payroll Coordinators benefit; this will be expanded to include
all UW employees.

PROJECT STATUS
    This project currently is under evaluation by the Access User Task Group to determine scope,
possible processes, and whether the USER project should be responsible for the on-going
development and implementation.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Sandy Moy, Director of University Computing Services, Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://www.washington.edu/user/hr_payroll/people/access/index.html

CONTACT
     Patricia Woehrlin, USER Project Leader
     University Services Renewal Project (USER)
     woehrlin@u.washington.edu



PASSWORD PROTECTION SOFTWARE (SECURE SERVICES)
WHAT
    This project focuses on eliminating the use of any clear text passwords on the network for
accessing any C&C computing systems. The term 'clear text' applies to any data that is readily
viewable or decoded if captured (simple ASCII, base64, uuencode, etc). The project scope includes
both server configurations and client-side tools. The project has the following objectives:

         Promote use of secure methods to access online C&C services.

         Promote consistent use of secure protocols within C&C.

         Prevent the use of any 'clear text passwords' on the network when accessing C&C
         systems.

         Minimize support issues and maximize ease of deployment.

WHY
    As computers and networking become more heavily used in UW educational, administrative, and
research activities, the need is growing to effectively protect UW systems from intrusion. An
important step in meeting this need is to allow only secure methods for accessing C&C computing
systems, eliminating the use of non-encrypted user IDs and passwords that easily can be used if
captured.




41           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
    All members of the University community benefit by improved security of UW accounts, thus
protecting sensitive information and computer systems.

PROJECT STATUS
   The project met its first major milestone in June, when the use of secure terminal session and
email clients became required for all access to C&C computers.

     This second milestone will require the use of secure file transfer software on C&C servers and as
client software used by anyone connecting to our services. It will become effective December 27,
2001 for most systems; UW administrative systems will be done as soon as possible after that date.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     The project team includes representatives from each C&C computing group (UCS, TSS, NDC,
etc.) and support groups (UWICK, SSG). Current membership includes: Jim Blankenship, Harold
Bobroff, Eliot Lim, Donn Cave, Mark McNair, David Wall, Ron Kline, Juan Perla, RL 'Bob' Morgan,
Nathan Dors, Carol Robinson, Rick Ells, Sid McHarg, Lori Stevens, Oren Sreebny, and Jim
DeRoest.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://staff.washington.edu/brad/secure_services_charter.htm

CONTACT
     Brad Greer, Senior Technology Engineer
     Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
     brad@cac.washington.edu



CROSS INSTITUTIONAL AUTHENTICATION—SHIBBOLETH
CATEGORY
     Future possibility

WHAT
    The goal of Shibboleth is to create cross-institutional authentication and authorization services
on the Web. It will focus on the ability to share a Web page (or CGI service) with individuals or
groups from various institutions, using the credentials and directories of their respective institutions.

WHY
     There is currently a need for a standards-based vendor-independent Web access control
infrastructure that can operate across institutional boundaries. The Internet community has achieved
significant commonality in the Web space by virtue of having such standards (e.g.,
HTML/HTTP/JavaScript/SSL/etc) and having a few no- or low-cost implementations of the clients
and servers.

    This project seeks to define similar standards for the secure exchange of trusted interoperable
information, which could be used in authorization decisions. The goal is to develop and promulgate
an architecture, which can then be used in a multi-vendor, open source, standards-based
environment. If a commercial product fits in this scenario, it does so because it embodies an
architecture that can potentially be replicated in a multi-vendor/open source/standards-based way.



42            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
    The UW community benefits by gaining access to controlled resources at other institutions. UW
departments providing nationwide services benefit by having a way to accept credentials from non-
UW clients. Of course, other institutional affiliates also benefit, as do vendors with commercial
products that can utilize the Shibboleth architecture.

PROJECT STATUS
    It is anticipated that the code will be available mid-August 2001 for alpha testing. The team is
planning a full-scale demonstration at the fall Internet2 member meeting on October 1, 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Terry Gray, Director and Lori Stevens, Assistant Director
     Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://middleware.internet2.edu/shibboleth/

CONTACT
     Bob Morgan, Senior Technology Architect
     Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
     rlmorgan@washington.edu




43           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                            D. AUTHORIZE ACTIVITIES

Authorize Activities
Recent Accomplishments     Current Activities          Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

     •   Student UW             •    Person registry        •    Workflow
         NetIDs                      (p. 44)                     management (p. 47)
     •   Ed. Outreach           •    Integrated             •    Integrated audit
         student UW                  authorization               database (p. 48)
         NetIDs                      project (p. 45)
     •   Employee UW            •    Group registry
         NetIDs                      (LDAP
                                     Authorization)
                                     (p. 46)



PERSON REGISTRY
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The Person Registry is an infrastructure directory that brings together data from University
source systems that deal with people. This data comes from Payroll, Registrar, the Medical Center,
Alumni Association, etc. Person Registry includes the following activities:

         Information about current UW populations is provided to applications.

         Data from multiple sources is reconciled.

         Data is matched to create one record per person.

         Searching with one of many identifiers returns information.

WHY
     There are many source systems at the University of Washington that collect data about UW
populations. Each of these systems uses its own method for gathering data about groups and for
describing its members. For instance, we can obtain some staff/faculty data from the HEPPS payroll
database and other pieces of data about students from the Student Database (SDB). An application
needing information about all populations and all affiliations for each member must draw from
multiple sources and must extract data differently from each source. There is no mechanism to
match records from multiple sources relating to one person. Therefore, no record exists to identify
all affiliations a person might have.

      Accurate, timely information regarding a person's current affiliations is crucial when assigning
resources, privileges, and access levels. Person Registry will provide applications with a single, shared
source of information about each member of UW populations including his or her current
affiliations.




44            1/10/06                 ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
     Users of the following applications will benefit from this service: MyUW, accounting
applications, human resources, white pages directory, and any application or entity that is concerned
with who someone is and his or her associated affiliations. This registry will help build our directory
infrastructure.

PROJECT STATUS
     Person Registry Phase I deliverable is expected February of 2002, with a client applications pilot
available December of 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Ed Lightfoot, Director of Information Systems
     Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Please visit the Person Registry Web site at:
http://depts.washington.edu/cac/project/personreg/index.shtml

CONTACT
     Doris Gallaugher, Person Registry Project Manager
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     dorisg@cac.washington.edu



INTEGRATED AUTHORIZATION PROJECT—ASTRA (ACCESS TO
SYSTEMS, TOOLS, RESOURCES , AND APPLICATIONS)
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     ASTRA is the product of the Integrated Authorization Project (IAP), which was launched to
address the growing system access and authorization needs of the UW. As Web-based resources
proliferate, and the number and variety of UW constituencies and affiliations grows, so does the need
for an integrated approach to authorization.

   A UW NetID and password uniquely identify an individual: this is "authentication". Defining
what specific applications, resources and services that individual may then access, and with what
permissions, is "authorization".

    The goal of the ASTRA development project is to produce a Web-based mechanism by which
authorized persons at the UW may readily grant system access to UW resources wherever
appropriate.

WHY
     The current authorization picture is confused. Access to the legacy administrative applications is
managed through a legacy authorization mechanism that is cumbersome, paper-based, inefficient,
and slow. Access to some of the more recently developed systems is managed in a number of
different ways. Rather than expecting each new application or system to solve this common problem
in an independent way, many benefits could be derived from the creation of a common solution.



45            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
    The initial beneficiaries of this system will be university faculty and staff, but it is expected that
over time other constituency groups will be using systems to which access is authorized through
ASTRA. Specific benefits and beneficiaries include the following:

         Administrators will be able to authorize or request system access for their staff easily
         and quickly. They will also be able to delegate authorization authority.

         End users will be provided quick and flexible access to the systems and resources
         they need to perform their jobs.

         System developers will have a central authorization scheme with which to integrate.
         Developers for any new system will not have the redundant task of developing their
         own authorization mechanism.

         Those responsible for appropriate use of any given system or application will have
         tools and data sources that permit them to review, report on, and if necessary
         withdraw access privileges.

PROJECT STATUS
    A prototype user interface has been designed in HTML, and work is underway to render this
design in ASP. Java components and stored procedures are being built, and database design work is
going forward. As the design is incomplete, a firm date for the release of the first increment of
ASTRA is speculative, but we are aiming for Fall Quarter 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    The formal project sponsors are Weldon Ihrig, Executive Vice President, and Ed Lightfoot,
Director, Information Systems. The project is guided by the USER Steering Committee, the USER
Process Improvement Team, and the C&C Security Infrastructure Team.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Please see the IAP Web site at http://www.washington.edu/user/iap/

CONTACT
     Ian Taylor, ASTRA Development Project Manager
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     iant@cac.washington.edu



GROUP REGISTRY (LDAP AUTHORIZATION)
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The LDAP authorization directory provides a means to authorize University of Washington UW
NetIDs to a particular network service. Authorization can be applied to many different things, for
example, it can allow access to a personal Web page or grant the ability to checkout materials from a
departmental library.




46            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHY
    The LDAP Directory is particularly suited to store information and group membership about a
UW NetID. An LDAP directory is centrally located but maintenance of individual authorization lists
can distributed.

WHO BENEFITS
     The LDAP Directory will benefit the following:

         Anyone in the University community who uses services that are protected by a UW
         NetID (for example, MyUW and Employee Self Services).

         Web page developers that use a UW NetID to determine who users are.

         Web page developers that use an LDAP API to determine what users are authorized
         to do.

PROJECT STATUS
     Currently deployed. Enhanced version to be deployed Autumn Quarter 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   University Computing Services—Advanced Systems Technology Group, Computing &
Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     https://staff.washington.edu/remmers/projects/ldap/GroupsServer.html

CONTACT
     Tom Remmers, Software Engineer
     University Computing Services—Advanced Systems Technology, Computing &
     Communications
     remmers@u.washington.edu



WORKFLOW MANAGEMENT
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    In addition to its e-commerce functionality, the e-commerce software package named Ariba
provides two useful capabilities: Web-based e-forms and workflow management.

         Within the Ariba platform, Web-based electronic forms can be created, edits defined
         and applied, and multiple approval paths and criteria established for a specific e-
         form.

         Workflow management allows users to establish and customize approval processes
         for individual electronic transactions by defining approval criteria, assigning
         originators and approvers, modifying the workflow through the Web, providing
         Web-based online status inquiry, and issuing automated email notifications.



47            1/10/06             ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
    Ariba will be interfaced with the ASTRA (Access to Systems, Tools, Resources and Applications)
authorization system to automatically populate some of the Ariba workflow management process
data, for example, approvers and approval criteria.

     As application systems, which require workflow management, are developed or acquired, they
will be integrated with the Ariba platform to take advantage of the capabilities offered. This
workflow management functionality will provide another layer of the technical infrastructure.

WHY
    Adopting the Ariba workflow management capability will provide a significant component of the
technology infrastructure for new administrative application systems. It will establish a common
standard and approach that can be used by all new applications, and it will offer a single standard
user interface and process for users to manage transaction workflow and approvals.

WHO BENEFITS
    This will benefit all applications that process transactions requiring some form of workflow or
approval after the initial entry of transaction data. It also will benefit users of applications such as the
G&C Proposal System, acquisition of goods and services, and accounting documents such as Journal
Vouchers.

PROJECT STATUS
    Workflow management will be made available as the Ariba infrastructure is established and
incrementally implemented over the next two-to-three years. The initial platform will be available
toward the end of 2001 to support applications systems development efforts happening in parallel:
Grant & Contract Initiative, Stores, and the Facilities Work Request. As new applications needing
workflow capability are developed, they will be integrated with Ariba.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Executive Vice Presidents Office and Computing & Communications

CONTACT
     Ms. Nancy Rauhauser, Technology Manager
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     rauhaus@u.washington.edu



INTEGRATED AUDIT DATABASE
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
      Audit Database (AuditDB) is a 'generic' transaction audit database with a related set of COM
components, which serves primarily to log transactions and to produce email notifications. Currently
it is used to generate Post Entry Review Messages (PERMs) for Distribution Changes and Early
Email. It soon will be used by ESS update.

WHY
    AuditDB is a transaction audit database and a set of related components. There currently is no
user interface available.



48            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
   Campus departments and central offices will benefit from UWAuth administration (ASTRA).
Computing & Communications will benefit from AuditDB.

PROJECT STATUS
     Depends upon ultimate "ownership" of the databases and related software.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://www.washington.edu/user/

CONTACT
     Patricia Woehrlin, USER Project Manager
     University Services Renewal Project (USER)
     woehrlin@u.washington.edu




49           1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
                             E. PERSONALIZE ACTIVITIES

Personalize Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities            Planned Activities         Future Possibilities

     •   35.000 MyUW              •    Additional user          •    MyWork (p. 51)
         student users                 views and content        •    Interface
     •   60,000 MyUW users             (p. 50)                       improvements
                                                                     (p. 52)



ADDITIONAL USER VIEWS AND CONTENT
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    Since the deployment of the University of Washington MyUW portal in spring 2000, views of
personal content and important services have been tailored for Seattle, Bothell, and Tacoma
undergraduates, graduate students, Educational Outreach students, alumni, employees, and teaching
faculty. Important applications such as WebPine email, the personal UW Calendar, Online Student
Registration, Employee Self Service, and UW Community alerts have been made available through
MyUW.

     Additional MyUW views are planned for research faculty, student applicants, prospective
students, parents, friends and donors, sports fans, and neighborhood and community groups. Efforts
with the Academic Medical Center currently are underway to include patient, referring physician, and
clinician views in MyUW. Health management for diseases such as diabetes and arthritis will be part
of the initial offerings. Other roles such as a research faculty view and a student applicant view are
currently under discussion.

WHY
     MyUW is considered an individual's personal UW portal. It facilitates access to UW services and
personal information that is important to a person. It uses the UW authentication and authorization
infrastructure so that a person gaining access only needs to enter their security credentials once in
order to get the full set of information available to them.

WHO BENEFITS
     The customer (UW faculty, staff, students, patients, referring physicians, former students,
clinicians, alumni, applicants, and eventually parents and prospective students) benefits by having to
remember only one URL and one set of security credentials in order to gain access to services and
personal information for their various roles.

     The UW benefits by using MyUW to market services and create synergy among the different
divisions (University relations, Outreach, the Academic Medical center) and constituents such as
patients and alumni.




50            1/10/06                   ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
PROJECT STATUS
    C&C and the Academic Medical Centers are working to bring the Medical Centers into the UW
Security Infrastructure. Patient and referring physician views are planned. A pilot of 36 diabetes
patients is targeted to begin in November 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     MyUW software engineers are collaborating with peer institutions and portal vendors to share
technology and ideas for future direction. Important technologies are implemented as they become
available. However, at some point, the MyUW interface might get a facelift to reflect the new
opportunities for personalization.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Try MyUW at http://myuw.washington.edu

CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu



MYWORK
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    MyWork is envisioned as a MyUW feature that would provide faculty and staff access to the UW
administrative systems and transactions necessary to do their jobs. For example, departmental payroll
coordinators would have access to systems such as OPUS thru a channel in MyUW. The service
would work within the UW security infrastructure and would display those services that the person
(authenticated with UW NetID to MyUW) has been authorized to use.

WHY
     Providing access through MyUW to the administrative services for which a person is authorized
facilitates access and also makes new services quickly available to the people who can use them
effectively.

WHO BENEFITS
     Beneficiaries include UW departmental administrators and central offices providing services.

PROJECT STATUS
   As new Web services for administrators are implemented, they will be made available through
MyUW.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Try MyUW at http://myuw.washington.edu




51            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu



INTERFACE IMPROVEMENTS
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
   The University of Washington's MyUW portal, deployed in spring 2000, was one of the first
campus-wide implementations of a portal in Higher Education.

    MyUW's primary goal is to act as a navigator to the personal services that are important to a
person logging in with a UW NetID. An additional goal is to provide personalization options for an
individual. For example, a person may add their own favorite links into MyUW and pick the
background colors they prefer.

     Through the concept of channels, control is given to campus units such as the Alumni
Association, the Academic Medical Centers, and the Registrar to provide personal information and
links to services specifically targeted to the person logging in. Several standards have been developed
for rendering these channels.

     As the technology and standards for university portals evolve, MyUW needs to be adjusted to
include standard ways of operating. The technical opportunities are continuing to expand. Efforts
will be made in the future to make the "personalization" options for individuals reflect common
portal techniques. As new, industry-wide, channel-rendering mechanisms develop, these
enhancements will be added to MyUW.

     New roles may require views for casual users, where the degree of authentication will not be as
strict as that currently in place, and adjustments will need to be made to accommodate this.

WHY
    As technical standards for portals evolve and the UW's strategy changes regarding use of the
portal for relationship building and marketing, MyUW will need to be modified to reflect these new
directions.

WHO BENEFITS
   Beneficiaries include individuals personalizing MyUW for their use and campus units using
MyUW to promote their services.

PROJECT STATUS
     Currently deployed. Enhanced version to be deployed Autumn Quarter 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    MyUW software engineers are collaborating with peer institutions and portal vendors to share
technology and ideas for future direction. Important technologies are implemented as they become




52            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
available. However, at some point, the MyUW interface might get a facelift to reflect the new
opportunities for personalization.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Try MyUW at http://myuw.washington.edu

CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu




53           1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
  F. SERVICES AND CONTENT, COMMUNICATIONS TOOLS
                     ACTIVITIES

Communications Tools Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities            Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   WebPine (p. 54)          •    Publish/subscribe        •    Alumni career
     •   Personal calendar             management                    connections (p. 61)
         (p. 55)                  •    Affiliate email          •    Import/export
     •   UW Online                     (p. 59)                       external calendar
         Technology News          •    Alumni directory              information (p. 62)
         (OnTechNews)                  services (p. 60)         •    Integrated personal
         (p. 55)                                                     calendar/events
     •   Community                                                   (p. 63)
         building tools
         (p. 56)
     •   Events system
         (p. 58)



WEBPINE
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     WebPine is a Web-based email program. Developed by the University of Washington's Pine
Team, WebPine is designed to provide secure, easy-to-use, and widely accessible connections to
email for UW students, staff, faculty and affiliates. WebPine is not yet a finished product, but it is
available for use and testing by the general UW community.

WHY
     WebPine was originally developed to provide simple, secure email access for users who are not at
their regular computers, who are traveling, or who cannot for some other reason use their usual email
client. Most Web browsers provide easy access to WebPine.

WHO BENEFITS
   Faculty, staff, students, and affiliates with relatively light email loads and who prefer to use a
Web browser interface such as Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator.

   It also benefits those who are not at their regular computer, who are traveling, or who cannot for
some other reason use their usual email client.

PROJECT STATUS
    WebPine should be in full production by Fall 2001. Additional functionality will be added in
future releases. WebPine is available to try at https://webpine.washington.edu

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Terry Gray, Lori Stevens

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     https://www.washington.edu/computing/email/webpine/



54             1/10/06                  ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
CONTACT
     Lori Stevens, Assistant Director, Distributed Systems Engineering
     Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
     lrs@cac.washington.edu



PERSONAL CALENDAR
CATEGORY
     Recent Accomplishment

WHAT
    The Personal Calendar provides the ability for anyone with a UW NetID to enter personal
events into the calendar that is included with the MyUW portal. The UW software development
community will be encouraged to contribute additional features through an open-source
development arrangement. Group calendaring eventually will be added.

WHY
     Calendaring services, along with email services, are a basic part of the computing services
infrastructure required by UW faculty, staff, and students.

WHO BENEFITS
   Beneficiaries include the entire UW community—faculty, staff, students, and other users of the
MyUW Portal, such as alumni and patients.

PROJECT STATUS
    The personal calendar was implemented as part of MyUW in August 2001. The open-source
development arrangement is intended to begin in spring 2002.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     https://myuw.washington.edu/uwcal/servlet/uwcal.UWCal

CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu



UW ONLINE TECHNOLOGY NEWS (ONTECHNEWS)
CATEGORY
     Recent Accomplishment

WHAT
     UW Online Technology News (OnTechNews), a monthly e-newsletter with links to Web sites,
presents news and information on technology issues for the UW community. Current and past issues
are available on the OnTechNews Web site, along with other resources and links. OnTechNews



55           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
strives to let faculty, staff, and students know about new and interesting technology that they might
be able to take advantage of in their teaching, learning, research, and other work.

WHY
    Many UW campus units are actively involved in technology in education. OnTechNews provides
an avenue for these groups to come together in presenting information and ideas to the campus
community in just one monthly message.

WHO BENEFITS
    All UW faculty, staff, and students can benefit from information sent in the OnTechNews email
newsletter. Because the Web site is world-readable, others outside the UW community also can
benefit as well as those in the UW community who chose to visit the Web site to search for further
information.

PROJECT STATUS
     OnTechNews was launched in April 2001. The e-newsletter is mailed monthly and the Web site
is updated at that time. Additional information and resource links are added as time allows.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     This is a joint effort of the following organizations:

         Center for Research and Development in Distance Learning

         Computing & Communications

         Educational Outreach

         Office of Educational Partnerships & Learning Technologies

         PETTT: Program for Educational Transformation Through Technology

         UW Libraries

    Additional sponsors may be added over time, particularly as new entities develop to meet a
campus need. Additionally, there is informal input and feedback from other campus groups and
individuals.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Please visit the OnTechNews Web site at http://www.washington.edu/computing/ontech/

CONTACT
     Kay Pilcher, Editor
     University Computing Services, Computing & Communications
     kpilcher@cac.washington.edu



COMMUNITY BUILDING TOOLS
CATEGORY
     Recent Accomplishment



56            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHAT
    Provide a set of tools to enable building and maintenance of online communities for various
constituencies of the University.

WHY
     The University of Washington, as a center of knowledge and research, is by its very nature at the
nexus of many communities of interest - ranging from the study groups of undergraduates to
international clusters of advanced scientific researchers. By providing online communication and
collaboration tools for these communities, the University can strengthen ties among community
members within the University and ties between the University and external constituencies.

WHO BENEFITS
     Beneficiaries include all University constituencies who want to enable communication and
collaboration among individuals and groups:

         Faculty and clinicians communicating with research colleagues, students, and
         members of the general public.

         Students communicating with each other, other students around the globe, faculty
         members, and others.

         Members of other University constituencies (alumni, parents, patients, etc.) and
         members of the general public who want to take advantage of the knowledge
         resources of the University.

PROJECT STATUS
     This "metaproject" consists of multiple individual projects:

     Available now:

         EPost - The Catalyst Epost tool allows creation of threaded online discussion
         boards. It provides participants with a place to exchange ideas any time, and from
         any Internet-connected computer.

         Peer Review - The Catalyst Peer Review tool enables participants to collaborate
         online by providing a forum for focused discussion or group work. Participants
         post, review, and comment on each other's work via a Web interface. The tool also
         allows comments to be made on the whole work, on a paragraph, or on a sentence.

         QuickPoll - The Catalyst QuickPoll tool enables administration of a one-question
         survey. Results are displayed numerically and graphically.

         WebQ - The Catalyst WebQ tool helps create online surveys, questionnaires, and
         quizzes. The tool allows a variety of question formats, and insertion of images,
         diagrams, or simulations.

     In Progress:

         Web Email List subscription page - This Web page will list publicly available email
         lists that are deemed to be of general interest to the UW community and allow




57            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         people to discover lists of interest and subscribe to them. It should be available
         before January 2002.

     Future Directions:

         Generalized Publish/Subscribe mechanism - It should be possible for any MyUW
         user to see a list of "channels" containing communications (whether one-way
         announcements or multi-way discussions) on topics that interest them, and to
         subscribe to those channels and have them appear within MyUW pages. It also
         should be possible for content creators easily to create these channels and have
         them published in the list. This project is not yet scheduled or funded.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    The Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology and Ed Lightfoot, Director of Information
Systems, Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Catalyst Tools: http://depts.washington.edu/catalyst/

CONTACT
     Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director
     Client Services, Computing & Communications
     oren@cac.washington.edu



PERSONAL CALENDAR (EVENTS SYSTEM)
CATEGORY
     Recent Accomplishment

WHAT
    UW department administrators and events planners now can use a Web interface to add events
into the UW Public Events calendar. Using a Web entry form, events are added, changed, or deleted.
After receiving authorization via their UW NetID, administrators can enter events that are Web-
searchable by anyone accessing the UW Home Page. These events also are automatically published in
University Week.

WHY
     The ability to publish campus events with ease to the campus and surrounding community
enables good communications, public relations, and community building. It helps build positive UW
relationships. It saves time for UW News and Information, increases the accuracy of the events
publications, and makes more events accessible to the community. Over 100 people now use the
Web interface to enter campus events.

WHO BENEFITS
     Beneficiaries include the entire UW community and state of Washington.

PROJECT STATUS
   The Public Events calendar was implemented in November 2000. To facilitate greater accuracy,
improvements are being planned to the events entry screens.



58            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Computing & Communications, UW News and Information

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Access the Calendar TAB in MyUW (http://myuw.washington.edu) to see today's events. Search
public events by date or category at http://myuw.washington.edu/newsroom/events/.

    Calendar coordinators in campus units can enter events directly online using a simple form. For
access to the form, contact Bob Roseth, roseth@u.washington.edu.

CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu



AFFILIATE EMAIL
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     The Affiliate Email project will provide a limited, high-quality University of Washington
electronic mail service to individuals affiliated with the University, but who are not in the populations
that get full email service. Affiliate email will supplement the current service, which allows people
leaving the University to forward email that is addressed to their UW email address to another email
address.

    The initial affiliate group receiving this service will be alumni who have recently graduated or left
the University.

WHY
   The goal of the Affiliate Email project is to keep and foster a lifetime relationship with people
who have or had a direct relationship with the UW, such as students, alumni, staff, faculty, and
donors and to create new relationships with interested people.

     This lifetime relationship will nurture good will and will result in:

         More private donations to the UW

         A favorable political climate for the UW for public funding

         A "ready market" for the UW to solicit/appeal to, via a quick, easy means of contact
         (MyUW, email)

     This can be most effectively be done by:

         Not severing a relationship we already have

         Using services we already offer and support



59            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         Aggregating and utilizing currently available but disparate data to expand some form
         of relationship to UW, or to revive an old relationship

         Partnering with groups that already are reaching out to populations of interest

WHO BENEFITS
     Those who will benefit are members of the affiliate groups, starting with recent graduates,
growing to include all alumni, donors, and other "friends" of the University. Groups that eventually
might be extended this service include parents of students, patients in the Medical Centers, and
others. The University as a whole ultimately benefits as members of the affiliate groups deepen their
relationships with the University.

PROJECT STATUS
     The initial test population—students most recently registered Winter Quarter 2001—received
this service at the beginning of August 2001. More former students will be added over the rest of
calendar year 2001. Discussions are continuing on the mechanics of adding additional populations,
including all former students, medical center patients, and others.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   Sandy Moy, Director
University Computing Services, Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://staff.washington.edu/hugh/affil_email/

CONTACT
     Hugh Sheets, Systems Programmer
     University Computing Services, Computing & Communications
     hugh@cac.washington.edu



ALUMNI DIRECTORY SERVICES
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     The Alumni Directory will provide access to the name and class year of all UW graduates to
anyone using the Alumni Website or the MyUW portal. This service can be used for degree
validation. UW graduates will be able to update contact information and may choose to make it
available for display to other graduates. An anonymous email feature will be included.

WHY
    The purpose of the Alumni Directory service is to provide a way for UW graduates to stay
connected with classmates and consequently become reattached to the UW community through it
and other Alumni and MyUW portal offerings.

WHO BENEFITS
  Beneficiaries include: the Alumni Association, University Relations, the UW Development office,
UW schools and departments, and UW graduates.



60            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
PROJECT STATUS
     The project is currently under development and is targeted for a Spring 2002 release.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     UW Alumni Association, Computing & Communications, UW Development Office

CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu



ALUMNI CAREER CONNECTIONS
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    The University of Washington Alumni Association (UWAA) Career Connections application will
provide a database application to manage and administer career networking and information
exchange between UW Alumni Association members and friends and UW Students and Alumni. The
application will be hosted on Computing & Communications (C&C) centrally managed servers and
incorporate security implementations for data access and networking.

     Base elements of the application will include:

         Definition of Career Connections volunteers in the Alumni Donor Information
         System ADVANCE database and data transfer to the UWAA Career Connections
         database application

         Online review and update to data in the UWAA Career Connections application by
         volunteers

         Organization and company specific orientation and networking by volunteers

         Functionality to UWAA Career Connections authorized application users (UW
         Students and Alumni Association members) including data searches, volunteer
         selections, and result reporting

         Email based communications to UWAA, volunteers, and users

         Online program evaluation by application users

         Administrative functionality for UWAA staff (data maintenance and reporting)

WHY
     The current UWAA Career Connections Web site provides a base level of the desired features
for career networking and information exchange activities. The limitations with the existing
implementation have prompted UWAA to seek a replacement system incorporating database
technology. UWAA wishes to upgrade the existing system by completing existing functionality,



61            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
adding enhancements, and hosting the application in a stable, centrally maintained computing
environment.

WHO BENEFITS
     Beneficiaries include:

         UW students, UW Alumni Association members and friends of the University of
         Washington

         The University of Washington Alumni Association

PROJECT STATUS
    The proposal for the project has been presented to the UWAA. Project initiation is dependant
on approval of the proposed work and associated development activities and implementation costs
by UWAA.

     If approved, the project will be addressed in two steps:

         Functional Specifications and Prototype.

         System Development and Implementation.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     UW Alumni Association and Computing & Communications, Information Systems

CONTACT
     Marcia Tufarolo, Manager
     C&C Client Services Project Consulting, Computing & Communications
     mtufar@cac.washington.edu



IMPORT/EXPORT EXTERNAL CALENDAR INFORMATION
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    Individuals are using PDA/wireless calendars as well as calendars provided by their departments
such as Corporate Time (Steltor). It is planned that UW Calendar will include a feature for
synchronizing events between calendars that use standard calendar protocols. In addition, units
entering public events will have the option to download their departmental events into a Web page,
XML or other standard format for integration into their departmental Web sites.

WHY
     Calendaring services along with email services are a basic part of the computing services
infrastructure required by UW faculty, staff, and students.

WHO BENEFITS
   Beneficiaries include the entire UW community - faculty, staff, students, and other users of the
MyUW Portal such as alumni and patients.



62            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
PROJECT STATUS
    The personal calendar was implemented as part of MyUW in August 2001, and the Public
Events calendar was implemented in November 2000. Software currently is under development to
synchronize Corporate Time and UW calendars. Other features are in the planning stages.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Try the Personal Calendar at https://myuw.washington.edu/uwcal/servlet/uwcal.UWCal

CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu



INTEGRATED PERSONAL CALENDAR AND EVENTS
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
     Now that both the public events calendar and the personal UW calendar have been implemented
in the same UW authentication/authorization infrastructure, we can allow a person to select public
events to automatically be pushed into his or her personal calendar.

    Future possibilities include filtering the public events by various categories for inclusion into
personal calendars as well as the ability to include student schedules, finals schedules, academic
calendars, teaching schedules, clinic appointments, etc. Integration of these various calendars will be
based on IETF calendar standards.

WHY
     Calendaring services along with email services are a basic part of the computing services
infrastructure required by UW faculty, staff, and students.

WHO BENEFITS
   Beneficiaries include the entire UW community - faculty, staff, students and other users of the
MyUW portal such as alumni and patients.

PROJECT STATUS
    The personal calendar was implemented as part of MyUW in August 2001, and the Public
Events calendar was implemented in November 2000. Planning and design for the integration of
these two calendars is underway.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Computing & Communications, UW News and Information, and the Registrar's Office

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     Try the Personal Calendar at https://myuw.washington.edu/uwcal/servlet/uwcal.UWCal



63            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
CONTACT
     Ellen Jensen, Assistant Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     ellenj@cac.washington.edu




64           1/10/06           ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
             G. SERVICES AND CONTENT, INFORMATION
               RESOURCES—KNOWLEDGE ACTIVITIES

Knowledge Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities              Planned Activities            Future Possibilities

     •   Catalyst Web tool        •    Library electronic         •    Digital libraries
     •   E-book collection             reserves                   •    E-books
     •   Cascade                  •    Digital media asset
                                       management system
                                       (p. 65)



DIGITAL MEDIA ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The digital media asset management project, MediaWeb, is directed at streamlining and
simplifying the acquisition, aggregation, cataloging, and distribution processes associated with
managing rich media assets. MediaWeb is essentially a multimedia data warehouse supporting a
diverse set of digital content sources and formats. MediaWeb provides reliable access to media
content for both on- and off-campus communities.

     The MediaWeb architecture had four components:

         Tera-scale hierarchical mass storage infrastructure made up of nearline robotic tape
         silos and large online disk caches. The mass store service reliably archives, secures,
         and enables fast retrieval of media assets.

         External meta-data service for cataloging media assets using schemas based on
         industry standards including Dublin Core and MPEG7.

         Stream manager service responsible for ingesting digital media, tracking asset state,
         and initiating data movement between mass store devices and delivery services.

         Web re-director service that intercepts client asset requests, applies access and rights
         controls, effects asset state change, and re-directs client request to the appropriate
         delivery service.

WHY
     Digital media assets in the form of audio, video, and images are becoming increasingly important
to the core business functions and outreach activities of the University. Like other institutional data,
media assets are created and collected by disparate organizations, departments, and affiliates in a
manner that makes it difficult to identify, share, re-purpose, and ensure the integrity of the collective
resource.

   Digital asset management systems like MediaWeb address this problem by providing a
mechanism to collocate, catalog, and deliver media assets in a form that is easily accessible to content



65             1/10/06                  ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
providers and consumers. Digital asset management systems also provide disaster recovery services
that secure and guarantee availability for long-term use. The subsystem, pluggable nature of the
MediaWeb architecture will allow it to grow and change as new streaming media technologies and
formats are introduced over time.

WHO BENEFITS
     MediaWeb addresses the need to provide global access to the University's digital assets through
portals and application specific interfaces. Students, faculty, staff, clinicians, affiliates, and K-20
participants will benefit by easy access to a wide range of media via MyUW. The system enables
exploration and experimentation in the delivery of high-bit-rate audio and video through channels
like KEXP radio, UWTV, and ResearchChannel. MediaWeb easily adapts to the diverse use
requirements of classroom and outreach education, production broadcast, library, and research
activities. The service provides a base for keeping the University of Washington at the forefront of
Internet-based digital media technologies.

PROJECT STATUS
    The MediaWeb project is currently in the first phase of prototyping. The basic infrastructure is
operational with a preliminary set of audio and video assets for demonstration purposes. University
media librarians, the Internet2 Video Middleware working group, and the Coalition for Networked
Information Video Development Initiative Metadata working group are reviewing the metadata
schema. Catalyst, Computer Science department, UWTV/ResearchChannel, and KEXP are
developing user interfaces. The system will be demonstrated at the Fall 2001 Internet2 conference in
Austin, TX.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   Executive Vice President Computing & Communications, UWTV, ResearchChannel, KEXP,
K-20.

CONTACT
     Jim DeRoest, Assistant Director, University Computing Services,
     Director, Streaming Media Technologies, ResearchChannel,
     Computing & Communications
     deroest@cac.washington.edu




66           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
              H. SERVICES AND CONTENT, INFORMATION
               RESOURCES—MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES

Management Activities
Recent Accomplishments            Current Activities            Planned Activities            Future Possibilities

     •   University statistical        •    Data warehousing:        •    Data warehousing:
         analysis group                     HR, student,                  grant & contract,
         (p. 67)                            financial (p. 68)             alumni (p. 69)



UNIVERSITY STRATEGIC ANALYSIS GROUP (USAG)
CATEGORY
     Recent accomplishment

WHAT
    The University Strategic Analysis Group (USAG) has compiled a University-wide relational
database to meet the analytic and planning needs of senior decision-makers across campus.

    USAG has been a fully cooperative effort among the Office of Planning and Budgeting,
Undergraduate Education (including the Office of Educational Assessment), Computing &
Communications, and the Registrar's Office. The USAG database is one of the finest university-level
academic research databases in the country.

     The database itself is composed of data from Planning and Budgeting (budgetary information),
the Office of the Registrar (student records and course scheduling information), the Office of
Educational Assessment (student evaluations and survey information), the Graduate School
(surveys), and national records of data (e.g., National Research Council Rankings). It is big: 1.5
million course registration records, 450,000 records of student registration, 65,000 unique students,
9,000 classes per quarter, and 4,000 instructors of record. New information is added to the database
in response to new needs.

WHY
     During the last two and one-half years, USAG has compiled a University-wide relational
database to meet the analytic and planning needs of senior decision-makers (e.g., chairs and deans)
across campus. These data have been used to support the University's enrollment planning efforts,
accountability reports, course access resource distribution decisions, grade inflation issues,
instructional quality initiatives, teaching assistant reallocation efforts, instructional resource utilization
studies, ten-year reviews, and strategic planning efforts in colleges and departments.

WHO BENEFITS
     The data have now been made available directly to deans and chairs for their use. Direct access
allows each academic leader to be able to ask questions of importance and/or timeliness to them. In
the last year, 50 chairs, deans, and their designates have been trained to use the database.
Additionally, USAG members have responded to 300+ requests for specific analyses.




67              1/10/06                      ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
PROJECT STATUS
    New data sources (such as Student Financial Aid data) are being added as needs arise. Work is
ongoing to take advantage of C&C data warehouse products. Departments around campus and staff
associated directly with the USAG group constantly are undertaking new analyses.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Debra Friedman, Associate Provost for Academic Planning

CONTACT
     Debra Friedman, Associate Provost for Academic Planning
     debraf@u.washington.edu



DATA WAREHOUSING INITIATIVE: HUMAN RESOURCES, STUDENT, AND
FINANCIAL
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The goal of the University's data warehousing initiative is to make it easier to access and analyze
important institutional information including financial, student, and human resources data, and to
provide decision-makers with timely, accurate, and meaningful information.

    A data warehouse achieves these goals by collecting, storing, and integrating data from multiple
sources, and by providing an easy-to-use way to access and analyze that information.

     The University's data warehousing initiative consists of four interrelated projects:

         Development of the technology environment necessary to allow data from many
         different sources to be collected, stored, and integrated in one location, and then
         easily accessed and analyzed.

         Development of a human resources data warehouse that integrates data from
         Payroll, Human Resources, Academic Personnel, and Affirmative Action.

         Development of a student records data warehouse.

         Development of a financial data warehouse.

WHY
     Currently important institutional data is scattered among many different departments and
systems throughout the University. For example, data on University finances, payroll, benefits,
purchasing, and student records is all on separate systems. This data is extremely valuable to the
University. It provides information vital to analyzing important issues facing the University and can
also be used to identify ways to improve faculty and staff productivity. The easier it is to retrieve and
analyze this data, the more useful it can be. At present, accessing and analyzing this data is often a
difficult, time consuming, and cumbersome process. In addition, there is no easy way to cross
reference the data.




68            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
    The data warehousing initiative is intended to make it easier to access, analyze, and cross
reference institutional data. The largest impact of data warehousing will come with the ability to
integrate data from human resources, student, and financial systems. This will enable that data to be
analyzed in ways that were not previously possible.

WHO BENEFITS
    Beneficiaries include all university users who need to access and analyze human resources,
student, and financial information.

PROJECT STATUS
         Development of the data warehousing technology environment: This project is well
         underway. A first iteration of a complete environment is expected to be finished by
         early in the year 2002.

         Development of a human resources data warehouse: This project is well underway.
         The work of collecting all of the necessary data and putting it into the new data
         warehouse should be completed by the end of the year 2001. The next step will be
         to identify the types of data analysis needed and to build the tools necessary to do
         that analysis.

         Development of a student data warehouse: This project is in the initial planning
         phase. Committees of users will be established to determine the scope of this effort.

         Development of a financial data warehouse: This project is in the initial planning
         phase. Committees of users will be established to determine the scope of this effort.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   This is a joint effort between the Office of the Executive Vice President, Computing &
Communications, and Planning and Budgeting.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Please visit the Data Warehousing Initiative Web site at
http://www.washington.edu/admin/datawarehousing/

CONTACT
     Jean Wells
     Data Warehousing Project Manager
     Information Systems, UW Computing & Communications
     Email: jeanw@cac.washington.edu



DATA WAREHOUSING INITIATIVE: GRANT & CONTRACT AND ALUMNI
DEVELOPMENT
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    The Data Warehousing Initiative, started in late 1999, is a cooperative effort among several
departments at the University of Washington. Its purpose is to facilitate end-user analysis of data by



69            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
providing information to distinct communities of interest. Data sources for warehouse information
can be internal operational systems or external data sources such as the Web, subscriptions, and
government agencies. Data Warehouse information delivery is facilitated by managed reports, ad hoc
query, and/or data analysis tools. Data warehousing is not a replacement for operational systems, nor
should it be considered the solution for all information needs. It should, however, become an integral
part of a strategic and tactical decision-making tool kit.

    Organized under the USER umbrella of projects, the Data Warehousing Initiative's stated
objectives are:

        Develop a comprehensive data-warehousing infrastructure for administrative
        information

        Work toward the long-term goal of replacing inadequate legacy mainframe system
        mechanisms for data access and reporting

        Identify and address user constituencies and business information needs

        Select small incremental projects with useful deliverables addressing specific
        business information needs and implement within the context of the overall DWI
        vision/plan

    The Data Warehousing Initiative currently has staff working on establishing warehouses for
human resources data, financial data, student data, and the ongoing development and maintenance of
the data-warehousing environment and technical infrastructure.

    Grant & Contract and Alumni Development are two extremely important areas that can provide
a wealth of data valuable to the operation and management of the University.

WHY
     There is an incredible amount of data maintained in computing systems, databases, tape files, etc.
all across campus. This data is a valuable asset, but it must be organized and managed in order to
leverage its potential value. Campus decision makers need access to data and tools that can transform
that data into valuable, useful information. They need to answer targeted business questions to
improve the productivity of faculty and staff. The biggest impact of data warehousing will come with
the ability to integrate data across administrative functional lines, addressing previously un-
answerable business questions.

WHO BENEFITS
   This initiative will benefit campus users with a need to use Grant & Contract and Alumni
Development data and information including University administrators, principal investigators, grant
administrators and support staff, Grant & Contract Services, Grant & Contract Accounting,
Development Officers.

PROJECT STATUS
    Currently the Grant & Contract and Alumni data warehousing efforts are not funded or staffed.
In the case of the G&C Data Warehouse, it will not begin until the Grant & Contract Initiative
System and the Grant & Contract Services Database System have been developed and implemented.
Planning discussions for the GCI and Alumni Development data warehouses are in progress to
determine how these projects should be organized, funded, and staffed. It is too early in the process
to estimate schedules or deliverables.



70           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   This is a joint effort between the Office of the Executive Vice President, Computing &
Communications, the Office of Research, and the Office of Development.

CONTACT
     Ed Lightfoot, Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     elight@u.washington.edu




71           1/10/06             ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         I. TRANSACTION SERVICES—PEOPLE ACTIVITIES

People Activities
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities             Planned Activities            Future Possibilities

     •   Employee early          •    Medical centers HR        •    Online work-leave        •    Integrated employee
         email                        system                         record (p. 77)                lifecycle
     •   Employee self-               enhancement               •    Integrated
         service                      (p. 74)                        recruiting/hiring
     •   Employee self-          •    Managed kiosk                  (p. 78)
         service update               (p. 76)
         (p. 72)
     •   Online personnel
         actions (p. 73)



EMPLOYEE SELF-SERVICES (ESS) UPDATE
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    ESS provides an easy-to-use Web interface that all employees can use to access their personal
information (e.g., earnings and benefits). Access to ESS is available through the MyUW portal.

    The first phase of ESS allowed employees to inquire about their earnings, deductions, and
contact information. The second phase of ESS added the ability to update of the employee’s personal
contact information, including emergency contact, home address, and campus/directory information.
At this point, no additional security beyond a valid UW NetID and password will be implemented.

    The public demo version of the ESS applications has been enhanced so that non-UW users may
access the applications and see examples of what the UW is working on in this area.

WHY
    ESS provides faculty and staff immediate access to personal information that previously has been
cumbersome to obtain, often requiring several phone calls or emails to different offices. Now
employees will have much quicker and convenient access. Employee Self-Service represents an
exciting new way of doing business at the University

   ESS also helps resolve the issues of the inaccurate information currently being stored in the
HEPPS database (in some cases the employees are not even aware of the data being
wrong/outdated, etc.).

WHO BENEFITS
   All UW employees with a UW NetID and access to a computer will benefit, including former
employees.

PROJECT STATUS
         Phase One-Completed Fall 2000 (Inquiry into employee’s earnings, tax, contact and
         benefit information).




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         Phase Two-Completed Summer 2001 (Update personal contact information).

    Once the initial phase of the online work leave record application is developed, information on
the employee’s balances for sick leave, vacation, compensatory time and Personal Holiday will then
be reported as part of Employee Self-Service (ESS).

     Future phases (timing to be determined) will include the update of additional information,
including W4 changes, benefit changes, optional deductions, and the ability to do “what-if” net pay
predictions based on different change scenarios.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Financial Management, Human Resources, and Academic HR.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://www.washington.edu/user/hr_payroll/people/ess/index.html

CONTACT
     Patricia Woehrlin, USER Project Leader
     University Services Renewal Project (USER)
     woehrlin@u.washington.edu



ONLINE PERSONNEL ACTIONS
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
     The purpose of the Online Payroll Update System (OPUS) is to eliminate the use the paper PAF
(Personnel Action Form). Departments use the paper to process approved personnel and payroll
actions such as salary increases, title changes, etc. The paper PAF will be replaced by the Online
Payroll Update System, where such entries will be made online via Web-based applications. Data
entry will be initiated by the campus departments and reviewed via email (Post Entry Review
Messages -PERMS) by persons responsible for the administration of those units as well as central
offices in some instances.

WHY
    The project goal is to eliminate the paper PAF. To accomplish this goal, there are several
outcomes:

         The Payroll Offices (including the hospitals) will discontinue doing data entry via
         HEPPS screens—they will use the new Web screens instead.

         Campus users (including central offices) will use the new Web system for "PAF"
         inquiry instead of the HEPPS screens.

         Payroll Office enterers and general campus inquiry users will be authorized and
         trained to use the new Web system.




73            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         The program code to support the HEPPS driver screens for PAFs will be obsolete
         as will the program code used to print PAFs.

         The paper PAF form stock will be obsolete.

         The new Web system will be expanded to handle all "PAF" entry (and inquiry)
         functionality.

         A transition plan also will be developed that will address the new policies and
         procedures that result (the existing system will continue to operate for some period
         of time).

         Operational Guidelines will be written and published on the Web.

WHO BENEFITS
     Central Offices, Payroll Coordinators, Department Administrators, and College Administrators
will benefit.

PROJECT STATUS
    The Online Distribution Change application was the first phase in the elimination of the paper
Personnel Action Form (in production as of summer 1999). A second phase offered pay rate changes
for hourly employees (April, 2000).

    In the fall of 2001, the Online Payroll Update System (OPUS) will be implemented and will
replace the Online Distribution Change application. OPUS will provide the comprehensive solution,
allowing all personnel actions to be performed via the new Web-based application.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Financial Management, Human Resources, and the Office of Academic Personnel.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://www.washington.edu/user/opus/index.html

CONTACT
     Patricia Woehrlin, USER Project Leader
     University Services Renewal Project (USER)
     woehrlin@u.washington.edu



MEDICAL CENTER HR SYSTEM ENHANCEMENT
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     The Medical Centers Human Resources System Enhancement Project was initiated to address
the following business objectives:




74            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
        Time and attendance data collection—ease of collection, accuracy of data,
        accommodating complex rules and multiple union contracts, and timely integration
        with the University Payroll System.

        Human resources management system—integrating the hiring process, recruitment
        tracking, tracking credentials, education, licenses, certifications, etc.

        Timely management reporting of HR data—labor distribution reporting,
        information on pay (overtime, premium pay, etc.), productive and non-productive
        time, employee demographics, etc.

        Leave and benefits administration—automate and track leave accruals, timely data,
        etc.

        Integration with complementary campus initiatives addressing human resource
        issues. Take advantage of campus projects and services such as ESS-Employee Self
        Service through MyUW, OPUS-online PAF Update System, Data Warehousing, etc.

    Multiple projects are envisioned to develop new applications, modify and enhance existing
systems, revise business practices, and implement services and processes that match or exceed
industry-wide best practice standards.

WHY
     The University Medical Centers (UMC and HMC) are customers of the University's
Payroll/Personnel System. They have business requirements that are not met by that system. Many
of those unmet needs are unmet requirements of campus departments as well. Addressing these
requirements will facilitate improved management of the Medical Center's personnel resources, better
service to employees, and more complete compliance with health industry regulations.

WHO BENEFITS
   The deliverables from this project will benefit Medical Centers' employees, administrators,
campus offices providing Human Resource services, and all University employees.

PROJECT STATUS
     Representatives from the sponsor organizations and development staff from Computing &
Communications and AMCIS have been meeting and are developing plans for multiple projects that
will address the stated business objectives. Incremental delivery of new features and capabilities are
planned for the next couple years.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     University Medical Centers (UMC and HMC), Executive Vice President's Office, Computing &
     Communications, UW and MC Personnel Offices, and University Benefits Office

CONTACT
     David Wells, Payroll Personnel Systems Manager
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     davwells@u.washington.edu

     Ed Lightfoot, Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     elight@u.washington.edu



75           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
MANAGED KIOSK
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     Managed kiosks will provide UW employees with shared Internet access points. These access
points will provide access to a defined set of UW services with appropriate security-related
restrictions for a shared computing environment.

WHY
    Not all employees currently have access to a computer as part of their job descriptions. In
addition, not all departments provide use of a shared computer for those employees who don't
require access as a critical part of their jobs.

    As more UW services move from paper to the Web, the demand for convenient and secure
computing access for all employees is increasing. The managed kiosk project is intended as a
solution. It will help to provide easy access to UW Web-based and other interactive services for those
employees who don't normally have access.

WHO BENEFITS
    Employees who don't normally have access to computing resources will benefit. In addition,
departments benefit from having the option to acquire a defined, managed, and more secure shared
access point for their employees to use.

PROJECT STATUS
     It is anticipated that this solution will be available in December 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Lori Stevens, Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://veil.cac.washington.edu/docs/brad/kiosk/charter.htm

CONTACT
     Brad Greer, Senior Technology Engineer
     Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
     brad@washington.edu




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ONLINE WORK LEAVE RECORD
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
     The goals of this project are to:

         Obtain and provide hours of work and leave information to employees via the Web

         Replace the manually prepared Form 220 with a Web-based Work and Leave
         Record

         Document the business rules and provide foundation for future development of an
         online time entry and reporting system for payment and leave tracking

WHY
    Work leave information is not currently stored in the HEPPS database. A system needs to be
designed to collect and store this information, as well as serve as a foundation for the future
development of an online time entry and reporting system for payment and leave tracking.

     The task for obtaining the leave information and defining the corresponding business rules and
edits is currently under the Time & Leave UTG group.

   Once this system is developed, information on the employee’s balances for sick leave, vacation,
compensatory time, and Personal Holiday then can be reported as part of Employee Self-Service
(ESS).

WHO BENEFITS
     Employees, Central Offices, Payroll Coordinators, and Departmental Administrators will benefit.

PROJECT STATUS
   The scope of the initial release of this application currently is being developed. Target
completion for the initial release is spring 2002.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Human Resources, and Financial Management.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://www.washington.edu/user/hr_payroll/people/tl/index.html

CONTACT
     Patricia Woehrlin, USER Project Leader
     University Services Renewal Project (USER)
     woehrlin@u.washington.edu




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INTEGRATED RECRUITING/HIRING
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
     The ideal solution is to "build" an integrated recruiting and hiring process that would support the
business needs of the hiring department, job applicant, and HR. There is a need for a Web-based tool
(via the MyUW portal) that would capture the data at the point of the hiring official and applicant
and track the status and workflow through the hiring process with the support of an integrated
database. To build such a system, the following "pieces" would need to be developed, including
(organized by end user):

     Hiring Department

         1. Online Personnel Request (PR)

         –   An Ariba e-form would be implemented to support the online entry and
             automated approval and workflow process. Would replace the current
             personnel request form.

         2. Position Description and Job Advertisement Templates and Database

         –   Builds a database to support the data collection of the position description and
             job advertisement.

     Job Applicants

         3. Applicant Tracking Database

         –   Replaces the current Resumix system to support the data collection of job
             applicants. Also provides facilities for Job Announcement and Resume Builder
             Web sites.

     HR Support Services

         4. Job Announcement Post to Web Tool

         5. HR Online for Applicant and Position Request Management

         6. HR Management Reporting Tools

         7. Integration of Hiring Process into Online Payroll Update System
            If hired, PR becomes initial personnel action into the Online Payroll Update System
            (OPUS).

WHY
    Currently, there are multiple systems (in varying degrees of efficiency) that support the recruiting
and hiring business process at the University of Washington. There is a recognition that these
systems either need to be replaced or upgraded to support the business needs.




78            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
     Prospective Employees (Applicants), Hiring Departments, and Central HR Support will benefit.

PROJECT STATUS
     The project is being reviewed to determine scope, resources, and budget. Alternative solutions
also are being considered in the near-term (stabilize post-to-Web, initial release of the Position
Description Builder, etc.). This will involve both USER and HEPPS resources.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Human Resources

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://www.washington.edu/user/hr_payroll/people/rh/index.html

CONTACT
     Patricia Woehrlin, USER Project Leader
     University Services Renewal Project (USER)
     woehrlin@u.washington.edu




79           1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         J. TRANSACTION SERVICES—MONEY ACTIVITIES

Money Activities
Recent Accomplishments          Current Activities            Planned Activities              Future Possibilities

     •   UW procurement              •    Selling goods and        •    Grant & contract           •    University
         card program                     services                      protocol                        budgeting system
     •   UW Web credit               •    Medical centers               development (p. 83)             (p. 86)
         card project (p. 80)             financial mgt.           •    Financial desktop          •    Grant & contract
                                          system                   •    Travel system                   accounts receivable
                                     •    E-Procurement                 (p. 85)                         system (p. 87)
                                          project (p. 81)



UW WEB CREDIT CARD PROJECT
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
    The goal of the UW Web Credit Card application project is to provide a central infrastructure
and application for Web-based credit card processing for areas at the University of Washington.

     This offers common benefits and efficiencies including:

         Providing a secure computing platform for credit card processing

         Mainstreaming expertise in the technology to avoid the need to duplicate skills for
         each installation

         Contracting with one credit card service provider to provide volume-pricing
         efficiencies

         Establishing common methods for UW-required functions including auditing
         procedures and data transfers to central systems

         Providing a computing environment and application for UW areas that currently do
         not have an application for product and sales tracking

WHY
    Areas at the University of Washington have identified the need for and interest in accepting
credit card transactions using the World Wide Web. Several areas at the UW currently have
applications or methodologies in place to accept Web-based credit card purchases. These areas have
taken different approaches and technologies to implement these services. In addition, a variety of
vendors have been selected for credit card transaction processing.

    There are significant security considerations when working with credit card data and the
supporting Web accessible hardware and software implementations.

WHO BENEFITS
     Those who will benefit include:



80              1/10/06                    ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         UW areas that want to accept payment using a Web-based process

         Anyone who purchases a product (a book, ticket, downloadable software, tuition,
         conference registration, donation, etc.) from a University area

PROJECT STATUS
     The project will be addressed in three phases:

         Phase I: Provide a base infrastructure for Web credit card processing to UW
         departments through a pilot project for Computing and Communications (C&C)
         Computer Training. This application will provide a model for expansion of the
         functionality to other UW areas. The pilot application is expected to be in
         production Summer 2001.

         Phase II: Expand the pilot project base to other areas at the UW that currently
         have an existing departmental application. The departmental application must meet
         defined specifications for interface with the UW Web Credit Card application in
         order to meet security implementations. Departmental candidates currently are
         being sought for this phase.

         Phase III: Expand the project to provide centrally hosted ‘generic’ applications
         with interface to the UW Web Credit Card application. These applications may
         include sale of goods, conference registration, donations and others. This will
         provide a method to accept credit card payments using the Web to UW areas that
         currently do not have an existing departmental application. A simplified pilot
         Conference Registration application is expected to be in production Fall 2001.

   Work on this project will continue as use of this application grows throughout the UW
community.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
     http://depts.washington.edu/cac/projects/webcc

CONTACT
     Marcia Tufarolo, Manager
     Computing & Communications Client Services Project Consulting
     mtufar@cac.washington.edu



E-PROCUREMENT PROJECT
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     The University of Washington has acquired two application system packages:




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        JD Edwards' OneWorld financial system. JD Edwards' OneWorld will be
        University Stores' new inventory management system. The University has also
        contracted with AMX consultants who specialize in implementing JD Edwards'
        software to assist with configuration and implementation.

        Ariba Buyer system. Ariba will allow Stores to take advantage of the Internet for
        customer ordering. As part of the USER project, the E-Procurement project's
        makeup includes client, business and technical staff from across the University.

WHY
    JDE OneWorld will replace the University's 25-year-old, part batch/part online, mainframe
stores system with a modern system providing easy-to-use online functionality, reporting, inventory
management, and many other features critical to meeting today's business requirements.
Implementing the JD Edwards system enables the following:

        Financials—reliable and precise handling of accounts receivable, accounts payable

        Distribution/Procurement—enhanced ability to handle shipping, receiving,
        picking/packing

        Improved Gas Cylinder/Bar Coding

        User-friendly interfaces with existing University systems

    The Ariba E-Procurement project is the solution for the shortcomings of the current University
Stores on-line ordering system. This solution includes client ordering over the Web, an illustrated
Web-based catalog with advanced searching, workflow routing, delivery, and invoice settlement. The
proposed system is based on an analysis of University Stores strategic initiatives aligned with
prioritized client needs and best business practices from private industry, the public sector, and those
of other industries. To create an integrated e-commerce system that will enhance and simplify the
process of procurement and inventory management. The new system will support the following
functions:

        Illustrated Web-based catalog with advanced searching tools. Includes stock and
        non-stock items.

        Straightforward, simple online ordering

        Workflow routing capabilities

        User-designated budget splitting

        Warehousing - Material receiving, storage, picking, packing, and shipping

        Equipment rental/ Gas cylinders

        Accounting - Invoice settlement, client charges, financial reporting

        Interfaces to other systems such as PAS and FAS

        User-produced reporting capabilities



82           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
   Beneficiaries of the new system will be UW faculty and staff who procure goods and services.
The new system will allow University Stores to offer the following benefits to customers:

         One-stop shopping

         The ability to place an order from virtually any Web-enabled computer

         Quicker turn-around time for orders

         Ability to check order status any time from virtually any computer

         Improved access to product and pricing information

         More timely delivery of orders

PROJECT STATUS
   The project currently is in progress. Implementation is expected to occur within the first half of
2002.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Executive Vice President's Office and Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    See more about the University Stores E-Procurement and JDE projects at:
http://www.washington.edu/admin/stores/user/index.html

CONTACT
     Mona Goldsmith-West, Assistant Director
     University Stores
     goldsmth@u.washington.edu



GRANT AND CONTRACT INITIATIVE: GRANT & CONTRACT PROTOCOL
DEVELOPMENT
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
     Grant and Contract Protocol Development (Research Protocols) is the second phase of a larger
process designed to transform the UW’s grant and contract process to better support faculty and
staff. A centerpiece of this transformation is the design and implementation of a system for Web-
based development of research protocols and the electronic submission of protocols to their
corresponding institutional compliance review boards.

     The growing complexity of the sponsored research environment, together with the increased rate
of grant and contract submissions, all lead to the need for improved business practices and advanced
electronic technologies.




83            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         Provide Web-based development and submission for animal care and human
         subjects protocols.

         Codify the complex business rules related to protocols.

         Provide electronic routing and email notification to researchers, staff, and
         committee members.

         Increase the efficiency of Human Subjects and Animal Care offices to meet
         growing workload demands with limited resources.

         Provide authorized individuals with convenient access to protocol information.

WHY
     The University of Washington values integrity and accountability in the conduct of all research
and vigilant protection of the rights and welfare of patients and other human subjects participating in
research. Beyond these core values and obligations, accepting external support for research, especially
from federal sources, entails further obligation to meet all requirements to ensure the ethical conduct
of research activity.

    The offices and staff charged with insuring full compliance are strained by complex requirements
and an ever-increasing volume of grant and contract submissions.

    The goal of this project is to improve the tools and procedures needed by the University to
insure all research fully complies with the ethical, regulatory, and policy mandates governing the use
of humans and animals in research.

WHO BENEFITS
    The University of Washington is nationally and internationally recognized for both the quality
and scope of its research program. This program is supported almost exclusively through grant and
contract funding of over $700 million per year. The level of total annual awards has nearly doubled
over the last decade from $350 million to over $700 million, an average of 7% a year.

    These research funds not only directly support specific research efforts but also support the
University's educational mission and the local economy. Spin-offs from University research activities
have a profound impact on the economy of the greater Seattle Area, the state, and the region.

    Insuring full compliance with all regulatory mandates is crucial to maintaining a successful
research environment.

    To that end, Web based submission of research protocols along with codification of the business
rules will save time for the PIs, their administrative staff, Animal Care committee and staff, Human
Subject Office staff and the volunteer faculty and staff comprising the Institutional Review Board by
reducing both errors and the extra effort required to correct them.

PROJECT STATUS
     Human Subjects Division (HSD) is currently documenting their business rules

         The Human Subject application form currently is being revised.




84            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         An interface to the Human Subjects Web site that will allow users to search for the
         status of a protocol using the application number is in the planning stage.

         Initial meetings with the Animal Care committee representative have taken place to
         discuss strategies and issues.

         An online system for protocol submission is in the very early planning stage.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   This is a joint effort between the Office of the Executive Vice President, Computing &
Communications, and the Office of Research.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Please visit the Grant and Contract Initiative Web site at
http://www.washington.edu/research/gci/

CONTACT
     Tim McAllister, Technical Lead
     Grant and Contract Initiative
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     gci@u.washington.edu



TRAVEL SYSTEM
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    The University of Washington Travel Office processes approximately 3,000 Travel Expense
Vouchers (TEVs) each month. UW travelers manually complete these forms, attach original receipts,
and submit them to the Travel Office for processing and reimbursement. The Travel Office insures
through a manual process that each TEV is accurate and complies with UW travel regulations before
approving for payment. An average of 3-4 transactions per TEV are data entered into a file that is
submitted to the Purchasing & Accounts Payable System, which generates the reimbursement
payment.

    Financial Services (FS), with Computing & Communications (C&C) participation, has had a
Travel Process Improvement Team analyzing and documenting travel associated business policies
and processes and reviewing potential systems that could modernize the way travel is done at the
UW. Recently the team evaluated two alternative approaches—system solutions for travel offered by
Ariba and by Payment Tech (recently acquired by J. P. Morgan/Chase). As part of this comparison,
C&C developed a proof of concept prototype application using the Ariba System capabilities. This
proof of concept was presented to Financial Services' senior management at the end of September
2001.

WHY
     The objectives for acquiring and implementing a system for processing travel TEVs include the
following:




85            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
         Make the process easier for the traveler.

         Improve accuracy and editing of Travel Expense Vouchers.

         Reduce number of days in the reimbursement payment cycle.

         Distribute the data entry to the point of origin—the traveler or department support
         person.

         Reduce the workload on the Travel Office & Financial Control Unit and refocus
         resources on customer service activities.

WHO BENEFITS
    Beneficiaries of the new system include UW travelers and staff in central offices who support the
travel process.

PROJECT STATUS
     The Travel System proof of concept was presented to the Financial Services' senior management
staff, and there was general agreement that developing the system based upon the Ariba
infrastructure was the right direction to proceed for this project. FS and C&C agreed to work
together to draft a project proposal—a plan and estimate of the resources required to execute that
plan and implement a travel system. Once complete, the draft project proposal combined with the
proof of concept will be presented to the University Administration for funding. The project cannot
start until funding is provided.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Office of the Executive Vice President and Computing & Communications

CONTACT
     Ann Anderson, Assistant Controller Financial Services
     Payables Administration
     andera@u.washington.edu



UNIVERSITY BUDGETING SYSTEM
CATEGORY
     Future possibility

WHAT
     The University's Budgeting System encompasses capabilities for developing and maintaining
biennial budgets, the salary revision process, faculty effort certification, and some budget planning. It
is closely integrated with the University's Financial Accounting System. In addition, the University
operates the Grant and Contract Budgeting System for managing grant budgets.

    All these systems were developed in the early 1980's and have not had significant enhancements
since that time. Most processes within the Budgeting System are batch processes and were developed
assuming a combination of automated system processes interwoven with manual processes
performed in the Budget Office. The systems use character-based online screens for inquiry and
update, and they operate with a non-relational database.



86            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
    The edits and business rules coded into the system were based upon the Budget Office business
procedures of that time. Up until a few years ago, the Computing & Communications and Budget
Office staff operating and supporting the system had in-depth knowledge of the system and budget
processes because they had participated in the development of the system. Today that is not the case,
and it shows in the lack of stability and responsiveness of the system.

WHY
    The Budgeting System does not meet today's business needs for the University. Twenty years
ago it was accepted practice to establish the new biennial budget over a six-to-eight week period
when departments could not access the system. Today's requirements include "all-the-time/anytime"
access to University budget information, multiple budgeting periods (not just biennial), and quick
access to data for analysis, reporting, and management decisions.

WHO BENEFITS
    Improvements to the budgeting system will benefit the central budgeting and financial offices,
department administrators, fiscal staff, and thousands of individuals who are responsible for
managing University budgets.

PROJECT STATUS
     Discussions have just begun between the Planning and Budget Office and Computing &
Communications to explore what approach to take. Defining a comprehensive plan for addressing
campus budgeting issues will require the inclusion of more representation from central offices,
colleges, departments, and, most importantly, campus users.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Planning and Budget Office and Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT
     Mike Pingree, Associate Director
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     mpingr@u.washington.edu



GRANT & CONTRACT ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE SYSTEM
CATEGORY
     Future possibility

WHAT
     The University of Washington receives hundreds of millions of research grant and contract
dollars each year from various government agencies and private companies or sponsors. To receive
this funding, the Grant and Contract Accounting Office must invoice and collect the funds from
sponsors and manage cash and account for amounts received (that is, they must apply the monies
received to the appropriate grant budgets so that Principal Investigators will have the correct amount
of funds available to spend on their research projects in a timely manner).

     The current system for managing grant and contract receivables is a rudimentary system, which is
built on a base of RBASE for DOS patched together with various programs developed in MS Access
and mainframe COBOL. This patchwork of separate systems is not integrated and requires extensive



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manual batch inputs of the same data into multiple systems. It is a makeshift assemblage that is
inadequate, inefficient, and ineffective in addressing the management of receivables in a large
research accounting office.

     Grants receivables are unique. There currently is not a stand-alone receivables package on the
market that invoices in the dozens of formats that are required by our sponsors (sponsors determine
the invoice formats). Most universities have "homegrown" receivable systems or ones that are part of
a comprehensive accounting software package. Since the UW has acquired and is installing the stores,
acquisitions, and inventory modules of the J. D. Edwards accounting package, it has been proposed
that the University acquire the Accounts Receivable component as well for use by the Grant &
Contract Accounting Office.

WHY
    The current system lacks the flexibility necessary to develop and produce the large variety of
complex and unique invoices and reports required by our sponsoring agencies. The result is that
invoices and reports are prepared manually, requiring significant staff resources, slowing the
receivables process and therefore reducing our potential cash flow. Over the next five years, the
average increase in interest earnings due to improved invoicing processes is estimated to be
approximately $500,000 per year, if a new, efficient accounts receivable system were in place.

WHO BENEFITS
    Beneficiaries of the new system and processes are the Grant and Contract Accounting Office,
Principal Investigators/Researchers, and grant administrators.

PROJECT STATUS
    The project proposal developed by the Grant and Contract Accounting Office and Computing
& Communications is proceeding through an iterative process of reviews by the Provost's Office to
obtain appropriate funding. If funded at requested levels, the project is estimated to take from 12 to
18 months to complete. It would also require an ongoing level of technical and business support and
maintenance.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Executive Vice Presidents Office and Computing & Communications

CONTACT
     Sue Camber, Assistant Controller
     Grant and Contract Accounting
     scamber@u.washington.edu




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     K. TRANSACTION SERVICES—FACILITIES ACTIVITIES

Facilities Activities
Recent Accomplishments         Current Activities          Planned Activities   Future Possibilities

     •   Facilities services        •    Capital Project
                                         services




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 L. TRANSACTION SERVICES—TEACHING AND LEARNING
                    ACTIVITIES

Teaching and Learning Activities
Recent Accomplishments      Current Activities              Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

     •   Catalyst and Web        •    Student personal           •    Online gradebook        •    Open knowledge
         tools                        services (p. 91)                (p. 98)                      initiative (p. 99)
     •   MyClass (p. 90)         •    Catalyst SimpleSite
                                      tool (p. 93)
                                 •    Undergraduate
                                      admissions (p. 94)
                                 •    Educational
                                      Outreach systems
                                      (p. 95)
                                 •    Catalyst Portfolio
                                      tool (p. 96)
                                 •    Student learning
                                      outcomes project
                                      (p. 97)



MYCLASS
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     The goal of the MyClass project is to provide UW teaching faculty with a single Web site
through which all Web-based teaching resources are available. The initial release will incorporate
existing Web-based resources including Catalyst tools, class lists, class descriptions, classroom
attributes, and textbook status. Faculty will be able to specify the location of the course's Web site so
this information automatically can be provided to students enrolled in the course.

     Subsequent development will use the MyClass foundation to provide a simple Web-based tool
for faculty to build and maintain course Web sites and a Web-based grade book that includes final
grade submission to the Registrar's Office. Access to MyClass will be through the Teaching tab of
the MyUW portal.

WHY
    In the past five years powerful Web-based teaching support resources have been created for UW
faculty. Utilization of the tools has been hampered by the lack of a single place to go to find them
and the inability of the tools to interact with each other.

    The lack of coordination has made it impossible to centrally collect and distribute information
on Web-based course materials to students. Collection of this information through MyClass will
enable the student view of MyUW to provide direct links to course Web sites.

WHO BENEFITS
     Teaching faculty, students, and administrators will benefit.




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PROJECT STATUS
    The initial version of MyClass will be released in autumn 2001. Additional functionality will be
provided throughout the 2001-2002 academic year.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     A joint effort of Computing & Communications, UWired, Division of Admissions and Records.

CONTACT
     Bill Shirey, Manager, Student Information Systems
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     bshirey@cac.washington.edu



STUDENT PERSONAL SERVICES
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
   The goal of Student Personal Services is to provide UW students with Web-based self-service to
complete their administrative functions. Services are available to students through the MyUW portal.
Core services have been completed and are in use by many students, including:

         Registration for classes
         Grade inquiry
         Address and emergency contact update
         Financial aid status
         Tuition statement
         Electronic payment and Direct Deposit authorization
         Undergraduate degree progress tracking including "what if" capability so a student
         can see what courses they would need to take to complete desired degree programs

     Services in development or planned include

         Tuition payment by credit card
         Application for short-term loan
         Financial aid award acceptance and revision
         Unofficial transcript display
         Order official transcript
         Apply to graduate (undergraduates)
WHY
    Empowering students through self-service can significantly improve their experience at the UW
by eliminating many of the administrative bottlenecks and institutional barriers that previously were
an unfortunate expectation of student life. Furthermore, students no longer are limited to the 10 am



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to 5 pm Monday-Friday office hours of the administrative offices. In most cases the process redesign
that accompanies the transition to self-service results in simpler, faster service. For example,
receiving financial aid proceeds through student-initiated Direct Deposit results in the money being
available several days earlier than the previous on-site aid check distribution process.

    Administrative offices have been able to reduce staff and reassign staff from routine transaction
processing to problem solving and enhanced customer service.

    Similarly, student use of the degree progress tracking service has allowed undergraduate academic
advisers to spend more time on value-added advising and less time monitoring student completion of
degree requirements. Better tracking by students of their degree requirements has the potential to
improve student time-to-degree and eliminate the frustration of taking courses that don't apply to
graduation requirements as expected.

WHO BENEFITS
     Students, UW administrators, and academic advisers will benefit from Student Personal Services.

PROJECT STATUS
     Core services were developed and implemented in 2000 and 2001.

     Services to be implemented during Autumn Quarter 2001 include:

         Tuition payment by credit card

         Application for short-term loan

         Financial aid award acceptance and revision

    Additional services will be developed as time and resources permit, subject to the priorities and
business needs of the University.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    This is a joint effort of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Student Fiscal
Services, and Computing & Communications.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    A demonstration model of the student personal services is available at
http://www.washington.edu/students/demo/registration1.htm

CONTACT
     Bill Shirey, Manager, Student Information Systems
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     bshirey@cac.washington.edu




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CATALYST SIMPLESITE TOOL
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     This Catalyst Tool is a Web-based application that allows users to publish Web pages through
easy-to-use templates. It is accessible from the University of Washington's Catalyst Web site and
MyClass, a MyUW portal service. Aimed at instructors who have little time to learn Web page design
or complicated applications, SimpleSite makes creating a course Web site effortless. An instructor
need only fill in a template with content, either by typing or cutting and pasting from other electronic
documents, and SimpleSite saves the page to their course Web site. The instructor can also upload
other documents and multimedia, link to them, check the spelling on their pages, password protect
their Web site, and more. A clean, simple interface and a basic, yet powerful feature set will help busy
instructors create and manage their course Web sites.

WHY
     There have been frequent requests for tools that enable instructors to get an easy start in putting
their course materials online and to move to using the kinds of advanced Web-based course tools
found in the set of Catalyst Tools. While there are some popular commercial packages that enable
this kind of easy start (WebCT and Blackboard are good examples), none of them integrate smoothly
into the UW's enterprise environment (MyUW, UW NetID authentication, back-end database
services), nor do they offer the kinds of advanced pedagogical tools found in the Catalyst Tools set.

WHO BENEFITS
   Instructors will benefit by being able to easily create course Web sites and integrate advanced
Web-based teaching/learning tools into those sites.

    Students will benefit from having access to a greater proportion of course materials on the Web
and from courses that use active Web-based learning methods.

    The UW benefits from having a greater access to course materials on the Web and from the
increased visibility of its course offerings.

    Academic departments benefit from being able to take advantage of centrally supported Web
tools for their instructors.

PROJECT STATUS
     Work is now (mid August 2001) concentrated in two major areas—design and implementation
of the user interface and coding of the back-end infrastructure that will allow SimpleSite to create
and manipulate Web sites on the courses.washington.edu Web server. Initial implementation is
planned before the end of 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director, Computing & Communications
Tom Lewis, Director, Education Technology Development Group




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CONTACT
     Tom Lewis, Director, Education Technology Development Group
     Office of Educational Partnerships
     tomlewis@u.washington.edu



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     Applicants for admission to the university as undergraduates will be able to review the status of
their application through a secure Web page. Information will be provided about the applicant's test
scores, transcripts, and other materials that have been received or are outstanding. Information about
deadlines and the timeline for the UW admission decision will be tailored based on the applicant's
situation.

     Authentication for the service will be based on the applicant requesting a UW NetID and
password. Upon receipt of their application, applicants will receive an acknowledgement message and
invitation to create a UW NetID.

WHY
         Recruitment: applicants expect Web-based personal services from a leading-edge
         university.

         Service improvement: applicants will have an easy way to make sure that all
         application materials have been received and processed without calling the
         Admissions Office during business hours. Admissions staff will have more time for
         recruitment and application review.

WHO BENEFITS
     Applicants for undergraduate admission and UW administrators will benefit.

PROJECT STATUS
     The service will be released in autumn 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   This is a joint effort of Computing & Communications and the Division of Admissions and
Records.

CONTACT
     Bill Shirey, Manager, Student Information Systems
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     bshirey@cac.washington.edu




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EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH SYSTEMS
CATEGORY
     Current activity

WHAT
     The goal of the Educational Outreach (EO) System project is create a Web-based administrative
system to handle key business processes for EO staff and students. The underlying database will be
housed on Computing & Communications (C&C) hardware and maintained by C&C staff. This
system will consist of the following functional components: application processing and admissions,
course and certificate program management, student demographics, student permanent records,
grading and completion tracking, student registration, marketing and recruiting, and
finance/accounting. Staff and students will use typical Web browsers to interact with the system. The
service delivery method for students will be through the MyUW portal. Completed system modules
will be phased in between now and the end of summer, 2002, starting with a thin slice of course
offerings and adding incremental features along the way.

WHY
    EO administrative systems are outdated and not able to handle the current or planned business
needs. Several processes now are loosely coupled to within UW central administrative systems, but
require more complete integration. Other necessary processes do not yet exist.

WHO BENEFITS
    This new administrative system will benefit EO staff, students, and administrators, as well as
other UW personnel who need reliable information concerning the Educational Outreach
community. Better integration with existing campus student information sources also will be
fostered.

PROJECT STATUS
    Phase I includes system look and feel, foundations for basic enrollment of students by EO staff,
student demographics, rudimentary course management services, methods of tracking revenues and
expenses, and ability for staff to follow audit trails for these actions. This functionality exists for a
rather thin, but manageable slice of course offerings. Phase I is complete, as of September 2001.

    Phase II will include increased accounting and finance functionality, enhanced reporting
capability, and student self-service features. Additional course formats will be included. Tracking
visas for international students, as well as English Language Program management, will be included.
An interface with the UW Credit Card infrastructure is planned during this phase, as is MyUW
student connectivity.

     Phase III will wrap up details on successfully managing distance learning courses, certificate
programs, student permanent records, and remaining credit courses. Other addressed functionality
also may include conference management and room scheduling.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     This is a joint project between Educational Outreach and Computing & Communications.

CONTACT
     Hugh Parker, Educational Outreach Systems Manager
     Information Systems, Computing & Communications
     hughp@cac.washington.edu



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CATALYST PORTFOLIO TOOL
CATEGORY
     Planned activity

WHAT
    The Portfolio Tool will be a Web-based software program that lets students collect and display a
variety of objects (papers, videos, computer programs, artwork, etc.) and use these objects to publish
portfolios on the Web. The tool will store these objects using students’ uniform access disk space,
creating a digital file cabinet that students can draw from to illustrate their accomplishments
throughout their university experiences.

WHY
    (The following text is from the Education Office of Research Consumer Guide, Number 8,
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/OR/ConsumerGuides/classuse.html)

     Portfolios are collections of student work representing a selection of performance. Portfolios in
classrooms today are derived from the visual and performing arts tradition in which they serve to
showcase artists' accomplishments and personally favored works. A portfolio may be a folder
containing a student's best pieces and the student's evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the
pieces. It may also contain one or more works-in-progress that illustrates the creation of a product,
such as an essay, evolving through various stages of conception, drafting, and revision. Portfolios are
useful as a support to the new instructional approaches that emphasize the student's role in
constructing understanding and the teacher's role in promoting understanding

     Research shows that students at all levels see assessment as something that is done to them on
their classwork by someone else. Beyond "percent correct," assigned letter grades, and grammatical
or arithmetic errors, many students have little knowledge of what is involved in evaluating their
classwork. Portfolios can provide structure for involving students in developing and understanding
criteria for good efforts, in coming to see the criteria as their own, and in applying the criteria to their
own and other students' work.

    Research also shows that students benefit from an awareness of the processes and strategies
involved in writing, solving a problem, researching a topic, analyzing information, or describing their
own observations. Without instruction focused on the processes and strategies that underlie effective
performance of these types of work, most students will not learn them or will learn them only
minimally. And without curriculum-specific experience in using these processes and strategies, even
fewer students will carry them forward into new and appropriate contexts. Portfolios can serve as a
vehicle for enhancing student awareness of these strategies for thinking about and producing work—
both inside and beyond the classroom.

WHO BENEFITS
    Creating personal, unique portfolios will allow students to reflect on their own learning processes
and help them to evaluate their university experiences. Also, because UW instructors can use the tool
to easily integrate student portfolios into course assignments, students will be asked to think critically
about the materials they turn in and get a better sense of what they are learning in their classes.

    Instructors benefit by having a wider panorama of students’ achievements and a context for
assessing student progress and planning student work.




96            1/10/06                ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
    It will also prove to be invaluable to advisors and students as they work with academic advisors
and career counselors, because both can use the tool to capture a clearer picture of a student's
university experience.

   Employers and prospective graduate schools will also benefit from having access to portfolio
materials that students make available to demonstrate their accomplishments.

PROJECT STATUS
    This project has been funded through a combination of funds from the Student Technology Fee
and the PETT project. A software developer is being hired to work on this project. The new
developer will proceed with training, learning the architecture of the Catalyst Tools, and planning the
Portfolio project. While the developer is in training, he or she will be sitting in on student and faculty
focus groups.

    By September 2001, screen designs will be finalized and work on the tool will begin in earnest.
An alpha version of the tool will be available for limited, in-house testing in late Winter Quarter and
a beta version will be released for testing in conjunction with select classes at UW in Spring Quarter
of 2002. The funded developer will then spend the summer improving the software and debugging it.

   In Autumn Quarter 2002 the tool will be released campus-wide and will be used by every student
member of the Freshman Interest Group (FIG) program.

    The funded developer will write the first draft of documentation for the new tool and continue
with support, minor updates, and maintenance of the tool to ensure the long-term stability and a
smooth handoff of the project.

    The developer will also work with the Center for Career Services, Central Advising, and other
specific divisions on campus to construct portfolio templates specific to their needs. The
appointment for this developer will end at the conclusion of Spring Quarter, 2002.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     George Bridges, Acting Dean, Undergraduate Education
     Louis Fox, Vice Provost, Office of Educational Partnerships & Learning Technologies

CONTACT
     Tom Lewis, Director, Education Technology Development Group
     Office of Educational Partnerships
     tomlewis@u.washington.edu



STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES PROJECT
CATEGORY
     Current Activity

WHAT
     The goal of the student learning outcomes project is to build an online system that allows
instructors to specify the learning objectives for a learning experience (such as a class, participation in
a research project, an internship, a service learning experience, etc.) and for students to be able to
search for learning experiences that offer specific kinds of learning objectives.



97            1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHY
     The current requirements for University of Washington undergraduate students are described in
terms of specific courses that must be taken. These course requirements are, in reality, a proxy for
trying to state that to achieve the University's requirements students need to achieve proficiency in
specific areas. For example, many departments require that students take Math 124 (Calculus 1). It is
likely that in most cases the requirement could be expressed in terms of specific knowledge that a
student should have before entering a major or taking other courses.

     The current method leaves much to be desired. It restricts the requirements to a narrow set of
specified courses, when students might be able to achieve the desired proficiencies through a wide
variety of learning experiences, such as participation in research, service learning experiences,
internships, etc. In addition the current method does not allow for learning experiences, which might
primarily be oriented towards one set of learning objectives, but also teach secondary skills in other
areas. For example, a course teaching statistics is primarily oriented towards quantitative reasoning
skills, but might also include assignments that strengthen written communication skills.

     Another problem is that it currently is difficult (if not impossible) to publicize and record student
participation in learning experiences that are not classes. While students may benefit greatly from
internships, participation in research projects, service learning experience, etc., there is no systematic
way to present these opportunities to students or recording their participation and accomplishments
in these experiences.

WHO BENEFITS
     Offering instructors the ability to specify the learning objectives for each learning experience
makes it possible to more fully describe the content of the experience. This can also serve to
differentiate one instructor's offering of a course from another's. Offering students the ability to
search for courses that offer specific types of learning objectives encourages students to discover and
participate in a wider variety of learning experiences.

PROJECT STATUS
   A prototype Learning Objectives system has been developed and is being used to discuss these
concepts with faculty. Further development and project planning is expected to take place during
Autumn Quarter, 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Debra Friedman, Associate Provost for Academic Planning
     Ed Lightfoot, Director, Information Systems, Computing & Communications

CONTACT
     Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director, Client Services
     Computing & Communications
     oren@cac.washington.edu



ONLINE GRADEBOOK
CATEGORY
     Planned activity




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WHAT
     The Online Gradebook will provide instructors a secure, Web-based, online system for recording
student grades (or other assessments) during the course of a learning experience (such as a class,
internship, or service experience), calculating final grades for the experience, and submitting those
grades at the end of the experience.

WHY
     Currently instructors use a wide array of methods of keeping track of student performance, and
final grades must be submitted to the Registrar's Office on paper forms, and then scanned. Many
instructors want to utilize a computerized method for recording student performance during a course
and then automatically submitting the final grade to the Registrar's Office. The Online Gradebook
will provide a centrally supported method for accomplishing this.

WHO BENEFITS
    Faculty and other instructors will benefit from having a widely available, centrally supported,
secure method for recording student performance.

PROJECT STATUS
   The project is currently in the planning phase. Initial design work will begin during Autumn
Quarter, 2001.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
     Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director Computing & Communications
     Scott Macklin, PETT Project
     Tom Lewis, Catalyst Initiative

CONTACT
     Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director
     Information Systems/Client Services, Computing & Communications
     oren@cac.washington.edu



OPEN KNOWLEDGE INITIATIVE
CATEGORY
     Future Possibility

WHAT
    The Open Knowledge Initiative (OKI) is a multi-institution effort to design and develop an
open and extensible architecture for learning management systems. The University of Washington is
participating in this effort, which is being led by MIT and Stanford.

     The Open Knowledge Initiative will identify, design, and package a set of Web enabled learning
components that will be of service to the widest range of educational environments. This solution
will enhance and streamline the development, delivery, and sustainability of interesting and advanced
knowledge components in the future. The products of this effort include strategies for engaging the
educational community to inform the design of the product, as well as supporting its ongoing
development and use. This initiative will look towards existing or proposed industry tools, open-
source solutions, and consortium developed standards. A key characteristic of the project is its
adherence to the open source approach to software development



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WHY
     The Open Knowledge Initiative (OKI) addresses what is perceived by many in Higher
Education as a critical need: meaningful, coherent, modular, easy to use Web-based environments,
for assembling, delivering, and accessing educational resources. OKI is building a scalable,
sustainable, open source reference system for Web-enabled education.

     The UW has built what is felt by many to be some of the best tools for Web-enabled learning—
the Catalyst Tools. There is a need to extend the use of these tools to new environments such as
Educational Outreach, regional K-12 institutions, community colleges, etc. One of the challenges in
scaling the use of these tools is the difficulty in porting the tools to new environments. The OKI will
provide a standard mechanism for allowing others to use tools developed at the UW and for the UW
to take advantage of tools developed elsewhere that adhere to this architecture.

WHO BENEFITS
    Faculty and other instructors will have access to a wider variety of Web-based tools. C&C and
other IT organizations will have an easier time integrating educational tools from disparate
environments. The UW will be able to take advantage of wider dissemination of its Catalyst tools.

PROJECT STATUS
   Initial discussion with project partners (MIT, Stanford, North Carolina State University,
University of Wisconsin Madison, and others) has taken place. Work on feature requirements
documents is taking place, with a goal of having a version 1.0 functional requirement document
completed by January 1, 2002.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
      Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director, Computing & Communications.
      Tom Lewis, Director, Education Technology Development Group

CONTACT
      Oren Sreebny, Assistant Director for Client Services
      Information Systems, Computing & Communications
      oren@cac.washington.edu




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            M. TRANSACTION SERVICES—RESEARCH AND
                    SCHOLARSHIP ACTIVITIES

Research and Scholarship Activities
Recent Accomplishments       Current Activities           Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

      •   Grant & contract        •    Grant & contract        •    Grant & contract
          guide (p. 101)               proposal                     administrative
                                       development                  systems (p. 103)
                                       (p. 102)




GRANT AND CONTRACT GUIDE
CATEGORY
      Recent accomplishment

WHAT
    The Grant and Contract Guide is a new Web site that combines all the currently available
information related to UW grants and contracts—from proposal development to awards
administration. Under each category the user can select such items as "create the proposal package"
or "communicate with the sponsor and the UW" to get information on these topics. The page also
contains a fast track to forms, fact sheets, and training; a reference guide including rules, regulations,
and a glossary of terms; and information about UW resources such as clinical trials and intellectual
property.

WHY
     Previously, Grant and Contract information was scattered over a large number of different Web
sites. This new site organized the process, and put it into the order that a researcher might need the
information, starting with finding funding opportunities, through the budget process, and ending
with the award close out.

WHO BENEFITS
    Beneficiaries include the entire UW community—researchers, faculty, staff, students, and users
from the greater research community.

PROJECT STATUS
      New content development is ongoing and will be added to the guide as it becomes available.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    The Grant and Contract Initiative (GCI), a component of the University Services Renewal
(USER) Project, grew out of an earlier Office of Research based effort, called the Grant and Contract
Process Enhancement Team, which began working on improving processes several years ago. The
GCI was funded under the University Initiatives Fund (UIF).
FOR MORE INFORMATION
      http://www.washington.edu/research/guide/

CONTACT
      guide@u.washington.edu



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GRANT AND CONTRACT PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT
CATEGORY
      Current activity

WHAT
     Grant and Contract Proposal Development is the first project of a larger process designed to
transform the UW's grant and contract process to better support faculty and staff. A centerpiece of
this transformation is the design and implementation of a system for Web-based development of
grant proposals, electronic routing and approval of grant proposals, and the electronic submission of
applications to grant sponsors.

     The growing complexity of the sponsored research environment and the increased rate of grant
and contract submissions and funding lead to the need for improved business practices and advanced
electronic technologies.

          Improve service to Principal Investigators (researchers), which will enhance their
          ability to obtain funding, reduce their workload, and speed the processing of their
          proposals.

          Increase the efficiency of Grant and Contract Services (GCS) to meet growing
          workload demands with limited resources.

          Provide authorized individuals with convenient access to timely information on the
          status of proposals.

          Take a leadership role in agency-sponsored Electronic Research Administration
          (ERA).

WHY
    The existing grant and contract process at the University of Washington is strained by increasing
volume and changing requirements. There are inefficient procedures and duplicated efforts at every
step in the process, from drafting the original proposal through auditing the financial records. In
addition, federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of
Health (NIH), and the Department of Energy (DOE), soon will require electronic processing of all
proposals and related grant transactions.

WHO BENEFITS
     Procuring and tracking grants and contracts is a major activity for researchers as well as for GCS
and GCA. Although incremental improvements have yielded significant benefits, this project has the
potential to deliver far more substantial gains by involving all affected groups in a complete redesign
of the entire process.

     The new process will save time for the researchers and their administrative staff. This frees up
more time to do research and to write winning proposals, which will position the University of
Washington to obtain and administer greater numbers of awards. Increased funding performance,
combined with an efficient support infrastructure, will enhance our ability to attract and retain
distinguished scientists, scholars and administrators. This, in turn, provides a richer learning
experience for students and enhances our ability to recruit the best faculty members and students.




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PROJECT STATUS
          Business process improvement—Prior to the development of the GC Guide,
          information about various aspects of the Proposal Development process was
          scattered across a large number of different University and outside Web sites, or not
          available on the Web at all. In an effort to provide "one-stop shopping" for needed
          Proposal Development information, the GCI and the GCI Task Groups, with the
          assistance of C&C's Webguides, developed the Grant and Contract Guide
          (http://www.washington.edu/research/guide/). The Guide provides up-to-date,
          "cradle-to-grave" information for researchers, their support staff, and school and
          departmental administrators.

          Proposal development prototype—A prototype for the online creation and
          electronic routing and approval of grant proposals was completed in January of
          2001 using the Ariba software platform. The prototype was deemed highly
          successful and a decision was made to move forward with further development
          using Ariba.

          Proposal development—A basic system for the electronic development, internal
          routing and approval, and submission of the most common types of grant proposals
          will be ready for testing by campus researchers/administrators autumn 2001.
          Deployment is scheduled for the spring of 2002.

          Electronic submission of applications—The GCI project team currently is
          collaborating with Federal agencies, other universities, and private sponsors in
          developing standards, tools, and applications capable of furthering the use of
          electronic information exchange in the context of grant proposal and award
          activities.

          For a complete list of procedural and system improvements to date see:
          http://www.washington.edu/research/gci/biennium.html

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   This is a joint effort between the Office of the Executive Vice President, Computing &
Communications, and the Office of Research.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Please visit the Grant and Contract Initiative Web site at
http://www.washington.edu/research/gci/

CONTACT
      Tim McAllister, Grant and Contract Initiative Technical Lead
      Information Systems, Computing & Communications
      gci@u.washington.edu



GRANT AND CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEMS
CATEGORY
      Planned activity




103             1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHAT
     Improvements planned for Grant and Contract Administrative Systems are part of a larger
strategy designed to transform the UW's grant and contract process for better support of faculty and
staff. These improvements currently target two central administrative units, Grant and Contract
Services and Grant and Contract Accounting. The growing complexity of the sponsored research
environment and the increased rate of grant and contract submissions lead to the need for improved
business practices and advanced electronic technologies.

        Develop systems to capture UW/Sponsor Award Negotiations, Awards, Conflict of
        Interest, Sub-Contracts, Tracking, and Reporting.

        Replace existing paper processes used to establish accounts with automated systems
        for account set up and management.

        Capture information required for account setup and tracking once, at the front of
        the process, and eliminate redundant manual information entry. Devise a means of
        passing this information electronically between Grant and Contract Services and
        Grant and Contract Accounting.

        Track and notify Researchers and fiscal staff regarding receipt of awards, account set
        up, and authorization to spend as part of a work flow audit trail that should be
        established and maintained from award through budget close.

        Develop automated warnings to be distributed to researchers and department fiscal
        staff for a variety of purposes such as deficit spending, need for animal care/human
        subjects review, project closing requirements, etc.

WHY
    The University of Washington is nationally and internationally recognized for both the quality
and scope of its research program. This program is supported almost exclusively through grant and
contract funding of over $700 million per year. The level of total annual awards has nearly doubled
over the last decade, from $350 million to over $700 million, an average of 7% per year.

    The University of Washington ranks in the bottom quartile among peer institutions in terms of
number of staff per grant dollars awarded and in the top quartile in terms of grant dollars managed
per administrative staff.

    Taken together these data put UW among the leanest and most cost-efficient institutions in
respect to grants management. However, a number of performance and other indicators of UW's
grants management processes point to opportunities to improve the effectiveness of key aspects of
financial management compliance and customer service.

     An ever-increasing volume of work strains staff in administrative offices, and they have limited
means to manage the increase effectively. Improvements in these offices are imperative if we are to
maintain the administrative infrastructure needed to support our role as the leading public research
institution in the nation.

WHO BENEFITS
    These improvements will save time for researchers and make the administration of grants and
contracts more efficient. This frees up more time to do research and to write winning proposals,
which will position the University of Washington to obtain and administer greater numbers of



104           1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
awards. Increased funding performance, combined with an efficient support infrastructure, will
enhance our ability to attract and retain distinguished scientists and scholars. This, in turn, provides a
richer learning experience for students and enhances our ability to recruit the best faculty members
and students.

PROJECT STATUS
          Grant and Contract Services staff are currently collaborating with Grant and
          Contract Initiative staff to define and build the infrastructure needed to support new
          internal systems for tracking and reporting grant activity.

          Numerous process improvements have already been identified and implemented in
          both Grant and Contract Services and Grant and Contract Accounting.

          Incremental process and system improvement are expected to continue through the
          end of the second phase of the Grants and Contracts Initiative (Winter 2003).

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   This is a joint effort between the Office of the Executive Vice President, Computing &
Communications, and the Office of Research.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
    Please visit the Grant and Contract Initiative Web site at
http://www.washington.edu/research/gci/

CONTACT
      Tim McAllister, Grant and Contract Initiative Technical Lead
      Information Systems, Computing & Communications
      gci@u.washington.edu




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 N. TRANSACTION SERVICES—HEALTH CARE ACTIVITIES

Health Care Activities
Recent Accomplishments   Current Activities               Planned Activities        Future Possibilities

                              •    Clinical information        •    Patient self-
                                   system                           management




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             O. ARCHITECTURE AND INFRASTRUCTURE—
                     COMPUTING ACTIVITIES

Computing Activities
Recent Accomplishments    Current Activities             Planned Activities             Future Possibilities

      •   Web hosting          •    Video/audio               •    Directory services
          services                  streaming services
                                    (p. 107)




VIDEO/AUDIO STREAMING SERVICES
CATEGORY
      Current activity

WHAT
     The video/audio streaming project is focused on developing a scalable, multimedia streaming
infrastructure supporting real-time, on demand, and Webcasting services. The project capitalizes on
successes in deploying clustered computing architectures to ensure scalability, fault tolerance, and
availability. The goal is to bring streaming to a service level on par with production broadcast
systems.

     The architecture supports multiple bit rates and streaming formats enabling access to the widest
possible community while remaining open ended to accommodate research and exploration of high-
bit-rate media technologies.

WHY
     Proliferation of desktop systems in homes, classrooms, and offices in concert with widely
available high-speed Internet (for example, services over cable systems and ADSL technologies fed
by Gigabit networks like Internet2) is fostering demand for distribution of audio and video materials
to support research, education, institutional outreach, and entertainment. The University of
Washington must create a media presence on the Internet to address these requirements and to stay
at the forefront of media technologies at the national and international levels.

WHO BENEFITS
     Streaming media services will act as a workbench for exploring new avenues for distance
learning; broaden access to University audio, video, and image collections; and enable remote
participation in campus activities widening the scope and range of the campus community. Students,
faculty and staff will benefit from enriched learning and remote collaboration experiences provided
via streamed audio and video. The University can explore new opportunities for outreach via
streaming experiments underway at KEXP, UWTV, and ResearchChannel. Examples include high-
definition streaming and video conferencing, and high-bit-rate audio streaming.

PROJECT STATUS
     Steaming services are currently deployed for University faculty, staff, and students via Uniform
Access. Streaming services are also in place for KEXP, UWTV, and ResearchChannel, both real-time
and on-demand. Formats supported include Windows Media, Real Networks, and QuickTime. The
existing streaming services are being incorporated as delivery agents into the digital media asset



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management system, MediaWeb. Efforts are underway to include support for high-definition video
bit rates and to improve overall monitoring of the service. Other development areas include
exploring combining objects and streams using technologies like MPEG4 to enhance end user
experience, and deploying servers for Webcasting.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
   Executive Vice President Computing & Communications, UWTV, ResearchChannel, KEXP,
K-20

CONTACT
      Jim DeRoest, Assistant Director, University Computing Services,
      Director, Streaming Media Technologies, ResearchChannel,
      Computing & Communications
      deroest@cac.washington.edu




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             P. ARCHITECTURE AND INFRASTRUCTURE—
               NETWORKING & WIREPLANT ACTIVITIES

Networking and Wireplant Activities
Recent Accomplishments     Current Activities           Planned Activities           Future Possibilities

                                •    Campus backbone         •    Building network        •    Wireless University
                                     upgrade (p. 109)             upgrade (p. 113)             (p. 114)
                                •    Wireless pilot
                                     project (p. 110)
                                •    Campus wireplant
                                     upgrade (p. 111)




CAMPUS BACKBONE UPGRADE (FORMERLY 10/100 MEGABITS
SWITCHED)
CATEGORY
      Current activity

WHAT
    The campus backbone is the core of the network and supports all Internet traffic between
departments and out to the rest of the Internet. Each day, over one and one-half terabytes of data are
passed over the backbone, doubling roughly every twelve months.

      The main components of the backbone include:

          Four "border routers" that connect the campus network to the rest of the Internet

          Forty "level-one routers" that provide connections to departments via four hundred
          different subnets

          Four "back bone switches" that act as the fabric that glues together the level-one
          routers and border routers

          Over one thousand miles of fiber optic cable used to interconnect the routers and
          switches

          Three routing centers that provide the necessary electrical power and environmental
          cooling to operate the routers and switches

          Software that coordinates the flow of traffic and offers advanced networking
          features to users

WHY
    It is crucial that the backbone never becomes a bottleneck, either because it cannot pass the
required amount of traffic or because it is vulnerable to unforeseen failures. Virtually all electronic
services depend on the campus backbone: email, Web, administrative computing, data sharing




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between UW researchers, and use of the Internet and high-speed research networks such as
Internet2.

    Upgrading the campus backbone is a continuous process with a technology cycle time of three to
four years. We are constantly evaluating new technologies to ensure the backbone remains un-
congested and fault tolerant.

WHO BENEFITS
      All users who access the campus network benefit from this upgrade.

PROJECT STATUS
    In the past year the backbone switches were replaced and all connections between routers were
upgraded to Gigabit Ethernet. Roughly one quarter of the level-one routers were replaced with
hardware capable of supporting gigabit subnets (see the "Building Network Upgrade" project).
Backbone software was upgraded to support multicasting, an efficient way to distribute point to
multi-point traffic.

   During the coming year the routing centers will be updated to include more robust electrical
power, including life safety power.

    Over the next two years the remaining level-one routers will be upgraded to support gigabit
subnets.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
      Vice President for Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
      http://www.washington.edu/networking/

CONTACT
      David Richardson, Manager
      Network Engineering and Special Projects
      Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
      drr@cac.washington.edu



WIRELESS NETWORK PILOT PROJECT
CATEGORY
      Current activity

WHAT
    IEEE 802.11b "Wireless Ethernet" is being deployed in a select set of buildings and classrooms.
Wireless Ethernet provides a shared eleven-megabit network connection for mobile computers,
allowing users to remain connected when moving throughout a building or without requiring a wired
connection to each classroom seat.

      The goals of the pilot project are to:




110             1/10/06               ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
          Develop engineering and support practices for deploying wireless networking (site
          surveys, installation, wiring, facilities, debugging).

          Evaluate hardware and software from multiple vendors. Engage vendors throughout
          project.

          Create a proposal for how (or whether) to proceed with enterprise-wide wireless
          networking.

          Document wireless networking issues for interested campus constituencies and
          communicate with campus departments doing wireless experiments.

WHY
     Wireless networking cannot replace all wired networking (and in fact requires quite a bit of wired
infrastructure), but it is very effective at supporting the modest bandwidth needs of productivity
applications. Laptop-using staff or students can remain connected to the network, allowing them to
retrieve Web pages, files, or email messages whenever necessary.

WHO BENEFITS
      Users of the wireless network will benefit from the wireless network project.

PROJECT STATUS
     All floors of Mary Gates Hall and Odegaard Undergraduate Library support wireless Ethernet.
Site surveys have been performed for Gerberding Hall and the Kane Hall room 120 auditorium.
Support procedures have been put in place and the UW Book Store caries recommended 802.11b
network cards.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
      Vice President for Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
      http://www.washington.edu/computing/connect/wireless/

CONTACT
      David Richardson, Manager
      Network Engineering and Special Projects
      Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
      drr@cac.washington.edu



CAMPUS WIREPLANT UPGRADE
CATEGORY
      Current activity

WHAT
    The goal of the Seattle campus communications wiring infrastructure upgrade is to provide
physical support for the robust data, voice, and video networking services essential to the learning,
research, and clinical work of faculty, staff, and students in the 21st century.




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      The campus communications wiring infrastructure upgrade achieves this goal by addressing:

          Physical spaces, such as per-floor communication rooms and main building entrance
          rooms

          Cable pathways, including conduits, cable trays and raceway, and inter-building
          tunnel facilities

          Current-standard communications cabling and terminations, including high-speed
          rated copper wiring and fiber optic cables

WHY
    The University of Washington is recognized among its peers as an Internet pioneer that has
successfully implemented highly robust data, voice, and video campus network services. The UW has
provided leadership for the development of next generation networking technology to supply state-
of-the-art tools to faculty, staff, and students.

     However, except in new or remodeled buildings, there is an ancient and aging wiring
infrastructure behind the distribution points for these services on the Seattle campus.

     This infrastructure is the result of the past decade's successful and cost-effective rehabilitation of
existing but obsolete cable to provide ubiquitous connectivity for Internet, email, Web, and
administrative systems. But by today's industry standards, this wiring infrastructure is no longer
sufficient to support the higher speeds required for physical networking connections. In an
increasing number of cases, it cannot be expanded to provide additional voice, fax, data, or video
circuits. The current physical infrastructure is a major barrier to the future expansion of network
services at the UW.

    The Seattle campus communications wiring upgrade is intended to provide cabling to support
the higher speeds required for advanced Web-based applications, multimedia tools, and converging
voice, video, and data technologies. Faculty and staff requests for extra phone, fax, or data lines,
and/or for higher speed network connections to support teaching, research, and clinical care can be
more easily accommodated.

WHO BENEFITS
    Beneficiaries include all university users of telephone, fax, Ethernet, video, Internet, email, Web,
and administrative systems.

PROJECT STATUS
    The entire project will be accomplished over the next several biennia. The current Phase I is
funded and will be completed no later than June 30, 2003. It includes the following:

          Establishment of a new source of dial tone from Qwest

          Renovation of sections of the underground Seattle campus utility tunnel system

          Interconnection of new and existing telecommunications hubs to distribute
          telecommunications services

          Establishment of pathways and cable facilities between telecommunications hubs
          and existing buildings



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SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
    Communication Technologies, a division of Computing & Communications, is the primary
sponsor for this project. This project is also part of the UW's strategic capital budget process and has
support from the Offices of the President and the Provost.

FOR MORE INFORMATION/CONTACT
      Lyle Zimmerman, Manager of Program Operations
      Communication Technologies, Computing & Communications
      lylez@cac.washington.edu
      206-543-2024

      Scott Mah, Director
      Communication Technologies, Computing & Communications
      scottm@cac.washington.edu
      206-543-5411



BUILDING NETWORK UPGRADE (FORMERLY GIGABIT ETHERNET)
CATEGORY
      Planned activity

WHAT
     Each building is served by one or more network subnets from the campus backbone. The
subnets allow data to be shared within the building and provide access to the campus backbone and
the rest of the Internet.

      The major components of the building network include:

          Physical facilities including an entrance room, communication closets, a riser system,
          and pathways to individual offices

          An aggregation switch in the entrance room that connects the subnet back to a
          level-one router, as well as edge switches in each communication closet

          Riser fiber optic cabling that connects the aggregation switches to the edge switches

          Copper cabling from the edge switches to office wall ports

    Upgrading the building network often involves changes to all four components. The Campus
Wireplant Upgrade project addresses the facilities and cabling issues. Edge and aggregation devices
must be replaced with equipment that supports switched 100-megabit service to each wall port and
gigabit uplinks back to the router.

WHY
    The vast majority of current building networks support shared 10-megabit connections to the
wall port with 100-megabit uplinks back to the router. With so many services dependent upon the
network, this is becoming a bottleneck, preventing users from having efficient access to UW data
sources and high-speed research networks such as Internet2.




113             1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
WHO BENEFITS
      All users of the campus network will benefit from building upgrades.

PROJECT STATUS
     This project is contingent upon the "Campus Wireplant Upgrade" project. Until the wireplant is
upgraded, building network upgrades can be performed only as department funding becomes
available.

SPONSORS/OWNERSHIP
      Vice President for Computing & Communications

FOR MORE INFORMATION
      http://www.washington.edu/networking/

CONTACT
      David Richardson, Manager
      Network Engineering and Special Projects
      Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
      drr@cac.washington.edu



WIRELESS UNIVERSITY
CATEGORY
      Future possibility

WHAT
     Wireless University is something of a misnomer in that we will always need a wired network, but
in the future wireless access to the University network may become pervasive. The goal of the
Wireless University activity is to track wireless networking technologies, standards, and deployment
challenges to ensure the University has access to robust, stable, wireless networking.

WHY
     While it cannot replace wired networking, wireless technologies provide convenient access to
data networks. Wireless enables new forms of communication, such as allowing physicians and lab
researchers to track records from hand-held devices, or students to access online class material from
the library or red square.

     Wireless technologies are evolving at a rapid pace, increasing in speed, range, and power
efficiency. At the same time, there are many risks in wireless networking, including incompatible
standards and the possibility of interference between deployments. If not deployed in a carefully
coordinated manner, it is possible for departmental and centrally managed infrastructures to interfere
with each other, diminishing the effectiveness and reliability of both.

     The Wireless University activity will track the evolution of wireless standards and propose
University policies and deployments, to ensure we have a wireless infrastructure as stable and robust
as the wired network.




114             1/10/06             ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
PROJECT STATUS
    The Wireless Pilot Project is our first effort to deploy wireless networking at the University. It
uses the IEEE 802.11b standard, and we are actively investigating the new, higher-speed IEEE
802.11a follow-on.

CONTACT
      David Richardson, Manager, Network Engineering and Special Projects
      Networks and Distributed Computing, Computing & Communications
      drr@cac.washington.edu




115            1/10/06              ISS REPORT APPENDICES -- WORKING DRAFT
           APPENDIX III. ABOUT THIS REPORT

                                    A. CONTRIBUTORS

      This section lists individuals who have contributed to developing this strategy.

      Text for this section has not been developed, but could be if there is interest.




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                                       B. REFERENCES

      This section lists sources used to develop this strategy.

      Text for this section has not been developed, but could be if there is interest.




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                C. DEVELOPMENT AND REVIEW PROCESS

      This section describes the process being followed to develop this strategy and to gather input
      from the University community.

      Text for this section has not been developed, but could be if there is interest.




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APPENDIX IV. —TECHNICAL INFORMATION
      Text for this section has not been developed, but could be if there is interest.




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